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  1. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Pyrophosphorolysis of CCA addition: implication for fidelity.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Takao; Liu, Cuiping; Morinaga, Hironobu; Kim, Sangbumn; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2011-11-18

    In nucleic acid polymerization reaction, pyrophosphorolysis is the reversal of nucleotide addition, in which the terminal nucleotide is excised in the presence of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). The CCA enzymes are unusual RNA polymerases, which catalyze CCA addition to positions 74-76 at the tRNA 3' end without using a nucleic acid template. To better understand the reaction mechanism of CCA addition, we tested pyrophosphorolysis of CCA enzymes, which are divided into two structurally distinct classes. Here, we show that only class II CCA enzymes catalyze pyrophosphorolysis and that the reaction can initiate from all three CCA positions and proceed processively until the removal of nucleotide C74. Pyrophosphorolysis of class II enzymes establishes a fundamental difference from class I enzymes, and it is achieved only with the tRNA structure and with specific divalent metal ions. Importantly, pyrophosphorolysis enables class II enzymes to efficiently remove an incorrect A75 nucleotide from the 3' end, at a rate much faster than the rate of A75 incorporation, suggesting the ability to perform a previously unexpected quality control mechanism for CCA synthesis. Measurement of kinetic parameters of the class II Escherichia coli CCA enzyme reveals that the enzyme catalyzes pyrophosphorolysis slowly relative to the forward nucleotide addition and that it exhibits weak binding affinity to PPi relative to NTP, suggesting a mechanism in which PPi is rapidly released after each nucleotide addition as a driving force to promote the forward synthesis of CCA.

  4. Zika without symptoms in returning travellers: What are the implications?

    PubMed

    Ginier, Mylène; Neumayr, Andreas; Günther, Stephan; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Blum, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Against the background of the emergence and rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas, we report the case of an afebrile ZIKV infection in a traveller returning from Central America to highlight relevant clinical and diagnostic aspects. ZIKV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical symptoms suggestive of dengue or chikungunya fever. Given the frequent subfebril and afebrile manifestations of ZIKV infections, we propose abstaining from the term "Zika fever (ZF)" in favour of "Zika virus disease (ZVD)". Owing to its unspecific clinical presentation and cross-reactivity in serological assays, ZVD may easily be missed or misdiagnosed as dengue fever. Until conclusive data on the currently suspected link between ZIKV infection in pregnancy and foetal microcephaly become available, pregnant women and women who are trying to become pregnant should be advised against travelling to regions with ongoing ZIKV transmission. In addition, male travellers returning from regions with ongoing transmission should be informed of the potential risk of sexual transmission until conclusive data on the significance of this mode of transmission become available. Although probably low and seasonally restricted, there is a risk of ZIKV importation to Aedes mosquito-infested regions in temperate climates (including regions of North America and Europe) with consecutive autochthonous transmission.

  5. Depressive symptoms among rural Bangladeshi mothers: implications for infant development.

    PubMed

    Black, Maureen M; Baqui, Abdullah H; Zaman, K; McNary, Scot W; Le, Katherine; Arifeen, Shams El; Hamadani, Jena D; Parveen, Monowara; Yunus, Md; Black, Robert E

    2007-08-01

    To examine how maternal depressive symptoms are related to infant development among low-income infants in rural Bangladesh and to examine how the relationship is affected by maternal perceptions of infant irritability and observations of caregiving practices. Development was measured among 221 infants at 6 and 12 months with the Bayley Scales II. Mothers reported on their depressive symptoms and on perceptions of their infant's temperament, and a home visit was made to complete the HOME Inventory. Half (52%) the mothers reported depressive symptoms. In bivariate analyses, maternal depressive symptoms were related to low scores on the Bayley Scales. Infants whose mothers reported depressive symptoms and perceived their infants to be irritable acquired fewer cognitive, motor, and Orientation/Engagement skills between 6-12 months than infants whose mothers reported neither or only one condition. The relationship linking maternal depressive symptoms and perceived infant irritability with infant cognitive skills was partially mediated by parental responsiveness and opportunities for play in the home. The intergenerational risks of maternal depressive symptoms on infant development extend to rural Bangladesh and are accentuated when mothers perceive their infants as irritable. Mothers who report depressive symptoms and infant irritability may lack the capacity to provide responsive, developmentally-oriented caregiving environments.

  6. Infants' symptoms of illness assessed by parents: impact and implications.

    PubMed

    Ertmann, Ruth K; Siersma, Volkert; Reventlow, Susanne; Söderström, Margareta

    2011-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. Some parents with a sick infant contact a doctor, while others do not. The reasons underlying such parental decisions have not been thoroughly studied. The purpose of this study was to explore how the actual symptoms in the infant were associated with parent-rated illness, illness severity, and the probability of the parents contacting a doctor. DESIGN. A retrospective questionnaire and a prospective diary study covering 14 months of the participating infants' lives. SETTING AND SUBJECTS. The 194 participating infants were followed for three months prospectively from the age of 11 to 14 months using diary cards, and retrospectively from birth until the age of 11 months by a questionnaire. RESULTS. During the three months of the diary card prospective follow-up, the infants had symptoms on average every second day, and the vast majority (92%) had 10 or more days with at least one symptom; 38% of the infants were reported to have had five or more symptoms for more than five days. Fever, earache, and vomiting were the symptoms most likely to cause parents to rate their infant as ill. Earache was the symptom that triggered doctor contact most immediately. The parent-rated illness severity was strongly related to the tendency to contact a doctor. However, this association was markedly weaker when adjustment was made for the infant not eating normally, having a cough, or running a fever. CONCLUSION. Specific symptoms such as fever, earache, and vomiting were strongly associated with the probability of parents rating the infant as ill. An earache would cause the parents to contact a doctor. Fever and vomiting were other symptoms triggering doctor contacts. First, these symptoms could cause the parents to want a doctor's expert evaluation of the infant's illness; second, the parents could expect medication to be necessary; or third, it could just be difficult for the parents to handle the ill infant.

  7. Depressive Symptoms among Rural Bangladeshi Mothers: Implications for Infant Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Maureen M.; Baqui, Abdullah H.; Zaman, K.; McNary, Scot W.; Le, Katherine; El Arifeen, Shams; Hamadani, Jena D.; Parveen, Monowara; Yunus, Md.; Black, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine how maternal depressive symptoms are related to infant development among low-income infants in rural Bangladesh and to examine how the relationship is affected by maternal perceptions of infant irritability and observations of caregiving practices. Methods: Development was measured among 221 infants at 6 and 12 months with…

  8. Depressive Symptoms among Rural Bangladeshi Mothers: Implications for Infant Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Maureen M.; Baqui, Abdullah H.; Zaman, K.; McNary, Scot W.; Le, Katherine; El Arifeen, Shams; Hamadani, Jena D.; Parveen, Monowara; Yunus, Md.; Black, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine how maternal depressive symptoms are related to infant development among low-income infants in rural Bangladesh and to examine how the relationship is affected by maternal perceptions of infant irritability and observations of caregiving practices. Methods: Development was measured among 221 infants at 6 and 12 months with…

  9. Psychological Symptoms and Concerns Experienced by International Students: Outreach Implications for Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyrazli, Senel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines psychological symptoms and concerns experienced by international students. Participants identified with a variety of psychological symptoms and concerns. The top three were related to academics (71%), career (60%), and stress (43%). In addition, 34% of the participants indicated being concerned about depression and/or anxiety.…

  10. The Role of Anxiety Control and Treatment Implications of Informant Agreement on Child PTSD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Weems, Carl F.; Scheeringa, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine parent and child agreement of child posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms pre- and posttreatment, as well as potential moderators of agreement including treatment responder status, child anxiety control, and parent self-reported PTSD symptoms. Method We examined child self-reported and parent-reported child PTSD symptoms from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Of the 141 parent–child pairs, the mean age of children was 12.72 (SD = 3.40), 53 percent were female, and 54 percent were Black. A subsample of participants (n = 47) was assessed after completion of a cognitive behavioral therapy treatment for PTSD. Results Moderate levels of agreement were found at baseline, though Criterion D (increased arousal) symptoms had lower levels of agreement than the other symptom clusters. Symptom agreement was lower at posttreatment. Treatment responders had higher levels of baseline informant agreement than treatment non-responders. Child perceived anxiety control significantly moderated informant agreement, such that pairs with children who had high levels of perceived control of their anxiety had lower PTSD symptom agreement where children reported lower symptoms relative to their parents. Contrary to expectations, parent self-reported PTSD did not moderate parent–child symptom agreement. Conclusion Factors associated with higher parent–child agreement of child PTSD symptoms were being a PTSD treatment responder and children with lower perceived anxiety control. These findings have potential implications for determining those who may benefit from greater symptom monitoring over the course of intervention and potential alternative intervention approaches. PMID:26645622

  11. Embracing additive manufacture: implications for foot and ankle orthosis design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The design of foot and ankle orthoses is currently limited by the methods used to fabricate the devices, particularly in terms of geometric freedom and potential to include innovative new features. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, where objects are constructed via a series of sub-millimetre layers of a substrate material, may present the opportunity to overcome these limitations and allow novel devices to be produced that are highly personalised for the individual, both in terms of fit and functionality. Two novel devices, a foot orthosis (FO) designed to include adjustable elements to relieve pressure at the metatarsal heads, and an ankle foot orthosis (AFO) designed to have adjustable stiffness levels in the sagittal plane, were developed and fabricated using AM. The devices were then tested on a healthy participant to determine if the intended biomechanical modes of action were achieved. Results The adjustable, pressure relieving FO was found to be able to significantly reduce pressure under the targeted metatarsal heads. The AFO was shown to have distinct effects on ankle kinematics which could be varied by adjusting the stiffness level of the device. Conclusions The results presented here demonstrate the potential design freedom made available by AM, and suggest that it may allow novel personalised orthotic devices to be produced which are beyond the current state of the art. PMID:22642941

  12. The role of histamine degradation gene polymorphisms in moderating the effects of food additives on children's ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jim; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McCann, Donna; Grimshaw, Kate; Parker, Karen M; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J; Holloway, John W; Warner, John O

    2010-09-01

    Food additives can exacerbate ADHD symptoms and cause non-immunoglobulin E-dependent histamine release from circulating basophils. However, children vary in the extent to which their ADHD symptoms are exacerbated by the ingestion of food additives. The authors hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms affecting histamine degradation would explain the diversity of responses to additives. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial, challenges involving two food color additive and sodium benzoate (preservative) mixtures in a fruit drink were administered to a general community sample of 3-year-old children (N = 153) and 8/9-year-old children (N = 144). An aggregate ADHD symptom measure (based on teacher and parent blind ratings of behavior, blind direct observation of behavior in the classroom, and--for 8/9-year-old children only--a computerized measure of attention) was the main outcome variable. The adverse effect of food additives on ADHD symptoms was moderated by histamine degradation gene polymorphisms HNMT T939C and HNMT Thr105Ile in 3- and 8/9-year-old children and by a DAT1 polymorphism (short versus long) in 8/9-year-old children only. There was no evidence that polymorphisms in catecholamine genes COMT Val108Met, ADRA2A C1291G, and DRD4-rs7403703 moderated the effect on ADHD symptoms. Histamine may mediate the effects of food additives on ADHD symptoms, and variations in genes influencing the action of histamine may explain the inconsistency between previous studies. Genes influencing a range of neurotransmitter systems and their interplay with environmental factors, such as diet, need to be examined to understand genetic influences on ADHD symptoms.

  13. Reports of head injury and symptom knowledge among college athletes: implications for assessment and educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Kaut, Kevin P; DePompei, Roberta; Kerr, Julie; Congeni, Joseph

    2003-07-01

    To identify the prevalence of head injuries and related symptoms among college athletes and examine knowledge of head injury consequences and behavioral tendencies of athletes in the presence of symptoms. Retrospective survey. A total of 461 male and female athletes beginning competitive play at the University of Akron (Akron, OH) during the years 1995 to 2001. Responses to survey questions were analyzed to determine the frequency of concussions and injury-related symptoms (eg, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting) in addition to behavioral responses in the presence of certain symptoms (eg, playing with headache, failure to report symptoms while playing). Written responses to queries regarding symptom knowledge were analyzed for thematic content and were used to identify deficiencies in signs and symptoms of concussion. Nearly 32% of all athletes had experienced a blow to the head causing dizziness, with over 1/4 confirming various somatic symptoms following a blow to the head (eg, seeing stars, nausea or vomiting, head pain). Continuing to play despite symptom presence was noted (eg, dizziness, 28.2%; headache, 30.4%), with 19.5% reporting a concussion diagnosis. Knowledge of head injury consequences was found to be deficient, with 56% indicating no knowledge of the possible consequences following a head injury. Of those providing responses, the majority reflected awareness of cognitive (eg, memory problems) and physical (eg, brain damage) consequences. A sizable number of athletes may enter collegiate play with a previous concussion diagnosis, and many more are likely to have experienced symptoms suggestive of a mild head injury. Of considerable concern is the tendency to play while symptomatic (eg, headache, dizziness) and the failure to report symptoms while playing--especially among football players (25.2%). The apparent deficiency in athlete knowledge of head injury consequences raises concern regarding athlete recognition of potentially problematic

  14. Amisulpride Augmentation for Clozapine-Refractory Positive Symptoms: Additional Benefit in Reducing Hypersialorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Bogorni, Fabiani; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Pimentel, Eduardo Mylius; Grohs, Géder Evandro Motta; Diaz, Alexandre Paim

    2015-01-01

    One-third to half of patients taking clozapine suffer from refractory symptoms despite adequate treatment. Among other adverse effects, clozapine-induced hypersalivation (CIH) occurs in approximately half of all patients. This is a case of a 30-year-old male with refractory schizophrenia; in this patient, the remission of residual positive symptoms, as well as the reduction of CIH, was achieved by treatment with clozapine augmented with amisulpride. PMID:25838958

  15. Analysis of the UCSF Symptom Management Theory: Implications for Pediatric Oncology Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    Symptom management research is a priority for both children and adults with cancer. The UCSF Symptom Management Theory (SMT) is a middle range theory depicting symptom management as a multidimensional process. A theory analysis using the process described by Walker and Avant evaluated the SMT with attention to application in research involving children with cancer. Application of the SMT in studies involving children has been limited to descriptive studies testing only portions of the theory. Findings of these studies have provided empiric support for the relationships proposed within the SMT. Considerations for future research involving children include attention to measurement of symptoms and clarity regarding the location of the parents and family within the model. With additional testing and refinement, the SMT has the potential to guide nursing research and practice to improve symptoms for children with cancer. PMID:20639345

  16. Mother and Child Depressive Symptoms in Youth with Spina Bifida: Additive, Moderator, and Mediator Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellinger, Kriston B.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Essner, Bonnie S.; Alvarez, Renae

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which parenting behaviors influence the relation between maternal and child depressive symptoms in youth with spina bifida and a comparison sample. Previous research has found that maternal depression not only negatively impacts the mother-child relationship, but also places the child at risk…

  17. Mother and Child Depressive Symptoms in Youth with Spina Bifida: Additive, Moderator, and Mediator Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellinger, Kriston B.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Essner, Bonnie S.; Alvarez, Renae

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which parenting behaviors influence the relation between maternal and child depressive symptoms in youth with spina bifida and a comparison sample. Previous research has found that maternal depression not only negatively impacts the mother-child relationship, but also places the child at risk…

  18. [Network clusters of symptoms as elementary syndromes of psychopathology: implications for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Goekoop, R; Goekoop, J G

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication we reported the existence of around 11 (to 15) 'elementary syndromes' that may combine in various ways, rather like 'building blocks', to explain the wide range of psychiatric symptoms. 'Bridge symptoms' seem to be responsible both for combining large sets of symptoms into elementary syndromes and for combining the various elementary syndromes to form one globally connected network structure. To discuss the implication of these findings for clinical practice. We performed a network analysis of symptom scores. Elementary syndromes provide a massive simplification of the description of psychiatric disease. Instead of the more than 300 categories in DSM-5, we now need to consider only a handful of elementary syndromes and personality domains. This modular representation of psychiatric illnesses allows us to make a complete, systematic and efficient assessment of patients and a systematic review of treatment options. Clinicians, patients, managerial staff and insurance companies can verify whether symptom reduction is taking place in the most important domains of psychopathology. Unlike classic multidimensional methods of disease description, network models of psychopathology can be used to explain comorbidity patterns, predict the clinical course of psychopathology and to designate primary targets for therapeutic interventions. A network view on psychopathology could significantly improve everyday clinical practice.

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. Proinflammatory cytokines and sickness behavior: implications for depression and cancer-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jamie S

    2008-09-01

    To review the relationship between proinflammatory cytokine release and resultant sickness behavior; to explore the implications of sickness behavior related to depression and cancer-related symptoms. Published articles and book chapters. Proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) are released as part of the immune response resulting in a syndrome called sickness behavior that is an adaptive and motivational reaction to disease. Sickness behavior includes lethargy, depression, anorexia, energy conservation, fever, anhedonia, cognitive impairment, hyperalgesia, and decreased social interaction. Sickness behavior is seen in patients with depression or cancer and has been described as a symptom cluster. Sickness behavior in patients with cancer may be the result of both the disease and the treatment. The related symptoms may have a profound effect on patients' quality of life. Treatment strategies that inhibit the release or activity of proinflammatory cytokines and relieve patients from symptoms of sickness behavior are being evaluated. Further research is needed to pinpoint the exact effects of specific cytokines, identify targets for therapy, and develop viable treatment strategies for preventing or minimizing the detrimental effects of cytokine-induced inflammatory responses. Sickness behavior resulting from cytokine release may provide a framework to explain many cancer-related symptoms, including depression, cognitive impairment, cachexia, fatigue, and a component of pain perception. Oncology nurses would benefit from awareness and understanding of the relationship between proinflammatory cytokine release and tissue involvement by tumors as well as some cancer-related therapies. Knowledge about the effects of cytokine release on patient behavior and the symptom experience would enhance nurses' ability to assess patients for anticipated side effects and provide appropriate education to patients and their families.

  2. Additive effect of smoking and cotton dust exposure on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function of cotton textile workers.

    PubMed

    Su, Yih-Ming; Su, Jenn-Rong; Sheu, Jia-Yih; Loh, Ching-Hui; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    2003-04-01

    One hundred and sixty-nine and 175 cotton textile workers (CTWs) were enrolled in the first (1991) and second (1996) surveys to investigate the prevalence of byssinosis. The synergistic effect of smoking on cotton dust exposure was also evaluated. Although the difference in prevalence of abnormal pulmonary function between the first (38.5%) and second study (38.9%) was not statistically significant, smokers had significantly higher frequency than nonsmokers in both surveys. A significant trend existed between the cotton dust levels and the frequency of abnormal lung function. The significant trend was also noted in both smokers and nonsmokers. The frequency of respiratory symptoms and the prevalence of severe byssinosis in the second survey (14.9% and 12.6%, respectively) were significantly lower than that in the first survey (39.7% and 21.9%, respectively). The reduction of symptoms was due to remodeling of this old cotton mill. The prevalences of respiratory symptoms and byssinosis in smokers being significantly higher than in nonsmokers only found in the first survey, but not found in the second survey. These results indicate that smoking potentiates the effect of cotton dust exposure on respiratory symptoms and byssinosis. The second study reveals high prevalence of byssinosis still existed in Taiwanese cotton mill, although the prevalence was declining. Smoking was found to show an additive effect on cotton dust exposure. Anti-smoking campaign, occupational health program to reduce the dust exposure, and periodical medical examination are measures to prevent from byssinosis.

  3. The clinical implications of integrating additional prognostic factors into the TNM.

    PubMed

    Henson, Donald Earl; Schwartz, Arnold M; Chen, Dechang; Wu, Dengyuan

    2014-04-01

    The management of solid tumors is governed by host and tumor factors that traditionally have incorporated TNM staging with additional pathologic, biologic, and clinical host factors. Beyond the anatomic-based TNM, increasingly new prognostic and predictive factors are being discovered that have important survival and treatment implications. However, because the TNM is based on a "bin" model, additional prognostic factors would rapidly overwhelm the current system. This communication demonstrates the clinical implications and improved patient prognosis derived from a new algorithmic model based on clustering analysis. A new algorithm is described that integrates additional factors into the TNM and calculates survival. The results indicate that additional factors can be integrated into the TNM staging system providing additional patient stratification without changing the TNM definitions. Adding prognostic factors to traditional TNM staging increases substratification of given stages and identifies and separates favorable and unfavorable clinical outcomes for specific TNM stages. Integration of additional prognostic factors into the TNM by a clustering algorithm can change the stratification of patient outcome. This may guide the clinician to select a more rational management program based on the additional factors and improve cohort selection for clinical trials. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessment of additive/nonadditive effects in structure-activity relationships: implications for iterative drug design.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogendra; Gillet, Valerie J; Howe, Trevor; Pastor, Joaquin; Oyarzabal, Julen; Willett, Peter

    2008-12-11

    Free-Wilson (FW) analysis is common practice in medicinal chemistry and is based on the assumption that the contributions to activity made by substituents at different substitution positions are additive. We analyze eight near complete combinatorial libraries assayed on several different biological response(s) (GPCR, ion channel, kinase and P450 targets) and show that only half-exhibit clear additive behavior, which leads us to question the concept of additivity that is widely taken for granted in drug discovery. Next, we report a series of retrospective experiments in which subsets are extracted from the libraries for FW analysis to determine the minimum attributes (size, distribution of substituents, and activity range) necessary to reach the same conclusion about additive/nonadditive effects. These attributes can provide guidelines on when it is appropriate to apply FW analysis as well as for library design, and they also have important implications for further steps in iterative drug design.

  5. Plastic-syringe induced silicone contamination in organic photovoltaic fabrication: implications for small-volume additives.

    PubMed

    Carr, John A; Nalwa, Kanwar S; Mahadevapuram, Rakesh; Chen, Yuqing; Anderegg, James; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2012-06-27

    Herein, the implications of silicone contamination found in solution-processed conjugated polymer solar cells are explored. Similar to a previous work based on molecular cells, we find this contamination as a result of the use of plastic syringes during fabrication. However, in contrast to the molecular case, we find that glass-syringe fabricated devices give superior performance than plastic-syringe fabricated devices in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based cells. We find that the unintentional silicone addition alters the solution's wettability, which translates to a thinner, less absorbent film on spinning. With many groups studying the effects of small-volume additives, this work should be closely considered as many of these additives may also directly alter the solutions' wettability, or the amount of silicone dissolved off the plastic syringes, or both. Thereby, film thickness, which generally is not reported in detail, can vary significantly from device to device.

  6. Plastic-Syringe Induced Silicone Contamination in Organic Photvoltaic Fabrication: Implications for Small-Volume Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, John A.; Nalwa, Kanwar S.; Mahadevapuram, Rakesh; Chen, Yuqing; Anderegg, James; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2012-05-15

    Herein, the implications of silicone contamination found in solution-processed conjugated polymer solar cells are explored. Similar to a previous work based on molecular cells, we find this contamination as a result of the use of plastic syringes during fabrication. However, in contrast to the molecular case, we find that glass-syringe fabricated devices give superior performance than plastic-syringe fabricated devices in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based cells. We find that the unintentional silicone addition alters the solution’s wettability, which translates to a thinner, less absorbent film on spinning. With many groups studying the effects of small-volume additives, this work should be closely considered as many of these additives may also directly alter the solutions’ wettability, or the amount of silicone dissolved off the plastic syringes, or both. Thereby, film thickness, which generally is not reported in detail, can vary significantly from device to device.

  7. Microbiota-gut-brain signalling in Parkinson's disease: Implications for non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Felice, Valeria D; Quigley, Eamonn M; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting 1-2% of the population over 65 years of age. The primary neuropathology is the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, resulting in characteristic motor deficits, upon which the clinical diagnosis is based. However, a number of significant non-motor symptoms (NMS) are also evident that appear to have a greater impact on the quality of life of these patients. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that neurobiological processes can be modified by the bi-directional communication that occurs along the brain-gut axis. The microbiota plays a key role in this communication throughout different routes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Thus, there has been an increasing interest in investigating how microbiota changes within the gastrointestinal tract may be implicated in health and disease including PD. Interestingly α-synuclein-aggregates, the cardinal neuropathological feature in PD, are present in both the submucosal and myenteric plexuses of the enteric nervous system, prior to their appearance in the brain, indicating a possible gut to brain route of "prion-like" spread. In this review we highlight the potential importance of gut to brain signalling in PD with particular focus on the role of the microbiota as major player in this communication.

  8. Utility of additional tissue sections in dermatopathology: diagnostic, clinical and financial implications.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Lauren N; Rodriguez, Adrianna S; Gardner, Jerad M; Foster, Toby E; MacKelfresh, Jamie; Parker, Douglas C; Chen, Suephy C; Stoff, Benjamin K

    2014-02-01

    As histopathologic assessment is subject to sampling error, some institutions 'preorder' deeper sections on some or all cases (hereafter referred to as prospective deeper sections), while others order additional sections only when needed (hereafter referred to as retrospective deeper sections). We investigated how often additional sections changed a diagnosis and/or clinical management. Given the recent decrease in reimbursement for CPT-code 88305, we also considered the financial implications of ordering additional sections. Cases (n = 204) were assigned a preliminary diagnosis, based on review of the initial slide, and a final diagnosis, after reviewing additional sections. Cases with discordant diagnoses were assessed by two dermatologists, who indicated whether the change in diagnosis altered clinical management. Expenses were estimated for three scenarios: (a) no additional sections, (b) prospective deeper sections and (c) retrospective deeper sections. Diagnoses were modified in 9% of cases, which changed clinical management in 56% of these cases. Lesions obtained by punch-biopsy and inflammatory lesions were disproportionately overrepresented amongst cases with changed diagnoses (p < 0.001, p = 0.12, respectively). The cost of prospective deeper sections and retrospective deeper sections represented a 56% and 115% increase over base costs, respectively. Labor costs, particularly the cost of dermatopathologist evaluation, were the most significant cost-drivers. While additional sections improve diagnostic accuracy, they delay turn-around-time and increase expenditures. In our practice, prospective deeper sections are cost effective, however, this may vary by institution. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rasch analysis of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System and research implications

    PubMed Central

    Cheifetz, O.; Packham, T.L.; MacDermid, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Reliable and valid assessment of the disease burden across all forms of cancer is critical to the evaluation of treatment effectiveness and patient progress. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (esas) is used for routine evaluation of people attending for cancer care. In the present study, we used Rasch analysis to explore the measurement properties of the esas and to determine the effect of using Rasch-proposed interval-level esas scoring compared with traditional scoring when evaluating the effects of an exercise program for cancer survivors. Methods Polytomous Rasch analysis (Andrich’s rating-scale model) was applied to data from 26,645 esas questionnaires completed at the Juravinski Cancer Centre. The fit of the esas to the polytomous Rasch model was investigated, including evaluations of differential item functioning for sex, age, and disease group. The research implication was investigated by comparing the results of an observational research study previously analysed using a traditional approach with the results obtained by Rasch-proposed interval-level esas scoring. Results The Rasch reliability index was 0.73, falling short of the desired 0.80–0.90 level. However, the esas was found to fit the Rasch model, including the criteria for uni-dimensional data. The analysis suggests that the current esas scoring system of 0–10 could be collapsed to a 6-point scale. Use of the Rasch-proposed interval-level scoring yielded results that were different from those calculated using summarized ordinal-level esas scores. Differential item functioning was not found for sex, age, or diagnosis groups. Conclusions The esas is a moderately reliable uni-dimensional measure of cancer disease burden and can provide interval-level scaling with Rasch-based scoring. Further, our study indicates that, compared with the traditional scoring metric, Rasch-based scoring could result in substantive changes to conclusions. PMID:24764703

  10. Rasch analysis of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System and research implications.

    PubMed

    Cheifetz, O; Packham, T L; Macdermid, J C

    2014-04-01

    Reliable and valid assessment of the disease burden across all forms of cancer is critical to the evaluation of treatment effectiveness and patient progress. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (esas) is used for routine evaluation of people attending for cancer care. In the present study, we used Rasch analysis to explore the measurement properties of the esas and to determine the effect of using Rasch-proposed interval-level esas scoring compared with traditional scoring when evaluating the effects of an exercise program for cancer survivors. Polytomous Rasch analysis (Andrich's rating-scale model) was applied to data from 26,645 esas questionnaires completed at the Juravinski Cancer Centre. The fit of the esas to the polytomous Rasch model was investigated, including evaluations of differential item functioning for sex, age, and disease group. The research implication was investigated by comparing the results of an observational research study previously analysed using a traditional approach with the results obtained by Rasch-proposed interval-level esas scoring. The Rasch reliability index was 0.73, falling short of the desired 0.80-0.90 level. However, the esas was found to fit the Rasch model, including the criteria for uni-dimensional data. The analysis suggests that the current esas scoring system of 0-10 could be collapsed to a 6-point scale. Use of the Rasch-proposed interval-level scoring yielded results that were different from those calculated using summarized ordinal-level esas scores. Differential item functioning was not found for sex, age, or diagnosis groups. The esas is a moderately reliable uni-dimensional measure of cancer disease burden and can provide interval-level scaling with Rasch-based scoring. Further, our study indicates that, compared with the traditional scoring metric, Rasch-based scoring could result in substantive changes to conclusions.

  11. National incomes and health: implications of some recent additions to the data.

    PubMed

    Cumper, G E

    1981-04-01

    2 of the possible links between national income and national health status have attracted particular attention. A strong statistical association exists between national per capita income and such indicators of national health status as infant mortality rates and life expectancy, suggesting some broad causal nexus between high incomes and better health. 2nd, the national accounts provide a convenient framework for defining the share of a country's resources which is devoted to health services, either through the public or the private sector, how these resources are provided and financed, and who are the beneficiaries. Either of these types of relationships between income level and health may have much significance for the development of health on a global scale--the improvement of the health status of the populations of the developing countries. Data and discussion regarding the international distribution of income and its implications for health and direct national comparisons of purchasing power and their implications for health lead to the following conclusions about policy toward health development in the 3rd world: 1) using the presently available health care approaches, there is reason to expect substantial improvement in health status in the developing countries by the year 2000 based on the following factors--the growth of per capita incomes for reasons external to the health sector, any additional increases in the per capita resources devoted to health care, and improvements in the efficiency with which inputs are applied in the health sector so as to bring all countries up to the level of the currently most efficient; and 2) foreign assistance to the health sector will be most effective if it concerns current rather than capital inputs and it takes the form of money or scarce equipment rather than the services of health personnel. Given data limitations these conclusions are tentative and lead to further outlined recommendations.

  12. Can we improve pollen season definitions by using the symptom load index in addition to pollen counts?

    PubMed

    Bastl, Katharina; Kmenta, Maximilian; Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Berger, Uwe; Jäger, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    Airborne pollen measurements are the foundation of aerobiological research and provide essential raw data for various disciplines. Pollen itself should be considered a relevant factor in air quality. Symptom data shed light on the relationship of pollen allergy and pollination. The aim of this study is to assess the spatial variation of local, regional and national symptom datasets. Ten pollen season definitions are used to calculate the symptom load index for the birch and grass pollen seasons (2013-2014) in Austria. (1) Local, (2) regional and (3) national symptom datasets are used to examine spatial variations and a consistent pattern was found. In conclusion, national datasets are suitable for first insights where no sufficient local or regional dataset is available and season definitions based on percentages provide a practical solution, as they can be applied in regions with different pollen loads and produce more constant results.

  13. Association of Depressive Symptoms and Disease Activity in Children with Asthma: Methodological and Clinical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxmonsky, James; Wood, Beatrice L.; Stern, Trudy; Ballow, Mark; Lillis, Kathleen; Cramer-Benjamin, Darci; Mador, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in children with asthma and the association between depression and asthma activity. Method: Children ages 7 to 17 (n = 129) were recruited from a hospital emergency department after presenting for asthma symptoms. The majority of subjects were from disadvantaged,…

  14. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  15. Association of Depressive Symptoms and Disease Activity in Children with Asthma: Methodological and Clinical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxmonsky, James; Wood, Beatrice L.; Stern, Trudy; Ballow, Mark; Lillis, Kathleen; Cramer-Benjamin, Darci; Mador, Jeffrey; Miller, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in children with asthma and the association between depression and asthma activity. Method: Children ages 7 to 17 (n = 129) were recruited from a hospital emergency department after presenting for asthma symptoms. The majority of subjects were from disadvantaged,…

  16. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  17. Frequency and clinical implications of supraesophageal and dyspeptic symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Ponce, Julio; Ponce, Marta; Balboa, Agustín; Gónzalez, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-06-01

    We studied the frequency of supraesophageal and dyspeptic symptoms and their impact on the quality of life (QoL) and treatment response in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Multicenter, prospective, observational study of patients who consulted a gastroenterologist because of typical GERD symptoms. Upper digestive symptoms were assessed using direct interviews. The Short Form-12 and the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia questionnaires were used to measure QoL. Patients were treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). A total of 301 patients (58% men; mean age, 45 years) were included. Baseline symptoms were heartburn (99% of cases; nocturnal heartburn 78%), regurgitation (86%), both heartburn and regurgitation (85%), dyspeptic symptoms (91%; epigastric pain syndrome 20%, postprandial distress syndrome 4%, both 75%), and supraesophageal symptoms (58%). In 56% of cases of heartburn, 35% of regurgitation, and 34% of nocturnal heartburn, symptoms were severe or very severe. One in six patients had dysphagia. Supraesophageal and/or dyspeptic symptoms were associated with worse scores on the Short Form-12 and Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia instruments. After treatment, heartburn and regurgitation disappeared in 93 and 87% of the patients, respectively. The percentage of patients responding to PPI treatment was significantly higher (P<0.05) in those with heartburn than those without heartburn (96 vs. 86%) and in those with regurgitation than without regurgitation (95 vs. 83%), whereas no differences were observed in those with and without supraesophageal or dyspeptic symptoms. Patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation) very frequently have dyspeptic and supraesophageal manifestations, which are related to a worse QoL but unrelated to PPI response.

  18. Genome Size Variation in the Genus Carthamus (Asteraceae, Cardueae): Systematic Implications and Additive Changes During Allopolyploidization

    PubMed Central

    GARNATJE, TERESA; GARCIA, SÒNIA; VILATERSANA, ROSER; VALLÈS, JOAN

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plant genome size is an important biological characteristic, with relationships to systematics, ecology and distribution. Currently, there is no information regarding nuclear DNA content for any Carthamus species. In addition to improving the knowledge base, this research focuses on interspecific variation and its implications for the infrageneric classification of this genus. Genome size variation in the process of allopolyploid formation is also addressed. • Methods Nuclear DNA samples from 34 populations of 16 species of the genus Carthamus were assessed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide. • Key Results The 2C values ranged from 2·26 pg for C. leucocaulos to 7·46 pg for C. turkestanicus, and monoploid genome size (1Cx-value) ranged from 1·13 pg in C. leucocaulos to 1·53 pg in C. alexandrinus. Mean genome sizes differed significantly, based on sectional classification. Both allopolyploid species (C. creticus and C. turkestanicus) exhibited nuclear DNA contents in accordance with the sum of the putative parental C-values (in one case with a slight reduction, frequent in polyploids), supporting their hybrid origin. • Conclusions Genome size represents a useful tool in elucidating systematic relationships between closely related species. A considerable reduction in monoploid genome size, possibly due to the hybrid formation, is also reported within these taxa. PMID:16390843

  19. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: Implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily-life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:20889248

  20. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research.

    PubMed

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria.

  1. Is Health Literacy Associated With Depressive Symptoms Among Korean Adults? Implications for Mental Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Lee, Hee Yun; Kim, Nam Keol; Han, Gyounghae; Lee, Jeonghwa; Kim, Kyoungwoo

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated whether health literacy is associated with depressive symptoms among Korean adults, when adjusting for relevant risk factors for depression. Data were collected from a sample of 585 community-dwelling Korean adults living in Seoul and Kwangju, South Korea, using a quota sampling strategy. A cross-sectional, multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the association between health literacy and depressive symptoms. When controlled for covariates, a lower level of health literacy was significantly associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms. Health literacy may play an important role in preventing and treating depression. Future research is needed to determine if improving health literacy, through health promotion interventions, can enhance community-dwelling Korean adults' understanding of depressive symptoms and relevant treatment options. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identification of Anxiety Symptom Clusters in Patients with COPD: Implications for Assessment and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Breland, Jessica Y; Hundt, Natalie E; Barrera, Terri L; Mignogna, Joseph; Petersen, Nancy J; Stanley, Melinda A; Cully, Jeffery A

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is palliative, and quality of life is important. Increased understanding of correlates of quality of life and its domains could help clinicians and researchers better tailor COPD treatments and better support patients engaging in those treatments or other important self-management behaviors. Anxiety is common in those with COPD; however, overlap of physical and emotional symptoms complicates its assessment. The current study aimed to identify anxiety symptom clusters and to assess the association of these symptom clusters with COPD-related quality of life. Participants (N = 162) with COPD completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Medical Research Council dyspnea scale. Anxiety clusters were identified, using principal component analysis (PCA) on the BAI's 21 items. Anxiety clusters, along with factors previously associated with quality of life, were entered into a multiple regression designed to predict COPD-related quality of life. PCA identified four symptom clusters related to (1) general somatic distress, (2) fear, (3) nervousness, and (4) respiration-related distress. Multiple regression analyses indicated that greater fear was associated with less perceived mastery over COPD (β = -0.19, t(149) = -2.69, p < 0.01). Anxiety symptoms associated with fear appear to be an important indicator of anxiety in patients with COPD. In particular, fear was associated with perceptions of mastery, an important psychological construct linked to disease self-management. Assessing the BAI symptom cluster associated with fear (five items) may be a valuable rapid assessment tool to improve COPD treatment and physical health outcomes.

  3. Perfectionism and ethnicity: implications for depressive symptoms and self-reported academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jennifer R; Rice, Kenneth G

    2003-02-01

    Ethnic differences in perfectionism were examined among Asian American, African American, and Caucasian American college students. Analyses revealed that Asian American students scored significantly higher than the other groups on 3 of 6 perfectionism subscales. Minority students reported significantly higher parental expectations than Caucasian students. Significant correlations emerged for all 3 groups between depressive symptoms and concerns about making mistakes, perceived criticism from parents, and self-doubt. In regression analyses, perfectionism explained significant variance in depressive symptoms for Asian Americans and Caucasians and explained significant variance in cumulative grade point average for Asian Americans and African Americans. Self-doubt emerged as a robust individual predictor in these analyses.

  4. Enhancing Diagnostic Performance of Symptom-Based Criteria for Irritable Bowel Syndrome by Additional History and Limited Diagnostic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ruchit; Camilleri, Michael; Gracie, David J; Gold, Matthew J; To, Natalie; Law, Graham R; Ford, Alexander C

    2016-10-01

    Symptom-based criteria to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) positively perform only modestly. Our aim was to assess whether including other items from the clinical history and limited diagnostic evaluation improves their performance. We collected complete symptom, colonoscopy, and histology data from 318 consecutive, unselected adult patients with lower gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in secondary care. All participants underwent colonoscopy, with relevant organic findings recorded. The reference standard used to define the presence of true IBS was patient-reported lower abdominal pain or discomfort associated with a change in bowel habit, in the absence of organic GI disease. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LRs), with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated for Rome III criteria, as well as for modifications, incorporating nocturnal stools, results of simple blood tests (hemoglobin and C-reactive protein (CRP)), measures of somatization, and/or affective disorders (hospital anxiety or depression scale (HADS) score). The sensitivity and specificity of the Rome III criteria for identifying IBS was 69.6%, and 82.0%, respectively, with positive and negative LRs of 3.87 and 0.37, respectively. Clinically useful enhancements in positive LRs were provided by combining Rome III criteria with: (a) high level of somatization (7.27); (b) normal hemoglobin and CRP with HADS score of ≥8 (5.04); (c) normal hemoglobin and CRP with a high level of somatization (7.56); or (d) no nocturnal passage of stool with a high level of somatization (17.3). Specificity was ≥95% with each of these modifications. Incorporating nocturnal stools, somatization, and affective disorders from the clinical history, and hemoglobin and CRP measurements, enhances the positive LR and specificity of symptom-based Rome III criteria for IBS.

  5. Value of symptoms and additional diagnostic tests for colorectal cancer in primary care: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jellema, Petra; van der Windt, Daniëlle A W M; Bruinvels, David J; Mallen, Christian D; van Weyenberg, Stijn J B; Mulder, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Objective To summarise available evidence on diagnostic tests that might help primary care physicians to identify patients with an increased risk for colorectal cancer among those consulting for non-acute lower abdominal symptoms. Data sources PubMed, Embase, and reference screening. Study eligibility criteria Studies were selected if the design was a diagnostic study; the patients were adults consulting because of non-acute lower abdominal symptoms; tests included signs, symptoms, blood tests, or faecal tests. Study appraisal and synthesis methods Two reviewers independently assessed quality with a modified version of the QUADAS tool and extracted data. We present diagnostic two by two tables and pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity. We refrained from pooling when there was considerable clinical or statistical heterogeneity. Results 47 primary diagnostic studies were included. Sensitivity was consistently high for age ≥50 (range 0.81-0.96, median 0.91), a referral guideline (0.80-0.94, 0.92), and immunochemical faeces tests (0.70-1.00, 0.95). Of these, only specificity of the faeces tests was good. Specificity was consistently high for family history (0.75-0.98, 0.91), weight loss (0.72-0.96, 0.89), and iron deficiency anaemia (0.83-0.95, 0.92), but all tests lacked sensitivity. None of these six tests was (sufficiently) studied in primary care. Conclusions Although combinations of symptom and results of immunochemical faeces tests showed good diagnostic performance for colorectal cancer, evidence from primary care is lacking. High quality studies on their role in the diagnostic investigation of colorectal cancer in primary care are urgently needed. PMID:20360221

  6. Symptoms and implications of selenium toxicity in fish: the Belews Lake case example

    Treesearch

    A. Dennis Lemly

    2002-01-01

    Belews Lake, North Carolina was contaminated by selenium in wastewater from a coal-fired power plant during the mid-1970s and toxic impacts to the resident fish community (20 species) were studied for over two decades. Symptoms of chronic selcnitun poisoning in Belews Lake fish included, (1) telangiectasia (swelling) of gill lamellae; (2) elevated lymphocytes; (3)...

  7. Implications of Timing of Maternal Depressive Symptoms for Early Cognitive and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Scaramella, Laura V.

    2006-01-01

    Statistically, women, particularly pregnant women and new mothers, are at heightened risk for depression. The present review describes the current state of the research linking maternal depressed mood and children's cognitive and language development. Exposure to maternal depressive symptoms, whether during the prenatal period, postpartum period,…

  8. Brief Symptom Inventory Factor Structure in Antisocial Adolescents: Implications for Juvenile Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitt, Ahmed; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) is widely used in juvenile justice settings; however, little is known regarding its factor structure in antisocial youth. The authors evaluated the BSI factor structure in a state residential treatment population. Methods: 707 adolescents completed the BSI. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses…

  9. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: Implications for DSM-V

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solanto, Mary V.; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of "DSM-IV" ADHD symptoms. Method: Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical "DSM-IV" items presented in two different formats, the…

  10. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: implications for DSM-V.

    PubMed

    Solanto, Mary V; Alvir, Jose

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical DSM-IV items presented in two different formats, the SNAP-IV and Conners' Revised Questionnaires, at two closely spaced points in time. For the combined sample, weighted kappa scores for intrarater agreement ranged from .30 ("fair") to .77 ("good") across symptoms. Kappa scores were good with respect to agreement on the DSM-IV criterion of endorsement of at least six symptoms in a given cluster for Inattention (.60 and .76, for parents and teachers, respectively) and Hyperactivity-Impulsivity (.72 and .75, respectively). Kappas for identification of cases as AD/HD or not AD/HD were good to excellent (.67 and .79 for parents and teachers, respectively). Classification as AD/HD or not AD/HD changed from the first to the second rating in 12% and 10% of cases rated parents and teachers, respectively. Reliability of individual ADHD symptoms appears to be suboptimal for clinical and research use and is improved, although less than ideal, at the levels of cluster endorsement and case classification.

  11. Reliability of DSM-IV Symptom Ratings of ADHD: Implications for DSM-V

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solanto, Mary V.; Alvir, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the intrarater reliability of "DSM-IV" ADHD symptoms. Method: Two-hundred-two children referred for attention problems and 49 comparison children (all 7-12 years) were rated by parents and teachers on the identical "DSM-IV" items presented in two different formats, the…

  12. Prodromal Symptoms and Atypical Affectivity as Predictors of Major Depression in Juveniles: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background: Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods: We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an…

  13. Prodromal Symptoms and Atypical Affectivity as Predictors of Major Depression in Juveniles: Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background: Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods: We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an…

  14. Exclusion of overlapping symptoms in DSM-5 mixed features specifier: heuristic diagnostic and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Gin S; Byrow, Yulisha; Outhred, Tim; Fritz, Kristina

    2016-11-21

    This article focuses on the controversial decision to exclude the overlapping symptoms of distractibility, irritability, and psychomotor agitation (DIP) with the introduction of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) mixed features specifier. In order to understand the placement of mixed states within the current classification system, we first review the evolution of mixed states. Then, using Kraepelin's original classification of mixed states, we compare and contrast his conceptualization with modern day definitions. The DSM-5 workgroup excluded DIP symptoms, arguing that they lack the ability to differentiate between manic and depressive states; however, accumulating evidence suggests that DIP symptoms may be core features of mixed states. We suggest a return to a Kraepelinian approach to classification-with mood, ideation, and activity as key axes-and reintegration of DIP symptoms as features that are expressed across presentations. An inclusive definition of mixed states is urgently needed to resolve confusion in clinical practice and to redirect future research efforts.

  15. Implications of Timing of Maternal Depressive Symptoms for Early Cognitive and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Scaramella, Laura V.

    2006-01-01

    Statistically, women, particularly pregnant women and new mothers, are at heightened risk for depression. The present review describes the current state of the research linking maternal depressed mood and children's cognitive and language development. Exposure to maternal depressive symptoms, whether during the prenatal period, postpartum period,…

  16. Implication of dorsostriatal D3 receptors in motivational processes: a potential target for neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Mathieu; Carcenac, Carole; Drui, Guillaume; Vachez, Yvan; Boulet, Sabrina; Savasta, Marc; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    Beyond classical motor symptoms, motivational and affective deficits are frequently observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD), dramatically impairing the quality of life of patients. Using bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in rats, we have been able to reproduce these neuropsychiatric/non-motor impairments. The present study describes how bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesions affect the function of the main striatal dopaminergic (DA) receptor subtypes. Autoradiography was used to measure the levels of striatal DA receptors, and operant sucrose self-administration and neuropharmacological approaches were combined to investigate the causal implication of specific DA receptors subtypes in the motivational deficits induced by a dorsostriatal DA denervation. We found that D3 receptors (D3R) exclusively are down-regulated within the dorsal striatum of lesioned rats. We next showed that infusion of a D3R antagonist (SB-277011A) in non-lesioned animals specifically disrupts preparatory, but not consummatory behaviors. Our findings reveal an unexpected involvement of dorsostriatal D3R in motivational processes. They strongly suggest an implication of dorsostriatal D3R in the neuropsychiatric symptoms observed in PD, highlighting this receptor as a potential target for pharmacological treatment. PMID:28134302

  17. Multidimensional influences on autism symptom measures: Implications for use in etiological research

    PubMed Central

    Havdahl, Karoline Alexandra; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Huerta, Marisela; Pickles, Andrew; Øyen, Anne-Siri; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Lord, Catherine; Bishop, Somer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Growing awareness that symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) transcend multiple diagnostic categories, and major advances in the identification of genetic syndromes associated with ASD, has led to widespread use of ASD symptom measures in etiological studies of neurodevelopmental disorders. Insufficient consideration of potentially confounding factors such as cognitive ability or behavior problems can have important negative consequences in interpretation of findings, including erroneous estimation of associations between ASD and etiological factors. Method Participants were 388 children aged 2–13 years with diagnoses of ASD or another neurodevelopmental disorder without ASD. Receiver operating characteristics methods were used to assess the influence of IQ and emotional/behavioral problems on the discriminative ability of three widely used ASD symptom measures; the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). Results IQ influenced the discriminative thresholds of the SRS and ADI-R, and emotional/behavioral problems affected the discriminative thresholds of the SRS, ADI-R, and ADOS. This resulted in low specificity of ASD cut-offs on the SRS and ADI-R for children with intellectual disability without ASD (27–42%), and low specificity across all three instruments for children without ASD with elevated emotional/behavioral problems (36–59%). Adjustment for these characteristics resulted in improved discriminative ability for all three ASD measures. Conclusion The findings indicate that scores on ASD symptom measures reflect far more than ASD symptoms. Valid interpretation of these measures requires steps to account for the influences of IQ and emotional/behavioral problems. PMID:27871640

  18. Intergenerational Ambivalence in Adolescence and Early Adulthood: Implications for Depressive Symptoms over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Lauren A.; Birditt, Kira S.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2016-01-01

    The parent-child relationship is often characterized by ambivalence, defined as the simultaneous experience of positive and negative relationship quality. This study examines reports of intergenerational ambivalence in 3 developmental periods: adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood, as well as its implications for depressive symptoms…

  19. Intergenerational Ambivalence in Adolescence and Early Adulthood: Implications for Depressive Symptoms over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Lauren A.; Birditt, Kira S.; Antonucci, Toni C.

    2016-01-01

    The parent-child relationship is often characterized by ambivalence, defined as the simultaneous experience of positive and negative relationship quality. This study examines reports of intergenerational ambivalence in 3 developmental periods: adolescence, emerging adulthood, and young adulthood, as well as its implications for depressive symptoms…

  20. Intersectionality of internalized HIV stigma and internalized substance use stigma: Implications for depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Earnshaw, Valerie A; Smith, Laramie R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Copenhaver, Michael M

    2015-08-01

    We adopted an intersectionality framework and examined whether the relationship between internalized HIV stigma and depressive symptoms is moderated by internalized substance use stigma. A total of 85 people living with HIV with a history of substance use in the Bronx, New York, completed a survey. Results revealed evidence of moderation: Participants who internalized HIV stigma experienced greater depressive symptoms only if they also internalized substance use stigma. Researchers should examine stigma associated with multiple socially devalued characteristics to best understand how stigma impacts mental health among people living with HIV. Healthcare providers should address stigma associated with the full range of socially devalued characteristics with which people living with HIV live. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Biomechanics of minor automobile accidents: treatment implications for associated chronic spine symptoms.

    PubMed

    Laborde, J M

    2000-01-01

    Biomedical experimental data indicate that automobile accidents with no vehicle damage are unlikely to cause injury to the occupants. Soft tissue injuries heal in a few weeks. Chronic pain has never been produced by experimental injury and is much less common in countries without financial payments for accident victims. Chronic pain after no-damage collisions is probably caused by psychologic factors. Psychologic treatment should be added to conventional nonoperative treatment when no objective explanation for chronic symptoms is found.

  2. Health-seeking norms for tuberculosis symptoms in southern Angola: implications for behaviour change communications.

    PubMed

    Luis, S F; Kamp, N; Mitchell, E M H; Henriksen, K; van Leth, F

    2011-07-01

    A passive case-finding strategy as present in the DOTS strategy presupposes a patient's willingness to seek care. This requires awareness of tuberculosis (TB) symptoms and the diagnostic process, and positive attitudes towards access and probability of cure. To measure parameters of health-seeking intention in Southern Angola and to inform the design of context-specific interventions to improve case detection. A survey in four communities based on the cough-to-cure pathway represented by five domains with either one or two proxy measures. These were assessed for association with appropriate health-seeking behaviour (visiting a medical institution or service). In total, 805 individuals were included in the study. Appropriate health-seeking behaviour was positively associated with knowing the disease (OR 3.1, 95%CI 1.4-6.8), knowing key symptoms (OR 1.4, 95%CI 1.0-1.9), perceived curability (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.0-1.6), and the perception that TB services were free of charge (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.4-2.7). Respondents who perceived a personal risk for TB were less likely to have an appropriate intended health-seeking behaviour (OR 0.7, 95%CI 0.5-0.9). Knowledge about TB should include key symptoms, perceived curability and information on access to services when designing interventions to improve case detection. The study highlights the importance of advocacy, social mobilisation and communication strategies.

  3. Cognitive and affective empathy in children with conduct problems: additive and interactive effects of callous-unemotional traits and autism spectrum disorders symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

    2014-11-30

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) symptoms are characterized by problems in empathy; however, these behavioral features are rarely examined together in children with conduct problems. This study investigated additive and interactive effects of CU traits and ASD symptoms in relation to cognitive and affective empathy in a non-ASD clinic-referred sample. Participants were 134 children aged 3 to 9 years (M=5.60; 79% boys) with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder, and their parents. Clinicians, teachers, and parents reported on dimensions of child behavior, and parental reports of family dysfunction and direct observations of parental warmth/responsiveness assessed quality of family relationships. Results from multiple regression analysis showed that, over and above the effects of child conduct problem severity and quality of family relationships, both ASD symptoms and CU traits were uniquely associated with deficits in cognitive empathy. Moreover, CU traits demonstrated an independent association with affective empathy, and this relationship was moderated by ASD symptoms. That is, there was a stronger negative association between CU traits and affective empathy at higher versus lower levels of ASD symptoms. These findings suggest including both CU traits and ASD-related social impairments in models delineating the atypical development of empathy in children with conduct problems.

  4. PRODROMAL SYMPTOMS AND ATYPICAL AFFECTIVITY AS PREDICTORS OF MAJOR DEPRESSION IN JUVENILES: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Maria; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Background Given the long-term morbidity of juvenile-onset major depressive disorder (MDD), it is timely to consider whether more effort should be dedicated to its primary and secondary prevention. Methods We reviewed studies of prodromal symptoms that may herald a first episode pediatric MDD and considered whether that literature has made an impact on secondary prevention (efforts to prevent progression from symptoms to full disorder). We also reviewed studies of children at familial risk for MDD that addressed atypical affectivity and the regulation of sad, dysphoric affect (mood repair) and related physiological systems, and considered whether research in those areas has made an impact on primary prevention of pediatric MDD (efforts to prevent the disorder). Results A compelling body of literature indicates that depressive symptoms in youngsters predict subsequent MDD across the juvenile (and early adult) years and that any combination of several symptoms for at least one week is informative in that regard. These findings are echoed in the case selection criteria used by many secondary prevention programs. Convergent findings also indicate that (compared to typical peers) young offspring at familial-risk for depression manifest low positive affectivity and compromised mood repair, along with signs of dysfunction in three intertwined physiological systems that contribute to affectivity and mood repair (the HPA axis, cerebral hemispheric asymmetry, and cardiac vagal control). While all these affect-related parameters are suitable for case selection and as intervention targets, they have not yet made an impact on primary prevention programs. Conclusions According to recent meta-analyses, attempts to prevent pediatric depression have not lived up to expectations. Based on our review, possible reasons for this include: (a) the use of case selection criteria that yield samples heterogeneous with regard to whether the symptoms are truly prodromal to an episode of MDD

  5. Additional low-dose antimuscarinics can improve overactive bladder symptoms in patients with suboptimal response to beta 3 agonist monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hyun; Kim, Aram; Choo, Myung-Soo

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to assess the patient-reported outcome (PRO) and efficacy of add-on low-dose antimuscarinic therapy in over-active bladder (OAB) patients with suboptimal response to 4-week treatment with beta 3 agonist monotherapy (mirabegron, 50 mg). We enrolled OAB patients with 4-week mirabegron (50 mg) treatment if the patients' symptoms improved, but not to a satisfactory extent (patient perception of bladder condition [PPBC] ≥4). Enrolled patients had 8-week low-dose antimuscarinics add-on therapy (propiverine HCl, 10 mg). Patients recorded 3-day voiding diary at screening, enrollment (after 4 weeks of mirabegron monotherapy) and after 8 weeks of add-on therapy. We assessed the change of PRO (PPBC) as a primary end point and the efficacy of add-on therapy (change of frequency, urgency, urinary urgency incontinence [UUI] based on voiding diary) as a secondary end point. Thirty patients (mean age, 62.3±12.8 years; mean symptom duration, 16.0±12.3 months) were finally enrolled in the study. The mean PPBC value was 4.3±0.4 after mirabegron monotherapy, and decreased to 3.2±1.0 after 8-week add-on therapy. The mean urinary frequency decreased from 10.1±3.1 to 8.8±3, the mean number of urgency episodes decreased from 3.6±1.6 to 1.8±1.2 and the number of urgency incontinence episodes decreased from 0.7±1.0 to 0.2±0.5 after add-on therapy. No patients had event of acute urinary retention and three patients complained of mild dry mouth after add-on therapy. Add-on therapy of low-dose antimuscarinics exhibits good efficacy and safety in patients with suboptimal response after 4-week of mirabegron (50 mg) monotherapy.

  6. Primary hyperhidrosis: Implications on symptoms, daily life, health and alcohol consumption when treated with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Alexander; Boman, Jens; Janlert, Urban; Brulin, Christine; Nylander, Elisabet

    2016-08-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis affects approximately 3% of the population and reduces quality of life in affected persons. Few studies have investigated the symptoms of anxiety, depression and hazardous alcohol consumption among those with hyperhidrosis and the effect of treatment with botulinum toxin. The first aim of this study was to investigate the effect of primary hyperhidrosis on mental and physical health, and alcohol consumption. Our second aim was to study whether and how treatment with botulinum toxin changed these effects. One hundred and fourteen patients answered questionnaires regarding hyperhidrosis and symptoms, including hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS), visual analog scale (VAS) 10-point scale for hyperhidrosis symptoms, hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), alcohol use disorder identification test (AUDIT) and short-form health survey (SF-36) before treatment with botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after. The age of onset of hyperhidrosis was on average 13.4 years and 48% described heredity for hyperhidrosis. Significant improvements were noted in patients with axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis regarding mean HDSS, VAS 10-point scale, HADS, SF-36 and sweat-related health problems 2 weeks after treatment with botulinum toxin. Changes in mean AUDIT for all participants were not significant. Primary hyperhidrosis mainly impairs mental rather than physical aspects of life and also interferes with specific daily activities of the affected individuals. Despite this, our patients did not show signs of anxiety, depression or hazardous alcohol consumption. Treatment with botulinum toxin reduced sweat-related problems and led to significant improvements in HDSS, VAS, HADS and SF-36 in our patients. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  7. MINORITY STRESS, POSITIVE IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT, AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RESILIENCE AMONG SEXUAL MINORITY MALE YOUTH

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Minority stress processes have been shown to have significant associations with negative mental health outcomes among sexual minority populations. Given that adversity may be experienced growing up as a sexual minority in heteronormative, if not heterosexist, environments, our research on resilience among sexual minority male youth proposes that positive identity development may buffer the effects of a range of minority stress processes. Methods An ethnically diverse sample of 200 sexual minority males ages 16–24 (mean age, 20.9 years) was recruited using mixed recruitment methods. We developed and tested two new measures: concealment stress during adolescence and sexual minority-related positive identity development. We then tested a path model that assessed the effects of minority stressors, positive identity development, and social support on major depressive symptoms. Results Experience of stigma was associated with internalized homophobia (β=.138, p<.05) and major depressive symptoms (β=1.076, OR=2.933, p<.001), and internalized homophobia partially mediated experience’s effects on major depression (β=.773, OR=2.167, p<.001). Concealment stress was associated with positive identity development (β=.155, p<.05) and internalized homophobia (β=.418, p<.001), and positive identity development partially mediated concealment stress’s effects on internalized homophobia (β=−.527, p<.001). Concealment stress demonstrated a direct effect on major depression (β=1.400, OR=4.056, p<.001), and indirect paths to social support through positive identity development. Conclusions With these results, we offer an exploratory model that empirically identifies significant paths among minority stress dimensions, positive identity development, and major depressive symptoms. This study helps further our understanding of minority stress, identity development, and resources of resilience among sexual minority male youth. PMID:26478901

  8. MINORITY STRESS, POSITIVE IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT, AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: IMPLICATIONS FOR RESILIENCE AMONG SEXUAL MINORITY MALE YOUTH.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2015-09-01

    Minority stress processes have been shown to have significant associations with negative mental health outcomes among sexual minority populations. Given that adversity may be experienced growing up as a sexual minority in heteronormative, if not heterosexist, environments, our research on resilience among sexual minority male youth proposes that positive identity development may buffer the effects of a range of minority stress processes. An ethnically diverse sample of 200 sexual minority males ages 16-24 (mean age, 20.9 years) was recruited using mixed recruitment methods. We developed and tested two new measures: concealment stress during adolescence and sexual minority-related positive identity development. We then tested a path model that assessed the effects of minority stressors, positive identity development, and social support on major depressive symptoms. Experience of stigma was associated with internalized homophobia (β=.138, p<.05) and major depressive symptoms (β=1.076, OR=2.933, p<.001), and internalized homophobia partially mediated experience's effects on major depression (β=.773, OR=2.167, p<.001). Concealment stress was associated with positive identity development (β=.155, p<.05) and internalized homophobia (β=.418, p<.001), and positive identity development partially mediated concealment stress's effects on internalized homophobia (β=-.527, p<.001). Concealment stress demonstrated a direct effect on major depression (β=1.400, OR=4.056, p<.001), and indirect paths to social support through positive identity development. With these results, we offer an exploratory model that empirically identifies significant paths among minority stress dimensions, positive identity development, and major depressive symptoms. This study helps further our understanding of minority stress, identity development, and resources of resilience among sexual minority male youth.

  9. Prevalence of type I allergy to natural rubber latex and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives in operating room staff with glove-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Miri, Sara; Pourpak, Zahra; Zarinara, Alireza; Zarinara, Alam; Heidarzade, Marzieh; Kazemnejad, Anoushirvan; Kardar, Gholamali; Firooz, Alireza; Moin, Athar

    2007-01-01

    There is lack of data on the prevalence of latex allergy in the health care setting in Iran. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of type I latex allergy and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives among the operating room staff with glove-related symptoms in 13 general hospitals in Tehran. Skin-prick tests with commercial latex extract, patch tests with latex and 25 rubber additive series, and total and latex-specific IgE detection were performed on the operating room staff who reported latex glove-related symptoms. Five hundred twelve self-administered questionnaires (100%) were completed by all operating room staff and latex glove-related symptoms were reported by 59 (11.5%) employees. Among all symptomatic operating room staff tested, the prevalence of type I latex allergy was 30.5% and the prevalence rates of type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives were 16.7 and 14.6%, respectively. The most positive patch test result with rubber additives was related to tetramethylthiuram monosulfide (38.5%). The risk factors for type I latex allergy were female sex (p = 0.009) and positive patch test with rubber additives (p = 0.012). Subjects who had positive patch test with latex were significantly more likely to have positive patch test with rubber additives (p < 0.0001). Our results showed a high prevalence of type I latex allergy and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives. Based on this study, we recommend eliminating powdered latex gloves from the operating rooms of the 13 studied general hospitals and support the substitution of powder-free latex gloves.

  10. HIV-Related Stigma: Implications for Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression among Malawian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Charles; Arganbright, Jill; Kienitz, Eliza; Weller, Melissa; Khaylis, Anna; Shenkman, Tammy; Smith, Sarah; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 11% of the adult population in Malawi, Africa, is living with HIV/AIDS. The disease has taken a toll on communities, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Malawian women carry the burden of being caretakers for individuals infected with HIV while also worrying about their own health; however, little is known about how HIV/AIDS affects psychological functioning among Malawian women in areas hit hardest by the epidemic. To that end, this paper examined the influence of HIV-related stigma on symptoms of anxiety and depression among 59 women 17-46 years old who were recruited from the Namitete area of Malawi. Women who reported greater worry about being infected with HIV and greater HIV-related stigma were significantly more likely to report greater symptoms of anxiety and depression. These findings suggest that interventions that reduce HIV-related stigma are likely to enhance psychological functioning among Malawian women, which in turn will improve the women's quality of life and well-being. PMID:25920985

  11. Additional low-dose antimuscarinics can improve overactive bladder symptoms in patients with suboptimal response to beta 3 agonist monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung Hyun; Kim, Aram

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to assess the patient-reported outcome (PRO) and efficacy of add-on low-dose antimuscarinic therapy in over-active bladder (OAB) patients with suboptimal response to 4-week treatment with beta 3 agonist monotherapy (mirabegron, 50 mg). Materials and Methods We enrolled OAB patients with 4-week mirabegron (50 mg) treatment if the patients' symptoms improved, but not to a satisfactory extent (patient perception of bladder condition [PPBC] ≥4). Enrolled patients had 8-week low-dose antimuscarinics add-on therapy (propiverine HCl, 10 mg). Patients recorded 3-day voiding diary at screening, enrollment (after 4 weeks of mirabegron monotherapy) and after 8 weeks of add-on therapy. We assessed the change of PRO (PPBC) as a primary end point and the efficacy of add-on therapy (change of frequency, urgency, urinary urgency incontinence [UUI] based on voiding diary) as a secondary end point. Results Thirty patients (mean age, 62.3±12.8 years; mean symptom duration, 16.0±12.3 months) were finally enrolled in the study. The mean PPBC value was 4.3±0.4 after mirabegron monotherapy, and decreased to 3.2±1.0 after 8-week add-on therapy. The mean urinary frequency decreased from 10.1±3.1 to 8.8±3, the mean number of urgency episodes decreased from 3.6±1.6 to 1.8±1.2 and the number of urgency incontinence episodes decreased from 0.7±1.0 to 0.2±0.5 after add-on therapy. No patients had event of acute urinary retention and three patients complained of mild dry mouth after add-on therapy. Conclusions Add-on therapy of low-dose antimuscarinics exhibits good efficacy and safety in patients with suboptimal response after 4-week of mirabegron (50 mg) monotherapy. PMID:28681036

  12. Comparison of symptoms and treatment outcomes between actively and passively detected tuberculosis cases: the additional value of active case finding.

    PubMed

    den Boon, S; Verver, S; Lombard, C J; Bateman, E D; Irusen, E M; Enarson, D A; Borgdorff, M W; Beyers, N

    2008-10-01

    Passive detection of tuberculosis (TB) cases may lead to delay in treatment which may contribute to increased severity of disease and mortality. Active case finding may be an alternative. In a community survey in Cape Town, South Africa, we actively detected 27 bacteriologically positive TB cases and compared those with 473 passively detected TB cases. Seven of 27 (26%) actively detected TB cases did not start treatment within 2 months and were considered initial defaulters. Those who did start treatment had similar treatment success rates as passively detected TB cases (both 80%) (OR 1.01, CI 0.33-3.09). Passively detected cases reported the presence of the symptoms cough (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.47-9.39), haemoptysis (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.03-9.93), night sweats (OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.40-7.99), fever (OR 4.28, 95% CI 1.21-15.14), and weight loss (OR 11.14, 95% CI 4.17-29.74) more often than those detected actively. We conclude that although TB cases detected by a community survey are less symptomatic and are prone to a high initial default rate, active case finding can potentially identify a substantial portion of the existing caseload at an earlier stage of disease, thereby reducing the risk of transmission.

  13. Signs and symptoms of rheumatic diseases as first manifestation of pediatric cancer: diagnosis and prognosis implications.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Mariana Bertoldi; Gomes, Francisco Hugo Rodrigues; Valera, Elvis Terci; Pileggi, Gecilmara Salviato; Gonfiantini, Paula Braga; Gonfiantini, Marcela Braga; Ferriani, Virgínia Paes Leme; Carvalho, Luciana Martins de

    2016-12-16

    To assess the prevalence and describe the clinical, laboratory and radiological findings, treatment and outcome of children with cancer initially referred to a tertiary outpatient pediatric rheumatology clinic. Retrospective analysis of medical records from patients identified in a list of 250 new patients attending the tertiary Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic, Ribeirão Preto Medical School hospital, University of São Paulo, from July 2013 to July 2015, whose final diagnosis was cancer. Of 250 patients seen during the study period, 5 (2%) had a cancer diagnosis. Among them, 80% had constitutional symptoms, especially weight loss and asthenia, and 60% had arthritis. Initially, all patients had at least one alteration in their blood count, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was increased in 80% and a bone marrow smear was conclusive in 60% of patients. Bone and intestine biopsies were necessary for the diagnosis in 2 patients. JIA was the most common initial diagnosis. The definitive diagnosis was acute lymphoblastic leukemia (2 patients), M3 acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and neuroblastoma (one case each). Of 5 patients studied, 3 (60%) are in remission and 2 (40%) died, one of them with prior use of steroids. The constitutional and musculoskeletal symptoms common to rheumatic and neoplastic diseases can delay the diagnosis and consequently worsen the prognosis of neoplasms. Initial blood count and bone marrow smear may be normal in the initial framework of neoplasms. Thus, the clinical follow-up of these cases becomes imperative and the treatment, mainly with corticosteroids, should be delayed until diagnostic definition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  14. Signs and symptoms of rheumatic diseases as first manifestation of pediatric cancer: diagnosis and prognosis implications.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Mariana Bertoldi; Gomes, Francisco Hugo Rodrigues; Valera, Elvis Terci; Pileggi, Gecilmara Salviato; Gonfiantini, Paula Braga; Gonfiantini, Marcela Braga; Ferriani, Virgínia Paes Leme; Carvalho, Luciana Martins de

    To assess the prevalence and describe the clinical, laboratory and radiological findings, treatment and outcome of children with cancer initially referred to a tertiary outpatient pediatric rheumatology clinic. Retrospective analysis of medical records from patients identified in a list of 250 new patients attending the tertiary Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic, Ribeirão Preto Medical School hospital, University of São Paulo, from July 2013 to July 2015, whose final diagnosis was cancer. Of 250 patients seen during the study period, 5 (2%) had a cancer diagnosis. Among them, 80% had constitutional symptoms, especially weight loss and asthenia, and 60% had arthritis. Initially, all patients had at least one alteration in their blood count, lactate dehydrogenase was increased in 80% and a bone marrow smear was conclusive in 60% of patients. Bone and intestine biopsies were necessary for the diagnosis in 2 patients. JIA was the most common initial diagnosis. The definitive diagnosis was acute lymphoblastic leukemia (2 patients), M3 acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and neuroblastoma (one case each). Of 5 patients studied, 3 (60%) are in remission and 2 (40%) died, one of them with prior use of steroids. The constitutional and musculoskeletal symptoms common to rheumatic and neoplastic diseases can delay the diagnosis and consequently worsen the prognosis of neoplasms. Initial blood count and bone marrow smear may be normal in the initial framework of neoplasms. Thus, the clinical follow-up of these cases becomes imperative and the treatment, mainly with corticosteroids, should be delayed until diagnostic definition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. The timing of maternal depressive symptoms and mothers' parenting practices with young children: implications for pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    McLearn, Kathryn Taaffe; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Strobino, Donna M; Marks, Elisabeth; Hou, William

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of maternal depressive symptoms and its associated consequences on parental behaviors, child health, and development are well documented. Researchers have called for additional work to investigate the effects of the timing of maternal depressive symptoms at various stages in the development of the young child on the emergence of developmentally appropriate parenting practices. For clinicians, data are limited about when or how often to screen for maternal depressive symptoms or how to target anticipatory guidance to address parental needs. We sought to determine whether concurrent maternal depressive symptoms have a greater effect than earlier depressive symptoms on the emergence of maternal parenting practices at 30 to 33 months in 3 important domains of child safety, development, and discipline. Secondary analyses from the Healthy Steps National Evaluation were conducted for this study. Data sources included a self-administered enrollment questionnaire and computer-assisted telephone interviews with the mother when the Healthy Steps children were 2 to 4 and 30 to 33 months of age. The 30- to 33-month interview provided information about 4 safety practices (ie, always uses car seat, has electric outlet covers, has safety latches on cabinets, and lowered temperature on the water heater), 6 child development practices (ie, talks daily to child while working, plays daily with child, reads daily to child, limits child television and video watching to <2 hours a day, follows > or = 3 daily routines, and being more nurturing), and 3 discipline practices (ie, uses more reasoning, uses more harsh punishment, and ever slapped child on the face or spanked the child with an object). The parenting practices were selected based on evidence of their importance for child health and development, near complete data, and sample variability. The discipline practices were constructed from the Parental Response to Misbehavior Scale. Maternal depressive symptoms were

  16. Consequences of cancer treatments on adult hippocampal neurogenesis: implications for cognitive function and depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Pereira Dias, Gisele; Hollywood, Ronan; Bevilaqua, Mário Cesar do Nascimento; da Silveira da Luz, Anna Claudia Domingos; Hindges, Robert; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Thuret, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is capable of generating new functional neurons throughout life, a phenomenon known as adult neurogenesis. The generation of new neurons is sustained throughout adulthood due to the proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem cells. This process in humans is uniquely located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is thought to play a major role in hippocampus-dependent functions, such as spatial awareness, long-term memory, emotionality, and mood. The overall aim of current treatments for cancer (such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy) is to prevent aberrant cell division of cell populations associated with malignancy. However, the treatments in question are absolutist in nature and hence inhibit all cell division. An unintended consequence of this cessation of cell division is the impairment of adult neural stem cell proliferation and AHN. Patients undergoing treatment for cancerous malignancies often display specific forms of memory deficits, as well as depressive symptoms. This review aims to discuss the effects of cancer treatments on AHN and propose a link between the inhibition of the neurogenetic process in the hippocampus and the advent of the cognitive and mood-based deficits observed in patients and animal models undergoing cancer therapies. Possible evidence for coadjuvant interventions aiming to protect neural cells, and subsequently the mood and cognitive functions they regulate, from the ablative effects of cancer treatment are discussed as potential clinical tools to improve mental health among cancer patients. PMID:24470543

  17. Pathological basis of symptoms and crises in sickle cell disorder: implications for counseling and psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ilesanmi, Oluwatoyin Olatundun

    2010-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disorder (SCD) is a congenital hemoglobinopathy. There is little in literature regarding the psychological variables affecting individuals living with SCD and all of the significant people around them. There are also limited numbers of trained clinical psychologists and genetic counselors to cater for the psychotherapeutic needs of individuals living with SCD. Even among those who have been trained, only a few might have fully grasped the complexities of the disease pathology. Early understanding of its pathological nature, sources, types, complications, pathophysiological basis, and clinical severity of symptoms among clinical psychologists, genetic counselors and psychotherapists, as well as general medical practitioners, could guide them in providing holistic care for dealing with and reducing pain among individuals living with SCD. It could allow risk-based counseling for families and individuals. It could also justify the early use of disease-modifying or curative interventions, such as hydroxyurea (HU), chronic transfusions (CTs), or stem-cell transplantation (SCT) by general medical practitioners. Hence, the need for this paper on the pathophysiology of SCD. PMID:22184515

  18. Prevalence and implications of Truman symptoms in subjects at ultra high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Luis; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Rocchetti, Matteo; Brandizzi, Martina; Samson, Carly; Azis, Matilda; Queen, Beverly; Bossong, Matthijs; Allen, Paul; Perez, Jesus; Howes, Oliver D; McGuire, Philip; Fusar-Poli, Paolo

    2016-04-30

    Preliminary qualitative research has suggested that patients with early stages of psychosis and those at Ultra High Risk (UHR) may experience "Truman symptoms" (TS). This study is an exploratory investigation of TS in a sample of 26 UHR subjects and 14 matched controls (HC) recruited from three prodromal and early intervention clinics and its relation with clinical features, depersonalization and basic self-disturbances. The UHR were assessed with the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS) and the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences (EASE) checklist. In our sample, TS were specific (TS absent in HC) and highly prevalent (50%) in UHR subjects. We found a significant difference in EASE total scores across HC, UHR with TS and without TS but post-hoc analyses showed similar scores in the two latter groups. The presence of TS in our UHR sample was associated with significant higher PANSS general psychopathology but with non-significant difference in the CAARMS, CDS and SOFAS scores. This study of TS in UHR subjects suggested that they might be prevalent and specific of this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Victoria Symptom Validity Test performance in acute severe traumatic brain injury: implications for test interpretation.

    PubMed

    Macciocchi, Stephen N; Seel, Ronald T; Alderson, Amy; Godsall, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Effort testing has become commonplace in clinical practice. Recent research has shown that performance on effort tests is highly correlated with performance on neuropsychological measures. Clinical application of effort testing is highly dependent on research derived interpretive guidelines. The Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT) is one of many measures currently used in clinical practice. The VSVT has recommended interpretive guidelines published in the test manual, but the samples used in developing interpretive guidelines are small and heterogeneous and concern has been expressed regarding high false negative rates. In this study, a homogeneous sample of acute, severely brain injured persons were used to assess the sensitivity of the VSVT. Results confirmed that acute, severely brain injured persons (N=71) perform very well on the VSVT. The severe brain injury population is 99% likely to have between 44.1 and 46.8 correct VSVT Combined Score responses. While the VSVT was insensitive to memory dysfunction, the presence of severe visual perceptual (Benton Visual Form Discrimination Score<21) and verbal fluency (Controlled Oral Word Association Score<15) deficits predicted poor performance on the VSVT. These results provide further evidence that performance expectations currently incorporated in the VSVT manual interpretative criteria are too conservative. Empirically based alternative criteria for interpreting VSVT Combined Scores in the TBI population are presented.

  20. Emotion in Bipolar I Disorder: Implications for Functional and Symptom Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Tharp, Jordan A.; Peckham, Andrew D.; McMaster, Kaja J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the centrality of emotion disturbance in neurobiological models of bipolar disorder, the behavioral literature has not yet clearly identified the most central aspects of emotion disturbance in bipolar disorder. Toward this aim, we gathered a battery of emotion-related measures in 67 persons diagnosed with bipolar I disorder as assessed with SCID and a well-matched control group of 58 persons without a history of mood disorders. Those with bipolar disorder were interviewed monthly until they achieved remission, and then tested on emotion measures. A subset of 36 participants with bipolar disorder completed symptom severity interviews at 12-month follow-up. Factor analyses indicated four emotion factor scores: Negative Emotion, Positive Emotion, Reappraisal and Suppression. Bivariate analyses suggested that bipolar disorder was tied to a host of emotion disturbances, but multivariate analyses suggested that bipolar disorder was particularly tied to elevations of Negative Emotion. High Negative Emotion, low Positive Emotion, and high Suppression were conjointly related to lower functioning. Reappraisal predicted declines in depression over time for those with bipolar disorder. Findings highlight the importance of considering the overall profile of emotion disturbance in bipolar disorder. Emotion and emotion regulation appear central to a broad range of outcomes in bipolar disorder. PMID:26480234

  1. Implications of timing of maternal depressive symptoms for early cognitive and language development.

    PubMed

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L; Scaramella, Laura V

    2006-03-01

    : Statistically, women, particularly pregnant women and new mothers, are at heightened risk for depression. The present review describes the current state of the research linking maternal depressed mood and children's cognitive and language development. Exposure to maternal depressive symptoms, whether during the prenatal period, postpartum period, or chronically, has been found to increase children's risk for later cognitive and language difficulties. The present review considers both the timing of maternal depression and the chronicity of mothers' depression on children's risk for cognitive and language delays. Infancy is frequently identified as a sensitive period in which environmental stimulation has the potential to substantially influence children's cognitive and language development. However, children's exposure to chronic maternal depression seems to be associated with more problematic outcomes for children, perhaps because depression interferes with mothers' ability to respond sensitively and consistently over time. Consistent with this expectation, interventions targeting parenting practices of depressed mothers have been found to increase children's cognitive competence during early childhood. The current review provides a synthesis of the current state of the field regarding the association between maternal depression and children's cognitive and language development during early childhood.

  2. CCA addition to tRNA: implications for tRNA quality control.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2010-04-01

    The CCA sequence is conserved at the 3' end of all mature tRNA molecules to function as the site of amino acid attachment. This sequence is acquired and maintained by stepwise nucleotide addition by the ubiquitous CCA enzyme, which is an unusual RNA polymerase that does not use a nucleic acid template for nucleotide addition. Crystal structural work has divided CCA enzymes into two structurally distinct classes, which differ in the mechanism of template-independent nucleotide selection. Recent kinetic work of the class II E. coli CCA enzyme has demonstrated a rapid and uniform rate constant for the chemistry of nucleotide addition at each step of CCA synthesis, although the enzyme uses different determinants to control the rate of each step. Importantly, the kinetic work reveals that, at each step of CCA synthesis, E. coli CCA enzyme has an innate ability to discriminate against tRNA backbone damage. This discrimination suggests the possibility of a previously unrecognized quality control mechanism that would prevent damaged tRNA from CCA maturation and from entering the ribosome machinery of protein synthesis. This quality control is relevant to cellular stress conditions that damage tRNA backbone and predicts a role of CCA addition in stress response.

  3. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  4. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  5. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  6. tRNA integrity is a prerequisite for rapid CCA addition: implication for quality control.

    PubMed

    Dupasquier, Marcel; Kim, Sangbumn; Halkidis, Konstantine; Gamper, Howard; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2008-06-06

    CCA addition to the 3' end is an essential step in tRNA maturation. High-resolution crystal structures of the CCA enzymes reveal primary enzyme contact with the tRNA minihelix domain, consisting of the acceptor stem and T stem-loop. RNA and DNA minihelices are efficient substrates for CCA addition in steady-state kinetics. However, in contrast to structural models and steady-state experiments, we show here by single-turnover kinetics that minihelices are insufficient substrates for the Escherichia coli CCA enzyme and that only the full-length tRNA is kinetically competent. Even a nick in the full-length tRNA backbone in the T loop, or as far away from the minihelix domain as in the anticodon loop, prevents efficient CCA addition. These results suggest a kinetic quality control provided by the CCA enzyme to inspect the integrity of the tRNA molecule and to discriminate against nicked or damaged species from further maturation.

  7. Additional Drug Resistance Patterns among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Korea: Implications for Regimen Design

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Detailed information on additional drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is essential to build an effective treatment regimen; however, such data are scarce in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed the results of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) of culture confirmed-TB patients from January 2010 to December 2014 in 7 university hospitals in Korea. MDR-TB was identified among 6.8% (n = 378) of 5,599 isolates. A total of 57.1% (n = 216) of the MDR-TB patients had never been treated for TB. Strains from MDR-TB patients showed additional resistance to pyrazinamide (PZA) (35.7%), any second-line injectable drug (19.3%), and any fluoroquinolone (26.2%). Extensively drug resistant TB comprised 12.4% (n = 47) of the MDR-TB patients. Of 378 MDR-TB patients, 50.3% (n = 190) were eligible for the shorter MDR-TB regimen, and 50.0% (n = 189) were fully susceptible to the 5 drugs comprising the standard conventional regimen (PZA, kanamycin, ofloxoacin, prothionamide, and cycloserine). In conclusion, the proportion of new patients and the levels of additional drug resistance were high in MDR-TB patients. Considering the high levels of drug resistance, the shorter MDR-TB treatment regimen may not be feasible; instead, an individually tailored regimen based on the results of molecular and phenotypic DST may be more appropriate in MDR-TB patients in Korea. PMID:28244290

  8. Additional Drug Resistance Patterns among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Korea: Implications for Regimen Design.

    PubMed

    Mok, Jeong Ha; Kang, Bo Hyoung; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Jang, Hang Jea; Cho, Yu Ji; Jeon, Doosoo

    2017-04-01

    Detailed information on additional drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is essential to build an effective treatment regimen; however, such data are scarce in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed the results of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) of culture confirmed-TB patients from January 2010 to December 2014 in 7 university hospitals in Korea. MDR-TB was identified among 6.8% (n = 378) of 5,599 isolates. A total of 57.1% (n = 216) of the MDR-TB patients had never been treated for TB. Strains from MDR-TB patients showed additional resistance to pyrazinamide (PZA) (35.7%), any second-line injectable drug (19.3%), and any fluoroquinolone (26.2%). Extensively drug resistant TB comprised 12.4% (n = 47) of the MDR-TB patients. Of 378 MDR-TB patients, 50.3% (n = 190) were eligible for the shorter MDR-TB regimen, and 50.0% (n = 189) were fully susceptible to the 5 drugs comprising the standard conventional regimen (PZA, kanamycin, ofloxoacin, prothionamide, and cycloserine). In conclusion, the proportion of new patients and the levels of additional drug resistance were high in MDR-TB patients. Considering the high levels of drug resistance, the shorter MDR-TB treatment regimen may not be feasible; instead, an individually tailored regimen based on the results of molecular and phenotypic DST may be more appropriate in MDR-TB patients in Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  9. Carbon doped PDMS: conductance stability over time and implications for additive manufacturing of stretchable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Mahmoud; Rocha, Rui; Osorio, Luis; Almeida, Miguel; de Almeida, Anibal; Ramachandran, Vivek; Tabatabai, Arya; Lu, Tong; Majidi, Carmel

    2017-03-01

    Carbon doped PDMS (cPDMS), has been used as a conductive polymer for stretchable electronics. Compared to liquid metals, cPDMS is low cost and is easier to process or to print with an additive manufacturing process. However, changes on the conductance of the carbon based conductive PDMS (cPDMS) were observed over time, in particular after integration of cPDMS and the insulating polymer. In this article we investigate the process parameters that lead to improved stability over conductance of the cPDMS over time. Slight modifications to the fabrication process parameters were conducted and changes on the conductance of the samples for each method were monitored. Results suggested that change of the conductance happens mostly after integration of a pre-polymer over a cured cPDMS, and not after integration of the cPDMS over a cured insulating polymer. We show that such changes can be eliminated by adjusting the integration priority between the conductive and insulating polymers, by selecting the right curing temperature, changing the concentration of the carbon particles and the thickness of the conductive traces, and when possible by changing the insulating polymer material. In this way, we obtained important conclusions regarding the effect of these parameters on the change of the conductance over time, that should be considered for additive manufacturing of soft electronics. Also, we show that these changes can be possibly due to the diffusion from PDMS into cPDMS.

  10. Removal of sulfamethoxazole by electrochemically activated sulfate: Implications of chloride addition.

    PubMed

    Radjenovic, Jelena; Petrovic, Mira

    2017-07-05

    Electrochemical oxidation is considered to be an attractive alternative to chemical oxidation for the treatment of polluted water. Given the of ability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes to generate hydroxyl radicals (OH), they are often selected for the degradation of persistent organic contaminants. Recently, BDD anodes have been demonstrated to form strong oxidants, sulfate radicals (SO4(-)), directly from sulfate ions. In this study, electrochemical activation of sulfate to SO4(-) at BDD anodes enhanced the removal of an antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (SMX). The rate of SMX oxidation was 6 times higher in sulfate anolyte compared to inert nitrate anolyte. Addition of chloride accelerated the disappearance of SMX in both anolytes due to electrochlorination. Yet, mineralization efficiency was decreased, particularly in Na2SO4 anolyte due to the scavenging of SO4(-) by Cl(-). Electrogenerated SO4(-) yielded nitroso- and nitro-derivatives, which were not observed in the absence of sulfate. The peak intensities of chlorinated TPs were three orders of magnitude lower in Na2SO4 than in NaNO3 anolyte, suggesting that addition of sulfate may lower the formation of chlorinated organics. However, attention should be paid to the formation of inorganic byproducts, as the formation rates of toxic chlorate and in particular perchlorate were higher in Na2SO4 anolyte. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Genome-wide Association Study of Dupuytren Disease Reveals 17 Additional Variants Implicated in Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michael; Thakkar, Dipti; Southam, Lorraine; Werker, Paul; Ophoff, Roel; Becker, Kerstin; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre; Nürnberg, Peter; Espirito-Santo, Ana Isabel; Izadi, David; Hennies, Hans Christian; Nanchahal, Jagdeep; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Furniss, Dominic

    2017-09-07

    Individuals with Dupuytren disease (DD) are commonly seen by physicians and surgeons across multiple specialties. It is an increasingly common and disabling fibroproliferative disorder of the palmar fascia, which leads to flexion contractures of the digits, and is associated with other tissue-specific fibroses. DD affects between 5% and 25% of people of European descent and is the most common inherited disease of connective tissue. We undertook the largest GWAS to date in individuals with a surgically validated diagnosis of DD from the UK, with replication in British, Dutch, and German individuals. We validated association at all nine previously described signals and discovered 17 additional variants with p ≤ 5 × 10(-8). As a proof of principle, we demonstrated correlation of the high-risk genotype at the statistically most strongly associated variant with decreased secretion of the soluble WNT-antagonist SFRP4, in surgical specimen-derived DD myofibroblasts. These results highlight important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of fibrosis, including WNT signaling, extracellular matrix modulation, and inflammation. In addition, many associated loci contain genes that were hitherto unrecognized as playing a role in fibrosis, opening up new avenues of research that may lead to novel treatments for DD and fibrosis more generally. DD represents an ideal human model disease for fibrosis research. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of char quality for ecosystem functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiluweit, M.; Nico, P. S.; Johnson, M. G.; Kleber, M.

    2009-12-01

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since biochar is a highly aromatic organic material such additions will modify the native molecular structure of soil organic matter and thus alter interactions with the global atmosphere and hydrosphere. Here we present a molecular level assessment of the physical organization and chemical complexity of biomass-derived chars and, specifically, that of aromatic carbon in char structures. Differences among wood and grass charred at temperatures from 100 to 700°C are investigated. BET-N2 surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy results demonstrate how the two plant precursor materials undergo analogous, but quantitatively different physical-chemical transitions as charring intensity increases. These changes suggest the existence of four distinct physical and chemical categories of char. We find that each category of char consists of a unique mixture of chemical phases and physical states: (i) in transition chars the crystalline character of the precursor materials is preserved, (ii) in amorphous chars the heat-altered molecules and incipient aromatic polycondensates are randomly mixed, (iii) composite chars consist of poorly ordered graphene stacks embedded in amorphous phases, and (iv) turbostratic chars are dominated by turbostratic (disordered) graphitic crystallites. There is wide variation in both the chemical and the physical nature of aromatic carbon among these char categories. In this presentation we will point out how molecular variations among the aromatic components of the different char categories translate into differences in their ability to: (i) persist in the

  13. Additionality and permanence standards in California's Forest Offset Protocol: A review of project and program level implications.

    PubMed

    Ruseva, T; Marland, E; Szymanski, C; Hoyle, J; Marland, G; Kowalczyk, T

    2017-08-01

    A key component of California's cap-and-trade program is the use of carbon offsets as compliance instruments for reducing statewide GHG emissions. Under this program, offsets are tradable credits representing real, verifiable, quantifiable, enforceable, permanent, and additional reductions or removals of GHG emissions. This paper focuses on the permanence and additionality standards for offset credits as defined and operationalized in California's Compliance Offset Protocol for U.S. Forest Projects. Drawing on a review of the protocol, interviews, current offset projects, and existing literature, we discuss how additionality and permanence standards relate to project participation and overall program effectiveness. Specifically, we provide an overview of offset credits as compliance instruments in California's cap-and-trade program, the timeline for a forest offset project, and the factors shaping participation in offset projects. We then discuss the implications of permanence and additionality at both the project and program levels. Largely consistent with previous work, we find that stringent standards for permanent and additional project activities can present barriers to participation, but also, that there may be a trade-off between project quality and quantity (i.e. levels of participation) when considering overall program effectiveness. We summarize what this implies for California's forest offset program and provide suggestions for improvements in light of potential program diffusion and policy learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiographic signs and symptoms in children treated for tuberculosis: possible implications for symptom-based screening in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Gie, Robert P; Hesseling, Anneke C; Schaaf, H Simon; Enarson, Donald A; Beyers, Nulda

    2006-03-01

    The World Health Organization advises active tracing of children younger than 5 years old in household contact with a sputum smear-positive tuberculosis index case. This study compared radiographic disease manifestations in 2 groups of children treated for tuberculosis in an endemic setting: those who presented with suspicious symptoms; and those actively traced as household contacts of an adult index case. We conducted a prospective descriptive study from February 2003 through October 2004 at 5 primary health care clinics in Cape Town South Africa, including all children (younger than 5 years old) treated for tuberculosis (TB). A total of 326 children (younger than 5 years old) received antituberculosis treatment; 190 (58.3%) presented with suspicious symptoms, and 136 (41.7%) were actively traced contacts. Children were categorized as; "not TB" 71 (22%), intrathoracic tuberculosis 230 (70%) and extrathoracic tuberculosis 25 (8%). Significantly more actively traced contacts were categorized as "not TB" (odds ratio, 7.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.8-14.3), or demonstrated elements of the primary complex only on the chest radiograph (odds ratio, 26.2; 95% confidence interval, 8.6-89.2), compared with children who presented with suspicious symptoms. Of all children diagnosed with intrathoracic tuberculosis, 20 of 230 (9%) reported no symptoms, all of whom demonstrated elements of the primary complex only. The majority of actively traced contacts had minimal disease. Symptom-based screening would have identified all but 9% of children diagnosed with intrathoracic tuberculosis, all of whom demonstrated elements of the primary complex only. Further investigation is required to establish whether symptom-based screening can be justified to improve access to preventive chemotherapy in resource-limited endemic settings.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases through February 2011. Twenty-four publications met inclusion criteria for synthetic food colors; 10 additional studies informed analysis of dietary restriction. A random-effects meta-analytic model generated summary effect sizes. Results Restriction diets reduced ADHD symptoms at an effect of g = 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07–0.53). For food colors, parent reports yielded an effect size of g = 0.18 (95% CI, 0.08–0.24; p = .0007), which decreased to 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01–0.23; p < .05) after adjustment for possible publication bias. The effect was reliable in studies restricted to food color additives (g = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06–0.36) but did not survive correction for possible publication bias and was not reliable in studies confined to Food and Drug Administration–approved food colors. Teacher/observer reports yielded a nonsignificant effect of 0.07 (95% CI = −0.03 to 0.18; p = .14). However, high-quality studies confined to color additives yielded a reliable effect (g = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.10–0.41, p = .030) that survived correction. In psychometric tests of attention, the summary effect size was 0.27 (95% CI = 0.07–0.47; p = .007) and survived correction. An estimated 8% of children with ADHD may have symptoms related to synthetic food colors. Conclusions A restriction diet benefits some children with ADHD. Effects of food colors were notable were but susceptible to publication bias or were derived from small, nongeneralizable samples. Renewed investigation of diet and ADHD is warranted. PMID:22176942

  16. Meta-analysis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel T; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases through February 2011. Twenty-four publications met inclusion criteria for synthetic food colors; 10 additional studies informed analysis of dietary restriction. A random-effects meta-analytic model generated summary effect sizes. Restriction diets reduced ADHD symptoms at an effect of g = 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07-0.53). For food colors, parent reports yielded an effect size of g = 0.18 (95% CI, 0.08-0.24; p = .0007), which decreased to 0.12 (95% CI, 0.01-0.23; p < .05) after adjustment for possible publication bias. The effect was reliable in studies restricted to food color additives (g = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06-0.36) but did not survive correction for possible publication bias and was not reliable in studies confined to Food and Drug Administration-approved food colors. Teacher/observer reports yielded a nonsignificant effect of 0.07 (95% CI = -0.03 to 0.18; p = .14). However, high-quality studies confined to color additives yielded a reliable effect (g = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.10-0.41, p = .030) that survived correction. In psychometric tests of attention, the summary effect size was 0.27 (95% CI = 0.07-0.47; p = .007) and survived correction. An estimated 8% of children with ADHD may have symptoms related to synthetic food colors. A restriction diet benefits some children with ADHD. Effects of food colors were notable were but susceptible to publication bias or were derived from small, nongeneralizable samples. Renewed investigation of diet and ADHD is warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Symptoms and Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients at Diagnosis of Incurability - Prevalences, Clinical Implications, and Feasibility of a Prospective Longitudinal Multicenter Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Alt-Epping, Bernd; Seidel, Wiebke; Vogt, Jeannette; Mehnert, Anja; Thomas, Michael; van Oorschot, Birgitt; Wolff, Hendrik; Schliephake, Henning; Canis, Martin; Dröge, Leif H; Nauck, Friedemann; Lordick, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the physical symptoms and psychosocial burden of patients at the time of diagnosis of an incurable situation, although cancer treatment guidelines demand early assessment and integration of palliative care concepts, beginning from the diagnosis of incurability. Therefore, we initiated a prospective longitudinal multicenter cohort study assessing the symptoms and needs of patients suffering from incurable cancer (various entities), from the time of diagnosing incurability (i.e., before palliative anticancer treatment was initiated) and in 3-monthly intervals thereafter, by using validated self-reporting tools. Here, we focus on patients with head and neck cancer and present preliminary results on symptoms and need prevalences, on clinical implications, and on the feasibility of a methodologically complex assessment procedure in a particularly vulnerable study population. 22 patients completed the first visit. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scores and most physical symptoms and psychosocial items varied between the extremes, from a virtually uncompromised condition to extremely perceived symptoms and needs. If intense face-to-face study support was provided, the study concept proved to be feasible, despite the complexity of assessment, problems in interdisciplinary and patient communication, comorbidities, and early death from complications. The striking variability in the perceived symptom and need intensities requires a highly individualized approach. For clinical purposes, a less complex screening procedure would be desirable, in order to enable a routine, early and comprehensive support, including palliative care services. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  18. Symptoms of Mental Health Problems: Children's and Adolescents' Understandings and Implications for Gender Differences in Help Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Alice; Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Amidst concerns that young people's mental health is deteriorating, it is important to explore their understandings of symptoms of mental health problems and beliefs around help seeking. Drawing on focus group data from Scottish school pupils, we demonstrate how they understood symptoms of mental health problems and how their characterisations of…

  19. Symptoms of Mental Health Problems: Children's and Adolescents' Understandings and Implications for Gender Differences in Help Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Alice; Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Amidst concerns that young people's mental health is deteriorating, it is important to explore their understandings of symptoms of mental health problems and beliefs around help seeking. Drawing on focus group data from Scottish school pupils, we demonstrate how they understood symptoms of mental health problems and how their characterisations of…

  20. Sex differences in self-reported symptoms after aerobic exercise in non-injured athletes: implications for concussion management programmes.

    PubMed

    Gaetz, M B; Iverson, G L

    2009-07-01

    After a concussion, when symptoms have decreased substantially at rest, it is recommended that athletes begin light aerobic exercise before progressing to sport specific exercise. The British Columbia Concussion Rehabilitation Programme (BC-CRP) uses a standardized cognitive and exercise test protocol designed to indicate when an athlete should progress to sport-specific exercise after a concussion. To document the effects of exercise on symptom reporting in healthy, uninjured, male and female amateur athletes. Quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test, nonequivalent groups design. Before the exercise protocol, 45 female and 30 male young amateur athletes completed computerized cognitive testing, symptom ratings and balance testing. The 15-minute cycle ergometry protocol, conducted at 90 revolutions/minute, was as follows: 0-2 minutes at 0 W tension, 2-5 minutes at 50 W, 5-8 minutes at 100 W, 8-11 minutes at 150 W and 11-14 minutes at 200 W tension followed by a 1-minute cooling-down period. After exercise, participants completed symptom ratings, balance testing and perceived exertion ratings. Self-reported symptoms were assessed using an abbreviated version of the Post-Concussion Scale. Significant increases in self-reported balance problems, numbness and tingling were seen for both genders after aerobic exercise. For women, emotional symptoms such as irritability, sadness, nervousness and feeling more emotional decreased significantly after aerobic exercise. Headache also decreased in the women, but no significant change was seen in the men. Sex differences exist for symptom reporting after aerobic exercise. Both genders report increases in somatic symptoms, but only women report decreases in emotional symptoms. The concept of being "asymptomatic" after exercise should be reconsidered to include expected mild increases and decreases in certain symptoms.

  1. [Food additives as a cause of medical symptoms: relationship shown between sulfites and asthma and anaphylaxis; results of a literature review].

    PubMed

    Reus, K E; Houben, G F; Stam, M; Dubois, A E

    2000-09-16

    To determine if a causal connection exists between food additives and various medical complaints. Literature study. Medline over the period January 1966-January 1999 was searched for articles on the following substances not containing protein and lactose: monosodium glutamate (MSG), sulfites, azo-dyes (tartrazine, sunset yellow, azorubin, amarant, cochineal red), benzoates, sorbates, butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHA/BHT), parabens, cinnamon and vanilla, in combination with key words regarding food and side effects. Of those studies purporting to demonstrate an effect, only double-blind randomized placebo-controlled studies with oral challenge were assessed further, unless the complaint was anaphylaxis. Of studies not demonstrating an effect the design was assessed. Only for sulfites as causative agents of asthma and anaphylaxis, methodologically adequate studies demonstrating a causal connection could be found. For azo-dyes, benzoates, MSG, sorbates and BHA/BHT, no link with medical symptoms was demonstrable. For parabens, cinnamon and vanilla there were insufficient or inadequate data to justify a conclusion.

  2. Antipsychotic, antidepressant, and cognitive-impairment properties of antipsychotics: rat profile and implications for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Wesołowska, Anna; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioral and psychological symptoms (BPSD), including psychosis and depression. Although antipsychotics are frequently prescribed off-label, they can have marked side effects. In addition, comparative preclinical studies of their effects are surprisingly scarce, and strategies for discovery of novel pharmacotherapeutics are lacking. We therefore compared eight antipsychotics in rat behavioral tests of psychosis, antidepressant-like activity, and cognitive impairment as a basis for preclinical evaluation of new drug candidates. The methods used in this study include inhibition of MK-801-induced hyperactivity, forced swim test (FST), passive avoidance (PA), spontaneous locomotor activity, and catalepsy. The drugs exhibited antipsychotic-like activity in the MK-801 test but with diverse profiles in the other models. Risperidone impaired PA performance, but with some dose separation versus its actions in the MK-801 test. In contrast, clozapine, olanzapine, lurasidone, and asenapine showed little or no dose separation in these tests. Aripiprazole did not impair PA performance but was poorly active in the MK-801 test. Diverse effects were also observed in the FST: chlorpromazine was inactive and most other drugs reduced immobility over narrow dose ranges, whereas clozapine reduced immobility over a wider dose range, overlapping with antipsychotic activity. Although the propensity of second-generation antipsychotics to produce catalepsy was lower, they all elicited pronounced sedation. Consistent with clinical data, most currently available second-generation antipsychotics induced cognitive and motor side effects with little separation from therapeutic-like doses. This study provides a uniform in vivo comparative basis on which to evaluate future early-stage drug candidates intended for potential pharmacotherapy of BPSD.

  3. Perceived social support buffers the impact of PTSD symptoms on suicidal behavior: implications into suicide resilience research.

    PubMed

    Panagioti, M; Gooding, P A; Taylor, P J; Tarrier, N

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research has highlighted the importance of identifying resilience factors against suicidal behavior. However, no previous study has investigated potential resilience factors among individuals with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to examine whether perceived social support buffered the impact of PTSD symptoms on suicidal behavior. Fifty-six individuals who had previously been exposed to a traumatic event and reported PTSD symptoms in the past month (n = 34, 60.7% participants met the full criteria for a current PTSD diagnosis) completed a range of self-report measures assessing PTSD symptoms, perceived social support and suicidal behavior. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine whether perceived social support moderates the effects of PTSD symptoms on suicidal behavior. The results showed that perceived social support moderated the impact of the number and severity of PTSD symptoms on suicidal behavior. For those who perceived themselves as having high levels of social support, an increased number and severity of PTSD symptoms were less likely to lead to suicidal behavior. The current findings suggest that perceived social support might confer resilience to individuals with PTSD and counter the development of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The milieu of social support potentially provides an area of further research and an important aspect to incorporate into clinical interventions for suicidal behavior in PTSD or trauma populations. © 2013.

  4. Non-Additive Voltametric Currents From a Mixture of Two, Three and Four Redox-Active Compounds and Electroanalytical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dass, Amala; Oh, Woon Su; Gao, Xue-Rong; Rawashdeh, Abdel M.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    We have published recently the effect of dissimilar diffusion coefficients on the size of the voltammetric waves from a mixture of two redox-active compounds. Similarly, at the potential range where three redox-active species, decamethylferrocene (dMeFc), ferrocene (Fc) and N-methylphenothiazine (MePTZ), are oxidized simultaneously with rates controlled by linear diffusion, electrogenerated radicals diffusing outwards from the electrode react with the original species diffusing towards the electrode from the bulk; thus, Fc(+) reacts with dMeFc producing Fc and dMeFc(+), while MePTZ(+) reacts both with dMeFc producing MePTZ and dMeFc(+), and with Fc producing MePTZ and Fc(+). These reactions replace dMeFc with Fc at the second plateau, and both dMeFc and Fc with MePTZ at the third plateau. Since the diffusion coefficients of the three species are not equal, the mass-transfer limited currents of the second and the third oxidation wave plateaus change by approx. 10%. Numerical simulations of the experimental voltamograms support this mechanism. Similar results were also obtained for a mixture of four redoxactive compounds. The implications of this non-additive nature of currents on: (a) the use of internal voltammetric standards for quantitative analysis of a mixture of redox-active compounds; and, (b) the half wave potentials (E1/2) of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th waves for qualitative analysis, will be discussed.

  5. Effects of additional repeated sprint training during preseason on performance, heart rate variability, and stress symptoms in futsal players: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio F; de Souza, Eberton A; de Freitas, Victor H; de Moraes, Solange M F; Leicht, Anthony S; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether supplementing regular preseason futsal training with weekly sessions of repeated sprints (RS) training would have positive effects on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and field test performance. Thirteen players from a professional futsal team (22.6 ± 6.7 years, 72.8 ± 8.7 kg, 173.2 ± 6.2 cm) were divided randomly into 2 groups (AddT: n = 6 and normal training group: n = 7). Both groups performed a RSA test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYo IR1), squat (SJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), body composition, and heart rate variability (HRV) measures at rest before and after 4 weeks of preseason training. Athletes weekly stress symptoms were recorded by psychometric responses using the Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes questionnaire and subjective ratings of well-being scale, respectively. The daily training load (arbitrary units) was assessed using the session of rating perceived exertion method. After the preseason training, there were no significant changes for body composition, SJ, CMJ, and RSAbest. The YoYo IR1, RSAmean, RSAworst, and RSAdecreament were significantly improved for both groups (p ≤ 0.05). The HRV parameters improved significantly within both groups (p ≤ 0.05) except for high frequency (HF, absolute and normalized units, [n.u.]), low frequency (LF) (n.u.), and the LF/HF ratio. A moderate effect size for the AddT group was observed for resting heart rate and several HRV measures. Training load and psychometric responses were similar between both groups. Additional RS training resulted in slightly greater positive changes for vagal-related HRV with similar improvements in performance and training stress during the preseason training in futsal players.

  6. Childhood trauma exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan war era veterans: implications for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and adult functional social support.

    PubMed

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E; Dedert, Eric A; Calhoun, Patrick S; Brancu, Mira; Runnals, Jennifer; Beckham, Jean C

    2012-05-01

    This study examined the relationship among childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and adult social support in a large sample of veterans who served in the military after 09/11/2001, with a specific focus on the potential role of the PTSD avoidance and numbing cluster as intervening in the association between childhood abuse and adult functional social support. Participants were 1,301 veterans and active duty soldiers who have served in the military since 09/11/2001; a subsample of these participants (n=482) completed an inventory of current functional social support. Analyses included linear regression and nonparametric bootstrapping procedures. After controlling for combat exposure, exposure to childhood trauma was associated with PTSD symptoms in adulthood. Further, PTSD symptoms, and particularly PTSD avoidance/numbing cluster symptoms, intervened in the relationship between childhood trauma and adult functional social support. Findings support the association of childhood trauma (both abuse related and other, non-abuse related trauma) with PTSD symptoms in military personnel and veterans, even after accounting for combat exposure. Additionally, the avoidance and numbing symptom cluster of childhood trauma-based PTSD may be particularly salient in compromising one's subsequent ability to garner functional social support in adulthood. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K.; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P.; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa. PMID:26731612

  8. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa.

  9. D-cycloserine increases positive symptoms in chronic schizophrenic patients when administered in addition to antipsychotics: a double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    van Berckel, B N; Evenblij, C N; van Loon, B J; Maas, M F; van der Geld, M A; Wynne, H J; van Ree, J M; Kahn, R S

    1999-08-01

    A hypofunction of the glutamatergic system and NMDA receptors in schizophrenia has been hypothesized. Therefore, stimulation of these receptors could be of benefit to patients with schizophrenia. D-cycloserine has been used for this purpose. This study reports the effects of 100 mg D-cycloserine, when added to typical antipsychotics in chronic schizophrenic patients exhibiting prominent negative symptoms, using a placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel, design. D-cycloserine slightly worsened psychotic symptoms and general psychopathology as compared to placebo. D-cycloserine failed to change negative symptoms and had no effect on extrapyramidal symptoms. The exacerbation of schizophrenic symptoms may be explained by the antagonistic effects of this dose of D-cycloserine at the glycine recognition site of the NMDA receptor due to competition with the endogenous agonist glycine. Another explanation for the increase in psychopathology may be an interaction with the effects of antipsychotics on NMDA mediated neurotransmission. Thus, D-cycloserine in this study did not ameliorate schizophrenic symptoms. However, the fact that they actually worsened suggests that NMDA systems may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Further placebo-controlled studies with lower dosages of D-cycloserine, preferably in drug-free patients, are necessary to evaluate if D-cycloserine is of use for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia.

  10. Relations Between Third Grade Teachers' Depressive Symptoms and Their Feedback to Students, With Implications for Student Mathematics Achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2017-08-31

    Recent studies have observed connections among teachers' depressive symptoms and student outcomes; however, the specific mechanisms through which teachers' mental health characteristics operate in the classroom remain largely unknown. The present study used student-level observation methods to examine the relations between third-grade teachers' (N = 32) depressive symptoms and their academic feedback to students (N = 310) and sought to make inferences about how these factors might influence students' mathematics achievement. A novel observational tool, the Teacher Feedback Coding System-Academic (TFCS-A), was used that assesses feedback across 2 dimensions-teacher affect and instructional strategy, which have been shown to be important to student learning. Multilevel exploratory factor analysis of TFCS-A data suggested 2 primary factors: positive feedback and neutral/negative feedback. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that positive feedback was related to higher math achievement among students who began the year with weaker math skills and that teachers who reported more depressive symptoms less frequently provided this positive feedback. Results offer new information about a type of instruction that may be affected by teachers' depressive symptoms and inform efforts aimed at improving teachers' instructional interactions with students. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Psychosocial Symptoms and Poor Insight as Predictors of Homicidality among Clients with Psychosis: Implications for Counseling Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether psychological symptoms, negative social events, treatment-related information, and degree of insight into one's illness predicted current homicidality in a population of clients with psychosis (N = 170). Multiple regression analyses revealed that homicidality can be reliably predicted when clients…

  12. Psychosocial Symptoms and Poor Insight as Predictors of Homicidality among Clients with Psychosis: Implications for Counseling Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether psychological symptoms, negative social events, treatment-related information, and degree of insight into one's illness predicted current homicidality in a population of clients with psychosis (N = 170). Multiple regression analyses revealed that homicidality can be reliably predicted when clients…

  13. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  14. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  15. Longitudinal Prediction of the One-Year Course of Preschool ADHD Symptoms: Implications for Models of Temperament-ADHD Associations

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Michelle M.; Gremillion, Monica L.; Roberts, Bethan A.; Zastrow, Brittany L.; Tackett, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is often conceptualized as an extreme trait, there remains controversy about the best way to understand associations between temperament traits and ADHD. The current study examines longitudinal associations between temperament traits and ADHD during early childhood in order to critically examine vulnerability and spectrum models of trait—ADHD associations. Study participants were 109 children between the ages of 3 and 6 and their primary caregivers and teachers/daycare providers, community-recruited for ADHD-related problems. Primary caregivers completed the Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorders Schedule semi-structured diagnostic interview at the initial appointment and one year later. At the initial appointment, primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Questionnaire as a measure of child temperament traits. Results from the initial time point indicated that high neuroticism and high surgency were associated with inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms, and low effortful control was associated with hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms. However, none of these traits predicted the one-year course of ADHD symptoms. Results are more consistent with a spectrum (vs. vulnerability) model of trait-psychopathology associations, suggesting that traits, but may not influence longitudinal course during early childhood. PMID:25598568

  16. Longitudinal Prediction of the One-Year Course of Preschool ADHD Symptoms: Implications for Models of Temperament-ADHD Associations.

    PubMed

    Martel, Michelle M; Gremillion, Monica L; Roberts, Bethan A; Zastrow, Brittany L; Tackett, Jennifer L

    2014-07-01

    Despite the fact that Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is often conceptualized as an extreme trait, there remains controversy about the best way to understand associations between temperament traits and ADHD. The current study examines longitudinal associations between temperament traits and ADHD during early childhood in order to critically examine vulnerability and spectrum models of trait-ADHD associations. Study participants were 109 children between the ages of 3 and 6 and their primary caregivers and teachers/daycare providers, community-recruited for ADHD-related problems. Primary caregivers completed the Kiddie Disruptive Behavior Disorders Schedule semi-structured diagnostic interview at the initial appointment and one year later. At the initial appointment, primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Questionnaire as a measure of child temperament traits. Results from the initial time point indicated that high neuroticism and high surgency were associated with inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms, and low effortful control was associated with hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms. However, none of these traits predicted the one-year course of ADHD symptoms. Results are more consistent with a spectrum (vs. vulnerability) model of trait-psychopathology associations, suggesting that traits, but may not influence longitudinal course during early childhood.

  17. The role of spousal loss in the development of depressive symptoms in the elderly - implications for diagnostic systems.

    PubMed

    Sikorski, Claudia; Luppa, Melanie; Heser, Kathrin; Ernst, Annette; Lange, Carolin; Werle, Jochen; Bickel, Horst; Mösch, Edelgard; Wiese, Birgitt; Prokein, Jana; Fuchs, Angela; Pentzek, Michael; König, Hans-Helmut; Brettschneider, Christian; Scherer, Martin; Maier, Wolfgang; Weyerer, Siegfried; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2014-06-01

    In the revised version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) the Mood Disorder Workgroup for DSM-V the bereavement exclusion criterion for the diagnosis of major depression has been eliminated. To investigate the impact of bereavement on the incidence of depression and depressive symptoms in the elderly. Participants over 75 years from the longitudinal German Study on Ageing, Cognition, and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe) that were still married at baseline were investigated (n=1,193). Data from four follow-ups (time frame: 6 years) were investigated. The response rate at baseline was 50.3%. Three clinical endpoints were analyzed: depressive symptoms according to Geriatric Depression Scale (1) GDS≥6, (2) GDS≥10, and (3) Major Depression (MD). The effect of loss was investigated using random-effects regression models. Experiencing a loss of spouse was predictive of a higher incidence in GDS≥6 (OR 4.52, 95% CI 2.6-7.9) and 10 (OR 5.59, 95% CI 1.8-17.0) even after adjusting for age, gender, impairment at baseline, and GDS score at baseline. Associations with MD were not significant (OR 1.77, 96% CI 0.9-3.5). Older adults experiencing the loss of their spouse are more likely to display elevated levels of depressive symptoms, that may reach a concerning level of severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effort-related motivational effects of the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine: implications for animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Hart, Evan E; Freeland, Charlotte; Yohn, Samantha E; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; López-Cruz, Laura; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-12-04

    Motivated behaviors are often characterized by a high degree of behavioral activation, and work output and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon cost/benefit analyses. Moreover, people with major depression and other disorders often show effort-related motivational symptoms such as anergia, psychomotor retardation, and fatigue. It has been suggested that tasks measuring effort-related choice behavior could be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT) inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine produces depressive symptoms in humans and, because of its selective inhibition of VMAT-2, it preferentially depletes dopamine (DA). Rats were assessed using a concurrent fixed-ratio 5/chow feeding choice task that is known to be sensitive to dopaminergic manipulations. Tetrabenazine shifted response choice in rats, producing a dose-related decrease in lever pressing and a concomitant increase in chow intake. However, it did not alter food intake or preference in parallel free-feeding choice studies. The effects of tetrabenazine on effort-related choice were reversed by the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 and the antidepressant bupropion. A behaviorally active dose of tetrabenazine decreased extracellular DA in nucleus accumbens and increased expression of DARPP-32 in accumbens medium spiny neurons in a pattern indicative of reduced transmission at both D1 and D2 DA receptors. These experiments demonstrate that tetrabenazine, which is used in animal models to produce depression-like effects, can alter effort-related choice behavior. These studies have implications for the development of animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression and related disorders.

  19. Effort-Related Motivational Effects of the VMAT-2 Inhibitor Tetrabenazine: Implications for Animal Models of the Motivational Symptoms of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Eric J.; Randall, Patrick A.; Hart, Evan E.; Freeland, Charlotte; Yohn, Samantha E.; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; López-Cruz, Laura; Correa, Mercè

    2013-01-01

    Motivated behaviors are often characterized by a high degree of behavioral activation, and work output and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon cost/benefit analyses. Moreover, people with major depression and other disorders often show effort-related motivational symptoms such as anergia, psychomotor retardation, and fatigue. It has been suggested that tasks measuring effort-related choice behavior could be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT) inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine produces depressive symptoms in humans and, because of its selective inhibition of VMAT-2, it preferentially depletes dopamine (DA). Rats were assessed using a concurrent fixed-ratio 5/chow feeding choice task that is known to be sensitive to dopaminergic manipulations. Tetrabenazine shifted response choice in rats, producing a dose-related decrease in lever pressing and a concomitant increase in chow intake. However, it did not alter food intake or preference in parallel free-feeding choice studies. The effects of tetrabenazine on effort-related choice were reversed by the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 and the antidepressant bupropion. A behaviorally active dose of tetrabenazine decreased extracellular DA in nucleus accumbens and increased expression of DARPP-32 in accumbens medium spiny neurons in a pattern indicative of reduced transmission at both D1 and D2 DA receptors. These experiments demonstrate that tetrabenazine, which is used in animal models to produce depression-like effects, can alter effort-related choice behavior. These studies have implications for the development of animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression and related disorders. PMID:24305809

  20. Clinician perspectives on symptom and quality of life experiences of patients during cancer therapies: Implications for eHealth.

    PubMed

    Berry, Donna L; Nayak, Manan M; Abrahm, Janet L; Braun, Ilana; Rabin, Michael S; Cooley, Mary E

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore clinician experiences with cancer symptom and quality of life (SQL) management from diagnosis throughout therapy in the ambulatory setting, plus identify preferences for a future SQL decision support system. Eligible clinicians worked in ambulatory cancer care with responsibility for direct patient care. Focus groups were conducted to discuss symptom management throughout the treatment experience and features desired in a future decision support system. Each group was audio-recorded, transcribed, de-identified, and entered into NVivo 9 for analysis. Open and axial coding was completed, grouping common concepts into nodes; large constructs among the nodes were identified and main messages were synthesized. A total of 118 clinicians were contacted by email resulting in a final sample of 51 attending 1 of 9 focus groups. Clinicians described a standard face-to-face approach to assessment of SQL, before and throughout therapy. Preparing patients for expected symptoms and approaches to management included paper-based patient education materials and referrals. Communicating with patients between visits was covered in detail, notably use of telephone and email. Future system features desired by the clinicians included an electronic, Web-based system with real-time, trended data, reasonable alerts, and tailored information for patients. Cancer care specialists reported strategies to assess and manage cancer SQL in ambulatory care including patient-reported outcome measures, contact communication modes, face-to-face interviews, and paper-based patient education materials. Future system features desired by clinicians included an electronic, Web-based system with real-time, trended data, reasonable alerts, and tailored information for patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dilated common bile duct in opium addicts with and without biliary symptoms --implication for research in AIDS cholangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Chuah, S Y; Leong, C K; Pang, C W

    2003-05-01

    Opium addicts (OA) with no biliary symptoms have been shown to have dilated common bile duct (CBD). Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) without biliary drainage in such asymptomatic OA is hazardous. Hence it is not indicated unless there are clear clinical and laboratory evidences of biliary stasis. To show that even when matched with controls with the same clinical diagnosis of the biliary system, OA still have significantly larger CBD diameters and that OA with biliary symptoms should be treated no differently from non-OA with biliary symptoms. Seven OA (all Chinese males), four of whom had undergone ERCP (three for CBD stones and one for ampullary carcinoma), were compared, using t-test, to 7 age, sex, race and diagnosis-matched controls, four of whom had also undergone ERCP (three for CBD stones and one for ampullary carcinoma). When ERCP was not done, ultrasonography was used to assess the biliary system and measure the CBD diameter. The mean (SD) CBD diameters of OA and controls were 15.7 mm (5.65) and 8.3 mm (5.95) respectively (t = 2.399, p = 0.032). The mean (SD) weight of OA and controls were 55.8 kg (9.22) and 57.3 kg (9.21) respectively (t = -0.305, p = 0.763). Only two of the seven OA were born in China, the remaining five in Malaysia. OA do get CBD pathology like non-OA and if indicated there should be no qualms about performing ERCP in them. When matched for age, sex, race and clinical diagnosis, OA still have a significantly larger CBD despite no difference in body weight.

  2. Prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV and respiratory symptoms in two Zambian communities: implications for tuberculosis control in the era of HIV.

    PubMed

    Ayles, Helen; Schaap, Albertus; Nota, Amos; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Tembwe, Ruth; De Haas, Petra; Muyoyeta, Monde; Beyers, Nulda

    2009-01-01

    The Stop TB Partnership target for tuberculosis is to have reduced the prevalence of tuberculosis by 50% comparing 2015 to 1990. This target is challenging as few prevalence surveys have been conducted, especially in high burden tuberculosis and HIV countries. Current tuberculosis control strategies in high HIV prevalent settings are therefore based on limited epidemiological evidence and more evidence is needed from community-based surveys to inform improved policy formulation. 8044 adults were sampled from 2 sub-districts (wards) in Lusaka province, Zambia. Questionnaires were used to screen for symptoms, respiratory samples were obtained for culture and oral secretions collected for HIV testing. 79 individuals were found to have Mycobacterium tuberculosis in their sputum, giving an adjusted overall prevalence of tuberculosis of 870/100,000 (95% CI 570-1160/100,000). The adjusted overall prevalence of HIV was 28.61% (95% CI 26.04-31.19). HIV- infection was significantly associated with prevalent tuberculosis (Adj OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.42-3.74) and the population attributable fraction of HIV for prevalent tuberculosis was 36%. Symptoms such as prolonged cough (adj OR 12.72, 95% CI 7.05-22.94) and fever (Adj OR 2.04, 95%CI 1.23-3.39), were associated with prevalent tuberculosis, but 8 (10%) individuals with prevalent tuberculosis denied having any symptoms at all and only 34 (43%) would have been classified as a TB suspect by current guidelines. Undiagnosed tuberculosis is a challenge for tuberculosis control and new approaches are needed if we are to reach international targets. Epidemiological studies can inform screening algorithms for both detection and prevention of active tuberculosis.

  3. Disclosure of Sexual Assault: Characteristics and Implications for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Among African American and Caucasian Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Tkatch, Rifky; Abbey, Antonia; Wegner, Rhiana

    2010-01-01

    Although the general trauma literature links disclosure of abuse to positive psychological and physical health outcomes, findings for sexual assault survivors are mixed. Supportive responses can reaffirm self-worth; however, negative responses can increase feelings of shame and isolation. This study examined the effects of disclosure in a community sample of Caucasian and African American sexual assault survivors who completed computer-assisted self-interviews. Among the 58.6% of survivors who had disclosed to someone (n = 136), 96% had disclosed to at least 1 informal and 24% at least 1 formal support provider. The experiences of African American and Caucasian survivors were similar in many ways. Participants received more positive than negative responses from others, although only negative responses were related to posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and particularly so for African American participants. Regretting disclosure and disclosure to formal providers were also related to posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Suggestions are made for programs to decrease negative responses to disclosure. PMID:20373205

  4. Broad implications for respiratory sinus arrhythmia development: Associations with childhood symptoms of psychopathology in a community sample

    PubMed Central

    Patriquin, Michelle A.; Lorenzi, Jill; Scarpa, Angela; Calkins, Susan D.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the group-based developmental trajectory methodology from our prior study (Patriquin, Lorenzi, Scarpa, & Bell, 2014), the current study examines the development of baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) across a new, larger cohort of typically developing children at 5, 10, 24, 36, and 48 months of age and examines the trajectory relationship with symptoms of childhood psychopathology. Group-based developmental trajectory modeling replicated our prior findings of a two-group model fit: a “High RSA” and “Low RSA” group. The “Low RSA” group, which demonstrated lower baseline RSA across all time points, had significantly more childhood problems at 48 months, namely increased withdrawal, aggressive behavior, pervasive developmental problems, and oppositional defiant problems. All participants for whom there were developmental or autism spectrum concerns (n = 6; based on maternal report at 48 months) were allocated to the Low RSA trajectory group. These results suggest that consistent developmental trajectories of RSA may point to protective factors (i.e., high RSA) against developing symptoms of childhood psychopathology. PMID:25503815

  5. Broad implications for respiratory sinus arrhythmia development: associations with childhood symptoms of psychopathology in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Michelle A; Lorenzi, Jill; Scarpa, Angela; Calkins, Susan D; Bell, Martha Ann

    2015-01-01

    Replicating the group-based developmental trajectory methodology from our prior study (Patriquin, Lorenzi, Scarpa, & Bell. 2014. Developmental Psychobiology, 56, 317-326), the current study examines the development of baseline respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) across a new, larger cohort of typically developing children at 5, 10, 24, 36, and 48 months of age and examines the trajectory relationship with symptoms of childhood psychopathology. Group-based developmental trajectory modeling replicated our prior findings of a two-group model fit: a "High RSA" and "Low RSA" group. The "Low RSA" group, which demonstrated lower baseline RSA across all time points, had significantly more childhood problems at 48 months, namely increased withdrawal, aggressive behavior, pervasive developmental problems, and oppositional defiant problems. All participants for whom there were developmental or autism spectrum concerns (n = 6; based on maternal report at 48 months) were allocated to the Low RSA trajectory group. These results suggest that consistent developmental trajectories of RSA may point to protective factors (i.e., high RSA) against developing symptoms of childhood psychopathology.

  6. Gender and factor-level interactions in psychopathy: implications for self-directed violence risk and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam

    2012-07-01

    Women with antisocial and psychopathic traits have a more extensive history of self-directed violence, as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, than their male counterparts (Chapman, Specht, & Cellucci, 2005; Warren et al., 2003). To inform this area of research, we examined gender differences in the relationship between psychopathy factors and risk for self-directed violence, as measured by a history of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempts, across 2 studies. In both studies, we found that the interaction of the interpersonal-affective (Factor 1) and impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy, a combination considered to exemplify high psychopathy, was associated with ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt histories specifically in women. In men, Factor 2 traits were associated with these risk indices for self-directed violence, regardless of Factor 1. In Study 2, we extended our analysis to examine whether BPD accounted for the relationship between psychopathy and self-directed violence differentially in women and men. Results suggested that BPD symptoms partially accounted for the effects of Factor 2 on self-directed violence (both self-harm and attempts) in both genders but fully accounted for Factor 1 protective effects only in men. These findings underscore the notion that the same psychopathic trait liabilities, at least as they are currently assessed, may confer risk for different forms of behavioral maladjustment in women versus men. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Unrecognized hospital trauma as a source of complex psychiatric symptoms: a systematic case study with implications for children's rights and evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Raby, Carly; Edwards, David

    2011-09-01

    This article describes the psychological assessment and treatment of Paul (12). For several years, he had received numerous diagnoses from a range of specialists and been unsuccessfully treated for epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment was based on a formulation-driven transdiagnostic approach. Soon it was clear that the correct diagnosis was posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) precipitated by an event in hospital when Paul was 6. Two sessions of Children's Accelerated Trauma Treatment (CATT) led to rapid resolution of the main symptoms and gains were consolidated and maintained in further treatment and follow-up sessions. The case material is used to examine why the correct case formulation had been missed, evidence for the efficacy of CATT, and implications for evidence-based practice and children's rights.

  8. Bupropion Increases Selection of High Effort Activity in Rats Tested on a Progressive Ratio/Chow Feeding Choice Procedure: Implications for Treatment of Effort-Related Motivational Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Patrick A.; Lee, Christie A.; Podurgiel, Samantha J.; Hart, Evan; Yohn, Samantha E.; Jones, Myles; Rowland, Margaret; López-Cruz, Laura; Correa, Mercè

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression and related disorders are characterized by deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational dysfunctions. Depressed patients show alterations in effort-related decision making and a bias towards selection of low effort activities. It has been suggested that animal tests of effort-related decision making could be useful as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. Methods: Because clinical studies have suggested that inhibition of catecholamine uptake may be a useful strategy for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms, the present research assessed the ability of bupropion to increase work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision-making (ie, a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats can choose between working for a preferred food (high-carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a progressive ratio schedule vs obtaining a less preferred laboratory chow that is freely available in the chamber. Results: Bupropion (10.0–40.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal) significantly increased all measures of progressive ratio lever pressing, but decreased chow intake. These effects were greatest in animals with low baseline levels of work output on the progressive ratio schedule. Because accumbens dopamine is implicated in effort-related processes, the effects of bupropion on markers of accumbens dopamine transmission were examined. Bupropion elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis and increased phosphorylated dopamine and cyclic-AMP related phosphoprotein 32 kDaltons (pDARPP-32) immunoreactivity in a manner consistent with D1 and D2 receptor stimulation. Conclusion: The ability of bupropion to increase exertion of effort in instrumental behavior may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in humans. PMID:25575584

  9. Bupropion increases selection of high effort activity in rats tested on a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice procedure: implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms.

    PubMed

    Randall, Patrick A; Lee, Christie A; Podurgiel, Samantha J; Hart, Evan; Yohn, Samantha E; Jones, Myles; Rowland, Margaret; López-Cruz, Laura; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2014-10-31

    Depression and related disorders are characterized by deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational dysfunctions. Depressed patients show alterations in effort-related decision making and a bias towards selection of low effort activities. It has been suggested that animal tests of effort-related decision making could be useful as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. Because clinical studies have suggested that inhibition of catecholamine uptake may be a useful strategy for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms, the present research assessed the ability of bupropion to increase work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision-making (ie, a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats can choose between working for a preferred food (high-carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a progressive ratio schedule vs obtaining a less preferred laboratory chow that is freely available in the chamber. Bupropion (10.0-40.0 mg/kg intraperitoneal) significantly increased all measures of progressive ratio lever pressing, but decreased chow intake. These effects were greatest in animals with low baseline levels of work output on the progressive ratio schedule. Because accumbens dopamine is implicated in effort-related processes, the effects of bupropion on markers of accumbens dopamine transmission were examined. Bupropion elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis and increased phosphorylated dopamine and cyclic-AMP related phosphoprotein 32 kDaltons (pDARPP-32) immunoreactivity in a manner consistent with D1 and D2 receptor stimulation. The ability of bupropion to increase exertion of effort in instrumental behavior may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in humans. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  10. Raltegravir-induced Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome - implications for clinical practice and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Perry, Melissa E O; Almaani, Noor; Desai, Nemesha; Larbalestier, Nick; Fox, Julie; Chilton, Daniella

    2013-08-01

    This case report describes two severe antiretroviral drug adverse reactions that occurred in the same patient. A 55-year-old HIV-positive African woman received a single epidural triamcinolone injection for pain relief of postherpetic neuralgia. Forty-one days later, she developed severe iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome due to the drug-drug interaction between triamcinolone and her boosted protease inhibitor therapy. The patient's antiretroviral regimen was thus changed to replace her protease inhibitor with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir. Shortly after commencing the drug, the patient developed a severe adverse drug reaction manifesting as Drug Reaction (or Rash) with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome. First described in 1996, this hypersensitivity syndrome presents with severe skin reaction as well as fever, rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement with marked eosinophilia. Clinicians should be aware of raltegravir-induced DRESS syndrome as well as the potential for drug-drug interactions due to protease inhibitor-based therapy.

  11. Eating disorder symptoms do not just disappear: the implications of adolescent eating-disordered behaviour for body weight and mental health in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Dempfle, Astrid; Konrad, Kerstin; Klasen, Fionna; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the outcomes of childhood and adolescent eating-disordered behaviour on the development of body mass index (BMI) and psychological functioning in young adulthood in a population-based sample in Germany (the BELLA study). Information at baseline and follow-up was obtained through a telephone interview and mailed self-report questionnaires. At both measurement points, BMI, eating disorder symptoms (SCOFF questionnaire), and symptoms of depression and anxiety were assessed in the same cohort of 771 participants (n = 420 females, n = 351 males). The age range at baseline was 11-17 years, and the age range at follow-up was 17-23 years. High scores for eating-disordered behaviour in childhood or adolescence significantly predicted eating-disordered behaviour in young adulthood (multiplicative effect estimate: 1.31; 95 % CI: 1.2-1.42, p < 0.0001), although there was a decline in prevalence (from 19.3 to 13.8 %, p = 0.002) and severity (mean decrease in SCOFF 0.07, 95 % CI: -0.01-0.14, p = 0.06). After accounting for potentially confounding variables at baseline (SES, probands' BMI, parental BMI, depressive symptoms), participants with more eating disorder symptoms at baseline had a higher risk of developing overweight (odds ratio (OR): 1.58; 95 % CI: 1.19-2.09, p = 0.001), obesity (OR = 1.67; 95 % CI: 1.03-2.66, p = 0.03), and depressive symptoms at follow-up (additive effect estimate: 0.45; 95 %CI: 0.19-0.7, p = 0.0006). Early symptoms of depression showed a significant relationship with extreme underweight in young adulthood (OR = 1.13; 95 %CI: 1.01-1.25, p = 0.02). The high stability of eating disorder symptoms and the significant association with overweight and worse mental health in adulthood underscore the need for early detection and intervention during childhood and adolescence. Youth with depression should be monitored for the development of restrictive eating disorders.

  12. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  13. Comparing Reports From Hip-Fracture Patients and Their Proxies: Implications on Evaluating Sex Differences in Disability and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shardell, Michelle; Alley, Dawn E.; Miller, Ram R.; Hicks, Gregory E.; Magaziner, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study compared sex differences in disability and depressive symptoms using reports from hip fracture patients and their proxies. Method Hip fracture patients (49 men, 183 women) aged ≥65 years and proxies were interviewed 1 year postfracture. Outcomes were Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) and number of dependencies in performing activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living. Results Mean ADL sex differences (men minus women) were 0.40 (p = .37) using proxy reports and 0.70 (p = .08) using patient self-reports. Mean CES-D sex differences were −3.60 (p = .02) using proxy reports and −1.26 (p = .38) using patient self-reports. Discrepancies between patients and proxies were smallest for proxies who have lived with the patient ≥ 1 year. Discussion Patients and proxies produced conflicting conclusions about sex differences. Results suggest that ideal proxies to recruit are those who have been cohabitating with the patients for an extended length of time. PMID:22210805

  14. [Oxytocin model of formation of psychotic symptoms and its implications for research on oxytocinergic pathway in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Holka-Pokorska, Justyna; Jarema, Marek

    2014-01-01

    There are more and more data to support the dysregulation of the oxytocinergic pathway in schizophrenia. The development of the above branch of knowledge began to evolve alongside the mainstream of studies concerning gene polymorphisms for dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotoninergic systems. Both experimental studies and clinical trials have demonstrated an antipsychotic effect of oxytocin. Starting with the pioneering neuroendocrinobehavioral experiment which demonstrated that oxytocin nasal spray increases the level of trust in healthy volunteers dozens of experiments were carried out confirming the modulatory role of oxytocin for the recognition of emotion, social memory, pro-social behaviours, collaborative behaviours and behaviours that require generosity and altruism. According to,oxytocin model' of development of psychotic symptoms--oxytocinergic system dysregulation may affect the incorrect attribution of meaning of emotional information from the environment. This can be manifested in the form of social cognition dysfunction and leads to abnormal social behaviour as withdrawal from social contact, isolation and formulation of paranoid delusions. From the clinical psychiatry point of view it became crucially need for research on selective oxytocin receptor agonists, as they may be used in the treatment of diseases which manifest in social withdrawal, lack of trust and the absence of affiliation behaviour as in schizophrenia.

  15. Identification of Students' Intuitive Mental Computational Strategies for 1, 2 and 3 Digits Addition and Subtraction: Pedagogical and Curricular Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazali, Munirah; Alias, Rohana; Ariffin, Noor Asrul Anuar; Ayub, Ayminsyadora

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to examine mental computation strategies used by Year 1, Year 2, and Year 3 students to solve addition and subtraction problems. The participants in this study were twenty five 7 to 9 year-old students identified as excellent, good and satisfactory in their mathematics performance from a school in Penang, Malaysia.…

  16. East Asian International Student Experiences as Learners of English as an Additional Language: Implications for School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popadiuk, Natalee E.; Marshall, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In the school counselling literature, little focus is placed on international students who are learners of English as an Additional Language (EAL) and on school counselling support related to their language acquisition. Using the Critical Incident Technique, we analyzed transcripts of 21 international EAL students from China, Japan, and Korea who…

  17. Analysis of the multidimensionality of hallucination-like experiences in clinical and nonclinical Spanish samples and their relation to clinical symptoms: implications for the model of continuity.

    PubMed

    Langer, Alvaro I; Cangas, Adolfo J; Serper, Mark

    2011-02-01

    Numerous studies have found that hallucinatory experiences occur in the general population. But to date, few studies have been conducted to compare clinical and nonclinical groups across a broad array of clinical symptoms that may co-occur with hallucinations. Likewise, hallucination-like experiences are measured as a multidimensional construct, with clinical and subclinical components related to vivid daydreams, intrusive thoughts, perceptual disturbance, and clinical hallucinatory experiences. Nevertheless, these individual subcomponents have not been examined across a broad spectrum of clinically disordered and nonclinical groups. The goal of the present study was to analyze the differences and similarities in the distribution of responses to hallucination-like experience in clinical and nonclinical populations and to determine the relation of these hallucination-like experiences with various clinical symptoms. These groups included patients with schizophrenia, non-psychotic clinically disordered patients, and a group of individuals with no psychiatric diagnoses. The results revealed that hallucination-like experiences are related to various clinical symptoms across diverse groups of individuals. Regression analysis found that the Psychoticism dimension of the Symptom Check List (SCL-90-R) was the most important predictor of hallucination-like experiences. Additionally, increased auditory and visual hallucination was the only subcomponent that differentiated schizophrenic patients from other groups. This distribution of responses in the dimensions of hallucination-like experiences suggests that not all the dimensions are characteristic of people hearing voices. Vivid daydreams, intrusive thoughts, and auditory distortions and visual perceptual distortions may represent a state of general vulnerability that does not denote a specific risk for clinical hallucinations. Overall, these results support the notion that hallucination-like experiences are closer to a

  18. Additional moults into 'elongatus' males in laboratory-reared Polydesmus angustus Latzel, 1884 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Polydesmidae) - implications for taxonomy.

    PubMed

    David, Jean-Francois; Geoffroy, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The number of stadia during post-embryonic development is supposed to be fixed in most species of the millipede order Polydesmida. For the first time since 1928, additional moults were observed in two males of Polydesmus angustus Latzel, 1884 reared in the laboratory. These 'elongatus' males sensu Verhoeff reached stadium IX instead of stadium VIII, with addition of a further podous ring (32 pairs of legs). One male had well-developed gonopods at stadium VIII, which regressed at stadium IX; the other had no gonopods at stadium VIII, which developed at stadium IX. The two cases correspond to the 'regressionis' and 'progressionis' forms described by Verhoeff in Polydesmus complanatus (Linnaeus, 1761), which confirms entirely his results. Additional moults appear to be associated with small body sizes and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. Comparisons between millipede orders indicate that post-embryonic development is less strictly canalized in Polydesmida than in Chordeumatida. This implies that the adult number of body rings is of limited taxonomic value in Polydesmida and should not be viewed as a character of generic importance.

  19. Effect of water treatment additives on lime softening residual trace chemical composition--implications for disposal and reuse.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weizhi; Roessler, Justin; Blaisi, Nawaf I; Townsend, Timothy G

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water treatment residues (WTR) offer potential benefits when recycled through land application. The current guidance in Florida, US allows for unrestricted land application of lime softening WTR; alum and ferric WTR require additional evaluation of total and leachable concentrations of select trace metals prior to land application. In some cases a mixed WTR is produced when lime softening is accompanied by the addition of a coagulant or other treatment chemical; applicability of the current guidance is unclear. The objective of this research was to characterize the total and leachable chemical content of WTR from Florida facilities that utilize multiple treatment chemicals. Lime and mixed lime WTR samples were collected from 18 water treatment facilities in Florida. Total and leachable concentrations of the WTR were measured. To assess the potential for disposal of mixed WTR as clean fill below the water table, leaching tests were conducted at multiple liquid to solid ratios and under reducing conditions. The results were compared to risk-based soil and groundwater contamination thresholds. Total metal concentrations of WTR were found to be below Florida soil contaminant thresholds with Fe found in the highest abundance at a concentration of 3600 mg/kg-dry. Aluminum was the only element that exceeded the Florida groundwater contaminant thresholds using SPLP (95% UCL = 0.23 mg/L; risk threshold = 0.2 mg/L). Tests under reducing conditions showed elevated concentrations of Fe and Mn, ranging from 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than SPLP leachates. Mixed lime WTR concentrations (total and leachable) were lower than the ferric and alum WTR concentrations, supporting that mixed WTR are appropriately represented as lime WTR. Testing of WTR under reducing conditions demonstrated the potential for release of certain trace metals (Fe, Al, Mn) above applicable regulatory thresholds; additional evaluation is needed to assess management options where

  20. Alteration of extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance by biochar addition: Implication for carbon sequestration in subtropical mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has attracted more and more attention due to its essential role in adsorbing pollutants, improving soil fertility, and modifying greenhouse gas emission. However, the influences of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance are still lack and debatable. Currently, there is no information about the impact of biochar on the function of mangrove ecosystems. Therefore, we explored the effects of biochar on extracellular enzyme activity and microbial abundance in subtropical mangrove sediment, and further estimated the contribution of biochar to C sequestration. In this study, sediments were amended with 0 (control), 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% of biochar and incubated at 25 °C for 90 days. After incubation, enzyme activities, microbial abundance and the increased percentage of sediment organic C content were determined. Both increase (phenol oxidase and β-glucosidase) and decrease (peroxidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase and acid phosphatase) of enzyme activities were observed in biochar treatments, but only peroxidase activity showed statistical significance (at least p < 0.01) compared to the control. Moreover, the activities of all enzymes tested were significantly related to the content of biochar addition (at least p < 0.05). On the other hand, bacterial and fungal abundance in biochar treatments were remarkably lower than control (p < 0.001), and the significantly negative relationship (p < 0.05) between bacterial abundance and the content of biochar was found. Additionally, the increased percentage of organic C gradually increased with biochar addition rate, which provided evidence for applying biochar to mitigate climate change. Given the importance of microorganisms and enzyme activities in sediment organic matter decomposition, the increased C sequestration might be explained by the large decrease of microbial abundance and enzyme activity after biochar intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implications of sludge liquor addition for wastewater-based open pond cultivation of microalgae for biofuel generation and pollutant remediation.

    PubMed

    Osundeko, Olumayowa; Pittman, Jon K

    2014-01-01

    The growth improvement of microalgal strains in municipal secondary-treated wastewater by addition of nutrient-rich activated sludge centrate liquor was examined. Two strains (Chlorella luteoviridis and Parachlorella hussii) were tolerant to liquor, with addition of 25% liquor providing the best growth, biomass productivity and nutrient removal values. The capability of C. luteoviridis and P. hussii for full seasonal cultivation in a 150 L open pond in a temperate climate was studied, using the optimised secondary wastewater +25% liquor medium. Each strain was capable of growth all year including in autumn and winter but with strongest growth, productivity and remediation characteristics in the summer and spring. Both strains could maintain monoculture growth with no significant contamination or culture crash, demonstrating the robustness of these strains for wastewater cultivation in a northern European climate. Each strain could also be efficiently cultivated in a semi-continuous system for steady production of biomass and nutrient removal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Analyses of the National Institute on Aging Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Family Study: implication of additional loci.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Graff-Radford, Neill; Foroud, Tatiana; Mayeux, Richard

    2008-11-01

    To identify putative genetic loci related to the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). Linkage analysis and family-based and case-control association analyses from a genomewide scan using approximately 6000 single-nucleotide polymorphic markers at an average intermarker distance of 0.65 cM. The National Institute on Aging Genetics Initiative for Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease (NIA-LOAD) was created to expand the resources for studies to identify additional genes contributing to the risk for LOAD. We investigated 1902 individuals from 328 families with LOAD and 236 unrelated control subjects. Clinical diagnosis of LOAD. The strongest overall finding was at chromosome 19q13.32, confirming the effect of the apolipoprotein E gene on LOAD risk in the family-based and case-control analyses. However, single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the following loci were also statistically significant in 1 or more of the analyses performed: 7p22.2, 7p21.3, and 16q21 in the linkage analyses; 17q21.31 and 22q11.21 in the family-based association analysis; and 7q31.1 and 22q12.3 in the case-control analysis. Positive associations at 7q31.1 and 20q13.33 were also significant in the meta-analysis results in a publicly available database. Several additional loci may harbor genetic variants associated with LOAD. This data set provides a wealth of phenotypic and genotypic information for use as a resource in discovery and confirmatory research.

  3. A Deep Multicolor Survey.III.Additional Spectroscopy and Implications for the Number Counts of Faint Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Julia D.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Green, Richard F.

    1997-12-01

    We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614). We have identified 9 new quasars with O.3<ζ<2.8 and l6.8<Β<21.6, all from the group of candidates with ultraviolet excess (UVX). No new quasars with ζ >3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B - R) and (V- R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3<ζ<2, nine with 2<ζ<3, three with 3<ζ<4, and 1 at ζ=4.3. One new quasar, DMS 0059-0055, is very bright with Β 16.8 and ζ=0.3, making its detection by our survey very unexpected. Including this new spectroscopy, the results of the DMS are converging with the predicted space densities of other surveys. In particular, we no longer find an excess of quasars with ζ<2.3 and Β<21 in the survey over predictions based on models by Koo & Kron (1988, ApJ, 325, 92). Also, the excess in the number of quasars seen at z>3 over predictions based on models by Warren et al. (1994, ApJ, 421, 412) is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.

  4. Cytoplasmic 3' poly(A) addition induces 5' cap ribose methylation: implications for translational control of maternal mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kuge, H; Richter, J D

    1995-01-01

    During the early development of many animal species, the expression of new genetic information is governed by selective translation of stored maternal mRNAs. In many cases, this translational activation requires cytoplasmic poly(A) elongation. However, how this modification at the 3' end of an mRNA stimulates translation from the 5' end is unknown. Here we show that cytoplasmic polyadenylation stimulates cap ribose methylation during progesterone-induced oocyte maturation in Xenopus laevis. Translational recruitment of a chimeric reporter mRNA that is controlled by cytoplasmic polyadenylation coincides temporally with cap ribose methylation during this period. In addition, the inhibition of cap ribose methylation by S-isobutyladenosine significantly reduces translational activation of a reporter mRNA without affecting the increase of general protein synthesis or polyadenylation during maturation. These results provide evidence for a functional interaction between the termini of an mRNA molecule and suggest that 2'-O-ribose cap methylation mediates the translational recruitment of maternal mRNA. Images PMID:8557049

  5. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; ...

    2016-12-08

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. Our study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. This study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS processmore » control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. Our current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.« less

  6. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; Gaiser, K.; Reynolds, T.; Clemon, L.; Lu, W. Y.; Schoenung, J. M.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. The study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. The study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS process control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. The current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.

  7. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; Gaiser, K.; Reynolds, T.; Clemon, L.; Lu, W. Y.; Schoenung, J. M.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. The study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. The study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS process control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. The current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.

  8. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; Gaiser, K.; Reynolds, T.; Clemon, L.; Lu, W. Y.; Schoenung, J. M.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2016-12-08

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. Our study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. This study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS process control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. Our current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.

  9. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  10. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case.

  11. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12–24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  12. Hofmeister effects in biology: effect of choline addition on the salt-induced super activity of horseradish peroxidase and its implication for salt resistance of plants.

    PubMed

    Pinna, M C; Bauduin, P; Touraud, D; Monduzzi, M; Ninham, B W; Kunz, W

    2005-09-01

    The effect of choline addition on the salt-induced super activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is investigated. HRP is presented in the literature as an efficient H(2)O(2) scavenger, and choline is the precursor of glycine betaine, a strong osmoprotectant molecule. Both the regulations of H(2)O(2) and of osmoprotectant concentrations are implicated in plants in order to counteract salt-induced cell damage. For the oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), sulfate anions were found to play a crucial role in the increase of HRP activity. This induced super activity can be strongly reduced by adding choline chloride. The phenomena provide an example of physicochemical Hofmeister effects playing a central regulatory role in an important biological system.

  13. Review: In vivo and postmortem effects of feed antioxidants in livestock: a review of the implications on authorization of antioxidant feed additives.

    PubMed

    Salami, S A; Guinguina, A; Agboola, J O; Omede, A A; Agbonlahor, E M; Tayyab, U

    2016-08-01

    The pivotal roles of regulatory jurisdictions in the feed additive sector cannot be over-emphasized. In the European Union (EU), antioxidant substances are authorized as feed additives for prolonging the shelf life of feedstuffs based on their effect for preventing lipid peroxidation. However, the efficacy of antioxidants transcends their functional use as technological additives in animal feeds. Promising research results have revealed the in vivo efficacy of dietary antioxidants for combating oxidative stress in production animals. The in vivo effect of antioxidants is significant for enhancing animal health and welfare. Similarly, postmortem effect of dietary antioxidants has been demonstrated to improve the nutritional, organoleptic and shelf-life qualities of animal products. In practice, dietary antioxidants have been traditionally used by farmers for these benefits in livestock production. However, some antioxidants particularly when supplemented in excess could act as prooxidants and exert detrimental effects on animal well-being and product quality. Presently, there is no exclusive legislation in the EU to justify the authorization of antioxidant products for these in vivo and postmortem efficacy claims. To indicate these efficacy claims and appropriate dosage on product labels, it is important to broaden the authorization status of antioxidants through the appraisal of existing EU legislations on feed additives. Such regulatory review will have major impact on the legislative categorization of antioxidants and the efficacy assessment in the technical dossier application. The present review harnesses the scientific investigations of these efficacy claims in production animals and, proposes potential categorization and appraisal of in vivo methodologies for efficacy assessment of antioxidants. This review further elucidates the implication of such regulatory review on the practical application of antioxidants as feed additives in livestock production

  14. Symptom control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Ingham, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Symptom control has become increasingly recognized as an important goal in patient care. In this article, advances in symptom assessment, and various definitions of symptom improvement are reviewed. Theoretical concepts underlying symptom control and clinically significant change are presented, as well as the role of symptom control as an endpoint in clinical trials. Symptom control is then surveyed in two broad categories for selected symptoms. The first area is therapy related symptoms, secondary to chemotherapy, radiation, hormonal therapy, and surgery. Symptoms reviewed include chemotherapy related mucositis, emesis, fatigue; hot flashes; and radiation related dermatitis, xerostomia, and mucositis. The second area is palliative oncologic approaches to disease-related symptoms. Results in palliative chemotherapy, palliative radiation therapy, cancer pain, and lack of appetite are summarized. Areas requiring further research are noted. Findings are presented in both a clinical and research context to help guide the reader with interpreting symptom control studies.

  15. The benefit of minocycline on negative symptoms in early-phase psychosis in addition to standard care - extent and mechanism (BeneMin): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lisiecka, Danuta M; Suckling, John; Barnes, Thomas R E; Chaudhry, Imran B; Dazzan, Paola; Husain, Nusrat; Jones, Peter B; Joyce, Eileen M; Lawrie, Stephen M; Upthegrove, Rachel; Deakin, Bill

    2015-03-02

    Negative symptoms of psychosis do not respond to the traditional therapy with first- or second-generation antipsychotics and are among main causes of a decrease in quality of life observed in individuals suffering from the disorder. Minocycline, a broad-spectrum tetracyclic antibiotic displaying neuroprotective properties has been suggested as a new potential therapy for negative symptoms. In the two previous clinical trials comparing minocycline and placebo, both added to the standard care, patients receiving minocycline showed increased reduction in negative symptoms. Three routes to neuroprotection by minocycline have been identified: neuroprotection against grey matter loss, anti-inflammatory action and stabilisation of glutamate receptors. However, it is not yet certain what the extent of the benefit of minocycline in psychosis is and what its mechanism is. We present a protocol for a multi-centre double-blind randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial entitled The Benefit of Minocycline on Negative Symptoms of Psychosis: Extent and Mechanism (BeneMin). After providing informed consent, 226 participants in the early phase of psychosis will be randomised to receive either 100 mg modified-release capsules of minocycline or similar capsules with placebo for 12 months in addition to standard care. The participants will be tested for outcome variables before and after the intervention period. The extent of benefit will be tested via clinical outcome measures, namely the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score, social and cognitive functioning scores, antipsychotic medication dose equivalent and level of weight gain. The mechanism of action of minocycline will be tested via blood screening for circulating cytokines and magnetic resonance imaging with three-dimensional T1-weighted rapid gradient-echo, proton density T2-weighted dual echo and T2*-weighted gradient echo planar imaging with N-back task and resting state. Eight research centres in UK and 15 National

  16. Octylisothiazolinone, an additional cause of allergic contact dermatitis caused by leather: case series and potential implications for the study of cross-reactivity with methylisothiazolinone.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Olivier; Meert, Hans; Romaen, Elien; Leysen, Julie; Matthieu, Lucretia; Apers, Sandra; Lambert, Julien; Goossens, An

    2016-11-01

    Octylisothiazolinone (OIT) is used as an antifungal agent by the leather industry. To show sensitization to OIT from leather, and to highlight the potential implications when cross-reactivity between OIT and methylisothiazolinone (MI) is studied. Two patients with allergic contact dermatitis caused by a leather belt and shoes, respectively, were patch tested with methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI)/MI, MI, MCI, OIT, and benzisothiazolinone (BIT). High-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was used to detect isothiazolinone derivatives in leather goods. Additionally, files of OIT-sensitized patients, observed at the KU Leuven department during the period 1990-2015, were retrospectively analysed. Both patients had been primarily sensitized to OIT, but the diagnosis in one of them could be achieved only when a higher patch test concentration of OIT (1000 ppm pet.) was used. HPLC-UV confirmed the presence of OIT in their leather goods. Non-relevant sensitization to MI was noted in both cases. Four additional cases of OIT sensitization from leather could be retrieved from the KU Leuven database. Non-occupational sensitization to OIT from leather may occur. Patch test concentrations of >250 ppm pet. may be necessary for diagnosis, and to show cross-reactivity with MI. Safer use limits for OIT in the leather industry may be needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sex and Age Differences in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Diagnoses: Implications for DSM-V and ICD-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal P.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender and age differences in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom endorsement in a large community-based sample. Method: Families with four or more full siblings ascertained from Missouri birth records completed telephone interviews regarding lifetime DSM-IV ADHD symptoms and the Strengths and Weaknesses…

  18. Depressive-symptom onset during toddlerhood in a sample of depressed preschoolers: Implications for future investigations of major depressive disorder in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Luby, Joan; Belden, Andy

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of depressive symptoms prior to age 36 months as retrospectively reported by parents of preschoolers with clinical depression. The study provides some of the first empirical data on the manifestations of depressive symptoms during the toddler period, advancing existing theoretical and case-report literature. A sample of 301 (depressed, disruptive, and healthy) children between the ages of 3.0 and 6.0 years were screened and oversampled for depressive symptoms from community sites. Primary caregivers (parents) were interviewed about their child's symptoms of depression (as well as other symptoms of mental disorders and developmental parameters), and age of first onset of depressive symptoms was ascertained. Findings suggest that clinical-level symptoms of depression may arise as early as age 24 months. The domain of negative self-concept during the toddler period evidenced by self-deprecation and difficulty making choices emerged as the two strongest variables predictive of preschool depression. Our results suggest that prospective empirical studies of depressive symptoms in children younger than 3 years of age should now be undertaken. Copyright © 2012 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  19. Sex and Age Differences in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Diagnoses: Implications for DSM-V and ICD-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal P.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Todd, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender and age differences in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom endorsement in a large community-based sample. Method: Families with four or more full siblings ascertained from Missouri birth records completed telephone interviews regarding lifetime DSM-IV ADHD symptoms and the Strengths and Weaknesses…

  20. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... and cause severe illness and even death. Cutaneous anthrax symptoms can include: A group of small blisters ... on the face, neck, arms, or hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort ...

  1. Advancing Symptom Science Through Use of Common Data Elements.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Nancy S; Anderson, Ruth; Bakken, Suzanne; Corwin, Elizabeth; Docherty, Sharron; Dorsey, Susan G; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Moore, Shirley; Pullen, Carol; Rapkin, Bruce; Schiffman, Rachel; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Grady, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Use of common data elements (CDEs), conceptually defined as variables that are operationalized and measured in identical ways across studies, enables comparison of data across studies in ways that would otherwise be impossible. Although healthcare researchers are increasingly using CDEs, there has been little systematic use of CDEs for symptom science. CDEs are especially important in symptom science because people experience common symptoms across a broad range of health and developmental states, and symptom management interventions may have common outcomes across populations. The purposes of this article are to (a) recommend best practices for the use of CDEs for symptom science within and across centers; (b) evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with the use of CDEs for symptom science; (c) propose CDEs to be used in symptom science to serve as the basis for this emerging science; and (d) suggest implications and recommendations for future research and dissemination of CDEs for symptom science. The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-supported P20 and P30 Center directors applied published best practices, expert advice, and the literature to identify CDEs to be used across the centers to measure pain, sleep, fatigue, and affective and cognitive symptoms. We generated a minimum set of CDEs to measure symptoms. The CDEs identified through this process will be used across the NINR Centers and will facilitate comparison of symptoms across studies. We expect that additional symptom CDEs will be added and the list will be refined in future work. Symptoms are an important focus of nursing care. Use of CDEs will facilitate research that will lead to better ways to assist people to manage their symptoms. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. A longitudinal analysis of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and their relationship with Fear and Anxious-Misery disorders: implications for DSM-V.

    PubMed

    Forbes, David; Parslow, Ruth; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan; Bryant, Richard; McFarlane, Alexander; Silove, Derrick; Shalev, Arieh

    2010-12-01

    This paper examined the hypothesis that PTSD-unique symptom clusters of re-experiencing, active avoidance and hyperarousal were more related to the fear/phobic disorders, while shared PTSD symptoms of dysphoria were more closely related to Anxious-Misery disorders (MDD/GAD). Confirmatory factor and correlation analyses examining PTSD, anxiety and mood disorder data from 714 injury survivors interviewed 3, 12 and 24-months following their injury supported this hypothesis with these relationships remaining robust from 3-24 months posttrauma. Of the nine unique fear-oriented PTSD symptoms, only one is currently required for a DSM-IV diagnosis. Increasing emphasis on PTSD fear symptoms in DSM-V, such as proposed DSM-V changes to mandate active avoidance, is critical to improve specificity, ensure inclusion of dimensionally distinct features and facilitate tailoring of treatment.

  3. Longitudinal sex differences of externalising and internalising depression symptom trajectories: Implications for assessment of depression in men from an online study.

    PubMed

    Rice, Simon M; Fallon, Barry J; Aucote, Helen M; Möller-Leimkühler, AnneMaria; Treeby, Matt S; Amminger, G Paul

    2015-05-01

    Clinical reports indicate that men tend to engage in a range of externalising behaviours in response to negative emotional states. Such externalising behaviours have been theorised to reflect a male sub-type of depression that is inconsistent with current diagnostic criteria, resulting in impeded detection and treatment rates of depressed men. In addressing previous study design limitations, this article presents self-report longitudinal data for the multidimensional Male Depression Risk Scale (MDRS-22) against ratings of diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder as assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression Module (PHQ-9). Longitudinal psychometric properties of the MDRS-22 are reported and symptom trajectories described. A sample of 233 adults (males = 125; 54%) completed measures of externalising and prototypic depression symptoms at Time 1, and again at Time 2 (15 weeks later). Psychometric properties were examined and within-subjects analyses undertaken. The MDRS-22 demonstrated stable internal consistency and test-retest correlations equivalent to those observed for the PHQ-9. Both prototypic and externalising depression symptoms increased with experiences of recent negative life events. Marked gender differences were observed. Males experiencing ≥ 2 stressful negative life events reported significantly higher MDRS-22 scores at both Time 1 and Time 2 relative to comparable females. Findings contribute to the validity of the MDRS-22 as a measure of externalising depression symptoms. Results suggest that while both males and females experience externalising depression symptoms, these symptoms may be particularly elevated for men following experiences of negative life events. Findings suggest that externalising symptoms may be a special feature of depression for men. Given the problematic nature of such externalising symptoms (e.g. excessive substance use, aggression, risk-taking), their clinical assessment appears warranted. © The Author

  4. Mindfulness and Coping Are Inversely Related to Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients and Informal Caregivers in the Neuroscience ICU: Implications for Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Kelly M; Riklin, Eric; Jacobs, Jamie M; Rosand, Jonathan; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2016-11-01

    To assess the correlation of psychosocial resiliency factors (mindfulness and coping) with symptoms of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depression in patients recently admitted to the neuroscience ICU and their primary informal caregivers. A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational study. Neuroscience ICU in a major medical center. A total of 78 dyads of patients (total n = 81) and their primary caregivers (total n = 92) from June to December 2015. Study enrollment occurred within the first 2 weeks of patient admission to the neuroscience ICU. None. Dyads completed self-report measures of mindfulness (Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale-Revised), coping (Measure of Coping Status-A), posttraumatic stress (Posttraumatic Checklist-Specific Stressor), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-A), and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-D). Rates of clinically significant posttraumatic stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were high and comparable between patient and caregiver samples. Own psychological resilience factors and psychiatric symptoms were strongly correlated for both patients and caregivers. Depressive symptoms were interdependent between patients and their caregivers, and one's own mindfulness was independently related to one's partner's depressive symptoms. Rates of clinically significant psychiatric symptoms were high, equally prevalent in patients and caregivers, and interdependent between patients and their caregivers. For both patients and caregivers, psychological resiliency factors were associated with both self and partner psychiatric symptoms. Findings suggest that attending to the psychiatric health of both patients and caregivers in the neuroscience ICU is a priority and that patients and their caregivers must be considered together in a system to fully address either individual's psychiatric symptoms.

  5. Clinical symptoms and alpha band resting-state functional connectivity imaging in patients with schizophrenia: implications for novel approaches to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hinkley, Leighton B.N.; Vinogradov, Sophia; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Fisher, Melissa; Findlay, Anne M.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with functional decoupling between cortical regions, but we do not know whether and where this occurs in low-frequency electromagnetic oscillations. The goal of this study was to use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to identify brain regions that exhibit abnormal resting-state connectivity in the alpha frequency range in patients with schizophrenia and investigate associations between functional connectivity and clinical symptoms in stable outpatient participants. Method Thirty patients with schizophrenia and fifteen healthy comparison participants were scanned in resting-state MEG (eyes closed). Functional connectivity MEGI (fcMEGI) data were reconstructed globally in the alpha range, quantified by the mean imaginary coherence between a voxel and the rest of the brain. Results In patients, decreased connectivity was observed in left pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and right superior temporal cortex while increased connectivity was observed in left extrastriate cortex and the right inferior PFC. Functional connectivity of left inferior parietal cortex was negatively related to positive symptoms. Low left PFC connectivity was associated with negative symptoms. Functional connectivity of midline PFC was negatively correlated with depressed symptoms. Functional connectivity of right PFC was associated with other (cognitive) symptoms. Conclusions This study demonstrates direct functional disconnection in schizophrenia between specific cortical fields within low-frequency resting-state oscillations. Impaired alpha coupling in frontal, parietal, and temporal regions is associated with clinical symptoms in these stable outpatients. Our findings indicate that this level of functional disconnection between cortical regions is an important treatment target in schizophrenia. PMID:21861988

  6. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  7. Symptom Cluster Analyses Based on Symptom Occurrence and Severity Ratings Among Pediatric Oncology Patients During Myelosuppressive Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A.; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms’ underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. Objective The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients’ ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Interventions/Methods Children and adolescents with cancer (10 to 18 years of age; N=131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10–18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a one week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA). The defined measurement model suggested by the best EFA model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Results Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated which were classified as a chemotherapy sequelae cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomforts cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Conclusions Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Implications for Practice Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom clusters research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field. PMID:21921793

  8. Common biological pathways underlying the psychoneurological symptom cluster in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Barsevick, Andrea M; Fang, Carolyn Y; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    A symptom cluster is a group of symptoms that occur together and are interrelated. The clinical implication of symptom cluster research is to use the clustering patterns of symptoms to understand the mechanisms for these symptoms and develop management strategies targeted at multiple symptoms. The purposes of this review were to summarize the evidence for a psychoneurological symptom cluster in cancer patients, to provide information regarding the underlying biological mechanisms for each of the psychoneurological symptoms within the cluster, and to propose possible common biological pathways that may underlie this cluster. A systematic review of the literature was conducted. Empirical evidence exists to support a cluster of psychoneurological symptoms (ie, depressive symptoms, cognitive disturbance, fatigue, sleep disturbance, pain). At a molecular level, common biological pathways (ie, proinflammatory cytokines, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and monoamine neurotransmission system) may underlie the development of symptoms within this cluster. Activation of proinflammatory cytokines is proposed as a first stage of mechanistic pathway. However, other biological factors, such as lowered estrogen or hemoglobin levels, may influence psychoneurological cluster. Additional studies are needed to confirm the roles of cytokines as well as other biological factors in the development of the psychoneurological cluster and to determine the biomarkers to identify the subgroups of cancer patients who are at greatest risk for this cluster. This information can be used by researchers and clinicians to guide the selection of symptom management strategies that are ideally targeted to the biological mechanisms that underlie this symptom cluster.

  9. The Relationship between Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms and Substance Use among Adolescents Involved with Child Welfare: Implications for Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Abby L.; Wekerle, Christine; Tonmyr, Lil; Thornton, Tiffany; Waechter, Randall; Pereira, Jessica; Chung, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in predicting substance use and substance-related problems in a sample of older youth and emerging adults involved with child welfare. The sample was drawn from the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) longitudinal study (Wekerle et al. 2009).…

  10. The Relationship between Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms and Substance Use among Adolescents Involved with Child Welfare: Implications for Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Abby L.; Wekerle, Christine; Tonmyr, Lil; Thornton, Tiffany; Waechter, Randall; Pereira, Jessica; Chung, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in predicting substance use and substance-related problems in a sample of older youth and emerging adults involved with child welfare. The sample was drawn from the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) longitudinal study (Wekerle et al. 2009).…

  11. Right ventricular pressure changes during induced ventricular tachycardias predict clinical symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion: implications for a reduction of unnecessary, painful ICD shocks.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ettore; Sarzi Braga, Simona; Balian, Vruyr; Pedretti, Roberto F E

    2009-03-01

    ICD shocks occurring in conscious patients (as in the case of well-tolerated arrhythmias, electromagnetic interference, or oversensing) have a deleterious impact on the quality of life. We evaluated if a hemodynamic parameter, calculated from the right ventricular pressure (RVP) or systemic arterial pressure (AP) signals, could predict early clinical symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion during induced ventricular tachycardias (VTs). We analyzed 42 tolerated (no symptoms) and 30 untolerated (syncope or severe symptoms within 30 seconds from the onset) VTs, induced during electrophysiological study. The cycle length (CL) and the hemodynamic data (mean AP and RVP, arterial pulse pressure and RV pulse pressure, and maximum AP and RVP dP/dT) were automatically sampled in two VT epochs: the "detection" window, from beat 24 to 32, and the "preintervention" window, immediately before the first therapeutic attempt. Although the CL and all the hemodynamic parameters (expressed as % change versus pre-VT values) were significantly lower in untolerated versus tolerated VTs both at detection and preintervention (with the exception of the mean RVP which progressively increased in both groups), ROC analysis demonstrated that only the preintervention RV pulse pressure showed no overlap between groups, providing 100% sensitivity and positive predictive value. The reduction of the RV pulse pressure is a better predictor of early cerebral symptoms than CL or other hemodynamic indexes during induced VTs. Since long-term RVP monitoring is feasible, this parameter could be incorporated into ICDs decisional path, in the perspective of reducing unnecessary, painful shocks.

  12. A preliminary investigation into the experience of symptoms of psychosis in mental health professionals: implications for the psychiatric classification model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fleming, M P; Martin, C R

    2009-06-01

    The psychiatric classification system regarding the discrete category of schizophrenia remains controversial. Key concerns regarding the legitimacy of the classification system for this presentation focus on issues of study design, the relevance and inter-relationship between symptom clusters and the lack of a coherent model of aetiology. A defining summary feature of the psychiatric model is the distinctiveness of psychotic symptoms in those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia compared with non-clinical samples. The current study sought to challenge the prevailing psychiatric system by exploring the occurrence and experience of psychotic symptoms in mental health practitioners who routinely engage in therapeutic work with clients with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia. A total of 16% (n = 19) of the sample indicated that they experienced voice hearing while 21% (n = 26) indicated they experienced delusions as assessed by validated assessment tools. The findings are indicative of a continuum model of psychotic symptom experience and run counter to the contemporary model of psychiatric classification of this disorder. The direction of future research is indicated.

  13. Childhood Trauma Exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan War Era Veterans: Implications for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Adult Functional Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Dedert, Eric A.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Brancu, Mira; Runnals, Jennifer; Beckham, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship among childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and adult social support in a large sample of veterans who served in the military after 09/11/2001, with a specific focus on the potential role of the PTSD avoidance and numbing cluster as intervening in the association between…

  14. Childhood Trauma Exposure in Iraq and Afghanistan War Era Veterans: Implications for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Adult Functional Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Dedert, Eric A.; Calhoun, Patrick S.; Brancu, Mira; Runnals, Jennifer; Beckham, Jean C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship among childhood trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and adult social support in a large sample of veterans who served in the military after 09/11/2001, with a specific focus on the potential role of the PTSD avoidance and numbing cluster as intervening in the association between…

  15. Maternal depressive symptoms at three months postpartum and breastfeeding rates at six months postpartum: Implications for primary care in a prospective cohort study of primiparous women in Australia.

    PubMed

    Woolhouse, Hannah; James, Jennifer; Gartland, Deirdre; McDonald, Ellie; Brown, Stephanie J

    2016-08-01

    The World Health Organisation recommends exclusive breastfeeding to six months postpartum, but most women in developed countries do not breastfeed this long. Prior studies exploring the relationship between breastfeeding duration and maternal depression show ambiguous findings. To explore associations between maternal depressive symptoms at three months postpartum, and breastfeeding status over the first six months postpartum. Prospective pregnancy cohort study of nulliparous women. 1507 women were recruited from six public hospitals in early pregnancy, completing baseline data in early pregnancy (mean gestation 15 weeks). Follow-up questionnaires were completed at three and six months postpartum. Women reported how many months they breastfed for (breastfeeding refers to 'any' breastfeeding, including expressed breastmilk). Depressive symptoms were measured at three months postpartum with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (scores ≥13 indicated probable major depression). Of the almost 95% of women who initiated breastfeeding, 76% were still breastfeeding at three months postpartum, and by six months postpartum this dropped to 61%. Women who reported depressive symptoms at three months had significantly lower rates of breastfeeding at six months postpartum compared to women without depressive symptoms (49% vs. 61%; adjusted OR=0.55, 95% CI 0.34-0.90). Maternal social characteristics associated with not breastfeeding at six months postpartum were: young maternal age; lower education; and smoking in pregnancy. Women's decisions around infant-feeding are influenced by a range of psycho-social factors, and early postnatal depressive symptoms appear to be a significant part of this picture, as either a cause or consequence of decisions to cease breastfeeding. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Advancing Symptom Science Through Use of Common Data Elements

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Nancy S.; Anderson, Ruth; Bakken, Suzanne; Corwin, Elizabeth; Docherty, Sharron; Dorsey, Susan G.; Heitkemper, Margaret; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Moore, Shirley; Pullen, Carol; Rapkin, Bruce; Schiffman, Rachel; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Grady, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of common data elements (CDEs), conceptually defined as variables that are operationalized and measured in identical ways across studies, enables comparison of data across studies in ways that would otherwise be impossible. Although healthcare researchers are increasingly using CDEs, there has been little systematic use of CDEs for symptom science. CDEs are especially important in symptom science because people experience common symptoms across a broad range of health and developmental states, and symptom management interventions may have common outcomes across populations. Purposes The purposes of this article are to (a) recommend best practices for the use of CDEs for symptom science within and across centers; (b) evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with the use of CDEs for symptom science; (c) propose CDEs to be used in symptom science to serve as the basis for this emerging science; and (d) suggest implications and recommendations for future research and dissemination of CDEs for symptom science. Design The National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)-supported P20 and P30 Center directors applied published best practices, expert advice, and the literature to identify CDEs to be used across the centers to measure pain, sleep, fatigue, and affective and cognitive symptoms. Findings We generated a minimum set of CDEs to measure symptoms. Conclusions The CDEs identified through this process will be used across the NINR Centers and will facilitate comparison of symptoms across studies. We expect that additional symptom CDEs will be added and the list will be refined in future work. Clinical Relevance Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 47:5, ©2015 Sigma Theta Tau International. PMID:26250061

  17. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  18. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment Photos ...

  19. Oral Ingestion and Intraventricular Injection of Curcumin Attenuates the Effort-Related Effects of the VMAT-2 Inhibitor Tetrabenazine: Implications for Motivational Symptoms of Depression.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Gorka, Dea; Mistry, Anisha; Collins, Samantha; Qian, Emily; Correa, Merce; Manchanda, Arushi; Bogner, Robin H; Salamone, John D

    2017-09-14

    Effort-related choice tasks are used for studying depressive motivational symptoms such as anergia/fatigue. These studies investigated the ability of the dietary supplement curcumin to reverse the low-effort bias induced by the monoamine storage blocker tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine shifted effort-related choice in rats, decreasing high-effort lever pressing but increasing chow intake. The effects of tetrabenazine were reversed by oral ingestion of curcumin (80.0-160.0 mg/kg) and infusions of curcumin into the cerebral ventricles (2.0-8.0 μg). Curcumin attenuates the effort-related effects of tetrabenazine in this model via actions on the brain, suggesting that curcumin may be useful for treating human motivational symptoms.

  20. Patient and caregiver perspectives on decision support for symptom and quality of life management during cancer treatment: Implications for eHealth.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Mary E; Nayak, Manan M; Abrahm, Janet L; Braun, Ilana M; Rabin, Michael S; Brzozowski, Jane; Lathan, Christopher; Berry, Donna L

    2017-08-01

    Adequate symptom and quality-of-life (SQL) management is a priority during cancer treatment. eHealth is a timely way to enhance patient-engagement, facilitate communication, and improve health outcomes. The objectives of this study were to describe patient and caregivers' perspectives for providing, processing, and managing SQL data to enhance communication and identify desired components for decision support. Data were collected from 64 participants through questionnaires and focus groups. Analysis was conducted using NVivo. Open and axial coding was completed, grouping commonalities and large constructs into nodes to identify and synthesize themes. Face-to-face meetings with clinicians were the prime time to communicate, and patients strove to understand treatment options and the effect on SQL by bringing caregivers to their visits, taking notes, tracking symptoms, and creating portable health records. Patients/caregivers struggled to self-manage their symptoms and were uncertain when to contact clinicians when experiencing uncontrolled symptoms. Most participants identified eHealth solutions for decision support. However, 38% of participants (n = 24) rarely used computers and identified non-eHealth options for decision support. Core components for both eHealth and non-eHealth systems were access to (1) cancer information, (2) medical records, (3) peer support, and (4) improved support and understanding on when to contact clinicians. Patients were faced with an overwhelming amount of information and relied on their caregivers to help navigate the complexities of cancer care and self-manage SQL. Health technologies can provide informational support; however, decision support needs to span multiple venues to avoid increasing disparities caused by a digital divide. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Stress in romantic relationships and adolescent depressive symptoms: Influence of parental support.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Samantha F; Salk, Rachel H; Hyde, Janet S

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that stressful life events can play a role in the development of adolescent depressive symptoms; however, there has been little research on romantic stress specifically. The relationship between romantic stress and depressive symptoms is particularly salient in adolescence, as adolescence often involves the onset of dating. This and other stressors are often dealt with in the context of the family. The present study examined the relationship between romantic stress and depressive symptoms both concurrently and prospectively, controlling for preexisting depressive symptoms. We then explored whether support from parents buffers the negative effects of romantic stress on depressive symptoms. In addition, the study sought to determine whether the benefits of support vary by parent and child gender. A community sample of 375 adolescents completed self-report measures of parental support (both maternal and paternal), romantic stress, and depressive symptoms. A behavioral measure of maternal support was also obtained. For boys and girls, romantic stress at age 15 predicted depressive symptoms at ages 15 and 18, even when controlling for age 13 depressive symptoms. Perceived maternal support buffered the stress-depressive symptom relationship for both genders at age 15, even when controlling for age 13 depressive symptoms. Higher perceived paternal support was associated with lower adolescent depressive symptoms; however, it did not have a buffering effect. These results have implications for the development of effective family-centered methods to prevent the development of depressive symptoms in adolescents. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The impact of parenting on the associations between child aggression subtypes and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Fite, Paula J

    2014-12-01

    The current study evaluated parenting behaviors (i.e., parental monitoring, inconsistent discipline, parental involvement, positive parenting, and corporal punishment) as moderators of the link between proactive and reactive aggression and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a community sample of 89 children ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44, SD = 1.14; 56 % male). Reactive, but not proactive, aggression was uniquely positively associated with ODD symptoms. Additionally, inconsistent discipline moderated the association between proactive, but not reactive, aggression and ODD symptoms, such that proactive aggression was associated with ODD symptoms only when levels of inconsistent discipline were high. Findings appear to suggest that associations between these aggression subtypes and ODD symptoms are influenced by different factors, with inconsistent discipline indicated in the association between proactively aggressive behavior and ODD symptoms. Implications for intervention are discussed.

  3. The Psychometric Properties of the Brief Symptom Inventory in Men under Criminal Justice Involvement: Implications for Forensic Social Workers in Practice Settings.

    PubMed

    Valera, Pamela; Fullilove, Robert; Cali, Shae; Nunes, Edward; Chiongbian, Victoria; Clark, Wayne; Covey, Lirio

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the factor structure and psychometric properties of the original and a revised modification of the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) in 259 black and Latino males, aged thirty-five to sixty-seven, who had been released from a New York state prison or a New York City jail. The data were analysed using exploratory factor analysis, principal axis factoring and confirmatory factor analysis. Standardised factor loadings were evaluated at 0.05, model fit was evaluated using the chi-square statistic, and fit indices were examined. Items whose communalities fell below 0.30 were eliminated from the procedure. The findings did not yield the same number of factors as the original BSI, but the revised BSI model fitted the current data better. This modified factor structure reduced the BSI to the nineteen most appropriate items to assess five key common psychiatric symptoms affecting men under community supervision. The results of the current factor structure suggest that the psychiatric disorders experienced by men under community supervision may differ from the populations studied by the original BSI factor structure. Forensic social work ought to examine the psychometric properties of standardised measures for different populations such that appropriate instruments may be specifically targeted and maximised.

  4. Parent-reported and clinician-observed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): implications for practice under DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Grzadzinski, Rebecca; Dick, Catherine; Lord, Catherine; Bishop, Somer

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often present with social difficulties, though the extent to which these clearly overlap with symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not well understood. We explored parent-reported and directly-observed ASD symptoms on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in children referred to ASD-specialty clinics who received diagnoses of either ADHD (n = 48) or ASD (n = 164). Of the ADHD sample, 21 % met ASD cut-offs on the ADOS and 30 % met ASD cut-offs on all domains of the ADI-R. Four social communication ADOS items (Quality of Social Overtures, Unusual Eye Contact, Facial Expressions Directed to Examiner, and Amount of Reciprocal Social Communication) adequately differentiated the groups while none of the items on the ADI-R met the criteria for adequate discrimination. Results of this work highlight the challenges that clinicians and researchers face when distinguishing ASD from other disorders in verbally fluent, school-age children.

  5. Post-concussion symptoms in mild traumatic brain injury: findings from a paediatric outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Charles; Ditchman, Nicole; Nersessova, Karine; Foster, Nicola; Wehman, Paul; West, Michael; Riedlinger, Brendalin; Monasterio, Eugenio; Shaw, Bill; Neblett, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common among children and is associated with a range of symptomatology and clinical presentations. This study uses data from a paediatric outpatient TBI clinic to (1) investigate characteristics associated with more severe post-concussive symptoms and (2) examine differences in the proportion of individuals endorsing specific post-concussion symptoms based on group (e.g., sex, type of injury, and psychiatric history). Methods Data from the Children's Hospital of Richmond's TBI outpatient programme were analysed (N = 157). Results Gender and sports injury were associated with severity of symptoms. In addition, females endorsed a greater number of overall symptoms than males. A number of specific symptoms were found to be endorsed to a greater extent based on psychiatric history and type of injury; however, overall total number of symptoms endorsed did not differ based on these characteristics. Conclusions Findings from this study provide further evidence that mTBI affects a wide range of youth and that associated symptomatology can indeed be varied. Moreover, results revealed differences in endorsement of specific symptoms and symptom severity based on patient and injury characteristics which have implications for concussion assessment and treatment. Implications for Rehabilitation Symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children and adolescents can have varied presentation, ranging from minimal to severe. Females and those with non-sports-related injuries are more likely to endorse greater symptoms following concussion. Symptom evaluation is an essential component of the concussion assessment and treatment of paediatric patients following mTBI, and clinicians should be aware of patient characteristics associated with increased symptoms, especially when baseline symptom data are not available.

  6. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  7. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Reversible Thiol Additions to Mono- and Diactivated Michael Acceptors: Implications for the Design of Drugs That Bind Covalently to Cysteines.

    PubMed

    Krenske, Elizabeth H; Petter, Russell C; Houk, K N

    2016-12-02

    Additions of cysteine thiols to Michael acceptors underpin the mechanism of action of several covalent drugs (e.g., afatinib, osimertinib, ibrutinib, neratinib, and CC-292). Reversible Michael acceptors have been reported in which an additional electron-withdrawing group was added at the α-carbon of a Michael acceptor. We have performed density functional theory calculations to determine why thiol additions to these Michael acceptors are reversible. The α-EWG group stabilizes the anionic transition state and intermediate of the Michael addition, but less intuitively, it destabilizes the neutral adduct. This makes the reverse reaction (elimination) both faster and more thermodynamically favorable. For thiol addition to be reversible, the Michael acceptor must also contain a suitable substituent on the β-carbon, such as an aryl or branched alkyl group. Computations explain how these structural elements contribute to reversibility and the ability to tune the binding affinities and the residence times of covalent inhibitors.

  8. Urinary tract infection-like symptom is associated with worse bladder cancer outcomes in the Medicare population: Implications for sex disparities.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kyle A; Ham, Sandra; Cohn, Joshua A; Steinberg, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    To determine the time to bladder cancer diagnosis from initial infection-like symptoms and its impact on cancer outcomes. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare, we designed a retrospective cohort study identifying beneficiaries aged ≥ 66 years diagnosed with bladder cancer from 2007 to 2009. Patients were required to have a hematuria or urinary tract infection claim within 1 year of bladder cancer diagnosis (n = 21 216), and have 2 years of prior Medicare data (n = 18 956) without any precedent hematuria, bladder cancer or urinary tract infection claims (n = 12 195). The number of days to bladder cancer diagnosis was measured, as well as the impact of sex and presenting symptom on time to diagnosis, pathology, and oncological outcomes. The mean time to bladder cancer diagnosis was 72.2 days in women versus 58.9 days in men (P < 0.001). A logistic regression model identified the greatest predictors of ≥ pT2 pathology were both women (odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.70-2.55) and men (odds ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.49-1.97) presenting with urinary tract infection. Cox proportional hazards analysis identified an increased risk of mortality from bladder cancer and all causes in women presenting with urinary tract infection (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.10-1.71, and hazard ratio 1.47, 95% confidence interval 1.28-1.69) compared with women with hematuria. Women have a longer interval from urinary tract infection to diagnosis of bladder cancer. Urinary tract infection presentation can adversely affect time to diagnosis, pathology and survival. Time to diagnosis seems not to be an independent predictor of bladder cancer outcomes. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. Marker-Based Estimates Reveal Significant Non-additive Effects in Clonally Propagated Cassava (Manihot esculenta): Implications for the Prediction of Total Genetic Value and the Selection of Varieties.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Marnin D; Kulakow, Peter; Rabbi, Ismail Y; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-31

    In clonally propagated crops, non-additive genetic effects can be effectively exploited by the identification of superior genetic individuals as varieties. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a clonally propagated staple food crop that feeds hundreds of millions. We quantified the amount and nature of non-additive genetic variation for three key traits in a breeding population of cassava from sub-Saharan Africa using additive and non-additive genome-wide marker-based relationship matrices. We then assessed the accuracy of genomic prediction for total (additive plus non-additive) genetic value. We confirmed previous findings based on diallel populations, that non-additive genetic variation is significant for key cassava traits. Specifically, we found that dominance is particularly important for root yield and epistasis contributes strongly to variation in CMD resistance. Further, we showed that total genetic value predicted observed phenotypes more accurately than additive only models for root yield but not for dry matter content, which is mostly additive or for CMD resistance, which has high narrow-sense heritability. We address the implication of these results for cassava breeding and put our work in the context of previous results in cassava, and other plant and animal species.

  10. Effects of nitrogen addition on soil microbes and their implications for soil C emission in the Gurbantunggut Desert, center of the Eurasian Continent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Cao, Yan Feng; Wang, Bin; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    Nitrogen (N) deposition can influence carbon cycling of terrestrial ecosystems. However, a general recognition of how soil microorganisms respond to increasing N deposition is not yet reached. We explored soil microbial responses to two levels of N addition (2.5 and 5 gN m(-2) yr(-1)) in interplant soil and beneath shrubs of Haloxylon ammodendron and their consequences to soil respiration in the Gurbantunggut Desert, northwestern China from 2011 to 2013. Microbial biomass and respiration were significantly higher beneath H. ammodendron than in interplant soil. The responses of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial respiration (MR) showed opposite responses to N addition in interplant and beneath H. ammodendron. N addition slightly increased MBC and MR in interplant soil and decreased them beneath H. ammodendron, with a significant inhibition only in 2012. N addition had no impacts on the total microbial physiological activity, but N addition decreased the labile carbon substrate utilization beneath H. ammodendron when N addition level was high. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis showed that N addition did not alter the soil microbial community structure as evidenced by the similar ratios of fungal to bacterial PLFAs and gram-negative to gram-positive bacterial PLFAs. Microbial biomass and respiration showed close correlations with soil water content and dissolved carbon, and they were independent of soil inorganic nitrogen across three years. Our study suggests that N addition effects on soil microorganisms and carbon emission are dependent on the respiratory substrates and water availability in the desert ecosystem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effects of a Subpsychotic Dose of Ketamine on Recognition and Source Memory for Agency: Implications for Pharmacological Modelling of Core Symptoms of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Honey, Garry D; O’Loughlin, Chris; Turner, Danielle C; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Corlett, Philip R; Fletcher, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Ketamine is increasingly used to model the cognitive deficits and symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated the extent to which ketamine administration in healthy volunteers reproduces the deficits in episodic recognition memory and agency source monitoring reported in schizophrenia. Intravenous infusions of placebo or 100 ng/ml ketamine were administered to 12 healthy volunteers in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, within-subjects study. In response to presented words, the subject or experimenter performed a deep or shallow encoding task, providing a 2(drug) × 2(depth of processing) × 2(agency) factorial design. At test, subjects discriminated old/new words, and recalled the sources (task and agent). Data were analyzed using multinomial modelling to identify item recognition, source memory for agency and task, and guessing biases. Under ketamine, item recognition and cued recall of deeply encoded items were impaired, replicating previous findings. In contrast to schizophrenia, there was a reduced tendency to externalize agency source guessing biases under ketamine. While the recognition memory deficit observed with ketamine is consistent with previous work and with schizophrenia, the changes in source memory differ from those reported in schizophrenic patients. This difference may account for the pattern of psychopathology induced by ketamine. PMID:16123767

  12. Effects of Two-Year Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Supplementation on Depressive Symptoms and Quality of Life in Older Adults with Elevated Homocysteine Concentrations: Additional Results from the B-PROOF Study, an RCT

    PubMed Central

    de Koning, Elisa J.; van der Zwaluw, Nikita L.; van Wijngaarden, Janneke P.; Sohl, Evelien; Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Enneman, Anke W.; Swart, Karin M. A.; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; Ham, Annelies C.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Uitterlinden, André G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Elders, Petra J. M.; Lips, Paul; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Lowering elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations by supplementing vitamin B12 and folic acid may reduce depressive symptoms and improve health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in older adults. This study aimed to test this hypothesis in a randomized controlled trial. Participants (N = 2919, ≥65 years, Hcy concentrations ≥12 µmol/L) received either 500 µg vitamin B12 and 400 µg folic acid daily or placebo for two years. Both tablets contained 15 µg vitamin D3. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS-15). HR-QoL was assessed with the SF-12 Mental and Physical component summary scores and the EQ-5D Index score and Visual Analogue Scale. Differences in two-year change scores were analyzed with Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). Hcy concentrations decreased more in the intervention group, but two-year change scores of the GDS-15 and three of four HR-QoL measures did not differ between groups. The EQ-5D Index score declined less in the intervention group than in the placebo group (mean change 0.00 vs. −0.02, p = 0.004). In conclusion, two-year supplementation with vitamin B12 and folic acid in older adults with hyperhomocysteinemia showed that lowering Hcy concentrations does not reduce depressive symptoms, but it may have a small positive effect on HR-QoL. PMID:27886078

  13. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in

  14. Self-compassion: a novel link with symptoms in schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Eicher, Amanda C; Davis, Louanne W; Lysaker, Paul H

    2013-05-01

    Self-compassion has been linked to both positive aspects of well-being and less psychopathology in nonclinical samples. Although this construct has begun to be investigated in case studies, the clinical correlates of self-compassion for those with schizophrenia spectrum disorders have yet to be explored. This study aimed to explore the relationship between self-compassion, symptoms, and insight in individuals with schizophrenia. A total of 88 participants with either schizophrenia (n = 51) or schizoaffective disorder (n = 37) who were enrolled in a study of metacognition at a Midwestern Veterans Affairs medical center completed measures of self-compassion and insight, along with a symptom interview. Higher self-compassion scores were associated with lower scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive, excitement, and emotional discomfort symptom scales in addition to poorer insight. Implications for treatment and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  15. Effects of Cerium Oxide and Ferrocene Nanoparticles Addition As Fuel-Borne Catalysts on Diesel Engine Particulate Emissions: Environmental and Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2017-04-06

    This study systematically examined the potential impacts of doping CeO2 and Fe(C5H5)2 nanoparticles as fuel-borne catalysts (FBCs) to ultralow sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel on the physical, chemical and toxicological characteristics of diesel particulate matter (DPM). The FBCs-doped fuels are effective in promoting soot oxidation and reducing the DPM mass emissions, but lead to a significant increase in the total particle counts due to the formation of self-nucleated metallic nanoparticles. Compared to undoped ULSD, the FBCs-doped fuels result in higher concentrations of particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes, higher fractions of organic carbon (OC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in particles, show slight alterations in soot nanostructure, reduce soot ignition temperature and activation energy. Exposure of the human-type II cell alveolar epithelial cells (A549) to DPM derived from FBCs-doped fuels shows a decrease in cell viability and alterations in the global gene expression with a broad range of biochemical pathways. The overall variations in DPM characteristics are mainly caused by the catalytic combustion process, and are related to the type, properties and contents of FBCs used in diesel fuel as well as the engine operating conditions. Environmental and health implications of the study are highlighted.

  16. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002435.htm Food additives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Food additives are substances that become part of a food ...

  17. Does community violence exposure predict trauma symptoms in a sample of maltreated youth in foster care?

    PubMed

    Garrido, Edward F; Culhane, Sara E; Raviv, Tali; Taussig, Heather N

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies find that childhood exposure to family and community violence is associated with trauma symptoms. Few studies, however, have explored whether community violence exposure (CVE) predicts trauma symptoms after controlling for the effects associated with family violence exposure (FVE). In the current study, CVE and FVE were examined in a sample of 179 youth with a recent history of maltreatment. CVE was associated with trauma symptoms after controlling for FVE, but FVE was not associated with trauma symptoms after controlling for CVE. In addition, negative coping strategies (e.g., self-harm, interpersonal aggression) partially mediated the association between CVE and trauma symptoms. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for interventions aimed at addressing the needs of children exposed to violence.

  18. Does Community Violence Exposure Predict Trauma Symptoms in a Sample of Maltreated Youth in Foster Care?

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Edward F.; Culhane, Sara E.; Raviv, Tali; Taussig, Heather N.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies find that childhood exposure to family and community violence is associated with trauma symptoms. Few studies, however, have explored whether community violence exposure (CVE) predicts trauma symptoms after controlling for the effects associated with family violence exposure (FVE). In the current study, CVE and FVE were examined in a sample of 179 youth with a recent history of maltreatment. CVE was associated with trauma symptoms after controlling for FVE, but FVE was not associated with trauma symptoms after controlling for CVE. In addition, negative coping strategies (e.g., self-harm, interpersonal aggression) partially mediated the association between CVE and trauma symptoms. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for interventions aimed at addressing the needs of children exposed to violence. PMID:21287965

  19. Emotional Awareness: A Transdiagnostic Risk Factor for Internalizing Symptoms in Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed Central

    Kranzler, Amy; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Abela, John R. Z.; Elias, Maurice J.; Selby, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study used longitudinal data to examine the role of emotional awareness as a transdiagnostic risk factor for internalizing symptoms. Participants were 204 youth, ages 7 to 16, who completed assessments every three months for a year. Results from hierarchical mixed effects modeling indicated that low emotional awareness predicted both depressive and anxiety symptoms for up to one year follow-up. In addition, emotional awareness predicted which youth went on to experience subsequent increases in depressive and anxiety symptoms over the course of the year. Emotional awareness also mediated both the cross-sectional and the longitudinal associations between anxiety and depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that emotional awareness may constitute a transdiagnostic risk factor for the development and/or maintenance of symptoms of depression and anxiety, which has important implications for youth treatment and prevention programs. PMID:25658297

  20. Addition of ethylene to a π-conjugated two-dimensional nickel-based organometallic framework with implications for olefin separation.

    PubMed

    Moncho, Salvador; Brothers, Edward N; Hall, Michael B

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated the mechanism for the reversible addition of ethylene to a periodic 2D network of square-planar nickel centers ([Ni(SC)4]n) using density functional theory. The mechanism is analogous to that for homogeneous olefin binding to metal bis(dithiolene) complexes. We considered periodic boundary calculations (PBC) as well as clusters containing up to 12 nickel atoms using a screened hybrid density functional to obtain accurate reaction barriers. Several different products were analyzed. The lowest-energy route begins with the addition of ethylene across the nickel-sulfur bond, which has previously not been considered for this system. The effect of the addition of several alkene molecules simultaneously on the surface was investigated to determine the potential efficiency of this material. This material is a candidate for alkene purification as it exhibits similar reactivity to its molecular analog in terms of the relative stability of products, energy barriers, and molecular efficiency while also providing the intrinsic technical benefits of heterogeneous catalysis.

  1. Additional moults into ‘elongatus’ males in laboratory-reared Polydesmus angustus Latzel, 1884 (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Polydesmidae) – implications for taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    David, Jean-Francois; Geoffroy, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The number of stadia during post-embryonic development is supposed to be fixed in most species of the millipede order Polydesmida. For the first time since 1928, additional moults were observed in two males of Polydesmus angustus Latzel, 1884 reared in the laboratory. These ‘elongatus’ males sensu Verhoeff reached stadium IX instead of stadium VIII, with addition of a further podous ring (32 pairs of legs). One male had well-developed gonopods at stadium VIII, which regressed at stadium IX; the other had no gonopods at stadium VIII, which developed at stadium IX. The two cases correspond to the ‘regressionis’ and ‘progressionis’ forms described by Verhoeff in Polydesmus complanatus (Linnaeus, 1761), which confirms entirely his results. Additional moults appear to be associated with small body sizes and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. Comparisons between millipede orders indicate that post-embryonic development is less strictly canalized in Polydesmida than in Chordeumatida. This implies that the adult number of body rings is of limited taxonomic value in Polydesmida and should not be viewed as a character of generic importance. PMID:22303094

  2. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  3. Eating disorder symptoms and parenting styles.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Emma; Blissett, Jackie

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between symptoms of eating disorders and parenting style, in a non-clinical sample. One hundred and five mothers completed self-report measures of eating disorder symptoms and parenting style. Higher levels of eating disorder symptoms were associated with more authoritarian and permissive parenting styles. Authoritative parenting was not significantly related to eating disorder symptoms. The findings demonstrate that eating disorder symptoms in non-clinical individuals are related to less adaptive parenting styles. These findings have potential implications for clinicians working with mothers with eating disorders. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence for an Additive Neurorestorative Effect of Simultaneously Administered CDNF and GDNF in Hemiparkinsonian Rats: Implications for Different Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Francesca; Stepanova, Polina; Bäck, Susanne; Yu, Li-Ying; Pörsti, Eeva; Männistö, Pekka T.; Tuominen, Raimo K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with a progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and the accumulation of intracellular inclusions containing α-synuclein. Current therapies do not stop the progression of the disease, and the efficacy of these treatments wanes over time. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are naturally occurring proteins promoting the survival and differentiation of neurons and the maintenance of neuronal contacts. CDNF (cerebral dopamine NTF) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived NTF) are able to protect DAergic neurons against toxin-induced degeneration in experimental models of PD. Here, we report an additive neurorestorative effect of coadministration of CDNF and GDNF in the unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of PD in rats. NTFs were given into the striatum four weeks after unilateral intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA (20 µg). Amphetamine-induced (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) rotational behavior was measured every two weeks. Number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells from SN pars compacta (SNpc) and density of TH-positive fibers in the striatum were analyzed at 12 weeks after lesion. CDNF and GDNF alone restored the DAergic function, and one specific dose combination had an additive effect: CDNF (2.5µg) and GDNF (1µg) coadministration led to a stronger trophic effect relative to either of the single treatments alone. The additive effect may indicate different mechanism of action for the NTFs. Indeed, both NTFs activated the survival promoting PI3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathway, but only CDNF decreased the expression level of tested endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress markers ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α subunit (eIF2α). PMID:28303260

  5. Symptom Identification in the Chronically Critically Ill

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Grace B.; Happ, Mary Beth

    2010-01-01

    Ascertaining the symptom experience of chronically critically ill (CCI) patients is difficult due to communication impairment and fluctuations in patient cognition and physiological conditions. The use of checklist self report ratings is hampered by the inability of most CCI patients to respond verbally to symptom queries. In addition to the communication problems caused by mechanical ventilation, the apparently diverse idioms of symptom expression add to the potential for miscommunication regarding symptom experience. Although patient communication impairment is a major barrier to symptom identification, symptom assessment and treatment are fundamental components of nursing care for CCI. This paper reviews and describes the unique constellation of symptoms experienced by many critically ill patients. We report our observations of symptom communication among CCI patients and nurses and discuss inconsistency in the language of symptom expression among nurses and patients. Clinically applicable strategies to improve nurse-patient symptom communication and suggestions for refinement of symptom assessment in chronic critical illness are provided. PMID:20118706

  6. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for hydrogen atom addition to N2 - Implications for the unimolecular lifetime of HN2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Duchovic, Ronald J.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from CASSCF externally contracted CI ab initio computations of the minimum-energy path for the addition of H to N2. The theoretical basis and numerical implementation of the computations are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The zero-point-corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation is estimated as 8.5 kcal/mol, and the lifetime of the lowest-lying quasi-bound vibrational state of HN2 is found to be between 88 psec and 5.8 nsec (making experimental observation of this species very difficult).

  7. More than constipation - bowel symptoms in Parkinson's disease and their connection to gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Mertsalmi, T H; Aho, V T E; Pereira, P A B; Paulin, L; Pekkonen, E; Auvinen, P; Scheperjans, F

    2017-09-11

    The majority of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms of which constipation is considered the most prominent. Recently, in addition to constipation, a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was also found to be associated with increased PD risk. Gut microbiota alterations have been reported in IBS and recently also in PD. IBS-like bowel symptoms in PD and their possible connection to other non-motor symptoms and faecal microbiota were assessed. This case-control study compared 74 PD patients with 75 controls without any signs of parkinsonism or potential premotor symptoms. IBS-like symptoms were assessed using the Rome III questionnaire. The non-motor symptoms were assessed using the Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire and Non-Motor Symptom Scale. Faecal microbiota were assessed by pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 regions of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Symptoms that were IBS-like were significantly more prevalent in PD patients than in controls (24.3% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.001). Criteria for functional constipation were met by 12.2% of PD patients and 6.7% of controls (P = 0.072). PD patients with IBS-like symptoms had more non-motor symptoms and a lower faecal abundance of Prevotella bacteria than those without IBS-like symptoms. Our results indicate that PD patients may suffer from colonic dysfunction beyond pure constipation. Therefore, a more comprehensive assessment of bowel symptoms could provide valuable information. The lower abundance of Prevotella bacteria in PD patients with IBS-like symptoms suggests that the microbiota-gut-brain axis may be implicated in the gastrointestinal dysfunction of PD patients. © 2017 EAN.

  8. Prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Anim, Michael Tetteh; Osafo, Joseph; Yirdong, Felix

    2016-11-10

    Previous research revealed high prevalence of psychological symptoms among sickle cell disease (SCD) patients in the West and Europe. In some Black SCD populations such as Nigeria and Jamaica, anxiety and depression had low prevalence rates compared to Europe. With difficulty locating research data on the prevalence of psychological symptoms in Ghana, this study aimed at exploring psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in a Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana. Two hundred and one participants (males 102 and females 99) who were HbSS (n = 131) and HbSC (n = 70), aged 18 years and above were purposively recruited. Using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) in a cross-sectional survey, the research answered questions about the prevalence of psychological symptoms. It also examined gender and genotype differences in psychological symptoms scores. Results indicated that adults with SCD had non-distress psychological symptoms scores. Although paranoid ideation as a psychological symptom indicated "a little bit" score, its prevalence was only 1 %. The prevalence of psychological symptoms as indexed by the Positive Symptom Total (PST) was 10 %. Anxiety, hostility, and depression were psychological symptoms with low scores. Furthermore, except psychoticism scores, males did not differ significantly from females in other psychological symptoms. On the contrary, HbSS participants differed significantly, reporting more psychological symptoms than their HbSC counterparts. The study concluded that there was low prevalence of psychological symptoms among adults with SCD in this Ghanaian study. Although psychological symptoms distress scores were not observed among study participants at this time, females differed significantly by experiencing more psychoticism symptoms than males. HbSS participants also differed significantly by experiencing more depression, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism, and additional symptoms such as poor appetite, trouble falling

  9. Effects of C-additions on ecosystem processes in the Serengeti: The role of grazing mammals and implications for global change research

    SciTech Connect

    Wilsey, B.J.; McNaughton, S.J. )

    1994-06-01

    Increases in atmospheric CO[sub 2] are predicted to cause an increase in the C:N ratio of plant substrates entering the soil organic matter pool. We experimentally increased soil C:N ratios by adding 40 g C/m[sup 2] as sucrose (metabolic C) or cellulose (structural C) in short-, mid-, and tall-grass plots in the Serengeti Ecosystem, and measured plant productivity, plant nutrient uptake rates, and mineralization rates. Experimental treatments also included fencing to exclude grazing and additions of 40 g N/m[sup 2] as urea to simulate a urine hit from an average-sized ungulate. Productivity was only 60% of controls in C-addition plots, and was similar for sucrose and cellulose. However, this response was not observed in the short-grass site, an area of relatively low rainfall and high fertility. These results support the role of a plant-microbe negative feedback mechanism on plant growth in which increased C to microbes results in increased immobilization, reduced plant uptake, and lowered plant growth.

  10. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Implications of estimated magmatic additions and recycling losses at the subduction zones of accretionary (non-collisional) and collisional (suturing) orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, D. W.; Von Huene, R.

    2009-01-01

    Arc magmatism at subduction zones (SZs) most voluminously supplies juvenile igneous material to build rafts of continental and intra-oceanic or island arc (CIA) crust. Return or recycling of accumulated CIA material to the mantle is also most vigorous at SZs. Recycling is effected by the processes of sediment subduction, subduction erosion, and detachment and sinking of deeply underthrust sectors of CIA crust. Long-term (>10-20 Ma) rates of additions and losses can be estimated from observational data gathered where oceanic crust underruns modern, long-running (Cenozoic to mid-Mesozoic) ocean-margin subduction zones (OMSZs, e.g. Aleutian and South America SZs). Long-term rates can also be observationally assessed at Mesozoic and older crust-suturing subduction zone (CSSZs) where thick bodies of CIA crust collided in tectonic contact (e.g. Wopmay and Appalachian orogens, India and SE Asia). At modern OMSZs arc magmatic additions at intra-oceanic arcs and at continental margins are globally estimated at c. 1.5 AU and c. 1.0 AU, respectively (1 AU, or Armstrong Unit,= 1 km3 a-1 of solid material). During collisional suturing at fossil CSSZs, global arc magmatic addition is estimated at 0.2 AU. This assessment presumes that in the past the global length of crustal collision zones averaged c. 6000 km, which is one-half that under way since the early Tertiary. The average long-term rate of arc magmatic additions extracted from modern OMSZs and older CSSZs is thus evaluated at 2.7 AU. Crustal recycling at Mesozoic and younger OMSZs is assessed at c. 60 km3 Ma-1 km-1 (c. 60% by subduction erosion). The corresponding global recycling rate is c. 2.5 AU. At CSSZs of Mesozoic, Palaeozoic and Proterozoic age, the combined upper and lower plate losses of CIA crust via subduction erosion, sediment subduction, and lower plate crustal detachment and sinking are assessed far less securely at c. 115 km3 Ma-1 km-1. At a global length of 6000 km, recycling at CSSZs is accordingly c. 0

  12. Aortic valve reimplantation for large root aneurysm and high-grade aortic regurgitation: incidence and implications of additional cusp and commissure repair.

    PubMed

    Kari, Fabian A; Siepe, Matthias; Rylski, Bartosz; Kueri, Sami; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2015-05-01

    Large-sized root aneurysm and high-grade aortic regurgitation (AR) might be contraindications for a valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedure (V-SARR) and aortic valve repair. The impact of a combination of root reimplantation and additional cusp/commissure repair on valve sufficiency in this setting was investigated with respect to early- and mid-term functional outcome. Out of a cohort of 220 patients treated with V-SARR, 73 with an aneurysm size ≥ 55 mm were identified. As a cut-off for high-grade preoperative AR, a grade of ≥ 3 was defined. End points were absolute early and mid-term aortic regurgitation grades, new incidence of AR and AR progression. The mean echocardiographic follow-up time was 3.8 years. T-tests, Kaplan-Meier and log-rank calculations were employed. Within the studied cohort of large aneurysms ≥ 55 mm [total, n = 73; mean age, 56 ± 14 years; female, n = 22 (30%); Marfan, n = 9 (12%); bicuspid valve n = 6 (8%)], 21 (29%) individuals had AR grades ≥ 3+. The rest had lower grade AR (63%) and 6 (8%) had a normally functioning aortic valve. The incidence rate of additional cusp procedures was 27% (n = 20) and included cusp plication, Trussler Stitch, cusp shaving and commissure resuspension. Incidence of additional cusp/commissure repair was 2 (9.5%) among patients with higher grade AR ≥ 3+, while it was 18 (30%) among patients with lower grade AR or a normally functioning valve (P = 0.03). The mean early postoperative AR was 0.5 (median, 1.0). The rate of freedom from early failure, valve replacement and AR ≥ 2 was 96%. The rate of freedom from AR progression was 96% and from new onset AR was 100%. The setting of a large proximal thoracic aortic aneurysm size and high-grade AR does not result in a higher need for cusp/commissure procedures in order to achieve a satisfactory mid-term functional outcome. Large aneurysm size and high-grade AR per se do not increase the complexity of repair. The choice of reimplantation technique

  13. Relationship between emotional numbing and arousal symptoms in American women of Japanese descent who experienced interpersonal victimization.

    PubMed

    Yoshihama, Mieko; Horrocks, Julie

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, studies of veterans and others who experienced various types of trauma have found a strong relationship between emotional numbing and arousal symptoms, challenging the current DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, which combines emotional numbing and avoidance symptoms in a single criterion. In this paper, we investigate emotional numbing symptoms in a community-based random sample of women of Japanese descent who had experienced interpersonal victimization, such as childhood abuse, intimate partner violence, and violence perpetrated by non-intimates (n = 202). Controlling for age, place of birth, and timing and severity of victimization, emotional numbing symptom counts were associated more strongly with arousal than avoidance symptoms, consistent with previous studies of veterans and assaulted women. In addition, emotional numbing symptom counts were significantly associated with age and, to a lesser degree, country of birth. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  14. Lack of nucleophilic addition in the isoxazole and pyrazole diketone modified analogs of curcumin; implications for their antitumor and chemosensitizing activities.

    PubMed

    Labbozzetta, Manuela; Baruchello, Riccardo; Marchetti, Paolo; Gueli, Maria C; Poma, Paola; Notarbartolo, Monica; Simoni, Daniele; D'Alessandro, Natale

    2009-09-14

    Curcumin (CUR) can be considered as a good lead compound for the design of new anticancer drugs. Further, structure-activity relationship studies may clarify the importance of the redox activities in the antitumor effects of the drug. We have elaborated the alpha,beta-unsaturated 1,3-diketone moiety of CUR into the isoxazole (ISO) and pyrazole (PYR) derivatives. These derivatives should be much less prone to nucleophilic addition than CUR and benzyl mercaptan addition analyses showed that indeed they do not form isolable conjugated products. When compared with CUR, ISO and PYR exhibited increased cell growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects in liver cancer HA22T/VGH cells as well as in other tumor cell types; in contrast to CUR, the antitumor effects of ISO or PYR were not influenced by concomitant administration of N-acetylcysteine, as a source of -SH groups, or buthionine sulfoximine, as an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Further, treatment with CUR, but not with ISO or PYR, significantly decreased the content of reduced glutathione in the HA22T/VGH cells. Finally, ISO and PYR lacked the ability of the parent compound to sensitize the HA22T/VGH cells to cisplatin (CIS), an effect which appeared to occur through an interaction of CUR and CIS at the level of the -SH groups. Thus, the ability of interacting with cell thiols might not be requested for the more potent antitumor activities of new diketone modified CUR derivatives, which might rely on other mechanisms, though possibly devoid of chemosensitization capabilities.

  15. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Expanding Mg-Zn hybrid chemistry: inorganic salt effects in addition reactions of organozinc reagents to trifluoroacetophenone and the implications for a synergistic lithium-magnesium-zinc activation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David R; Clegg, William; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Kennedy, Alan R; McCall, Matthew D; Russo, Luca; Hevia, Eva

    2011-07-18

    Numerous organic transformations rely on organozinc compounds made through salt-metathesis (exchange) reactions from organolithium or Grignard reagents with a suitable zinc precursor. By combining X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, this study sheds new light on the constitution of the organometallic species involved in this important synthetic tool. Investigations into the metathesis reactions of equimolar amounts of Grignard reagents (RMgX) and ZnCl(2) in THF led to the isolation of novel magnesium-zinc hybrids, [{(thf)(2)Mg(μ-Cl)(3)ZnR}(2)] (R=Et, tBu, nBu or o-OMe-C(6)H(4)), which exhibit an unprecedented structural motif in mixed magnesium-zinc chemistry. Furthermore, theoretical modelling of the reaction of EtMgCl with ZnCl(2) reveals that formation of the mixed-metal compound is thermodynamically preferred to that of the expected homometallic products, RZnCl and MgCl(2). This study also assesses the alkylating ability of hybrid 3 towards the sensitive ketone trifluoroacetophenone, revealing a dramatic increase in the chemoselectivity of the reaction when LiCl is introduced as an additive. This observation, combined with recent related breakthroughs in synthesis, points towards the existence of a trilateral Li/Mg/Zn synergistic effect.

  17. Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Shungu, Dikoma C; Weiduschat, Nora; Murrough, James W; Mao, Xiangling; Pillemer, Sarah; Dyke, Jonathan P; Medow, Marvin S; Natelson, Benjamin H; Stewart, Julian M; Mathew, Sanjay J

    2012-09-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex illness, which is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric illness. In two previous reports, using (1)H MRSI, we found significantly higher levels of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate in patients with CFS relative to those with generalized anxiety disorder and healthy volunteers (HV), but not relative to those with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this third independent cross-sectional neuroimaging study, we investigated a pathophysiological model which postulated that elevations of CSF lactate in patients with CFS might be caused by increased oxidative stress, cerebral hypoperfusion and/or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Fifteen patients with CFS, 15 with MDD and 13 HVs were studied using the following modalities: (i) (1)H MRSI to measure CSF lactate; (ii) single-voxel (1)H MRS to measure levels of cortical glutathione (GSH) as a marker of antioxidant capacity; (iii) arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF); and (iv) (31)P MRSI to measure brain high-energy phosphates as objective indices of mitochondrial dysfunction. We found elevated ventricular lactate and decreased GSH in patients with CFS and MDD relative to HVs. GSH did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. In addition, we found lower rCBF in the left anterior cingulate cortex and the right lingual gyrus in patients with CFS relative to HVs, but rCBF did not differ between those with CFS and MDD. We found no differences between the three groups in terms of any high-energy phosphate metabolites. In exploratory correlation analyses, we found that levels of ventricular lactate and cortical GSH were inversely correlated, and significantly associated with several key indices of physical health and disability. Collectively, the results of this third independent study support a pathophysiological model of CFS in which increased oxidative stress may play a key role in CFS etiopathophysiology.

  18. Neurologic Outcome After Resection of Parietal Lobe Including Primary Somatosensory Cortex: Implications of Additional Resection of Posterior Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, June Sic; Lee, Sang Kun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative neurologic outcomes after primary somatosensory cortex (S1) resection have not been well documented. This study was designed to evaluate the neurologic deterioration that follows resection of the S1 areas and to assess the risk factors associated with these morbidities. We reviewed 48 consecutive patients with medically intractable epilepsy who underwent resection of the S1 and/or the adjacent cortex. The 48 patients were categorized into 4 groups according to the resected area as seen on postoperative magnetic resonance images: group 1 (resection of S1 only; n = 4), 2 (the posterior parietal cortex [PPC] only; n = 24), 3 (S1 and PPC; n = 10), and 4 (S1 and precentral gyrus; n = 10). After the resection of S1 areas, 19 patients (40%) experienced neurologic worsening, including 6 (13%) with permanent and 13 (27%) with transient deficits. Patients with permanent deficits included 2 with motor dysphasia, 1 with dysesthesia, 2 with equilibrium impairments, and 1 with fine movement disturbance of the hand. The overall and permanent neurologic risks were 25% and 0% in group 1, 17% and 4% in group 2, 80% and 20% in group 3, and 60% and 30% in group 4, respectively. Multivariate analysis determined that the resection of both S1 and PPC was the only significant risk factor for neurologic deficits (P = 0.002). The neurologic risk of the resection of S1 and/or its adjacent cortical areas was 40%. The additional resection of the PPC was significantly associated with the development of postoperative neurologic impairments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proposed Ice Flow, Given 200m and 400m Additional Ice in the Allan Hills Region, Antarctica: Implications for Meteorite Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub-Metlay, S.; Cassidy, W. A.

    1992-07-01

    The Allan Hills-David Glacier region contains some of the most highly populated meteorite stranding surfaces in Antarctica. Nearly 2000 meteorites have to date been collected from the icefields associated with the Allan Hills, and nearly 1500 from areas around Elephant Moraine. While much attention has been focused on the current geological and glaciological conditions of these stranding surfaces, less work has been done concerning what they may have looked like in the past, when ice thicknesses may have been greater. In this study, conjectural maps of the current Allan Hills area with 200 meters and 400 meters of additional ice cover each are analyzed for probable regional and local ice flow patterns. A dramatic decrease in ice thickness over a relatively brief period of time could result either from climatic change or a geologically rapid regional uplift. Delisle and Sievers (1991) noted that the valley between the Allan Hills Main Icefield and the Allan Hills resembles a half-graben resulting from east-west extensional tectonics, and that the mesa-like bedrock features associated with the Near Western and Mid Western Icefields resemble fault blocks. They concluded that the Allan Hills area icefields may have become active stranding surfaces as a result of a regional uplift within the past 1-2 million years, assuming a current rate of uplift in the Allan Hills region of ~100 meters/million years. Whether the cause was climatic or tectonic, generalized maps of current ice contours plus 400 and 200 meters ice may provide views of what the Allan Hills region looked like just before activation of the modern meteorite stranding surfaces (Figs. 1 and 2). At an ice thickness greater by 400 meters, ice could flow smoothly over the Allan Hills and would drain down to the Mawson Glacier via the Odell Glacier, east of the Allan Hills; down the Manhaul Bay depression between the east and west arms of Allan Hills; and down the half-graben discovered by Delisle and Sievers

  20. Evidence That Psychotic Symptoms Are Prevalent in Disorders of Anxiety and Depression, Impacting on Illness Onset, Risk, and Severity—Implications for Diagnosis and Ultra–High Risk Research

    PubMed Central

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; van Nierop, Martine; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Lieb, Roselind; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ullrich; van Os, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is commonly assumed that there are clear lines of demarcation between anxiety and depressive disorders on the one hand and psychosis on the other. Recent evidence, however, suggests that this principle may be in need of updating. Methods: Depressive and/or anxiety disorders, with no previous history of psychotic disorder, were examined for the presence of psychotic symptoms in a representative community sample of adolescents and young adults (Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology study; n = 3021). Associations and consequences of psychotic symptomatology in the course of these disorders were examined in terms of demographic distribution, illness severity, onset of service use, and risk factors. Results: Around 27% of those with disorders of anxiety and depression displayed one or more psychotic symptoms, vs 14% in those without these disorders (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.89–2.66, P < .001). Presence as compared with nonpresence of psychotic symptomatology was associated with younger age (P < .0001), male sex (P < .0058), and poorer illness course (P < .0002). In addition, there was greater persistence of schizotypal (P < .0001) and negative symptoms (P < .0170), more observable illness behavior (P < .0001), greater likelihood of service use (P < .0069), as well as more evidence of familial liability for mental illness (P < .0100), exposure to trauma (P < .0150), recent and more distant life events (P < .0006–.0244), cannabis use (P < .0009), and any drug use (P < .0008). Conclusion: Copresence of psychotic symptomatology in disorders of anxiety and depression is common and a functionally and etiologically highly relevant feature, reinforcing the view that psychopathology is represented by a network or overlapping and reciprocally impacting dimensional liabilities. PMID:22258882

  1. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  2. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Center Finder Home » About Multiple Myeloma » Symptoms Multiple Myeloma Symptoms Multiple myeloma symptoms may vary by patient, ... to be managed or prevented. The most common multiple myeloma symptoms may include: Bone pain or bone fractures ...

  3. Depressive symptoms in patients with cancer: does cortisol keep cytokines from singing the blues?

    PubMed

    Low, Carissa A; Bovbjerg, Dana H

    2014-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common among patients with cancer, and both psychological stress and physiological factors have been implicated in the etiology of depression. Scientific progress in this area is challenged by the changing nature of psychological and physiological processes over the course of cancer diagnosis and treatment. The article by Wu and colleagues in the current issue of Psychosomatic Medicine provides an example of thoughtful consideration of the complex longitudinal relationships between psychological stress, physiology, and depressive symptoms. These findings are put into context by discussing broader challenges in this area, with a focus on the contribution of inflammatory processes caused by cancer and/or its treatment to depressive and related sickness behavior symptoms. We outline several regulatory pathways by which cortisol, inflammatory processes, and depressive symptoms may interact in the context of cancer and highlight implications of these interactions for tumor progression. Additional research is needed to delineate these pathways and advance scientific understanding of the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying depressive symptoms in the context of cancer, with important implications for the development of effective interventions for patients undergoing initial cancer treatment, as well as for long-term survivors.

  4. Coping, family social support, and psychological symptoms among student veterans.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel H; Riggs, Shelley A; Ruggero, Camilo

    2015-04-01

    With rising numbers of student veterans on today's college campuses, multicultural competence in college counseling centers increasingly includes an understanding of military culture and its relation to the psychological health and functioning of student veterans. Research on interpersonal and intrapersonal factors associated with college student veterans' mental health is scarce. The current study examines the contributions of coping style and family social support on symptoms of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress in a student veteran sample. We also tested the moderating role of family social support in the relationship between coping style and psychological symptoms. Data from 136 student veterans were analyzed by using path analysis. Results revealed that avoidant coping and family social support significantly predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms. Avoidant coping also significantly predicted posttraumatic stress symptoms. In addition, findings indicated that family social support moderated the relationship between problem-focused coping and depression, as well as between avoidant coping and symptoms of anxiety and depression but not posttraumatic stress. Implications of results for college and university counselors are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  6. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  7. Hypothyroidism with presenting symptoms of fibrositis.

    PubMed

    Wilke, W S; Sheeler, L R; Makarowski, W S

    1981-01-01

    Eight patients who initially presented with signs and symptoms of the fibrositis syndrome, without overt hypothyroid disease, were found to have chemical evidence of hypothyroidism. Myalgic symptoms resolved in 6 of 8 patients treated with low dose thyroid replacement. In addition, another hypothesis of pathophysiology of the myalgic symptoms observed in patients with hypothyroidism related to sleep disturbance is offered.

  8. Exposure to traumatic perinatal experiences and posttraumatic stress symptoms in midwives: prevalence and association with burnout.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Kayleigh; Spiby, Helen; Slade, Pauline

    2015-02-01

    Midwives provide care in a context where life threatening or stressful events can occur. Little is known about their experiences of traumatic events or the implications for psychological health of this workforce. To investigate midwives' experiences of traumatic perinatal events encountered whilst providing care to women, and to consider potential implications. A national postal survey of UK midwives was conducted. 421 midwives with experience of a perinatal event involving a perceived risk to the mother or baby which elicited feelings of fear, helplessness or horror (in the midwife) completed scales assessing posttraumatic stress symptoms, worldview beliefs and burnout. 33% of midwives within this sample were experiencing symptoms commensurate with clinical posttraumatic stress disorder. Empathy and previous trauma exposure (personal and whilst providing care to women) were associated with more severe posttraumatic stress responses. However, predictive utility was limited, indicating a need to consider additional aspects increasing vulnerability. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress were associated with negative worldview beliefs and two domains of burnout. Midwives may experience aspects of their work as traumatic and, as a consequence, experience posttraumatic stress symptomatology at clinical levels. This holds important implications for both midwives' personal and professional wellbeing and the wellbeing of the workforce, in addition to other maternity professionals with similar roles and responsibilities. Organisational strategies are required to prepare midwives for such exposure, support midwives following traumatic perinatal events and provide effective intervention for those with significant symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of symptom severity measured just before termination to predict child treatment dropout.

    PubMed

    Chasson, Gregory S; Vincent, John P; Harris, Gerald E

    2008-07-01

    The current study examined indices of trauma-related symptom severity as predictors of dropout from exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy in a sample of 99 child and adolescent trauma victims. The investigation incorporated measures of symptom severity at two time points: pretreatment and just before termination. The results indicated that a model with symptom severity measured just before termination was significantly associated with the number of attended sessions; however, a model with the symptom-severity indices measured at pretreatment was nonsignificant. In addition, a significant main effect indicated that increased avoidance behavior measured just before termination was related to fewer treatment sessions. Further analyses also suggested that higher severity of intrusion and depression measured just before termination was correlated with fewer treatment sessions. The results support the idea that more immediate distress may be related to treatment dropout. Implications for the research and practice of exposure therapy for child trauma are discussed. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. PERSONALITY PREDISPOSITIONS IN CHINESE ADOLESCENTS: THE RELATION BETWEEN SELF-CRITICISM, DEPENDENCY, AND PROSPECTIVE INTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joseph R; Young, Jami F; Hankin, Benjamin L; Yao, Shuqiao; Zhu, Xiong Zhao; Abela, John R Z

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the prospective relation between two personality predispositions, self-criticism and dependency, and internalizing symptoms. Specifically, it was examined whether self-criticism and dependency predicted symptoms of depression and social anxiety, and if a moderation (e.g. diathesis-stress) or mediation model best explained the relation between the personality predispositions and emotional distress in Chinese adolescents. Participants included 1,150 adolescents (597 females and 553 males) from mainland China. Participants completed self-report measures of self-criticism, dependency, and neuroticism at baseline, and self-report measures of negative events, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety symptoms once a month for six months. Findings showed that self-criticism predicted depressive symptoms, while dependency predicted social anxiety symptoms. In addition, support was found for a mediation model, as opposed to a moderation model, with achievement stressors mediating the relation between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight new developmental pathways for the development of depression and social anxiety symptoms in mainland Chinese adolescents. Implications for cross-cultural developmental psychopathology research are discussed.

  11. Fathers of children with or without ID: understanding long-term psychological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S R; Zeedyk, S M; Tipton, L A; Rodas, N V; Blacher, J

    2015-12-28

    Researchers have primarily relied on mother report to understand the parenting contexts of rearing children with intellectual disabilities. Fathers are increasingly being considered as equally important reporters of their child's behaviours, as they have unique and independent relationships with their children. The purpose of this study was to understand how one source of stress - reports of child behaviour problems - along with spousal support related to parenting tasks, associated with fathers' reports of psychological symptoms over time. One hundred eighty-two father participants completed measures of child behaviour problems, spousal support and psychological symptoms. Growth curve modelling was employed to examine paternal psychological symptoms over the child's developmental trajectory. Fathers' reports of child behaviour problems predicted initial levels of paternal psychological symptoms but did not predict change in paternal psychological symptoms over time. Spousal support further reduced initial levels of paternal psychological symptoms. Child behaviour problems are more important than disability status in predicting father's psychological symptoms. Spousal support predicts paternal psychological symptoms and can be viewed as an additional resource for fathers. Implications for research and practice are discussed. © 2015 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. PERSONALITY PREDISPOSITIONS IN CHINESE ADOLESCENTS: THE RELATION BETWEEN SELF-CRITICISM, DEPENDENCY, AND PROSPECTIVE INTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Yao, Shuqiao; Zhu, Xiong Zhao; Abela, John R.Z.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the prospective relation between two personality predispositions, self-criticism and dependency, and internalizing symptoms. Specifically, it was examined whether self-criticism and dependency predicted symptoms of depression and social anxiety, and if a moderation (e.g. diathesis-stress) or mediation model best explained the relation between the personality predispositions and emotional distress in Chinese adolescents. Participants included 1,150 adolescents (597 females and 553 males) from mainland China. Participants completed self-report measures of self-criticism, dependency, and neuroticism at baseline, and self-report measures of negative events, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety symptoms once a month for six months. Findings showed that self-criticism predicted depressive symptoms, while dependency predicted social anxiety symptoms. In addition, support was found for a mediation model, as opposed to a moderation model, with achievement stressors mediating the relation between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight new developmental pathways for the development of depression and social anxiety symptoms in mainland Chinese adolescents. Implications for cross-cultural developmental psychopathology research are discussed. PMID:25798026

  13. [Unusual reactions to food additives].

    PubMed

    Novembre, E; Dini, L; Bernardini, R; Resti, M; Vierucci, A

    1992-01-01

    The most important symptoms caused by food additives are urticaria and angioedema, but rhinitis, asthma and gastrointestinal disturbances are also reported. Only seldom food additives have been shown to induce symptoms in other organs such central nervous system or joints and with a sparse objective evidence. In this study, we report two cases of unusual reactions to food additives (tartrazine and benzoates) involving mainly the central nervous system (headache, migraine, overactivity, concentration and learning difficulties, depression) and joints (arthralgias), confirmed with diet and double blind challenge. The possible pathogenetic mechanisms are also discussed.

  14. Memorial symptom assessment scale.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor T; Hwang, Shirley S; Thaler, Howard T; Kasimis, Basil S; Portenoy, Russell K

    2004-04-01

    Patients with advanced illnesses often have multiple symptoms. As interest in palliative care and interventions for symptom control increase, the ability to assess multiple symptoms has become more important. A number of instruments have been developed to meet this need in cancer patients. This article reviews the development and applications of a multidimensional instrument, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has 32 symptoms and three dimensions of frequency, severity, and distress. Shorter versions - The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale Short Form (32 symptoms with one dimension) and the Condensed Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (14 symptoms with one dimension), and a version for children aged 7-12 years, have also been developed. A distinctive feature is the summary subscales for physical distress, psychological distress, and The Global Distress Index. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has proven useful in description of symptom epidemiology, the role of symptoms in pain, fatigue, and spirituality; as a predictor of survival, and in proxy assessments of pain. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale has been used in studies of cancer and AIDS patients, and patients with advanced medical illnesses. Possible future roles of instruments such as the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale include use in clinical trials, for pharmacoeconomic analyses, definition of symptom clusters and symptom burden, the development of symptom outcome measures, symptom monitoring, and improving care for patients. Continued research is needed for the versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale and other symptom instruments in different populations and applications.

  15. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  16. Depression and immunity: inflammation and depressive symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Stefan M; Irwin, Michael R

    2006-08-01

    There is strong evidence that depression involves alterations in multiple aspects of immunity that may contribute to the development or exacerbation of a number of medical disorders and also may play a role in the pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. Accordingly, aggressive management of depressive disorders in medically ill populations or individuals at risk for disease may improve disease outcome or prevent disease development. On the other hand, in light of data suggesting that immune processes may interact with the pathophysiologic pathways known to contribute to depression, novel approaches to the treatment of depression may target relevant aspects of the immune response. Taken together, the data provide compelling evidence that a psychoimmunologic frame of reference may have profound implications regarding the consequences and treatment of depression. In addition, this approach may be used to investigate the possibility that peripheral and central production of cytokines may account for neuropsychiatric symptoms in inflammatory diseases. This article summarizes evidence for a cytokine-mediated pathogenesis of depression and fatigue in MS. The effects of central inflammatory processes may account for some of the behavioral symptoms seen in patients who have MS that cannot be explained by psychosocial factors or CNS damage. This immune-mediated hypothesis is supported by indirect evidence from experimental and clinical studies of the effect of cytokines on behavior, which have found that both peripheral and central cytokines may cause depressive symptoms. Emerging clinical data from patients who have MS support an association of central inflammation (as measured by MRI) and inflammatory markers with depressive symptoms and fatigue. Based on the literature reviewed in this article, subtypes of MS fatigue and depression may exist that are caused by different pathogenetic mechanisms, including inflammation and CNS damage as well as psychosocial factors or

  17. Schemas and Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms in incarcerated women.

    PubMed

    Specht, Matt W; Chapman, Alex; Cellucci, Tony

    2009-06-01

    There is increasing interest regarding the role of maladaptive cognition in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). The current study examined the relationship between early maladaptive schema (EMS) domains and BPD symptoms as well as whether schema domains account for the relationship between childhood maltreatment and BPD severity. Incarcerated women (N=105) were assessed for BPD symptoms via semi-structured diagnostic interview. Disconnection/Rejection and Impaired Limits were associated with BPD pathology although these domains shared variance with depression and antisocial personality disorder pathology, respectively. In addition, the relationship between childhood abuse and BPD severity was non-significant after controlling for schema domains. Related findings and the implications for cognitive treatment of BPD are discussed.

  18. Premenstrual symptoms and smoking-related expectancies.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Bello, Mariel S; Stone, Matthew D; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Huh, Jimi; Monterosso, John; Haselton, Martie G; Fales, Melissa R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2016-06-01

    Given that prior research implicates smoking abstinence in increased premenstrual symptoms, tobacco withdrawal, and smoking behaviors, it is possible that women with more severe premenstrual symptoms have stronger expectancies about the effects of smoking and abstaining from smoking on mood and withdrawal. However, such relations have not been previously explored. This study examined relations between premenstrual symptoms experienced in the last month and expectancies that abstaining from smoking results in withdrawal (i.e., smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies), that smoking is pleasurable (i.e., positive reinforcement smoking expectancies), and smoking relieves negative mood (i.e., negative reinforcement smoking expectancies). In a cross-sectional design, 97 non-treatment seeking women daily smokers completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, premenstrual symptoms, mood symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Affect premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased negative reinforcement smoking expectancies, but not over and above covariates. Affect and pain premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased positive reinforcement smoking expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Affect, pain, and water retention premenstrual symptoms were associated with increased smoking abstinence withdrawal expectancies, but only affect premenstrual symptoms remained significant in adjusted models. Findings from this study suggest that addressing concerns about withdrawal and alternatives to smoking may be particularly important in women who experience more severe premenstrual symptoms, especially affect-related changes.

  19. Cancer symptom clusters: current concepts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Aynur

    2013-03-01

    Cluster research examines complex interrelationships between multiple concurrent symptoms and their mechanisms. An individual's varying understanding of the cluster concept and variations in assessment tools results in discrepancies. This article will focus on the conceptual and methodological issues associated with definitions, symptom interrelationships, and outcomes of cancer symptom clusters. An important issue in symptom cluster research is to clarify the definition of a cluster. Some evidence suggests that 'symptom pairs' should be treated as clusters. There is substantial evidence (both qualitative and quantitative) to support a psychoneurological symptom cluster in cancer patients. It has been proposed that consistent clusters are those that have similar 'core' symptoms over time. Research has also shown that a 'sentinel' symptom can predict the presence of other relevant symptoms within a cluster. Identification of patient subgroups with higher symptom severity may be useful in targeting the most needy individuals for intervention. Symptom clusters are predictors of patient outcomes, including decreased functional performance and shorter cancer survival. Additional efforts should refine the cluster definition and elucidate the cluster stability and sentinel symptom. Both conceptual and empirical contributions should advance symptom cluster research. The qualitative approaches can explore the experience of symptom clusters and provide a conceptual basis for future research.

  20. Rejection sensitivity and depressive symptoms: Longitudinal actor-partner effects in adolescent romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Norona, Jerika C; Roberson, Patricia N E; Welsh, Deborah P

    2016-08-01

    The present study utilizes the actor-partner interdependence model to examine the longitudinal relationship between rejection sensitivity and one's own and one's partner's depressive symptoms. The sample included adolescent romantic couples from the U.S. (N = 198 adolescents; 50% girls; 90.2% Caucasian) whose rejection sensitivity at Time 1 and depressive symptoms approximately one year later (Time 2) were assessed. Additionally, aggressive behaviors and maintenance behaviors that commonly associated with rejection sensitivity (e.g., self-silencing) are explored as mediators. Results indicate that boyfriends' rejection sensitivity at Time 1 predicted girlfriends' depressive symptoms at Time 2. Additionally, girls' rejection sensitivity predicted their own and their boyfriends' self-silencing. Developmental and clinical implications are discussed.

  1. ODD Symptom Network during Preschool.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tess E; Lee, Christine A; Martel, Michelle M; Axelrad, Marni E

    2016-08-15

    Several different conceptualizations of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) symptoms have been proposed, including one undivided set of symptoms (DSM-IV-TR; APA 2000); two domains of symptoms subdivided into affective and behavioral; and three domains of symptoms subdivided as angry/irritable, argumentative/defiant, and spiteful. The current study utilizes a novel approach to examining the division of ODD symptoms through use of network analysis. Participants were 109 preschoolers (64 male) between the ages of three and six (M = 4.34 years, SD = 1.08) and their parents and teachers/caregivers, who provided ratings of ODD symptoms. Results are consistent with one-, two-, and three- cluster solutions of ODD, but perhaps provide most support for the three-cluster solution. In addition, results support the idea that negative affect, particularly anger, forms the core of the ODD symptom network during preschool. These results suggest the importance of targeting anger in preschool interventions for ODD.

  2. Does Fear Reactivity during Exposure Predict Panic Symptom Reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Seidel, Anke; Rosenfield, Benjamin; Hofmann, Stefan G.; Rosenfield, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective Fear reactivity during exposure is a commonly used indicator of learning and overall therapy outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the predictive value of fear reactivity during exposure using multimodal indicators and an advanced analytical design. We also investigated the degree to which treatment condition (cognitive training versus respiratory skill training) moderated fear reactivity and therapeutic outcome. Method Thirty-four patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia completed a total of 123 in-vivo exposure sessions, comprised of three weekly sessions and a fourth session 2 months following therapy completion. Sessions varied in length and phobic stimuli. Cardio-respiratory physiology (heart rate, PCO2, respiration rate) and experiential symptoms (panic symptoms and anxiety) were assessed repeatedly throughout exposure sessions, in addition to weekly assessments of panic cognitions, avoidance, and functioning. Results Panic symptomatology decreased substantially in both treatment conditions during therapy and follow-up. Significant cardio-respiratory and experiential reactivity was observed during all exposures, characterized by activation followed by reduction. Greater within-session activation of anxiety and panic symptoms was inversely related to improvement in panic symptoms severity, but neither physiological activation, nor within- or between-session reduction of either physiological or experiential variables was predictive of outcome. No moderating effects of treatment condition were found. Conclusions Fear activation and reduction during exposure are weak predictors of corrective learning and fear extinction. Clinical implications for exposure therapy and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:22486408

  3. Symptom-related attributional biases in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Nicole; Woodward, Todd S

    2017-07-01

    Biases in causal attributions and evidence integration have been implicated in delusions, but have not been investigated simultaneously to examine additive or multiplicative effects. It was hypothesised that paranoid delusions would correlate with self-serving and personalising biases ("defence" model of paranoia), particularly when these biases were disconfirmed. Constrained principal component analysis was used to investigate differences between schizophrenia patients (paranoid vs. non-paranoid), bipolar disorder patients, and healthy controls, as well as to examine the extent to which psychotic symptoms could predict patterns of responding on a novel attributional bias task (Attributional Style BADE, or ASB) that requires integrating contextual information. Although no group differences were found, disorganisation and manic symptoms correlated with situation attributions and self-blame when such attributions were unsupported by the available evidence, and depression and anxiety correlated with other-person and self attributions (not situation attributions) when confirmed by the available evidence, regardless of diagnosis. While group differences accounted for little variance in responses on the ASB task, a transdiagnostic association between symptoms of psychosis and the ASB task was observed. This highlights the importance of considering symptom profiles rather than diagnostic groupings when investigating cognitive biases and related non-pharmacological treatments.

  4. Trajectories of depressive symptoms in foster youth transitioning into adulthood: the roles of emotion dysregulation and PTSD.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Christine E; Bailey, Brenda E; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Lilly, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Foster youth often experience considerable adversity both in and out of foster care, including histories of abuse and/or neglect, and further stressors within the foster system. These adverse experiences often occur at key developmental periods that can compromise emotional functioning and lead to posttraumatic symptomatology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and emotion dysregulation. In the face of difficult histories and ongoing mental health challenges, youth transitioning into adulthood may be particularly vulnerable to increases in depressive symptoms. We explored the trajectory of depressive symptoms in foster youth from age 17 to 19 using a piecewise linear growth model, examining the effects of PTSD and emotion dysregulation on youth's depressive symptoms over time. Results revealed depressive symptoms decreased from age 17 to 18 but increased from 18 to 19. PTSD and emotion dysregulation predicted greater baseline depressive symptoms and decreases in symptoms from age 17 to 18, whereas only PTSD predicted increases in depressive symptoms from 18 to 19. Females reported higher levels of depressive symptoms compared to males. Additionally, emotion dysregulation was a stronger predictor of depressive symptoms for females than males. Implications for service delivery for foster youth transitioning into adulthood are discussed.

  5. Symptom load and general function among patients with erythema migrans: a prospective study with a 1-year follow-up after antibiotic treatment in Norwegian general practice

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Knut Eirik; Hjetland, Reidar; Reiso, Harald; Lindbæk, Morten; Tschudi-Madsen, Hedda

    2017-01-01

    Objective Promptly treated erythema migrans (EM) has good prognosis. However, some patients report persistent symptoms. Do patients with EM have more symptoms than the general population? We describe individual symptoms and general function in EM-patients at time of diagnosis and one year after treatment. Design Prospective study with 1-year follow up after treatment. Questionnaires included a modified version of the Subjective Health Complaints Inventory, comprising three additional Lyme borreliosis (LB) related symptoms. General function was assessed using a five-point scale modified from the COOP/WONCA charts. Setting Norwegian general practice. Subjects A total of 188 patients were included in a randomized controlled trial comparing three antibiotic regimens for EM, of whom 139 had complete data for this study. Main outcome measures Individual symptoms, symptom load and general function. Results Mild symptoms were common, reported by 84.9% at baseline and by 85.6% at follow-up. At baseline, patients reported a mean of 5.4 symptoms, compared with 6.2 after one year. Severely bothersome symptoms and severely impaired general function were rare. Tiredness was the most reported symptom both at baseline and at follow-up. Palsy (other than facial) was the least reported symptom, but the only one with a significant increase. However, this was not associated to the EM. Conclusion The symptom load was comparable to that reported in the general population. We found an increase in symptom load at follow-up that did not significantly affect general function. Implication: Monitoring patients’ symptom loads prior to treatment reduce the probability of attributing follow-up symptoms to LB. Key points Erythema migrans has a good prognosis.Patients treated for erythema migrans have a slight increase in symptom load one year after treatment. This increase does not affect general function. The levels of subjective health complaints in patients treated for erythema migrans are

  6. Symptom Effects on Employment in a Structural Model of Mental Illness and Treatment: Analysis of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Slade, Eric; Salkever, David

    2001-03-01

    employment of a reduction in negative symptoms is several times greater than the effect of a comparable reduction in positive symptoms. Moreover, the effect of an improvement in symptoms on employment is stronger for non-supported employment than for working in sheltered or supported employment. Although commonly measured symptoms of schizophrenia impact employment, greater control of symptoms alone is unlikely to lead to large increases in employment for persons with schizophrenia in the near term. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH CARE PROVISION AND USE: These findings suggest that improved treatment that results in reduced symptom levels will increase rates of employment among persons with schizophrenia, but that large employment impacts probably also require more effective rehabilitative therapies that target improvement in functioning. IMPLICATION FOR POLICY: Expansions of supported employment opportunities and removal of work disincentives in public income-support programs are two additional measures that may help to increase employment participation.

  7. Beyond "somatization" and "psychologization": symptom-level variation in depressed Han Chinese and Euro-Canadian outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dere, Jessica; Sun, Jiahong; Zhao, Yue; Persson, Tonje J; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    The finding that people of Chinese heritage tend to emphasize somatic rather than psychological symptoms of depression has frequently been discussed in the culture and mental health literature since the 1970s. Recent studies have confirmed that Chinese samples report more somatic and fewer psychological depression symptoms compared to "Western" samples. The question remains, however, as to whether or not these effects are attributable to variation in all the constituent symptoms or to a subset. If the latter, there is the additional possibility that some symptoms might show a divergent pattern. Such findings would have implications for how cultural variations in symptom presentation are interpreted, and would also inform the cultural study of affective experiences more broadly. The current study addressed these issues in Chinese (n = 175) and Euro-Canadian (n = 107) psychiatric outpatients originally described by Ryder et al. (2008). Differential item functioning (DIF) was used to examine whether specific somatic and psychological symptoms diverged from the overall patterns of cultural variation. Chi-square analyses were used to examine atypical somatic symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia), previously neglected in this literature. No DIF was observed for the typical somatic symptoms, but Euro-Canadians reported greater levels of atypical somatic symptoms, and showed higher rates of atypical depression. DIF was observed for psychological symptoms-the Chinese reported high levels of "suppressed emotions" and "depressed mood," relative to their overall psychological symptom reporting. Chinese outpatients also spontaneously reported "depressed mood" at similar levels as the Euro-Canadians, contrary to prevailing ideas about Chinese unwillingness to discuss depression. Overall, the findings provide a more nuanced picture of how culture shapes symptom presentation and point toward future studies designed to unpack cultural variation in narrower subsets of depressive symptoms.

  8. Physiologic and Psychological Symptoms Experienced by Adults With Acute Leukemia: An Integrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Tara A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the current knowledge of symptoms experienced by adults with acute leukemia (AL) and provide evidence to inform practice and research. Data Sources Literature review using an electronic search supplemented by a hand search of current literature reporting the physiologic and/or psychological symptoms of patients with AL was conducted. Data Synthesis Because of the variability found in the methods and specific aims of the articles, a rating system was applied to score how strongly the findings contributed to meeting the aims of the research. This rating system was applied to assist the authors in analyzing the findings. Therefore, the articles that scored lower ultimately contributed less during the analysis phase. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the symptoms experienced by adults undergoing treatment is being slowly evaluated. However, to better understand and subsequently manage these symptoms, longitudinal research examining the symptom trajectories in this population is needed. Implications for Nursing Additional investigation into symptom characteristics will facilitate the development of tailored interventions to manage the temporal characteristics of symptoms for this population. PMID:24769593

  9. Longitudinal Relationships of Social Reactions, PTSD Symptoms, and Revictimization in Sexual Assault Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Peter-Hagene, Liana C.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual assault survivors receive various positive and negative social reactions to assault disclosures, yet little is known about the directionality of associations of social reactions to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over time. Data from a large, diverse sample of women who had experienced adult sexual assault was analyzed with hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to examine how negative and positive reactions relate to PTSD symptoms over 3 years and to test the hypothesis that the relationship between negative social reactions and PTSD symptoms is reciprocal. We found that, as predicted, social reactions predicted subsequent PTSD symptoms, and in turn PTSD symptoms predicted subsequent social reactions. We also investigated the role of sexual revictimization by comparing women who suffered (versus not) additional sexual victimization during the course of our study. Revictimized women had greater PTSD symptoms and more negative social reactions, but associations of social reactions with PTSD symptoms did not vary according to revictimization status. Implications for practice and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:25538120

  10. Parent alcoholism impacts the severity and timing of children's externalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hussong, Andrea M; Huang, Wenjing; Curran, Patrick J; Chassin, Laurie; Zucker, Robert A

    2010-04-01

    Although previous studies show that children of alcoholic parents have higher rates of externalizing symptoms compared to their peers, it remains unclear whether the timing of children's externalizing symptoms is linked to that of their parent's alcohol-related symptoms. Using a multilevel modeling approach, we tested whether children aged 2 through 17 showed elevated mother-, father- and child-reported externalizing symptoms (a) at the same time that parents showed alcohol-related consequences (time-varying effects), (b) if parents showed greater alcohol-related consequences during the study period (proximal effects), and (c) if parents had a lifetime diagnosis of alcoholism that predated the study period (distal effects). We used integrative data analysis to combine samples from two prospective studies to test these hypotheses. Distal effects of parent alcoholism on increased child externalizing symptoms were large and consistent. In addition, proximal and time-varying effects of parent alcohol symptoms were also found. Implications for preventing escalations in externalizing symptoms among this high-risk population are discussed.

  11. Differential associations between sensory loss and neuropsychiatric symptoms in adults with and without a neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Kim M; Mortby, Moyra E; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the differential associations between sensory loss and neuropsychiatric symptoms among older adults with and without diagnosed neurocognitive disorder. The sample comprised 1,393 adults (52.3% men) aged between 72 and 79 years from a community-based cohort study. There were 213 cases of mild and 64 cases of major neurocognitive disorders. The main outcome was number of informant reported symptoms on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Sensory loss was defined by visual acuity worse the 0.3 logMAR (6/12 or 20/40) and self-reported hearing problems. Clinically relevant NPI symptoms were reported in 182 (13.1%) participants, but no individual symptom occurred in more than 5% of the total sample. Among participants diagnosed with a major neurocognitive disorder, those with any sensory loss had over three times (95%CI: 1.72-11.78) greater rates of NPI symptoms than those with unimpaired levels of sensory functioning. There were no differences in the number of neuropsychiatric symptoms by type of sensory loss, and no additional risk associated with a dual sensory loss compared to a single sensory loss. There was no evidence of an association between sensory loss and number of neuropsychiatric symptoms among cognitively healthy adults. The extent to which this association is the result of underlying neuropathology, unmet need, or interpersonal factors is unclear. These findings have significant implications for dementia care settings, including hospitals and respite care, as patients with sensory loss are at increased risk of neuropsychiatric symptoms and may require additional psychosocial support. Interventions to manage sensory loss and reduce the impact of sensory limitations on neuropsychiatric symptoms are needed.

  12. Energy barriers for the addition of H, *CH3, and *C2H5 to *CH2=CHX [X = H, CH3, OH] and for H-atom addition to RCH=O [R = H, CH3, *C2H5, n-C3H7]: implications for the gas-phase chemistry of enols.

    PubMed

    Simmie, John M; Curran, Henry J

    2009-07-09

    Although enols have been identified in alcohol and other flames and in interstellar space and have been implicated in the formation of carboxylic acids in the urban troposphere in the past few years, the reactions that give rise to them are virtually unknown. To address this data deficit, particularly with regard to biobutanol combustion, we have carried out a number of ab initio calculations with the multilevel methods CBS-QB3 and CBS-APNO to determine the activation enthalpies for methyl addition to the CH(2) group of CH(2)=CHX where X = H, OH, and CH(3). These average at 26.3 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and are not influenced by the nature of X; addition to the CHX end is energetically costlier and does show the influence of group X = OH and CH(3). Replacing the attacking methyl radical by ethyl makes very little difference to addition at CH(2) and follows the same trend of a higher barrier for addition to the CH(OH) end. In the case of H-addition it is more problematic to draw general conclusions since the DFT-based methodology, CBS-QB3, struggles to locate transition states for some reactions. However, the increase in barrier heights in reaction at the CHX end in comparison to addition at the methylene end is evident. For hydrogen atom reaction with the carbonyl group in the compounds methanal, ethanal, propanal, and butanal we see that for addition at the O-center the barrier heights of ca. 38 kJ mol(-1) are not influenced by the nature of the alkyl group whereas addition at the C-center is different on going from H --> alkyl but seems to be invariant at 20 kJ mol(-1) once alkylated. Rate constants for H-atom elimination from 1-hydroxyethyl, 1-hydroxypropyl, and 1-hydroxybutyl radicals, valid over the range 800-2000 K, are reported. These demonstrate that enols are more prevalent than previously suspected and that 1-buten-1-ol should be almost as abundant as its isomeric aldehyde 1-butanal during the combustion of 1-butanol and that this will also be the case for

  13. Network localization of neurological symptoms from focal brain lesions

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sashank; Liu, Hesheng; Liu, Qi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Caviness, Verne S.; Fox, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    A traditional and widely used approach for linking neurological symptoms to specific brain regions involves identifying overlap in lesion location across patients with similar symptoms, termed lesion mapping. This approach is powerful and broadly applicable, but has limitations when symptoms do not localize to a single region or stem from dysfunction in regions connected to the lesion site rather than the site itself. A newer approach sensitive to such network effects involves functional neuroimaging of patients, but this requires specialized brain scans beyond routine clinical data, making it less versatile and difficult to apply when symptoms are rare or transient. In this article we show that the traditional approach to lesion mapping can be expanded to incorporate network effects into symptom localization without the need for specialized neuroimaging of patients. Our approach involves three steps: (i) transferring the three-dimensional volume of a brain lesion onto a reference brain; (ii) assessing the intrinsic functional connectivity of the lesion volume with the rest of the brain using normative connectome data; and (iii) overlapping lesion-associated networks to identify regions common to a clinical syndrome. We first tested our approach in peduncular hallucinosis, a syndrome of visual hallucinations following subcortical lesions long hypothesized to be due to network effects on extrastriate visual cortex. While the lesions themselves were heterogeneously distributed with little overlap in lesion location, 22 of 23 lesions were negatively correlated with extrastriate visual cortex. This network overlap was specific compared to other subcortical lesions (P < 10−5) and relative to other cortical regions (P < 0.01). Next, we tested for generalizability of our technique by applying it to three additional lesion syndromes: central post-stroke pain, auditory hallucinosis, and subcortical aphasia. In each syndrome, heterogeneous lesions that themselves had

  14. Network localization of neurological symptoms from focal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Boes, Aaron D; Prasad, Sashank; Liu, Hesheng; Liu, Qi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Caviness, Verne S; Fox, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    A traditional and widely used approach for linking neurological symptoms to specific brain regions involves identifying overlap in lesion location across patients with similar symptoms, termed lesion mapping. This approach is powerful and broadly applicable, but has limitations when symptoms do not localize to a single region or stem from dysfunction in regions connected to the lesion site rather than the site itself. A newer approach sensitive to such network effects involves functional neuroimaging of patients, but this requires specialized brain scans beyond routine clinical data, making it less versatile and difficult to apply when symptoms are rare or transient. In this article we show that the traditional approach to lesion mapping can be expanded to incorporate network effects into symptom localization without the need for specialized neuroimaging of patients. Our approach involves three steps: (i) transferring the three-dimensional volume of a brain lesion onto a reference brain; (ii) assessing the intrinsic functional connectivity of the lesion volume with the rest of the brain using normative connectome data; and (iii) overlapping lesion-associated networks to identify regions common to a clinical syndrome. We first tested our approach in peduncular hallucinosis, a syndrome of visual hallucinations following subcortical lesions long hypothesized to be due to network effects on extrastriate visual cortex. While the lesions themselves were heterogeneously distributed with little overlap in lesion location, 22 of 23 lesions were negatively correlated with extrastriate visual cortex. This network overlap was specific compared to other subcortical lesions (P < 10(-5)) and relative to other cortical regions (P < 0.01). Next, we tested for generalizability of our technique by applying it to three additional lesion syndromes: central post-stroke pain, auditory hallucinosis, and subcortical aphasia. In each syndrome, heterogeneous lesions that themselves had

  15. Perimenstrual symptoms: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Logue, C M; Moos, R H

    1986-01-01

    This article provides an overview of information on the prevalence of perimenstrual symptoms. Overall, at least 40% of women experience some cyclical perimenstrual symptoms. Although most women rate their symptoms as mild, approximately 2%-10% report severe symptoms. Prospective studies of perimenstrual symptoms indicate that retrospective reports are reasonably accurate among women who experience moderate to severe symptoms. However, among the majority of women with few or minimal symptoms, retrospective reports may amplify the cyclicity of variation in comparison to concurrent reports. A variety of risk factors are associated with patterns of symptom reporting and may provide clues to the etiology of perimenstrual symptoms and help to identify women most vulnerable to them. A woman's age and cycle characteristics are predictors of the type and severity of perimenstrual symptoms she experiences. In addition, a history of affective illness may be associated with increased reporting of perimenstrual symptoms. Future research should focus on developing new diagnostic criteria for subtypes of perimenstrual syndromes, exploring positive symptoms and experiences associated with the menstrual cycle, and formulating holistic treatment approaches that view perimenstrual syndromes as psychosomatic conditions.

  16. A prospective investigation of the relationships among sleep quality, physical symptoms, and depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamysheva, Ekaterina; Skouteris, Helen; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Paxton, Susan J; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prospective relationship between pregnancy physical discomforts experienced during the second trimester and late pregnancy depressive symptoms, as well as the mediating effect of sleep quality on antenatal depressive symptomatology. Healthy pregnant women (N=257) completed the Physical Symptoms Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Inventory at early-mid second trimester, and then again at late third trimester. Physical symptoms and sleep quality at the first time point were both correlated moderately with depressive symptoms at late pregnancy. Discomfort associated with physical symptoms was a better predictor of depressive symptoms than Frequency of symptoms, although a score combining Frequency, Discomfort and Effect of symptoms on life was the strongest predictor of depressive symptoms. Results of the hierarchical regression analyses of the mediation model indicated that physical symptoms at early-mid second trimester predicted depressive symptoms in the last trimester both directly, and via poor sleep quality (prospectively), which mediated the relationship. The clinical implications of these findings for antenatal care are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology.

  18. Subthreshold Symptoms of Depression in Preadolescent Girls Are Stable and Predictive of Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alsion; Feng, Xin; Babinski, Dara; Hinze, Amanda; Rischall, Michal; Henneberger, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of depression are investigated among 232 preadolescent girls to study if they were predictive and stable of depression. Findings show that early symptoms of depression among preadolescent girls predict depressive disorders. Implications for preventive measures are discussed.

  19. Subthreshold Symptoms of Depression in Preadolescent Girls Are Stable and Predictive of Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alsion; Feng, Xin; Babinski, Dara; Hinze, Amanda; Rischall, Michal; Henneberger, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of depression are investigated among 232 preadolescent girls to study if they were predictive and stable of depression. Findings show that early symptoms of depression among preadolescent girls predict depressive disorders. Implications for preventive measures are discussed.

  20. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Rebecca; Hasking, Penelope; Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan's Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed.

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms in College Students: The Complex Interplay between Alexithymia, Emotional Dysregulation and Rumination

    PubMed Central

    Reupert, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Both Emotional Cascade Theory and Linehan’s Biosocial Theory suggest dysregulated behaviors associated with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) emerge, in part, because of cycles of rumination, poor emotional recognition and poor emotion regulation. In this study we examined relationships between rumination, alexithymia, and emotion regulation in predicting dysregulated behaviors associated with BPD (e.g. self-harm, substance use, aggression), and explored both indirect and moderating effects among these variables. The sample comprised 2261 college students who completed self-report measures of the aforementioned constructs. BPD symptoms, stress, family psychological illness, and alexithymia exerted direct effects on behaviors. Symptoms had an indirect effect on behaviors through rumination, alexithymia and emotional dysregulation. In addition, the relationship between symptoms and dysregulated behaviors was conditional on level of rumination and alexithymia. Implications for early identification and treatment of BPD and related behaviors in college settings are discussed. PMID:27348858

  2. The structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in war veterans.

    PubMed

    Konecky, Brian; Meyer, Eric C; Kimbrel, Nathan A; Morissette, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    The present research examined the underlying factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as conceptualized in the recently published fifth edition of the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5). Participants were 258 trauma-exposed Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans. A self-report measure of PTSD symptoms was administered to all participants and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to compare several different models of PTSD. CFA revealed that the best-fitting model was a six-factor model in which symptoms loaded onto the factors of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, dysphoric arousal, and anxious arousal. These findings have important implications for ongoing conceptualization of PTSD and suggest that additional modifications to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD may still be warranted to more accurately reflect the underlying structure of PTSD symptoms.

  3. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety among adolescents following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Yanyun; Mo, Lei; Liu, Xianchen

    2011-02-01

    This study examined the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression among 2,250 adolescents 6 months after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China. Results showed that 15.8%, 40.5%, and 24.5% of participants reported clinical symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression, respectively. Posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression were highly comorbid. Risk factors for symptoms of the 3 disorders were female gender, older age, and earthquake disaster exposure. In addition, the interaction effects of residence (urban/rural) and number of siblings of study subjects on symptoms of the 3 disorders were examined. Implications of findings on intervention and prevention of mental health problems among adolescents after experiencing earthquake disasters are discussed. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  4. The Role of Family Routines in the Intergenerational Transmission of Depressive Symptoms between Parents and their Adolescent Children.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Erika M; Williams, Deanna; Chen, Edith

    2017-05-01

    Whereas previous research on environmental factors implicated in the intergenerational transmission of depression has tended to focus on the role of parenting quality (e.g., harshness), the current study sought to assess whether structural aspects of families may contribute to depression-relevant affective and immune processes in youths. Specifically, the present study examined the role of family routines in linking parental depressive symptoms to youth emotion regulation, a depression-relevant marker of low-grade inflammation, and depressive symptoms in youths. 261 parent-adolescent dyads reported on their own depressive symptoms, family routines, and youths' emotion regulation abilities. In addition, peripheral blood was drawn from youths to assess levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6). Path analyses provided support for a model in which parental depressive symptoms related to fewer family routines, which in turn were associated with higher IL-6 and depressive symptoms in youths as well as marginally associated with worse youth emotion regulation. Moreover, family routines were found to statistically account for part of the association between parent- and youth- depressive symptoms. Together, these results suggest that family routines may represent an additional facet of the family environment that can potentially contribute to the intergenerational transmission of depressive symptoms.

  5. Adverse Life Events and Depressive Symptoms in African American Youth: The Role of Control-Related Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Yadira M.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2011-01-01

    The association between experiences of adverse life events and adolescent depressive symptoms has been well documented. However, this association is not consistently observed in urban and low income African American youth. In addition, mechanisms linking life event stress and African American adolescents' depressive symptoms have received little attention. This study examined past year violent and nonviolent life events assessed in 6th grade as predictors of 7th grade depressive symptoms among a community epidemiologically defined sample of 447 (47% girls) urban African American adolescents. Depressive symptoms were assessed twice, at a 1-year interval, and initial depressive symptoms were controlled in the analyses. Control-related beliefs were examined as mediators of the association between life events and depressive symptoms, and gender was examined as a moderator of the association between control-related beliefs and depressive symptoms. Associations among study variables were examined in a series of models, from general to more specific. A model in which nonviolent and violent life events were examined separately and control and contingency beliefs examined as one latent variable was the most informative about the etiology of depressive symptoms in a sample of urban, African American youth. Implications of the findings for preventive interventions and future research are discussed. PMID:21197108

  6. The Early Course of Depression: A Longitudinal Investigation of Prodromal Symptoms and Their Relation to the Symptomatic Course of Depressive Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Choi, Jimmy Y.

    2010-01-01

    The current study explored longitudinal evidence for prodromal symptoms of depression episodes. A model based on previous findings of the relations between prodromal and residual symptoms was described and used to generate hypotheses tested in this study. Data were analyzed from 160 participants from the Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression (CVD) Project (Alloy & Abramson, 1999) who experienced an episode of depression during the prospective follow-up period and 60 CVD participants who did not. Congruent with the hypothesis, individuals who subsequently developed an episode of depression experienced significantly greater numbers of depression symptoms in the period of time leading up to the acute episode compared with those who did not develop a depressive episode. Seven depression symptoms were particularly likely to appear before the onset of an acute episode. Further, all three predictions from the model were supported: the durations of prodromal and residual phases were correlated, the prodromal and residual symptom profiles were quite similar, and the order of symptom onset was significantly and highly negatively correlated with the order of symptom remission. Additionally, residual symptom profiles were similar to subsequent prodromal symptom profiles in individuals who experienced more than one depressive episode. These findings are discussed in terms of the importance of understanding the earliest prodromal symptoms to appear and their relation to the symptomatic course of depression episodes. Implications for early intervention are also discussed. PMID:20677835

  7. Symptoms of Blood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly, symptoms are caused by decreases in the blood components. Decreased red blood cells and hemoglobin can cause ... bruising . Occasionally, symptoms may relate to increases in blood components. Increased red blood cells can cause headache and ...

  8. Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... grow into (and restore) the body's blood cells. Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Painless, swollen lymph nodes in the ... leukemia" or "lymphoma" in the search box) Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Symptoms Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the ...

  9. PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms As with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), PTSD ...

  10. Patterns of symptom reporting during pregnancy comparing opioid maintained and control women.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrea L; Lopatko, Olga V; Stacey, Helen; Pearson, Vicki; Woods, Anna; Fisk, Ann; White, Jason M

    2012-12-01

    To characterize the range of symptoms experienced by pregnant methadone-maintained (MM) and buprenorphine-maintained (BM) women to determine whether these differ from those experienced by a control group of nonopioid exposed pregnant women. Opioid-maintained (OM) patients report high rates of symptoms related to direct opioid effects and withdrawal. Pregnancy is associated with a range of symptoms, some overlapping with opioid effects and withdrawal. Prospective, nonrandomized, open-label comparison study undertaken in a large teaching maternity hospital in South Australia. Pregnant BM (n = 25), MM (n = 25) and nonopioid exposed controls (n = 25) were recruited and matched for age, parity, gravidity, alcohol consumption, and smoking status. Symptom report patterns, maternal withdrawal, and additional substance use were assessed. MM women reported 10 and BM women reported 2 symptoms throughout pregnancy at rates greater than controls. Methadone-maintained women reported significantly (P < 0.05) more symptoms than BM women compared to controls throughout pregnancy. Methadone-maintained women reported 8 and BM women reported 3 symptoms in the third trimester at rates greater than controls. Methadone-maintained women reported greater opioid withdrawal than controls; this did not occur in BM women. Additional substance use was comparable between BM and MM women but greater than controls. Patterns of symptom reports may have clinical implications for maternal and fetal health during pregnancy for OM women including optimization of opioid dosing regimens, education regarding maternal nutritional intake and preventing postnatal depression, thereby ensuring maternal health and fetal development during pregnancy and enhancing mother-infant bonding and healthy child development postnatally.

  11. [Negative symptoms: which antipsychotics?].

    PubMed

    Maurel, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    Treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia is a major issue and a challenge for the functional and social prognosis of the disease, to which they are closely linked. First- and second-generation antipsychotics allow a reduction of all negative symptoms. The hope of acting directly on primary negative symptoms with any antipsychotic is not supported by the literature. However, the effectiveness of first- and second-generation antipsychotics is demonstrated on secondary negative symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Time interval between concussions and symptom duration.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Matthew A; Andrea, John; Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah

    2013-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that children with a previous history of concussion have a longer duration of symptoms after a repeat concussion than those without such a history. Prospective cohort study of consecutive patients 11 to 22 years old presenting to the emergency department of a children's hospital with an acute concussion. The main outcome measure was time to symptom resolution, assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPSQ). Patients and providers completed a questionnaire describing mechanism of injury, associated symptoms, past medical history, examination findings, diagnostic studies, and the RPSQ. Patients were then serially administered the RPSQ for 3 months after the concussion or until all symptoms resolved. A total of 280 patients were enrolled over 12 months. Patients with a history of previous concussion had a longer duration of symptoms than those without previous concussion (24 vs 12 days, P = .02). Median symptom duration was even longer for patients with multiple previous concussions (28 days, P = .03) and for those who had sustained a concussion within the previous year (35 days, P = .007) compared with patients without those risk factors. In a multivariate model, previous concussion, absence of loss of consciousness, age ≥13, and initial RPSQ score >18 were significant predictors of prolonged recovery. Children with a history of a previous concussion, particularly recent or multiple concussions, are at increased risk for prolonged symptoms after concussion. These findings have direct implications on the management of patients with concussion who are at high risk for repeat injuries.

  13. Psychotic symptoms in acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Denzil; Safeekh, A.T.; Trivedi, Mohit

    2005-01-01

    Various psychiatric symptoms have been reported in patients with acromegaly. Most of them are personality changes characterized by lack of initiative and spontaneity. There are few case reports of the presence of auditory and visual hallucinations, and delusions in patients with acromegaly. We report a patient with acromegaly who had psychotic symptoms including Schneiderian first-rank symptoms.

  14. The structure of obsessive compulsive symptoms and beliefs: A correspondence and biplot analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kang; McKay, Dean; Taylor, Steven; Tolin, David; Olatunji, Bunmi; Timpano, Kiara; Abramowitz, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Research has suggested that obsessive-compulsive (OC) beliefs are differentially predictive of OC symptom dimensions. One additional way in which beliefs and symptoms may be related is by severity; that is, the role of beliefs may vary as a function of symptom severity. In order to evaluate this possibility, correspondence analysis with biplot was applied to evaluate the association between OC beliefs and OC symptom severity across three subsamples, individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; N=398), individuals with anxiety disorders (N=104), and undergraduate students (N=285). To do so, we generated five row categories of symptom severity and six columns based on the Obsessive Compulsive Beliefs Questionnaire (OBQ) for three subsamples. Unlike factor analyses of inter-variable correlations (or covariances), the CA-biplot paradigm calibrates simultaneously row and column information and estimates dimensional coordinates (analogous to factor loadings) separately for rows and columns. We used the first two dimensions from each subsample because they accounted for most variance (on average 89%) so as to construct a hypothetical plane with them. Then, we visually inspected associations among five severity categories (rows) and six OBQ subscales (columns) in the plane and also calculated their correlations. The visual configurations and numerical correlations were consistent across three subsamples, indicating that inflated responsibility was significantly associated with OC symptoms, but only for those with the least severe symptoms. Importance and control of thoughts were associated with OC symptoms across all levels of symptom severity. The implications of these findings for the cognitive model of OCD are considered.

  15. Associations between signs and symptoms of dry eye disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, Jimmy D; Keith, Michael S; Sudharshan, Lavanya; Snedecor, Sonya J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The accurate diagnosis and classification of dry eye disease (DED) is challenging owing to wide variations in symptoms and lack of a single reliable clinical assessment. In addition, changes and severity of clinical signs often do not correspond to patient-reported symptoms. To better understand the inconsistencies observed between signs and symptoms, we conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate published studies reporting associations between patient-reported symptoms and clinical signs of DED. Methods PubMed and Embase were searched for English-language articles on the association between clinical signs and symptoms of DED up to February 2014 (no lower limit was set). Results Thirty-four articles were identified that assessed associations between signs and symptoms, among which 33 unique studies were reported. These included 175 individual sign–symptom association analyses. Statistical significance was reported for associations between sign and symptom measures in 21 of 33 (64%) studies, but for only 42 of 175 (24%) individual analyses. Of 175 individual analyses, 148 reported correlation coefficients, of which the majority (129/148; 87%) were between −0.4 and 0.4, indicating low-to-moderate correlation. Of all individual analyses that demonstrated a statistically significant association, one-half (56%) of reported correlation coefficients were in this range. No clear trends were observed in relation to the strength of associations relative to study size, statistical methods, or study region, although results from three studies did suggest that disease severity may be a factor. Conclusion Associations between DED signs and symptoms are low and inconsistent, which may have implications for monitoring the response to treatment, both in the clinic and in clinical trials. Further studies to increase understanding of the etiopathogenesis of DED and to identify the most reliable and relevant measures of disease are needed to enhance clinical

  16. Symptom patterns in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Tord; Valderhaug, Robert

    2006-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) defined at the diagnostic level encompasses divergent symptoms. The present study examines symptom patterns in OCD in children and adolescents in order to search for the presence of diagnostic heterogeneity. Two hundred and thirteen outpatients with primary OCD participated. The patients' and primary caretakers' responses on the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale were used to generate severity ratings for 61 OCD symptoms, and cluster analysed them. A five cluster solution was judged to be the most clinically and theoretically relevant model. The clusters were named: (1) "Mental Rituals, Touching & Ordering", (2) "Contamination & Cleaning", (3) "Superstitions", (4) "Obsessions/Checking & Confessing" and (5) "Somatic Concerns". The symptom patterns of the groups differed, and three groups were particularly homogeneous. In addition, there were differences in severity, number of symptoms and age. OCD in children and adolescents is a heterogeneous disorder and discrepancies vis-à-vis adult studies indicate that childhood OCD may have developmentally specific traits. The sub-groups obtained are likely to have implications for the assessment of OCD symptoms in children, their prognosis and outcome in treatment research.

  17. Investigating Treatment Outcomes Across OCD Symptom Dimensions in a Clinical Sample of OCD Patients.

    PubMed

    Chase, Tannah; Wetterneck, Chad T; Bartsch, Robert A; Leonard, Rachel C; Riemann, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the heterogeneous nature of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), many self-report assessments do not adequately capture the clinical picture presenting within each symptom dimension, particularly unacceptable thoughts (UTs). In addition, obsessions and ordering/arranging compulsions are often underrepresented in samples of treatment outcome studies for OCD. Such methodological discrepancies may obscure research findings comparing treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions. This study aimed to improve upon previous research by investigating treatment outcomes across OCD symptom dimensions using the Dimensional Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, which offers a more comprehensive assessment of UTs. The study included a primarily residential sample of 134 OCD patients. Results indicated that there were no significant differences in treatment outcomes across symptom dimensions. However, the severity of UTs remained significantly greater than other symptom dimensions at both admission and discharge. Thus, it is possible that UTs may exhibit uniquely impairing features, compared with other symptom dimensions. It is also possible that these findings may reflect the characteristics of the residential OCD samples. These speculations as well as implications for OCD treatment and future research are discussed.

  18. Depressive Symptoms in Chiropractic Students

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Stuart; Puhl, Aaron Anthony; Reinhart, Christine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The intensive training associated with health care education has been suggested to have unintended negative consequences on students’ mental or emotional health that may interfere with the development of qualities deemed essential for proficient health care professionals. This longitudinal study examined the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms among students at a chiropractic educational institution. Methods: Chiropractic students at all levels of training were surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the academic years of 2000/2001, 2001/2002, and 2002/2003. The measurement tool employed was the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). Previously established BDI-II cutoff scores were used to assess the severity of reported depression symptoms, and these were compared by sex and year of training. Results: The survey was completed by 1303 students (70%) over the 3 years of the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was nearly 25%, with 13.7% of respondents indicating a rating of mild depression, 7.1% indicating moderate depressive symptoms, and 2.8% indicating severe symptoms. Significant differences were found between years of training, with 2nd-year students having the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms, and sex, with females having a higher rate of symptoms. Conclusions: Chiropractic students surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College had high rates of depression similar to those measured in other health care profession students. Chiropractic educational institutions should be aware of this situation and are encouraged to emphasize students’ awareness of their own personal health and well-being and their access to appropriate care, in addition to the same concerns for their future patients. PMID:22069339

  19. Negative symptoms in psychometrically defined schizotypy: The role of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Timothy R; Elis, Ori; Mote, Jasmine; Sanchez, Amy H; Kring, Ann M

    2016-06-30

    People high in schizotypy, a risk factor for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, can have negative symptoms, including diminished experience of motivation/pleasure (MAP) and emotional expressivity (EXP). Additionally, people high in schizotypy often report elevated depressive symptoms, which are also associated with diminished MAP and EXP. In this study, we examined whether negative symptoms were related to schizotypy above and beyond the presence of depressive symptoms. Thirty-one people high in schizotypy and 24 people low in schizotypy were administered the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), an interview-based measure of MAP and EXP negative symptoms and completed a self-report measure of cognitive and somatic-affective depressive symptoms. People high in schizotypy had more MAP negative symptoms than people low in schizotypy, but we found no group differences in EXP negative symptoms. Importantly, the relationship between MAP negative symptoms and schizotypy was fully mediated by cognitive depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive symptoms, specifically cognitive depressive symptoms, may be a pathway for motivation and pleasure impairment, in people at elevated risk for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  20. What Are the Symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Condition Information What are common symptoms? How many people are affected/at ... What are the symptoms of PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content In addition to ...

  1. Subdural hygroma presenting as dementia with kluver-bucy symptoms.

    PubMed

    Duggal, H S; Khess, C R; Nizamie, S H

    1999-10-01

    Dementia is not an uncommon presentation in psychiatric practice. Of the various causes of reversible dementia, subdural hygroma is a lesser-known potentially reversible cause. A case of dementia with Kluver-Bucy symptoms secondary to subdural hygroma is described and implications of Kluver-Bucy symptoms in dementia are discussed.

  2. Ethnicity and symptom expression in patients with acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nadine; Newman, Jennifer; D'Antonio, Emily; McKelvey, Jennifer; Serper, Mark

    2011-02-28

    Chinese patients have been largely ignored in the literature examining ethnic differences in schizophrenia. This study examined demographics and symptom profiles of Euro-, African-, Chinese-American, and Latino inpatients with schizophrenia. Chinese-American patients had fewer symptoms, hospitalizations, and least amount of education compared to other groups. Cultural and clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Grief, Depressive Symptoms, and Physical Health Among Recently Bereaved Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Rebecca L.; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Widowhood is among the most distressing of all life events, resulting in both mental and physical health declines. This paper explores the dynamic relationship between physical health and psychological well-being among recently bereaved spouses. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 328 bereaved persons who participated in the “Living After Loss” study, we modeled trends in physical health, somatic symptoms, and psychological well-being over the first year and a half of widowhood. The primary focus is whether physical health at the time of widowhood modifies psychological well-being over time. Results: There were considerable somatic symptoms during the earliest months of bereavement but no major health declines over the first year and half of bereavement. Those in poor health had initially higher levels of grief and depressive symptoms, but the trajectories or changes over time were similar regardless of health status. Those with poor health at the time of widowhood had significantly higher risks of complicated grief and major depression disorder. Implications: Bereavement requires physical and emotional adjustment, but the psychological trajectory of bereavement may be somewhat universal. Bereavement support ought to include a focus on self-care and health promotion in addition to emotional support, especially because those with poor health initially may be most susceptible to prolonged and intense clinical distress. PMID:22156713

  4. Negative symptoms: psychopathological models.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Djenderdjian, A; Shamasunder, P; Costa, J; Herrera, J; Sramek, J

    1991-01-01

    The psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia have been broadly divided into positive and negative symptom groups. Even though there is no definitive consensus, psychomotor agitation, motor excitement, hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder constitute positive and psychomotor retardation, amotivation, apathy and decreased emotional expression are grouped into negative symptoms. The negative symptoms have been reported to appear late in the course of the illness and resistant to treatment with neuroleptics. While these claims have not been substantiated, the current interest on negative symptoms is related to the fact that many nonfunctioning institutionalized as well as ambulatory schizophrenics manifest negative symptoms. As chronic psychiatric beds have become scarce, many patients with negative symptoms who were harbored in the chronic mental hospitals have been released to the community care and some of these patients live on the streets. Thus their visibility has challenged psychiatry to focus its efforts on the etiology and treatment of negative symptoms. PMID:2049366

  5. Empathy, depressive symptoms, and social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Amy C; Ginger, Emily J; Gollan, Jackie K; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-05-30

    Empathy deficits have been associated with schizophrenia and depression. We compared whether individuals with schizophrenia with and without co-occurring depressive symptoms differed on self-reported and performance-based measures of empathy and social functioning. We also examined the relationships among depressive symptoms, empathy, clinical symptoms, and social functioning. Twenty-eight individuals with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms, 32 individuals with schizophrenia without depressive symptoms, and 44 control subjects were compared on assessments of depressive symptoms, empathy, global neurocognition, clinical symptoms, and social functioning. Both groups of individuals with schizophrenia scored higher than controls on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index personal distress subscale. Individuals with schizophrenia and co-occurring depressive symptoms scored significantly higher than individuals with schizophrenia without depressive symptoms on the personal distress subscale. Personal distress and depressive symptoms were significantly correlated among individuals with schizophrenia and co-occurring depressive symptoms, while both measures negatively correlated with social functioning. Emotional empathy was related to clinical symptoms in both groups of individuals with schizophrenia. Personal distress partially mediated the relationship between co-occurring depressive symptoms and social functioning. Personal distress may be an important implication for social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia and co-occurring depressive symptoms, and should be examined further as a potential treatment target.

  6. BIOMARKERS: SYMPTOMS, SURVIVORSHIP, AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    PubMed Central

    Miaskowski, Christine; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence on a number of biomarkers that show potential clinical utility in the prediction of and treatment responsiveness for the four most common symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment (i.e., pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression). Data Sources Review and synthesis of review articles and data-based publications. Conclusions A growing body of evidence suggests that sensitive and specific biomarkers will be available to assist clinicians with the assessment and management of symptoms. Implications for Practice Nurses will play a critical role in educating patients about their risk for specific symptoms based on an evaluation of specific biomarkers. Nurses will be involved in using biomarker data to titrate medications based on patient’s responses to symptom management interventions. PMID:22542321

  7. Bidirectional Associations Between Cannabis Use and Depressive Symptoms From Adolescence Through Early Adulthood Among At-Risk Young Men.

    PubMed

    Womack, Sean R; Shaw, Daniel S; Weaver, Chelsea M; Forbes, Erika E

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have established a relationship between cannabis use and affective problems among adolescents and young adults; however, the direction of these associations remains a topic of debate. The present study sought to examine bidirectional associations between cannabis use and depressive symptoms, specifically testing the validity of two competing hypotheses: the cannabis effect hypothesis, which suggests that cannabis use contributes to the onset of later depressive symptoms; and the self-medication hypothesis, which posits that individuals increase their use of a substance to alleviate distressing psychological symptoms. Participants in this study were 264 low-socioeconomic-status males assessed at ages 17, 20, and 22. Cross-lag panel models were fit to test bidirectional associations between cannabis use frequency and depressive symptoms across the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. In addition, analyses were conducted within two high-risk subsamples to examine whether associations between cannabis use frequency (ranging from never used to daily use) and depressive symptoms differed among regular cannabis users (used cannabis more than once per week) or subjects reporting at least mild levels of depressive symptoms. Cannabis use and depressive symptoms were concurrently correlated. Cannabis use predicted increases in later depressive symptoms, but only among the mild-depression subsample. Depressive symptoms predicted only slight increases in later cannabis use, among the subsample of regular cannabis users. Temporal patterns of cannabis use and depressive symptoms provide evidence for the cannabis effect but limited evidence for the self-medication hypothesis. Adolescents higher in depressive symptoms may be vulnerable to the adverse psychological effects of using cannabis. Results are discussed in terms of implications for basic research, prevention, and intervention.

  8. Bidirectional Associations Between Cannabis Use and Depressive Symptoms From Adolescence Through Early Adulthood Among At-Risk Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Womack, Sean R.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Weaver, Chelsea M.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies have established a relationship between cannabis use and affective problems among adolescents and young adults; however, the direction of these associations remains a topic of debate. The present study sought to examine bidirectional associations between cannabis use and depressive symptoms, specifically testing the validity of two competing hypotheses: the cannabis effect hypothesis, which suggests that cannabis use contributes to the onset of later depressive symptoms; and the self-medication hypothesis, which posits that individuals increase their use of a substance to alleviate distressing psychological symptoms. Method: Participants in this study were 264 low-socioeconomic-status males assessed at ages 17, 20, and 22. Cross-lag panel models were fit to test bidirectional associations between cannabis use frequency and depressive symptoms across the transition from adolescence to early adulthood. In addition, analyses were conducted within two high-risk subsamples to examine whether associations between cannabis use frequency (ranging from never used to daily use) and depressive symptoms differed among regular cannabis users (used cannabis more than once per week) or subjects reporting at least mild levels of depressive symptoms. Results: Cannabis use and depressive symptoms were concurrently correlated. Cannabis use predicted increases in later depressive symptoms, but only among the mild-depression subsample. Depressive symptoms predicted only slight increases in later cannabis use, among the subsample of regular cannabis users. Conclusions: Temporal patterns of cannabis use and depressive symptoms provide evidence for the cannabis effect but limited evidence for the self-medication hypothesis. Adolescents higher in depressive symptoms may be vulnerable to the adverse psychological effects of using cannabis. Results are discussed in terms of implications for basic research, prevention, and intervention. PMID:26997187

  9. The sweet spot of clinical intuitions: Predictors of the effects of context on impressions of conduct disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jessecae K; Burke, Christopher T; De Los Reyes, Andres

    2016-02-01

    How people interpret a mental disorder symptom has been shown to depend on the contextual life factors surrounding its presentation. Specifically, people are more likely to judge a symptom as clinically relevant if that symptom presents in a high-risk environment (e.g., child associates with deviant peers) relative to a low-risk environment (e.g., child associates with normative peer group). Importantly, not all symptoms are influenced by context to the same extent, and there is low agreement across people as to how this influence manifests. In this paper, we explore what factors predict the extent to which clinicians and laypeople interpret mental disorder symptoms as a function of diagnosis-congruent versus incongruent contextual information. We tested the impact of 2 statistical factors (prevalence and diagnosticity) and 2 more intuitive factors (diagnostic importance and abnormality) on the degree to which a symptom is interpreted differently in different contexts. Clinicians' impressions of the diagnosticity and importance of a symptom evidenced a curvilinear relationship with the use of context, with extremely important and unimportant as well as extremely diagnostic and nondiagnostic symptoms being less influenced by context. Laypeople showed a similar curvilinear relation between diagnosticity judgments and context effects. Additionally, clinicians showed a linear relationship between abnormality judgments and context use, with extremely abnormal symptoms being influenced less by context, whereas laypeople showed a curvilinear relationship between symptom abnormality and context use, with extremely abnormal and normal symptoms being influenced the most by context. We discuss implications of these findings for clinical diagnosis. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. 16p11.2 Microduplication and associated symptoms: A case study.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Martin; Arnett, Kirsten; Hertza, Jeremy

    2017-05-22

    The minimal amount known regarding chromosomal microduplications and microdeletions presents a fascinating new direction of research into better understanding misunderstood symptoms and overall genomic influence. Specifically, the 16p11.2 microduplication has been associated with a myriad of possible cognitive, physical, and emotional symptoms. The purpose of this study is to inform the reader of the biological basis of the 16p11.2 microduplication, review sources that suggest a link between the microduplication and clinically relevant diagnoses/sources of impairment, and to better understand the implications and development of symptoms through the illustration of a case example. The case study involves an adolescent African-American female that possesses the 16p11.2 microduplication and focuses on the patient's intellectual and developmental delays, seen through self-report and analysis of her neurocognitive assessment results. Additionally, the patient's associated health complications, such as the development of seizures and a possibly compromised immune system, along with the development of anxiety and depression, are discussed. Implications toward the need for more robust protocol in testing and tracking the effects of this microduplication, such as implementing immunosorbent assay testing at the first sign of associated symptoms, are explored. Limitations are discussed.

  11. Experimental affective symptoms in panic disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Overbeek, Thea; Schruers, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ine Docters; Klaassen, Tineke; Griez, Eric

    2005-03-01

    To date, carbon dioxide (CO2) challenge tests in panic disorder (PD) patients have focused on anxiety as the sole outcome measure. This study assesses a broader range of symptoms in patients with PD. We administered a gas mixture of 35% CO2 and 65% oxygen (O2) to 25 patients with PD. Nine patients met the criteria for a comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD), and 16 did not. We assessed not only subjects' symptoms of anxiety but also their symptoms of depression and aggression. Baseline ratings did not differ across the 2 subgroups. Postchallenge ratings were higher for PD and MDD patients on all the assessed affective symptoms, except for specific panic symptoms. These findings suggest that, in addition to anxiety, CO2 challenge induces depressive and aggressive symptoms, specifically in PD patients with comorbid depression.

  12. Explaining the covariance between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms: the role of hedonic responsivity.

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Michael C; Pettit, Jeremy W; Leventhal, Adam M; Hill, Ryan M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine low hedonic responsivity, a facet of hedonic capacity, as a potential explanatory variable in the relationship between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and depressive symptoms. One hundred ninety-eight undergraduate students (mean age = 21.3, standard deviation = 4.6; 59.6% women) from a large, public university completed self-report measures for this cross-sectional study. Results indicated that ADHD symptoms were significantly associated with depressive symptoms, and that low hedonic responsivity partially accounted for this association. This effect was statistically significant for total ADHD symptoms and inattentive symptoms, but not for hyperactive-impulsive symptoms. Findings are consistent with the possibility that impaired hedonic responsiveness may be a common endophenotype for depression and the inattentive symptoms of ADHD. Implications for future research and clinical work are discussed. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Different patterns of depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Truijens, Sophie E M; Spek, Viola; van Son, Maarten J M; Guid Oei, S; Pop, Victor J M

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the US Preventive Services Task Force has advocated to screen pregnant and postpartum women for depression. However, we questioned the meaning of a single elevated depression score: does it represent just one episode of depression or do these symptoms persist throughout the entire pregnancy? This study assessed depressive symptoms at each trimester in a cohort of 1813 pregnant women and evaluated whether women with different patterns of depressive symptoms showed other characteristics. Depending on the trimester, elevated depression scores were prevalent in 10-15% of the pregnant women. Up to 4% reported persistent symptoms of depression throughout pregnancy. Different patterns of depressive symptoms were observed, for which persistent symptoms were related to other characteristics than incidentally elevated symptoms. Besides a previous history of mental health problems as best overall predictor, incidentally elevated depression scores were related to major life events. Furthermore, persistently depressive symptoms were related to unplanned pregnancy and multiparity. An EDS assessment at 12 weeks of gestation including three additional items (history of mental health problems, unplanned pregnancy and multiparity) enabled us to identify 83% of the women with persistent depressive symptoms. A depression screening strategy in pregnant women should take into account the potential chronicity of depressive symptoms by repeated assessments in order to offer an intervention to the most vulnerable women.

  14. The relationship between perceived social support and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms: the role of gender.

    PubMed

    Marques, Luana; Weingarden, Hilary M; LeBlanc, Nicole J; Siev, Jedidiah; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2011-09-01

    Whether social support is associated with severity of body dysmorphic symptoms is unknown. To address this gap in the literature, the present study aims to examine the association between three domains of perceived social support (i.e., family, friends, and significant others) and severity of body dysmorphic disorder symptoms. Participants (N = 400) with symptoms consistent with diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder completed measures of symptomatology and social support via the internet. More perceived social support from friends and significant others was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms for males, and more perceived social support from family and friends was associated with less severe body dysmorphic disorder symptoms among females. Additionally, gender moderated the association between perceived social support from significant others and symptom severity, such that perceived social support from a significant other was significantly negatively associated with body dysmorphic symptom severity in males, but not females. The present study implicates social support as an important area of future body dysmorphic disorder research.

  15. Symptom perceptions and help-seeking behaviour prior to lung and colorectal cancer diagnoses: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    McLachlan, Sarah; Mansell, Gemma; Sanders, Tom; Yardley, Sarah; van der Windt, Daniëlle; Brindle, Lucy; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Little, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Lung and colorectal cancer are common and have high UK mortality rates. Early diagnosis is important in reducing cancer mortality, but the literature on lung and colorectal cancers suggests many people wait for a considerable time before presenting symptoms. To gain in-depth understanding of patients' interpretations of symptoms of lung and colorectal cancer prior to diagnosis, and to explore processes leading to help-seeking. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients diagnosed with lung (N=9) or colorectal (N=20) cancer within the previous 12 months. Patients were asked about symptoms experienced in the period preceding diagnosis, their interpretations of symptoms, and decision making for help-seeking. Thematic analysis was conducted and comparisons drawn within and across the patient groups. Patients were proactive and rational in addressing symptoms; many developed alternative, non-cancer explanations based on their knowledge and experience. Discussions with important others frequently provided the impetus to consult, but paradoxically others often initially reinforced alternative explanations. Fear and denial did not emerge as barriers to help-seeking, but help-seeking was triggered when patients' alternative explanations could no longer be maintained, for instance due to persistence or progression of symptoms. Patients' reasoning, decision making and interpersonal interactions prior to diagnosis were complex. Prompting patients for additional detail on symptoms within consultations could elicit critical contextual information to aid referral decisions. Findings also have implications for the design of public health campaigns. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Attention to threat images in individuals with clinical and subthreshold symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Charmaine L; Goegan, Lauren D; Newman, Kristin R; Arndt, Jody E; Sears, Christopher R

    2013-06-01

    Attention to general and trauma-relevant threat was examined in individuals with clinical and subthreshold symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants' eye gaze was tracked and recorded while they viewed sets of four images over a 6-s presentation (one negative, positive, and neutral image, and either a general threat image or a trauma-relevant threat image). Two trauma-exposed groups (a clinical and a subthreshold PTSD symptom group) were compared to a non-trauma-exposed group. Both the clinical and subthreshold PTSD symptom groups attended to trauma-relevant threat images more than the no-trauma-exposure group, whereas there were no group differences for general threat images. A time course analysis of attention to trauma-relevant threat images revealed different attentional profiles for the trauma-exposed groups. Participants with clinical PTSD symptoms exhibited immediate heightened attention to the images relative to participants with no-trauma-exposure, whereas participants with subthreshold PTSD symptoms did not. In addition, participants with subthreshold PTSD symptoms attended to trauma-relevant threat images throughout the 6-s presentation, whereas participants with clinical symptoms of PTSD exhibited evidence of avoidance. The theoretical and clinical implications of these distinct attentional profiles are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Caregiver Person-Centeredness and Behavioral Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Timed-Event Sequential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Roberts, Tonya J.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Brown, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that person-centered caregiving approaches may reduce dementia-related behavioral symptoms; however, little is known about the sequential and temporal associations between specific caregiver actions and behavioral symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify sequential associations between caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and the temporal variation within these associations. Design and Methods: Videorecorded observations of naturally occurring interactions (N = 33; 724min) between 12 nursing home (NH) residents with dementia and eight certified nursing assistants were coded for caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and analyzed using timed-event sequential analysis. Results: Although caregiver actions were predominantly person-centered, we found that resident behavioral symptoms were significantly more likely to occur following task-centered caregiver actions than person-centered actions. Implications: Findings suggest that the person-centeredness of caregivers is sequentially and temporally related to behavioral symptoms in individuals with dementia. Additional research examining the temporal structure of these relationships may offer valuable insights into the utility of caregiver person-centeredness as a low-cost strategy for improving behavioral symptom management in the NH setting. PMID:26055782

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    PubMed

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  19. Symptom Clusters in Adults With Chronic Health Problems and Cancer as a Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Catherine M; Engberg, Sandra J; Donovan, Heidi S; Cohen, Susan M; Houze, Martin P; Rosenzweig, Margaret Q; Mallory, Gail A; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Sereika, Susan M

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To identify and compare symptom clusters in individuals with chronic health problems with cancer as a comorbidity versus individuals with chronic health problems who do not have cancer as a comorbidity and to explore the effect of symptoms on their quality of life. Design Secondary analysis of data from two studies. Study 1 was an investigation of the efficacy of an intervention to improve medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Study 2 was an investigation of the efficacy of an intervention for urinary incontinence (UI) in older adults. Setting School of Nursing at the University of Pittsburgh. Sample The sample for study 1 was comprised of 639 adults with RA. The sample for study 2 was comprised of 407 adults with UI. A total of 154 (15%) subjects had a history of cancer, 56 (9%) of the subjects with RA and 98 (25%) of the subjects with UI. Methods Analysis of existing comorbidity and symptom data collected from both studies. Main Research Variables Symptom clusters, chronic disease, and cancer as a comorbidity. Findings Individuals with chronic health problems who have cancer may not have unique symptom clusters compared to individuals with chronic health problems who do not have cancer. Conclusions The symptom clusters experienced by the study participants may be more related to their primary chronic health problems and comorbidities. Implications for Nursing Additional studies are needed to examine symptom clusters in cancer survivors. As individuals are living longer with the disease, a comprehensive understanding of the symptom clusters that may be unique to cancer survivors with comorbidities is critical. PMID:18192145

  20. Variation in symptom distress in underserved Chinese American cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Lara K; Lam, Kin; Cheung, William; Shao, Theresa; Li, Zujun; Van de Maele, Sandra; Chang, Victor T; Chen, Jack; Ye, Huiyan; Wong, Rhoda; Lam, Wan Ling; Chan, Selina; Bookbinder, Marilyn; Dieckmann, Nathan F; Portenoy, Russell

    2015-09-15

    Cancer is prevalent in the rapidly growing Chinese American community, yet little is known about the symptom experience to guide comprehensive treatment planning. This study evaluated symptom prevalence and patient subgroups with symptom distress in a large sample of Chinese American cancer patients. Patients were consecutively recruited from 4 oncology practices, and they completed a translated cancer symptom scale. Latent class cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups of patients with distinct symptom distress profiles. There were 1436 patients screened; 94.4% were non-English-speaking, and 45.1% were undergoing cancer therapy. The cancers included breast (32.6%), lung (14.8%), head and neck (12.5%), and hematologic cancer (10.1%). Overall, 1289 patients (89.8%) had 1 or more symptoms, and 1129 (78.6%) had 2 or more. The most prevalent symptoms were a lack of energy (57.0%), dry mouth (55.6%), feeling sad (49.3%), worrying (47.5%), and difficulty sleeping (46.8%). Symptoms causing "quite a bit" or "very much" distress included difficulty sleeping (37.9%), a lack of appetite (37.2%), feeling nervous (35.8%), pain (35.2%), and worrying (34.0%). Four patient subgroups were identified according to the probability of reporting moderate to high symptom distress: very low physical and psychological symptom distress (49.5%), low physical symptom distress and moderate psychological symptom distress (25.2%), moderate physical and psychological symptom distress (17.4%), and high physical and psychological symptom distress (7.8%). Symptom prevalence is high in community-dwelling Chinese American cancer patients, and nearly half experience severe distress (rated as "quite a bit" or "very much" distressing) from physical symptoms, psychological symptoms, or both. These data have important implications for the development of effective symptom control interventions. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  1. Esophageal Varices: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms Esophageal varices usually don't cause signs and symptoms unless they bleed. Signs and symptoms of bleeding esophageal varices include: Vomiting and seeing significant amounts of blood ...

  2. Massage therapy for fibromyalgia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Leonid

    2010-07-01

    Massage therapy is widely used by patients with fibromyalgia seeking symptom relief. We performed a review of all available studies with an emphasis on randomized controlled trials to determine whether massage therapy can be a viable treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms. Extensive narrative review. PubMed, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PEDro, ISI Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases (inception-December 2009) were searched for the key words "massage", "massotherapy", "self-massage", "soft tissue manipulation", "soft tissue mobilization", "complementary medicine", "fibromyalgia" "fibrositis", and "myofascial pain". No language restrictions were imposed. The reference lists of all articles retrieved in full were also searched. The effects of massage on fibromyalgia symptoms have been examined in two single-arm studies and six randomized controlled trials. All reviewed studies showed short-term benefits of massage, and only one single-arm study demonstrated long-term benefits. All reviewed studies had methodological problems. The existing literature provides modest support for use of massage therapy in treating fibromyalgia. Additional rigorous research is needed in order to establish massage therapy as a safe and effective intervention for fibromyalgia. In massage therapy of fibromyalgia, we suggest that massage will be painless, its intensity should be increased gradually from session to session, in accordance with patient's symptoms; and the sessions should be performed at least 1-2 times a week.

  3. Coparenting Behaviors as Mediators between Postpartum Parental Depressive Symptoms and Toddler’s Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Tissot, Hervé; Favez, Nicolas; Frascarolo, France; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum parental depression, even of mild intensity and short duration, has negative consequences on child development, including increased externalizing and internalizing symptoms. Studies revealed that the links between parental depression and child development are mediated by parenting difficulties. On the other hand, the mediating role of problematic family-level relationships, such as low coparenting support and high conflict between the parents, has rarely been considered, although coparenting difficulties have been linked with both increased depressive symptoms in parents and increased symptoms in toddlers. In the present study, we proposed testing a comprehensive mediation model linking parental depression, coparenting, and child symptoms. At 3 months postpartum, a convenience sample of 69 parental couples completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. In addition, we assessed levels of coparenting support and conflict during a mother–father–infant play situation, the Lausanne Trilogue Play. At 18 months postpartum, both parents assessed child symptoms with the Symptom Checklist Questionnaire. The results showed that coparenting support mediated the links between parental depressive symptoms and child symptoms, but only for mothers: Maternal depressive symptoms were linked with lower coparenting support, which in turn predicted increased psychofunctional symptoms and behavior problems assessed by mothers. Although coparenting conflict behaviors were not predicted by parents’ depressive symptoms, higher conflict was unexpectedly linked with fewer behavior problems assessed by both parents. The present study allowed us to unveil complex pathways between mild parental mood disturbances, family-level relationships, and child development in the first months of the child’s life. PMID:28018259

  4. Daily Shame and Hostile Irritability in Adolescent Girls with Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms. PMID:25580673

  5. Do interactions between stress and immune responses lead to symptom exacerbations in irritable bowel syndrome?

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Dervla; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2011-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, debilitating gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, with a worldwide prevalence of between 10% and 20%. This functional gut disorder is characterized by episodic exacerbations of a cluster of symptoms including abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit, including diarrhea and/or constipation. Risk factors for the development of IBS include a family history of the disorder, childhood trauma and prior gastrointestinal infection. It is generally accepted that brain-gut axis dysfunction is fundamental to the development of IBS; however the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain elusive. Additional considerations in comprehending the chronic relapsing pattern that typifies IBS symptoms are the effects of both psychosocial and infection-related stresses. Indeed, co-morbidity with mood disorders such as depression and anxiety is common in IBS. Accumulating evidence points to a role for a maladaptive stress response in the initiation, persistence and severity of IBS-associated symptom flare-ups. Moreover, mechanistically, the stress-induced secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is known to mediate changes in GI function. Activation of the immune system also appears to be important in the generation of IBS symptoms and increasing evidence now implicates low-grade inflammation or immune activation in IBS pathophysiology. There is a growing body of research focused on understanding at a molecular, cellular and in vivo level, the relationship between the dysregulated stress response and immune system alterations (either individually or in combination) in the etiology of IBS and to the occurrence of symptoms.

  6. Brief report: adolescents' co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with friends, and internalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Waller, Erika M; Rose, Amanda J

    2013-04-01

    The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with friends, and anxious/depressed symptoms. Early- to mid-adolescents (N = 393) reported on co-rumination and normative self-disclosure with mothers and friends and on their internalizing symptoms in this cross-sectional study. Co-rumination with mothers (but not normative self-disclosure) was concurrently associated with adolescents' co-rumination with friends. In addition, the relation between co-rumination with mothers and adolescents' anxious/depressed symptoms reported previously (Waller & Rose, 2010) became non-significant when co-rumination with friends was statistically controlled. This suggests that the relation between friendship co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms may help explain the relation between mother-child co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms. Potential implications for promoting adolescents' well-being are discussed. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Occupational Stress and Mental Health Symptoms: Examining the Moderating Effect of Work Recovery Strategies in Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Gargi; Jennings, Kristen S; Britt, Thomas W; Sliter, Michael T

    2017-06-12

    The goal of this research was to examine the moderating effect of work recovery strategies on the relationship between occupational stress experienced by firefighters and mental health symptoms. Work recovery strategies were identified through semistructured interviews with 20 firefighters and a literature search on recovery strategies. A total of 7 work recovery strategies emerged using the 2 methods: work-related talks, stress-related talks, time with coworkers/supervisor, exercise, recreational activities, relaxation, and mastery experiences. Using a prospective study design with a 1-month time interval in a sample of 268 firefighters, experienced occupational stress at Time 1 was positively related to mental health symptoms at Time 2. In addition, with the exception of spending time with coworkers/supervisor, exercise and mastery experiences, recovery strategies at Time 1 were negatively related to mental health symptoms at Time 2. Lastly, all work recovery strategies, except stress-related talks and relaxation, moderated the relationship between experienced occupational stress at Time 1 and mental health symptoms at Time 2. Specifically, the positive relationship between experienced occupational stress and mental health symptoms was stronger when firefighters engaged in low, rather than high, work recovery strategies. Implications for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Matter of will: The association between posttraumatic stress symptoms and the will-to-live.

    PubMed

    Palgi, Yuval

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined how posttraumatic-stress-symptoms presented after prolonged traumatic exposure to rocket attacks are related to the perception of the worthiness of life among individuals in the second half of their lives. Additionally, it was questioned whether the subjective evaluation of the time one has left to live affects this relationship. Using an in-region random digit dialing methodology, phone calls made to residents in the south of Israel, we sampled 339 community-dwelling older adults (age range 50-90; M=65.44, SD=9.77) in Wave 1, 170 of whom were interviewed again in Wave 2 about a year later. Participants completed a phone-questionnaire on posttraumatic-stress-symptoms, subjective nearness-to-death, and will-to-live. The cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses results showed that higher levels of posttraumatic-stress-symptoms were positively related to higher will-to-live in both waves, among individuals who felt further away from death, while higher levels of posttraumatic-stress-symptoms were negatively related or unrelated to lower will-to-live among those who felt close to death in Waves 1and 2, respectively. The findings emphasize that perceptions regarding one's future perspective may affect the quality of the relationship between posttraumatic-stress-symptoms and will-to-live. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brief Report: Adolescents' Co-Rumination with Mothers, Co-Rumination with Friends, and Internalizing Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research examined co-rumination (extensively discussing, rehashing, and speculating about problems) with mothers and friends. Of interest was exploring whether adolescents who co-ruminate with mothers were especially likely to co-ruminate with friends as well as the interplay among co-rumination with mothers, co-rumination with friends, and anxious/depressed symptoms. Early- to mid-adolescents (N = 393) reported on co-rumination and normative self-disclosure with mothers and friends and on their internalizing symptoms in this cross-sectional study. Co-rumination with mothers (but not normative self-disclosure) was concurrently associated with adolescents' co-rumination with friends. In addition, the relation between co-rumination with mothers and adolescents' anxious/depressed symptoms reported previously (Waller & Rose, 2010) became non-significant when co-rumination with friends was statistically controlled. This suggests that the relation between friendship co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms may help explain the relation between mother-child co-rumination and anxious/depressed symptoms. Potential implications for promoting adolescents' well-being are discussed. PMID:23398818

  10. Migraine Features, Associated Symptoms, and Triggers: A Principal Component Analysis in the Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Schürks, Markus; Buring, Julie E.; Kurth, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Aims Migraine has a wide clinical spectrum. Our aim was to group information on migraine characteristics into meaningful components and to identify key components of the migraine phenotype. Methods We performed two principal component analyses, one among participants in the Women's Health Study enrolment cohort and one in a sub-cohort with additional migraine-specific information. Results Among the 9,427 women with migraine attack-related information at enrolment, the three most important components pertained to central nervous system (CNS) sensitization, attack frequency/pain location, and aura/visual phenomena. In the sub-group of 1,675 women with more detailed information, food triggers and unspecific symptoms constituted two principal components that explain more of the variance of the migraine phenotype than the three attack-related components. Conclusions Our results indicate that information on migraine-associated features, symptoms, and triggers is highly correlated allowing the extraction of principal components. Migraine attack-related symptoms are best summarized by symptoms related to CNS sensitization, attack frequency/pain location, and aura/visual phenomena. Taking a more general view, unspecific symptoms and food triggers appear to carry stronger importance in characterizing the migraine phenotype. These components are useful for future research on the pathophysiology and genetics of migraine and may have implications for diagnosing and treating patients. PMID:21398421

  11. Building a Competitive Edge with Additive Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    be collected, processed to recapture cutting solvents, and compacted into soup can sized aluminum “pucks.” Those pucks are then sold to a third party...Thomas A. Campbell , “Toward a Printed World: Additive Manufacturing and its Implications for National Security.” Defense Horizons, No. 73...A. Campbell , “Toward a Printed World: Additive Manufacturing and its Implications for National Security.” Defense Horizons, No. 73 (September 2012

  12. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  13. THE STABILITY OF SYMPTOMS AND SYNDROMES IN CHRONIC SCHIZOPHRENIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Milind; Davis, Elizabeth J.B.; Sharma, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    36 chronic schizophrenic patients meeting D.S.M. III - R criteria were assessed by a single rater using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Ratings were repeated 9 months later by the same rater. Negative symptoms and syndromes were much more stable over time than positive symptoms and syndromes. Only hallucinations had stability comparable to the negative symptoms. Positive and negative subtypes of schizophrenia based on the composite score were very stable. Relatively few symptoms from the general psychopathology subscale were stable over time. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21776113

  14. Betahistine for symptoms of vertigo.

    PubMed

    Murdin, Louisa; Hussain, Kiran; Schilder, Anne G M

    2016-06-21

    Vertigo is a symptom in which individuals experience a false sensation of movement. This type of dizziness is thought to originate in the inner ear labyrinth or its neural connections. It is a commonly experienced symptom and can cause significant problems with carrying out normal activities. Betahistine is a drug that may work by improving blood flow to the inner ear. This review examines whether betahistine is more effective than a placebo at treating symptoms of vertigo from different causes. To assess the effects of betahistine in patients with symptoms of vertigo from different causes. The Cochrane ENT Information Specialist searched the Cochrane ENT Trials Register; Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 8); PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL; Web of Science; ClinicalTrials.gov; ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The date of the search was 21 September 2015. We included randomised controlled trials of betahistine versus placebo in patients of any age with vertigo from any neurotological diagnosis in any settings. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Our primary outcome was the proportion of patients with reduction in vertigo symptoms (considering together the intensity, frequency and duration those symptoms). We included 17 studies, with a total of 1025 participants; 12 studies were published (567 patients) and five were unpublished (458 patients). Sixteen studies including 953 people compared betahistine with placebo. All studies with analysable data lasted three months or less. The majority were at high risk of bias, but in some the risk of bias was unclear. One study, at high risk of bias, included 72 people with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and compared betahistine with placebo; all patients also had particle repositioning manoeuvres. The studies varied considerably in terms of types of participants, their

  15. The interplay of loneliness and depressive symptoms across adolescence: exploring the role of personality traits.

    PubMed

    Vanhalst, Janne; Klimstra, Theo A; Luyckx, Koen; Scholte, Ron H J; Engels, Rutger C M E; Goossens, Luc

    2012-06-01

    Based on current theories of depression, reciprocal links between loneliness and depressive symptoms are expected to occur. However, longitudinal studies on adolescent samples are scarce and have yielded conflicting results. The present five-wave longitudinal study from mid- to late adolescence (N=428, M age at T1=15.22 years; 47% female) examined the direction of effect between loneliness and depressive symptoms, using cross-lagged path analysis. In addition, the robustness of these prospective associations was tested by examining the role of the Big Five personality traits (i.e., extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism, and openness) as explaining factors and moderators. Results indicated that loneliness and depressive symptoms influenced one another reciprocally, and these reciprocal associations were not attributable to their mutual overlap with personality traits. In addition, neuroticism was found to be a moderator, in that the bidirectional effects between loneliness and depressive symptoms were only found in adolescents high in neuroticism. Practical implications are discussed, and suggestions for future research are outlined.

  16. Family context, victimization, and child trauma symptoms: variations in safe, stable, and nurturing relationships during early and middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Turner, Heather A; Finkelhor, David; Ormrod, Richard; Hamby, Sherry; Leeb, Rebecca T; Mercy, James A; Holt, Melissa

    2012-04-01

    Based on a nationally representative sample of 2,017 children age 2-9 years, this study examines variations in "safe, stable, and nurturing" relationships (SSNRs), including several forms of family perpetrated victimization, and documents associations between these factors and child trauma symptoms. Findings show that many children were exposed to multiple forms of victimization within the family (such as physical or sexual abuse, emotional maltreatment, child neglect, sibling victimization, and witnessing family violence), as evidenced by substantial intercorrelations among the different forms of victimization. Moreover, victimization exposure was significantly associated with several indices of parental dysfunction, family adversity, residential instability, and problematic parenting practices. Of all SSNR variables considered, emotional abuse and inconsistent or hostile parenting emerged as having the most powerful independent effects on child trauma symptoms. Also, findings supported a cumulative risk model, whereby trauma symptom levels increased with each additional SSNR risk factor to which children were exposed. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  17. [Validity of assessment of schizophrenic basic symptoms].

    PubMed

    Mass, R; Hitschfeld, K; Wall, E; Wagner, H B

    1997-03-01

    A study on the concept and measurement of the basic disorders of schizophrenia is presented. A total of 151 male adult psychiatric inpatients (51 with a dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and alcoholism, 50 schizophrenics and 50 alcoholics) were included. The aims of this study were: (1) the replication of the previous finding that the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FBF) contains items that discriminate between schizophrenia and alcoholism; (2) an empirical comparison between FBF and the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS); (3) testing the relationship between basic and negative versus positive symptoms, as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Regarding (1), the former result was replicated. Regarding (2), FBF subscales and BSABS categories were shown to be significantly but weakly related, even if identical symptoms were included in the inquiry. Regarding (3), FBF and BSABS were found to be more closely related to negative than to positive PANSS items. Theoretical implications and consequences for further research are discussed.

  18. Depersonalization and basic symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Carlo; Raballo, Andrea; Salvatore, Paola

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the classic psychopathologic notion of depersonalization in the light of the Basic Symptom paradigm. A sample of 57 chronic schizophrenics was cross-sectionally assessed with the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS) and contextually with specific scales testing positive, negative, depressive and alexithymic dimensions. In order to categorize depersonalized vs. nondepersonalized patients three specific BSABS items explicitly identifying the allo-/auto-/somatopsychic domains of depersonalization were used, according to the wernickian threefold definition. Depersonalized schizophrenics showed a semiological profile that was distinct from that of nondepersonalized schizophrenics (as regards basic, positive, depressive symptoms and alexithymia); patients with multiple co-occurring forms of depersonalization revealed higher levels of cognitive disturbance, lowering of stress threshold and greater alexithymia. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  19. Posttraumatic stress disorder and somatic symptoms among child and adolescent survivors following the Lushan earthquake in China: A six-month longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhu, Shenyue; Du, Changhui; Zhang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    To explore somatic conditions in a sample of 2299 child and adolescent survivors of an earthquake and their relationship to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-13 scale, a short version of PHQ-15 scale that omits two items involving sexual pain/problems and menstrual problems, and a project-developed questionnaire were administered to participants three and six months after the earthquake. Among child and adolescent survivors, the prevalence rates of probable PTSD were 37.4 and 24.2% three and six months, respectively, after the earthquake. The most common somatic symptoms were trouble sleeping (58.4 and 48.4%), feeling tired or having low energy (52.0 and 46.1%), and stomach pain (45.8 and 45.4%) after three and six months, respectively. Several specific somatic symptoms evaluated three months after the earthquake including trouble sleeping, headache, and shortness of breath were predictors of the overall PTSD symptoms evaluated six months after the earthquake. Additionally, the symptom of hyperarousal evaluated after three months could predict the overall somatic symptoms evaluated after six months. PTSD and somatic symptoms were common after the earthquake, and a longitudinal association between PTSD and somatic symptoms was detected among child and adolescent survivors. These findings have implications in China and possibly elsewhere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Common Versus Specific Correlates of Fifth-Grade Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms: Comparison of Three Racial/Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Banspach, Stephen W.; Tortolero, Susan; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which risk profiles or correlates of conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms overlap among youth continues to be debated. Cross-sectional data from a large, representative community sample (N=4,705) of African-American, Latino, and White fifth graders were used to examine overlap in correlates of CD and ODD symptoms. About 49 % of the children were boys. Analyses were conducted using negative binomial regression models, accounting for several confounding factors (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms), sampling weights, stratification, and clustering. Results indicated that CD and ODD symptoms had very similar correlates. In addition to previously established correlates, several social skills dimensions were significantly related to ODD and CD symptoms, even after controlling for other correlates. In contrast, temperamental dimensions were not significantly related to CD and ODD symptoms, possibly because more proximal correlates (e.g., social skills) were also taken into account. Only two factors (gender and household income) were found to be specific correlates of CD, but not ODD, symptoms. The pattern of common and specific correlates of CD and ODD symptoms was replicated fairly consistently across the three racial/ethnic subgroups. Implications of these findings for further research and intervention efforts are discussed. PMID:25411125

  1. Common Versus Specific Correlates of Fifth-Grade Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms: Comparison of Three Racial/Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Margit; Elliott, Marc N; McLaughlin, Katie A; Banspach, Stephen W; Tortolero, Susan; Schuster, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which risk profiles or correlates of conduct disorder (CD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms overlap among youth continues to be debated. Cross-sectional data from a large, representative community sample (N = 4,705) of African-American, Latino, and White fifth graders were used to examine overlap in correlates of CD and ODD symptoms. About 49 % of the children were boys. Analyses were conducted using negative binomial regression models, accounting for several confounding factors (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms), sampling weights, stratification, and clustering. Results indicated that CD and ODD symptoms had very similar correlates. In addition to previously established correlates, several social skills dimensions were significantly related to ODD and CD symptoms, even after controlling for other correlates. In contrast, temperamental dimensions were not significantly related to CD and ODD symptoms, possibly because more proximal correlates (e.g., social skills) were also taken into account. Only two factors (gender and household income) were found to be specific correlates of CD, but not ODD, symptoms. The pattern of common and specific correlates of CD and ODD symptoms was replicated fairly consistently across the three racial/ethnic subgroups. Implications of these findings for further research and intervention efforts are discussed.

  2. Sensory symptoms in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Eric P; Stornelli, Jennifer L; O'Rourke, Julia A; Koesterer, Karmen; McDougle, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the recent literature regarding abnormalities in sensory functioning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including evidence regarding the neurobiological basis of these symptoms, their clinical correlates, and their treatment. Abnormalities in responses to sensory stimuli are highly prevalent in individuals with ASD. The underlying neurobiology of these symptoms is unclear, but several theories have been proposed linking possible etiologies of sensory dysfunction with known abnormalities in brain structure and function that are associated with ASD. In addition to the distress that sensory symptoms can cause patients and caregivers, these phenomena have been correlated with several other problematic symptoms and behaviors associated with ASD, including restrictive and repetitive behavior, self-injurious behavior, anxiety, inattention, and gastrointestinal complaints. It is unclear whether these correlations are causative in nature or whether they are due to shared underlying pathophysiology. The best-known treatments for sensory symptoms in ASD involve a program of occupational therapy that is specifically tailored to the needs of the individual and that may include sensory integration therapy, a sensory diet, and environmental modifications. While some empirical evidence supports these treatments, more research is needed to evaluate their efficacy, and other means of alleviating these symptoms, including possible psychopharmacological interventions, need to be explored. Additional research into the sensory symptoms associated with ASD has the potential to shed more light on the nature and pathophysiology of these disorders and to open new avenues of effective treatments.

  3. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  4. Gender differences in the relationship between alcohol use and depressive symptoms in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Weihai; Shaboltas, Alla V.; Skochilov, Roman V.; Kozlov, Andrei P.; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V.; Abdala, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Background Gender differences in the relationship between alcohol use and depressive symptoms are inconsistent, and few studies have addressed this issue in Russia. Because this finding may have important implications for interventions to reduce alcohol misuse or alcohol related problems in Russia, we conducted a study to investigate whether the association between alcohol use and depressive symptoms differs by gender at high risk for HIV. Methods We used the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale to measure alcohol use and depressive symptoms among 307 patients who attended a clinic for sexually transmitted infections in St. Petersburg, Russia. Logistic regression models were applied for the analysis. Results The comparison of data between men and women revealed a significant quadratic term of alcohol use and significant interactions between alcohol use and gender on depressive symptoms. Men with an AUDIT score in the first and fourth quartiles were more likely to report depressive symptoms in comparison to men in the second quartile. Their odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were 7.54 (2.00–28.51) and 5.06 (1.31–19.63), respectively. Among women, a linear trend was observed such that those who misused alcohol were three times more likely to have depressive symptoms than those who did not misuse alcohol (OR = 3.03, 95% CI, 1.05–8.80). Conclusion The association between alcohol use and depressive symptoms differed by gender. Additional research is needed to investigate this relationship in Russia. Strategies to reduce alcohol-related problems in Russia may need to consider these differences. PMID:23240098

  5. Elevated Depressive Symptoms Enhance Reflexive but not Reflective Auditory Category Learning

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, W. Todd; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Smayda, Kirsten; Yi, Han-Gyol; Koslov, Seth; Beevers, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    In vision an extensive literature supports the existence of competitive dual-processing systems of category learning that are grounded in neuroscience and are partially-dissociable. The reflective system is prefrontally-mediated and uses working memory and executive attention to develop and test rules for classifying in an explicit fashion. The reflexive system is striatally-mediated and operates by implicitly associating perception with actions that lead to reinforcement. Although categorization is fundamental to auditory processing, little is known about the learning systems that mediate auditory categorization and even less is known about the effects of individual difference in the relative efficiency of the two learning systems. Previous studies have shown that individuals with elevated depressive symptoms show deficits in reflective processing. We exploit this finding to test critical predictions of the dual-learning systems model in audition. Specifically, we examine the extent to which the two systems are dissociable and competitive. We predicted that elevated depressive symptoms would lead to reflective-optimal learning deficits but reflexive-optimal learning advantages. Because natural speech category learning is reflexive in nature, we made the prediction that elevated depressive symptoms would lead to superior speech learning. In support of our predictions, individuals with elevated depressive symptoms showed a deficit in reflective-optimal auditory category learning, but an advantage in reflexive-optimal auditory category learning. In addition, individuals with elevated depressive symptoms showed an advantage in learning a non-native speech category structure. Computational modeling suggested that the elevated depressive symptom advantage was due to faster, more accurate, and more frequent use of reflexive category learning strategies in individuals with elevated depressive symptoms. The implications of this work for dual-process approach to auditory

  6. Reducing Internalizing Symptoms among High-Risk, Hispanic Adolescents: Mediators of a Preventive Family Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Tatiana; Brincks, Ahnalee; Howe, George; Brown, C. Hendricks; Prado, Guillermo; Pantin, Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Familias Unidas is a family-focused preventive intervention that has been found to reduce drug use and sexual risk behaviors among Hispanic adolescents. In some trials, Familias Unidas has also been found to be efficacious in reducing adolescent internalizing symptoms (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms), even though the intervention did not specifically target internalizing symptoms. This study examines potential mediators or mechanisms by which Familias Unidas influences internalizing symptoms, specifically the role of intervention-targeted improvements in parent-adolescent communication and reductions in youth externalizing behaviors. A total of 213 Hispanic eighth grade students with a history of externalizing behavior problems and their primary caregivers were recruited from the public school system. Participants, with a mean age of 13.8 years, were randomized into the Familias Unidas intervention or community practice control condition, and assessed at baseline, 6-months, 18-months, and 30-months post-baseline. A cascading mediation model was tested in which the Familias Unidas intervention was hypothesized to decrease adolescent internalizing symptoms through two mediators: improvements in parent-adolescent communication leading to decreases in externalizing behaviors. Findings show that the intervention had significant direct effects on youth internalizing symptoms at 30-months post-baseline. In addition, the cascading mediation model was supported in which the Familias Unidas intervention predicted significant improvements in parent-adolescent communication at 6-months, subsequently decreasing externalizing behaviors at 18-months, and ultimately reducing youth internalizing symptoms at 30-months post-baseline. Implications for prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:27154768

  7. Ethnic identity, perceived support, and depressive symptoms among racial minority immigrant-origin adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tummala-Narra, Pratyusha

    2015-01-01

    Although racial minority immigrant-origin adolescents compose a rapidly growing sector of the U.S. population, few studies have examined the role of contextual factors in mental health among these youth. The present study examined the relationship between ethnic identity and depressive symptoms, the relationship between perceived social support and depressive symptoms, and the relationship between sociodemographic factors (ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status) and depressive symptoms, among a culturally diverse group of adolescents. In addition, the potential moderating role of nativity status (U.S. born vs. foreign born) was examined in these associations. Participants were 9th and 10th graders (N = 341; 141 foreign born and 200 U.S. born, from Asian, Latino(a), and Afro-Caribbean backgrounds), attending an urban high school. Consistent with previous research, ethnic identity was negatively associated with depressive symptomatology in the overall sample. Nativity status did not moderate the relationship between ethnic identity and depressive symptoms. Among the sociodemographic factors examined, only gender was associated with depressive symptoms, with girls reporting higher levels of depressive symptoms compared with boys. Contrary to expectations, there were no differences in the degree of depressive symptomatology between U.S.-born and foreign-born adolescents, and perceived social support was not associated with fewer depressive symptoms. The findings suggest the importance of gender and ethnic identity in mental health and, more broadly, the complexity of social location in mental health outcomes among U.S.-born and foreign-born immigrant-origin adolescents. Implications for research and interventions with immigrant-origin adolescents are discussed.

  8. Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: the relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koreki, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Abe, Akiko; Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu; Okubo, Jo; Oguri, Atsushi; Orimo, Keisuke; Katayama, Nariko; Sato, Hiroyo; Shikimoto, Ryo; Nishiyama, Go; Nogami, Waka; Haki, Kazuma; Hayashi, Tetsuro; Fukagawa, Yuko; Funaki, Kei; Matsuzawa, Mia; Matsumoto, Ayako; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-03-26

    Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n = 53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n = 23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may

  9. The Perceptions, Social Determinants, and Negative Health Outcomes Associated With Depressive Symptoms Among U.S. Chinese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Chang, E-Shien; Wong, Esther; Simon, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Recent demographic growth of the U.S. Chinese aging population calls for comprehensive understanding of their unique health needs. The objective of this study is to examine the perceptions, social determinants of depressive symptoms as well as their impact on health and well-being in a community-dwelling U.S. Chinese aging population in Chicago. Design and Methods: A community-based participatory research approach was implemented to partner with the Chicago Chinatown population in a geographically defined community. Data were collected from questionnaires and semistructured focus group interviews with 78 community-dwelling Chinese older adults. Results: Our findings suggest that the depressive symptoms were common among older adults. It was frequently identified through feelings of helplessness, feelings of dissatisfaction with life, feelings of getting bored, loss of interests in activities, suicidal ideation, and feelings of worthlessness. Societal conflicts, family conflicts, financial constraints, personality, and worsening physical health may be associated with greater depressive symptoms. In addition, depressive symptoms may be detrimental to the overall health and well-being of Chinese older adults. Implications: This study has wide implications for health care professionals, social services agencies, and policy makers. Our results call for improved public health education and awareness programs to highlight the health impact of depressive symptoms on Chinese older adults. Future prospective studies are needed to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among U.S. Chinese older adults. Longitudinal research is needed to quantify the risk and protective factors of depressive symptoms. PMID:22156734

  10. Changes in Depressive Symptoms in First Time Mothers in Home Visitation

    PubMed Central

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Altaye, Mekibib; Chen, Liang; Holleb, Lauren J.; Stevens, Jack; Short, Jodie A.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The expansion of home visitation programs for at-risk, first-time mothers and their young children has drawn attention to the potential impact of depression on program outcomes, yet little research has examined depression in the context of home visitation. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of and changes in depressive symptoms in mothers enrolled in home visitation and identify predictors of change in symptoms over the first 9 months of service. Methods Subjects consisted of 806 at-risk, first-time mothers enrolled in a home visitation program. Self-reported depression was measured at enrollment and again 9 months later. Established clinical cutoffs were used to identify clinically elevated levels of depression. Additional measures were taken of interpersonal trauma history, concurrent intimate partner violence, and social support. Results Results indicated that (1) 45.3% of mothers had clinically elevated symptoms of depression at some point during the first 9 months of service, (2) 25.9% of mothers had elevated symptoms at both time points or at the 9 month assessment, and (3) 74.1% experienced an interpersonal trauma prior to enrollment. Lack of improvement or worsening of depressive symptoms from enrollment to 9 months was best predicted by pre-enrollment interpersonal trauma history, young maternal age, being African American, and symptoms severe enough to have led to mental health treatment. Conclusions Findings suggest that maternal depressive symptoms are a significant problem in home visitation. The role of interpersonal trauma in depressive symptoms, and how to best address these clinical issues in home visitation, warrants further examination. Practice Implications Maternal depression is prevalent in home visitation programs, and many mothers exhibit elevated symptoms at multiple time points over the first year of service. Interpersonal trauma history is also prevalent, and is predictive of increased depressive symptoms

  11. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  12. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. Other symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts ...

  13. Symptoms of Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Related Links Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers Basic Information What Are the Risk Factors? What ... Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Uterine cancer may cause vaginal discharge or bleeding that is not normal for ...

  14. Giardia: Illness & Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Giardia Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Giardia General Information Illness & Symptoms Diagnosis & Detection Treatment Sources ...

  15. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet our Partners How to Get Involved Donate Dermatomyositis (DM) Share print email share facebook twitter google ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? For many decades, DM was considered “ polymyositis with ...

  16. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms include headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. With Lyme disease you may also experience joint pain. The severity ... disease and the patient's personal tolerance level. Rash: Lyme disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain ...

  17. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... often involve the fingers and hands or the mouth. If symptoms only occur in "episodes" that last for minutes or hours, the terms paroxysmal dystonia and dyskinesias are used. The word torsion is sometimes used, usually in reference to ...

  18. Handedness and schizophrenic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P; Dalton, R; Fleminger, J J

    1982-09-01

    Studies of the handedness of schizophrenics have produced conflicting results. One possible explanation for this is that, as schizophrenia presents in many different forms, certain symptoms of the illness may relate better than the diagnosis to laterality patterns. Some previous work supports this view. The symptoms of 232 schizophrenics were examined in relation to their handedness. Among males only the handedness patterns of those who showed expressive (formal) thought disorder differed from those of their non-thought-disordered peers, but proved to be very similar to those of normal controls. The distribution of handedness did not otherwise vary significantly with type of symptom. Thus it appears to be the schizophrenic syndrome, and not any individual symptom, that best correlates with the deviation from normal handedness patterns seen among schizophrenics.

  19. Signs and Symptoms (Smallpox)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smallpox Website NIH Smallpox Research CDC Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Poxvirus Diseases Signs and Symptoms Recommend on ... Smallpox Website NIH Smallpox Research CDC Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Poxvirus Diseases File Formats Help: How do ...

  20. Symptoms of Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  1. Coping with Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Team Finding Resources Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide information about symptoms, medications, resources & more. Order ...

  2. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tetanus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tetanus Home About Tetanus Causes and Transmission Symptoms and ...

  3. Kwashiorkor symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Kwashiorkor is a condition resulting from inadequate protein intake. Early symptoms include fatigue, irritability, and lethargy. As protein deprivation continues, one sees growth failure, loss of muscle mass, generalized swelling (edema), and ...

  4. Fibromyalgia Symptoms and Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Wasan, Ajay D.; Szigethy, Eva; Lotrich, Francis; DiMartini, Andrea F.

    2015-01-01

    Background An association between fibromyalgia and hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been previously described. However, the relationship between nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibromyalgia symptoms has not been assessed, though they share several risk factors. Aim We aimed to assess the factors associated with fibromyalgia symptoms across etiologies of liver disease. Methods Patients with cirrhosis due to HCV, NASH, or alcohol were recruited from an outpatient hepatology clinic and administered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia. Serum inflammatory markers were measured with standard luminex assays. Results Of 193 participants, 53 (27 %) met criteria for fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with etiology of liver disease (HCV: 35 %, NASH: 30 %, alcohol-related liver disease: 12 %, p < 0.01). Using logistic regression, mood symptoms (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.06, 1.22), sleep disturbance (OR 1.32, 95 % CI 1.16, 1.52), and etiology of liver disease (NASH vs. HCV not different, alcohol vs. HCV OR 0.19, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.63) were associated with fibromyalgia symptoms. If abdominal pain was included in the model, etiology became nonsignificant, indicating that it may be central sensitization due to abdominal pain in patients with chronic liver disease that explains fibromyalgia symptoms rather than the etiology of liver disease or inflammation. Conclusions Fibromyalgia symptoms were significantly associated with HCV and NASH cirrhosis and with psychiatric symptoms. Future work should focus on the underlying pathophysiology and management of widespread pain in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:25433921

  5. Non-specific symptoms in response to hazard exposure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, A; Gompertz, D; Harrington, J M

    1997-07-01

    Recent concerns in occupational health have shown a shift in emphasis from the study of diseases with well-established pathology toward the investigation of conditions characterized by a range of nonspecific symptoms. Exposure to potential hazards differing widely in terms of their physical nature or chemical composition, for example, electromagnetic fields, organophosphate-based pesticides, and organic solvents, frequently results in the reporting of a relatively consistent group of symptoms. Furthermore, these symptoms may arise among groups of workers where no specific physical or chemical cause can be implicated; for example, in many cases of sick building syndrome. The role of psychosocial factors in the expression of ill-health has been well-documented in the psychological literature. Important modifying factors include the attitudes and belief systems of the individuals concerned, certain personality and behavior patterns, and the presence of current stress or pre-existing psychological distress. In addition, social processes may be involved in the generation and reinforcement of health concerns at the group level. These include the workers' perceptions of the competence and credibility of managers and professionals, and the influence and involvement of the media, pressure groups, and the legal system. A proper understanding of the association between putative hazards and the reporting of nonspecific symptoms therefore requires consideration not only of the direct physical pathway between hazard and harm, but also an assessment of factors which may modify the relationship between exposure and symptom reporting. The results of such investigations have important implications for determining the focus of any management and control strategies which may subsequently be implemented in the workplace.

  6. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Mucci, Armida; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Tandon, Rajiv

    2014-04-01

    Clinical heterogeneity is a confound common to all of schizophrenia research. Deficit schizophrenia has been proposed as a homogeneous disease entity within the schizophrenia syndrome. Utilizing the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome (SDS) has allowed the definition of a subgroup dominated by persistent clusters of negative symptoms. While a number of studies have appeared over the years examining the electrophysiological correlates of the cluster of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, only a few studies have actually focused on the deficit syndrome (DS). PubMed as well as MEDLINE were searched for all reports indexed for "negative symptoms" or "deficit syndrome" and one of the following electrophysiology assessment tools: electroencephalography (EEG), evoked potentials (EPs), or polysomnography (PSG). While this line of research is evidently in its infancy, two significant trends emerge. First, spectral EEG studies link increased slow wave activity during wakefulness to the prevalence of negative symptoms. Secondly, sleep studies point to an association between decrease in slow wave sleep and prevalence of negative symptoms. Several studies also indicate a relationship of negative symptoms with reduced alpha activity. A host of other abnormalities--including sensory gating and P300 attenuation--are less consistently reported. Two studies specifically addressed electrophysiology of the DS. Both studies provided evidence suggesting that the DS may be a separate disease entity and not simply a severe form of schizophrenia.

  7. The relationship between suboptimal effort and post-concussion symptoms in children and adolescents with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriel C; Antonini, Tanya N; Monahan, Kerry; Gelfius, Carl; Klamar, Karl; Potts, Michelle; Yeates, Keith O; Bodin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective chart review study explored the relationship between suboptimal effort and post-concussion symptoms in pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Participants were 382 clinically referred children and adolescents between 8 and 16 years of age who sustained an mTBI. Suboptimal effort was identified using reliable digit span and age-corrected scaled scores from the Numbers subtest of the Children's Memory Scale (CMS); 20% of the sample were classified as non-credible performers. Chi-square analyses and t-tests were used to examine differences in post-concussion symptoms and neuropsychological test performance between credible and non-credible performers. Linear regression was used to examine whether CMS Numbers performance predicted post-concussion symptoms after controlling for baseline symptoms and other relevant demographic- and injury-related factors. We found that non-credible performers presented with a greater number of post-concussion symptoms as compared with credible performers. Additionally, non-credible performers demonstrated comparatively poorer performance on neuropsychological tests of focused attention and processing speed. These results suggest that children and adolescents with mTBI who fail effort testing might have a greater tendency to exaggerate post-concussion symptoms and cognitive impairment. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Symptom Discrimination and Habituation: A Case Study of Behavioral Treatment for Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS).

    PubMed

    Ralston, Timothy E; Kanzler, Kathryn E

    2016-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a multifaceted disorder of the autonomic nervous system that profoundly impacts physical functioning. In addition to physical consequences, many patients develop situational anxiety that causes reduced activity level, which may impede functional recovery from POTS. Despite links with anxiety, to date there have been no reports of psychological intervention for POTS. Here we report a case study of POTS in a 40-year-old female serving on active duty in the US military. Because there are no established guidelines for the psychological treatment of POTS, intervention techniques were adapted for use with the patient. Elements of cognitive behavioral therapy, including in-vivo exposure and symptom discrimination, were used to target avoidance of feared situations. Over the course of treatment, the patient learned to discriminate her POTS symptoms from anxiety and displayed a significant decrease in POTS-related functional impairment. Implications for future care are discussed.

  9. Dimensions of normal and abnormal personality: elucidating DSM-IV personality disorder symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tromp, Noor B; Koot, Hans M

    2010-06-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate dimensions of normal and abnormal personality underlying DSM-IV personality disorder (PD) symptoms in 168 adolescents referred to mental health services. Dimensions derived from the Big Five of normal personality and from Livesley's (2006) conceptualization of personality pathology were regressed on interview-based DSM-IV PD symptom counts. When examined independently, both models demonstrated significant levels of predictive power at the higher order level. However, when added to the higher order Big Five dimensions, Livesley's higher and lower order dimensions afforded a supplementary contribution to the understanding of dysfunctional characteristics of adolescent PDs. In addition, they contributed to a better differentiation between adolescent PDs. The present findings suggest that adolescent PDs are more than extreme, maladaptive variants of higher order normal personality traits. Adolescent PDs seem to encompass characteristics that may be more completely covered by dimensions of abnormal personality. Developmental issues and implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Characteristics of college students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms who misuse their medications.

    PubMed

    Jardin, Bianca; Looby, Alison; Earleywine, Mitch

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the characteristics of college students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms who misuse their prescribed psychostimulant medications. Forty-three undergraduate students with a prescription for Ritalin or Adderall completed structured interviews and a battery of questionnaires. Analyses revealed that compared to non-misusers, misusers were significantly more likely to report using a greater number of illicit substances, including nicotine, marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, and opiates, over the past year. Additionally, compared to non-misusers, misusers were significantly more likely to report greater negative expectancies effects, experience more hyperactivity symptoms, and score higher on a measure of sensation seeking. The findings have important implications for future prevention initiatives. In particular, knowledge regarding the extent of misuse in populations with and without prescriptions and variables associated with misuse is essential to the development of effective prevention programs.

  11. Longitudinal Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms Among Male and Female Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Katie L; Wu, Qi; Smokowski, Paul R

    2016-06-01

    Using ecological theory and the peer socialization model, the current study identified risk and protective factors associated with internalizing and externalizing symptoms across ecological domains. It was hypothesized that the constellation of risk and protective factors within the peer microsystem would vary by gender: future optimism and negative peer influence were expected to be significant risk/protective factors for males, whereas peer victimization was expected to be significant risk factors among females. Using four waves of data, three-level hierarchical linear models were estimated for males and females. Results revealed that negative peer influence was a particularly salient risk factor for both internalizing and externalizing behaviors among males, although future optimism did not emerge as a significant protective factor. In addition, as hypothesized, peer victimization indicators were significant risk factors for females. Parent-child conflict was also significantly and positively associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms for males and females. Implications are discussed.

  12. Psychological symptoms, smoking lapse behavior, and the mediating effects of nicotine withdrawal symptoms: A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Katherine J; Leventhal, Adam M

    2015-03-01

    The influence of psychological symptoms on smoking-lapse behavior is critical to understand. However, this relationship is obscured by comorbidity across multiple forms of psychological symptoms and their overlap with nicotine withdrawal. To address these challenges, we constructed a structural model of latent factors underlying 9 manifest scales of affective and behavioral symptoms and tested relations between latent factors and manifest scale residuals with nicotine withdrawal and smoking lapse in a laboratory analog task. Adult daily smokers (N = 286) completed a baseline session at which several forms of affective and behavioral symptoms were assessed and 2 experimental sessions (i.e., following 16 hr of smoking abstinence and following regular smoking), during which withdrawal symptoms and delay of smoking in exchange for monetary reinforcement, as an analogue for lapse propensity, were measured. A single second-order factor of general psychological maladjustment associated with more severe withdrawal-like symptoms, which in turn associated with shorter delay of smoking. The first-order factors, which tapped qualitatively unique domains of psychological symptoms (low positive affect, negative affect, disinhibition), and the manifest scale residuals provided little predictive power beyond the second-order factor with regard to lapse behavior. Relations among general psychological maladjustment, withdrawal-like symptoms, and lapse were significant in both abstinent and nonabstinent conditions, suggesting that psychological maladjustment, and not nicotine withdrawal per se, accounted for the relation with lapse. These results highlight the potential for smoking-cessation strategies that target general psychological maladjustment processes and have implications for addressing withdrawal-like symptoms among individuals with psychological symptoms. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. An update in symptom clusters using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System in a palliative radiotherapy clinic.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Vithusha; Zhang, Liying; Chan, Stephanie; Wan, Bo Angela; Drost, Leah; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Barnes, Elizabeth; McDonald, Rachel; Rowbottom, Leigha; Zaki, Pearl; Chow, Ronald; Hwang, Matthew K; DeAngelis, Carlo; Lao, Nicholas; Chow, Edward

    2017-05-23

    To identify symptom clusters in advanced cancer patients attending a palliative radiotherapy clinic using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). Principal component analysis (PCA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were used to identify symptom clusters among the nine ESAS items using scores from each patient's first visit. ESAS scores from 182 patients were analyzed. The PCA identified three symptom clusters (cluster 1: depression-anxiety-well-being, cluster 2: pain-tiredness-drowsiness, cluster 3: nausea-dyspnea-loss of appetite). The EFA identified two clusters (cluster 1: tiredness-drowsiness-loss of appetite-well-being-pain-nausea-dyspnea, cluster 2: depression-anxiety). The HCA identified three clusters similar to the PCA with an exception of the loss of appetite item being classified under cluster 1 rather than 3. Two to three symptom clusters were identified using three analytical methods, with similar patterns reported in the literature. Particular groups of items co-occurred consistently across all three analyses: depression and anxiety; nausea and dyspnea; as well as pain, tiredness, and drowsiness. Three similar symptom clusters were identified in our patient population using the PCA and HCA; whereas, the EFA produced two clusters: one physical and one psychological cluster. Given the implications of symptom clusters in the management of quality of life, clinicians should be aware of these clusters to aid in the palliative treatment of patients.

  14. Core OCD Symptoms: Exploration of Specificity and Relations with Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Stasik, Sara M.; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Chmielewski, Michael; Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition, comprised of multiple symptom domains. This study used aggregate composite scales representing three core OCD dimensions (Checking, Cleaning, Rituals), as well as Hoarding, to examine the discriminant validity, diagnostic specificity, and predictive ability of OCD symptom scales. The core OCD scales demonstrated strong patterns of convergent and discriminant validity – suggesting that these dimensions are distinct from other self-reported symptoms – whereas hoarding symptoms correlated just as strongly with OCD and non-OCD symptoms in most analyses. Across analyses, our results indicated that Checking is a particularly strong, specific marker of OCD diagnosis, whereas the specificity of Cleaning and Hoarding to OCD was less strong. Finally, the OCD Checking scale was the only significant predictor of OCD diagnosis in logistic regression analyses. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of assessing OCD symptom dimensions separately and implications for classification. PMID:23026094

  15. Relations between anger and DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Durham, Tory A; Byllesby, Brianna M; Armour, Cherie; Forbes, David; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-30

    The present study investigated the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anger. Anger co-occurring with PTSD is found to have a severe effect across a wide range of traumatic experiences, making this an important relationship to examine. The present study utilized data regarding dimensions of PTSD symptoms and anger collected from a non-clinical sample of 247 trauma-exposed participants. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine the underlying factor structure of both PTSD and anger by examining anger in the context of three models of PTSD. Results indicate that a five-factor representation of PTSD and one-factor representation of anger fit the data best. Additionally, anger demonstrated a strong relationship with the dysphoric arousal and negative alterations in cognitions and mood (NACM) factors; and dysphoric arousal was differentially related to anger. Clinical implications include potential need to reevaluate PTSD's diagnostic symptom structure and highlight the potential need to target and treat comorbid anger in individuals with PTSD. In regard to research, these results support the heterogeneity of PTSD.

  16. Addison's Disease: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Addison's disease Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Addison's disease symptoms usually develop slowly, often over several months, ... crisis) Sometimes, however, the signs and symptoms of Addison's disease may appear suddenly. In acute adrenal failure (addisonian ...

  17. Variations in menstrual cycle symptom reporting.

    PubMed

    Sheldrake, P; Cormack, M

    1976-01-01

    The student population at Edinburgh University was surveyed in 1974 to collect data on women's menstrual cycles and to examine sources of individual differences in reporting symptoms associated with the cycle. 2542 non-oral contraceptive (OC) users and 756 OC users provided data. Both sets of respondents were questioned about the occurrence, both premenstrually and during menstruation, of 9 symptoms. The "physical" symptoms (stomachache, backache, nausea, fainting) were more often reported during menstruation, whereas the so-called "emotional" symptoms (lethargy, irritability, depression, tension, headache) had a greater prevalence premenstrually. When the 9 menstrual symptoms were broken down by students' fields of concentration, arts students were found to report more "emotional" symptoms than those in the sciences and professions (medicine and law). Further analysis showed that only and 1st born children were slightly less likely to report symptoms than those whose nearest sibling is 7 or more years older or younger or later born children. A similar trend was found for the reporting of illness in an earlier analysis of data from this sample. When cycle length and reqularity were analyzed together, women with long and regular cycles were found to have the lowest proportion reporting symptoms during menstruating with the exception of tension, nausea, and fainting, and women with short and irregular cycles had a correspondingly high incidence of all symptoms. In addition, women with more regular cycles were more likely to report infrequent recall of dreams than those with irregular cycles. Overall, the women who are most likely to report menstrual symptoms, especially those of an "emotional" character, are more likely to report other illnesses with emotional connotations, recall their dreams more frequently, show a preference for the arts, and tend to have been brought up with older siblings. This cluster of personality attributes defines an "expressive

  18. Calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, and hydride affinity trends in pincer-ligated d(8)-Ir((tBu4)PXCXP) complexes: implications for the thermodynamics of oxidative H2 addition.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Abdulkader; El-Hellani, Ahmad; Bengali, Ashfaq A; Goldman, Alan S; Hasanayn, Faraj

    2014-12-01

    DFT methods are used to calculate the ionization energy (IE) and electron affinity (EA) trends in a series of pincer ligated d(8)-Ir((tBu4)PXCXP) complexes (1-X), where C is a 2,6-disubstituted phenyl ring with X = O, NH, CH2, BH, S, PH, SiH2, and GeH2. Both C2v and C2 geometries are considered. Two distinct σ-type ((2)A1 or (2)A) and π-type ((2)B1 or (2)B) electronic states are calculated for each of the free radical cation and anion. The results exhibit complex trends, but can be satisfactorily accounted for by invoking a combination of electronegativity and specific π-orbital effects. The calculations are also used to study the effects of varying X on the thermodynamics of oxidative H2 addition to 1-X. Two closed shell singlet states differentiated in the C2 point group by the d(6)-electon configuration are investigated for the five-coordinate Ir(III) dihydride product. One electronic state has a d(6)-(a)(2)(b)(2)(b)(2) configuration and a square pyramidal geometry, the other a d(6)-(a)(2)(b)(2)(a)(2) configuration with a distorted-Y trigonal bipyramidal geometry. No simple correlations are found between the computed reaction energies of H2 addition and either the IEs or EAs. To better understand the origin of the computed trends, the thermodynamics of H2 addition are analyzed using a cycle of hydride and proton addition steps. The analysis highlights the importance of the electron and hydride affinities, which are not commonly used in rationalizing trends of oxidative addition reactions. Thus, different complexes such as 1-O and 1-CH2 can have very similar reaction energies for H2 addition arising from opposing hydride and proton affinity effects. Additional calculations on methane C-H bond addition to 1-X afford reaction and activation energy trends that correlate with the reaction energies of H2 addition leading to the Y-product.

  19. Symptom cluster analyses based on symptom occurrence and severity ratings among pediatric oncology patients during myelosuppressive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Christina; Cooper, Bruce A; Marina, Neyssa; Matthay, Katherine K; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Symptom cluster research is an emerging field in symptom management. The ability to identify symptom clusters that are specific to pediatric oncology patients may lead to improved understanding of symptoms' underlying mechanisms among patients of all ages. The purpose of this study, in a sample of children and adolescents with cancer who underwent a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, was to compare the number and types of symptom clusters identified using patients' ratings of symptom occurrence and symptom severity. Children and adolescents with cancer (10-18 years of age; N = 131) completed the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale 10-18 on the day they started a cycle of myelosuppressive chemotherapy, using a 1-week recall of experiences. Symptom data based on occurrence and severity ratings were examined using exploratory factor analysis. The defined measurement model suggested by the best exploratory factor analysis model was then examined with a latent variable analysis. Three clusters were identified when symptom occurrence ratings were evaluated, which were classified as a chemotherapy sequela cluster, mood disturbance cluster, and a neuropsychological discomfort cluster. Analysis of symptom severity ratings yielded similar cluster configurations. Cluster configurations remained relatively stable between symptom occurrence and severity ratings. The evaluation of patients at a common point in the chemotherapy cycle may have contributed to these findings. Additional uniformity in symptom clusters investigations is needed to allow appropriate comparisons among studies. The dissemination of symptom cluster research methodology through publication and presentation may promote uniformity in this field.

  20. Associations Among Symptoms of Autism, Symptoms of Depression and Executive Functions in Children with High-Functioning Autism: A 2 Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Per Normann; Skogli, Erik Winther; Hovik, Kjell Tore; Egeland, Jens; Øie, Merete

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the course of and association among changes in autism symptoms, depression symptoms and executive functions (EF) in children with high-functioning autism (HFA). Thirty-four children with HFA and 45 typically developing children (age 9-16) were assessed at baseline and after 2 years. Children with HFA had impaired scores on all measures at both time points. According to parent reports, depressive symptoms decreased over time, while EF improved and autism symptoms were stable. Children's reports did not reveal less depressive symptoms over time. A positive association was found only between changes in autism symptoms and changes in symptoms of depression. A possible implication is that interventions aimed at either autism symptoms or symptoms of depression may improve the other.

  1. Cooperation and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brendan Clark, C; Thorne, Christopher B; Hardy, Sonya; Cropsey, Karen L

    2013-09-25

    Deficits in pro-social cooperation are common in many individuals with mental illnesses such as depression. For decades, researchers have used economic game paradigms to compare cross-cultural cooperative behavior. However, research using economic games to assess cooperative behavior in clinical populations is in the early stages. We hypothesized that individuals with greater depressive symptoms would struggle to maintain reciprocity in iterative games, but not in single-iteration games measuring personal values. Participants (n=41) played four computer-based economic games (prisoner's dilemma, the public goods game, the ultimatum game, and the trust game) measuring different aspects of cooperation. Participants completed the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) and other measures of personality and demographics. Analyses assessed the relationships between game performance and psychological distress as measured by the DASS. Significant correlations were found between game performance and depressive symptoms, but not symptoms of anxiety or stress. Performance in the prisoner's dilemma and public goods game was significantly related to depression in a linear regression even when known associations with depressive affect such as age, gender, race, education, marital status, and neuroticism were controlled for. Depressive symptoms were associated with an inability to sustain reciprocal cooperation. Participants showed the predicted deficits in cooperation in these economic games. Economic games show the potential for assessing the social deficits associated with depressive symptoms. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examinzation of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents without any psychiatric disorder participated with one of their children (ages 6 to 14 years; 46.4% male; 75.8% Caucasian). Parent anxiety was related to both child anxiety and depression, but not child externalizing symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only parent externalizing symptoms had additive effects, beyond parent anxiety symptoms, in relation to child anxiety symptoms. Further, parent anxiety symptoms moderated the relationship between parent and child externalizing symptoms, such that the strength of this relationship was reduced in the presence of high levels of parent anxiety symptoms. Results of this study illuminate the role of parent comorbidity in understanding relations between parent and child symptoms. PMID:20432062

  3. Parental anxiety and child symptomatology: an examination of additive and interactive effects of parent psychopathology. [corrected

    PubMed

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-10-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents without any psychiatric disorder participated with one of their children (ages 6 to 14 years; 46.4% male; 75.8% Caucasian). Parent anxiety was related to both child anxiety and depression, but not child externalizing symptoms. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that only parent externalizing symptoms had additive effects, beyond parent anxiety symptoms, in relation to child anxiety symptoms. Further, parent anxiety symptoms moderated the relationship between parent and child externalizing symptoms, such that the strength of this relationship was reduced in the presence of high levels of parent anxiety symptoms. Results of this study illuminate the role of parent comorbidity in understanding relations between parent and child symptoms.

  4. Reviewing the Dissociative Symptoms in Patients With Schizophreniaand their Association With Positive and Negative Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ghoreishi, Abolfazl; Shajari, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to clarify dissociative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and its association with negative and positive symptom of schizophrenia. Methods: Based on the 4th edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria, 80 schizophrenic subjects were randomly selected from patients who referred to the clinics of psychiatry hospital in Kerman, Iran. Eighty non-schizophrenic patients were chosen as the control group. Both groups were evaluated for dissociation symptom using the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES). Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) score was also used in the case group for determination of positive and negative symptom of schizophrenia. Results: The prevalence of dissociation symptom was 13% and 4% among schizophrenic and control groups, respectively (p = 0.02). In addition, there was a statistical significant association between DES score and positive symptom in schizophrenia (p = 0.02). Conclusion: The association between dissociative symptom and schizophrenia was significant and dissociative symptoms were associated with positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24995025

  5. Marker-based estimates reveal significant non-additive effects in clonally propagated cassava (Manihot esculenta): implications for the prediction of total genetic value and the selection of varieties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In clonally propagated crops, non-additive genetic effects can be effectively exploited by the identification of superior genetic individuals as varieties. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a clonally propagated staple food crop that feeds hundreds of millions. We quantified the amount and natur...

  6. Asthma Outcomes: Asthma Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Elward, Kurtis S.; Kattan, Meyer; Matsui, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Herman; Sutherland, E. Rand; Minnicozzi, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory symptoms are commonly used to assess the impact of patient-centered interventions. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to propose which measurements of asthma symptoms should be used as a standardized measure in future clinical research studies. Methods Asthma symptom instruments were classified as daily diaries (prospectively recording symptoms between research visits) or retrospective questionnaires (completed at research visits). We conducted a systematic search in PubMed and a search for articles that cited key studies describing development of instruments. We classified outcome instruments as either core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to study aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Four instruments (3 daily diaries, 1 for adults and 2 for children; and 1 retrospective questionnaire for adults) were identified. Minimal clinically important differences have not been established for these instruments, and validation studies were only conducted in a limited number of patient populations. Validity of existing instruments may not be generalizable across racial-ethnic or other subgroups. Conclusions An evaluation of symptoms should be a core asthma outcome measure in clinical research. However, available instruments have limitations that preclude selection of a core instrument. The working group participants propose validation studies in diverse populations, comparisons of diaries versus retrospective questionnaires, and evaluations of symptom assessment alone versus composite scores of asthma control. PMID:22386505

  7. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen affected all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appears to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit: risk profile and safety of hormone therapy. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients’ risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely impacts the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit: risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  8. Psychotherapy Technique Related to Changes in Anxiety Symptoms With a Transdiagnostic Sample.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Seth R; Hilsenroth, Mark J; Weinberger, Joel; Conway, Francine; Owen, Jesse

    2017-06-01

    The current study examined how techniques in a psychodynamic model of therapy (Blagys and Hilsenroth, Clin Psychol Sci Pract. 7, 167-188, 2000) were related to changes in anxiety symptoms across early treatment process among a transdiagnostic sample of patients with primary anxiety disorder, subclinical anxiety disorder, and no anxiety disorder. Secondary analyses examined the use of specific psychodynamic techniques in relation to symptom change. Results revealed that therapists' use of psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques were significantly and directly related to changes in anxiety symptoms, in line with previous findings (Pitman, Slavin-Mulford, and Hilsenroth, J Nerv Ment Dis. 202, 391-396, 2014). In addition, patients with co-occurring axis I and II disorders demonstrated positive changes in anxiety symptoms regardless of level of PI technique used, whereas patients without co-occurring disorders experienced greater improvement with more PI. Implications for transdiagnostic treatment protocols for anxiety, notably Leichsenring and Salzer's (Psychotherapy 51, 224, 2104) Unified Psychodynamic Protocol for Anxiety Disorders, are discussed in relation to the current findings.

  9. Risk factors for DSM 5 PTSD symptoms in Israeli civilians during the Gaza war

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Or-Chen, Keren; Harel, Hila

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness. Method Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack. Results A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males. Conclusions The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25905028

  10. Foods provoking and alleviating symptoms in gastroparesis: patient experiences.

    PubMed

    Wytiaz, Victoria; Homko, Carol; Duffy, Frank; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2015-04-01

    Nutritional counseling for gastroparesis focuses on reduction of meal size, fiber, and fat to control symptoms. The tolerance of gastroparesis patients for particular foods is largely anecdotal. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize foods provoking or alleviating gastroparesis symptoms. Gastroparesis patients completed: (1) Demographic Questionnaire; (2) Patient Assessment of Upper GI Symptoms; (3) Food Toleration and Aversion survey asking patients about experiences when eating certain foods utilizing a scale from -3 (greatly worsening symptoms) to +3 (greatly improving symptoms). Descriptive qualities (acidic, fatty, spicy, roughage-based, bitter, salty, bland, and sweet) were assigned to foods. Forty-five gastroparesis patients participated (39 idiopathic gastroparesis). Foods worsening symptoms included: orange juice, fried chicken, cabbage, oranges, sausage, pizza, peppers, onions, tomato juice, lettuce, coffee, salsa, broccoli, bacon, and roast beef. Saltine crackers, jello, and graham crackers moderately improved symptoms. Twelve additional foods were tolerated by patients (not provoking symptoms): ginger ale, gluten-free foods, tea, sweet potatoes, pretzels, white fish, clear soup, salmon, potatoes, white rice, popsicles, and applesauce. Foods provoking symptoms were generally fatty, acidic, spicy, and roughage-based. The foods shown to be tolerable were generally bland, sweet, salty, and starchy. This study identified specific foods that worsen as well as foods that may help alleviate symptoms of gastroparesis. Foods that provoked symptoms differed in quality from foods that alleviated symptoms or were tolerable. The results of this study illustrate specific examples of foods that aggravate or improve symptoms and provide suggestions for a gastroparesis diet.

  11. Symptom clusters in adults with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Conley, Samantha; Proctor, Deborah D; Jeon, Sangchoon; Sandler, Robert S; Redeker, Nancy S

    2017-10-01

    Symptoms (pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and anxiety) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are associated with reduced quality of life. Understanding how IBD symptoms cluster and the clinical and demographic factors associated with symptom clusters will enable focused development of symptom management interventions. The study purposes were to (i) identify symptom cluster membership among adults with IBD and (ii) examine associations between demographic (age, gender, race/ethnicity, and education) and clinical factors (smoking status, time since diagnosis, medication type, IBD type, disease activity), and membership in specific symptom cluster groups. We conducted a retrospective study of data from the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America's (CCFA) Partners Cohort and used Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) measures to measure pain interference, fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depression. The sample included 5,296 participants with IBD (mean age 44, 72% female). In latent class analysis (LCA), four groups of participants were identified based on symptoms: "low symptom burden" (26% of sample), "high symptom burden" (38%), "physical symptoms" (22%), and "psychological symptoms" (14%). In multinomial regression, female gender, smoking, corticosteroids, Crohn's disease, and active disease state were associated with membership in the high symptom burden group. Additional research is needed to test interventions that may be effective at reducing symptom burden for individuals with IBD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cognitive Function in Heart Failure is Associated with Nonsomatic Symptoms of Depression but Not Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Fulcher, Michael J.; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have high rates of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been associated with greater cognitive impairments in HF; however, it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are more detrimental to cognition than others. Objective To identify whether somatic and/or nonsomatic depressive symptom clusters were associated with cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods Participants were 326 HF patients (40.5% female, 26.7% race-ethnicity, aged 68.6±9.7 years). Depressive symptoms were measured using a depression questionnaire commonly used in medical populations: the Patient Health Questionnatire-9 (PHQ-9). Somatic and Nonsomatic subscales scores were created using previous factor analytic results. A neuropsychological battery tested attention, executive function, and memory. Composites were created using averages of age-adjusted scaled scores. Regressions adjusting for demographic and clinical factors were conducted. Results Regressions revealed that PHQ-9 Total was associated with Attention (β=−.14, p=.008) and Executive Function (β=−.17, p=.001). When analyzed separately, the Nonsomatic subscale – but not the Somatic symptoms subscale (ps ≥.092) – was associated with Attention scores (β=−.15, p=.004) and Memory (β=−.11, p=.044). Both Nonsomatic (β=−.18, p<.001) and Somatic symptoms (β=−.11, p=.048) were related to Executive Function. When included together, only the Nonsomatic symptom cluster was associated with Attention (β=−.15, p=.020) and Executive Function (β=−.19, p=.003). Conclusions Greater overall depressive symptom severity was associated with poorer performance on multiple cognitive domains, an effect driven primarily by the nonsomatic symptoms of depression. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that screening explicitly for nonsomatic depressive symptoms may be warranted and that the mechanisms underlying the

  13. Opioid neonatal abstinence syndrome: controversies and implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Kim; Perez-Montejano, Raul

    2014-01-01

    The Opioid Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) is a term used to describe a cluster of signs and symptoms seen in infants experiencing withdrawal from opioid drugs. Despite a substantial literature the relationship between maternal methadone dose, NAS and the method of assessment of NAS symptoms has not been agreed. The following review will address current and historical controversies surrounding these issues and will examine the evidence concerned with the evaluation of neonates exposed to methadone in utero. The key findings are as follows: A variety of NAS scales are used to assess the severity of neonatal withdrawal symptoms including locally adapted validated tools. Inconsistencies in the use of NAS scales have included the timing, duration and frequency of administration; the degree to which observers were trained to reliability; the use of NAS scales designed for term neonates to assess pre-term neonates who may have a qualitatively different expression of abstinence symptoms and; the research setting in which the tool was administered. There is a lack of research investigating the observant bias' effect upon scoring NAS, the basis for treatment decisions and the influence of concomitant maternal use of non-opioid drugs late in pregnancy. We also discuss the implications of the lack of recognition of NAS symptoms leading to possible under reporting and inappropriate, early neonatal discharge from hospital. In addition, this paper also discusses the merits and problems of conducting research in this area and highlights gaps in our knowledge and areas for further research.

  14. Review of factor analytic studies examining symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Jill; Perry, Adrienne; Bebko, James; Toplak, Maggie E

    2014-01-01

    Factor analytic studies have been conducted to examine the inter-relationships and degree of overlap among symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This paper reviewed 36 factor analytic studies that have examined ASD symptoms, using 13 different instruments. Studies were grouped into three categories: Studies with all DSM-IV symptoms, studies with a subset of DSM-IV symptoms, and studies with symptoms that were not specifically based on the DSM-IV. There was consistent support for a common social/communication domain that is distinct from a restricted and repetitive behaviours and interests domain. Implications for symptom conceptualization and diagnosis in ASD are discussed.

  15. Relationships between Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, Dissociative Symptoms, and Lifetime Heroin Use among Individuals Who Abuse Substances in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, E. Gail; Diaz, Naelys; Peluso, Paul R.; Mullaney, Donald; Weiner, Michael; McIlveen, John W.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, dissociation, and lifetime heroin use among inpatient clients who abused substances. Results indicate important implications for practice and directions for future research. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  16. Relationships between Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, Dissociative Symptoms, and Lifetime Heroin Use among Individuals Who Abuse Substances in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, E. Gail; Diaz, Naelys; Peluso, Paul R.; Mullaney, Donald; Weiner, Michael; McIlveen, John W.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, dissociation, and lifetime heroin use among inpatient clients who abused substances. Results indicate important implications for practice and directions for future research. (Contains 1 figure and 1 table.)

  17. Anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms in orthognathic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Bitar, Zaid B; Al-Ahmad, Hazem T

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact of orthognathic surgery in terms of anxiety and stress levels in pre-treatment and post-treatment groups compared with controls and the role of previous trauma exposure on anxiety and stress levels following treatment. A case-control study was performed involving three age-gender matched groups: 38 'pre-surgery', 39 'post-surgery' and 39 'control' subjects. All subjects had assessment of dental anxiety, post-traumatic stress responses and frequency of previous distressing events. Seventeen subjects were followed up prospectively for 1 year after surgery. 'Post-surgery' group reported lower dental trait anxiety (S-DAI) scores than other groups (P = 0.001). S-DAI was significantly associated with frequency of previous traumatic events in 'pre-surgery' and 'post-surgery' groups (P < 0.01), and was significantly associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 'pre-surgery' subjects (P < 0.01) who had the highest PTSD symptoms among the three groups (P = 0.005). Symptom severity (IES-R) levels were significantly associated with frequency of previous distressing dental events in 'pre-surgery' (P < 0.05) and 'post-surgery' groups (P < 0.01). Post-operative S-DAI and IES were significantly associated with pre-operative PTSD symptoms (P < 0.01). The two orthognathic groups were associated with low levels of anxiety and PTSD symptoms in comparison with the control group of the study. Trauma exposure prior to orthognathic treatment can be considered as a risk factor for the development of dental anxiety and PTSD symptoms. The need to improve communication between patients and team is emphasized, especially during the assessment of patients' emotional state pre-operatively, in addition to discussing psychological issues and psychosocial treatment implications. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Relative Influence of Genetics and Shared Environment on Child Mental Health Symptoms Depends on Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Van Hulle, Carol A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Maier, Rose; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Background Comorbidity among childhood mental health symptoms is common in clinical and community samples and should be accounted for when investigating etiology. We therefore aimed to uncover latent classes of mental health symptoms in middle childhood in a community sample, and to determine the latent genetic and environmental influences on those classes. Methods The sample comprised representative cohorts of twins. A questionnaire-based assessment of mental health symptoms was used in latent class analyses. Data on 3223 twins (1578 boys and 1645 girls) with a mean age of 7.5 years were analyzed. The sample was predominantly non-Hispanic Caucasian (92.1%). Results Latent class models delineated groups of children according to symptom profiles–not necessarily clinical groups but groups representing the general population, most with scores in the normative range. The best-fitting models suggested 9 classes for both girls and boys. Eight of the classes were very similar across sexes; these classes ranged from a “Low Symptom” class to a “Moderately Internalizing & Severely Externalizing” class. In addition, a “Moderately Anxious” class was identified for girls but not boys, and a “Severely Impulsive & Inattentive” class was identified for boys but not girls. Sex-combined analyses implicated moderate genetic influences for all classes. Shared environmental influences were moderate for the “Low Symptom” and “Moderately Internalizing & Severely Externalizing” classes, and small to zero for other classes. Conclusions We conclude that symptom classes are largely similar across sexes in middle childhood. Heritability was moderate for all classes, but shared environment played a greater role for classes in which no one type of symptom predominated. PMID:25077799

  19. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  20. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  1. The relationship between depressive symptoms, diabetes symptoms, and self-management among an urban, low-income Latino population.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Annie L; Green, Janelle; Enguidanos, Susan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of depression symptoms among Latinos with diabetes following transition from hospital to home and the relationship of depressive symptoms to diabetes symptom severity and self-management activities. 203 Latino patients with diagnosed diabetes completed a survey assessing depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), diabetes symptom severity, and diabetes self-management activities (SDSCA). Characteristics and diabetes outcomes between patients with and without probable major depression were compared. Associations between PHQ-9 scores and diabetes outcomes were assessed. Multivariate regression models evaluated the relationship between depressive symptoms and diabetes outcomes and exercise after controlling for patient characteristics. 31.5% of participants indicated probable major depression (PHQ-9≥10). More severe diabetes symptoms and less reported exercise were associated with higher PHQ-9 scores. Regression models showed no relationship between self-management and depression. More severe diabetes symptoms were significantly associated with being female, married, and having probable major depression. Odds of exercising were reduced by 6% for every one-unit increase in PHQ-9 score. The prevalence of probable depressive symptoms is high in this population. Having depressive symptoms is an indicator of poorer diabetes symptoms. Screening for depressive symptoms may help identify individuals who need additional support with diabetes symptom and self-management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Music therapy for dementia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koger, S M; Brotons, M

    2000-01-01

    While music/music therapy does not represent a treatment of dementia, its use is based on a possible beneficial effect on symptoms including social, emotional and cognitive skills and for decreasing behavioral problems of individuals with dementias. Thus, there are clear implications for patients' and caregivers' quality of life. However, quantification and documentation of the evidence of this effect is necessary. Professional music therapists are accountable for providing efficient, beneficial treatment. Further, music therapists are responsible for assessing, designing and implementing music therapy treatments, monitoring client progress, and reformulating their practice according to data collected and new advancements in the field. If they wait until sufficient valid, empirical data on all aspects of a disability or music response are available before attempting to design a therapy session, they may well reach retirement age before even one client can be served. On the other hand, promulgating the efficacy of music therapy in general, or of specific music therapy techniques, in the absence of any substantiation other than intuition or tradition borders on professional recklessness. To gather and evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia symptoms. All available sources of references were searched for randomised controlled trials of music therapy used as an intervention in dementia. The search terms included 'controlled trial or study, music*, therapy, dement*, Alzheimer*, cognitive impairment.' The reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the studies available for inclusion. The criteria used are presence and adequacy of a control condition, independent assessment of patients' performance (ie standardized ratings carried out by a person other than the music therapist) and the number of participants (no fewer than three). No randomised controlled trials, or trials with quantitative data suitable for analysis were found. The

  3. Music therapy for dementia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koger, S M; Brotons, M

    2000-01-01

    While music/music therapy does not represent a treatment of dementia, its use is based on a possible beneficial effect on symptoms including social, emotional and cognitive skills and for decreasing behavioral problems of individuals with dementias. Thus, there are clear implications for patients' and caregivers' quality of life. However, quantification and documentation of the evidence of this effect is necessary. Professional music therapists are accountable for providing efficient, beneficial treatment. Furthermore, music therapists are responsible for assessing, designing and implementing music therapy treatments, monitoring client progress, and reformulating their practice according to data collected and new advancements in the field. If they wait until sufficient valid, empirical data on all aspects of a disability or music response are available before attempting to design a therapy session, they may well reach retirement age before even one client can be served. On the other hand, promulgating the efficacy of music therapy in general, or of specific music therapy techniques, in the absence of any substantiation other than intuition or tradition borders on professional recklessness. To gather and evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia symptoms. All available sources of references were searched in March 2000 for randomised controlled trials of music therapy used as an intervention in dementia. The search terms included 'controlled trial or study, music, therapy, dementia, Alzheimer's, cognitive impairment' and derivatives of these. The reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the studies available for inclusion. The criteria used are presence and adequacy of a control condition, independent assessment of patients' performance (ie standardized ratings carried out by a person other than the music therapist) and the number of participants (no fewer than three). No randomised controlled trials, or trials with

  4. Trismus, the first symptom in a challenging diagnosis of Tetanus.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Lorenzo; Maccari, Alberto; Chiesa, Valentina; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2016-02-11

    Tetanus is a severe, life-threatening infectious disease present worldwide. The incidence of this disease is very low in developed countries, and practitioners are unfamiliar with its symptoms and signs, resulting in late diagnosis and low recovery rate. Furthermore, main symptoms, such as trismus, are often associated with several confounding factors: these may lead the physician to send patients towards an incorrect diagnostic management and the calling on of wrong specialists. This case focuses on the importance of considering tetanus in the differential diagnosis of trismus associated with systemic symptoms, and discusses the clinical implications of an initial wrong diagnostic pathway. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  5. A modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom clusters in radiation oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Peter A S; Lee, Jae; Zhou, Jun-Min; Ma, Zhenjun; Portman, Diane; Jim, Heather; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael

    2017-09-01

    Patient-reported outcomes regarding symptom burden may provide valuable information in addition to physician assessment. Systematic collection of patient-reported outcomes may be an important metric to identify unmet needs and improve quality of patient care. To understand common symptoms of patients seen in radiation oncology clinic, we examined the prospectively collected modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-r) data to explore symptom clusters. Our clinic established use of a modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in August 2015. All outpatients presenting for radiation oncology services completed the form at each clinic visit. Symptom clusters are defined by two or more symptoms that are interrelated and occur simultaneously with a high degree of predictability. A sample of 916 de-identified surveys was assessed statistically using principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation to determine independent clustering between the symptoms queried. We found four major clusters of symptoms: Tiredness (tired, drowsiness; PC1), Loss of Appetite (nausea, lack of appetite; PC2), Low Well-Being (overall & spiritual well-being; PC3), and Depression (depression, anxiety; PC4). These accounted for 46%, 9.2%, 7.6%, and 7% of total variance, respectively. Internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha was 0.87, 0.7, 0.82, and 0.87, respectively. The most frequent write-in item was itchiness, present in 24% of the 148 patients responding. Assessment of patients seen in a large radiation oncology clinic revealed several symptom clusters. {Tiredness and drowsiness} represents a major symptom cluster. Itchiness may be underrecognized. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Should we cluster patients or symptoms? The myth of symptom clusters based on 'depression, insomnia, pain' and 'depression, fatigue, pain'.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Aynur; Walsh, Declan; Hauser, Katherine; Rybicki, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    'Depression, fatigue, pain' (DFP) and 'depression, insomnia, pain' (DIP) symptom clusters (SCs) have been proposed in cancer. These symptoms are common and co-occur, that is, they constitute clusters of patients rather than symptoms. The following research questions were addressed: (1) What is the frequency of co-occurrence of two symptom groups (DFP and DIP) in advanced cancer? (2) What is the degree of symptom item association within each symptom group? (3) Were either of these symptom trios associated with prognosis? We reanalysed a symptom data set of 1000 patients with advanced cancer. We identified the frequency of co-occurrence of two symptom groups: DFP and DIP, using both prevalence and severity data. The symptom associations were tested by χ(2) and Spearman correlations. We also determined whether either of these symptom trios were associated with a major biological outcome, that is, survival by time-to-event analyses. (1) Although DFP and DIP co-occured in about a quarter of the population, they were not SCs, but rather patient clusters. (2) Many persons had only one symptom from any symptom pair, and correlation coefficients were low for all symptom pairs. (3) Neither DFP nor DIP were associated with survival. Neither DFP nor DIP symptom item combinations constituted a specific cancer SC contrary to prior reports. DFP co-occurred in 27% and DIP in only 20%. Additionally, these symptom combinations were not associated with a biological outcome, that is, poor prognosis. Patient subgroups identified by shared symptom experiences alone do not identify SCs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome.

  8. Diphenhydramine for Acute Extrapyramidal Symptoms After Propofol Administration.

    PubMed

    Sherer, James; Salazar, Tomas; Schesing, Kevin B; McPartland, Shannon; Kornitzer, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms are an uncommon but well-recognized side effect after the administration of general anesthesia in patients without a significant neurologic history. Several case reports implicate propofol as the likely causative agent producing these symptoms, which include ballismus, dystonia, choreoathetosis, and opisthotonus. Currently, there is no clear consensus on first-line treatment of these symptoms. In each of the published cases, anticholinergic medications and benzodiazepines were central to initial management, although the speed and extent of symptom resolution were variable. Here we present a case of a 17-year-old boy with ulcerative colitis who presented with ballismus, torticollis, tongue thrusting, and oculogyric movements after colonoscopy under general anesthesia with propofol. The patient responded promptly to treatment with diphenhydramine. This is the first reported case in which diphenhydramine was successfully used as the primary treatment of severe extrapyramidal symptoms in a pediatric patient after propofol administration. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Symptoms and the body: Taking the inferential leap.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Omer; Witthöft, Michael; Petersen, Sibylle; Brown, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    The relationship between the conscious experience of physical symptoms and indicators of objective physiological dysfunction is highly variable and depends on characteristics of the person, the context and their interaction. This relationship often breaks down entirely in the case of "medically unexplained" or functional somatic symptoms, violating the basic assumption in medicine that physical symptoms have physiological causes. In this paper, we describe the prevailing theoretical approach to this problem and review the evidence pertaining to it. We then use the framework of predictive coding to propose a new and more comprehensive model of the body-symptom relationship that integrates existing concepts within a unifying framework that addresses many of the shortcomings of current theory. We describe the conditions under which a close correspondence between the experience of symptoms and objective physiology might be expected, and when they are likely to diverge. We conclude by exploring some theoretical and clinical implications of this new account.

  10. The measurement of menstrual symptoms: factor structure of the menstrual symptom questionnaire in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Negriff, Sonya; Dorn, Lorah D; Hillman, Jennifer B; Huang, Bin

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the factor structure of the Menstrual Symptom Questionnaire (MSQ) in a sample of 210 adolescent girls (11-17 years). Such an examination has not been carried out with an adolescent sample. In addition, the definitions of menstrual disorders have evolved since the creation of the MSQ. Exploratory factor analysis supported a three factor structure indicating abdominal pain, negative affect/somatic complaints, and back pain. Partial correlations indicated all three MSQ factors were correlated with depressive symptoms, but only the negative affect factor was correlated with trait anxiety. Future research should explore potential associations in multiple areas of functioning as menstrual symptoms may alter healthy developmental processes during adolescence.

  11. Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Developmental Course of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms From Childhood to Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Viding, Essi; Galéra, Cédric; Greven, Corina U; Zheng, Yao; Plomin, Robert; Rijsdijk, Frühling

    2015-07-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is conceptualized as a neurodevelopmental disorder that is strongly heritable. However, to our knowledge, no study to date has examined the genetic and environmental influences explaining interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptoms from childhood to adolescence (ie, systematic decreases or increases with age). The reason ADHD symptoms persist in some children but decline in others is an important concern, with implications for prognosis and interventions. To assess the proportional impact of genes and the environment on interindividual differences in the developmental course of ADHD symptom domains of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention between ages 8 and 16 years. A prospective sample of 8395 twin pairs from the Twins Early Development Study, recruited from population records of births in England and Wales between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 1996. Data collection at age 8 years took place between November 2002 and November 2004; data collection at age 16 years took place between February 2011 and January 2013. Both DSM-IV ADHD symptom subscales were rated 4 times by participants' mothers. Estimates from latent growth curve models indicated that the developmental course of hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms followed a sharp linear decrease (mean score of 6.0 at age 8 years to 2.9 at age 16 years). Interindividual differences in the linear change in hyperactivity/impulsivity were under strong additive genetic influences (81%; 95% CI, 73%-88%). More than half of the genetic variation was specific to the developmental course and not shared with the baseline level of hyperactivity/impulsivity. The linear decrease in inattention symptoms was less pronounced (mean score of 5.8 at age 8 years to 4.9 at age 16 years). Nonadditive genetic influences accounted for a substantial amount of variation in the developmental course of inattention symptoms (54%; 95% CI, 8%-76%), with more than

  12. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Symptoms and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jasona, Leonard A.; Zinn, Marcie L.; Zinn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide with an estimated one million cases in the United States. Hurdles to establishing consensus to achieve accurate evaluation of patients with ME continue, fueled by poor agreement about case definitions, slow progress in development of standardized diagnostic approaches, and issues surrounding research priorities. Because there are other medical problems, such as early MS and Parkinson’s Disease, which have some similar clinical presentations, it is critical to accurately diagnose ME to make a differential diagnosis. In this article, we explore and summarize advances in the physiological and neurological approaches to understanding, diagnosing, and treating ME. We identify key areas and approaches to elucidate the core and secondary symptom clusters in ME so as to provide some practical suggestions in evaluation of ME for clinicians and researchers. This review, therefore, represents a synthesis of key discussions in the literature, and has important implications for a better understanding of ME, its biological markers, and diagnostic criteria. There is a clear need for more longitudinal studies in this area with larger data sets, which correct for multiple testing. PMID:26411464

  13. A Primer on Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantz, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of persistent postconcussion symptoms (PPCS) is controversial, and there is ongoing debate as to whether the etiology of PPCS is psychogenic or physiogenic. In addition, there is a lack of agreement on diagnostic definitions of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and concussion and the terms are used interchangeably in the research…

  14. Improvement of negative symptoms: Concepts, definition and assessment.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, N C

    1997-05-01

    The development of new medications for the treatment of schizophrenia is closely tied to the concept of the disorder and its characteristic symptoms. In recent years, the symptoms have been divided into two broad categories: positive and negative. Positive symptoms tend to command clinical attention and to be treatment-responsive, which negative symptoms are more insidious and disabling, but less spectacular. Negative symptoms, which are similar to the core symptoms of schizophrenia defined by Krapaelin and Bleuler, have not received much attention until recently because of concern about reliability. However, rating scales with good reliability are now available for use in clinical and neurobiological studies. Clinical drug trials are also meeting the challenge of documenting the response to carefully rated negative symptoms. In addition, they are exploring the effects of medication on negative symptoms that are primary rather than secondary to reduced extrapyramidal side effects, or of medication that lowers levels of depression or decreases the demoralizing effects of positive symptoms. One ideal strategy for identifying the effects of medication on primary negative symptoms is to study patients with high levels of negative symptoms and low levels of positive symptoms, who are in the early stages of the illness and have been given minimal treatment with classical neuroleptics. Such samples are highly informative, but difficult to collect. Alternatively, when all confounders cannot be eliminated, the effects of medication can be explored using statistical techniques to examine covariance.

  15. Isolating Biomarkers for Symptomatic States: Considering Symptom-Substrate Chronometry

    PubMed Central

    Treadway, Michael T.; Leonard, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing goal of psychopathology research is to develop objective markers of symptomatic states, yet progress has been far slower than expected. While prior reviews have attributed this state of affairs to diagnostic heterogeneity, symptom comorbidity, and phenotypic complexity, little attention has been paid to the implications of intra-individual symptom dynamics and inter-relatedness for biomarker study designs. In this critical review, we consider the impact of short-term symptom fluctuations on widely-used study designs that regress the “average level” of a given symptom against biological data collected at a single time-point, and summarize findings from ambulatory assessment studies suggesting that such designs may be sub-optimal to detect symptom-substrate relationships. While such designs play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biological substrates related to more stable, longer-term changes (e.g., grey matter thinning during a depressive episode), they may be less optimal for the detection of symptoms that exhibit show high frequency fluctuations, are susceptible to common reporting biases, or may be heavily influenced by the presence of other symptoms. We propose that a greater emphasis on intra-individual symptom chronometry may be useful for identifying subgroups of patients with a common, proximal pathological indicators. Taken together, these three recent developments in the areas of symptom conceptualization and measurement raise important considerations for future studies attempting to identify reliable biomarkers in psychiatry. PMID:27240533

  16. Relationship Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Interference, Symptoms, and Maladaptive Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Doron, Guy; Derby, Danny; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Nahaloni, Elad; Moulding, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive preoccupation, doubts, and compulsive behaviors focusing on one's romantic relationship and partner are receiving increasing clinical, theoretical, and empirical attention. Commonly referred to as relationship obsessive-compulsive disorder (ROCD), such symptoms have been linked with decreased relational and sexual functioning and lower mood, even after controlling for other obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms. To date, however, these symptoms have been studied in community samples alone. In the present study, we compared levels of interference, OCD, and mood symptoms between clinical participants with ROCD, OCD, and community controls. We also examined group differences in maladaptive beliefs previously linked with OCD and ROCD. Participants included 22 ROCD clients, 22 OCD clients, and 28 community controls. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to attain clinical diagnoses of OCD and ROCD. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate primary-symptoms severity. All participants completed measures of symptoms and dysfunctional beliefs. ROCD clients reported more severe ROCD symptoms than the OCD and control groups. ROCD and OCD clients did not differ in severity of their -primary-symptoms. ROCD clients scored higher than the other groups on maladaptive OCD-related and relationship-related beliefs. Finally, ROCD clients showed more severe depression symptoms than community controls. ROCD is a disabling presentation of OCD that warrants research attention. Maladaptive OCD-related and relationship-related beliefs may be implicated in the development and maintenance of ROCD.

  17. DO SYMPTOMS OF ILLNESS SERVE SIGNALING FUNCTIONS? (HINT: YES).

    PubMed

    Tiokhin, Leonid

    2016-06-01

    Symptoms of illness provide information about an organism's underlying state. This notion has inspired a burgeoning body of research on organisms' adaptations for detecting and changing behavior toward ill individuals. However, little attention has been paid to a likely outcome of these dynamics. Once an organism's fitness is affected by others' responses to symptoms of illness, natural selection can favor individuals who alter symptom expression to influence the behavior of others. That is, many symptoms may originate as cues, but will evolve into signals. In this paper, I develop the hypothesis that symptoms of illness serve signaling functions, and provide a comprehensive review of relevant evidence from diverse disciplines. I also develop novel empirical predictions generated by this hypothesis and discuss its implications for public health. Signaling provides an ultimate explanation for otherwise opaque aspects of symptom expression, such as why symptoms fluctuate in social contexts, and can exist without underlying pathology, and why individuals deliberately generate symptoms of illness. This analysis suggests that signaling theory is a major organizing framework for understanding symptom etiology.

  18. Unique and Overlapping Symptoms in Schizophrenia Spectrum and Dissociative Disorders in Relation to Models of Psychopathology: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Renard, Selwyn B; Huntjens, Rafaele J C; Lysaker, Paul H; Moskowitz, Andrew; Aleman, André; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H M

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs) and dissociative disorders (DDs) are described in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and tenth edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) as 2 categorically distinct diagnostic categories. However, several studies indicate high levels of co-occurrence between these diagnostic groups, which might be explained by overlapping symptoms. The aim of this systematic review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the research concerning overlap and differences in symptoms between schizophrenia spectrum and DDs. For this purpose the PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant literature. The literature contained a large body of evidence showing the presence of symptoms of dissociation in SSDs. Although there are quantitative differences between diagnoses, overlapping symptoms are not limited to certain domains of dissociation, nor to nonpathological forms of dissociation. In addition, dissociation seems to be related to a history of trauma in SSDs, as is also seen in DDs. There is also evidence showing that positive and negative symptoms typically associated with schizophrenia may be present in DD. Implications of these results are discussed with regard to different models of psychopathology and clinical practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Interrelations between executive function and symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity and inattention in preschoolers: a two year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Brocki, Karin C; Eninger, Lilianne; Thorell, Lisa B; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    The present study, including children at risk for developing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), examined the idea that complex executive functions (EFs) build upon more simple ones. This notion was applied in the study of longitudinal interrelations between core EF components - simple and complex inhibition, selective attention, and working memory (WM) - at age 5 and 6 as well as their predictive relations to ADHD symptoms at age 7. The results showed that simple inhibition and selective attention at age 5 independently predicted complex inhibition and WM at age 6. In addition, EFs primarily predicted symptoms of inattention rather than hyperactivity/impulsivity even at this young age. Finally, age 6 complex inhibition was shown to act as a mediator in the relations between simple inhibition and selective attention at age 5 and symptoms of inattention at age 7. These findings provide novel longitudinal support for the theory that fundamental EF components show a progression with age toward more complex executive control (see Garon et al. Psychological Bulletin 134(1):31-60 2008). Further, complex inhibition, implicating both inhibition and WM, seems to be a particularly strong correlate of ADHD symptoms in young children and should as such be the focus of future studies examining the relation between cognitive function and ADHD symptoms from a developmental perspective.

  20. [Sadness, worries and fears: depression and anxiety disorders in preschool age--results of relevance, symptoms and impairment].

    PubMed

    Otto, Yvonne; Andreas, Anna; von Klitzing, Kai; Fuchs, Sandra; Klein, Annette M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the current strain and impairment of children with depressive and anxiety disorders in terms of their development and family environment compared to children without mental disorders. Conclusions for dealing with clinical disorders in preschool are to be derived. Internalizing symptoms/disorders were measured dimensionally with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; multi-informant approach) and categorially with the Preschool Age Psychiatric Assessment (PAPA). The sample consisted of n = 93 children with pure anxiety disorders, n = 20 children with depressive and anxiety disorders, n = 42 children with subclinical symptoms of depression and anxiety disorders, and n = 76 children without mental disorders. We assessed stability of symptoms, as well as agreement between mothers, fathers and kindergarten teachers regarding internalizing symptoms which was higher between mothers and fathers than between parents and kindergarten teachers. In comparison to kindergarten teachers parents reported more internalizing symptoms. Regarding the overall impairment, family adversity, family environment and maternal psychopathology children with depression and additional anxiety disorders showed the highest scores. There were no differences in overall impairment between children with pure anxiety disorders and without mental disorders. Finally, implications for practice are discussed.

  1. The role of collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms for Asian and Latino children of immigrants.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Taveeshi; Rogers-Sirin, Lauren; Okazaki, Sumie; Ryce, Patrice; Sirin, Selcuk R

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a 3-wave, longitudinal study to examine the role of ethnic collective self-esteem and United States (U.S.) collective self-esteem on anxious-depressed symptoms over time among Asian and Latino immigrant-origin adolescents (n = 171). Growth curve analysis revealed that anxious-depressed symptoms first decreased between 10th and 11th grade and then increased over time for both groups. Additionally higher levels of ethnic collective self-esteem were associated with lower levels of anxious-depressed symptoms only for Asian adolescents. There was a differing pattern for U.S. collective self-esteem such that for Latino adolescents, higher U.S. collective self-esteem was associated with higher anxious-depressed symptoms, whereas for Asian adolescents there was an inverse relationship with anxious-depressed symptoms. The results expand the literature on ethnic and U.S. collective self-esteem and their link to mental health. Implications of the findings for research in general, and for counseling immigrant youth and families in particular, are discussed.

  2. Beyond frequency: who is most bothered by vasomotor symptoms?

    PubMed

    Thurston, Rebecca C; Bromberger, Joyce T; Joffe, Hadine; Avis, Nancy E; Hess, Rachel; Crandall, Carolyn J; Chang, Yuefang; Green, Robin; Matthews, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    Most menopausal women report vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats). However, not all women with vasomotor symptoms, including frequent symptoms, are bothered by them. The primary aim was to identify correlates of vasomotor symptom bother beyond symptom frequency. The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation participants reporting vasomotor symptoms at annual visit 7 comprised the sample (N = 1,042). Assessments included hot flash and night sweats frequency (number per week) and bother (1, not at all- 4, very much). Negative affect (index of depressive symptoms, anxiety, perceived stress, negative mood), symptom sensitivity, sleep problems, and vasomotor symptom duration (number of years) were examined cross-sectionally in relation to bother in ordinal logistic regression models with symptom frequency and covariates. Hot flashes and night sweats were considered separately. In multivariable models controlling for hot flash frequency, negative affect (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.08-1.51), symptom sensitivity (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03-1.37), sleep problems (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04-1.85), poorer health (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.03-1.48), duration of hot flashes (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06-1.23), younger age (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-0.99), and African American race (vs white, OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12-2.26) were associated with hot flash bother. After controlling for night sweats frequency and covariates, sleep problems (OR = 1.84, 95% CI:1.33-2.55) and night sweats duration (OR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.20) were associated with night sweats bother. Beyond frequency, factors associated with bothersome hot flashes include mood, symptom sensitivity, symptom duration, sleep problems, age, and race. Correlates of bothersome night sweats include sleep problems and symptom duration. In addition to reducing frequency, interventions for vasomotor symptoms might consider addressing modifiable factors related to symptom bother.

  3. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Hearing symptoms personal stereos.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-04-01

     Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time.  to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use  Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos.  The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p = 0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming.  Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young.

  5. Hearing symptoms personal stereos

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time. Objective: to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use Method: Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos. Results: The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p = 0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming. Conclusion: Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young. PMID:25991931

  6. [Symptoms diagnosis and treatment of dyscalulia].

    PubMed

    Ise, Elena; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2013-07-01

    Children with dyscalculia show deficits in basic numerical processing which cause difficulties in the acquisition of mathematical skills. This article provides an overview of current research findings regarding the symptoms, cause, and prognosis of dyscalculia, and it summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis, early intervention, and treatment thereof. Diagnosis has improved recently because newly developed tests focus not only on the math curriculum, but also on basic skills found to be impaired in dyscalculia. A controversial debate continues with regard to IQ achievement discrepancy. International studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of specialized interventions. This article summarizes the research findings from intervention studies, describes different treatment approaches, and discusses implications for clinical practice.

  7. Rabeprazole and psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Paola; Gallo, Adele; Gallo, Salvatore; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille P

    2007-07-01

    To report the case of a patient who developed marked anxiety associated with episodes of panic attacks after starting rabeprazole therapy. An otherwise healthy 55-year-old woman was prescribed rabeprazole 20 mg/day administered in the morning for persistent symptoms of dyspepsia. Ten days later, she presented with a 7 day history of marked anxiety associated with panic attacks, night terror (pavor nocturnus), episodic mental confusion, and attention deficit. Within 2 days of discontinuing rabeprazole, the patient recovered completely from the neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subsequent esomeprazole therapy did not cause psychiatric symptoms. Rabeprazole-induced hypergastrinemia may have played a role in this neuropsychiatric adverse reaction. Several lines of evidence have indicated that gastrin-releasing peptide, whose release is mediated by proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced secretion of gastrin, is involved in regulating aspects of behavior that might be altered in disorders such as anxiety, depression, and dementia. The fact that rabeprazole has the highest capacity of inducing gastrin increase compared with other PPIs might explain why our patient's panic symptoms disappeared after switching to esomeprazole. Based on the Naranjo probability scale, rabeprazole was the probable cause of the adverse reaction. Specific studies are needed to investigate the potential role of PPI-induced hypergastrinemia in neuropsychiatric adverse reactions.

  8. Treating Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia: an Update.

    PubMed

    Remington, Gary; Foussias, George; Fervaha, Gagan; Agid, Ofer; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Lee, Jimmy; Hahn, Margaret

    Interest in the negative symptoms of schizophrenia has increased rapidly over the last several decades, paralleling a growing interest in functional, in addition to clinical, recovery, and evidence underscoring the importance negative symptoms play in the former. Efforts continue to better define and measure negative symptoms, distinguish their impact from that of other symptom domains, and establish effective treatments as well as trials to assess these. Multiple interventions have been the subject of investigation, to date, including numerous pharmacological strategies, brain stimulation, and non-somatic approaches. Level and quality of evidence vary considerably, but to this point, no specific treatment can be recommended. This is particularly problematic for individuals burdened with negative symptoms in the face of mild or absent positive symptoms. Presently, clinicians will sometimes turn to interventions that are seen as more "benign" and in line with routine clinical practice. Strategies include use of atypical antipsychotics, ensuring the lowest possible antipsychotic dose that maintains control of positive symptoms (this can involve a shift from antipsychotic polypharmacy to monotherapy), possibly an antidepressant trial (given diagnostic uncertainty and the frequent use of these drugs in schizophrenia), and non-somatic interventions (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT). The array and diversity of strategies currently under investigation highlight the lack of evidence-based treatments and our limited understanding regarding negative symptoms underlying etiology and pathophysiology. Their onset, which can precede the first psychotic break, also means that treatments are delayed. From this perspective, identification of biomarkers and/or endophenotypes permitting earlier diagnosis and intervention may serve to improve treatment efficacy as well as outcomes.

  9. Therapeutics for multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zacharia, Aliza Bitton

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms management in multiple sclerosis is an integral part of its care. Accurate assessment and addressing the different symptoms provides increased quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may be identified as primary, secondary, or tertiary symptoms. Primary symptoms, such as weakness, sensory loss, and ataxia, are directly related to demyelination and axonal loss. Secondary symptoms, such as urinary tract infections as a result of urinary retention, are a result of the primary symptoms. Tertiary symptoms, such as reactive depression or social isolation, are a result of the social and psychological consequences of the disease. Common multiple sclerosis symptoms include fatigue and weakness; decreased balance, spasticity and gait problems; depression and cognitive issues; bladder, bowel, and sexual deficits; visual and sensory loss; and neuropathic pain. Less-common symptoms include dysarthria and dysphagia, vertigo, and tremors. Rare symptoms in multiple sclerosis include seizures, hearing loss, and paralysis. Symptom management includes nonpharmacological methods, such as rehabilitation and psychosocial support, and pharmacological methods, ie, medications and surgical procedures. The keys to symptom management are awareness, knowledge, and coordination of care. Symptoms have to be recognized and management needs to be individualized. Multiple sclerosis therapeutics include nonpharmacological strategies that consist of lifestyle modifications, rehabilitation, social support, counseling, and pharmacological agents or surgical procedures. The goal is vigilant management to improve quality of life and promote realistic expectations and hope.

  10. Reciprocal relationships between parent and adolescent internalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Elizabeth K; Gullone, Eleonora

    2010-04-01

    Previous investigations of the association between parent and adolescent internalizing problems have been largely restricted to the unidirectional effect of parent symptoms on their children. This study therefore aimed to investigate potential reciprocal relationships between parent and adolescent internalizing symptoms. One-hundred and seventy-seven adolescents ages 14 to 18 years and their parents (172 mothers, 124 fathers) completed measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms at two time points, 6 months apart. Results supported reciprocity between maternal and adolescent internalizing symptoms but not between paternal and adolescent internalizing symptoms. In addition, the relationship between maternal symptoms and later adolescent symptoms was found to be partially mediated by maternal parenting self-esteem. The study highlights the potential impact of adolescent internalizing problems on maternal well-being, a phenomenon previously neglected in the literature. 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  11. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  12. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  13. Prevalence of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Related Symptoms among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome among 1,474 nurses was addressed through a mailed questionnaire (202 respondents). Demographic characteristics, symptoms, and possible prevalence rates are presented and discussed. Implications of these findings are considered, and the methodology used is analyzed. Suggestions are made for conducting…

  14. Prevalence of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Related Symptoms among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome among 1,474 nurses was addressed through a mailed questionnaire (202 respondents). Demographic characteristics, symptoms, and possible prevalence rates are presented and discussed. Implications of these findings are considered, and the methodology used is analyzed. Suggestions are made for conducting…

  15. Impact of combat and non-military trauma exposure on symptom reduction following treatment for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Forbes, David; Fletcher, Susan; Phelps, Andrea; Wade, Darryl; Creamer, Mark; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2013-03-30

    Military veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently report exposure to multiple other traumas in addition to their military experiences. This study aimed to examine the impact of exposure-related factors for military veterans with PTSD on recovery after participation in a group-based treatment program. Subjects included 1548 military veterans with PTSD participating in specialist veterans' PTSD programs across Australia. The study included measures of PTSD, depression, anxiety and alcohol use. Analyses of variance found higher combat exposure was associated with more severe PTSD at intake. No differences in PTSD intake severity were evident in those with additional non-military trauma. Severity of combat exposure did not affect treatment outcomes, although those with low combat exposure and additional non-military trauma (which included high rates of molestation) did report reduced symptom improvement. These findings have implications for considerations of optimal interventions for those with lower levels of combat exposure and additional non-military trauma.

  16. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  17. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection Task started the development of a real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record for the additive manufacturing process using infrared camera imaging and processing techniques. This project will benefit additive manufacturing by providing real-time inspection of internal geometry that is not currently possible and reduce the time and cost of additive manufactured parts with automated real-time dimensional inspections which deletes post-production inspections.

  18. Depressive symptoms in the second trimester relate to low oxytocin levels in African-American women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Giurgescu, Carmen; Carter, C Sue; Holditch-Davis, Diane; McFarlin, Barbara L; Schwertz, Dorie; Seng, Julia S; White-Traut, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    Low-income African-American women report elevated prenatal depressive symptoms more often (42 %) than the national average (20 %). In the USA in 2012, 16.5 % of African-American women experienced a premature birth (less than 36 completed gestational weeks) compared to 10.3 % of white women. In addition, 13 % of African-American women had a low-birth weight infant (less than 2,500 g) compared to 7 % of white women. Variation in the neuropeptide, oxytocin has been implicated in perinatal depression, maternal behavior, regulation of stress responses, and may be associated with this health disparity. The purpose of this investigation was to examine factors associated with prenatal depressive symptoms, including plasma oxytocin levels and birth weight, in a sample of urban African-American women. Pregnant African-American women (N = 57) completed surveys and had blood drawn twice during pregnancy at 15-22 weeks and 25-37 weeks. In addition, birth data were collected from medical records. A large number of participants reported elevated prenatal depressive symptoms at the first (n = 20, 35 %) and the second (n = 19, 33 %) data points. Depressive symptoms were higher in multigravidas (t(51) = -2.374, p = 0.02), women with higher anxiety (r(47) = 0.71, p = 0.001), women who delivered their infants at an earlier gestational age (r(51) = -0.285, p = 0.04), and those without the support of the infant's father (F(4, 48) = 2.676, p = 0.04). Depressive symptoms were also higher in women with low oxytocin levels than in women with high oxytocin levels (F(2, 47) = 3.3, p = 0.05). In addition, women who had low oxytocin tended to have infants with lower birth weights (F(2, 47) = 2.9, p = 0.06). Neither prenatal depressive symptoms nor prenatal oxytocin levels were associated with premature birth. Pregnant multigravida African-American women with increased levels of anxiety and lacking the baby's father's support during the

  19. Towards a symptom cluster model in chronic kidney disease: A structural equation approach.

    PubMed

    Almutary, Hayfa; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test a symptom cluster model in chronic kidney disease patients based on the Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms, accounting for the relationships between influencing factors, symptom experience and consequences for quality of life. The evaluation of symptom clusters is a new field of scientific inquiry directed towards more focused symptom management. Yet, little is known about relationships between symptom clusters, predictors and the synergistic effect of multiple symptoms on outcomes. Cross-sectional. Data were collected from 436 patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease during July 2013-February 2014 using validated measures of symptom burden and quality of life. Analysis involved structural equation modelling. The final model demonstrated good fit with the data and provided strong evidence for the predicted relationships. Psychological distress, stage of chronic kidney disease and age explained most of the variance in symptom experience. Symptom clusters had a strong negative effect on quality of life, with fatigue, sexual symptoms and restless legs being the strongest predictors. Overall, the model explained more than half of the deterioration in quality of life. However, a reciprocal path between quality of life and symptom experience was not found. Interventions targeting symptom clusters could greatly improve quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease. The symptom cluster model presented has important clinical and heuristic implications, serving as a framework to encourage and guide new lines of intervention research to reduce symptom burden in chronic kidney disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  1. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page ... Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its ...

  2. Generating physical symptoms from visual cues: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jane; Zoukas, Serafim

    2009-12-01

    This experimental study explored whether the physical symptoms of cold, pain and itchiness could be generated by visual cues, whether they varied in the ease with which they could be generated and whether they were related to negative affect. Participants were randomly allocated by group to watch one of three videos relating to cold (e.g. ice, snow, wind), pain (e.g. sporting injuries, tattoos) or itchiness (e.g. head lice, scratching). They then rated their self-reported symptoms of cold, pain and itchiness as well as their negative affect (depression and anxiety). The researcher recorded their observed behaviour relating to these symptoms. The results showed that the interventions were successful and that all three symptoms could be generated by the visual cues in terms of both self-report and observed behaviour. In addition, the pain video generated higher levels of anxiety and depression than the other two videos. Further, the degree of itchiness was related to the degree of anxiety. This symptom onset process also showed variability between symptoms with self-reported cold symptoms being greater than either pain or itchy symptoms. The results show that physical symptoms can be generated by visual cues indicating that psychological factors are not only involved in symptom perception but also in symptom onset.

  3. Impact of primary negative symptoms on functional outcomes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, G; Foussias, G; Agid, O; Remington, G

    2014-09-01

    Negative symptoms are known to undermine functional outcomes in people with schizophrenia; however, most studies have not accounted for whether these symptoms were primary or secondary to other psychopathological factors. The present study examined the impact of primary negative symptoms on functional outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. The sample included 1427 patients with schizophrenia who completed the baseline visit in the CATIE study. Symptoms were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Calgary Depression Scale, extrapyramidal side effects with the Simpson-Angus scale, and functional status with the Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale. Negative symptoms were significantly and inversely related to each domain of functioning examined. These relationships remained after statistically controlling for the influence of potential sources of secondary negative symptoms. In addition, the relationships between negative symptoms and specific domains of functioning remained in patients who had mild/absent positive, depressive, anxiety and extrapyramidal symptoms. Negative symptoms were associated with functional outcomes even in antipsychotic-free patients. Primary negative symptoms significantly contribute to the functional impairment seen in people with schizophrenia. A better understanding of the etiology and pathobiology of these symptoms is required to guide the search for effective therapeutics that promote functional recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  6. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T.; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies to-date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to 1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and 2) identify bio-psychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with Sickle Cell Disease. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African-American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. Results A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African-American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of bio-psychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Conclusion Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and to explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  7. Symptom attribution and symptom reporting in Australian Gulf War veterans.

    PubMed

    Wright, Breanna K; McFarlane, Alexander C; Clarke, David M; Sim, Malcolm R; Kelsall, Helen L

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the consistent elevated symptom reporting by Gulf War veterans; we compared Australian Gulf War veterans and military-comparison group on symptom attributional styles and the relationship with total number and grouping of somatic and psychological symptoms. Postal questionnaires were completed by Australian Gulf War veterans (n=697) and military-comparison group (n=659) in 2000-2002 and 2011-2012. Data were collected on deployments, military-psychological stressors, symptom reporting, symptom factors and attributional style (normalising, psychologising, somatising, mixed-attribution). Gulf War veterans did not differ in attributional style from comparison group (p>0.05); normalising was the predominant style. Groups were combined for analyses. Psychologisers reported the highest overall symptoms (mean(M)=10.95, standard deviation(SD)=9.15), the most psychophysiological (M=1.71, SD=2.82), cognitive (M=5.79, SD=5.09) and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=1.53, SD=1.73). Psychologisers and somatisers reported significantly more symptoms across overall symptoms, all three symptom factors and psychological distress than normalisers. Normalisers consistently reported fewest overall symptoms (M=2.85, SD=4.49), psychophysiological (M=0.40, SD=0.98), cognitive (M=1.14, SD=2.22), and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=0.72, SD=1.31). Persistent symptoms, rather than remitted, between baseline and follow-up were associated with increased rates of psychologising and mixed-attribution compared with normalising. For incident symptoms a similar pattern was observed, some symptoms also showed increased rates of somatising. In veterans, psychologising was associated with higher symptom reporting, whilst somatisers and mixed-attribution also demonstrated higher reporting than normalisers. Symptom persistence and incidence were associated with symptom attribution. The findings indicate that attributional style is associated with patterns of symptom reporting and

  8. Allergic and immunologic reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatih; Doguc, Duygu Kumbul

    2013-08-01

    For centuries, food additives have been used for flavouring, colouring and extension of the useful shelf life of food, as well as the promotion of food safety. During the last 20 years, the studies implicating the additives contained in foods and medicine as a causative factor of allergic reactions have been proliferated considerably. In this review, we aimed to overview all of the food additives which were approved to consume in EU and find out how common and serious allergic reactions come into existence following the consuming of food additives.

  9. Menstrual cycle effects on psychological symptoms in women with PTSD.

    PubMed

    Nillni, Yael I; Pineles, Suzanne L; Patton, Samantha C; Rouse, Matthew H; Sawyer, Alice T; Rasmusson, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    The menstrual cycle has been implicated as a sex-specific biological process influencing psychological symptoms across a variety of disorders. Limited research exists regarding the role of the menstrual cycle in psychological symptoms among women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study examined the severity of a broad range of psychological symptoms in both the early follicular (Days 2-6) and midluteal (6-10 days postlutenizing hormone surge) phases of the menstrual cycle in a sample of trauma-exposed women with and without PTSD (N = 49). In the sample overall, total psychological symptoms (d = 0.63), as well as depression (d = 0.81) and phobic anxiety (d = 0.81) symptoms, specifically, were increased in the early follicular compared to midluteal phase. The impact of menstrual cycle phase on phobic anxiety was modified by a significant PTSD × Menstrual Phase interaction (d = 0.63). Women with PTSD reported more severe phobic anxiety during the early follicular versus midluteal phase, whereas phobic anxiety did not differ across the menstrual cycle in women without PTSD. Thus, the menstrual cycle appears to impact fear-related symptoms in women with PTSD. The clinical implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.

  10. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  11. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  12. Maternal and Paternal Depressive Symptoms as Predictors of Toddler Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinfield, Nancy S.; Ingerski, Lisa; Moreau, Stacey Coffey

    2009-01-01

    In this study we explored the relation between maternal and paternal depressive symptoms and toddler adjustment in a community sample, testing direct, additive, and interactive models of parental depressive symptoms and child adjustment. Participants were 49 families with 30-month-old children. Data were collected on maternal and paternal…

  13. Eating disorder symptoms and borderline personality symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Sansone, R A; Chu, J W; Wiederman, M W; Lam, C

    2011-06-01

    According to the empirical literature, there are high rates of borderline personality disorder (BPD) among individuals with formal diagnoses of eating disorders, and high rates of eating disorders among individuals with BPD. In this study, we examined relationships between three eating disorder symptoms (i.e., binge eating, starving oneself, abusing laxatives) and borderline personality symptomatology according to two self-report measures (the borderline personality scale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 and the Self- Harm Inventory) in a sample of psychiatric inpatients (N=126) and in a sample of internal medicine outpatients (N=419). Each individual eating disorder item, as well as a composite score of all three items, demonstrated statistically significant correlations with both measures of borderline personality symptomatology in both samples. In addition, endorsement of all three symptoms was invariably associated with borderline personality symptomatology on both measures. Specific eating disorder symptoms, alone, may predict for borderline personality symptomatology.

  14. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  15. Acculturative stress negatively impacts maternal depressive symptoms in Mexican-American women during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    D'Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L; Aleman, Brenda; Flores, Ana-Mercedes

    2015-05-01

    Mexican-American women exhibit high rates of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms relative to the general population. Though pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women experience cultural stressors such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination that may contribute to elevated depressive symptoms, the contribution of these socio-cultural correlates to depressive symptomology is unknown. Ninety-eight pregnant women of Mexican descent were recruited from a community hospital clinic during their first trimester. Women completed surveys about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, general perceived stress, and maternal depressive symptoms as well as the potential protective factor of Mexican cultural values. Women who experienced greater acculturative and perceived stress, but not perceived discrimination or acculturation, reported significantly elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Also, women who experienced greater acculturative stress identified with a mixture of Mexican and American cultural values. However, only the Mexican cultural value of respect was protective against maternal depressive symptoms while adhering to the Anglo value of independence and self-reliance was a risk factor. A limitation in the study is the cross-sectional and descriptive self-report nature of the work, underscoring the need for additional research. Moreover, physiological measures of stress were not analyzed in the current study. Results point to acculturative stress, above other cultural stressors, as a potential intervention target in culturally competent obstetric care. These findings have implications for maternal mental health treatment during pregnancy, which likely affects maternal-fetal programming and may favorably affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acculturative stress negatively impacts maternal depressive symptoms in Mexican-American women during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L.; Aleman, Brenda; Flores, Ana-Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexican-American women exhibit high rates of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms relative to the general population. Though pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women experience cultural stressors such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination that may contribute to elevated depressive symptoms, the contribution of these socio-cultural correlates to depressive symptomology is unknown. Method Ninety-eight pregnant women of Mexican descent were recruited from a community hospital clinic during their first trimester. Women completed surveys about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, general perceived stress, and maternal depressive symptoms as well as the potential protective factor of Mexican cultural values. Results Women who experienced greater acculturative and perceived stress, but not perceived discrimination or acculturation, reported significantly elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Also, women who experienced greater acculturative stress identified with a mixture of Mexican and American cultural values. However, only the Mexican cultural value of respect was protective against maternal depressive symptoms while adhering to the Anglo value of independence and self-reliance was a risk factor. Limitations A limitation in the study is the cross-sectional and descriptive self-report nature of the work, underscoring the need for additional research. Moreover, physiological measures of stress were not analyzed in the current study. Conclusions Results point to acculturative stress, above other cultural stressors, as a potential intervention target in culturally competent obstetric care. These findings have implications for maternal mental health treatment during pregnancy, which likely affects maternal-fetal programming and may favorably affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population. PMID:25699668

  17. Prenatal and Postpartum Evening Salivary Cortisol Levels in Association with Peripartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Stavros I.; Comasco, Erika; Sylvén, Sara; Hellgren, Charlotte; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2015-01-01

    Background The biology of peripartum depression remains unclear, with altered stress and the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis response having been implicated in its pathophysiology. Methods The current study was undertaken as a part of the BASIC project (Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging, Cognition), a population-based longitudinal study of psychological wellbeing during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Uppsala County, Sweden, in order to assess the association between evening salivary cortisol levels and depressive symptoms in the peripartum period. Three hundred and sixty-five pregnant women from the BASIC cohort were recruited at pregnancy week 18 and instructed to complete a Swedish validated version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the 36th week of pregnancy as well as the sixth week after delivery. At both times, they were also asked to provide evening salivary samples for cortisol analysis. A comprehensive review of the relevant literature is also provided. Results Women with postpartum EPDS score ≥ 10 had higher salivary evening cortisol at six weeks postpartum compared to healthy controls (median cortisol 1.19 vs 0.89 nmol/L). A logistic regression model showed a positive association between cortisol levels and depressive symptoms postpartum (OR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.7–9.7). This association remained significant even after controlling for history of depression, use of tobacco, partner support, breastfeeding, stressful life events, and sleep problems, as possible confounders (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.5–14.1). Additionally, women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher postpartum cortisol levels compared to both women with depressive symptoms antenatally and controls (p = 0.019 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions Women with depressive symptoms postpartum had higher postpartum cortisol levels, indicating an altered response of the HPA-axis in postpartum depression. PMID:26322643

  18. Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms a person feels are related to psychological factors. These symptoms can’t be traced to a specific physical cause. In people who have a somatic symptom and related disorder, medical test results are either normal or don’t explain ...

  19. Symptom Clusters among Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knishkowsky, Barry; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines recurrent psychosomatic symptoms and symptom clusters among Israeli school children (n=259). Results of a questionnaire that asked about the frequency of 8 psychosomatic and 8 organic complaints indicated that girls had a higher prevalence than boys for 8 of the symptoms, and that abdominal pain and headache were each reported as an…

  20. Symptom Clusters among Young Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knishkowsky, Barry; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines recurrent psychosomatic symptoms and symptom clusters among Israeli school children (n=259). Results of a questionnaire that asked about the frequency of 8 psychosomatic and 8 organic complaints indicated that girls had a higher prevalence than boys for 8 of the symptoms, and that abdominal pain and headache were each reported as an…

  1. Tourette Syndrome: Classroom Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaturvedi, Amrita; Gartin, Barbara C.; Murdick, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurobiological disorder characterized by various involuntary motor movements and vocal tics. Symptoms of TS emerge between the ages of 3 to 8 years old, are most severe when an individual reaches puberty, and decrease by the time a person is 20 years old. Additionally, persons with TS may have secondary disabilities of…

  2. Interpretation biases in victims and non-victims of interpersonal trauma and their relation to symptom development.

    PubMed

    Elwood, Lisa S; Williams, Nathan L; Olatunji, Bunmi O; Lohr, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies examining information processing in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have focused on attention and memory biases, with few studies examining interpretive biases. The majority of these studies have employed lexically based methodologies, rather than examining the processing of visual information. In the present study, victims (N=40) and non-victims (N=41) of interpersonal trauma viewed a series of short positive, neutral, and threatening filmstrips of social situations with ambiguous endings. Participants were then asked about their perceptions and interpretations of the situations. Victims perceived threatening situations as more predictable and more quickly increasing in risk than non-victims. Trauma status interacted with the perceived predictability of positive situations and the perceived speed with which neutral situations reached their conclusion to predict anxious symptoms. In addition, trauma status interacted with the perceived increase in risk of positive situations to predict PTSD symptoms. The implications of these findings for theories of PTSD are discussed.

  3. Intolerance to food additives - does it exist?

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul J; Kemp, Andrew S

    2012-02-01

    'Food intolerance' is often confused with a range of adverse symptoms which may be coincidental to ingestion of food. 'Food intolerance' is defined as a reaction in which symptoms must be objectively reproducible and not known to involve an immunological mechanism. A more precise term is non-allergic food hypersensitivity, which contrasts with food allergies which are due to an immunological mechanism. Some children will experience food reactions to food additives. Reported symptoms range from urticaria/angioedema to hyperactive behaviours. While parents/carers report that over one fifth of children experience of food reaction, only 1 in 20 of these are confirmed to have a non-allergic food hypersensitivity on testing.

  4. Medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Margaret L; Paauw, Douglas S

    2014-05-01

    In summary, caring for patients with MUS is challenging for health care providers. Even defining somatization syndromes is complex and controversial, reflecting the medical community’s limited understanding of the pathophysiology for this group of disorders. Although risk factors for MUS have been described and are well understood, little is known about how MUS can be prevented. Uncertainty in medicine, as in any human enterprise, is a given, but the difficulties in identification and treatment of patients with MUS highlight the limitations in understanding the intersection between physical and mental health. Patients come to their physician looking for clarity, understanding, and relief of debilitating symptoms. The understanding of MUS will evolve, and perhaps an organic cause not yet understood or described may emerge to lend clarity and therapeutic opportunities to some patients with somatic disorders. In the meantime, the most powerful tools available are the ability to communicate the limits of current understanding, acknowledge the difficulties faced by patients with this disorder, and reinforce the willingness and desire of clinicians to partner with patients as the focus shifts from diagnosis to symptom management. Thus, the physician-patient relationship, still in its rightful place at the heart of the practice of medicine, lies at the center of effective treatment of patients with MUS.

  5. Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p < 10−16, r2 > 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

  6. Correlations among insomnia symptoms, sleep medication use and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Komada, Yoko; Nomura, Takashi; Kusumi, Masayoshi; Nakashima, Kenji; Okajima, Isa; Sasai, Taeko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2011-02-01

    To elucidate the factors associated with insomnia symptoms and the use of sleep medication, and the correlations among insomnia symptoms, sleep medication use and depressive symptoms in the general population. This survey was conducted in a rural community of Japan. Questionnaires consisted of basic information, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and a 12-item version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, and were administered to all community members aged 20 years or over. A total of 2822 respondents with valid answers were subjected to analysis. Occurrence of insomnia symptoms appeared to be associated with advancing age and existence of depressive symptoms. The extent of sleep medication use in the entire sample was 9%, and the value in the subjects with insomnia symptoms was 26%. Sleep medication use in insomniacs was associated with female sex and advancing age as well as higher scores in subcomponents of both poor subjective sleep quality and prolonged delay of sleep onset. Depressive symptoms were worst in the group with insomnia symptoms using sleep medication, and were significantly lower in the group without insomnia symptoms using sleep medication. Our study revealed that female sex, advancing age, depressive symptoms, poor sleep quality, and prolonged delay of sleep onset appeared as risk factors for sleep medication use. Insomnia symptoms were suspected to act as an exacerbating factor for depressive symptoms. However, our findings suggested that appropriate use of sleep medication could reduce depressive symptoms in the subjects with insomnia symptoms. © 2010 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2010 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  7. [GERD related respiratory symptoms: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Cuenca-Abente, Federico; Faerberg, Alejandro; Marty, Pablo Fernández; Corti, Rodolfo

    2006-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can cause respiratory symptoms. These symptoms are triggered by reflux events that reach the pharynx, causing microaspiration or through vagal reflex. Respiratory symptoms can be vague and coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, without a real link between the two entities. To effectively treat these patients, it is important tofind an association between the two diseases. Work up should include the diagnosis of reflux disease, the diagnosis of pharyngeal reflux events--microaspiration--and, if possible, of laryngeal injury. Once the diagnosis has been established, an effective therapy must be offered to the patient. In these patients, medical treatment is less effective when compared to the results in the population with typical symptoms. This may be due to the fact that non-acid reflux episodes are causing the respiratory symptoms or as a result of an irreversible damage generated in the airway. Antireflux surgery is an effective therapy that reduces both acid and non-acid reflux events. This article describes the different diagnostic tests as well as the results obtained with surgical treatment in this population. Additionally, it describes potential applications of esophageal and pharyngeal impedance monitoring in these patients.

  8. Is benign prostatic obstruction surgery indicated for improving overactive bladder symptoms in men with lower urinary tract symptoms?

    PubMed

    Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Grise, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men are highly prevalent, and include both storage and voiding symptoms in many cases. The effect of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) relief on storage symptoms remains unclear. The present review summarizes data about the relation between overactive bladder (OAB), voiding symptoms, and urodynamic characteristics in men with LUTS. Pathomechanisms of OAB in a context of BPO are reviewed. Rates of persistent bladder dysfunction after BPO relief are described along with predictive factors of persisting OAB. OAB is a common clinical feature in a population of male LUTS, often concomitant with voiding symptoms. Although detrusor overactivity is found in some patients with OAB and BPO, there is no absolute correspondence between clinical symptoms and urodynamic findings. In the context of BPO, OAB pathophysiology implicates nitric oxide pathway, bladder ischemia, ageing of the urinary tract, and calcium-activated potassium channels activity. BPO relief can be followed in the medium term by persistence of OAB symptoms, and preoperative detrusor overactivity has been identified as the main predictive factor. However, preoperative urodynamics remain only indicated in specific cases, when it could directly influence clinical decision-making. Antimuscarinics may be the treatment of choice for persistent symptoms after surgery, but there is no firm recommendation in this clinical setting.

  9. High Baseline Postconcussion Symptom Scores and Concussion Outcomes in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Custer, Aimee; Sufrinko, Alicia; Elbin, R. J.; Covassin, Tracey; Collins, Micky; Kontos, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    outcomes after SRC. Clinicians should examine baseline symptom levels to better identify patients for earlier referral and treatment for their injury. Additional investigation of baseline symptoms is warranted to help delineate the type and severity of premorbid symptoms. PMID:26885702

  10. Multi-Dimensional Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index: Validation of a Brief GI Symptom Assessment Tool.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Michael D; Umar, Sarah B; Lacy, Brian E; Jones, Michael P; DiBaise, John K; Talley, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    Few instruments have been developed and validated for the evaluation of multi-dimensional GI symptoms. The Gastrointestinal Symptoms Severity Index (GISSI), a multi-dimensional, self-report instrument, was designed as a brief measure of the frequency, severity, and bothersomeness of individual GI and pelvic floor/urogynecologic symptoms. To report the psychometric properties of the GISSI subscales, including factorial structure, validity, and internal consistency. The GISSI included 32 items that assessed upper and lower GI symptoms and seven items related to pelvic floor/urogynecologic symptoms. A total of 934 patients presenting for upper and lower GI complaints completed the questionnaire between January 2013 and December 2013. The sample was randomly split into derivation (n = 466) and validation datasets (n = 468). A non-patient sample of 200 was collected separately. Exploratory factor analysis supported a six-factor model for the derivation sample that accounted for 69.3 % of the total variance. The six GI symptom clusters were labeled as constipation/difficult defecation (five items), abdominal pain/discomfort (four items), dyspepsia (four items), diarrhea/anal incontinence (four items), GERD/chest symptoms (four items), and nausea/vomiting (two items). Inclusion of additional items related to female pelvic floor/urogynecologic symptoms resulted in a separate factor. Confirmatory factor analysis of the validation dataset supported the a priori hypothesized six-factor measurement model (Χ (2)(428) = 1462.98; P < 0.001; GFI = .88; RMSEA = .051). The GISSI demonstrated good to excellent psychometric properties and provided multi-dimensional scaling of prominent GI symptom clusters. Further validation may provide an efficient, valid, and reliable measure of patient-reported clinical outcomes.

  11. Low basal salivary cortisol is associated with teacher-reported symptoms of conduct disorder.

    PubMed

    Oosterlaan, Jaap; Geurts, Hilde M; Knol, Dirk L; Sergeant, Joseph A

    2005-03-30

    Cortisol has been implicated in psychobiological explanations of antisocial behavior. This study measured basal salivary cortisol in a sample of 25 children (age range 6 to 12 years) selected to vary in levels of antisocial behavior. Regression analyses were used to predict cortisol concentrations from parent- and teacher-reported symptoms. Parent-reported symptoms did not predict basal cortisol. Teacher-reported conduct disorder (CD) symptoms explained 38% of the variance in the cortisol concentrations, with high symptom severity associated with low cortisol. When a distinction was made between aggressive and non-aggressive CD symptoms, aggressive CD symptoms were more clearly related to low cortisol than non-aggressive CD symptoms. In contrast to previous research, no evidence was found for a mediating role of anxiety symptoms in the relationship between CD and cortisol. The results support biologically based models of antisocial behavior in children that involve reduced autonomic activity.

  12. Network analysis of substance abuse and dependence symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rhemtulla, Mijke; Fried, Eiko I; Aggen, Steven H; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Kendler, Kenneth S; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-04-01

    The DSM uses one set of abuse and dependence criteria to assess multiple substance use disorders (SUDs). Most SUD research aggregates across these symptoms to study the behavior of SUD as a static construct. We use an alternative approach that conceptualizes symptoms as directly interacting variables in psychopathological networks. We apply network models to symptom-level data to investigate the unique roles of individual symptoms and their interactions in SUD. We analyzed 11 DSM III-R/IV abuse and dependence criteria in a sample of 2405 adult twins who reported use of at least one illicit substance six or more times from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders (VATSPSUD). We estimated a symptom network for each substance class as well as a global network collapsed across all substance classes. We examined similarities and differences across the 6 networks in terms of symptom-to-symptom connections and symptom centrality. The global network model revealed several interesting symptom connections, such as a strong predictive relation between tolerance and more-than-planned substance use. The most central symptom was using a drug more than planned. In addition, several interesting differences across substances emerged, both in the strength of symptom connections as well as the centrality of symptoms to each network. When analyzed as networks, abuse and dependence symptoms do not function equivalently across illicit substance classes. These findings suggest the value of analyzing individual symptoms and their associations to gain new insight into the mechanisms of SUD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross D.; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by U.S. adults reporting neuropsychiatric symptoms and whether this prevalence changes based on the number of symptoms reported. Additional objectives include identifying patterns of CAM use, reasons for use, and disclosure of use with conventional providers in U.S. adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Design Secondary database analysis of a prospective survey. Participants A total of 23,393 U.S. adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Methods We compared CAM use between adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Symptoms included self-reported anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches, memory deficits, attention deficits, and excessive sleepiness. CAM use was defined as use of mind—body therapies (eg, meditation), biological therapies (eg, herbs), or manipulation therapies (eg, massage) or alternative medical systems (eg, Ayurveda). Statistical analysis included bivariable comparisons and multivariable logistical regression analyses. Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of CAM use among adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms within the previous 12 months and the comparison of CAM use between those with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results Adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms had a greater prevalence of CAM use compared with adults who did not have neuropsychiatric symptoms (43.8% versus 29.7%, P < .001); this prevalence increased with an increasing number of symptoms (trend, P < .001). Differences in the likelihood of CAM use as determined by the number of symptoms persisted after we adjusted for covariates. Twenty percent of patients used CAM because standard treatments were either too expensive or ineffective, and 25% used CAM because it was recommended by a conventional provider. Adults with at least one neuropsychiatric symptom were more likely to disclose the use of CAM to a conventional provider (47.9% versus 39.0%, P < .001

  14. Latent Classes of Psychiatric Symptoms among Chinese Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Keith C.; Bi, Yu; Borden, Lindsay A.; Reinke, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Describing co-occurring symptom patterns among children in nonwestern contexts may have important implications for how emotional and behavior problems are defined, conceptualized, studied, and ultimately prevented. A latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted on the co-occurring psychiatric symptoms of 196 Chinese children living in poverty.…

  15. Depressive Symptoms among College Students: An Assessment of the Influence of Environmental Factors on Retention Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudric, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Depressive symptoms among college students have major implications for higher education institutions across the country. First-year college students are particularly susceptible to the various impacts that the college experience may produce during the transitional first year of college. The effects of depressive symptoms among college students in…

  16. Depressive Symptoms among College Students: An Assessment of the Influence of Environmental Factors on Retention Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudric, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Depressive symptoms among college students have major implications for higher education institutions across the country. First-year college students are particularly susceptible to the various impacts that the college experience may produce during the transitional first year of college. The effects of depressive symptoms among college students in…

  17. Latent Classes of Psychiatric Symptoms among Chinese Children Living in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Keith C.; Bi, Yu; Borden, Lindsay A.; Reinke, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    Describing co-occurring symptom patterns among children in nonwestern contexts may have important implications for how emotional and behavior problems are defined, conceptualized, studied, and ultimately prevented. A latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted on the co-occurring psychiatric symptoms of 196 Chinese children living in poverty.…

  18. A neuropsychological comparison of siblings with neurological versus hepatic symptoms of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, Deborah; Stewart, Jeanette; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Batchelor, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's Disease (WD) (also known as hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 30,000. The clinical features associated with WD are highly varied. However, subtypes generally reflect neurological, hepatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The present case study reports two brothers with a recent diagnosis of WD. Neurological symptoms and cognitive deficits were exhibited in one brother (BL) in the form of extrapyramidal features, while the other brother (AL) only exhibited hepatic symptoms. Extensive neuropsychological testing was conducted on both siblings to compare cognitive profiles. Results for BL indicated significantly impaired motor functioning and information processing speed, which impacted him significantly at school. Aspects of executive dysfunction were also apparent in addition to reduced visual and verbal memory, working memory, and attention. Results for AL revealed evidence of verbal memory difficulties and aspects of executive dysfunction. Comparison is made of the distinct and common cognitive characteristics of the cases presented in terms of implications for early intervention and management of cognitive difficulties.

  19. Reducing the symptoms of lymphoedema: is there a role for aromatherapy?

    PubMed

    Barclay, Janet; Vestey, Jenny; Lambert, Anita; Balmer, Claire

    2006-04-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic and debilitating condition caused by lymphatic insufficiency, which may have serious physical, social and psychological implications for the patient. It is usually managed by a combination of strategies aimed at protecting and decongesting the oedematous limb(s) and stimulating the development of supplementary lymphatic pathways to control swelling in the long-term. However, it is not known which therapies are the most effective. Anecdotally, the addition of aromatherapy oils to massage cream may have a positive effect on symptom relief in people with cancer, although evidence is again lacking. This paper describes a randomized trial of self-massage and skin care using a cream containing aromatherapy oils versus self-massage and skin care using a cream without aromatherapy oils on objective limb volume measurements and symptom relief as measured by the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile 2 (MYMOP2) in a sample of people with lymphoedema. Results indicate that self-massage and skin care significantly improved patient-identified symptom relief and wellbeing for this sample. It also slightly, but not significantly reduced limb volume. However, aromatherapy oils, carefully chosen on the basis that they should benefit this group, did not appear to influence any improvement in these measures.

  20. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety (worry and oversensitivity, social concerns and concentration, and physiological anxiety) as well as total anxiety symptoms at an initial assessment and 1 year later. Total anxiety and worry and oversensitivity symptoms are found to predict later depressive symptoms more strongly for girls than for boys. There is a similar pattern of results for social concerns and concentration symptoms, although this does not reach statistical significance. Physiological anxiety predicts later depressive symptoms for both boys and girls. These findings highlight the importance of anxiety for the development of depression in adolescence, particularly worry and oversensitivity among girls. PMID:19756209

  1. Diagnostic validity of basic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Klosterkötter, J; Ebel, H; Schultze-Lutter, F; Steinmeyer, E M

    1996-01-01

    Although the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS) [13] has come into use in several European countries, its diagnostic validity has not yet been sufficiently examined. That is why we have assessed BSABS items on a sample of 243 consecutive admissions to the Department of Psychiatry at the RWTH University, Aachen, and 79 psychologically healthy persons. Then, a cluster analysis was calculated to identify the empirical item-grouping. Five well-interpretable BSABS subsyndromes were found. In addition, uni- and multivariate analyses were computed to evaluate the diagnostic validity of these subsyndromes. We were able to show that every BSABS subsyndrome separates at least schizophrenic, organic mental and affective disorders from personality, neurotic and substance-induced disorders, as well as from psychological health. Furthermore, the subsyndrome "information processing disturbances" differentiates between schizophrenic and organic mental disorders, on the one hand, and affective disorders, on the other, and additionally, the subsyndrome "interpersonal irritation" between schizophrenics and all other persons examined.

  2. Psychosomatic symptoms, stress, and modernization: a model.

    PubMed

    Dressler, W W

    1985-09-01

    The quantity of research on the effects of stress on disease has increased substantially in recent years, but little effort has been devoted to examining the effects of cultural influences in the stress process. A model is proposed in this paper in which cultural context exerts a modifying influence on the relationship between sociocultural stressors and psychosomatic symptoms, specifically in the context of modernization. In change situations involving increasing modernization there is increased differentiation in systems of social stratification within a community, due to increased potential for upward social mobility. The individuals who are upwardly mobile adopt a particular style of life, involving the acquisition of western consumer goods, as symbolic of their success. Lower class individuals strive to attain this same style of life as a claim to a higher status social identity, but their lower economic condition results in stressful incongruities and higher psychosomatic symptoms. Individuals who are successful in upward mobility are confronted by a different set of stressors that are primarily intrapsychic in nature. Events and circumstances perceived as threats to their self-identity are related to more psychosomatic symptoms. Thus, the meaning of specific stressors changes depending on the sociocultural context of the individual, and this meaning serves as a bridge between environmental circumstances and physiological outcomes. This model receives substantial empirical support in two field studies. Limitations of the model and implications for future research are discussed.

  3. Distress related to subclinical negative symptoms in a non-clinical sample: Role of dysfunctional attitudes.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-12-15

    Negative symptoms are a prominent feature of schizophrenia that are intimately linked to poor outcomes characterizing the illness. One mechanistic model suggests that these symptoms are produced and maintained, at least in part, through maladaptive attitudes. Beyond mechanisms, it remains phenomenologically unclear if these symptoms are particularly distressing. In the present study we examined whether subclinical negative symptoms evaluated in a non-clinical sample of young adults (N=370) were distressful or bothersome to participants and, further, whether these symptoms were associated with dysfunctional attitudes. We found that greater severity of subclinical negative symptoms such as amotivation and anhedonia were associated with higher ratings of distress specifically attributable to these symptoms. This relationship held even after controlling for severity of depressive symptoms. Moreover, greater negative symptom burden was associated with greater endorsement of defeatist performance beliefs. Negative symptoms expressed in the general population were found to be particularly distressing. Maladaptive cognitive schemas are implicated in the expression of these symptoms, as well as the amount of distress these symptoms instil. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying negative symptoms, including both neurobiological and cognitive, is needed in order to effectively develop treatment strategies for these disabling symptoms.

  4. [Visual epileptic seizures. Signs and symptoms, and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    González-Cuevas, Montserrat; Toledo, Manuel; Santamarina, Estevo; Sueiras-Gil, María; Cambrodí-Masip, Roser; Sarria, Silvana; Quintana, Manuel; Salas-Puig, Javier

    2015-03-16

    Introduccion. Los fenomenos visuales pueden ser sintomas de crisis epilepticas, aunque con un significado clinico y una relacion con el foco epileptogeno incierto. Objetivo. Describir las implicaciones clinicas de las crisis epilepticas visuales segun su semiologia en adultos. Pacientes y metodos. Durante un año se recoge consecutivamente a pacientes que describian semiologia visual como manifestacion principal de sus crisis y se clasifican los sintomas visuales segun las caracteristicas de la descripcion. Resultados. Se incluye a 78 pacientes con una edad media de 43,5 años. El 97% de los casos eran epilepsias focales. Entre el 63% de las epilepsias sintomaticas, el 57% eran vasculares. Las crisis visuales eran, en un 81,9%, el aura previa a la crisis, y en un 17,9%, crisis visuales aisladas. La coexistencia de crisis visuales y otro tipo de crisis se asocio a farmacorresistencia (p = 0,021). Los sintomas visuales fueron: alucinaciones simples (55,1%), ilusiones (23,1%), alucinaciones complejas (15,4%) y perdida de vision (6,4%). La localizacion lobar de las lesiones era occipital (24,4%), temporoparietooccipital (21,8%), temporal (9%), parietal (3,8%) y frontal (1,3%). Las lesiones occipitales se asociaron con alucinaciones visuales simples (p < 0,001), y las ilusiones visuales y alucinaciones visuales complejas, con lesiones de la encrucijada temporoparietooccipital (p < 0,05). Del 55,1% de los pacientes con lesion unilateral en la resonancia magnetica, el 33% referia los sintomas en el hemicampo visual contralateral. Conclusiones. Las crisis visuales se presentan, principalmente, como auras epilepticas. Las alucinaciones simples se relacionan con el origen occipital, mientras que las alucinaciones complejas se asocian con regiones cerebrales mas anteriores. La aparicion de fenomenos visuales lateralizados nos orienta a un origen en el hemisferio contralateral.

  5. Trajectories of Depression Symptoms among Older Youths Exiting Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Munson, Michelle R; McMillen, Curtis

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories of depressive symptoms as older youths from the foster care system mature while also examining the correlates of these trajectories. Data came from a longitudinal study of 404 youths from the foster care system in Missouri, who were interviewed nine times between their 17th and 19th birthdays. Depression was assessed with the Depression Outcomes Module and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV. Data best fit a model of three trajectory classes, describing young people (1) maintaining low levels of depressive symptoms (never depressed class, 78%), (2) with increasing symptoms (increasing class, 6%), and (3) with decreasing symptoms (decreasing class, 15%). The increasing depression group was mostly male youths who were working or in school; the decreasing class was mostly highly maltreated female youths exiting the foster care system from residential care, with low levels of employment, and in school. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  6. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  7. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  8. Implications of Additive Manufacturing Deployed at the Tactical Edge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-15

    SkyMall, 2014). The wide availability of inexpensive tools has created a great deal of sensation around the field of AM, resulting in misconceptions about...550 cord [common parachute cord] to mount the antenna to the mast. A 3D printed part would have allowed me to solve both problems without destroying

  9. Symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    2011-10-26

    Most people with Parkinson's disease (PD) have some non-motor symptoms such as sleep disturbance. Some will have impulse control disorders manifested as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, binge eating or compulsive shopping. Others show lack of initiative, indifference and lack of emotional response. This apathy, which is distinct from depression, has been reported to be present in 70 per cent of people with PD. This study examined 99 non-demented people with PD and found that quality of life was reduced in those with either of these impulse control disorders. The behavioural changes put a strain on relationships, and apathy resulted in a withdrawal from relationships and hobbies. The authors emphasise the need to diagnose and manage complications in a timely manner.

  10. Altered functional connectivity links in neuroleptic-naïve and neuroleptic-treated patients with schizophrenia, and their relation to symptoms including volition

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Weidan; Rolls, Edmund T.; Guo, Shuixia; Liu, Haihong; Yu, Yun; Xue, Zhimin; Feng, Jianfeng; Liu, Zhening

    2014-01-01

    In order to analyze functional connectivity in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia, resting-state fMRI data were obtained for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis from 22 first-episode neuroleptic-naïve schizophrenia (NNS), 61 first-episode neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia (NTS) patients, and 60 healthy controls (HC). Reductions were found in untreated and treated patients in the functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate gyrus and precuneus, and this was correlated with the reduction in volition from the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), that is in the willful initiation, sustenance, and control of thoughts, behavior, movements, and speech, and with the general and negative symptoms. In addition in both patient groups interhemispheric functional connectivity was weaker between the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and temporal pole. These functional connectivity changes and the related symptoms were not treated by the neuroleptics. Differences between the patient groups were that there were more strong functional connectivity links in the NNS patients (including in hippocampal, frontal, and striatal circuits) than in the NTS patients. These findings with a whole brain analysis in untreated and treated patients with schizophrenia provide evidence on some of the brain regions implicated in the volitional, other general, and negative symptoms, of schizophrenia that are not treated by neuroleptics so have implications for the development of other treatments; and provide evidence on some brain systems in which neuroleptics do alter the functional connectivity. PMID:25389520

  11. Symptom experience of family caregivers of patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Swore Fletcher, Barbara A; Dodd, Marylin J; Schumacher, Karen L; Miaskowski, Christine

    2008-03-01

    To review the literature on depression, anxiety,sleep disturbance, fatigue, and pain in family caregivers of patients with cancer in the context of the Symptom Management Model (SMM)developed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Published research studies and systematic reviews from 1990-2007. Studies of depressive symptoms in caregivers of patients with cancer were the most numerous. A limited number of studies examined anxiety, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and pain. Most studies focused on the symptom experience dimension of the UCSF SMM. Based on the small sample sizes, cross-sectional nature of the studies, and lack of comparison groups, little is known about the prevalence and effects of symptoms in caregivers of patients with cancer. Additional research is needed to determine the prevalence, severity, and effects of symptoms on caregivers. Better descriptive, correlational studies will lead to the development of interventions to improve symptom management for this group of caregivers.

  12. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  13. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  14. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  15. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  16. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  17. [Dissociative symptoms in patients with mood and anxiety disorders].

    PubMed

    Moscariello, Marianna Margherita; Ratti, Flavia; Quartini, Adele; Forcén, Fernando Espí; Munuera, Joaquin Nieto; Bersani, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of dissociative symptoms in outpatients affected by mood or anxiety disorder and their potential implication in general psychopathology and treatment response. The sample was recruited at Italian and Spanish psychiatric outpatient services. The sample consisted in 40 (13 Male, 27 Female) outpatients, 22 Italians (55%) and 18 Spanish (45%). Inclusion criteria were the Axis I diagnosis of any DSM-IV-TR mood or anxiety disorder and Clinical Global Impression/Global Severity Index (CGI) baseline scores > or = 3 and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) baseline scores > or = 18. General psychopathology, dissociative symptoms and personality traits were respectively assessed by the self-report symptom inventory Symptom Check-List 90 (SCL-90), the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES) and the Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Dissociative symptoms emerged as relatively frequent in mood and anxiety disorders. Globally, depression symptoms seem to correlate positively with the dissociative experiences and the severity of global psychopathology. Dissociative symptoms seem to correlate positively with some personality traits and the severity of global psychopathology and should receive further investigation in clinical practice, as might be a predictor of poor response to conventional drug treatment.

  18. Trajectories of suicidal ideation and posttraumatic stress symptoms among former prisoners of war: a 17-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zerach, Gadi; Levi-Belz, Yossi; Solomon, Zahava

    2014-02-01

    War captivity is one of the most severe human-inflicted traumatic experiences with wide and substantial long-term negative effects. However, only one retrospective study examined suicidal ideation (SI) among ex-prisoners of war (ex-POWs). This study aimed to prospectively assess SI among ex-POWs and its associations with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms over a 17-year period. Two groups of male Israeli veterans from the 1973 Yom Kippur War were examined: ex-POWs and comparable veterans who were not taken captive. Both groups were assessed via self-report measures of SI and PTSD symptoms at three time points: T1 18 (1991), T2 30 (2003), and T3 35 (2008) years after the war. Latent growth curve modeling (LGM) results showed that ex-POWs reported higher levels of SI at T2 and T3 and a pattern of increase in SI levels trajectory over time, compared to control veterans. Furthermore, among ex-POWs, PTSD symptoms at T1 contributed to the increase in rate of change in SI overtime. In addition, PTSD symptoms affected SI at the same measurement, above and beyond above the trajectories of SI. Clinical implications of these findings for the relations between captivity trauma and suicidality are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Working memory - not processing speed - mediates fluid intelligence deficits associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Christopher R; Ozolnieks, Krista L; Roberts, Gareth

    2017-09-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a psychological condition characterized by inattention and hyperactivity. Cognitive deficits are commonly observed in ADHD patients, including impaired working memory, processing speed, and fluid intelligence, the three of which are theorized to be closely associated with one another. In this study, we aimed to determine if decreased fluid intelligence was associated with ADHD, and was mediated by deficits in working memory and processing speed. This study tested 142 young adults from the general population on a range of working memory, processing speed, and fluid intelligence tasks, and an ADHD self-report symptoms questionnaire. Results showed that total and hyperactive ADHD symptoms correlated significantly and negatively with fluid intelligence, but this association was fully mediated by working memory. However, inattentive symptoms were not associated with fluid intelligence. Additionally, processing speed was not associated with ADHD symptoms at all, and was not uniquely predictive of fluid intelligence. The results provide implications for working memory training programs for ADHD patients, and highlight potential differences between the neuropsychological profiles of ADHD subtypes. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  20. The cortical signature of symptom laterality in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Santamaria, Pamela M; Gendelman, Howard E; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often present with unilateral motor symptoms that eventually spread to the other side. This symptom lateralization is diagnostically important, as it serves to distinguish PD from other motor disorders with overlapping symptom profiles. Further, recent studies have shown that the side of symptom onset is important for prognosis, as there are differences in the rate of disease progression and the incidence of secondary symptoms between right- and left-dominant (RD, LD) patients. Physiologically, previous studies have shown asymmetrical decline in structure and metabolism throughout the basal ganglia, although connecting this directly to motor function has been difficult. To identify the neurophysiological basis of symptom laterality in PD, we recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) during left- and right-hand movement paradigms in patients with PD who exhibited either RD or LD symptomatology. The beta oscillations serving these movements were then imaged using beamforming methods, and we extracted the time series of the peak voxel in the left and right primary motor cortices for each movement. In addition, each patient's symptom asymmetry was quantitated using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), which allowed the relationship between symptom asymmetry and neural asymmetry to be assessed. We found that LD patients had stronger beta suppression during movement, as well as greater post-movement beta rebound compared to patients with RD symptoms, independent of the hand that was moved. Interestingly, the asymmetry of beta activity during right-hand movement uniquely correlated with symptom asymmetry, such that the more LD the symptom profile, the more left-lateralized (i.e., contralateral to movement) the beta response; conversely, the more RD the symptom profile, the more right-lateralized (i.e., ipsilateral to movement) the beta response. This study is the first to directly probe the relationship between symptom

  1. [Food additive hypersenisivity--near myth].

    PubMed

    Hannuksela, Matti; Haahtela, Tari

    2009-01-01

    There are over 200 food additives that have been approved in Finland. They are being used in order to improve preservability, flavor, appearance and texture. Some of them may cause hypersensitivity reactions, the most common being anaphylactic reactions, urticaria and exacerbation of asthma. Such reactions are, however, very rare. Anaphylactic reactions and other symptoms have resulted from carmine, lysozyme, acetic acid and acetates, gums of plant origin, sulfites and tartrazine.

  2. Transgender women of color: discrimination and depression symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Kevin; Neilands, Torsten B.; Sevelius, Jae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Trans women of color contend with multiple marginalizations; the purpose of this study is to examine associations between experiencing discriminatory (racist/transphobic) events and depression symptoms. It uses a categorical measure of combined discrimination, and examines a protective association of transgender identity on depression symptoms. Design/methodology/approach Data from a subset of trans women of color participants in the Sheroes study were analyzed with linear and logistic regress