Science.gov

Sample records for implosive therapy

  1. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  2. Implosive Therapy as a Treatment for Insomnia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrera, Richard N.; Elenewski, Jeffrey J.

    1980-01-01

    The death implosion produced a decrease in insomnia beyond the strong expectancy effects that resulted from all experimental treatments. The failure to observe changes in reported fear of death was attributed to subjects' anxiety-based reluctance to acknowledge openly such fear. (Author)

  3. Implosive Therapy as a Treatment for Insomnia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrera, Richard N.; Elenewski, Jeffrey J.

    1980-01-01

    The death implosion produced a decrease in insomnia beyond the strong expectancy effects that resulted from all experimental treatments. The failure to observe changes in reported fear of death was attributed to subjects' anxiety-based reluctance to acknowledge openly such fear. (Author)

  4. A Comparison of Implosive Therapy and Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ronald E.; Nye, S. Lee

    1973-01-01

    Both Desensitization and implosive therapy resulted in significant decreases in scores on Sarason's Test Anxiety Scale. However, the desensitization group also demonstrated a significant reduction in state anxiety assessed during simulated testing sessions and a significant increase in grade point average, while the implosive therapy group showed…

  5. Comparison of Three Methods of Reducing Test Anxiety: Systematic Desensitization, Implosive Therapy, and Study Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Richard D.; Dilley, Josiah S.

    1973-01-01

    Systematic desensitization, implosive therapy, and study counseling have all been effective in reducing test anxiety. In addition, systematic desensitization has been compared to study counseling for effectiveness. This study compares all three methods and suggests that systematic desentization is more effective than the others, and that implosive…

  6. Laser implosion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, C.

    1983-12-01

    The Institute of Laser Engineering at Osaka University outlines key issues of research, which are: the development of high-power drivers, pertinent pellet design for implosion by a large-scale computer code, pellet fabrication and handling, and diagnostic of the implosion process, with high resolution in space and time. Experimental facilities such as the GEKKO series and the CO/sub 2/-laser LEKKO series are discussed. A table and illustrations show energy drivers, the GEKKO XII optical arrangement, and the glass laser system of GEKKO XII. Fundamental processes in laser-plasma coupling, scaling of implosion presure, and implosion of the pellet and Cannonball target are described and accompanied by illustrations and photographs. The KONGOH project and activities at the Electrochemical Laboratory present research and progress on target experiments.

  7. Double shell liner implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.

    1997-05-05

    Experiments on the double shell liner (DSL) implosions with and without an initial axial magnetic were performed on the SNOP-3 pulse generator (1.1 MA, 100 ns). In implosions of a DSL without an initial axial magnetic field, high radial compressions of the inner shell were observed, as in previous experiments with an initial axial magnetic field. Possible mechanisms for the formation of the initial azimuthal magnetic field are discussed.

  8. Wellbottom fluid implosion treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Brieger, Emmet F.

    2001-01-01

    A system for inducing implosion shock forces on perforation traversing earth formations with fluid pressure where an implosion tool is selected relative to a shut in well pressure and a tubing pressure to have a large and small area piston relationship in a well tool so that at a predetermined tubing pressure the pistons move a sufficient distance to open an implosion valve which permits a sudden release of well fluid pressure into the tubing string and produces an implosion force on the perforations. A pressure gauge on the well tool records tubing pressure and well pressure as a function of time.

  9. Isochoric implosions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2006-06-05

    Fast Ignition (FI) exploits the ignition of a dense, uniform fuel assembly by an external energy source to achieve high gain. In conventional ICF implosions, however, the fuel assembles as a dense shell surrounding a low density, high-pressure hotspot. Such configurations are far from optimal for FI. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942).] may be employed to implode a dense, quasi-uniform fuel assembly with minimal energy wastage in forming a hotspot. A scheme for realizing these specialized implosions in a practical ICF target is also described.

  10. Isochoric Implosions for Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Tabak, M

    2007-04-04

    Various gain models have shown the potentially great advantages of Fast Ignition (FI) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) over its conventional hot spot ignition counterpart [e.g., S. Atzeni, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3316 (1999); M. Tabak et al., Fusion Sci. & Technology 49, 254 (2006)]. These gain models, however, all assume nearly uniform-density fuel assemblies. In contrast, conventional ICF implosions yield hollowed fuel assemblies with a high-density shell of fuel surrounding a low-density, high-pressure hot spot. Hence, to realize fully the advantages of FI, an alternative implosion design must be found which yields nearly isochoric fuel assemblies without substantial hot spots. Here, it is shown that a self-similar spherical implosion of the type originally studied by Guderley [Luftfahrtforschung 19, 302 (1942)] may be employed to yield precisely such quasi-isochoric imploded states. The difficulty remains, however, of accessing these self-similarly imploding configurations from initial conditions representing an actual ICF target, namely a uniform, solid-density shell at rest. Furthermore, these specialized implosions must be realized for practicable drive parameters and at the scales and energies of interest in ICF. A direct-drive implosion scheme is presented which meets all of these requirements and reaches a nearly isochoric assembled density of 300 g=cm{sup 3} and areal density of 2.4 g=cm{sup 2} using 485 kJ of laser energy.

  11. Modeling Mix in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.; Chang, B.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2014-10-01

    The observation of ablator material mixing into the hot spot of ICF implosions correlates with reduced yield in National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments. Higher Z ablator material radiatively cools the central hot spot, inhibiting thermonuclear burn. This talk focuses on modeling a ``high-mix'' implosion from the NIC, where greater than 1000 ng of ablator material was inferred to have mixed into the hot spot. Standard post-shot modeling of this implosion does not predict the large amounts of ablator mix necessary to explain the data. Other issues are explored in this talk and sensitivity to the method of radiation transport is found. Compared with radiation diffusion, Sn transport can increase ablation front growth and alter the blow-off dynamics of capsule dust. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Shock wave driven by a phased implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, R.; Lackner, K.S.; Johnson, N.L.; Colgate, S.A.; Hyman, J.M. ); Miranda, G.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the theory of an axially phased radial implosion of a channel is developed. When the phase velocity of the implosion exceeds the sound velocity inside the channel, a planar shock wave traveling along the channel axis can develop. For the energy of the implosion system in the appropriate range, the theory predicts a stable steady-state flow configuration. The effect of the phased implosion is for the channel wall to form a nozzle that travels along the channel axis. The flow behind the axial shock is well described by the equations for nozzle flow with an additional dynamical degree of freedom for the shape of the wall. Experiments presented here verify the theoretical predictions. The numerical simulations show the formation of the axial shock during start-up and the approach to steady state to be in good agreement with experiment and theory. A potential application of the axially phased implosion is the design of a super shock tube.

  13. Hydrodynamic efficiencies in implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Fabre, Edouard; Boudenne, Jean-Michel; Michard, Alain; Fews, P.

    1990-04-01

    Experiments on the implosion of high aspect ratio glass microballoons, filled with an equimolar mixture of 10 atmosphere D-T gas, aimed at determining hydrodynamic efficiencies, the characteristics (density and temperature) of the wall, are described. Experimental results for kinetic and thermal variations, obtained for 350 and 450 micrometer targets, at an absorbed laser power of about 120 J, are compared with values given by simulations with the FILM code. The comparison is made at the time of shock reflection on the internal wall of the shell. The use of X spectroscopy in such experiments is discussed.

  14. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy andmore » vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest-growing modes and that high mode numbers are required to reach this limit (Legendre mode ℓ ≳ 100

  15. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. M.

    2015-06-15

    With this study, I consider the hydrodynamic stability of imploding ideal gases as an idealized model for inertial confinement fusion capsules, sonoluminescent bubbles and the gravitational collapse of astrophysical gases. For oblate modes (short-wavelength incompressive modes elongated in the direction of the mean flow), a second-order ordinary differential equation is derived that can be used to assess the stability of any time-dependent flow with planar, cylindrical or spherical symmetry. Upon further restricting the analysis to homologous flows, it is shown that a monatomic gas is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability. Under buoyantly unstable conditions, both entropy and vorticity fluctuations experience power-law growth in time, with a growth rate that depends upon mean flow gradients and, in the absence of dissipative effects, is independent of mode number. If the flow accelerates throughout the implosion, oblate modes amplify by a factor (2C)|N0|ti, where C is the convergence ratio of the implosion, N0 is the initial buoyancy frequency and ti is the implosion time scale. If, instead, the implosion consists of a coasting phase followed by stagnation, oblate modes amplify by a factor exp(π|N0|ts), where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. Even under stable conditions, vorticity fluctuations grow due to the conservation of angular momentum as the gas is compressed. For non-monatomic gases, this additional growth due to compression results in weak oscillatory growth under conditions that would otherwise be buoyantly stable; this over-stability is consistent with the conservation of wave action in the fluid frame. The above analytical results are verified by evolving the complete set of linear equations as an initial value problem, and it is demonstrated that oblate modes are the fastest

  16. Considerations for Inductively Driven Plasma Implosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    W.L. Baker, M.G. Clark, J.H. Degnan, G.F. Kiuttu C.R. McClenahan, and R.E. Reinovsky, "Electro- magnetic-Implosion Generation of Pulsed High - Energy - Density Plasma ," J... energy density plasma suitable for use as an intense X-ray Source1 • Under the SHIVA program experiments have been conducted in which a plasma...implosion. introduction The Air Force Weapons Laboratory is investigating plasma implosion techniques as a desirable method for generating a very high

  17. Progress in Cryogenic Target Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Séguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets are imploded on the OMEGA Laser System in a direct-drive configuration. Areal densities of approximately 200 mg/cm2 have been measured with implosion velocities of 3 × 107 cm/s. These implosions are used to study the dynamics of cryogenic target compression and to develop areal-density diagnostics that will be used as part of the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Buoyancy instability of homologous implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Hot spot turbulence is a potential contributor to yield degradation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules, although its origin, if present, remains unclear. In this work, a perturbation analysis is performed of an analytical homologous solution that mimics the hot spot and surrounding cold fuel during the late stages of an ICF implosion. It is shown that the flow is governed by the Schwarzschild criterion for buoyant stability, and that during stagnation, short wavelength entropy and vorticity fluctuations amplify by a factor exp (π |N0 | ts) , where N0 is the buoyancy frequency at stagnation and ts is the stagnation time scale. This amplification factor is exponentially sensitive to mean flow gradients and varies from 103-107 for realistic gradients. Comparisons are made with a Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, and it is found that a numerical resolution of ~ 30 zones per wavelength is required to capture the evolution of vorticity accurately. This translates to an angular resolution of ~(12 / l) ∘ , or ~ 0 .1° to resolve the fastest growing modes (Legendre mode l > 100).

  19. Improving Hohlraums for High Foot Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ma, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Doeppner, T.; Goyon, C. S.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of High Foot implosions show that performance has been limited by the radiation drive environment, i.e., the hohlraum. Demonstrated here is that improvements in the radiation environment result in an enhancement in implosion performance. This is accomplished by using a longer, larger case-to-capsule ratio hohlraum at lower gas fill density. At fixed laser energy, High Foot implosions driven with this hohlraum have achieved a 1.4 x increase in stagnation pressure, with an accompanying relative increase in fusion yield of 50%. Low mode asymmetries are still present, however, and are most likely a consequence of poor inner beam propagation through the hohlraum to the wall. Presented here are results from these High Foot implosions, as well as analyses of inner beam propagation, and additional hohlraum improvements that further ameliorate the implosion. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Simulations of Indirectly Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, J. M.; Beck, J. B.

    1999-11-01

    The growth of perturbations via the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (ART) instability plays a significant role in the efficiency of ICF implosions. Experiments of radiation-driven cylindrical implosions have been performed to investigate the effects of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor and Bell-Plesset instabilities in a convergent geometry [W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 78, 3876 (1997)]. The ART instability at the ablation front of an ICF capsule is a dominant effect which degrades the implosion efficiency. Additionally, the Bell-Plesset effect, growth of a perturbation due to convergent geometry, further enhances implosion non-uniformity. New physics simulation codes are presently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of ASCI (Advanced Super Computing Initiative). Importance is being placed upon validation of these computational codes with relevant Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. One of these codes, RAGE [Baltrusaitis, R.M., et al, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)], an Eulerian based hydrodynamics code, utilizes adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to resolve regions of physical interest in the computational domain. We will present comparisons of the perturbation growth from the RAGE code to the experimental data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36.

  1. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  2. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  3. Scaling Laws for Hydrodynamically Equivalent Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu

    2001-10-01

    The EPOC (equivalent physics of confinement) scenario for the proof of principle of high gain inertial confinement fusion is presented, where the key concept "hydrodynamically equivalent implosions" plays a crucial role. Scaling laws on the target and confinement parameters are derived by applying the Lie group analysis to the PDE (partially differential equations) chain of the hydrodynamic system. It turns out that the conventional scaling law based on adiabatic approximation significantly differs from one which takes such energy transport effect as electron heat conduction into account. Confinement plasma parameters of the hot spot such as the central temperature and the areal mass density at peak compression are obtained with a self-similar solution for spherical implosions.

  4. Temperature Measurements of an Implosion Focus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    emissivity can also be evaluated from the values at the intersection of the line with the vertical axis. However, after evaluating Implosion-.Focus...Ref. 11. S. COMPARISON OP EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND THEORY Figure 5 compares the experimental results and the expected average tom- iI 13121 Salto et a1...ahead of the shock front, even though the imploding shock wave continued to conveo’ge. A high degree of I 13141 Salto et al. convergence was obtained

  5. RAGE Simulations of Indirectly Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, John; Beck, J. Bradley

    2000-10-01

    New physics simulation codes are being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of ASCI (Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative). Importance is being placed upon validation of these computational codes with relevant inertial confinement fusion experiments. One of these codes, RAGE [Baltrusaitis, R.M., et al, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)], an Eulerian based hydrodynamics code, utilizes adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to resolve regions of physical interest in the computational domain. A recent addition to RAGE is a multi-group radiation-diffusion transport package. We performed simulations of indirectly-driven cylindrical implosion experiments measuring the effects of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor and Bell-Plesset instabilities in a convergent geometry [W. W. Hsing and N. M. Hoffman, Phys. Rev. Lett., 78, 3876 (1997)]. In these experiments, the radiation drive contained a distinct M-shell component from the gold hohlraum that preheats the imploding cylinder, a difficult to simulate effect without multi-group radiation transport. Preheat places the target implosion on a higher adiabat reducing convergence and perturbation growth due to the Bell-Plesset effect. We compare the implosion trajectories and perturbation growth from the RAGE code to the experimental data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36.

  6. Implosion hydrodynamics of fast ignition targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, R. B.; Hatchett, S. P.; Tabak, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Bonino, M.; Nikroo, A.; Petrasso, R.; Sangster, T. C.; Smith, J.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current base line FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct- or indirect-drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultraintense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. A theoretical and experimental investigation was undertaken of the collapse of such targets, validating modeling, and exploring the trade-offs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side, hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But for FI it is a liability; the hot, low-density inner core impedes the compaction of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain. Approaches to optimizing this shell design are discussed.

  7. Implosion Hydrodynamics of Fast Ignition Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, R. B.

    2004-11-01

    The fast ignition (FI) concept requires the generation of a compact, dense, pure fuel mass accessible to an external ignition source. The current baseline FI target is a shell fitted with a reentrant cone extending to near its center. Conventional direct or indirect drive collapses the shell near the tip of the cone and then an ultra-intense laser pulse focused to the inside cone tip generates high-energy electrons to ignite the dense fuel. We have theoretically and experimentally investigated the collapse of such targets, validating modeling and exploring the tradeoffs available, in such an asymmetric geometry, to optimize compaction of the fuel and maintain the integrity of the cone. The collapse is complex. Away from the cone, the shell collapses much as does a conventional implosion, generating a hot, low-density inner core. But because of the open side this hot plasma exhausts out toward the tip of the cone. This hot plasma is advantageous for implosion diagnostics; it can provide protons for angular dependent measurements of the shell wall, neutrons for temperature measurements, and self-emission for contamination measurements. But the hot spot must be controlled; for FI it is a liability. The hot, low-density inner core simply impedes the collapse of the cold fuel, lowering the implosion/burn efficiency and the gain while making ignition more difficult. We discuss approaches to minimizing this effect and experimental tests.

  8. Two-dimensional implosion simulations with a kinetic particle code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, I.; Even, W. P.; Strother, T. T.

    2017-05-01

    We perform two-dimensional implosion simulations using a Monte Carlo kinetic particle code. The application of a kinetic transport code is motivated, in part, by the occurrence of nonequilibrium effects in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions, which cannot be fully captured by hydrodynamic simulations. Kinetic methods, on the other hand, are able to describe both continuum and rarefied flows. We perform simple two-dimensional disk implosion simulations using one-particle species and compare the results to simulations with the hydrodynamics code rage. The impact of the particle mean free path on the implosion is also explored. In a second study, we focus on the formation of fluid instabilities from induced perturbations. We find good agreement with hydrodynamic studies regarding the location of the shock and the implosion dynamics. Differences are found in the evolution of fluid instabilities, originating from the higher resolution of rage and statistical noise in the kinetic studies.

  9. Kinetic simulation of hydrodynamic equivalent capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas; Le, Ari; Schmitt, Mark; Herrmann, Hans

    2016-10-01

    We have carried out simulations of direct-drive hydrodynamic equivalent capsule implosion experiments conducted on Omega laser facility at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester. The capsules had a glass shell (SiO2) 4.87 μm with an inner diameter of 1086 μm. One was filled with deuterium (D) and tritium (T) at 6.635 and 2.475 atmospheric pressure respectively. The other capsule with D, T, and He-3 at 2.475, 2.475, and 5.55 atmospheric pressure respectively. The capsules were imploded with 60 laser beams with a square pulse length of 0.6ns of total energy of 15.6 kJ. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic calculations with HYDRA and kinetic particle/hybrid simulations with LSP are carried out for the post-shot analysis. HYDRA outputs at 0.6ns are linked to LSP, in which the electrons are treated as a fluid while all the ion dynamics is simulated by the standard particle-in-cell technique. Additionally, simulations with the new photon package in LSP are initiated at the beginning of the implosion to include the implosion phase of the capsule. The simulation results of density, temperature, and velocity profiles of the electrons, D, T, He-3, and SiO2species are compared with HYDRA. Detail comparisons among the kinetic simulations, rad-hydro simulations, and experimental results of neutron yield, yield ratio, fusion burn histories, and shell convergence will be presented to assess plasma kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the US DOE by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W7405-ENG-36.

  10. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  11. Two-dimensional implosion simulations with a kinetic particle code [2D implosion simulations with a kinetic particle code

    DOE PAGES

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley Paul; Strother, Terrance Timothy

    2017-05-17

    Here, we perform two-dimensional implosion simulations using a Monte Carlo kinetic particle code. The application of a kinetic transport code is motivated, in part, by the occurrence of nonequilibrium effects in inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions, which cannot be fully captured by hydrodynamic simulations. Kinetic methods, on the other hand, are able to describe both continuum and rarefied flows. We perform simple two-dimensional disk implosion simulations using one-particle species and compare the results to simulations with the hydrodynamics code rage. The impact of the particle mean free path on the implosion is also explored. In a second study, we focusmore » on the formation of fluid instabilities from induced perturbations. We find good agreement with hydrodynamic studies regarding the location of the shock and the implosion dynamics. Differences are found in the evolution of fluid instabilities, originating from the higher resolution of rage and statistical noise in the kinetic studies.« less

  12. Capsule Implosion Symmetry in OMEGA Tetrahedral Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, J. D.; Craxton, R. S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Turner, R. E.; Wallace, J. M.; Murphy, T. J.; Delamater, N. D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hauer, A. A.; Klare, K. A.

    1998-11-01

    The 3-D time-dependent capsule implosion symmetry has been calculated for spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes. The code BUTTERCUP calculates the locations of beam spots on the hohlraum wall and includes a model for the absorption and x-ray conversion of the laser energy. The gold wall is heated by 1-D radiation diffusion, and radiation transport is carried out with a 3-D view-factor algorithm. A simple hydrodynamic calculation of the imploding capsule gives the resulting 3-D time-dependent drive symmetry. The predicted radiation uniformity incident on the capsule is very good ( ~1% rms) throughout the laser pulse. Experimental images of the capsule show round implosions with convergence ratios of 10 for standard capsules,(T. J. Murphy, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 42), 2008 (1997). in agreement with predictions. Radiation temperatures and capsule trajectories are calculated and show good agreement with experiment. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  13. Developing one-dimensional implosions for inertial confinement fusion science

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; ...

    2016-12-12

    Experiments on the National Ignition Facility show that multi-dimensional effects currently dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a one-dimensional (1D) implosion platform where 1D means measured yield overmore » the 1D clean calculation. A high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed using beryllium capsules enabling larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the implosion convergence can be controlled via the initial vapor pressure set by the target fielding temperature. The last method is double shell targets. For double shells, the smaller inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. However, double shell targets have a different set of trade-off versus advantages. As a result, details for each of these approaches are described.« less

  14. Developing one-dimensional implosions for inertial confinement fusion science

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Olson, Richard Edward; Wilson, Douglas Carl; Kyrala, George Amine; Perry, Theodore Sonne; Batha, Steven H.; Dewald, Eddie L.; Ralph, Joe E.; Strozzi, David J.; MacPhee, Andy G.; Callahan, Debbie A.; Hinkel, Denise; Hurricane, Omar A.; Leeper, Ramon J.; Zylstra, Alex B.; Peterson, Robert Ross; Haines, Brian Michael; Yin, Lin; Bradley, Paul Andrew; Shah, Rahul C.; Braun, Tom; Biener, Jorgan; Kozioziemski, Bernie J.; Sater, Jim D.; Biener, Monika M.; Hamza, Alex V.; Nikroo, Abbas; Berzak Hopkins, Laura F.; Ho, Darwin; LePape, Sebastian; Meezan, Nathan B.; Montgomery, David S.; Daughton, William Scott; Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Cardenas, Tana; Dodd, Evan S.

    2016-12-12

    Experiments on the National Ignition Facility show that multi-dimensional effects currently dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a one-dimensional (1D) implosion platform where 1D means measured yield over the 1D clean calculation. A high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed using beryllium capsules enabling larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the implosion convergence can be controlled via the initial vapor pressure set by the target fielding temperature. The last method is double shell targets. For double shells, the smaller inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. However, double shell targets have a different set of trade-off versus advantages. As a result, details for each of these approaches are described.

  15. Zonal flow generation in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, J. L.; Humbird, K. D.; Field, J. E.; ...

    2017-03-06

    A supervised machine learning algorithm trained on a multi-petabyte dataset of inertial confinement fusion simulations has identified a class of implosions that robustly achieve high yield, even in the presence of drive variations and hydrodynamic perturbations. These implosions are purposefully driven with a time-varying asymmetry, such that coherent flow generation during hotspot stagnation forces the capsule to self-organize into an ovoid, a shape that appears to be more resilient to shell perturbations than spherical designs. Here this new class of implosions, whose configurations are reminiscent of zonal flows in magnetic fusion devices, may offer a path to robust inertial fusion.

  16. Zonal flow generation in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Humbird, K. D.; Field, J. E.; Brandon, S. T.; Langer, S. H.; Nora, R. C.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.

    2017-03-01

    A supervised machine learning algorithm trained on a multi-petabyte dataset of inertial confinement fusion simulations has identified a class of implosions that robustly achieve high yield, even in the presence of drive variations and hydrodynamic perturbations. These implosions are purposefully driven with a time-varying asymmetry, such that coherent flow generation during hotspot stagnation forces the capsule to self-organize into an ovoid, a shape that appears to be more resilient to shell perturbations than spherical designs. This new class of implosions, whose configurations are reminiscent of zonal flows in magnetic fusion devices, may offer a path to robust inertial fusion.

  17. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Fedunin, A. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a “hot spot”. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stages are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.

  18. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  19. Improving cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosion performance on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; and others

    2013-05-15

    A flexible direct-drive target platform is used to implode cryogenic deuterium–tritium (DT) capsules on the OMEGA laser [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamically equivalent performance where the laser drive intensity, the implosion velocity, the fuel adiabat, and the in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR) are the same as those for a 1.5-MJ target [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)] designed to ignite on the National Ignition Facility [Hogan et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 (2001)]. The results from a series of 29 cryogenic DT implosions are presented. The implosions were designed to span a broad region of design space to study target performance as a function of shell stability (adiabat) and implosion velocity. Ablation-front perturbation growth appears to limit target performance at high implosion velocities. Target outer-surface defects associated with contaminant gases in the DT fuel are identified as the dominant perturbation source at the ablation surface; performance degradation is confirmed by 2D hydrodynamic simulations that include these defects. A trend in the value of the Lawson criterion [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] for each of the implosions in adiabat–IFAR space suggests the existence of a stability boundary that leads to ablator mixing into the hot spot for the most ignition-equivalent designs.

  20. Implosion Source Development and Diego Garcia Reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P E; Boro, C

    2001-06-01

    Calibration of hydroacoustic stations for nuclear explosion monitoring is important for increasing monitoring capability and confidence from newly installed stations and from existing stations. Past work at Ascension Island has shown that ship-towed airguns can be effectively used for local calibrations such as sensor location, amplitude and phase response, and T-phase coupling in the case of T-phase stations. At regional and ocean-basin distances from a station, the calibration focus is on acoustic travel time, transmission loss, bathymetric shadowing, diffraction, and reflection as recorded at a particular station. Such station calibrations will lead to an overall network calibration that seeks to maximize detection, location, and discrimination capability of events with acoustic signatures. Active-source calibration of hydroacoustic stations at regional and ocean-basin scales has not been attempted to date, but we have made significant headway addressing how such calibrations could be accomplished. We have developed an imploding sphere source that can be used instead of explosives on research and commercial vessels without restriction. The imploding sphere has been modeled using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory hydrodynamic code CALE and shown to agree with field data. The need for boosted energy in the monitoring band (2-100 Hz) has led us to develop a 5-sphere implosion device that was tested in the Pacific Ocean earlier this year. Boosting the energy in the monitoring band can be accomplished by a combination of increasing the implosion volume (i.e. the 5-sphere device) and imploding at shallower depths. Although active source calibrations will be necessary at particular locations and for particular objectives, the newly installed Diego Garcia station in the Indian Ocean has shown that earthquakes can be used to help understand regional blockages and the locations responsible for observed hydroacoustic reflections. We have analyzed several events

  1. First Beryllium Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, John

    2015-11-01

    The first implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to confirm the superior ablation properties and to elucidate possible Be-ablator issues. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs have measured the laser energy backscatter, shock velocities, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable, if not better, for Be than for plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results demonstrate good coupling of laser energy to the target and control over the implosion shape indicating the feasibility of Be capsule design opening up a larger design space for ICF. In addition, this data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicates that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules.

  2. Two-frame flash x-radiography system for target implosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.; Fehl, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    A two-frame flash x-radiography system has been developed to study target implosion dynamics. It is capable of taking two time separated 3 ns exposure x-ray shadowgrams of a particle beam driven target implosion.

  3. High Foot Implosion Experiments in Rugby Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Joseph; Leidinger, J.-P.; Callahan, D.; Kaiser, P.; Morice, O.; Marion, D.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Strozzi, D.; Hinkel, D.; Michel, P.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Khan, S.; Rygg, R.; Hurricane, O.; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Team; CEA/DAM Team

    2015-11-01

    The rugby hohlraum design is aimed at providing uniform x-ray drive on the capsule while minimizing the need for crossed beam energy transfer (CBET). As part of a series of experiments at the NIF using rugby hohlraums, design improvements in dual axis shock tuning experiments produced some of the most symmetric shocks measured on implosion experiments at the NIF. Additionally, tuning of the in-flight shell and hot spot shape have demonstrated that capsules can be tuned between oblate and prolate with measured velocities of nearly 340 km/s. However, these experimental measurements were accompanied by high levels of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) that may result from the long inner beam path length, reamplification of the inner SRS by the outers, significant (CBET) or a combination of these. All rugby shots results were achieved with lower levels of hot electrons that can preheat the DT fuel layer for increased adiabat and reduced areal density. Detailed results from these experiments and those planned throughout the summer will be presented and compared with results obtained from cylindrical hohlraums. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Lab under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Bounce-free spherical hydrodynamic implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Hsu, Scott C.; Awe, Thomas J.

    2011-10-01

    In a bounce-free spherical hydrodynamic implosion, the post-stagnation hot core plasma does not expand against the imploding flow. A solution family realizing such a regime has been explicitly found. This regime found is most naturally applied and would be of most benefit to plasma liner driven magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). That is, this version of inertial confinement relies on maintaining the compressed hot spot within the thermonuclear burning condition for as long as possible, rather than on initiating the burn wave. Consequently, in MIF it is the best-case scenario that the fuel target persists in the state of maximum compression after reaching stagnation. Also, the plasma liner driven MIF provides substantial freedom in shaping the profiles of the imploding flow (i.e. liner) pressure, density and fluid velocity. By comparing the fuel disassembly time against that of a stationary imploding flow case, we find that shaping this flow appropriately is likely to increase the dwell time and fusion gain by a factor of four or more. Moreover, in this newly found regime the shocked region of the liner is at rest. That is, the kinetic energy of the original liner is entirely converted into internal energy. Hence, our result supports the idea of using the deuterium-tritium in the inner parts of the liner or the so-called ``after-burner,'' which upon becoming shocked will also burn, thus further increasing the gain. The work is supported by LANL LDRD.

  5. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of OMEGA implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Michel, D. T.; Shah, R. C.; ...

    2017-03-30

    Here, the effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming), target offset, and variation in target-layer thickness were investigated using the low-noise, three-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Simulations indicate that these asymmetries can significantly degrade the implosion performance. The most important sources of the asymmetries are the target offsets (~10 to 20 μm), beam-power imbalance (σrms ~ 10%), and variations (~5%) in target-layer thickness. Large-scale asymmetries distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of implosion targets.more » The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra is influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to an ~1 -keV increase in apparent temperature. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires a reduction in large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing highly efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs, which mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh–Taylor growth.« less

  6. Long Implosion Time Aluminum K-shell Radiation Scaling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.; Spielman, R. B.; Jobe, D.; Struve, K.; McGurn, J.; Riordan, J.; Levine, J.; Song, Y.; Failor, B.; Whitton, B.; Thornhill, J. W.; Apruzese, J. P.; Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    1998-11-01

    Several experiments to study the K-shell emissions of long implosion time z-pinches have been performed over the last couple of years. These types of experiments have been motivated primarily by the need to development a z-pinch source for the DECADE-Quad pulsed power driver. In this work, aluminum wire arrays were fielded as the z-pinch load on the 2.5 MA Decade Module 2 (DM2) and on the 7 MA Saturn accelerator. A peak aluminum K-shell yield (1.8 keV photons) of 4 kJ was measured on DM2 at an implosion time of 260 ns while the Saturn experiments produced > 30 kJ with an implosion time of 160 ns. These results will be compared to 0-d calculations and discussed within the context of K-shell scaling laws. The long implosion time results will also be compared with short implosion time measurements. This work is supported by the Defense Special Weapons Agency and the Department of Energy.

  7. Surface Roughness Instability Simulations of Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlinchey, Kristopher; Niasse, Nicolas; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Understanding hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by the inherit roughness on a capsule's surface is critical in quantifying an implosion's performance. Combined with instabilities on the ice-gas interface during the deceleration phase, their growth can lead to inhomogeneity in the shell's areal density. Recent work carried out at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) on surface roughness Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) growth rates show larger amplitudes in experiment as compared to simulation, even with a deliberately roughened surface. We report on simulations of ICF experiments occurring at NIF using the Chimera code developed at Imperial College. Chimera is a fully explicit, Eulerian 3D multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics code utilising P1/3 automatic flux limiting radiation transport with opacity data from a non-LTE atomic model also developed at Imperial College. One-dimensional simulations are briefly presented to highlight that proper shock timing and stagnation properties have been achieved as are 2D harmonic perturbation simulations to benchmark their growth rates. Surface roughness implosions (initialised from metrology data) were then simulated for: shot N120321, a low-foot implosion with large surface perturbations and shot N130927, a high-foot implosion. Synthetic radiographs of these implosions were constructed at low convergence ratio (3-4) for comparison to experiment and at higher convergence to investigate what will be observable by new diagnostics in development at NIF.

  8. Indirectly driven, high-convergence implosions (HEP1)

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    High-gain inertial confinement fusion will most readily be achieved with hot-spot ignition, in which a relatively small mass of gaseous fuel at the center of the target is heated to 5-10 keV, igniting a larger surrounding mass of approximately isobaric fuel at higher density but lower temperature. Existing lasers are too low in energy to achieve thermonuclear gain, but hydrodynamically equivalent implosions using these lasers can demonstrate that the important, scalable parameters of ignition capsules are scientifically and technologically achievable. The experiments described in this article used gas-filled glass shells driven by x rays produced in a surrounding cavity, or hohlraum. These implosions achieved convergence ratios (initial capsule radius/ final fuel radius) high enough to fall in the range required for ignition-scale capsules, and they produced an imploded configuration (high-density glass with hot gas fill) that is equivalent to the hot-spot configuration of an ignition-scale capsule. Other recent laser-driven implosions have achieved high shell density but at lower convergences and without a well defined hot spot. Still other experiments have used very-low-density gas fill to reach high convergence with unshaped drive, but that approach results in a relatively low shell density. Moreover, even at the highest convergence ratios the implosions described here had neutron yields averaging 8% of that calculated for an idealized, clean, spherically symmetric implosion - much higher than previous high-convergence experiments.

  9. Progress of LMJ-relevant implosions experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Seytor, P.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H.; Ross, J.; Amendt, P.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.; Loiseau, P.; Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Seguin, F.; Rosenberg, M.; Renaudin, P.

    2013-11-01

    In preparation of the first ignition attempts on the Laser Mégajoule (LMJ), an experimental program is being pursued on OMEGA to investigate LMJ-relevant hohlraums. First, radiation temperature levels close to 300 eV were recently achieved in reduced-scale hohlraums with modest backscatter losses. Regarding the baseline target design for fusion experiments on LMJ, an extensive experimental database has also been collected for scaled implosions experiments in both empty and gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums. We acquired a full picture of hohlraum energetics and implosion dynamics. Not only did the rugby hohlraums show significantly higher x-ray drive energy over the cylindrical hohlraums, but symmetry control by power balance was demonstrated, as well as high-performance D2 implosions enabling the use of a complete suite of neutrons diagnostics. Charged particle diagnostics provide complementary insights into the physics of these x-ray driven implosions. An overview of these results demonstrates our ability to control the key parameters driving the implosion, lending more confidence in extrapolations to ignition-scale targets.

  10. Towards a Phonetic Explanation for Universal Preferences in Implosives and Ejections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javkin, Hector

    Two possible explanations based on elementary facts of physics are suggested for the universal preference for place of articulation of implosives and ejectives. Languages show a preference for ejectives in the order: velar, alveolar, and labial while implosives occur most often in the opposite order. A language will only have velar implosives if…

  11. Towards a Phonetic Explanation for Universal Preferences in Implosives and Ejections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javkin, Hector

    Two possible explanations based on elementary facts of physics are suggested for the universal preference for place of articulation of implosives and ejectives. Languages show a preference for ejectives in the order: velar, alveolar, and labial while implosives occur most often in the opposite order. A language will only have velar implosives if…

  12. Hydrodynamic analysis of laser-driven cylindrical implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramis, R.

    2013-08-15

    Three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to study laser-driven cylindrical implosions in the context of experiments (F. Perez et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 124035 (2009)) carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the framework of the HiPER project. The analysis is carried out by using the 3D version of the hydrocode MULTI (R. Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475-505 (1988)). The influence of the main laser parameters on implosion performance and symmetry is consistently studied and compared with the results of 2D analysis. Furthermore, the effects of uncertainties in laser irradiation (pointing, focusing, power balance, and time jitter) on implosion performance (average peak density and temperature) are studied by means of statistical analysis.

  13. Uniform fuel target implosion in heavy ion inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.; Kondo, S.; Iinuma, T.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    For a steady operation of a fusion power plant the target implosion should be robust against the implosion non-uniformities. In this paper the non-uniformity mitigation mechanisms in the heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination are discussed in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF). A density valley appears in the energy absorber, and the large-scale density valley also works as a radiation energy confinement layer, which contributes to the radiation energy smoothing for the HIB illumination non-uniformity. The large density-gradient scale, which is typically ∼500μm in HIF targets, also contributes to a reduction of the Rayleigh- Taylor instability growth rate. In HIF a wobbling HIBs illumination would also reduce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth and to realize a uniform implosion.

  14. Calculations for Indirectly Driven Be capsule Implosion Experiments at Omega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, George; Kline, John; Merritt, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium (Be) ablators offer an attractive path to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). They offer better ablation rate, higher efficiency, and higher ablation velocity than the currently used CH or Diamond capsules. We have designed a capsule of Be for implosions at Omega to test our understanding of Be implosions in the foot of the anticipated NIF pulse, ~100-110 eV for a period of 1-2 ns drive. We calculated the emission profile, diameter, and implosion time. We will present a comparison to the completed experiments using either Be or CH ablator. We also will provide calculations of the effect of adding different amounts of an Argon dopant on the expected x-ray yield and emission shapes. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  15. Strong coupling and degeneracy effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Militzer, B; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of ρ=0.002-1596  g/cm3 and T=1.35  eV-5.5  keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density (ρR), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  16. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.; Militzer, B.

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of {rho}=0.002-1596 g/cm{sup 3} and T=1.35 eV-5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density ({rho}R), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  17. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of ρ=0.002-1596g/cm3 and T=1.35eV-5.5keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density (ρR), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  18. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-10

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of rho = 0.002–1596 g/cm^3 and T = 1.35 eV–5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density, and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  19. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Kozioziemski, B.; Schneider, M. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ma, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Hoover, D.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2016-05-01

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  20. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; and others

    2016-05-15

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  1. Three-Dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes less than 30) asymmetries in OMEGA direct-drive implosions caused by laser illumination nonuniformities (beam-power imbalance and beam mispointing and mistiming) and target offset, mount, and layers nonuniformities were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic simulations. Simulations indicate that the performance degradation in cryogenic implosions is caused mainly by the target offsets ( 10 to 20 μm), beampower imbalance (σrms 10 %), and initial target asymmetry ( 5% ρRvariation), which distort implosion cores, resulting in a reduced hot-spot confinement and an increased residual kinetic energy of the stagnated target. The ion temperature inferred from the width of simulated neutron spectra are influenced by bulk fuel motion in the distorted hot spot and can result in up to 2-keV apparent temperature increase. Similar temperature variations along different lines of sight are observed. Simulated x-ray images of implosion cores in the 4- to 8-keV energy range show good agreement with experiments. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition designs on OMEGA requires reducing large-scale target and laser-imposed nonuniformities, minimizing target offset, and employing high-efficient mid-adiabat (α = 4) implosion designs that mitigate cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and suppress short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth. These simulations use a new low-noise 3-D Eulerian hydrodynamic code ASTER. Existing 3-D hydrodynamic codes for direct-drive implosions currently miss CBET and noise-free ray-trace laser deposition algorithms. ASTER overcomes these limitations using a simplified 3-D laser-deposition model, which includes CBET and is capable of simulating the effects of beam-power imbalance, beam mispointing, mistiming, and target offset. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Divol, L.; Weber, S.; Doeppner, T.; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Ma, T.; Town, R. P.; Bradley, D. K.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilne, J.

    2012-10-15

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above {approx}8 keV. On multiple implosions, {approx}200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  3. Diagnosing radiative shocks from deuterium and tritium implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Pak, A; Divol, L; Weber, S; Döppner, T; Kyrala, G A; Kilne, J; Izumi, N; Glenn, S; Ma, T; Town, R P; Bradley, D K; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    During the recent ignition tuning campaign at the National Ignition Facility, layered cryogenic deuterium and tritium capsules were imploded via x-ray driven ablation. The hardened gated x-ray imager diagnostic temporally and spatially resolves the x-ray emission from the core of the capsule implosion at energies above ~8 keV. On multiple implosions, ~200-400 ps after peak compression a spherically expanding radiative shock has been observed. This paper describes the methods used to characterize the radial profile and rate of expansion of the shock induced x-ray emission.

  4. Dynamically stable implosions in a large simulation dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. Luc; Field, John; Humbird, Kelli; Brandon, Scott; Langer, Steve; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric implosion drive can severely impact the performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules. In particular the time-varying radiation environment produced in near-vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility is thought to limit the conversion efficiency of shell kinetic energy into hotspot internal energy. To investigate the role of dynamic asymmetries in implosion behavior we have created a large database of 2D capsule implosions of varying drive amplitude, drive asymmetry and capsule gas fill that spans 13 dimensions and consists of over 60,000 individual simulations. A novel in-transit analysis scheme allowed for the real-time processing of petabytes of raw data into hundreds of terabytes of physical metrics and synthetic images, and supervised learning algorithms identified regions of parameter space that robustly produce high yield. We will discuss the first results from this dataset and explore the dynamics of implosions that produce significant yield under asymmetric drives. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697262.

  5. Analysis of a High-Adiabat Cryogenic Implosion on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, A. R.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; Forrest, C. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Radha, P. B.; Howard, J.

    2014-10-01

    The performance of high-adiabat implosions >~ 10 is marginally affected by nonuniformities because of the strong ablative stabilization. To test the validity of the one-dimensional (1-D) physics included in existing hydrocodes, a study of high-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions is carried out by comparing the results of 1-D simulations with several measured quantities. It is found that after including nonlocal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and hot electrons, 1-D simulations reproduce most of the observables with reasonable accuracy. Since the analysis is applied to the only high-adiabat DT implosion fielded on OMEGA, these results do not fully validate the 1-D physics of current hydrocodes. However, this work shows the framework for establishing a validation capability of the 1-D physics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  6. Fuel gain exceeding unity in an inertially confined fusion implosion.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kline, J L; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R

    2014-02-20

    Ignition is needed to make fusion energy a viable alternative energy source, but has yet to be achieved. A key step on the way to ignition is to have the energy generated through fusion reactions in an inertially confined fusion plasma exceed the amount of energy deposited into the deuterium-tritium fusion fuel and hotspot during the implosion process, resulting in a fuel gain greater than unity. Here we report the achievement of fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the US National Ignition Facility using a 'high-foot' implosion method, which is a manipulation of the laser pulse shape in a way that reduces instability in the implosion. These experiments show an order-of-magnitude improvement in yield performance over past deuterium-tritium implosion experiments. We also see a significant contribution to the yield from α-particle self-heating and evidence for the 'bootstrapping' required to accelerate the deuterium-tritium fusion burn to eventually 'run away' and ignite.

  7. A study on cavity collapse for utilizing green implosion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunhee; Gojani, Ardian; Han, Tae-Hee; Yoh, Jack

    2009-06-01

    The mechanical energy generated by laser-induced implosion and the dynamics between non-condensable gas and liquid are studied experimentally and numerically. We have designed a micro implosion piston (MIP) to utilize the energy of implosion for inducing a piston motion. The MIP has the shape of a cone and is filled with liquid at room temperature and a high pressure (˜ 6 bars). Focusing of a high power laser pulse inside the MIP leads to creation of several bubbles that expand and collapse with successive rebounds. The bubble-liquid interaction develops a micro- jet that destroys the symmetry of the bubble. This bubble implosion motion, induced by the pressure gradient across the cavity wall produces high pressures wave within a few nanoseconds. These pressure waves are affected by different conditions such as the distance between the bubble and piston head, the dimension of the MIP, and the pressure at which the MIP is driven. The radius of the bubble is measured by double exposure photography, while pressure histories are measured by hydrophones. We investigate the relationship between the radius of the bubble, the overpressure of the secondary shock wave and the motion of the micro piston, and compare it to numerical simulations. The aim is to reach a state inside the MIP that would cause a sustainable and efficient motion of piston through cavity collapse induced high pressure pulses.

  8. Diagnosing implosion velocity and ablator dynamics at NIF (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Anna; Grim, Gary; Jungnam, Jerry; Bradley, Paul; Rundberg, Bob; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Wilson, Doug

    2009-07-09

    An enhanced understanding of the unique physics probed in a burning NIP capsule is important for both nuclear weapons physics and thermonuclear ignition. In this talk we introduce a new diagnostic idea, designed to measure dynamic aspects of the capsule implosion that are not currently accessible. The current set of diagnostics for the NIF experiments includes reaction history (a time resolved measure of the d + t burn), neutron time-of-flight and spectrometry and spatial imaging of the neutron production and scattering. Although valuable, this abbreviated set of diagnostics cannot determine key dynamical properties of the implosion, such as implosion velocity (v{sub impl}) and ablator thickness. To surpass the present limits of {approx} 10{sup 15} d+t reactions, it will be necessary to increase significantly the implosion energy delivered to the DT fuel by finely tuning the balance between the remaining (imploding) ablator mass and velocity. If too much mass remains, the implosion velocity will be too slow, and the subsecpwnt PdV work will not be sufficient to overcome cooling via conduction and radiation. If too little mass remains, hydrodynamic instabilities will occur, resulting in unpredictable and degraded performance. Detailed calculations suggest the ablator must reach an implosion velocity of 3-4 x 10{sup 7} cm/sec and an areal density of {rho}{Delta}R {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2} in order to achieve ignition. The authors present a new scheme to measure these important quantities using neutron reactions on the ablator material. During the burn, the ablator is moving relative to the 14.1 MeV d+t neutrons that are traversing the capsule. The resulting neutron-ablator Doppler shift causes a few unique nuclear reactions to become sensitive detectors of the ablator velocity at peak burn time. The 'point-design' capsule at the NIF will be based on a {sup 9}Be ablator, and the {sup 9}Be(n,p){sup 9}Li reaction has an energy threshold of 14.2 MeV, making it the ideal

  9. Cryogneic-Target Performance and Implosion Physics Studies on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Hu, S.X.; Knauer, J.P.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, R.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    2009-03-06

    Recent progress in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reviewed. Ignition-relevant areal densities of ~200 mg/cm^2 in cryogenic D2 implosions with peak laser-drive intensities of ~5 x 10^14 W/cm^2 were previously reported [T. C. Sangster et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 185006 (2008)]. The laser intensity is increased to ~10^15 W/cm^2 to demonstrate ignition-relevant implosion velocities of 3–4 x 10^7 cm/ s, providing an understanding of the relevant target physics. Planar-target acceleration experiments show the importance of the nonlocal electron-thermal-transport effects for modeling the laser drive. Nonlocal and hot-electron preheat is observed to stabilize the Rayleigh–Taylor growth at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2. The shell preheat caused by hot electrons generated by two-plasmon-decay instability was reduced by using Si-doped ablators. The measured compressibility of planar plastic targets driven with high-compression shaped pulses agrees well with one-dimensional simulations at these intensities. Shock mistiming has contributed to compression degradation of recent cryogenic implosions driven with continuous pulses. Multiple-picket (shock-wave) target designs make it possible for a more robust tuning of the shock-wave arrival times. Cryogenic implosions driven with double-picket pulses demonstrate somewhat improved compression performance at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2.

  10. The implosion of the Calgary General Hospital: ambient air quality issues.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Dennis; Wardman, Dennis; Lambert, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the implosion of a large inner-city hospital in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on October 4, 1998. Stationary and mobile air monitoring conducted after the implosion indicated there were several short-term air quality issues, including significant temporal increases in total suspended particles, particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10), PM with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microm (PM2.5), asbestos, and airborne and settled lead. In addition, the implosion created a dust cloud that traveled much further than expected, out to 20 km. The ability of an implosion to effectively aerosolize building materials requires the removal of all friable and nonfriable forms of asbestos and all Pb-containing painted surfaces during pre-implosion preparatory work. Public advisories to mitigate personal exposure and indoor migration of the implosion dust cloud constituents should extend to 10 or 20 km around an implosion site. These findings point to a number of complex and problematic issues regarding implosions and safeguarding human health and suggest that implosions in metropolitan areas should be prohibited. Further work to characterize the public health risks of conventional versus implosion demolition is recommended.

  11. Backlighting Direct-Drive Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray backlighting has been frequently used to measure the in-flight characteristics of an imploding shell in both direct- and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. These measurements provide unique insight into the early time and stagnation stages of an implosion and guide the modeling efforts to improve the target designs. Backlighting a layered DT implosion on OMEGA is a particular challenge because the opacity of the DT shell is low, the shell velocity is high, the size and wall thickness of the shell is small, and the self-emission from the hot core at the onset of burn is exceedingly bright. A framing-camera-based crystal imaging system with a Si Heα backlighter at 1.865keV driven by 10-ps short pulses from OMEGA EP was developed to meet these radiography challenges. A fast target inserter was developed to accurately place the Si backlighter foil at a distance of 5 mm to the implosion target following the removal of the cryogenic shroud and an ultra-stable triggering system was implemented to reliably trigger the framing camera coincident with the arrival of the OMEGA EP pulse. This talk will report on a series of implosions in which the DT shell is imaged for a range of convergence ratios and in-flight aspect ratios. The images acquired have been analyzed for low-mode shape variations, the DT shell thickness, the level of ablator mixing into the DT fuel (even 0.1% of carbon mix can be reliably inferred), the areal density of the DT shell, and the impact of the support stalk. The measured implosion performance will be compared with hydrodynamic simulations that include imprint (up to mode 200), cross-beam energy transfer, nonlocal thermal transport, and initial low-mode perturbations such as power imbalance and target misalignment. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. Capsule implosions driven by dynamic hohlraum x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic hohlraum experiments at the Z facility already implode capsules with up to 80 kJ absorbed x-ray energy. However, many challenging issues remain for ICF. The present experiments use diagnostic capsules to address two of these issues: symmetry measurement and control and building understanding of the capsule/hohlraum implosion system. A suite of x-ray spectrometers record time and space resolved spectra emitted by Ar tracer atoms in the implosion core, simultaneously from up to three different quasi-orthogonal directions. Comparing the results with simulation predictions provide severe tests of understanding. These data also can used to produce a tomographic reconstruction of the time resolved core temperature and density profiles. X-ray and neutron diagnostics are used to examine how the implosion conditions change as the capsule design changes. The capsule design changes include variations in CH wall thickness and diameter, Ge-doped CH shells, and SiO2 shells. In addition, a new campaign investigating Be capsule implosions is beginning. Be capsules may offer superior performance for dynamic hohlraum research and it may be possible to investigate NIF-relevant Be implosion issues such as the fill tube effects, sensitivity to columnar growth associated with sputtered Be capsule fabrication, and the effect of Cu dopants on implosion conditions. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. * In collaboration with G.A. Rochau, G.A. Chandler, S.A. Slutz, P.W. Lake, G. Cooper, G.S. Dunham, R.J. Leeper, R. Lemke, T.A. Mehlhorn, T.J. Nash, D.S. Nielsen, K. Peterson, C.L. Ruiz, D.B. Sinars, J. Torres, W. Varnum, Sandia; R.C. Mancini, T.J. Buris-Mog, UNR; I. Golovkin, J.J. MacFarlane, PRISM; A. Nikro, D. Steinman, J.D. Kilkenny, H. Xu, General Atomics; M. Bump, T.C. Moore, K-tech; D.G. Schroen, Schafer

  13. Implosion and burn of fast ignition capsules-Calculations with HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, H. D.; Amendt, P.; Clark, D.; Ho, D.; Key, M.; Koning, J.; Marinak, M.; Strozzi, D.; Tabak, M.

    2012-09-15

    We present a methodology for conducting the design calculations for fast ignition indirect-drive implosions with an embedded cone for introducing a second laser beam to ignite the compressed fuel. These calculations are tuned to achieve several design goals. We demonstrate a major feature of the implosion simulations, the lagging of the implosions along the cone. Possible avenues for enhancing the coupling of the fast electrons to the dense compressed DT fuel are discussed.

  14. Changes of implosion dynamics derived by difference of equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.; Nagatomo, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate an implosion dynamics with different equation-of-state (EOS) models in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), we compare two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulation with QEOS, ideal gas EOS, and SESAME. The maximum density achieved during the implosion for the ideal gas EOS is higher than that for the QEOS. The sound velocity for the SESAME is faster than that for the QEOS. These results indicated that the EOS models affect the implosion dynamics in ICF.

  15. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; DEENEY,CHRISTOPHER; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; COVERDALE,CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK,N.F.; HAINES,M.G.

    1999-11-05

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment.

  16. Spectroscopic determination of dynamic plasma gradients in implosion cores.

    PubMed

    Golovkin, I; Mancini, R; Louis, S; Ochi, Y; Fujita, K; Nishimura, H; Shirga, H; Miyanaga, N; Azechi, H; Butzbach, R; Uschmann, I; Förster, E; Delettrez, J; Koch, J; Lee, R W; Klein, L

    2002-01-28

    The time-dependent gradient structure of a laser-compressed, high-energy-density plasma has been determined using a method based on the simultaneous analysis of time-resolved x-ray monochromatic images and x-ray line spectra from Ar-doped D2 implosion cores. The analysis self-consistently determines the temperature and density gradients that yield the best fits to the spatial-emissivity profiles and spectral line shapes. This measurement is important for understanding the spectra formation and plasma dynamics associated with the implosion process. In addition, since the results are independent of hydrodynamic simulations, they are also important for comparison with fluid-dynamic models.

  17. Proton Radiography of a Laser-Driven Implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hey, D.; Hicks, D. G.; Key, M. H.; Phillips, T. W.; Snavely, R. A.; Town, R. P. J.; Borghesi, M.; Kar, S.; Romagnani, L.; Clarke, R. C.; Freeman, R. R.; Habara, H.; Lancaster, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P. A.; Notley, M. M.; King, J. A.

    2006-07-28

    Protons accelerated by a picosecond laser pulse have been used to radiograph a 500 {mu}m diameter capsule, imploded with 300 J of laser light in 6 symmetrically incident beams of wavelength 1.054 {mu}m and pulse length 1 ns. Point projection proton backlighting was used to characterize the density gradients at discrete times through the implosion. Asymmetries were diagnosed both during the early and stagnation stages of the implosion. Comparison with analytic scattering theory and simple Monte Carlo simulations were consistent with a 3{+-}1 g/cm{sup 3} core with diameter 85{+-}10 {mu}m. Scaling simulations show that protons >50 MeV are required to diagnose asymmetry in ignition scale conditions.

  18. Influence and measurement of mass ablation in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spears, B.; Hicks, D.; Velsko, C.; Stoyer, M.; Robey, H.; Munro, D.; Haan, S.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Huang, H.

    2008-05-01

    Point design ignition capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently use an xray-driven Be(Cu) ablator to compress the DT fuel. Ignition specifications require that the mass of unablated Be(Cu), called residual mass, be known to within 1% of the initial ablator mass. The specifications also require that the implosion bang time, a surrogate measurement for implosion velocity, be known to 50 ps RMS. Experiments designed to measure and to tune experimentally the amount of residual mass are being developed as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). Tuning adjustments of the residual mass and peak velocity can be achieved using capsule and laser parameters. We currently plan to measure the residual mass using streaked radiographic imaging of surrogate tuning capsules. This technique, together with bang time measurements, should allow us to tune ignition capsules to meet NIC specs.

  19. Instabilities in foil implosions and the effect of radiation output

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Peterson, D.L.; Goforth, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    One of the aims of the Athena program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is the generation of a high fluence of soft x-rays from the thermalization of an radially imploding foil. In the experiments in Athena program, a large axial current is passed through a cylindrical aluminum foil. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resulting plasma accelerates toward the axis, thermalizes, and produces a fast soft x-ray pulse with a blackbody temperature up to several hundred electron volts. In order that there be the maximum power compression and the highest x-ray fluence and temperature, the plasma stagnation on axis must occur very promptly. This requires that the imploding plasma be as thin and symmetric as possible. A serious problem in the thermalization process is the formation of instabilities in the plasma due to the self-magnetic field that governs the implosion of foil. A large diagnostic effort was developed to capture the details of the implosion and instability growth in several foil implosion experiments. In this report, we will present visible light images and x-ray data designed to study the effects of foil mass, current, and initial perturbations on the instability growth during foil implosion. Representative data is presented from several experiments using the Pegasus capacitor bank system and the explosively driven Procyon system. These experiments are labeled Peg 25 and Peg 33 for the Pegasus experiments and PDD1, PDD2 and PRF0 for the Procyon experiments. In these experiments, all foils had radii of 5 centimeters but varied in mass and initial conditions. Experimental data from several shots were compared with each other and to a radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) computation and described in a separate paper.

  20. Arcade Implosion Caused by a Filament Eruption in a Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juntao; Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Thalmann, J. K.; Hudson, H. S.; Hannah, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    Coronal implosions—the convergence motion of plasmas and entrained magnetic field in the corona due to a reduction in magnetic pressure—can help to locate and track sites of magnetic energy release or redistribution during solar flares and eruptions. We report here on the analysis of a well-observed implosion in the form of an arcade contraction associated with a filament eruption, during the C3.5 flare SOL2013-06-19T07:29. A sequence of events including the magnetic flux-rope instability and distortion, followed by a filament eruption and arcade implosion, lead us to conclude that the implosion arises from the transfer of magnetic energy from beneath the arcade as part of the global magnetic instability, rather than due to local magnetic energy dissipation in the flare. The observed net contraction of the imploding loops, which is found also in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations, reflects a permanent reduction of magnetic energy underneath the arcade. This event shows that, in addition to resulting in the expansion or eruption of an overlying field, flux-rope instability can also simultaneously implode an unopened field due to magnetic energy transfer. It demonstrates the “partial opening of the field” scenario, which is one of the ways in 3D to produce a magnetic eruption without violating the Aly-Sturrock hypothesis. In the framework of this observation, we also propose a unification of three main concepts for active region magnetic evolution, namely the metastable eruption model, the implosion conjecture, and the standard “CSHKP” flare model.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of the HT and DT fusion burn histories in inertial fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hale, G.; Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the thermonuclear burn history is an important way to diagnose inertial fusion implosions. Using the gas Cherenkov detectors at the OMEGA laser facility, we measure the HT fusion burn in a H2+T2 gas-fueled implosion for the first time. Using multiple detectors with varied Cherenkov thresholds, we demonstrate a technique for simultaneously measuring both the HT and DT burn histories from an implosion where the total reaction yields are comparable. This new technique will be used to study material mixing and kinetic phenomena in implosions.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of the HT and DT fusion burn histories in inertial fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, Alex B.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Yong Ho; ...

    2017-05-23

    Measuring the thermonuclear burn history is an important way to diagnose inertial fusion implosions. Here, using the gas Cherenkov detectors at the OMEGA laser facility, we measure the HT fusion burn in a H2+T2 gas-fueled implosion for the first time. Then, using multiple detectors with varied Cherenkov thresholds, we demonstrate a technique for simultaneously measuring both the HT and DT burn histories from an implosion where the total reaction yields are comparable. This new technique will be used to study material mixing and kinetic phenomena in implosions.

  3. Influence and measurement of mass ablation in ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, B K; Hicks, D; Velsko, C; Stoyer, M; Robey, H; Munro, D; Haan, S; Landen, O; Nikroo, A; Huang, H

    2007-09-05

    Point design ignition capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently use an x-ray-driven Be(Cu) ablator to compress the DT fuel. Ignition specifications require that the mass of unablated Be(Cu), called residual mass, be known to within 1% of the initial ablator mass when the fuel reaches peak velocity. The specifications also require that the implosion bang time, a surrogate measurement for implosion velocity, be known to +/- 50 ps RMS. These specifications guard against several capsule failure modes associated with low implosion velocity or low residual mass. Experiments designed to measure and to tune experimentally the amount of residual mass are being developed as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). Tuning adjustments of the residual mass and peak velocity can be achieved using capsule and laser parameters. We currently plan to measure the residual mass using streaked radiographic imaging of surrogate tuning capsules. Alternative techniques to measure residual mass using activated Cu debris collection and proton spectrometry have also been developed. These developing techniques, together with bang time measurements, will allow us to tune ignition capsules to meet NIC specs.

  4. Hot spot mix in ICF implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tammy

    2016-10-01

    In the quest to achieve ignition through the inertial confinement fusion scheme, one of the critical challenges is to drive a symmetric implosion at high velocity without hydrodynamic instabilities becoming detrimental. These instabilities, primarily at the ablation front and the fuel-ablator interface, can cause mix of the higher-Z shell into the hot spot, resulting in increased radiation loss and thus reduced temperature and neutron yield. To quantify the level of mix, we developed a model that infers the level of hot spot contamination using the ratio of the enhanced x-ray production relative to the neutron yield. Applying this methodology to the full ensemble of indirect-drive National Ignition Facility (NIF) cryogenically layered DT implosions provides insight on the sensitivity of performance to the level of ablator-hot spot mix. In particular, the improvement seen with the High Foot design can be primarily attributed to a reduction in ablation-front instability mix that enabled the implosions to be pushed to higher velocity and performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  5. Kinetic Effects at Material Interfaces in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, S. C.; Cabot, W.; Whitley, H.; Greenough, J.; Cohen, B. I.; Belof, J.; Zimmerman, G.; Amendt, P. A.; Lepape, S.; Divol, L.; Dimits, A.; Graziani, F.; Molvig, K.; Dodd, E.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Laffite, S.; Larroche, O.; Casanova, M.; Masse, L.

    2014-10-01

    The mixing of materials at an interface during an ICF implosion, for example the DT- Carbon interface in an ICF capsule, is a complex process. In general, rad-hydro codes do an excellent job of modeling the important processes during an ICF implosion. However, there are certain times during the implosion when kinetic effects of the ions may play a role in how two materials mix across the interface between them, even in the absence of shocks moving through them. The Knudsen layer effect is one such example. We will describe results of multi-ion species hybrid LSP simulations where the ions are treated kinetically and the electrons are treated as a fluid. We observe that the DT and carbon ions diffuse across the interface in a self-similar manner, at a rate proportional to the square root of time, in agreement with diffusion theory. The resulting ion distributions for each species (on both sides of the interface) will be presented, and the result of this mixing on the yield will be discussed for ICF capsules. Preliminary results of a related mixing that occurs at the gas-hohlraum wall interface will also be presented. Performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL, Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNS, LLC.

  6. Mix Model Comparison of Low Feed-Through Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Jesse; MacLaren, S.; Greenough, J.; Casey, D.; Dewald, E.; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J.; Smalyuk, V.; Tipton, R.; Kyrala, G.

    2016-10-01

    The CD Mix campaign previously demonstrated the use of nuclear diagnostics to study the mix of separated reactants in plastic capsule implosions at the NIF. Recently, the separated reactants technique has been applied to the Two Shock (TS) implosion platform, which is designed to minimize this feed-through and isolate local mix at the gas-ablator interface and produce core yields in good agreement with 1D clean simulations. The effects of both inner surface roughness and convergence ratio have been probed. The TT, DT, and DD neutron signals respectively give information about core gas performance, gas-shell atomic mix, and heating of the shell. In this talk, we describe efforts to model these implosions using high-resolution 2D ARES simulations. Various methods of interfacial mix will be considered, including the Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) KL method as well as and a multicomponent enhanced diffusivity model with species, thermal, and pressure gradient terms. We also give predictions of a upcoming campaign to investigate Mid-Z mixing by adding a Ge dopant to the CD layer. LLNL-ABS-697251 This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Modeling of Low Feed-Through CD Mix Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Jesse; MacLaren, Steven; Greenough, Jeff; Casey, Daniel; Dittrich, Tom; Kahn, Shahab; Kyrala, George; Ma, Tammy; Salmonson, Jay; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Tipton, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The CD Mix campaign previously demonstrated the use of nuclear diagnostics to study the mix of separated reactants in plastic capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility. However, the previous implosions suffered from large instability growth seeded from perturbations on the outside of the capsule. Recently, the separated reactants technique has been applied to two platforms designed to minimize this feed-through and isolate local mix at the gas-ablator interface: the Two Shock (TS) and Adiabat-Shaped (AS) Platforms. Additionally, the background contamination of Deuterium in the gas has been greatly reduced, allowing for simultaneous observation of TT, DT, and DD neutrons, which respectively give information about core gas performance, gas-shell atomic mix, and heating of the shell. In this talk, we describe efforts to model these implosions using high-resolution 2D ARES simulations with both a Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes method and an enhanced diffusivity model. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-674867.

  8. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Zhang, S. Q. Dan, J. K. Li, J. Cai, H. C. Wang, K. L. Ouyang, K. Xu, Q. Duan, S. C. Chen, G. H. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  9. A New Theory of Mix in Omega Capsule Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Dana; Chacon, Luis; Rauenzahn, Rick; Simakov, Andrei; Taitano, William; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie

    2014-10-01

    We put forth a new mix model that relies on the development of a charge-separation electrostatic double-layer at the fuel-pusher interface early in the implosion of an Omega plastic ablator capsule. The model predicts a sizable pusher mix (several atom %) into the fuel. The expected magnitude of the double-layer field is consistent with recent radial electric field measurements in Omega plastic ablator implosions. Our theory relies on two distinct physics mechanisms. First, and prior to shock breakout, the formation of a double layer at the fuel-pusher interface due to fast preheat-driven ionization. The double-layer electric field structure accelerates pusher ions fairly deep into the fuel. Second, after the double-layer mix has occurred, the inward-directed fuel velocity and temperature gradients behind the converging shock transports these pusher ions inward. We first discuss the foundations of this new mix theory. Next, we discuss our interpretation of the radial electric field measurements on Omega implosions. Then we discuss the second mechanism that is responsible for transporting the pusher material, already mixed via the double-layer deep into the fuel, on the shock convergence time scale. Finally we make a connection to recent mix motivated experimental data on. This work conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory, managed by LANS, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  10. Kr X-ray spectroscopy to diagnose NIF ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, A.; Ouart, N.; Giuliani, J. L.; Clark, R. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Scott, H. A.; Chen, H.; Ma, T.; Apruzese, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    X ray spectroscopy is used on the NIF to diagnose the plasma conditions in the ignition target in indirect drive ICF implosions. High-energy emission spectra from mid to high atomic number elements can provide estimates of electron temperature near stagnation of an ICF implosion. A platform is being developed at NIF where small traces of krypton are used as a dopant to the fuel gas for spectroscopic diagnostics using krypton line emissions. The fraction of krypton dopant was varied in the experiments and was selected so as not to perturb the implosion. Simulations of the krypton spectra using a 1 in 104 atomic fraction of krypton in direct-drive exploding pusher with a range of electron temperatures and densities show discrepancies when different atomic models are used. We use our non-LTE atomic model with a detailed fine-structure level atomic structure and collisional-radiative rates to investigate the krypton spectra at the same conditions. Synthetic spectra are generated with a detailed multi-frequency radiation transport scheme from the emission regions of interest to analyze the experimental data and compare and contrast with the existing simulations at LLNL. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under Contract # DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2011-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on OMEGA have revealed the importance of crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET), which is caused by stimulated Brillouin scattering. The CBET reduces the laser absorption in a target corona by ~10% to 20% and, therefore, decreases the implosion performance. The signature of CBET is observed in time-resolved, reflected-light spectra as a suppression of red-shifted light during the main laser pulse. Simulations without CBET typically predict an earlier bang time and overestimate the laser absorption in high-compression, low-adiabat implosions. Simulations using a CBET model and a nonlocal heat-transport model explain well the scattered-light and bang-timing measurements. This talk will summarize the possible mitigation strategies for CBET required for robust ignition designs. CBET most effectively scatters incoming light that interacts with outgoing light originated from laser beam edges. This makes it possible to mitigate CBET by reducing the beam diameter with respect to the target diameter. Implosion experiments using large 1400- μm-diam plastic shells and in-focus and defocus laser beams have demonstrated the reduction of CBET in implosions with a smaller ratio of the beam-to-target diameters. Simulations predict the optimum range of this ratio to be 0.7 to 0.8. Another mitigation strategy involves splitting the incident light into two or more colors. This reduces CBET by shifting and suppressing the coupling resonances. The reduction in scattered light caused by CBET is predicted to be up to a factor of 2 when incident light colors are separated by δλ > 6 Ã. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. H. Froula, V. N. Goncharov, R. S. Craxton, R. L. McCrory, A. V. Maximov, D. D. Meyerhofer, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl. I. V. Igumenshchevet

  12. In-flight observations of low-mode ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; ...

    2015-05-01

    Charged-particle spectroscopy is used to assess implosion symmetry in ignition-scale indirect-drive implosions for the first time. Surrogate D3He gas-filled implosions at the National Ignition Facility produce energetic protons via D+3He fusion that are used to measure the implosion areal density (ρR) at the shock-bang time. By using protons produced several hundred ps before the main compression bang, the implosion is diagnosed in-flight at a convergence ratio of 3-5 just prior to peak velocity. This isolates acceleration-phase asymmetry growth. For many surrogate implosions, proton spectrometers placed at the north pole and equator reveal significant asymmetries with amplitudes routinely ≳10%, which aremore » interpreted as l=2 Legendre modes. With significant expected growth by stagnation, it is likely that these asymmetries would degrade the final implosion performance. X-ray self-emission images at stagnation show asymmetries that are positively correlated with the observed in-flight asymmetries and comparable in magnitude, contradicting growth models; this suggests that the hot-spot shape does not reflect the stagnated shell shape or that significant residual kinetic energy exists at stagnation. More prolate implosions are observed when the laser drive is sustained (“no-coast”), implying a significant time-dependent asymmetry in peak drive.« less

  13. In-flight observations of low-mode ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B. Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Kritcher, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Meezan, N. B.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; Bell, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Charged-particle spectroscopy is used to assess implosion symmetry in ignition-scale indirect-drive implosions for the first time. Surrogate D{sup 3}He gas-filled implosions at the National Ignition Facility produce energetic protons via D+{sup 3}He fusion that are used to measure the implosion areal density (ρR) at the shock-bang time. By using protons produced several hundred ps before the main compression bang, the implosion is diagnosed in-flight at a convergence ratio of 3–5 just prior to peak velocity. This isolates acceleration-phase asymmetry growth. For many surrogate implosions, proton spectrometers placed at the north pole and equator reveal significant asymmetries with amplitudes routinely ≳10%, which are interpreted as ℓ=2 Legendre modes. With significant expected growth by stagnation, it is likely that these asymmetries would degrade the final implosion performance. X-ray self-emission images at stagnation show asymmetries that are positively correlated with the observed in-flight asymmetries and comparable in magnitude, contradicting growth models; this suggests that the hot-spot shape does not reflect the stagnated shell shape or that significant residual kinetic energy exists at stagnation. More prolate implosions are observed when the laser drive is sustained (“no-coast”), implying a significant time-dependent asymmetry in peak drive.

  14. In-flight observations of low-mode ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rygg, J. R.; Kritcher, A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hicks, D. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Meezan, N. B.; Olson, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; Bell, P.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D.; Collins, G.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S.; Doppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Grim, G.; Hatchett, S.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O.; LePape, S.; Li, C. K.; Lindl, J.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Meyerhofer, D.; Moses, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Pak, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Sangster, T. C.; Sepke, S.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Spears, B.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Weber, S.; Wilson, D.; Yeamans, C.; Zacharias, R.

    2015-05-01

    Charged-particle spectroscopy is used to assess implosion symmetry in ignition-scale indirect-drive implosions for the first time. Surrogate D3He gas-filled implosions at the National Ignition Facility produce energetic protons via D+3He fusion that are used to measure the implosion areal density (ρR) at the shock-bang time. By using protons produced several hundred ps before the main compression bang, the implosion is diagnosed in-flight at a convergence ratio of 3-5 just prior to peak velocity. This isolates acceleration-phase asymmetry growth. For many surrogate implosions, proton spectrometers placed at the north pole and equator reveal significant asymmetries with amplitudes routinely ≳10%, which are interpreted as l=2 Legendre modes. With significant expected growth by stagnation, it is likely that these asymmetries would degrade the final implosion performance. X-ray self-emission images at stagnation show asymmetries that are positively correlated with the observed in-flight asymmetries and comparable in magnitude, contradicting growth models; this suggests that the hot-spot shape does not reflect the stagnated shell shape or that significant residual kinetic energy exists at stagnation. More prolate implosions are observed when the laser drive is sustained (“no-coast”), implying a significant time-dependent asymmetry in peak drive.

  15. Experimental Results from SHIVA Star Vacuum Inductive Store/Plasma Flow Switch Driven Implosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    energy density plasmas and intense radiation pulses1• In 1976-1978, we achieved direct capacitor drive, 1.0 to 1.5 ~s implosions of aluminum and...early 1970’s, the Air Force Weapons Laboratory has been investigating the electromagnetic implosion of cylindrical plasma liners to produce high

  16. Observation of high temperature plasma in nickel wire array implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeney, C.; Nash, T.; LePell, P. D.; Childers, K.; Krishnan, M.

    1989-12-01

    Time- and space-resolved filtered pinhole photography and crystal X-ray spectroscopy have been used to diagnose K-shell emission from nickel wire array implosions on the DNA/Double-EAGLE 6TW generator. In this paper, results are presented which show electron beam induced Ni Kα emission prior to and during a rapid localized heating of the plasma and the formation of intense hot spots. The observation of hydrogen-like nickel lines from the hot spots is indicative of multi-keV electron temperatures.

  17. Understanding the stagnation and burn of implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, J. D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Yeamans, C. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Divol, L.; Eckart, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Herrmann, H. W.; Le Pape, S.; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    An improved the set of nuclear diagnostics on NIF measures the properties of the stagnation plasma of implosions, including the drift velocity, areal density (ρr) anisotropy and carbon ρr of the compressed core. Two types of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas filled targets are imploded by shaped x-ray pulses, producing stagnated and burning DT cores of radial convergence (Cr) ∼ 5 or ∼20. Comparison with two-dimensional modeling with inner and outer surface mix shows good agreement with nuclear measurements.

  18. Develop and Perform Experiments for High Energy Density Implosion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-20

    high energy density plasma implosion systems. In the area of laser-guided discharges the following tasks have been accomplished: a preliminary analysis of the laser-aerosol-air interactions, which are responsible for initiating laser breakdown, has been performed; and a detailed air chemistry code, CHMAIR, has been developed to follow the evolution of air plasmas created by CO2 lasers and other heating or ionization sources to determine their temperature and chemical composition. Simple hydrodynamic calculations have been performed to predict channel

  19. ARES Modeling of High-foot Implosions (NNSA Milestone #5466)

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-10-11

    ARES “capsule only” simulations demonstrated results of applying an ASC code to a suite of high-foot ICF implosion experiments. While a capability to apply an asymmetric FDS drive to the capsule-only model using add-on Python routines exists, it was not exercised here. The ARES simulation results resemble the results from HYDRA simulations documented in A. Kritcher, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 23, 052709 (2016); namely, 1D simulation and data are in reasonable agreement for the lowest velocity experiments, but diverge from each other at higher velocities.

  20. Alternate Implosion Models for the Plane Parallel Diode.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-02

    manifested solely as a diminished voltage on the plasma load and the energy delivered is simply ftdt (IplasmaV gen ). Here only the plasma current...8i89 UNCLSSIFIED F/G 1211 N EohhEEmoEmoiI 1.2 1. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963- A DNA 6153F ALTERNATE IMPLOSION...imploding Z-pinch plasmas in a plane parallel diode is modeled in two ways through the computer code ZDIPR, described here. The first consists in a

  1. Influence of atomic processes on the implosion of plasma liners

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyoungkeun; Zhang Lina; Samulyak, Roman; Parks, Paul

    2012-08-15

    The influence of atomic physics processes on the implosion of plasma liners for magneto-inertial nuclear fusion has been investigated numerically by using the method of front tracking in spherically symmetric geometry and equation of state models accounting for dissociation and ionization. Simulation studies of the self-collapse of argon liners to be used in the Los Alamos Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) program have been performed as well as studies of implosion of deuterium and argon liners on plasma targets. Results show that atomic processes in converging liners reduce the temperature of liners and increase the Mach number that results in the increase of the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain. For deuterium and argon liners imploding on plasma targets, dissociation and ionization increased the stagnation pressure and the fusion energy gain by the factor of 1.5 (deuterium) and 2 (argon) correspondingly. Similarly, ionization during the self-collapse of argon liners leads to approximately doubling of the Mach number and the stagnation pressure. The influence of the longitudinal density spread of the liner has also been investigated. The self-collapse stagnation pressure decreased by the factor of 8.7 when the initial position of the liner was shifted from the merging radius (33 cm) to the PLX chamber edge (137.2 cm). Simulations with and without the heat conduction demonstrated that the heat conduction has negligible effect on the self-collapse pressure of argon liners.

  2. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-10-14

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems for ICF targets are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel. The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system, or by an ion beam system, that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion. 3 figs.

  3. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  4. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOEpatents

    Mark, James W.

    1988-08-02

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  5. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Cerjan, C. J.; Batha, S. H.

    2015-08-01

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  6. Implosion of Cylindrical Cavities via Short Duration Impulsive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Higgins, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    An apparatus has been developed to study the collapse of a cylindrical cavity in gelatin subjected to a symmetric impact-driven impulsive loading. A gas-driven annular projectile is accelerated to approximately 50 m/s, at which point it impacts a gelatin casting confined by curved steel surfaces that allow a transition from an annular geometry to a cylindrically imploding motion. The implosion is visualized by a high-speed camera through a window which forms the top confining wall of the implosion cavity. The initial size of the cavity is such that the gelatin wall is two to five times thicker than the impacting projectile. Thus, during impact the compression wave which travels towards the cavity is closely followed by a rarefaction resulting from the free surface reflection of the compression wave in the projectile. As the compression wave in the gelatin reaches the inner surface, it will also reflect as a rarefaction wave. The interaction between the rarefaction waves from the gelatin and projectile free surfaces leads to large tensile stresses resulting in the spallation of a relatively thin shell. The study focuses on the effect of impact parameters on the thickness and uniformity of the imploding shell formed by the cavitation in the imploding gelatin cylinder.

  7. Implosion Robustness, Time-Dependent Flux Asymmetries and Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Field, J. E.; Spears, B. K.; Brandon, S. T.; Gaffney, J. A.; Hammer, J.; Kritcher, A.; Nora, R. C.; Springer, P. T.

    2015-11-01

    Both direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion rely on the formation of spherical implosions, which can be a challenge under temporal and spatial drive variations (either from discrete laser beams, a complex hohlraum radiation environment, or both). To that end, we examine the use of large simulation databases of 2D capsule implosions to determine the sensitivity of indirectly driven NIF designs to time-varying low-mode radiation drive asymmetries at varying convergence ratios. In particular, we define and calculate a large number of extensive quantities for the simulations within the database and compare with the equivalent quantities extracted from fully 3D simulations and those used in 1D hydrodynamic models. Additionally, we discuss some of the practical challenges of searching for physical insight in multi-petabyte datasets. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-674884.

  8. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, B. Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Cerjan, C. J.

    2015-08-15

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  9. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  10. Development of an accelerating piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, J.; Loiseau, J.; Higgins, A. J.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest for a number of scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. In the implosion-driven launcher (ILD) concept, explosives are used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures than the propellant of conventional light-gas guns. The propellant of the IDL is compressed through the linear implosion of a pressurized tube. The imploding tube behaves like a piston which travels into the light gas at the explosive detonation velocity, thus forming an increasingly long column of shock-compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill designed IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This work will focus on the implementation of a novel launch cycle in which the explosively driven piston is accelerated in order to gradually increase driver gas compression, thus maintaining a relatively constant projectile driving pressure. The theoretical potential of the concept as well as the experimental development of an accelerating piston driver will be examined.

  11. X-ray Spectroscopy of Directly Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, D.; Hooper, C.; Delamater, N.; Barnes, C.; Oertel, J.; Pollak, G.; Tubbs, D.; Watt, R.; Boehly, T.; Bradley, D.; Jaanimagi, P.; Knauer, J.

    1998-11-01

    X-ray spectra from a chlorinated polystyrene marker layer in a series of directly driven cylindrical implosions are presented and analyzed. The 4μm thick, 500μm long C_8H_6Cl2 (1.42g/cc) annular spectroscopic tracer layer is centrally located on the interior surface of the 20μm thick, 2250μm long polystyrene (1.044g/cc) 860μ m inner diameter cylindrical shell. The shell is filled with polystyrene foam (60mg/cc).(Barnes, C. W., et al.) 1998, to be published in Rev. Sci. Instrum., Tubbs, D. L., et al. 1998, to be published in Lasers and Particle Beams The implosions are driven by 50 beams of the OMEGA Laser facility. The temperature and density sensitive K-shell Cl spectra are recorded by a time-resolved spectrograph, and compared to calculated spectra in order to infer the evolution of electron temperature and density in the marker layer.(This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-36)

  12. IMPLOSION OF INDIRECTLY DRIVEN REENTRANT CONE SHELL TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS,RB

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The authors have examined the implosion of an indirectly driven reentrant-cone shell target to clarify the issues attendant on compressing fuel for a fast ignition target. The target design is roughly hydrodynamic equivalent to a NIF cryo-ignition target, but scaled down to be driven by Omega. A sequence of backlit x-radiographs recorded each implosion. The collapse was also modeled with LASNEX, generating simulated radiographs. They compare experimental and simulated diameter, density and symmetry as functions of time near stagnation. The simulations were generally in good agreement with the experiments with respect to the shell, but did not show the opacity due to ablation of gold off the cone; non-thermal gold M-line radiation from the hohlraum wall penetrates the shell and drives this ablation causing some Au to mix into the low density center of the core and into the region between the core and cone. This might be a problem in a cryo-ignition target.

  13. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. A study of CR-39 track response to charged particles from NOVA implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.W.; Cable, M.D.; Hicks, D.G.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    1996-06-14

    We have exposed CR-39 track recording material to a number of NOVA implosions. Radiation from the implosion passed through an array of ranging filters, which aided identification of the incident particles and their energies. The etching procedure was calibrated by including a piece of track exposed to DD protons from a small accelerator. For the same shots, we quantitatively compare the DD neutron yield with the DD proton yield determined from the track. In DT implosions, tracks produced by neutron interactions prevent observation of charged-particle tracks that are produced by the processes of knock-on, secondary or tertiary fusion.

  15. Capsule Ablator Inflight Performance Measurements Via Streaked Radiography Of ICF Implosions On The NIF*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Mackinnon, A.; MacPhee, A.; Meezan, N.; Olson, R.; Hicks, D.; LePape, S.; Izumi, N.; Fournier, K.; Barrios, M. A.; Ross, S.; Pak, A.; Döppner, T.; Kalantar, D.; Opachich, K.; Rygg, R.; Bradley, D.; Bell, P.; Hamza, A.; Dzenitis, B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B.; LaFortune, K.; Widmayer, C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Edwards, M. J.; Atherton, J.; Moses, E. I.

    2016-03-01

    Streaked 1-dimensional (slit imaging) radiography of 1.1 mm radius capsules in ignition hohlraums was recently introduced on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and gives an inflight continuous record of capsule ablator implosion velocities, shell thickness and remaining mass in the last 3-5 ns before peak implosion time. The high quality data delivers good accuracy in implosion metrics that meets our requirements for ignition and agrees with recently introduced 2-dimensional pinhole radiography. Calculations match measured trajectory across various capsule designs and laser drives when the peak laser power is reduced by 20%. Furthermore, calculations matching measured trajectories give also good agreement in ablator shell thickness and remaining mass.

  16. Simulations of fill tube effects on the implosion of high-foot NIF ignition capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. R.; Hurricane, O. A.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Doeppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Harte, J. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kritcher, A. L.; Ma, T.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Parham, T. G.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Weber, C. R.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Encouraging results have been obtained using a strong first shock during the implosion of carbon-based ablator ignition capsules. These “high-foot” implosion results show that capsule performance deviates from 1D expectations as laser power and energy are increased. A possible cause of this deviation is the disruption of the hot spot by jets originating in the capsule fill tube. Nominally, a 10 μm outside diameter glass (SiO2) fill tube is used in these implosions. Simulations indicate that a thin coating of Au on this glass tube may lessen the hotspot disruption. These results and other mitigation strategies will be presented.

  17. Compact wire array sources: power scaling and implosion physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Jones, M. C.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Ivanov, V. V.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Ampleford, David J.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, L. I.; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Vigil, Marcelino Patricio

    2008-09-01

    A series of ten shots were performed on the Saturn generator in short pulse mode in order to study planar and small-diameter cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at {approx}5 MA current levels and 50-60 ns implosion times as candidates for compact z-pinch radiation sources. A new vacuum hohlraum configuration has been proposed in which multiple z pinches are driven in parallel by a pulsed power generator. Each pinch resides in a separate return current cage, serving also as a primary hohlraum. A collection of such radiation sources surround a compact secondary hohlraum, which may potentially provide an attractive Planckian radiation source or house an inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. Prior to studying this concept experimentally or numerically, advanced compact wire array loads must be developed and their scaling behavior understood. The 2008 Saturn planar array experiments extend the data set presented in Ref. [1], which studied planar arrays at {approx}3 MA, 100 ns in Saturn long pulse mode. Planar wire array power and yield scaling studies now include current levels directly applicable to multi-pinch experiments that could be performed on the 25 MA Z machine. A maximum total x-ray power of 15 TW (250 kJ in the main pulse, 330 kJ total yield) was observed with a 12-mm-wide planar array at 5.3 MA, 52 ns. The full data set indicates power scaling that is sub-quadratic with load current, while total and main pulse yields are closer to quadratic; these trends are similar to observations of compact cylindrical tungsten arrays on Z. We continue the investigation of energy coupling in these short pulse Saturn experiments using zero-dimensional-type implosion modeling and pinhole imaging, indicating 16 cm/?s implosion velocity in a 12-mm-wide array. The same phenomena of significant trailing mass and evidence for resistive heating are observed at 5 MA as at 3 MA. 17 kJ of Al K-shell radiation was obtained in one Al planar array fielded at 5.5 MA, 57 ns and we

  18. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Ho; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, P.aul Andrew; Gales, Steve; Horsfield, Colin J.; Rubery, Mike; Leatherland, Alex; Johnson, Maria Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2016-05-26

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). In addition, the fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between the observed neutron yields and those simulated.

  19. Towards an integrated model of the NIC layered implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenzer, S.; Marinak, M.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J.; Olson, R.; Patel, M.; Robey, H.; Sepke, S.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Weber, S.; Wilson, D.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign (NIC) cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. The model adjustments brought much of the simulated data into closer agreement with the experiment, with the notable exception of the measured yields, which were 15-40% of the calculated yields.

  20. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-07-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10`s of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  1. Modeling Z-Pinch implosions in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.; Bowers, R.; Brownell, J.

    1997-12-31

    Ideally, simulations of Z-Pinch implosions should provide useful information about important physics processes underlying observed experimental results and provide design capabilities for future experiments. With this goal the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow Z-Pinches in two dimensions and applied it to experiments conducted on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, the Procyon explosion generator system, and the Saturn and PBFA-Z accelerators. In comparisons with experimental results the simulations have reproduced important features of the current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. Comparison of the instability development in the simulations with visible light framing camera photos has shown a close correlation with the observed instability wavelengths and amplitudes. Using this methodology the authors are analyzing recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments and applying the 2-D modeling in developing applications such as the dynamic hohlraum.

  2. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  3. Laser-driven Implosion Simulations with the Kull Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas B.; Owen, J. Michael; Madsen, Niel K.

    1999-11-01

    We present results of two- and three-dimensional simulations of implosion of a gamma-law gas driven by absorption of energy from an external laser source. Laser light propagation and power deposition were modeled with a recently-developed package(T. B. Kaiser, J. L. Milovich, A. I. Shestakov, M. K. Prasad, Bulletin of the A.P.S. 43), paper R8Q 26 (1998). that uses geometrical optics and inverse-bremsstrahlung to model the relevant physical processes, while the hydrodynamics calculations used a finite-volume, staggered-grid ALE scheme, and electron heat transport was treated diffusively. The simulations were performed with Kull, an ASCI code currently being developed at LLNL to model ICF experiments and astrophysical phenomena.

  4. Magnetic Implosion for Novel Strength Measurements at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Preston, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.L.

    1998-10-19

    Recently Lee and Preston have proposed to use magnetic implosions as a new method for measuring material strength in a regime of large strains and high strain rates inaccessible to previously established techniques. By its shockless nature, this method avoids the intrinsic difficulties associated with an earlier approach using high explosives. The authors illustrate how the stress-strain relation for an imploding liner can be obtained by measuring the velocity and temperature history of its inner surface. They discuss the physical requirements that lead us to a composite liner design applicable to different test materials, and also compare the code-simulated prediction with the measured data for the high strain-rate experiments conducted recently at LANL. Finally, they present a novel diagnostic scheme that will enable us to remove the background in the pyrometric measurement through data reduction.

  5. Quantifying uncertainty in NIF implosion performance across target scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spears, Brian; Baker, K.; Brandon, S.; Buchoff, M.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D.; Field, J.; Gaffney, J.; Hammer, J.; Humbird, K.; Hurricane, O.; Kruse, M.; Munro, D.; Nora, R.; Peterson, L.; Springer, P.; Thomas, C.

    2016-10-01

    Ignition experiments at NIF are being performed at a variety of target scales. Smaller targets require less energy and can be fielded more frequently. Successful small target designs can be scaled up to take advantage of the full NIF laser energy and power. In this talk, we will consider a rigorous framework for scaling from smaller to larger targets. The framework uses both simulation and experimental results to build a statistical prediction of target performance as scale is increased. Our emphasis is on quantifying uncertainty in scaling predictions with the goal of identifying the dominant contributors to that uncertainty. We take as a particular example the Big Foot platform that produces a round, 0.8 scale implosion with the potential to scale to full NIF size (1.0 scale). This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; and others

    2012-12-15

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell

  7. Optimizing implosion yields using rugby-shaped hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Robey, H.; Amendt, P.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Caillaud, T.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Landoas, O.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Seguin, F.; Rosenberg, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2009-11-01

    We present the first experimental results on optimizing capsule implosion experiments by using rugby-shaped hohlraums [1] on the Omega laser, University of Rochester. This campaign compared D2-filled capsule performance between standard cylindrical Au hohlraums and rugby-shaped hohlraums for demonstrating the energetics advantages of the rugby geometry. Not only did the rugby-shaped hohlraums show nearly 20% more x-ray drive energy over the cylindrical hohlraums, but also the high-performance design of the capsules provided nearly 20 times more DD neutrons than in any previous Omega hohlraum campaigns, thereby enabling use of neutron temporal diagnostics. Comparison with simulations on neutron burn histories, x-ray core imaging, backscattered laser light and radiation temperature are presented. [1] P. Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 012702 (2008)

  8. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  9. Krypton spectroscopy diagnosis of high temperature implosions. Semiannual report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This report covers observation of K-shell krypton lines, determination of temperature by line-intensity ratio, mixing diagnosis based on high-opacity Kr lines, and a method for measuring the escape factor. High-temperature implosions are planned for the OMEGA Upgrade experimental program. By using relatively thin shell targets, temperatures >> 1 keV at modest compressed densities (1-5 g/cm{sup 3}) are predicted. Goal is to demonstrate that by adding a small admixture of Kr (0.01 atm) to the fuel, the temperature can be diagnosed through the spectrum of He-like (Kr{sup +34}) and H-like (Kr{sup 35+}) lines. By increasing the fill pressure, resonant Kr lines become opaque through self absorption and relative intensities can be used to diagnose shell-fuel mixing.

  10. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  11. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong Ho; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hoffman, Nelson M.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). In addition, the fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between themore » observed neutron yields and those simulated.« less

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of Nova capsule implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Landen, O.L.

    1995-11-01

    Capsule implosion experiments carried out on the Nova laser are simulated with the three-dimensional HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code. Simulations of ordered near single mode perturbations indicate that structures which evolve into round spikes can penetrate farthest into the hot spot. Bubble-shaped perturbations can burn through the capsule shell fastest, however, causing even more damage. Simulations of a capsule with multimode perturbations shows spike amplitudes evolving in good agreement with a saturation model during the deceleration phase. The presence of sizable low mode asymmetry, caused either by drive asymmetry or perturbations in the capsule shell, can dramatically affect the manner in which spikes approach the center of the hot spot. Three-dimensional coupling between the low mode shell perturbations intrinsic to Nova capsules and the drive asymmetry brings the simulated yields into closer agreement with the experimental values.

  13. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  14. On krypton-doped capsule implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Ma, T.; Nora, R.; Barrios, M. A.; Scott, H. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Casey, D. T.; Hammel, B. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Landen, O. L.; Patel, P. K.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Spears, B. K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the spectroscopic aspects of using Krypton as a dopant in NIF capsule implosions through simulation studies and the first set of NIF experiments. Using a combination of 2D hohlraum and 1D capsule simulations with comprehensive spectroscopic modeling, the calculations focused on the effect of dopant concentration on the implosion, and the impact of gradients in the electron density and temperature to the Kr line features and plasma opacity. Experimental data were obtained from three NIF Kr-dopant experiments, performed with varying Kr dopant concentrations between 0.01% and 0.03%. The implosion performance, hotspot images, and detailed Kr spectral analysis are summarized relative to the predictions. Data show that fuel-dopant spectroscopy can serve as a powerful and viable diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  15. Direct-drive implosion physics: Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ma, T.; Pape, S. Le; MacKinnon, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments from both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are critical to gain confidence in ignition predictions on the NIF. Adequate performance of hydrodynamically scaled 1.8-MJ ignition designs must be obtained on OMEGA at 26 kJ. Implosions on the NIF must be used to identify and mitigate the effect of laser-plasma interactions (LPI's) on hydrodynamic parameters at the NIF scale. Results from spherically driven OMEGA cryogenic implosion experiments are described. Mitigation of nonuniformity sources and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is important for improving target performance on OMEGA. Initial polar-driven implosion experiments on the NIF have provided valuable measurements of trajectory and symmetry. Simulations that include the effect of CBET more closely reproduce the observed velocity.

  16. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  17. Measurements of the depth-dependent characteristics of light bulb implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungho; Kang, Donhyug

    2015-11-01

    Impulsive signals generated by the implosion of an incandescent light bulb were measured in shallow water with implosion depths in the range of 10 - 80 m. The received waveform was characterized by successive negative and positive pressure pulses originating from the bubble oscillation process. The time intervals between successive bubble pulses decreased with increasing implosion depth and the peaks of subsequent bubble oscillations dissipated relatively quickly. In this paper, semi-empirical formulas are derived to model the depth-dependent characteristics of the bulb implosion signal, including the time interval between bubble pulses and peak source level. The model predictions are compared with the measured signals and with the results in the literature. Possible causes of the differences in the comparison with previous results are discussed.

  18. Direct-drive implosion physics: Results from OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Craxton, R. S.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ma, T.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments from both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are critical to gain confidence in ignition predictions on the NIF. Adequate performance of hydrodynamically scaled 1.8-MJ ignition designs must be obtained on OMEGA at 26 kJ. Implosions on the NIF must be used to identify and mitigate the effect of laser-plasma interactions (LPI's) on hydrodynamic parameters at the NIF scale. Results from spherically driven OMEGA cryogenic implosion experiments are described. Mitigation of nonuniformity sources and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is important for improving target performance on OMEGA. Initial polar-driven implosion experiments on the NIF have provided valuable measurements of trajectory and symmetry. Simulations that include the effect of CBET more closely reproduce the observed velocity.

  19. Progress in modelling ignition implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J.

    2016-03-01

    The recently completed National Ignition Campaign on the National Ignition Facility showed significant discrepancies between 2-D simulations predictions of implosion performance and experimentally measured performance, particularly in thermonuclear yield. This discrepancy between simulation and observation persisted despite concerted efforts to include all of the known sources of implosion degradation within a reasonable 2-D simulation model, e.g., using measured surface imperfections and radiation drives adjusted to reproduce observed implosion trajectories. Since this simulation study was undertaken, more recent experiments have brought to light several effects that can significantly impact implosion performance, in particular large inflight long-wavelength shell asymmetries and larger than expected perturbations seeded by the capsule support tent. These effects are now being included in the simulation model and show improved agreement with observation. In addition, full-capsule 3-D simulations with resolution adequate to model the dominant unstable hydrodynamic modes are being run and show further improvements in agreement with experiment.

  20. Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    Achieving ignition in a direct-drive cryogenic implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar, which is a factor of 3 to 4 less than what is required for indirect-drive designs. The OMEGA Laser System is used to study the physics of cryogenic implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the spherical ignition designs of the NIF. Current cryogenic implosions on OMEGA have reached 56 Gbar, and implosions with shell convergence CR< 17 and fuel adiabat α > 3.5 proceed close to 1-D predictions. Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA will require reducing coupling losses caused by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), minimizing long- wavelength nonuniformity seeded by power imbalance and target offset, and removing target debris occumulated during cryogenic target production.

  1. Performance of indirectly driven capsule implosions on NIF using adiabat-shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Baker, K. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatarik, R.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jones, O. S.; Kerbel, G. D.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Marinak, M. M.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, M.; Patel, P. K.; Perkins, L. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Weber, C. R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C.; Giraldez, E.; Hoover, D.; Nikroo, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2016-05-01

    A series of indirectly driven capsule implosions has been performed on the National Ignition Facility to assess the relative contributions of ablation-front instability growth vs. fuel compression on implosion performance. Laser pulse shapes for both low and high-foot pulses were modified to vary ablation-front growth & fuel adiabat, separately and controllably. Two principal conclusions are drawn from this study: 1) It is shown that an increase in laser picket energy reduces ablation-front instability growth in low-foot implosions resulting in a substantial (3-10X) increase in neutron yield with no loss of fuel compression. 2.) It is shown that a decrease in laser trough power reduces the fuel adiabat in high-foot implosions results in a significant (36%) increase in fuel compression together with no reduction in neutron yield. These results taken collectively bridge the space between the higher compression low-foot results and the higher yield high-foot results.

  2. Development of Improved Radiation Drive Environment for High Foot Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ma, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Döppner, T.; Goyon, C. S.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Turnbull, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-11-01

    Analyses of high foot implosions show that performance is limited by the radiation drive environment, i.e., the hohlraum. Reported here are significant improvements in the radiation environment, which result in an enhancement in implosion performance. Using a longer, larger case-to-capsule ratio hohlraum at lower gas fill density improves the symmetry control of a high foot implosion. Moreover, for the first time, these hohlraums produce reduced levels of hot electrons, generated by laser-plasma interactions, which are at levels comparable to near-vacuum hohlraums, and well within specifications. Further, there is a noteworthy increase in laser energy coupling to the hohlraum, and discrepancies with simulated radiation production are markedly reduced. At fixed laser energy, high foot implosions driven with this improved hohlraum have achieved a 1.4 ×increase in stagnation pressure, with an accompanying relative increase in fusion yield of 50% as compared to a reference experiment with the same laser energy.

  3. Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions with Seeded Magnetic Fields on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    Experiments applying laser-driven magnetic-flux compression to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to enhance the fuel-assembly performance are described. Spherical CH targets filled with 10 atm of deuterium gas were imploded by the OMEGA laser in polar-drive geometry. The targets were embedded with an 80-kG magnetic seed field. Upon laser irradiation, the high-implosion velocities and ionization of the target fill lead to trapping of the magnetic field inside the capsule and its amplification through flux compression to up to tens of megagauss. At such strong magnetic fields, the hot spot inside a spherical target becomes strongly magnetized, reducing the heat losses through electron confinement. The experimentally observed ion temperature was enhanced by 15% and the neutron yield was increased by 30%, compared to nonmagnetized implosions. This represents the first experimental verification of performance enhancement resulting from embedding a strong magnetic field into an ICF capsule. The compressed field was probed via proton deflectometry using the 14.7-MeV protons generated in the D+3He fusion reactions from a laser-imploded glass microballoon. Experimental data for the fuel-assembly performance and magnetic field are compared to numerical results from combining the 1-D hydrodynamics code LILAC with a 2-D, azimuthal symmetry MHD postprocessor. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54789 and DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with P.-Y. Chang, G. Fiksel, J. P. Knauer, R. Betti, F. J. Marshall, and D. D. Meyerhofer (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Univ. of Rochester), and F. H. Séguin and R. D. Petrasso (PSFC, MIT).

  4. Three-dimensional simulations of the implosion of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R.P.J.; Bell, A.R. )

    1991-09-30

    The viability of inertial confinement fusion depends crucially on implosion symmetry. A spherical three-dimensional hydrocode called PLATO has been developed to model the growth in asymmetries during an implosion. Results are presented in the deceleration phase which show indistinguishable linear growth rates, but greater nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability than is found in two-dimensional cylindrical simulations. The three-dimensional enhancement of the nonlinear growth is much smaller than that found by Sakagami and Nishihara.

  5. Systematic Fuel Cavity Asymmetries in Directly Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Shah, Rahul C.; Haines, Brian Michael; Wysocki, Frederick Joseph; ...

    2017-03-30

    Here, we present narrow-band self-emission x-ray images from a titanium tracer layer placed at the fuel-shell interface in 60-laser-beam implosion experiments at the OMEGA facility. The images are acquired during deceleration with inferred convergences of ~9-14. Novel here is that a systematically observed asymmetry of the emission is linked, using full sphere 3D implosion modeling, to performance-limiting low mode asymmetry of the drive.

  6. Development and Fielding of High-Speed Laser Shadowgraphy for Electro-Magnetically Driven Cylindrical Implosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    shockwave in a cylindrical geometry provides fundamental benchmarks used in the modeling of 1-D and 2-D hydrodynamic phenomena from high or solid...DEVELOPMENT AND FIELDING OF HIGH-SPEED LASER SHADOWGRAPHY FOR ELECTRO -MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN CYLINDRICAL IMPLOSIONS J. P. Roberts, G. Rodriguez...an electro -magnetically driven solid density liner implosion in Lucite is described. The laser shadowgraphy system utilizes an advanced high-energy

  7. Examining the radiation drive asymmetries present in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the origin, interplay, and mitigation of time dependent radiation drive asymmetries is critical to improving the performance of indirectly driven implosion experiments. Recent work has successfully modeled many aspects of the observed symmetry in implosions using the so-called high foot radiation drive by applying a semi-empirical fit to the low mode time dependent flux asymmetries that the capsule experiences. In these experiments, laser plasma interactions, including cross beam energy transfer, inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, and stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, make controlling the symmetry of the radiation flux that drives the implosion challenging. More recently, control of implosion symmetry without the use of cross beam energy transfer, in hohlraums with lower gas fill densities using both plastic and high density carbon ablators, have been explored. The aim of these experiments was to reduce the amount of highly non-linear laser plasma interactions and develop implosions in which the radiation flux symmetry could be more easily understood and controlled. This work describes the experimental reemission, shock timing, radiography, and x-ray self emission measurements that inform our understanding of time dependent radiation drive asymmetries. This data indicates that in the high foot series of implosion experiments, the drive asymmetry initialized during the first shock of the implosion was enhanced by the asymmetry that develops during the peak of the radiation drive. In contrast, in lower gas filled hohlraum experiments, a reduction in the magnitude of time dependent radiation asymmetries has been observed. Incorporating additional data and modeling, this work seeks to further our understanding of the physical mechanisms that currently limit symmetry control in implosion experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA

  8. Systematic Fuel Cavity Asymmetries in Directly Driven Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. C.; Haines, B. M.; Wysocki, F. J.; Benage, J. F.; Fooks, J. A.; Glebov, V.; Hakel, P.; Hoppe, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Kagan, G.; Mancini, R. C.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Murphy, T. J.; Schoff, M. E.; Silverstein, K.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.

    2017-03-01

    We present narrow-band self-emission x-ray images from a titanium tracer layer placed at the fuel-shell interface in 60-laser-beam implosion experiments at the OMEGA facility. The images are acquired during deceleration with inferred convergences of ˜9 - 14. Novel here is that a systematically observed asymmetry of the emission is linked, using full sphere 3D implosion modeling, to performance-limiting low mode asymmetry of the drive.

  9. Radiative Properties of High Wire Number Tungsten Arrays with Implosion Times up to 250 ns

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, F.N.; Coverdale, C.A.; Deeney, C.; Douglas, M.R.; Haines, M.G.; Peterson, D.L.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruiz-Camacho, J.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.

    1999-02-02

    High wire number, 25-mm diameter tungsten wire arrays have been imploded on the 8-MA Saturn generator, operating in a long-pulse mode. By varying the mass load from 710 to 6140 ps/cm, implosion times of 130 to 250 ns have been obtained with implosion velocities of 50 to 25 cn-dys, respectively. These z-pinch implosions produced plasmas with millimeter diameters that radiated 600 to 800 kJ of x-rays, with powers of 20 to 49 TW; the corresponding pulse widths were 19 to 7.5 ns, with risetimes ranging from 6.5 to 4.0 ns. These powers and pulse widths are similar to those achieved with 50 ns implosion times on Saturn. Two-dimensional, radiation- magnetohydrodynamic calculations indicate that the imploding shells in these long implosion time experiments are comparable in width to those in the short pulse cases. This can only be due to lower initial perturbations. A heuristic wire array model suggests that the reduced perturbations, in the long pulse cases, may be due to the individual wire merger occurring well before the acceleration of the shell. The experiments and modeling suggest that 150 to 200 ns implosion time z-pinches could be employed for high-power, x-ray source applications.

  10. Mode 1 drive asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K. Edwards, M. J.; Hatchett, S.; Kritcher, A.; Lindl, J.; Munro, D.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Kilkenny, J.; Knauer, J.

    2014-04-15

    Mode 1 radiation drive asymmetry (pole-to-pole imbalance) at significant levels can have a large impact on inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This asymmetry distorts the cold confining shell and drives a high-speed jet through the hot spot. The perturbed hot spot shows increased residual kinetic energy and reduced internal energy, and it achieves reduced pressure and neutron yield. The altered implosion physics manifests itself in observable diagnostic signatures, especially the neutron spectrum which can be used to measure the neutron-weighted flow velocity, apparent ion temperature, and neutron downscattering. Numerical simulations of implosions with mode 1 asymmetry show that the resultant simulated diagnostic signatures are moved toward the values observed in many NIF experiments. The diagnostic output can also be used to build a set of integrated implosion performance metrics. The metrics indicate that P{sub 1} has a significant impact on implosion performance and must be carefully controlled in NIF implosions.

  11. Control of Be capsule low mode implosions symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Nagel, S.; Rygg, J. R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of the beryllium experimental campaign on the implosion symmetry properties of beryllium capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. These indirect drive experiments measure both the inflight and core self-emission implosion symmetry. The inflight symmetry of the ablator before stagnation is measured using a backlight imaging technique. A copper backlighter was used to measure the transmissions (or backlit absorption) of the copper doped beryllium shells. Images of the x-ray emission from the core around bang time provide a measure of the symmetry near peak compression. Both pieces of information about the 2D symmetry are used to infer the drive and velocity uniformity enabling us to predictably adjust the properties of the incident laser, mainly the time dependent ratio of the inner beam cone power to the outer laser beam powers, to achieve proper symmetry of the implosion. Results from these experiments show inner beam propagation is not degraded compared to similar implosions with CH ablators. Variations in the shape compared with implosions using CH ablators also provides information about the cross beam energy transfer used to adjust the equatorial shape and thus infer information about the differences in plasma conditions near the laser entrance holes. Experimental results of the implosion shape for beryllium capsules will be presented along with comparisons relative to CH ablators.

  12. The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A. Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kervin, P.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; and others

    2014-05-15

    The “High-Foot” platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.3×10{sup 15}) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the “bootstrapping” associated with alpha-particle self-heating.

  13. On the importance of minimizing "coast-time" in x-ray driven inertially confined fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A.; Callahan, D. A.; Landen, O.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kline, J.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Moore, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J. D.; Widmann, K.

    2017-09-01

    By the time an inertially confined fusion (ICF) implosion has converged a factor of 20, its surface area has shrunk 400 × , making it an inefficient x-ray energy absorber. So, ICF implosions are traditionally designed to have the laser drive shut off at a time, toff, well before bang-time, tBT, for a coast-time of t coast = t B T - t o f f > 1 ns. High-foot implosions on NIF showed a strong dependence of many key ICF performance quantities on reduced coast-time (by extending the duration of laser power after the peak power is first reached), most notably stagnation pressure and fusion yield. Herein we show that the ablation pressure, pabl, which drives high-foot implosions, is essentially triangular in temporal shape, and that reducing tcoast boosts pabl by as much as ˜ 2 × prior to stagnation thus increasing fuel and hot-spot compression and implosion speed. One-dimensional simulations are used to track hydrodynamic characteristics for implosions with various coast-times and various assumed rates of hohlraum cooling after toff to illustrate how the late-time conditions exterior to the implosion can impact the fusion performance. A simple rocket model-like analytic theory demonstrates that reducing coast-time can lead to a ˜ 15 % higher implosion velocity because the reduction in x-ray absorption efficiency at late-time is somewhat compensated by small ( ˜ 5 % - 10 %) ablator mass remaining. Together with the increased ablation pressure, the additional implosion speed for short coast-time implosions can boost the stagnation pressure by ˜ 2 × as compared to a longer coast-time version of the same implosion. Four key dimensionless parameters are identified and we find that reducing coast-time to as little as 500 ps still provides some benefit. Finally, we show how the high-foot implosion data is consistent with the above mentioned picture.

  14. Maximizing 1D “like” implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion science

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L.

    2016-07-15

    While the march towards achieving indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion at the NIF has made great progress, the experiments show that multi-dimensional effects still dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seed by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of ICF implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. To this end, LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a 1D implosion platform where 1D means high yield over 1D clean calculations. Taking advantage of the properties of beryllium capsules, a high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed. The higher drive efficiency for beryllium enables larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry at the expense of drive. Smaller capsules with a high adiabat drive are expected to reduce the convergence and thus increase predictability. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the initial mass in the hot spot can be controlled via the target fielding temperature which changes the liquid vapor pressure. Varying the initial hot spot mass via the vapor pressure controls the implosion convergence and minimizes the need to vaporize the dense fuel layer during the implosion to achieve ignition relevant hot spot densities. The last method is double shell targets. Unlike hot spot ignition, double shells ignite volumetrically. The inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. Radiation trapping and the longer confinement times relax the conditions required to ignite the fuel. Key challenges for double shell targets are coupling the momentum of the outer shell to

  15. Simulation analysis of the effects of an initial cone position and opening angle on a cone-guided implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.

    2013-10-15

    In inertial confinement fusion, the implosion process is important in forming a high-density plasma core. In the case of a fast ignition scheme using a cone-guided target, the fuel target is imploded with a cone inserted. This scheme is advantageous for efficiently heating the imploded fuel core; however, asymmetric implosion is essentially inevitable. Moreover, the effect of cone position and opening angle on implosion also becomes critical. Focusing on these problems, the effect of the asymmetric implosion, the initial position, and the opening angle on the compression rate of the fuel is investigated using a three-dimensional pure hydrodynamic code.

  16. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  17. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; ...

    2014-11-03

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D3He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2x higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infermore » the areal density (pR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (Rcm) from the downshift of the shock-produced D3He protons. The observed pR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time ('short-coast'), while longer-coasting implosions have lower pR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (~800 ps) than in the short-coast (~400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time. This result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel pR.« less

  18. Performance of Indirectly-Driven Capsule Implosions on NIF Using Adiabat-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Indirectly-driven capsule implosions are being conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Early experiments conducted during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) were driven by a laser pulse with a relatively low-power initial foot (``low-foot''), which was designed to keep the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on a low adiabat to achieve a high fuel areal density (ρR). These implosions were successful in achieving high ρR, but fell significantly short of the predicted neutron yield. A leading candidate to explain this degraded performance was ablation front instability growth, which can lead to the mixing of ablator material with the DT fuel layer and in extreme cases into the central DT hot spot. A subsequent campaign employing a modified laser pulse with increased power in the foot (``high-foot'') was designed to reduce the adverse effects of ablation front instability growth. These implosions have been very successful, increasing neutron yields by more than an order of magnitude, but at the expense of reduced fuel compression. To bridge these two regimes, a series of implosions have been designed to simultaneously achieve both high stability and high ρR. These implosions employ adiabat-shaping, where the driving laser pulse is high in the initial picket similar to the high-foot to retain the favorable stability properties at the ablation front. The remainder of the foot is similar to that of the low-foot, driving a lower velocity shock into the DT fuel to keep the adiabat low and compression high. This talk will present results and analysis of these implosions and will discuss implications for improved implosion performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. The High-Foot Implosion Campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, Omar

    2013-10-01

    The `High-Foot' platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This tactic gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. This approach is generally consistent with the philosophy laid out in a recent international workshop on the topic of ignition science on NIF [``Workshop on the Science of Fusion Ignition on NIF,'' Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Report, LLNL-TR-570412 (2012). Op cit. V. Gocharov and O.A. Hurricane, ``Panel 3 Report: Implosion Hydrodynamics,'' LLNL-TR-562104 (2012)]. Side benefits our the High-Foot pulse-shape modification appear to be improvements in hohlraum behavior--less wall motion achieved through higher pressure He gas fill and improved inner cone laser beam propagation. Another consequence of the `High-Foot' is a higher fuel adiabat, so there is some relation to direct-drive experiments performed at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). In this talk, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the High-Foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the High-Foot experimental campaign. Most notably, at the time of this writing record DT layer implosion performance with record low levels of inferred mix and excellent agreement with one-dimensional implosion models without the aid of mix models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires reaching fast implosion velocities, which highlights the need for a highly efficient hohlraum to drive indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. Gas-filled hohlraums are typically utilized due to the pulse length (15-20 ns) needed to drive plastic (CH) capsules. With the recent use of 3× denser high-density carbon (HDC) capsules, ignition pulses can be less than 10 ns in duration, providing the opportunity to utilize near-vacuum hohlraums (NVH) to drive ignition-relevant implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with minimal laser-plasma instabilities which complicate standard gas-filled hohlraums. Initial NVH implosions on the NIF have demonstrated coupling efficiency significantly higher than observed in gas-filled hohlraums - backscatter losses less than 2% and virtually no suprathermal electron generation. A major design challenge for the NVH is symmetry control. Without tamping gas, the hohlraum wall quickly expands filling the volume with gold plasma. However, results to-date indicate that the inner-cone beams propagate freely to the hohlraum wall for at least 6.5 ns. With minimal predicted cross-beam power transfer, this propagation enables symmetry control via dynamic beam phasing - time-dependent direct adjustment of the inner- and outer-cone laser pulses. A series of experiments with an HDC ablator and NVH culminated in a 6 ns, 1.2 MJ cryogenic DT layered implosion yielding 1.8 × 1015 neutrons--significantly higher yield than any CH implosion at comparable energy. This implosion reached an ignition-relevant velocity -350 km/s - with no observed ablator mix in the hot spot. Recent experiments have explored two-shock designs in a larger, 6.72 mm hohlraum, and upcoming experiments will incrementally extend the pulse duration toward a 9 ns long, three-shock ignition design. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Olson, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; Bell, P.; Benedetti, R.; Hopkins, L. Berzak; Betti, R.; Bradley, D.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D.; Collins, G.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Grim, G.; Hatchett, S.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O.; LePape, S.; Li, C. K.; Lindl, J.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Macphee, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Meyerhofer, D.; Moody, J.; Moses, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M.; Ross, J. S.; Sangster, T. C.; Sepke, S.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Weber, S.; Wilson, D.; Zacharias, R.

    2014-11-03

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D3He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2x higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (pR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (Rcm) from the downshift of the shock-produced D3He protons. The observed pR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time ('short-coast'), while longer-coasting implosions have lower pR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (~800 ps) than in the short-coast (~400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time. This result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel pR.

  2. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Olson, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; Bell, P.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Betti, R.; Bradley, D.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D.; Collins, G.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Grim, G.; Hatchett, S.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O.; LePape, S.; Li, C. K.; Lindl, J.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Macphee, A.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Meyerhofer, D.; Moody, J.; Moses, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M.; Ross, J. S.; Sangster, T. C.; Sepke, S.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Weber, S.; Wilson, D.; Zacharias, R.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D3He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (Rcm) from the downshift of the shock-produced D3He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time ("short-coast"), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (˜800 ps) than in the short-coast (˜400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700-800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  3. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B. Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sinenian, N.; Sio, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; Atherton, J.; Barrios, M.; and others

    2014-11-15

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D{sup 3}He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D{sup 3}He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2× higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infer the areal density (ρR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (R{sub cm}) from the downshift of the shock-produced D{sup 3}He protons. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time (“short-coast”), while longer-coasting implosions have lower ρR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (∼800 ps) than in the short-coast (∼400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time; this result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel ρR.

  4. T-T Neutron Spectrum from Inertial Confinement Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggiano, Joseph; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Bacher, Andrew; McNabb, Denns

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the T(2n,)^4He reaction (TT) have been conducted using high-purity tritium, gas-filled capsules in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. At the OMEGA laser facility, TT neutron spectra were measured using two instruments: the neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) facility and the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) facility. The resolutions of these systems were improved for nTOF by using a crystal with much faster decay time and for MRS by using a thinner, more uniform CD2 recoil foil. Measurements at c.m. energies of 10-30 keV can be used to study the TT three-body reaction mechanism near astrophysical energies. With both nTOF and MRS, we observe a small, narrow peak starting at the 9.44 MeV endpoint, corresponding to the n + ^5He (g.s.) reaction channel. Most of the TT reaction proceeds through other reaction channels which produce broad, continuous neutron spectra in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. Implications for ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility will be discussed. Work in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, D. T. Casey, M. J.-E. Manuel, N. Sinenian, A. B. Zylstra, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, V. Yu Glebov, P. B. Radha, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, P. A. Amendt, R. Hatarik, D. B. Sayre, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann and Y. H. Kim.

  5. Improved ICF implosion performance through precision engineering features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    The thin membrane that holds the capsule in-place in the hohlraum is recognized as one of the most significant contributors to reduced performance in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This membrane, known as the ``tent'', seeds a perturbation that is amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor and can rupture the capsule. The ICF program is undertaking a major effort to develop a less damaging capsule support mechanism. Possible alternatives include micron-scale rods spanning the hohlraum width and supporting either the capsule or stiffening the fill-tube, a larger fill-tube to both fill and support the capsule, or a low-density foam layer that protects the capsule from the tent impact. In addition to the challenges presented by nano and microscale engineering, it is difficult to model and experimentally verify improvement from these changes. The 3D nature of the proposed replacements and the radiation shadows they cast on the capsule prohibit direct simulation. Therefore a combination of reduced models and experimental verification are used to set requirements and down-select the options. Ultimately the improved capsule support will be used to repeat a DT-layered implosion and demonstrate improved performance. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Implosive Interatomic Coulombic decay in the simplest molecular anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Chris H.; Perez-Rios, Jesus; Slipchenko, Lyudmila

    2016-05-01

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) has been extensively studied in different systems: from diatomic systems such as He2 up to more complex chemical systems with interest in biochemistry. Independently of the size and complexity of the system, the ICD process proposed involves the emission of an electron through exchange of a virtual photon. The present theoretical study investigates the ICD process in the helium hydride anion, which involves two final product states that can be produced through a Coulomb implosion following high energy ejection of a He 1s electron accompanied by excitation to He+(n = 2) . One of the subsequent decay channels is associated with the usual emission of a single electron, to produce a stable molecule: HeH+, which can compete with the usual dissociated final state of the system. The second channel involves the emission of two electrons, leading to the usual Coulomb explosion of the final product ions He+(1 s) + H + . In addition, the process of formation of the helium hydride anion is analyzed in terms of the existing technology of ionic molecular beams and buffer gas cooling techniques. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1306905.

  7. PHELIX: design of transformer-driven linear implosion system

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Atchison, Walter L; Rousculp, Chris L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Experiments involving electromagnetically-imploded, solid-density liners can be achieved at reduced cost and energy if we start with a scale-size based on diagnostic resolution, rather than on the largest capacitor bank or generator we could bring to bear. For minimum resolution of 100 microns or less, many useful experiments could be performed with initial liner diameters that are factors of two to three smaller than used on high-energy systems, such as Atlas, thereby reducing energy requirements to sub-megajoule levels. Reduction in scale-size, however, also decreases the inductance change associated with liner motion relative to other inductances in the circuit. To improve coupling efficiency to liner kinetic energy, we invoke a current step-up transformer. Scaling relations have been developed for reducing the size and energy of such systems and compared with detailed numerical simulations. We discuss these calculations and describe the engineering embodiment of the resulting design for a system called PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment).

  8. Observation of Compressible Plasma Mix in Cylindrically Convergent Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Lanier, Nicholas E.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Tubbs, David L.; Dunne, A. M.; Rothman, Steven R.; Youngs, David L.

    2000-10-01

    An understanding of hydrodynamic mix in convergent geometry will be of key importance in the development of a robust ignition/burn capability on NIF, LMJ and future pulsed power machines. We have made use of the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester to investigate directly the mix evolution in a convergent geometry, compressible plasma regime. The experiments comprise a plastic cylindrical shell imploded by direct laser irradiation. The cylindrical shell surrounds a lower density plastic foam which provides sufficient back pressure to allow the implosion to stagnate at a sufficiently high radius to permit quantitative radiographic diagnosis of the interface evolution near turnaround. The susceptibility to mix of the shell-foam interface is varied by choosing different density material for the inner shell surface (thus varying the Atwood number). This allows the study of shock-induced Richtmyer-Meshkov growth during the coasting phase, and Rayleigh-Taylor growth during the stagnation phase. The experimental results will be described along with calculational predictions using various radiation hydrodynamics codes and turbulent mix models.

  9. Improving ICF implosion performance with alternative capsule supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; MacPhee, A.; Milovich, J.; Martinez, D.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Stadermann, M.; Amendt, P.; Bhandarkar, S.; Chang, B.; Choate, C.; Crippen, J.; Felker, S. J.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Johnson, S.; Kroll, J. J.; Landen, O. L.; Marinak, M.; Mcinnis, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Sepke, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    The thin membrane that holds the capsule in-place in the hohlraum is recognized as one of the most significant contributors to reduced performance in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on the National Ignition Facility. This membrane, known as the "tent," seeds a perturbation that is amplified by Rayleigh-Taylor and can rupture the capsule. A less damaging capsule support mechanism is under development. Possible alternatives include the micron-scale rods spanning the hohlraum width and supporting either the capsule or stiffening the fill-tube, a larger fill-tube to both fill and support the capsule, or a low-density foam layer that protects the capsule from the tent impact. Experiments are testing these support features to measure their imprint on the capsule. These experiments are revealing unexpected aspects about perturbation development in indirect drive ICF, such as the importance of shadows coming from bright spots in the hohlraum. Two dimensional and 3D models are used to explain these features and assess the impact on implosion performance. Experiments and modeling suggest that the fill-tube supported by a perpendicular rod can mount the capsule without any additional perturbation beyond that of the fill tube.

  10. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D{sub 2} and D{sup 3}He gas-filled “exploding-pusher” inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D DRACO hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  11. Ultra-high mode mix in low-adiabat National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Robert; Central Laser Facility Team

    2016-10-01

    This work re-examines a sub-set of the `slow-rise', low adiabat implosions from the National Ignition Campaign using the Hyades radiation-hydrodynamics code in an effort to better understand potential phenomenological sources of `excess' mix observed experimentally. An extensive effort has been made to match both shock-timing and backlit radiography (Con-A) implosion data in an effort to reproduce the experimental conditions as accurately as possible. A 30% reduction in ablation pressure at peak drive is required to match the experimental data. This reduced ablation pressure allows the ablator to decompress, in turn causing the DT ice-ablator interface to go Rayleigh-Taylor unstable early in the implosion acceleration phase. Post-processing the runs with various mix models indicates high-mode mix from the DT ice-ablator interface may penetrate deep into the hotspot. This work offers a potential explanation of why these low adiabat implosions exhibited significantly higher levels of mix than expected from high-fidelity multi-dimensional simulations. Through this new understanding a possible route forward for low-adiabat implosions on NIF is suggested.

  12. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  13. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  14. Neutron spectrometry--an essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Carpenter, A; Cerjan, C J; Clancy, T J; Doeppner, T; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hatchett, S P; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Le Pape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; McKernan, M A; Moran, M J; Moses, E; Munro, D H; McNaney, J; Park, H S; Ralph, J; Remington, B; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S M; Smalyuk, V; Spears, B; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J P; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Kline, J; Morgan, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J

    2012-10-01

    DT neutron yield (Y(n)), ion temperature (T(i)), and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the complementarity required for reliable measurements of Y(n), T(i), and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density (ρR) is determined through the relationship ρR(tot) (g∕cm(2)) = (20.4 ± 0.6) × dsr(10-12 MeV). The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation, and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration of the as-built spectrometers, which are now performing to the required accuracy. Recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFx), which is a function of dsr (or fuel ρR) and Y(n), has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  15. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE PAGES

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; ...

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore » the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  16. Performance of indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility using adiabat-shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Baker, K. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; and others

    2016-05-15

    A series of indirectly driven capsule implosions has been performed on the National Ignition Facility to assess the relative contributions of ablation-front instability growth vs. fuel compression on implosion performance. Laser pulse shapes for both low and high-foot pulses were modified to vary ablation-front growth and fuel adiabat, separately and controllably. Three principal conclusions are drawn from this study: (1) It is shown that reducing ablation-front instability growth in low-foot implosions results in a substantial (3-10X) increase in neutron yield with no loss of fuel compression. (2) It is shown that reducing the fuel adiabat in high-foot implosions results in a significant (36%) increase in fuel compression together with a small (10%) increase in neutron yield. (3) Increased electron preheat at higher laser power in high-foot implosions, however, appears to offset the gain in compression achieved by adiabat-shaping at lower power. These results taken collectively bridge the space between the higher compression low-foot results and the higher yield high-foot results.

  17. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Pino, J.; McNaney, J. M.; Rygg, J. R.; Amendt, P. A.; Bellei, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Divol, L.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Rosen, M. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Zacharias, R. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kyrala, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Olson, R. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D2 and D3He gas-filled "exploding-pusher" inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D draco hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  18. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

    2012-05-02

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  19. Modeling of low convergence liquid layer wetted foam implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S. A.; Olson, R. E.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Zylstra, A. B.; Haines, B. M.; Peterson, R. R.; Bradley, P. A.; Shah, R. C.; Kline, J. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.

    2016-10-01

    A new platform has been developed that allows for lower convergence ratio implosions (CR 15) than is possible with traditional DT ice layered capsules (CR 30). We present HYDRA simulation models of the first low convergence DT implosions on NIF utilizing the wetted foam platform. When tuned to match the observed bangtime and hotspot symmetry, our rad-hydro models agree well with many experimental observables. In particular, the inferred hotspot density and pressure are consistent with simulations, and our modeled burn widths are in better relative agreement with the data than in high convergence implosions. The observed neutron yields are approximately 60-70% of postshot calculations. These results indicate that at a reduced convergence ratio CR 15 the hotspot formation process is well modeled by our simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Experimental study of fill-tube hydrodynamic effects on implosions using capsules with plastic stalks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Amendt, P.; Dittrich, T.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S.; Klingmann, J.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O.; Langer, S.; Letts, S.; Seugling, R.; Sorce, C.; Spears, B.; Turner, R.; Wallace, R.

    2006-10-01

    Cryogenic ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are expected to use a fill tube to introduce liquid DT into the capsule prior to solid layer formation. This fill tube is expected to form a hydrodynamic jet during the deceleration phase of the implosion. Numerical simulations indicate that a 10μm tube with a 3μm hole has an acceptable impact on implosion performance, but experimental data validating these simulations are lacking. We therefore initiated experiments at the Omega laser facility to explore the hydrodynamic effects of stalks on implosion performance, and we recently obtained high-quality x-ray images of hydrodynamic jets created by 9-37 μm diameter stalks made of PAMS (polyalpha-methylstyrene). We discuss the experiments and compare the results to simulations

  1. Three-dimensional modeling of capsule implosions in OMEGA tetrahedral hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, J. D.; Craxton, R. S.

    2000-07-01

    Tetrahedral hohlraums have been proposed as a means for achieving the highly uniform implosions needed for ignition with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [J. D. Schnittman and R. S. Craxton, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3786 (1996)]. Recent experiments on the OMEGA laser system have achieved good drive uniformity consistent with theoretical predictions [J. M. Wallace et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3807 (1999)]. To better understand these experiments and future investigations of high-convergence ICF implosions, the three-dimensional (3-D) view-factor code BUTTERCUP has been expanded to model the time-dependent radiation transport in the hohlraum and the hydrodynamic implosion of the capsule. Additionally, a 3-D postprocessor has been written to simulate x-ray images of the imploded core. Despite BUTTERCUP's relative simplicity, its predictions for radiation drive temperatures, fusion yields, and core deformation show close agreement with experiment. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of capsule implosions in OMEGA tetrahedral hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, J. D.; Craxton, R. S.

    2000-07-01

    Tetrahedral hohlraums have been proposed as a means for achieving the highly uniform implosions needed for ignition with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) [J. D. Schnittman and R. S. Craxton, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3786 (1996)]. Recent experiments on the OMEGA laser system have achieved good drive uniformity consistent with theoretical predictions [J. M. Wallace et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3807 (1999)]. To better understand these experiments and future investigations of high-convergence ICF implosions, the three-dimensional (3-D) view-factor code BUTTERCUP has been expanded to model the time-dependent radiation transport in the hohlraum and the hydrodynamic implosion of the capsule. Additionally, a 3-D postprocessor has been written to simulate x-ray images of the imploded core. Despite BUTTERCUP's relative simplicity, its predictions for radiation drive temperatures, fusion yields, and core deformation show close agreement with experiment.

  3. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  4. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A. Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Knauer, J.

    2014-11-15

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  5. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega facility

    SciTech Connect

    Laffite, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Caillaud, T.; Delettrez, J A; Frenje, J. A.; Girard, F.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Joshi, Tirtha Raj; Landoas, O.; Legay, G.; Lemaire, S.; Mancini, R. C.; Marshall, F. J.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Michel, D. T.; Philippe, F.; Reverdin, C.; Seka, W.; Tassin, V.

    2016-01-14

    We present in this article direct-drive experiments that were carried out on the Omega facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Two different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target whose parameters, dimensions and composition, remained the same. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolvedmeasurement of the scattered light. We show that, provided the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the “bang-time” and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. In contrast, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assessed by comparing the target performances between prediction and measurement. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measuredneutron number is about 80% of the prediction. Lastly, for the 2-step 2-ns pulse, we test here that this ratio falls to about 20%.

  6. Design of Platforms for Backlighting Spherical Implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craxton, R. S.; Hohenberger, M.; Kehoe, W. E.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    A common problem when backlighting implosions on OMEGA and at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is that the implosion uniformity can be compromised by the loss of those beams used to drive the backlighter. The 2-D hydrodynamics code SAGE, which includes 3-D laser ray tracing, has been used to design irradiation configurations in which beam pointings and energies are adjusted to restore optimal implosion uniformity. Experimental x-ray self-emission images have demonstrated the effectiveness of these configurations for an OMEGA platform in which six beams are removed to drive the backlighter and a polar-drive NIF platform in which two quads are removed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  8. Radiative properties of argon gas puff z-pinch implosions on COBRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, N. D.; de Grouchy, P. W. L.; Qi, N.; Giuliani, J. L.; Dasgupta, A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.

    2016-10-01

    Spatially resolved and time-integrated x-ray spectroscopy, combined with modeling of the spectra with detailed radiation kinetics and transport, is a powerful method to study the conditions in a hot moving plasma. K-shell argon spectra were measured from gas puff implosions with different center jet masses on the 1 MA COBRA generator at Cornell University. The outer to inner plenum pressures (1 and 3 psia, respectively) were the same for all shots producing an outer to inner mass ratio of 1:1. This paper uses non-local thermodynamic equilibrium kinetic modeling to infer the ion density, electron temperature, K-shell radiating mass, and K-shell powers from stagnating argon gas puff z-pinch implosion. We find that the implosions with a center jet produced bright spot regions of plasma with higher temperature and density than those without a jet.

  9. Demonstration of the improved rocket efficiency in direct-drive implosions using different ablator materials.

    PubMed

    Michel, D T; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Epstein, R; Froula, D H

    2013-12-13

    The success of direct-drive implosions depends critically on the ability to create high ablation pressures (∼100  Mbar) and accelerating the imploding shell to ignition-relevant velocities (>3.7×10(7 ) cm/s) using direct laser illumination. This Letter reports on an experimental study of the conversion of absorbed laser energy into kinetic energy of the shell (rocket efficiency) where different ablators were used to vary the ratio of the atomic number to the atomic mass. The implosion velocity of Be shells is increased by 20% compared to C and CH shells in direct-drive implosions when a constant initial target mass is maintained. These measurements are consistent with the predicted increase in the rocket efficiency of 28% for Be and 5% for C compared to a CH ablator.

  10. First liquid-layer implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Olson, R.; Leeper, R.; Kline, J.; Yi, S. A.; Peterson, R.; Bradley, P.; Haines, B.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D.; Herrmann, H.; Shah, R.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Hamza, A.; Nikroo, A.; Meezan, N.; Biener, M.; Sater, J.; Walters, C.

    2016-10-01

    Replacing the standard ice layer in an ignition design with a liquid layer allows fielding the target with a higher central vapor pressure, leading to reduced implosion convergence ratio (CR). At lower CR, the implosions are expected to be more robust to instabilities and asymmetries than standard ignition designs. The first liquid-layer implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been performed by wicking the liquid fuel into a supporting foam. A 3-shot series has been conducted at CR=14-16 using a HDC ablator driven by a 3-shock pulse in a near-vacuum Au hohlraum; data and inferred quantities, such as pressure, show good agreement with expectations.

  11. Theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial-confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, LiFeng; Ye, WenHua; He, XianTu; Wu, JunFeng; Fan, ZhengFeng; Xue, Chuang; Guo, HongYu; Miao, WenYong; Yuan, YongTeng; Dong, JiaQin; Jia, Guo; Zhang, Jing; Li, YingJun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Min; Ding, YongKun; Zhang, WeiYan

    2017-05-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been considered a promising, nearly inexhaustible source of sustainable carbon-free power for the world's energy future. It has long been recognized that the control of hydrodynamic instabilities is of critical importance for ignition and high-gain in the inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) hot-spot ignition scheme. In this mini-review, we summarize the progress of theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in the ICF central hot-spot implosion in our group over the past decade. In order to obtain sufficient understanding of the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF, we first decompose the problem into different stages according to the implosion physics processes. The decomposed essential physics pro- cesses that are associated with ICF implosions, such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), convergent geometry effects, as well as perturbation feed-through are reviewed. Analyti- cal models in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries have been established to study different physical aspects, including density-gradient, interface-coupling, geometry, and convergent effects. The influence of ablation in the presence of preheating on the RTI has been extensively studied by numerical simulations. The KHI considering the ablation effect has been discussed in detail for the first time. A series of single-mode ablative RTI experiments has been performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The theoretical and simulation research provides us the physical insights of linear and weakly nonlinear growths, and nonlinear evolutions of the hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF implosions, which has directly supported the research of ICF ignition target design. The ICF hot-spot ignition implosion design that uses several controlling features, based on our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, to address shell implosion stability, has

  12. Higher Velocity High-Foot Implosions on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra

    2014-10-01

    After the end of the National Ignition Campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, we began a campaign to test capsule performance using a modified laser pulse-shape that delivers higher power early in the pulse (``high foot''). This pulse-shape trades one-dimensional performance (peak compression) for increased hydrodynamic stability. The focus of the experiments this year have been to improve performance by increasing the implosion velocity using higher laser power/energy, depleted uranium hohlraums, and thinner capsules. While the mix of ablator material into the hotspot has been low for all of these implosions, the challenge has been to keep the implosion shape under control. As the peak laser power is increased, the plasma density in the hohlraum is increased - making it more and more challenging for the inner cone beams to reach the midplane of the hohlraum and resulting in an oblate implosion. Depleted uranium hohlraums have higher albedo than Au hohlraums, which leads to additional drive and improved implosion shape. Thinner ablators increase the velocity by reducing the amount of payload; thinner ablators also put less mass into the hohlraum which results in improved inner beam propagation. These techniques have allowed us to push the capsule to higher and higher velocity. In parallel with this effort, we are exploring other hohlraums such as the rugby shaped hohlraum to allow us to push these implosions further. This talk will summarize the progress of the high foot campaign in terms of both capsule and hohlraum performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  14. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the "adiabat shaping" mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  15. Simulation and assessment of ion kinetic effects in a direct-drive capsule implosion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    The first simulations employing a kinetic treatment of both fuel and shell ions to model inertial confinement fusion experiments are presented, including results showing the importance of kinetic physics processes in altering fusion burn. A pair of direct drive capsule implosions performed at the OMEGA facility with two different gas fills of deuterium, tritium, and helium-3 are analyzed. During implosion shock convergence, highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions and separations in the density and temperature amongst the ion species are observed. Diffusion of fuel into the capsule shell is identified as a principal process that degrades fusion burn performance.

  16. A scheme for reducing deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Liu, Jie; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-05-01

    It is demonstrated that the growth of acceleration-phase instabilities in inertial confinement fusion implosions can be controlled, especially in the high-foot implosions [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility. However, the excessive growth of the deceleration-phase instabilities can still destroy the hot spot ignition. A scheme is proposed to retard the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by shock collision near the waist of the inner shell surface. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm the improved deceleration-phase hot spot stability properties without sacrificing the fuel compression.

  17. A scheme for reducing deceleration-phase Rayleigh–Taylor growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F. Ye, W. H.; Liu, Jie; Wu, J. F.; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-05-15

    It is demonstrated that the growth of acceleration-phase instabilities in inertial confinement fusion implosions can be controlled, especially in the high-foot implosions [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility. However, the excessive growth of the deceleration-phase instabilities can still destroy the hot spot ignition. A scheme is proposed to retard the deceleration-phase Rayleigh–Taylor instability growth by shock collision near the waist of the inner shell surface. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm the improved deceleration-phase hot spot stability properties without sacrificing the fuel compression.

  18. Doppler measurement of implosion velocity in fast Z-pinch x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Maron, Y.; Coverdale, C. A.; Yu, E. P.; Hansen, S. B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lake, P. W.; Dunham, G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.; Fisher, D. V.; Fisher, V. I.; Bernshtam, V.; Starobinets, A.; Weingarten, L.

    2011-11-01

    The observation of Doppler splitting in K-shell x-ray lines emitted from optically thin dopants is used to infer implosion velocities of up to 70 cm/μs in wire-array and gas-puff Z pinches at drive currents of 15-20 MA. These data can benchmark numerical implosion models, which produce reasonable agreement with the measured velocity in the emitting region. Doppler splitting is obscured in lines with strong opacity, but red-shifted absorption produced by the cooler halo of material backlit by the hot core assembling on axis can be used to diagnose velocity in the trailing mass.

  19. Simulation and assessment of ion kinetic effects in a direct-drive capsule implosion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Ari Yitzchak; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Batha, Steven H.

    2016-10-24

    The first simulations employing a kinetic treatment of both fuel and shell ions to model inertial confinement fusion experiments are presented, including results showing the importance of kinetic physics processes in altering fusion burn. A pair of direct drive capsule implosions performed at the OMEGA facility with two different gas fills of deuterium, tritium, and helium-3 are analyzed. During implosion shock convergence, highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions and separations in the density and temperature amongst the ion species are observed. Finally, diffusion of fuel into the capsule shell is identified as a principal process that degrades fusion burn performance.

  20. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  1. Ion-viscosity effects on plasma-liner formation and implosion via merging supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Samulyak, Roman; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2016-10-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma-liner formation and implosion by merging a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for MIF. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. Ion viscosity is anticipated to be an important mechanism for momentum transport during liner formation, implosion, and stagnation. To study this, ion viscosity was incorporated into the code. To provide confidence in the numerical output and to help identify the difference between numerical and physical diffusion, a series of test cases were performed, consisting of Couette flow, Gresho vortex, and a Taylor-Green vortex. An L2-norm analysis was performed to measure the error and convergence. Simulations of conical (6 jets) and 4 π (60 jets) liners with and without ion viscosity reveal potential effects of viscosity on ram pressure, Mach-number degradation, and evolution of liner perturbations during jet merging and liner implosion.

  2. First Liquid Layer Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Olson, R E; Leeper, R J; Kline, J L; Zylstra, A B; Yi, S A; Biener, J; Braun, T; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Bradley, P A; Peterson, R R; Haines, B M; Yin, L; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Walters, C; Biener, M M; Kong, C; Crippen, J W; Kyrala, G A; Shah, R C; Herrmann, H W; Wilson, D C; Hamza, A V; Nikroo, A; Batha, S H

    2016-12-09

    The first cryogenic deuterium and deuterium-tritium liquid layer implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) demonstrate D_{2} and DT layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions that can access a low-to-moderate hot-spot convergence ratio (1230) DT ice layer implosions. Although high CR is desirable in an idealized 1D sense, it amplifies the deleterious effects of asymmetries. To date, these asymmetries prevented the achievement of ignition at the NIF and are the major cause of simulation-experiment disagreement. In the initial liquid layer experiments, high neutron yields were achieved with CRs of 12-17, and the hot-spot formation is well understood, demonstrated by a good agreement between the experimental data and the radiation hydrodynamic simulations. These initial experiments open a new NIF experimental capability that provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between hot-spot convergence ratio and the robustness of hot-spot formation during ICF implosions.

  3. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-15

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (∼0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  4. Two-Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Keck, R.L.; Keller, D.E.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Srebro, Y.; Town, R.P.J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2005-02-18

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance.

  5. The impact of a building implosion on airborne particulate matter in an urban community.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christopher M; Geyh, Alison; Srinivasan, Arjun; Breysse, Patrick N; Eggleston, Peyton A; Buckley, Timothy J

    2003-10-01

    In response to community concerns, the air quality impact of imploding a 22-story building in east Baltimore, MD, was studied. Time- and space-resolved concentrations of indoor and outdoor particulate matter (PM) (nominally 0.5-10 microm) were measured using a portable nephelometer at seven and four locations, respectively. PM10 levels varied in time and space; there was no measurable effect observed upwind of the implosion. The downwind peak PM10 levels varied with distance (54,000-589 microg/m3) exceeding pre-implosion levels for sites 100 and 1130 m 3000- and 20-fold, respectively. Estimated outdoor 24-hr integrated mass concentrations varied from 15 to 72 microg/m3. The implosion did not result in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for PM10 being exceeded. X-ray fluorescence analysis indicated that the elemental composition was dominated by crustal elements: calcium (57%), silicon (23%), aluminum (7.6%), and iron (6.1%). Lead was above background but at a low level (0.17 microg/m3). Peak PM10 concentrations were short-lived; most sites returned to background within 15 min. No increase in indoor PM10 was observed even at the most proximate 250 m location. These results demonstrate that a building implosion can have a severe but short-lived impact on community air quality. Effective protection is offered by being indoors or upwind.

  6. Effects of plasma physics on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L.; Delamater, N.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Hauer, A.

    1994-10-01

    Initial experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes from preliminary experiments are more oblate than predicted. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  7. Experimental measurement of Au M-band flux in indirectly-driven double-shell implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Perry, T S; Park, H S; Amendt, P; Sorce, C M; Compton, S M; Campbell, K M; Knauer, J P

    2004-09-17

    Indirectly-driven double-shell implosions are being investigated as a possible noncryogenic path to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In recent double-shell implosions, the inner shell trajectory was shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the temporal history of the M-band (2-5 keV) radiation emitted from the Au hohlraum wall. A large time-dependent discrepancy was observed between measurement and simulation of the x-ray flux in this range. In order to better characterize the radiation environment seen in these implosions, an experimental campaign was conducted on the Omega Laser. A number of diagnostics were used to measure both the temporal and spectral nature of the M-band flux. Results were obtained from an absolutely calibrated 12 channel filtered x-ray diode array (Dante) as well as two streaked crystal spectrometers and an absolutely calibrated time-integrated spectrometer (Henway). X-ray backlighting was also used to directly measure the effect of M-band radiation on the trajectory of the inner shell. The data from all diagnostics are shown to be in excellent agreement and provide a consistent picture of the M-band flux. These results are being used to improve the simulation of hohlraum-generated M-band radiation that will be necessary for the design of future double-shell implosions employing higher Z inner shells.

  8. Implosion symmetry tuning with megajoule laser pulses on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Meezan, N.; Dixit, S.; Kyrala, G.; London, R.; Thomas, C.; Callahan, D.; Widmann, K.; Glenzer, S.; Suter, L.; Hinkel, D.; Williams, E.; Dewald, E.; Landen, O.; Edwards, J.; MacGowan, B.; Divol, L.; Haynam, C.; Kalantar, D.; Le Pape, S.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M.; Schneider, M.; Young, B.

    2010-11-01

    A key element for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion is tuning the implosion symmetry. Symmetric implosions maximize the transfer of kinetic energy to the hot spot. One technique to measure the drive symmetry is the symcap. A symcap is a surrogate capsule that replaces the DT fuel layer by an equivalent mass of ablator material to mimic the hydrodynamic behavior of the capsule. The symcaps are filled with gas that provides an x-ray self-emission flash upon stagnation and is used to diagnose the radiation drive based on the shape of the emission. Simulations indicate that the shape of the emission flash correlates well with an ignition capsule's core shape. Using this data, the radiation drive in the hohlraum can be tuned to achieve symmetric implosions. The current symmetry campaign sets the initial hohlraum conditions to provide symmetric implosions for the ignition campaign. Experimental results will be presented for symmetry tuning with laser energies up to 1.3 MJ. Work for DOE by LANL (DE-AC52-06NA25396 and by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344).

  9. Laser/x-ray coupling in the first NIF beryllium implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Jones, O.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The x-ray flux driving a capsule is currently overestimated in standard Hydra high-flux model (Rosen et al., HEDP 7,180 (2011)) calculations of gas-filled hohlraums. Jones et al. (Phys. Plasmas,19,056315 (2012)) introduced time dependent multipliers to reduce the laser drive and achieve an appropriate radiation drive on NIF capsules. Using shock velocities from VISAR capsule experiments, symmetry capsule implosion times with truncated laser pulses, and time dependent DANTE X-ray flux measurements from 1D and 2D convergent ablator implosions, we derived a set of time dependent flux multipliers for the first NIF cryogenically layered beryllium capsule implosion. The similarity between these multipliers for both plastic and beryllium capsules suggests that they are primarily correcting for improper modeling of the hohlraum physics, with possibly some residual contribution from capsule modeling deficiencies. Using Lasnex we have adjusted hohlraum physics and resolution in an attempt to model these implosions without drive multipliers. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy.

  10. First Liquid Layer Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Yi, S. A.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Sater, J. D.; Bradley, P. A.; Peterson, R. R.; Haines, B. M.; Yin, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Walters, C.; Biener, M. M.; Kong, C.; Crippen, J. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Shah, R. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Wilson, D. C.; Hamza, A. V.; Nikroo, A.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-12-01

    The first cryogenic deuterium and deuterium-tritium liquid layer implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) demonstrate D2 and DT layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions that can access a low-to-moderate hot-spot convergence ratio (12 30 ) DT ice layer implosions. Although high CR is desirable in an idealized 1D sense, it amplifies the deleterious effects of asymmetries. To date, these asymmetries prevented the achievement of ignition at the NIF and are the major cause of simulation-experiment disagreement. In the initial liquid layer experiments, high neutron yields were achieved with CRs of 12-17, and the hot-spot formation is well understood, demonstrated by a good agreement between the experimental data and the radiation hydrodynamic simulations. These initial experiments open a new NIF experimental capability that provides an opportunity to explore the relationship between hot-spot convergence ratio and the robustness of hot-spot formation during ICF implosions.

  11. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005), 10.1364/OPN.16.7.000030], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045001]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D3He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006), 10.1063/1.2228252]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  12. Implosion Dynamics and Mix in Double-Shell ICF Capsule Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, Mark; Daughton, William; Simakov, Andrei; Wilson, Douglas; Watt, Robert; Delamater, Norman; Montgomery, David

    2015-11-01

    From an implosion dynamics perspective, double-shell ICF capsule designs have several advantages over the single-shell NIF ICF capsule point design. Double shell designs do not require precise shock sequencing, do not rely on hot spot ignition, have lower peak implosion speed requirements, and have lower convergence ratio requirements. However, there are still hurdles that must be overcome. The timing of the two main shocks in these designs is important in achieving sufficient compression of the DT fuel. Instability of the inner gold shell due to preheat from the hohlraum environment can disrupt the implosion of the inner pill. Mix, in addition to quenching burn in the DT fuel, also decreases the transfer of energy between the beryllium ablator and the inner gold shell during collision thus decreasing the implosion speed of the inner shell along with compression of the DT fuel. Herein, we will discuss practical implications of these effects on double-shell design we carry out in preparation for the NIF double-shell campaign. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  13. Shell and CORE Symmetry of beryllium capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, George; Kline, J.; Yi, S.; Simakov, A.; Olson, R.; Wilson, D.; Perry, T.; Batha, S.; Dewald, E.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J.; Strozzi, D.; Schneider, M.; Macphee, A.; Callahan, D.; Hurricane, O.; Milovich, J.; Hinnkel, D.; Khan, S.; Rygg, J.; Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.

    2015-11-01

    We will present results of the Be experimental campaign on the implosion symmetry properties of Be capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The experiments measured the inflight and core implosion symmetry. Images of the x-ray emission from the core around bang time provide a measure the symmetry near peak compression. Inflight symmetry of the ablator before stagnation is measured using a backlight imaging techniques. A Cu backlighter was used to measure the transmissions of the Cu doped Be shells. 2D symmetry is used to infer the drive and velocity uniformity and help adjust the time dependent ratio of the inner to the outer laser beam powers, to achieve proper implosion symmetry. Results show inner beam propagation is not degraded compared to CH ablators, corroborated by laser backscatter measurements. Variations in shape compared to CH ablators also provides information about the cross beam energy transfer used to adjust the equatorial shape and thus infer information about the differences in plasma conditions near the laser entrance holes. Experimental results and modeling implosion shape for Be capsules will be presented with comparisons to CH ablators.

  14. The effects of early time laser drive on hydrodynamic instability growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Suter, L. J.; Masse, L. P.

    2014-09-15

    Defects on inertial confinement fusion capsule surfaces can seed hydrodynamic instability growth and adversely affect capsule performance. The dynamics of shocks launched during the early period of x-ray driven National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions determine whether perturbations will grow inward or outward at peak implosion velocity and final compression. In particular, the strength of the first shock, launched at the beginning of the laser pulse, plays an important role in determining Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillations on the ablation front. These surface oscillations can couple to the capsule interior through subsequent shocks before experiencing Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth. We compare radiation hydrodynamic simulations of NIF implosions to analytic theories of the ablative RM and RT instabilities to illustrate how early time laser strength can alter peak velocity growth. We develop a model that couples the RM and RT implosion phases and captures key features of full simulations. We also show how three key parameters can control the modal demarcation between outward and inward growth.

  15. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-15

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  16. High-resolution, detailed simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3-D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current radiation hydrodynamics simulation capabilities. This talk describes the current state of progress of 3-D, high-resolution, capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. Most importantly, it is found that a single, standard simulation methodology appears adequate to model both implosion types and gives confidence that such a model can be used to guide future implosion designs toward ignition. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  17. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  18. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≃ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10{sup 7} cm/s, and a laser intensity of ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  19. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Amendt, P.; Delettrez, J.; Bellei, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Landen, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  20. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; ...

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  1. First observations of nonhydrodynamic mix at the fuel-shell interface in shock-driven inertial confinement implosions.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, H G; Sio, H; Li, C K; Zylstra, A B; Rosenberg, M J; Amendt, P; Delettrez, J; Bellei, C; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Betti, R; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C; Landen, O; Smalyuk, V A; Wilks, S; Greenwood, A; Nikroo, A

    2014-04-04

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50∶50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  2. Detailed implosion modeling of deuterium-tritium layered experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Eder, D. C.; Jones, O. S.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Suter, L. J.; Town, R. P. J.

    2013-05-15

    More than two dozen inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments with cryogenic deuterium-tritium layers have now been performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. Each of these yields a wealth of data including neutron yield, neutron down-scatter fraction, burn-averaged ion temperature, x-ray image shape and size, primary and down-scattered neutron image shape and size, etc. Compared to 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations modeling both the hohlraum and the capsule implosion, however, the measured capsule yield is usually lower by a factor of 5 to 10, and the ion temperature varies from simulations, while most other observables are well matched between experiment and simulation. In an effort to understand this discrepancy, we perform detailed post-shot simulations of a subset of NIF implosion experiments. Using two-dimensional HYDRA simulations [M. M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).] of the capsule only, these simulations represent as accurately as possible the conditions of a given experiment, including the as-shot capsule metrology, capsule surface roughness, and ice layer defects as seeds for the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities. The radiation drive used in these capsule-only simulations can be tuned to reproduce quite well the measured implosion timing, kinematics, and low-mode asymmetry. In order to simulate the experiments as accurately as possible, a limited number of fully three-dimensional implosion simulations are also being performed. Despite detailed efforts to incorporate all of the effects known and believed to be important in determining implosion performance, substantial yield discrepancies remain between experiment and simulation. Some possible alternate scenarios and effects that could resolve this discrepancy are discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; ...

    2016-05-04

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using three-dimension hydrodynamic simulations performed using a newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams, capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm), and imperfect pointing, energy balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σrms ~10 μm, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which a 880-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by the same-diameter beams, and a “R75” designmore » using a capsule of 900 μm in diameter and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations found that nonuniformities because of capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores resulting in an incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores is well represented by neutron images, but loosely in x-rays. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations and up to ~ 2 keV variation of the hot spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design is more hydrodynamically efficient because of mitigation of crossed-beam energy transfer, but also suffers more from the nonuniformities. Furthermore, simulations predict a performance advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam imbalance σrms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.« less

  4. The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, C. M.; Wilkerling, J.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    The implosion of cylindrical shell structures in a high-pressure water environment is studied experimentally. The shell structures are made from thin-walled aluminium and brass tubes with circular cross sections and internal clearance-fit aluminium end caps. The structures are filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The implosions are created in a high-pressure tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m by raising the ambient water pressure slowly to a value, Pc, just above the elastic stability limit of each shell structure. The implosion events are photographed with a high-speed digital movie camera, and the pressure waves are measured simultaneously with an array of underwater blast sensors. For the models with larger values of length-to-diameter ratio, L/D0, the tubes flatten during implosion with a two-lobe (mode 2) cross-sectional shape. In these cases, it is found that the pressure wave records scale primarily with Pc and the time scale (where Ri is the internal radius of the tube and ρ is the density of water), whereas the details of the structural design produce only secondary effects. In cases with smaller values of L/D0, the models implode with higher-mode cross-sectional shapes. Pressure signals are compared for various mode-number implosions of models with the same available energy, PcV , where V is the internal air-filled volume of the model. It is found that the pressure records scale well temporally with the time scale , but that the shape and amplitudes of the pressure records are strongly affected by the mode number. PMID:24353473

  5. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-05-04

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using three-dimension hydrodynamic simulations performed using a newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams, capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm), and imperfect pointing, energy balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σrms ~10 μm, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which a 880-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by the same-diameter beams, and a “R75” design using a capsule of 900 μm in diameter and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations found that nonuniformities because of capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores resulting in an incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores is well represented by neutron images, but loosely in x-rays. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations and up to ~ 2 keV variation of the hot spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design is more hydrodynamically efficient because of mitigation of crossed-beam energy transfer, but also suffers more from the nonuniformities. Furthermore, simulations predict a performance advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam imbalance σrms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.

  6. An Investigation Into Bayesian Networks for Modeling National Ignition Facility Capsule Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrani, J

    2008-08-18

    Bayesian networks (BN) are an excellent tool for modeling uncertainties in systems with several interdependent variables. A BN is a directed acyclic graph, and consists of a structure, or the set of directional links between variables that depend on other variables, and conditional probabilities (CP) for each variable. In this project, we apply BN's to understand uncertainties in NIF ignition experiments. One can represent various physical properties of National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosions as variables in a BN. A dataset containing simulations of NIF capsule implosions was provided. The dataset was generated from a radiation hydrodynamics code, and it contained 120 simulations of 16 variables. Relevant knowledge about the physics of NIF capsule implosions and greedy search algorithms were used to search for hypothetical structures for a BN. Our preliminary results found 6 links between variables in the dataset. However, we thought there should have been more links between the dataset variables based on the physics of NIF capsule implosions. Important reasons for the paucity of links are the relatively small size of the dataset, and the sampling of the values for dataset variables. Another factor that might have caused the paucity of links is the fact that in the dataset, 20% of the simulations represented successful fusion, and 80% didn't, (simulations of unsuccessful fusion are useful for measuring certain diagnostics) which skewed the distributions of several variables, and possibly reduced the number of links. Nevertheless, by illustrating the interdependencies and conditional probabilities of several parameters and diagnostics, an accurate and complete BN built from an appropriate simulation set would provide uncertainty quantification for NIF capsule implosions.

  7. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-05-04

    The effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA laser system are investigated using three-dimension hydrodynamic simulations performed using a newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams, capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm), and imperfect pointing, energy balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σrms ~10 μm, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which a 880-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by the same-diameter beams, and a “R75” design using a capsule of 900 μm in diameter and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations found that nonuniformities because of capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores resulting in an incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores is well represented by neutron images, but loosely in x-rays. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations and up to ~ 2 keV variation of the hot spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design is more hydrodynamically efficient because of mitigation of crossed-beam energy transfer, but also suffers more from the nonuniformities. Furthermore, simulations predict a performance advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam imbalance σrms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.

  8. Symmetry control of an indirectly driven high-density-carbon implosion at high convergence and high velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divol, L.; Pak, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Ho, D. D.-M.; Khan, S. F.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ross, J. S.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Millot, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Field, J. E.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S. R.; Rygg, J. R.; Edgell, D.; Macphee, A. G.; Goyon, C.; Hohenberger, M.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P.; Strozzi, D.; Cassata, W.; Casey, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D.; Volegov, P.; Yeamans, C.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Biener, J.; Crippen, J.; Choate, C.; Huang, H.; Kong, C.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N. G.; Stadermann, M.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Haan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Moody, J. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Edwards, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the most recent and successful effort at controlling the trajectory and symmetry of a high density carbon implosion at the National Ignition Facility. We use a low gasfill (0.3 mg/cc He) bare depleted uranium hohlraum with around 1 MJ of laser energy to drive a 3-shock-ignition relevant implosion. We assess drive performance and we demonstrate symmetry control at convergence 1, 3-5, 12, and 27 to better than ±5 μm using a succession of experimental platforms. The symmetry control was maintained at a peak fuel velocity of 380 km/s. Overall, implosion symmetry measurements are consistent with the pole-equator symmetry of the X-ray drive on the capsule being better than 5% in the foot of the drive (when shocks are launched) and better than 1% during peak drive (main acceleration phase). This level of residual asymmetry should have little impact on implosion performance.

  9. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  10. On the importance of minimizing ``coast-time'' in x-ray driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kritcher, A.; Landen, O.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    By the time an ICF implosion has converged a factor of 20, its surface area has shrunk 400x, making it an inefficient x-ray energy absorber. So traditionally, ICF implosions are designed to have the laser drive shut off at a time, toff, well before bang-time, tBT, for a coast-time of tcoast =tBT -toff . Contrary to expectations, high-foot implosions on NIF show a strong dependence of many key ICF quantities on reduced coast-time (by extending the duration of laser peak power at constant power), most notably stagnation pressure. Herein we show that the ablation pressure, pabl, which drives high-foot implosions, is essentially triangular in temporal shape, and that reducing tcoast boosts pabl by 2x. Analytic theory demonstrates that reducing coast-time can lead to a 15% higher implosion velocity, which together with the increased ablation pressure, can boost the stagnation pressure by 2x as compared to a coasting version of the same implosion. Four dimensionless parameters are identified. We find that reducing coast-time to as little as 500 ps still provides some benefit. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Effect of the implosion and demolition of a hospital building on the concentration of fungi in the air.

    PubMed

    Barreiros, Gloria; Akiti, Tiyomi; Magalhães, Ana Cristina Gouveia; Nouér, Simone A; Nucci, Marcio

    2015-12-01

    Building renovations increase the concentration of Aspergillus conidia in the air. In 2010, one wing of the hospital building was imploded due to structural problems. To evaluate the impact of building implosion on the concentration of fungi in the air, the demolition was performed in two phases: mechanical demolition of 30 m of the building, followed by implosion of the wing. Patients at high risk for aspergillosis were placed in protected wards. Air sampling was performed during mechanical demolition, on the day of implosion and after implosion. Total and specific fungal concentrations were compared in the different areas and periods of sampling, using the anova test. The incidence of IA in the year before and after implosion was calculated. The mean concentration of Aspergillus increased during mechanical demolition and on the day of implosion. However, in the most protected areas, there was no significant difference in the concentration of fungi. The incidence of invasive aspergillosis (cases per 1000 admissions) was 0.9 in the 12 months before, 0.4 during, and 0.5 in the 12 months after mechanical demolition (P > 0.05). Continuous monitoring of the quality of air and effective infection control measures are important to minimize the impact of building demolition. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  13. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Effects of Low-Mode Asymmetries on OMEGA Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. S.; McKenty, P. W.; Shvydky, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marinak, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the role of low-mode asymmetries is essential to characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions. Asymmetries seeded by nonuniformities in laser drive, capsule manufacture, and target positioning lead to shell modulation as well as nonradial hydrodynamic flow in the hot spot at stagnation, which can adversely affect peak pressure and neutron yield. Full-sphere three-dimensional simulations are required to quantify the flow in the hot spot and its impact on hot-spot pressure and other observables. This paper will analyze results from HYDRA simulations of OMEGA cryogenic implosions modeling various sources of low-mode asymmetries (e.g., target offset, laser power imbalance, ice layer roughness) and show comparisons with experimental observables. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Numbers DE-NA0001944 and performed under the auspices of the LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B. Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-15

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ∼±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ∼±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15−20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ∼±25−40 km/s.

  15. A strategy for reducing stagnation phase hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    Encouraging progress is being made in demonstrating control of ablation front hydrodynamic instability growth in inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)]. Even once ablation front stabilities are controlled, however, instability during the stagnation phase of the implosion can still quench ignition. A scheme is proposed to reduce the growth of stagnation phase instabilities through the reverse of the “adiabat shaping” mechanism proposed to control ablation front growth. Two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations confirm that improved stagnation phase stability should be possible without compromising fuel compression.

  16. A multi-point radial photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) diagnostic for cylindrical implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Devon; Dolan, Daniel; Lemke, Raymond; McBride, Ryan; Martin, Matthew; Harding, Eric; Walker, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Radial photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) has been successfully applied in cylindrical implosion experiments fielded on Sandia's Z accelerator. Magnetically driven cylinders have been diagnosed well beyond 20 km/s, using a ``leapfrog'' configuration to address the bandwidth limitations of currently available detectors and digitizers. Implosion symmetry is the latest question this diagnostic will attempt to answer. An innovative multi-point configuration is being developed to allow six concurrent measurements during each experiment. This presentation describes the implementation of radial PDV in this extreme environment. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Rinderknecht, H G; Rosenberg, M J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; McCluskey, M; Mastrosimone, D; Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.

  18. Using absolute x-ray spectral measurements to infer stagnation conditions in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Benedetti, L. R.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Landen, O.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the continuum x-ray spectrum emitted from the hot-spot of an ICF implosion can be used to infer a number thermodynamic properties at stagnation including temperature, pressure, and hot-spot mix. In deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we field a number of x-ray diagnostics that provide spatial, temporal, and spectrally-resolved measurements of the radiated x-ray emission. We report on analysis of these measurements using a 1-D hot-spot model to infer thermodynamic properties at stagnation. We compare these to similar properties that can be derived from DT fusion neutron measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; ...

    2014-06-04

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energymore » uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.« less

  20. Improved Rocket Efficiency in Direct-Drive Implosions Using Different Ablator Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-10-01

    A set of experiments varied the ratio of the atomic number over the atomic mass (A/ Z) of the ablator to increase both the ablation pressure and the mass ablation rate and improve the rocket efficiency. A 20% increase in the implosion velocity was observed when using a Be ablator (A/ Z = 2.25) compared to C (A/ Z = 2) and CH (A/ Z = 1.85) ablators. These measurements are consistent with hydrodynamic simulations that predicted an increase in the hydrodynamic efficiency of 18% for Be and 7% for C compared to CH ablator. A comparable amount of unabsorbed laser power was measured for the three materials (~30%) that shows that the increase in implosion velocity for Be ablator is a result of the increase in the rocket efficiency, not an increase in absorption. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  1. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-01

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ˜±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ˜±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ˜±25-40 km/s.

  2. Reduced instability growth with high-adiabat high-foot implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Smalyuk, V A; Raman, K S; Peterson, J L; Berzak Hopkins, L; Callahan, D A; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Hinkel, D E; Hoover, D; Hurricane, O A; Kroll, J J; Landen, O L; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Rygg, J R; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Widmann, K

    2014-07-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are a major obstacle in the quest to achieve ignition as they cause preexisting capsule defects to grow and ultimately quench the fusion burn in experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Unstable growth at the ablation front has been dramatically reduced in implosions with "high-foot" drives as measured using x-ray radiography of modulations at the most dangerous wavelengths (Legendre mode numbers of 30-90). These growth reductions have helped to improve the performance of layered DT implosions reported by O. A. Hurricane et al. [Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)], when compared to previous "low-foot" experiments, demonstrating the value of stabilizing ablation-front growth and providing directions for future ignition designs.

  3. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V.; Baksht, R. B.

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  4. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility.

  5. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-04

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is capable of measuring the yield to ~±10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~±50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to ±15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~±25-40 km/s.

  6. Experimental Studies of Direct-Drive, Low-Intensity, Low-Adiabat Spherical Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Betti, R.; Delettrez, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Li, D.Y.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    2006-02-15

    Low-adiabat (high-compressibility) implosions were performed with shells filled with 15 atm of D2 gas driven with ~12.5 kJ, 3-ns-square pulse shapes, and a laser intensity of ~2 x 10^14 W/cm^2. Initial target modulations, imprinted on the target surface by laser nonuniformities, were varied by using drive with and without smoothing by spectral dispersion. The performance of the spherical implosions was correlated with measured target modulations at the end of the acceleration pulse performed in a planar target with similar conditions using through-foil radiography. The neutron yield decreases sharply when target modulations become comparable with the target thickness at the end of the acceleration phase. The measured target areal densities are less sensitive to target modulations.

  7. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic studies of implosion modes of nested wire array z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jun; Ding, Ning Xue, Chuang; Sun, Shunkai

    2014-07-15

    Implosion dynamics of nested wire arrays in (r, θ) geometry was studied with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D MHD) simulations. Three different implosion modes are obtained by just changing the wire number of the outer array, when the other conditions, such as the initial radius, length, mass of each array, the wire number of the inner array, and the discharge voltage waveform, are fixed. Simulation results show that the effect of discrete wires, which cannot be described by the thin shell inductive model, will influence the distribution of current between the outer and inner arrays at the early stage, and the discrepancy between results from MHD and thin shell model increases with the interwire gap of the outer array.

  8. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  9. Development of a Two-shock, Vacuum Hohlraum, Plastic Capsule Implosion Experimental Platform on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonson, Jay; MacLaren, Stephen; Dittrich, Thomas; Ma, Tammy; Pino, Jesse; Tipton, Robert; Olson, Richard

    2014-10-01

    A new experimental platform has been developed to study a variety of indirect drive capsule implosion characteristics. A relatively small, ~1700 micron outer diameter, and thick, ~200 microns, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a standard size 5750 micron diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about ~1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. Compared to an NIF ignition experiment, this relatively simple, low laser energy platform will allow detailed studies, via sequences of shots, scanning implosion symmetry, capsule gas-fill and convergence, roughness and mix, as well as optimizing stagnation pressure. Recent experimental results toward commissioning this platform will be discussed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Measurement of inflight shell areal density perturbations in NIF capsule implosions near peak velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammel, B. A.; Pickworth, L.; Smalyuk, V.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative measurements of shell-RhoR perturbations in capsules near peak implosion velocity (PV) are challenging. An external backlighter samples both sides of the shell, unless a re-entrant cone is used (potentially perturbing implosion). Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to PV, has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule. Adding high-Z gas (~ 1% Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at photon energies ~ 8 keV over nominal fills. From images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer, we infer the growth at PV of imposed perturbations (100 nm amplitude, mode 40). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Theoretical Investigation of Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Radha, P. B.; Skupsky, S.; Militze, B.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) and opacity is essential to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosion designs reach strongly coupled, degenerate plasma conditions. Using the first-principles, path-integral Monte Carlo method, we have established an EOS table of deuterium, spanning typical ICF shell conditions (densities of 0.001 to 100 g/cc and temperatures of 1 eV to 1 keV). Noticeable differences in energy/pressure at moderately coupled, degenerate regimes have been found in comparison to the SESAME and Thomas-Fermi EOS. Hydrodynamic simulations using these EOS's and opacities for OMEGA implosions will be presented. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  12. Progress Report on Rotating Liquid Liner Implosion Experiment, 1 June to 31 December 1975.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A critical question in the use of imploding liner flux compression for controlled fusion has been the stability of the inner surface of the liner ...To study the problem experimentally, the existing NRL Imploding Liner Facility was modified to allow the implosion of rotating liquid metal liners ...Rotational stabilization of lthe inner surface of a decelerating liquid sodium-potassium liner has been demonstrated, with excellent circularity of the

  13. High performance capsule implosions on the OMEGA Laser facility with rugby hohlraumsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.-S.; Town, R. P. J.; Milovich, J. L.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Sorce, C.; Strozzi, D. J.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Liberatore, S.; Monteil, M.-C.; Séguin, F.; Rosenberg, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Stoeckl, C.; Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E.

    2010-05-01

    Rugby-shaped hohlraums have been proposed as a method for x-ray drive enhancement for indirectly driven capsule implosions. This concept has recently been tested in a series of shots on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. In this paper, experimental results are presented comparing the performance of D2-filled capsules between standard cylindrical Au hohlraums and rugby-shaped hohlraums. The rugby hohlraums demonstrated 18% more x-ray drive energy as compared with the cylinders, and the high-performance design of these implosions (both cylinder and rugby) also provided ≈20× more deuterium (DD) neutrons than any previous indirectly driven campaign on OMEGA and ≈3× more than ever achieved on NOVA [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] implosions driven with nearly twice the laser energy. This increase in performance enables, for the first time, a measurement of the neutron burn history and imaging of the neutron core shapes in an indirectly driven implosion. Previous DD neutron yields had been too low to register this key measurement of capsule performance and the effects of dynamic mix. A wealth of additional data on the fuel areal density from the suite of charged particle diagnostics was obtained on a subset of the shots that used D H3e rather than D2 fuel. Comparisons of the experimental results with numerical simulations are shown to be in very good agreement. The design techniques employed in this campaign, e.g., smaller laser entrance holes and hohlraum case-to-capsule ratios, provide added confidence in the pursuit of ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)].

  14. High Performance Capsule Implosions on the Omega Laser Facility with Rugby Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry F.

    2009-11-01

    Rugby-shaped hohlraums have been proposed as a method for x-ray drive enhancement for indirectly-driven capsule implosions [1]. This concept has recently been tested in a series of shots on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. In this talk, experimental results are presented comparing the performance of D2-filled capsules between standard cylindrical Au hohlraums and rugby-shaped hohlraums. Not only did the rugby hohlraums demonstrate 18% more x-ray drive energy as compared with the cylinders, but the high-performance design of these implosions (both cylinder and rugby) also provided 20X more DD neutrons than any previous indirectly-driven campaign on Omega (and 3X more than ever achieved on Nova implosions driven with nearly twice the laser energy). This increase in performance enables, for the first time, a measurement of the neutron burn history of an indirectly-driven implosion. Previous DD neutron yields had been too low to register this key measurement of capsule performance and the effects of dynamic mix. A wealth of additional data on the fuel areal density from the suite of charged particle diagnostics was obtained on a subset of the shots that used D^3He rather than D2 fuel. Comparisons of the experimental results with numerical simulations are shown to be in excellent agreement. The design techniques employed in this campaign, e.g., smaller NIF-like laser entrance holes and hohlraum case-to-capsule ratios, provide added confidence in the pursuit of ignition on the National Ignition Facility. [4pt] [1] P. Amendt, C. Cerjan, D. E. Hinkel, J. L. Milovich, H.-S. Park, and H. F. Robey, ``Rugby-like hohlraum experimental designs for demonstrating x-ray drive enhancement'', Phys. Plasmas 15, 012702 (2008).

  15. Multidimensional Analysis of Direct-Drive Plastic-Shell Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.

    2004-11-01

    Direct-drive implosions of plastic shells with the OMEGA laser are used as energy-scaled warm surrogates for ignition cryogenic targets designed for use on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic targets involve varying shell thickness (15 to 33 μm), fill pressures (3 to 15 atm), and shell adiabats. The multidimensional hydrodynamics code DRACO is used to evaluate the effects of capsule-surface roughness and illumination nonuniformities on target performance. These simulations indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining fusion yields. For shells that are thick enough to survive the Rayleigh--Taylor growth, target yields are significantly reduced by growth of the long (ℓ < 10) and intermediate modes (20 < ℓ < 50) occurring from single-beam laser nonuniformities. The neutron production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1-D) predictions. The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells, however, have significantly lower amplitudes and widths closer to 1-D results, indicating shell breakup during the acceleration phase. The simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. Previously, the stability of plastic-shell implosions had been correlated to a static ``mix-width'' at the boundary of the gas and plastic pusher estimated using a variety of experimental observables and an assumption of spherical symmetry. Results of these 2-D simulations provide a comprehensive understanding of warm-target implosion dynamics without assumptions of spherical symmetry and serve to answer the question of the hydrodynamic surrogacy between these plastic-shell implosions and the cryogenic ignition designs.

  16. Preliminary Experimental Design and Theoretical Investigation of a Plasma Implosion Driven Mass Accelerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-30

    magnetic energy storage systems. More recently high power pulses with rise times In the tens of nanoseconds have been Investigated ’ with success. The...velocities. Such a process would provide us with a new type of electrically driven gun with the potential for achieving projectile velocities well above... under the support of this contract. 3. LUMPED PARAMETER IMPLOSION MODEL This model is based on an equation for the driving circuit energized by a

  17. Progress towards a one-dimensional layered DT implosion using HDC capsules at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divol, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Using a 0.8x scale HDC capsule (D=1.6 mm) in a full scale DU hohlraum (D=5.75 mm) filled with relatively low He gas (0.3mg/cc), we have been able to achieve a high (C=26) convergence layered DT implosion that is diagnosed within 10 percent of round at all measured times. An adiabat-2.5, 3-shock, 1MJ-7ns laser pulse was used to achieved velocities >350 km/s, neutron yield 3e15 with a down scattered ratio 0.03. This platform shows minimal laser plasma interaction (no measurable hot electrons, > 97 % coupling, no cross beam energy transfer required). A direct control of the laser cone fraction vs. time was used to obtain 3-shock-breakout symmetry (keyhole target), in flight symmetry (radiography at convergence 2-4) and symmetric hot spot/rebound shock at convergence 12 (gas-filled capsule) and 26 (layered DT). Further repointing of laser cones demonstrated control of higher modes (P4). 4 layered DT implosions allowed to compare the effect of W-dopant, symmetry and velocity on performance. We will show using experimental results and simulations that the W-doped HDC implosion behaves as expected and reaches 40% of Yield Over Clean (YOC), with the fill-tube perturbation being a possible cause of the reduced yield. The undoped HDC capsule has a YOC < 0.3, showing more sensitivity to X-ray preheat than expected. The path towards an equivalent scale 1 implosion capable of large alpha-heating will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Direct-drive cryogenic-target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yudong; Huang, Tianxuan; Lei, Haile; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Jiahua; Yang, Zhiwen; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun

    2015-04-15

    Directly driven cryogenic target implosion experiments are performed on the SGIII prototype laser facility. X-ray pinhole images reveal frozen condensation on the sealing film. The influence of the condensation on the delivery of laser energy to the capsule surface is then quantified experimentally. It is found that, with a carefully chosen pre-pulse duration, the influence can be reduced, and the neutron yield is increased by an order of magnitude. Subsequently, the cryogenic layered capsule and cryogenic gas-filled capsule are imploded using 6.5-kJ laser energy. The implosion performance is characterized by the neutron yield, the 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell, and the primary proton spectrum. The neutron yield is 2 × 10{sup 7} for the gas-filled capsule and 2.8 × 10{sup 7} for the layered capsule. The 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell exhibit significant implosion asymmetry. The energy downshift of the proton spectrum is used to infer the areal density. For the gas-filled capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.1 MeV, yielding an areal density of 1–3 mg/cm{sup 2}. For the layered capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.5 MeV, yielding an areal density of 4–6 mg/cm{sup 2}. Improving the implosion symmetry would help to further increase the areal density.

  19. A simple method to prevent hard X-ray-induced preheating effects inside the cone tip in indirect-drive fast ignition implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongxiao; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shui, Min; He, Yingling; Gu, Yuqiu Zhang, Baohan; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Chen, Li; Chen, Ming; and others

    2016-06-15

    During fast-ignition implosions, preheating of inside the cone tip caused by hard X-rays can strongly affect the generation and transport of hot electrons in the cone. Although indirect-drive implosions have a higher implosion symmetry, they cause stronger preheating effects than direct-drive implosions. To control the preheating of the cone tip, we propose the use of indirect-drive fast-ignition targets with thicker tips. Experiments carried out at the ShenGuang-III prototype laser facility confirmed that thicker tips are effective for controlling preheating. Moreover, these results were consistent with those of 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  20. Three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility implosions: Insight into experimental observables

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K. Munro, David H.; Sepke, Scott; Caggiano, Joseph; Clark, Daniel; Hatarik, Robert; Kritcher, Andrea; Sayre, Daniel; Yeamans, Charles; Knauer, James; Hilsabeck, Terry; Kilkenny, Joe

    2015-05-15

    We simulate in 3D both the hydrodynamics and, simultaneously, the X-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosions. We apply asymmetric radiation drive to study the impact of low mode asymmetry on diagnostic observables. We examine X-ray and neutron images as well as neutron spectra for these perturbed implosions. The X-ray images show hot spot evolution on small length scales and short time scales, reflecting the incomplete stagnation seen in the simulation. The neutron images show surprising differences from the X-ray images. The neutron spectra provide additional measures of implosion asymmetry. Flow in the hot spot alters the neutron spectral peak, namely, the peak location and width. The changes in the width lead to a variation in the apparent temperature with viewing angle that signals underlying hot spot asymmetry. We compare our new expectations based on the simulated data with NIF data. We find that some recent cryogenic layered experiments show appreciable temperature anisotropy indicating residual flow in the hot spot. We also find some trends in the data that do not reflect our simulation and theoretical understanding.

  1. Measurements of the Effect of Adiabat on Shell Decompression in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Davis, A. K.; Craxton, R. S.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the effect of adiabat (α) on the shell thickness were performed in direct-drive implosions. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was obtained using a novel technique where the outer and inner surfaces of the shell were simultaneously measured using self-emission images of the imploding target. When reducing the shell's adiabat from α = 6 to α = 4.5 , the shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 μm to 60 μm, but when decreasing the adiabat further (α = 1.8), the shell thickness was measured to increase to 75 μm. The measured shell thickness, shell trajectories, neutron bang time, and neutron yield were reproduced by two-dimensional simulations that include laser imprint, nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation-of-state models. These results show that the decompression of the shell measured for low-adiabat implosions was a result of laser imprint. Additional information on the evolution of the density profile was obtained using x-ray radiography. The backlighter was created with six of the 60 OMEGA laser beams, with the pointings and energies of other beams adjusted to maintain a uniform implosion. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium–tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-15

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium–tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  3. The Effects of Target Mounts in Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I.V.; Marshall, F.J.; Marozas, J.A.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Collins, T.J.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Skupsky, S.

    2009-08-19

    The effects of two types of target mounts, stalks and spider silks, on the implosion of both room-temperature D2-gas-filled shells and cryogenic D2-ice-filled shells have been studied both experimentally and by means of two-dimensional simulations. The simulations indicate that the hydrodynamic effect of the expanding plasma created by the ablation of material from the target mounts and refraction of laser light by this plasma induce perturbations in the imploding shell that are damaging to the implosion. The spider silks are the more-damaging type of mount since the silks (typically four) are arrayed over the target surface, whereas the stalk (typically one) meets the target at a single point. Stalks are therefore preferred over silks as a target mount. The scale and magnitude of the perturbations induced by the spider silks have been verified by planar-target experiments performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1995)]. The perturbations predicted by simulations to arise from stalks qualitatively agree with the results of implosion experiments using Ti-doped plastic shells.

  4. Validating kinetic models in a fluid code using data from high-Knudsen-number capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N.; Molvig, K.; Dodd, E.; Albright, B.; Simakov, A.; Zimmerman, G.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A.; Sinenian, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Sangster, C.

    2013-10-01

    We validate models of (a) ion diffusion and (b) fusion reactivity decrease from modified ion-distribution tails, implemented in a rad-hydro code, using data for five quantities (DD-n yield, D3He-p yield, DD burn temperature, bang time, and absorbed energy) from recent thin-shell D3He-filled capsules at OMEGA. Four inputs (laser source fraction, electron thermal flux limiter, Knudsen number multiplier, and ion flux multiplier) are varied to find the best fit to the ten observables from two implosions (8-atm fill and 23-atm fill). The calibrated input values can explain the data from a set of other D3He implosions with fill pressures from 1 atm to 17 atm (Knudsen numbers from 0.5 to ~6). Using a new transport model for ion loss, we will develop a model of wide validity for OMEGA direct-drive implosions. Funded by USDOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  5. Data driven models of the performance and repeatability of NIF high foot implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jim; Casey, Dan; Callahan, Debbie; Hartouni, Ed; Ma, Tammy; Spears, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Recent high foot (HF) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments performed at the national ignition facility (NIF) have consisted of enough laser shots that a data-driven analysis of capsule performance is feasible. In this work we use 20-30 individual implosions of similar design, spanning laser drive energies from 1.2 to 1.8 MJ, to quantify our current understanding of the behavior of HF ICF implosions. We develop a probabilistic model for the projected performance of a given implosion and use it to quantify uncertainties in predicted performance including shot-shot variations and observation uncertainties. We investigate the statistical significance of the observed performance differences between different laser pulse shapes, ablator materials, and capsule designs. Finally, using a cross-validation technique, we demonstrate that 5-10 repeated shots of a similar design are required before real trends in the data can be distinguished from shot-shot variations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-674957.

  6. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega facility

    SciTech Connect

    Laffite, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Caillaud, T.; Girard, F.; Landoas, O.; Lemaire, S.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Philippe, F.; Reverdin, C.; Tassin, V.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Joshi, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Legay, G.

    2016-01-15

    We present in this article direct-drive experiments that were carried out on the Omega facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Two different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target whose parameters, dimensions and composition, remained the same. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolved measurement of the scattered light. We show that, provided the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the “bang-time” and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. In contrast, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assessed by comparing the target performances between prediction and measurement. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measured neutron number is about 80% of the prediction. For the 2-step 2-ns pulse, we test here that this ratio falls to about 20%.

  7. X-ray radiation from puff-on-wire implosion on the COBRA generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouart, N.; Engelbrecht, J.; de Grouchy, P.; Qi, N.; Shelkovenko, T.; Pikuz, S.; Kusse, B.; Hammer, D.; Giuliani, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Velikovich, A.; Apruzese, J.; Clark, R.

    2016-10-01

    Substantial progress has been made in developing plasma radiation sources from Z-pinch implosions. University pulsed power machines provide a cost effective platform to study alternative mechanisms of producing x-rays that may provide guidance in search of further improvements on the larger machines. Radiation from puff-on-wire implosions were previously studied. We report recent observations and modeling of puff-on-wire implosions using the 1 MA COBRA generator in the long pulse mode. The gas puff used Ne, Ar, or Kr and the wire material was either Cu or manganin 290 (84% Cu, 12% Mn, 4% Ni). The diagnostics include time-integrated pinhole cameras and an axially resolved spectrometer, multiple filtered PCDs and Si-diodes, and time-gated XUV cameras. X-ray radiation from the gas puff and the K-alpha line from wire material was detected. A 1-D multi-zone non-LTE kinetics code with radiation transport will be used to model the radiation to infer the plasma conditions. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  8. Monochromatic backlighting of direct-drive cryogenic DT implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Betti, R.; Bittle, W.; Delettrez, J. A.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Janezic, R. T.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Mileham, C.; McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Morse, S. F. B.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Shmayda, W. T.; Sorce, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2017-05-01

    Backlighting is a powerful technique to observe the flow of cold and dense material in high-energy-density-plasma experiments. High-performance, direct-drive cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions are a challenging backlighting configuration because of the low opacity of the DT shell, the high shell velocity, the small size of the stagnating shell, and the very bright self-emission of the hot core. A crystal imaging system with a Si Heα backlighter at 1.865 keV driven by ˜20-ps short pulses from OMEGA EP was developed to radiograph the OMEGA cryogenic implosions. The high throughput of the crystal imaging system makes it possible to record high-quality images with good photon statistics and a spatial resolution of ˜15 μm at 10% to 90% modulation. This imager has been used to study the evolution of preimposed mass-density perturbations in the ablator, to quantify the perturbations caused by the stalk that is used to mount the target, and to study the mix caused by laser imprint or small-scale debris on the target surface. Because of the very low opacity of DT relative to carbon, even 0.1% of mix of carbon into the DT ice can be reliably inferred from the images. With the current implosion designs, mix is only observed for an adiabat below α = 4.

  9. Diagnosis of pusher-fuel mix in indirectly driven Nova implosions (HEP3)

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, T.R.; Hammel, B.A.; Keane, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    A key issue for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. Imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations that degrade capsule performance. Understanding this process is crucial if the authors are to successfully predict requirements for future high-gain ICF capsules. Experiments on the Nova laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have directly measured perturbation growth on planar foils, and three experimental groups have investigated backlit perturbation growth using imploding spheres. In addition to these efforts, which concentrate on indirectly driven implosions, is work investigating the hydrodynamic stability of directly driven ICF capsules. In these direct-drive experiments the laser light shines directly on the capsules, causing the implosion and providing the seed for perturbation growth. This article reports measurement, via emission from spectroscopic tracers, of the full process of perturbation growth leading to pusher-fuel mix in spherical implosions, and shows perturbation growth dependence on initial perturbation amplitude and wavelength. In contrast to the cited direct-drive work, the authors have in this experiment separated the drive from the perturbation seed.

  10. Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation in large-diameter gas puff Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Sze, H.; Failor, B. H.; Banister, J.; Levine, J. S.; Riordan, J. C.; Steen, P.; Sincerny, P.; Lojewski, D.

    2008-02-15

    Recently, a new approach for efficiently generating K-shell x-rays in large-diameter, long-implosion time, structured argon gas Z-pinches has been demonstrated based on a 'pusher-stabilizer-radiator' model. In this paper, direct observations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability mitigation of a 12-cm diameter, 200-ns implosion time argon Z-pinch using a laser shearing interferometer (LSI) and a laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) are presented. Using a zero-dimensional snowplow model, the imploding plasma trajectories are calculated with the driver current waveforms and the initial mass distributions measured using the planar laser induced fluorescence method. From the LSI and LWA images, the plasma density and trajectory during the implosion are measured. The measured trajectory agrees with the snowplow calculations. The suppression of hydromagnetic instabilities in the ''pusher-stabilizer-radiator'' structured loads, leading to a high-compression ratio, high-yield Z-pinch, is discussed. For comparison, the LSI and LWA images of an alternative load (without stabilizer) show the evolution of a highly unstable Z-pinch.

  11. Capsule modeling of high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, M. V.; Sepke, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of detailed, capsule-only simulations of a set of high foot implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments span a range of ablator thicknesses, laser powers, and laser energies, and modeling these experiments as a set is important to assess whether the simulation model can reproduce the trends seen experimentally as the implosion parameters were varied. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations have been run including a number of effects—both nominal and off-nominal—such as hohlraum radiation asymmetries, surface roughness, the capsule support tent, and hot electron pre-heat. Selected three-dimensional simulations have also been run to assess the validity of the 2D axisymmetric approximation. As a composite, these simulations represent the current state of understanding of NIF high foot implosion performance using the best and most detailed computational model available. While the most detailed simulations show approximate agreement with the experimental data, it is evident that the model remains incomplete and further refinements are needed. Nevertheless, avenues for improved performance are clearly indicated.

  12. Time history prediction of direct-drive implosions on the Omega facility

    DOE PAGES

    Laffite, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Caillaud, T.; ...

    2016-01-14

    We present in this article direct-drive experiments that were carried out on the Omega facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Two different pulse shapes were tested in order to vary the implosion stability of the same target whose parameters, dimensions and composition, remained the same. The direct-drive configuration on the Omega facility allows the accurate time-resolvedmeasurement of the scattered light. We show that, provided the laser coupling is well controlled, the implosion time history, assessed by the “bang-time” and the shell trajectory measurements, can be predicted. This conclusion is independent on the pulse shape. Inmore » contrast, we show that the pulse shape affects the implosion stability, assessed by comparing the target performances between prediction and measurement. For the 1-ns square pulse, the measuredneutron number is about 80% of the prediction. Lastly, for the 2-step 2-ns pulse, we test here that this ratio falls to about 20%.« less

  13. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C. Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W.

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub α} line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  14. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; ...

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  15. Simulated impact of self-generated magnetic fields in the hot-spot of NIF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partha, M. A.; Haan, S. W.; Koning, J.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    Deviations from sphericity in an imploded hot-spot result in magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery effect. The magnetic field can reduce thermal conductivity, affect α transport, change instability growth, and cause magnetic pressure. Previous estimates of these effects have indicated that they are not of great consequence, but have suggested that they could plausibly affect NIF observables such as yield and ion temperature by 5-25%. Using the MHD capability in the Hydra code, we evaluated the impact of these processes in a post-shot model for a typical NIF implosion. Various implosion asymmetries were implemented, with the goal of surveying plausible implosion configurations to find the geometry in which the MHD effects were the most significant. Magnetic fields are estimated to approach 104 Tesla, and to affect conductivity locally by more than 50%, but global impact on observables is small in most cases. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Compression versus first shock strength in indirect-drive NIF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, Otto; Celliers, Peter; Robey, Harry; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Haan, Steve; Lindl, John

    2016-10-01

    NIF indirect-drive cryogenic DT implosions have used a variety of multi-shock pulse shapes to implode capsules with in-flight fuel adiabats ranging from 1.5 to 4. At a given design adiabat, the stagnated convergence ratio and fuel areal density inferred from the neutron image size and the ratio of downscattered to primary neutron yield shows variability that can be ascribed to shot-to-shot differences in shock timing, ablator dopant level and duration of coast phase. However, the locus of maxima in convergence and fuel areal density is shown to depend principally on the first shock strength that is measured by separate shock timing shots. No clear secondary dependence on hot electron preheat levels that vary by orders of magnitude between designs is observed. The scalings, which include all NIF indirect-drive implosions shot to date, are fitted using an analytic 1D implosion model. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Weber, Christopher; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Robey, Harry; Kritcher, Andrea; Milovich, Jose; Salmonson, Jay

    2016-10-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or ``shimmed,'' so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Techniques for Enhancing Implosion Performance on High-Foot Ignition Capsules on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, T. R.; Hurricane, O.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Callahan, D. A.; Clark, D.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Two options that have the potential to improve implosion performance in the High-Foot series of ignition capsules on NIF will be presented. The first option explores changing the shape of the x-ray drive to include a 4th and even a 5th shock in the implosion. According to simulations, these extra shocks improve the configuration of the assembled fuel and lead to improved confinement and performance. A ``ramp compression'' between the foot of the drive and the main pulse is also investigated. The second option studies the effect of increasing the Si dopant in a thin-shell capsule. NIF shot N150211 produced relatively high fusion yield (7.6E15 neutrons) but may have suffered from shell burn through. Increasing the Si dopant may delay this burn through yet preserve high implosion velocity. This work was performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Comparison of high-density carbon implosions in unlined uranium versus gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Meezan, Nathan; Tommasini, Riccardo; Khan, Shahab; MacKinnon, Andrew; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Divol, Laurent; Lepape, Sebastien; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn; Pak, Arthur; Nikroo, Abbas; Landen, Otto

    2016-10-01

    In Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions, laser energy is converted to x-ray radiation in hohlraums with High-Z walls. At radiation temperatures near 300 eV relevant for ICF experiments, the radiative losses in heating the wall are lower for U than for Au hohlraums. Furthermore, the intensity of the ``M-band'' x-rays with photon energies h ν >1.8 keV is lower for uranium, allowing for reduced capsule dopant concentrations employed to minimize inner ablator preheat and hence keep favorable fuel/ablator interface Atwood numbers. This in turn improves the ablator rocket efficiency and reduces the risk of polluting the hot-spot with emissive dopant material. The first uranium vacuum hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with undoped high-density carbon (HDC, or diamond) capsules have demonstrated 30% lower ``M-band'' intensity relative to Au, resulting in lower inflight ablator thickness due to reduced preheat. In addition, fusion neutron yields are 2x higher in U than in Au hohlraums for D2-gas filled capsule implosions at ICF relevant velocities of 380 +/-20 km/s. These results have led the NIF ICF implosions to routinely employ U hohlraums. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Gas-filled Rugby hohlraum energetics and implosions experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, Alexis; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Seytor, P.; Monteil, M. C.; Villette, B.; Reverdin, C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments [1,2] have validated the x-ray drive enhancement provided by rugby-shaped hohlraums over cylinders in the indirect drive (ID) approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This class of hohlraum is the baseline design for the Laser Mégajoule program, is also applicable to the National Ignition Facility and could therefore benefit ID Inertial Fusion Energy studies. We have carried out a serie of energetics and implosions experiments with OMEGA ``scale 1'' rugby hohlraums [1,2]. For empty hohlraums these experiments provide complementary measurements of backscattered light along 42 cone, as well as detailed drive history. In the case of gas-filled rugby hohlraums we have also study implosion performance (symmetry, yield, bangtime, hotspot spectra...) using a high contrast shaped pulse leading to a different implosion regime and for a range of capsule convergence ratios. These results will be compared with FCI2 hydrocodes calculations and future experimental campaigns will be suggested. [4pt] [1] F. Philippe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 035004 (2010). [0pt] [2] H. Robey et al., Phys. Plasnas 17, 056313 (2010).

  1. Measuring Mix in Direct-Drive Cryogenic DT Implosions Using Soft X-Ray Narrowband Backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Theobald, W.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mix is widely seen as the major source of perturbations, which limit the performance of low-adiabat cryogenic implosions in both direct- and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. Backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions recorded with a narrowband x-ray imager using an aspherically bent quartz crystal for the Si Heα line at ~ 1.86 keV show a clear signature of carbon from the CD outer shell of the cryogenic target mixing into the DT layer at the end of the acceleration phase. These implosions are driven on a low adiabat with a high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR). Comparison with post-processed 1-D hydrodynamic simulations show that the absorption seen in the backlit images is ~ 5 × larger than expected, consistent with mixing ~ 0.2% of carbon into the DT shell. Experiments with a slightly higher adiabat and lower IFAR match the predictions of clean 1-D simulations showing no signature of carbon mix. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Hydrodynamic Scaling of the Deceleration-Phase Rayleigh-Taylor Instability for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, A.; Betti, R.; Woo, K.; Nora, R.

    2014-10-01

    Hydrodynamic equivalence and ignition theory allow for the extrapolation of OMEGA experiments to ignition-scale implosions. The yield-over-clean (YOC = measured yield/1-D yield) depicts the effect of hydro-instabilities on inertial confinement fusion implosions. A 2-D study of the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is carried out to assess the YOC scaling with target size at varying nonuniformity levels. The deceleration-phase ablative RTI is mitigated by the hot-spot thermal and radiation transport, which do not scale hydro-equivalently. Scaling of the thermal conduction shows that hot-spot ablation velocity is higher on OMEGA than on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), resulting in higher RTI growth factors on the NIF. Radiation emitted in the hot-spot makes the implosion nearly hydro-equivalent by increasing the density gradient scale length on the NIF. Thermal conduction and radiation both are nonscalable physics in the deceleration phase, with complementary impacts the scaling of deceleration-phase RTI. Analytic and numerical study of the deceleration-phase RTI on OMEGA and NIF-scale targets show that YOCNIF ~ YOCΩ considering identical laser imprinting and normalized ice roughness levels. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  3. Studying the Burn Region in ICF Implosions with Proton Emission Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deciantis, J. L.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Chen, C. D.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2004-11-01

    Proton core imaging spectroscopy (PCIS) is being used to study the effects of fuel shell mix in implosions of D^3He-filled capsules at OMEGA. Penumbral imaging of fusion products is used to obtain the size and shape of the nuclear burn region. Experimental differences in the D^3He burn region will be explored for varying laser conditions and for different shell types (2 to 3 mm glass and 17, 20, 24 and 27 mm CH). Secondary D^3He proton production profiles from a D_2-filled-capsule implosion will be examined to explore the feasibility of imaging cryogenic implosions. Measured burn profiles will be compared to predictions of clean 1-D simulations and to x-ray images. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG03-03SF22691, DE-FG03-03NA00058, and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-92SF19460), LLE (412160-001G), and LLNL (B504974).

  4. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  5. Analysis of the turbulent flow field in a spherically convergent implosion problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boureima, Ismael; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Attal, Nitesh

    2016-11-01

    We describe results from 3D, numerical simulations of a spherically convergent, implosion problem. The problem definition follows, and involves a time-dependent pressure drive that sustains the implosion of an interface in a slow-fast configuration. The simulations are performed within a spherical wedge, where the interface is initialized with multimode perturbations leading to turbulent flow. The initial stages of the implosion are dominated by the Richtymer-Meshkov (RM) instability, while the late stages involve a stagnation phase interspersed with reshocks during which both RM and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities are observed. The simulations were performed with the FLASH code, with a mesh resolution corresponding to 512x512 zones in the (θ, ϕ) directions, and proportional gridding in the r-direction. We report on several quantities that could provide insights in to the evaluation of turbulence models including the turbulent kinetic energy, anisotropy tensor, density self-correlation, and atomic mixing among others. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  6. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  7. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGES

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; ...

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  8. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  9. Main drive optimization of a high-foot pulse shape in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Wu, J. F.; Liu, Jie; Zhang, W. Y.; He, X. T.

    2016-12-01

    While progress towards hot-spot ignition has been made achieving an alpha-heating dominated state in high-foot implosion experiments [Hurricane et al., Nat. Phys. 12, 800 (2016)] on the National Ignition Facility, improvements are needed to increase the fuel compression for the enhancement of the neutron yield. A strategy is proposed to improve the fuel compression through the recompression of a shock/compression wave generated by the end of the main drive portion of a high-foot pulse shape. Two methods for the peak pulse recompression, namely, the decompression-and-recompression (DR) and simple recompression schemes, are investigated and compared. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations confirm that the peak pulse recompression can clearly improve fuel compression without significantly compromising the implosion stability. In particular, when the convergent DR shock is tuned to encounter the divergent shock from the capsule center at a suitable position, not only the neutron yield but also the stability of stagnating hot-spot can be noticeably improved, compared to the conventional high-foot implosions [Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)].

  10. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-15

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or “shimmed,” so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  11. Experimental measurement of Au M-band flux in indirectly-driven double-shell implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Perry, T S; Park, H S; Amendt, P; Sorce, C M; Compton, S M; Campbell, K M; Knauer, J P

    2005-03-24

    Indirectly-driven double-shell implosions are being investigated as a possible noncryogenic path to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In recent double-shell experiments, the inner shell trajectory was shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the temporal history of the M-band (2-5 keV) radiation emitted from the Au hohlraum wall. A large time-dependent discrepancy was observed between measurement and simulation of the x-ray flux in this range. In order to better characterize the radiation environment seen in these implosions, an experimental campaign was conducted on the Omega Laser. A number of diagnostics were used to measure both the temporal and spectral nature of the M-band flux. Results were obtained from an absolutely calibrated 12 channel filtered x-ray diode array (Dante) as well as two streaked crystal spectrometers and an absolutely calibrated time-integrated spectrometer (Henway). X-ray backlighting was also used to directly measure the effect of M-band radiation on the trajectory of the inner shell. The data from all diagnostics are shown to be in excellent agreement and provide a consistent picture of the M-band flux. These results are being used to constrain and improve the simulation of hohlraum-generated M-band radiation that will be necessary for the design of future double-shell implosions employing higher-Z inner shells.

  12. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  13. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  14. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or "shimmed," so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  15. Diagnostics for high-density implosions at nova and the national Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, M.D.; Barbee, T.W., Jr.; Koch, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large (1.8 MJ on target at 0.35 {micro}m) multi-beam laser facility that will be used for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). ICF implosions at this facility will produce core plasma temperatures over 10 keV and densities over 100 g/cm{sup 3}. Properties of these plasmas can be measured by a variety of optical, x-ray, and nuclear diagnostic techniques such as those used at existing facilities like the Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Some of these currently used techniques will be directly applicable to NIF; others require significant development. Damage of components close to the target will be a much greater issue at NIF, necessitating the development of distant detector techniques. To penetrate the larger targets, x-ray-based core diagnostics will need to utilize substantially higher energies than are in routine use today. Penetrating nuclear-particle-based diagnostics will be particularly well suited to these implosions, and the higher nuclear yields will allow new techniques to be developed. Some examples of diagnostics used for high-density-implosion experiments at Nova and corresponding development of new techniques for NIF are discussed.

  16. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of X-ray Self Emission in ICF Implosions Using Orthogonal Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Patel, P.; Bradley, D. K.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven experiments can create implosion cores that are hot and dense enough for inertially-confined fusion. This implosion method is inherently three-dimensional, where loss of symmetry often indicates reduced performance. However, the symmetry of the core at stagnation is typically only diagnosed by images of x-ray self emission along two orthogonal lines of sight. We report on a method to use x-ray self-emission images along multiple lines of sight to infer quantitative properties of the implosion. Specifically we find that we can use absolute x-ray yields to quantify variations in the compressed fuel and shell that surrounds the core. In addition, we can use the spatial variations in x-ray brightness to estimate volumes of very asymmetric hotspots that are otherwise not well described by spherical or ellipsoidal approximations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL-ABS-697774.

  18. Optimizing the hohlraum gas density for better symmetry control of indirect drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Hall, G. N.; Nagel, S. R.; Khan, S.; Rygg, R. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O. S.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.

    2014-10-01

    To achieve a spherically symmetric implosion, control of drive uniformity is essential. Both the ablation pressure and the mass ablation rate on the capsule surface should be made as uniform as possible for the duration of the drive. For an indirect drive implosion, the drive uniformity changes during the pulse because of: (1) the dynamic movement of the laser spots due to blow-off of the hohlraum wall, and (2) cross-beam energy transfer caused by laser-plasma interaction in the hohlraum. To tamp the wall blow-off, we use gas filled hohlraums. The cross-beam energy transfer can be controlled by applying a wave length separation between the cones of the laser beams. However, both of those dynamic effects are sensitive to the initial density of the hohlraum gas fill. To assess this, we performed implosion experiments with different hohlraum gas densities and tested the effect on drive asymmetry. The uniformity of the acceleration was measured by in-flight x-ray backlit imaging of the capsule. The uniformity of the core assembly was observed by imaging the self emission x-ray from the core. We will report on the experimental results and compare them to hydrodynamic simulations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-626372.

  19. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Khan, S. F.; Pak, A. E.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; Ma, T.; Doeppner, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Field, J. E.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Hamza, A. V.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations <10 ns. A series of experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.5 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This talk describes these experiments and comparisons with the design code HYDRA. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape; however, other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. The streak camera-based SPIDER diagnostic showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of a low-temperature hot spot. Changes to the laser pulse-shape and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot-spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1 . 8 ×1015 neutrons. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Study of the current-sheath formation during the implosion of multishell gas puffs

    SciTech Connect

    Labetsky, A. Yu.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Fedyunin, A. V.; Fursov, F. I.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Shishlov, A. V.; Zhidkova, N. A.

    2008-03-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the dynamics of large-diameter multishell gas puffs imploded by microsecond megampere current pulses. The experiments were conducted on the GIT-12 generator in the regime of microsecond implosion (t{sub imp} = 1.1-1.2 {mu}s, I{sub 0} = 3.4-3.7 MA). The influence of the load configuration on the dynamics of current losses and gas-puff radiative characteristics was studied. The correlation between the radial compression ratio (the ratio between the initial and final Z-pinch radii) and the magnitude of the current flowing at the plasma periphery was investigated. The experiments show that, in a multishell gas puff, large-scale instabilities insignificantly affect the gas-puff implosion even over microsecond time intervals and that a compact dense pinch with a relatively high average electron temperature (400-600 eV) forms at the Z-pinch axis. The diameter of the plasma column radiating in the K-shell lines of neon is about 3-4 mm, the K-shell radiation yield being 5-11 kJ/cm. In the final stage of implosion, only a small portion of the current flows through the high-temperature central region of the pinch plasma, whereas the major part of the generator current flows through the residual peripheral plasma.

  1. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  2. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Boni, R; Ehrne, F; Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Lonobile, D J; Magoon, J; Regan, S P; Shoup, M J; Sorce, A; Sorce, C; Sangster, T C; Weiner, D

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments-a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  3. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited).

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Bedzyk, M; Brent, G; Epstein, R; Fiksel, G; Guy, D; Goncharov, V N; Hu, S X; Ingraham, S; Jacobs-Perkins, D W; Jungquist, R K; Marshall, F J; Mileham, C; Nilson, P M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Theobald, W

    2014-11-01

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si Heα line at ∼1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ∼7 cm in ∼100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ∼1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 μm. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  4. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. With first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ =0.1 to 100 g /cm3 and T =1000 to 4 000 000 K ). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ˜30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ˜5% reduction in implosion velocity that is caused by the ˜10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered light from ICF implosions.

  5. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.

  6. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Kress, J D; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. With first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ=0.1to100g/cm(3) and T=1000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ∼30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ∼5% reduction in implosion velocity that is caused by the ∼10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered light from ICF implosions.

  7. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel-shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot "fuel-shell" mix mass can be inferred.

  8. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  9. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; Séguin, Fredrick H.; Frenje, Johan A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Higdon, David M.; Srinivasan, Gowri; Glebov, Vladimir Yu.; Stoeckl, Christian; Seka, Wolf; Sangster, T. Craig

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. Transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. Furthermore, we expect that the success of our simple

  10. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Séguin, Fredrick H.; Frenje, Johan A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Higdon, David M.; Srinivasan, Gowri; Glebov, Vladimir Yu.; Stoeckl, Christian; Seka, Wolf; Sangster, T. Craig

    2015-05-01

    "Reduced" (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach

  11. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; ...

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore » here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple

  12. Recent results from the first polar direct drive plastic capsule implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) offers a simplified platform for conducting strongly driven implosions on NIF to investigate mix, hydro-burn and ignition-relevant physics. Its successful use necessitates a firm understanding and predictive capability of its implosion characteristics including hydro performance, symmetry and yield. To assess this capability, the first two PDD implosions of deuterium filled CH capsules were recently conducted at NIF. The P2 Legendre mode symmetry seen in these implosions agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700kJ drive energy produced intensities that far exceeded thresholds for both Raman and Brillouin stimulated scattering. These shots were also the first to employ image backlighting driven by two laser quads. Preliminary results indicate that the yield from the uncoated 2.25 mm diameter, 42 μm thick, CH shells was reduced by about a factor of two owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. Similarly, a small (sim50 μm) centroid offset between the upper and lower shell hemispheres seen in the first shot appears to be indicative of the laser quad energies. Overall, the implosion trajectories agreed with pre-shot predictions of bangtime. The second shot incorporated an 80 ?m wide,10 ?m deep depression encircling the equator of the capsule. This engineered feature was imposed to test our capability to predict the effect of high-mode features on yield and mix. A predicted yield reduction factor of 3 was not observed.[4pt] In collaboration with P. A. Bradley, J. A. Cobble, P. Hakel, S. C. Hsu, N. S. Krasheninnikova, G. A. Kyrala, G. R. Magelssen, T. J. Murphy, K. A. Obrey, R. C. Shah, I. L. Tregillis and F. J. Wysocki of Los Alamos National Laboratory; M. Marinak, R. Wallace, T. Parham, M. Cowan, S. Glenn, R. Benedetti and the NIF Operations Team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; R. S. Craxton and P. W. McKenty of the Univ. Rochester; P. Fitzsimmons and A. Nikroo of General Atomics; H. Rinderknecht, M. Rosenberg, and M. G

  13. Increase in the energy density of the pinch plasma in 3D implosion of quasi-spherical wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, V. V.; Gasilov, V. A.; Grabovski, E. V.; Gritsuk, A. N. Laukhin, Ya. N.; Mitrofanov, K. N.; Oleinik, G. M.; Ol’khovskaya, O. G.; Sasorov, P. V.; Smirnov, V. P.; Frolov, I. N.; Shevel’ko, A. P.

    2014-12-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the characteristics of the soft X-ray (SXR) source formed in the implosion of quasi-spherical arrays made of tungsten wires and metalized kapron fibers. The experiments were carried out at the Angara-5-1 facility at currents of up to 3 MA. Analysis of the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission with photon energies above 20 keV in the pinch images taken during the implosion of quasi-spherical tungsten wire arrays (QTWAs) showed that a compact quasi-spherical plasma object symmetric with respect to the array axis formed in the central region of the array. Using a diffraction grazing incidence spectrograph, spectra of SXR emission with wavelengths of 20–400 Å from the central, axial, and peripheral regions of the emission source were measured with spatial resolutions along the array radius and height in the implosion of QTWAs. It is shown that the emission spectra of the SXR sources formed under the implosion of quasi-spherical and cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at currents of up to 3 MA have a maximum in the wavelength range of 50–150 Å. It is found that, during the implosion of a QTWA with a profiled linear mass, a redistribution of energy in the emission spectrum takes place, which indicates that, during 3D implosion, the energy of longitudinal motion of the array material additionally contributes to the radiation energy. It is also found that, at close masses of the arrays and close values of the current in the range of 2.4{sup −3} MA, the average energy density in the emission source formed during the implosion of a quasi-spherical wire array is larger by a factor of 7 than in the source formed during the implosion of a cylindrical wire array. The experimental data were compared with results of 3D simulations of plasma dynamics and radiation generation during the implosion of quasi-spherical wire arrays with a profiled mass by using the MARPLE-3D radiative magnetohydrodynamic code, developed at the

  14. Numerical investigation on the implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, {theta}) geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Ding Ning; Ning Cheng; Sun Shunkai; Zhang Yang; Xiao Delong; Xue Chuang

    2012-06-15

    The implosion dynamics of wire-array Z-pinches are investigated numerically in 2D (r, {theta}) geometry by using a resistive MHD code. It is assumed that the wires have expanded to plasmas with diameter d{sub 0}, which is used as the initial condition for the consequent implosion process. In fact, the explosion process of individual wires is not included. By changing d{sub 0}, the effects of the wire expansion degree on the implosion dynamics are analyzed. When d{sub 0} is larger, the current density is more concentrated at the outer side of the wires and the fraction of current flow around the wire plasmas is nearly in proportion to d{sub 0}. As a result, the ablation rate of wires is increased and the implosion phase starts earlier. This conclusion agrees with the simulation works of other authors [Chittenden et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(3), 1118 (2004)]. When the array radius and initial wire plasma diameter are fixed, the increase of wire number leads to the azimuthal merge of wires during implosion. When the wires number exceed a critical value, which is related to d{sub 0}, wire plasmas can merge to a continuous shell with an azimuthal perturbation in density, which depends on the initial wires number.

  15. Realization of quasi-spherical implosion using pre-shaped prolate wire arrays with a compression foam target inside

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Ding, Ning; Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Xue, Chuang; Shu, Xiaojian; Wang, Jianguo; Li, Zhenghong Xu, Rongkun; Chen, Dingyang; Ye, Fan; Chen, Faxin; Chen, Jinchuan; Li, Linbo; Zhou, Xiuwen

    2015-02-15

    Quasi-spherical (QS) implosion of wire arrays and its impact on the foam target have been studied on the 100 ns 1.5 MA Qiangguang-I facility, which suggests that a high quality impact between the QS implosion and foam target can be achieved by adjusting load's initial shape carefully to match the external magnetic pressure. Implosions of loads with H/d ∼ 1.2 were studied with a self-emission x-ray pinhole image system and a dark field schlieren system. The radially developed spike-like instabilities indicate the spherical convergence of plasma. The observed radiation on the foam target surface suggests satisfying implosion symmetry and wire-foam impact simultaneity. An average implosion speed of 10.5 × 10{sup 6 }cm/s was obtained with an optical streak image system. The derived peak kinetic energy density ∼2.1 kJ/cm is remarkably higher than cylindrical cases, which agree with the expectations.

  16. OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE NEUROSIS: TREATMENT OF 28 CASES BY BEHAVIOUR THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, P.V.; Ayyar, K.S.; Munjal, P.D.; Gopalani, J.H.; Mundra, A.V.; Doshi, Jyoti; Bagadia, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY Twenty-eight cases of obsessive compulsive neurosis were treated with a behaviour therapy package and good results were obtained in 15 (53.6%). Relaxation, thought-stopping, implosion, modelling, response prevention, electrical aversion and positive reinforcement wei; the techniques employed. Chronicity, previous treatments, follow-up data, drop-outs and the use of behaviour therapy in our setting are discussed in this paper. PMID:21965959

  17. Flooding and Implosive Therapy with Situation Specific and Non-Situation Specific Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudewyns, Patrick A.

    Two inpatients, one with a circumscribed phobia for dentists and dental offices and another who had been diagnosed as suffering from an anxiety neurosis, were treated with a flooding procedure. A simple flooding technique which dealt with only the symptom contingent cues was sufficient to change behavior in the former case, but for the relatively…

  18. Effect of the Initial Load Parameters on the K-shell Output of Al Planar Wire Arrays Operating in the Microsecond Implosion Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shishlov, A.; Chaikovsky, S.; Fedunin, A.; Fursov, F.; Kokshenev, V.; Kurmaev, N.; Labetsky, A.; Oreshkin, V.; Rousskikh, A.; Labetskaya, N.

    2009-01-21

    A set of microsecond implosion experiments was carried on the GIT-12 generator to study the radiative performance of Al planar wire arrays. The load parameters such as a wire diameter, a gap between the wires, the number of wires, and the total planar wire mass and width were varied during the experiments, however the implosion time and the peak implosion current were almost the same for all load configurations. This ensured equal energy deposition to the plasma due to kinetic mechanisms for all load configurations. Two implosion regimes with the implosion times of 1050 ns and 850 ns were investigated. The experimental data on the K-shell radiation yield and power at varying load parameters are presented.

  19. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    DOE PAGES

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; ...

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As amore » result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.« less

  20. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    SciTech Connect

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-19

    In this study, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ~600 kA with ~200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. As a result, this technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  1. The role of hot spot mix in the low-foot and high-foot implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Patel, P. K.; Izumi, N.; Springer, P. T.; Key, M. H.; Atherton, L. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Kauffman, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Le Pape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Sio, H.; Spears, B. K.; Smalyuk, V.; Suter, L. J.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.; Edwards, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrodynamic mix of the ablator into the DT fuel layer and hot spot can be a critical performance limitation in inertial confinement fusion implosions. This mix results in increased radiation loss, cooling of the hot spot, and reduced neutron yield. To quantify the level of mix, we have developed a simple model that infers the level of contamination using the ratio of the measured x-ray emission to the neutron yield. The principal source for the performance limitation of the "low-foot" class of implosions appears to have been mix. Lower convergence "high-foot" implosions are found to be less susceptible to mix, allowing velocities of >380 km/s to be achieved.

  2. The role of hot spot mix in the low-foot and high-foot implosions on the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, T.; Patel, P. K.; Izumi, N.; ...

    2017-05-18

    Hydrodynamic mix of the ablator into the DT fuel layer and hot spot can be a critical performance limitation in inertial confinement fusion implosions. This mix results in increased radiation loss, cooling of the hot spot, and reduced neutron yield. To quantify the level of mix, we have developed a simple model that infers the level of contamination using the ratio of the measured x-ray emission to the neutron yield. The principal source for the performance limitation of the “low-foot” class of implosions appears to have been mix. As a result, lower convergence “high-foot” implosions are found to be lessmore » susceptible to mix, allowing velocities of >380 km/s to be achieved.« less

  3. Measuring spatial distributions of nuclear burn in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF using proton emission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, Fredrick; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rosenberg, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.; McKenty, P.; Craxton, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Le Pape, S.; Smalyuk, V.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C.; MacKinnon, A.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Fusion reactions in ICF implosions of D3He-filled capsules produce 14.7-MeV D3He protons and 3-MeV DD protons. Spatial distributions of the D3He and DD reactions are studied with a penumbral imaging camera that utilizes a CR-39-based imaging detector to detect the protons. Up to three orthogonal cameras have been used simultaneously at OMEGA to study the 3-D structure of asymmetric implosions, and two orthogonal cameras have now been used to study an exploding-pusher implosion at the NIF. Recent data from OMEGA and from the NIF will be shown. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  4. Technique for fabrication of ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments with sub-megaampere currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we describe a technique for fabricating ultrathin foils in cylindrical geometry for liner-plasma implosion experiments using sub-MA currents. Liners are formed by wrapping a 400 nm, rectangular strip of aluminum foil around a dumbbell-shaped support structure with a non-conducting center rod, so that the liner dimensions are 1 cm in height, 6.55 mm in diameter, and 400 nm in thickness. The liner-plasmas are imploded by discharging ˜600 kA with ˜200 ns rise time using a 1 MA linear transformer driver, and the resulting implosions are imaged four times per shot using laser-shadowgraphy at 532 nm. This technique enables the study of plasma implosion physics, including the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, sausage, and kink instabilities on initially solid, imploding metallic liners with university-scale pulsed power machines.

  5. Modeling, measuring, and mitigating instability growth in liner implosions on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kyle

    2015-11-01

    Electro-thermal instabilities result from non-uniform heating due to temperature dependence in the conductivity of a material. In this talk, we will discuss the role of electro-thermal instabilities on the dynamics of magnetically accelerated implosion systems. We present simulations that show electro-thermal instabilities form immediately after the surface material of a conductor melts and can act as a significant seed to subsequent magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability growth. We discuss measurement results from experiments performed on Sandia National Laboratories Z accelerator to investigate signatures of electro-thermal instability growth on well-characterized initially solid aluminum or beryllium rods driven with a 20 MA, 100 ns risetime current pulse. These measurements show good agreement with electro-thermal instability simulations and exhibit larger instability growth than can be explained by MRT theory alone. Recent experiments have confirmed simulation predictions of dramatically reduced instability growth in solid metallic rods when thick dielectric coatings are used to mitigate density perturbations arising from the electro-thermal instability. These results provide further evidence that the inherent surface roughness of the target is not the dominant seed for the MRT instability, in contrast with most inertial confinement fusion approaches. These results suggest a new technique for substantially reducing the integral MRT growth in magnetically driven implosions. Indeed, recent results on the Z facility with 100 km/s Al and Be liner implosions show substantially reduced growth. These new results include axially magnetized, CH-coated beryllium liner radiographs in which the inner liner surface is observed to be remarkably straight and uniform at a radius of about 120 microns (convergence ratio ~20). Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under

  6. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  7. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B. E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ≈60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  8. First Argon Gas Puff Experiments With 500 ns Implosion Time On Sphinx Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Maury, P.; Grunenwald, J.; Georges, A.; Morell, A.; Bedoch, J.-P.; Ritter, S.; Combes, P.; Smaniotto, O.; Lample, R.; Coleman, P. L.; Krishnan, M.

    2009-01-21

    Experiments have been performed at the SPHINX driver to study potential of an Argon Gas Puff load designed by AASC. We present here the gas Puff hardware and results of the last shot series.The Argon Gas Puff load used is injected thanks to a 20 cm diameter nozzle. The nozzle has two annuli and a central jet. The pressure and gas type in each of the nozzle plena can be independently adjusted to tailor the initial gaz density distribution. This latter is selected as to obtain an increasing radial density from outer shell towards the pinch axis in order to mitigate the RT instabilities and to increase radiating mass on axis. A flashboard unit produces a high intensity UV source to pre-ionize the Argon gas. Typical dimensions of the load are 200 mm in diameter and 40 mm height. Pressures are adjusted to obtain an implosion time around 550 ns with a peak current of 3.5 MA.With the goal of improving k-shell yield a mass scan of the central jet was performed and implosion time, mainly given by outer and middle plena settings, was kept constant. Tests were also done to reduce the implosion time for two configurations of the central jet. Strong zippering of the radiation production was observed mainly due to the divergence of the central jet over the 40 mm of the load height. Due to that feature k-shell radiation is mainly obtained near cathode. Therefore tests were done to mitigate this effect first by adjusting local pressure of middle and central jet and second by shortening the pinch length.At the end of this series, best shot gave 5 kJ of Ar k-shell yield. PCD detectors showed that k-shell x-ray power was 670 GW with a FWHM of less than 10 ns.

  9. The art of implosions has impacted the success of three decontamination and decommissioning projects at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Borgman, T.D.

    1997-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati, Ohio, has successfully impacted the safety, cost and schedule goals of the Decontamination and Dismantling (D&D) Program by using the art of implosions. An implosion is the act of bringing a structure down in a well planned and directed manner using explosive materials. Three major structures in three separate projects were imploded using this well known commercial technology. Safety is, and will always be, the major consideration with each of the projects. As each project succeeded another, the work process used new and improved methods to lower the risk to the environment, provide a safer workplace by reducing the exposure of high risk work and reducing the spread of lead, asbestos and radioactive materials. The time frame for dismantlement of the steel structures was greatly improved, thus reducing the total project cost. The lessons learned were incorporated from one project to another, to continually improve the work process. A number of alternatives were considered for the removal of the structures, seven, four and three stories in height. The subcontractor and its demolition sub-tier contractor worked in a fixed price lump sum contract environment. While skeptical at first, the subcontractor realized the benefits of the technology, a win-win situation for all participants. The overall planning of each of the events was tied to the needs of the client (DOE), the stakeholders and the community surrounding the site, and the continuing progress at the Fernald site. The recording and application of several key lessons learned in the sequence of implosions, will be the key issues of interest in this paper. Each project offered interesting opportunities for contingency planning, coordination, safety culture adjustments, and high regard for the protection of surrounding structures.

  10. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-02-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus’kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion’s central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  11. Characteristics of implosion and radiation for aluminum planar wire array z-pinch at 1.5 MA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Liangping; Wu Jian; Li Mo; Han Juanjuan; Guo Ning; Wu Gang; Qiu Aici

    2012-12-15

    Planar wire arrays Z pinches were carried out on Qiangguang generator (1.5 MA, 100 ns). Loads with varied row widths (6-24 mm) and wire numbers (10-34) were employed in the experiments. The implosion dynamics of planar wire arrays has been studied. Meanwhile, the changes of the implosion time, radiation yield and power with array mass, inter-wire gap, and array width were investigated. The images of a soft X-ray camera exhibit that the trailing mass, precursor column, and R-T instability exist during the implosion phase, and when m = 0 maybe accompanied with m = 1, instability will rapidly develop after stagnation. The implosion trajectories show that loads will implode by the snowplow mode and about 50% of total initial array mass will participate in the final implosion. The maximum total X-ray energy is 22 kJ with a power of 630 GW, while the maximum K-shell yield is 3.9 kJ with a power of 158 GW. Experiments with different planar wire arrays show that the value of m{sub P}D{sub 0}{sup 2} (the product of line mass and squared width) is the critical factor which affects the implosion time and the X-ray products of the wire arrays. The optimum value of m{sub P}D{sub 0}{sup 2} should be in the range of 200-400 {mu}gcm and the inter-wire gap should be less than 1 mm.

  12. Dynamic high pressure generation through plasma implosion driven by an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Yuan, T.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-03-01

    When an intense laser pulse is loaded upon solids, very high impact pressure can be generated on the surface. In this letter, we simulate this process through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and find that the pressure as high as 0.13 TPa can be generated after the laser pulse with intensity 1015 W/cm2 and 5 picosecond duration is injected upon a nanometer solid-density plasma. The peak pressure is shown to be resulted from an energetic high-density plasma bunch, produced through plasma implosion under extremely high light pressure.

  13. Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock ρR and strength in NIF implosions.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M J-E; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G W; Dewald, E; Döppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S; Hicks, D G; Landen, O L; London, R; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Richardson, M; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Weber, S; Zacharias, R; Moses, E; Kilkenny, J; Nikroo, A; Sangster, T C; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C; Olson, R; Leeper, R J; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Wilson, D

    2012-10-01

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-(3)He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and (3)He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total ρR through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  14. Spectroscopic study of temperature and density spatial profiles and mix in implosion cores

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S. W.; Haynes, D. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2008-10-22

    New techniques of x-ray spectroscopy have been developed to extract the temperature and density spatial structure of implosion cores. Results from an emissivity analysis, which neglects optical depth effects, compare well with the independent results of an intensity analysis used in the low optical depth limit. The intensity analysis has also been applied in its full form, in which case density spatial profiles demonstrate significant opacity effects. The emissivity and intensity analyses were combined to infer the spatial profile of mixing between shell and fuel material. This experimentally-derived information on mix is compared with predictions from two standard theoretical mix models.

  15. Measurement of the shell decompression in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Davis, A. K.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Radha, P. B.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-05-01

    A series of direct-drive implosions performed on OMEGA were used to isolate the effect of an adiabat on the in-flight shell thickness. The maximum in-flight shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 ±2 to 60 ±2 μ m when the adiabat of the shell was reduced from 6 to 4.5, but when decreasing the adiabat further (1.8), the shell thickness increased to 75 ±2 μ m due to the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Hydrodynamic simulations suggest that a laser imprint is the dominant seed for these nonuniformities.

  16. Gas-puff liner implosion in the configuration with helical current return rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2013-02-01

    Results of experiments with double-shell gas-puff liners carried out on a high-current MIG generator (2 MA, 80 ns) are presented. To stabilize the process of liner implosion and increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the generator to the liner plasma, a current return in the form of a multifilar helix was used. The effect of the configuration of the current return on the parameters of the generated pulses of argon and neon K-shell radiation (with photon energies of 3-5 and 0.9-1.5 keV, respectively) and the neutron yield from a deuterium liner were studied.

  17. Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock {rho}R and strength in NIF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Casey, D. T.; Sinenian, N.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Waugh, C. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Friedrich, S.; Knittel, K.; Bionta, R.; McKernan, M.; Callahan, D.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

  18. Observation of a Reflected Shock in an Indirectly Driven Spherical Implosion at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N. B.; Casey, D.; Frenje, J.; Herrmann, H.; McNaney, J.; Ma, T.; Widmann, K.; Pak, A.; Grimm, G.; Knauer, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    A 200 μm radius hot spot at more than 2 keV temperature, 1 g/cm3 density has been achieved on the National Ignition Facility using a near vacuum hohlraum. The implosion exhibits ideal one-dimensional behavior and 99% laser-to-hohlraum coupling. The low opacity of the remaining shell at bang time allows for a measurement of the x-ray emission of the reflected central shock in a deuterium plasma. Comparison with 1D hydrodynamic simulations puts constraints on electron-ion collisions and heat conduction. Results are consistent with classical (Spitzer-Harm) heat flux.

  19. Gas-puff liner implosion in the configuration with helical current return rods

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2013-02-15

    Results of experiments with double-shell gas-puff liners carried out on a high-current MIG generator (2 MA, 80 ns) are presented. To stabilize the process of liner implosion and increase the efficiency of energy transfer from the generator to the liner plasma, a current return in the form of a multifilar helix was used. The effect of the configuration of the current return on the parameters of the generated pulses of argon and neon K-shell radiation (with photon energies of 3-5 and 0.9-1.5 keV, respectively) and the neutron yield from a deuterium liner were studied.

  20. Multi-Fluid Interpenetration Mixing in X-ray and Directly Laser driven ICF Capsule Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Douglas

    2003-10-01

    Mix between a surrounding shell and the fuel leads to degradation in ICF capsule performance. Both indirectly (X-ray) and directly laser driven implosions provide a wealth of data to test mix models. One model, the multi-fluid interpenetration mix model of Scannapieco and Cheng (Phys. Lett. A., 299, 49, 2002), was implemented in an ICF code and applied to a wide variety of experiments (e.g. J. D. Kilkenny et al., Proc. Conf Plasm. Phys. Contr. Nuc. Fus. Res. 3, 29(1988), P. Amendt, R. E. Turner, O. L. Landen, Phy. Rev. Lett., 89, 165001 (2002), or Li et al., Phy. Rev. Lett, 89, 165002 (2002)). With its single adjustable parameter fixed, it replicates well the yield degradation with increasing convergence ratio for both directly and indirectly driven capsules. Often, but not always the ion temperatures with mixing are calculated to be higher than in an unmixed implosion, agreeing with observations. Comparison with measured directly driven implosion yield rates ( from the neutron temporal diagnostic or NTD) shows mixing increases rapidly during the burn. The model also reproduces the decrease of the fuel "rho-r" with fill gas pressure, measured by observing escaping deuterons or secondary neutrons. The mix model assumes fully atomically mixed constituents, but when experiments with deuterated plastic layers and 3He fuel are modeled, less that full atomic mix is appropriate. Applying the mix model to the ablator - solid DT interface in indirectly driven ignition capsules for the NIF or LMJ suggests that the capsules will ignite, but that burn after ignition may be somewhat degraded. Situations in which the Scannapieco and Cheng model fails to agree with experiments can guide us to improvements or the development of other models. Some directly driven symmetric implosions suggest that in highly mixed situations, a higher value of the mix parameter may needed. Others show the model underestimating the fuel burn temperature. This work was performed by the Los Alamos

  1. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. J. Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-15

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ∼40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3} g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  2. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; ...

    2014-05-19

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or ''exploding pushers,'' generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D3He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure 3He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important inmore » the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations« less

  3. Two-dimensional modeling of x-ray output from switched foil implosions on Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, R. L.; Nakafuji, G.; Greene, A. E.; McLenithan, K. D.; Peterson, D. L.; Roderick, N. F.

    1996-09-01

    A series of two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic calculations are presented of a Z-pinch implosion using a plasma flow switch. Results from a recent experiment using the high explosive driven generator Procyon, which delivered 16.5 MA to a plasma flow switch and switched about 15 MA into a static load, are used to study the implosion of a 29 mg load foil [J. H. Goforth et al., ``Review of the Procyon Explosive Pulsed Power System,'' in Ninth IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, June 1993, Albuquerque, edited by K. R. Prestwich and W. L. Baker (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1993), p. 36]. The interaction of the switch with the load plasma and the effects of background plasma on the total radiation output is examined. Models which assume ideal switching are also included. Also included are the effects of perturbations in the load plasma which may be associated with initial vaporization of the load foil. If the background plasma density in the switch region and in the load region does not affect the dynamics, the pinch is predicted to produce a total radiation output of about 4 MJ. Including perturbations of the load plasma associated with switching and assuming a background plasma density after switching in excess of 10-7 g/cm3 results in a total output from the pinch of about 0.6 MJ.

  4. X-ray driven implosions at ignition relevant velocities on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Le Pape, S.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Farley, D. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Di Nicola, P.; Callahan, D. A.; Robey, H. F.; Thomas, C. A.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Clark, D. S.; Eder, D. C.; Schneider, M. B.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Backlit convergent ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are indirect drive implosions that study the inflight dynamics of an imploding capsule. Side-on, backlit radiography provides data used by the National Ignition Campaign to measure time-dependent properties of the capsule ablator including its center of mass radius, velocity, and unablated mass. Previously, Callahan [D. A. Callahan et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056305 (2012)] and Hicks [D. H. Hicks et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 122702 (2012)] reported backlit convergent ablator experiments demonstrating velocities approaching those required for ignition. This paper focuses on implosion performance data in the “rocket curve” plane, velocity vs. ablator mass. These rocket curve data, along with supporting numerical simulations, show that the nominal 195 μm-thick ignition capsule would reach the ignition velocity goal V = 370 km/s with low ablator mass remaining–below the goal of M = 0.25 mg. This finding led to experiments with thicker capsule ablators. A recent symmetry capsule experiment with a 20 μm thicker capsule driven by 520 TW, 1.86 MJ laser pulse (along with a companion backlit convergent ablator experiment) appears to have demonstrated V≥350 km/s with ablator mass remaining above the ignition goal.

  5. Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer in symmetric implosions on OMEGA using wavelength detuning

    DOE PAGES

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; ...

    2017-06-13

    The effects of frequency detuning laser beams in direct-drive symmetric implosions were investigated with a 3-D cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) model. Our model shows that interactions between beams with relative angles between 45° and 90° are most significant for CBET in OMEGA direct-drive implosions. There is no net exchange in power between beams but there is significant redistribution of power from the ingoing central portion of the beam profile to the outgoing edge as it is exiting the plasma, reducing the total absorbed power. Furthermore, redistribution of laser power because of CBET increases the root-mean-square (rms) absorption nonuniformity by anmore » order of magnitude. CBET mitigation by shifting relative wavelengths of three groups of laser beams fed by each of the different beamlines was modeled. At an on-target wavelength shift of Δλ ~ 10 Å, the total laser absorption was maximized, and the rms absorption nonuniformity was near minimum. In order to completely decouple the three groups of beams from each other requires wavelength shifts Δλ > 30 Å.« less

  6. Understanding Laser-Imprint Effects on Plastic-Target Implosions on OMEGA with New Physics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Using the state-of-the-art physics models (nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation of state) recently implemented in our two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, we have performed a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA by both simulations and experiments. Through varying the laser picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats ranging from α = 2 to α = 6 . As the shell adiabat α decreases, we observed: (1) the measured shell thickness at the hot spot emission becomes larger than the uniform prediction; (2) the hot-spot core emits and neutron burn starts earlier than the corresponding 1-D prediction; and (3) the measured neutron yields are significantly reduced from their 1-D designs. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by our DRACO simulations with laser imprints. These studies clearly identify that laser imprint is the major cause for target performance degradation of OMEGA implosions of α <= 3 . Mitigating laser imprints must be an essential effort to improve low- α target performance in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ignition attempts. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Measurement of the shell decompression in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Davis, A. K.; ...

    2017-05-10

    Measurement of the effect of adiabat (α) on the shell thickness were performed in direct-drive implosions. When reducing the adiabat of the shell from α = 6 to α = 4:5, the shell thickness was measured to decrease from 75 μm to 60 μm, but when decreasing the adiabat further (α = 1:8), the shell thickness was measured to increase to 75 μm. The measured shell thickness, shell trajectories, neutron bang time, and neutron yield were reproduced by two dimensional simulations that include laser imprint, nonlocal thermal transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and first-principles equation-of-state models. The minimum core size wasmore » measured to decrease from 40 μm to 30 μm, consistent with the reduction of the adiabat from α = 6 to α = 1:8. Simulations that neglected imprint reproduced the measured core size of the entire adiabat scan, but signi cantly underestimate the shell thickness for adiabat below ~3. These results show that the decompression of the shell measured for low-adiabat implosions was a result of laser imprint.« less

  8. Evaluation of the Effects of Long-Wavelength Perturbations in OMEGA 80-Gbar Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Shvydky, A.; Anderson, K. S.

    2016-10-01

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics, as part of the National Laser Direct Drive Program, has identified the goal of producing 100-Gbar neutron-averaged, hot-spot pressures (P*) by the year 2020. An intermediate goal of 80 Gbar is currently being pursued. This work first analyzes the behavior of P* as a function of the target convergence ratio. From this a critical converge ratio can be defined at which point the implosion achieves the P* = 80-Gbar goal. Further capsule convergence then maps out a target region in design space that details the acceptable degradation from 1-D performance an implosion could suffer while still achieving the 80-Gbar goal. Two-dimensional simulation results will be presented, indicating the maximum-allowed levels for long-wavelength perturbations (offset, power imbalance, and inner-surface ice roughness) while still completing this goal. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DENA0001944.

  9. Cryogenic Implosion Performance Using High-Purity Deuterium-Tritium Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Earley, R.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J., III; Michel, D. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence between symmetric implosions on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility ignition designs will require a number of facility enhancements that include dynamic bandwidth reduction, a set of higher-order super-Gaussian phase plates, high-spatial-resolution gated-core imaging, high-bandwidth neutron burnwidth measurements, improved power balance, and contaminant-free deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The historic DT fuel supply was contaminated with ~6 atm% of 1H, leading to significant fractionation of the fuel during the layering process (the triple points of H:D and H:T are significantly colder than DD, DT, and TT). The fractionation leads to a drop in the potential yield because the D and T number densities are lower in the void than they would be with a pure-DT mixture). An isotope separation system has been developed to remove the 1H from the DT fuel supply. This talk will discuss the first results with the purified fuel, conclusions from recent implosions to test cross-beam energy transfer mitigation, and the status of the remaining facility enhancements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Suppression of blast pressure and noise from implosive-type connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Contestabile, E.; Thomas, C. |

    1995-12-31

    Implosive-type electrical/mechanical connectors such as XECONEX have been used extensively for joining electrical transmission lines. This implosive action of explosives has also been applied to other forms of high energy metal working with excellent results. However, as with many other products, the inherent blast energy of these units has caused some environmental concerns especially when used in proximity to inhabited areas. This paper identifies the problem associated with the use of this type of connector in inhabited areas and details the efforts directed toward its solution. A test program was designed in which various materials and configurations were evaluated as potential candidates for reducing the blast pressure. The explosive charges were in two configurations; linear charges assembled with detonating cord and steel pipes wrapped with detonating cord. Various materials of varying densities and sizes were then used as a wrap around the explosive charge. The effectiveness of these wraps as blast suppressing mediums was established by monitoring the blast pressure and sound levels. Although, a complete solution was not found within the performance requirements, materials such as vermiculite and cardboard were found to be particularly useful in suppressing blast overpressures. Plotted against scaled distance on a TNT output curve, the data indicates the effectiveness of these materials. Also practical are the plots showing the mitigation of blast pressure as the suppressant material thickness is varied.

  11. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; ...

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosionsmore » on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.« less

  12. Diagnosing Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Using Beamlets of Unabsorbed Light from Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic is now being fielded to record the unabsorbed laser light from implosions on OMEGA. Unabsorbed light from each OMEGA beam is imaged as a distinct ``spot'' in time-integrated images. Each spot is, in essence, the end point of a beamlet of light that originates from a specific region of a beam profile and follows a path determined by refraction. The intensity of light in the beamlet varies along that path because of absorption and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) with other beamlets. This diagnostic allows for the detailed investigation of the effects of CBET on specific locations of the beam profile. A pinhole can be used to isolate specific spots, allowing the time-resolved spectrum of the beamlet to be measured. A fully 3-D CBET hydrodynamics code postprocessor is used to model the intensity and wavelength of each beamlet as it traverses the coronal plasma to the diagnostic. The model predicts that if a single beam in a symmetric implosion is turned off, the recorded intensity of nearby spots will decrease by ~ 15% as a result of loss of CBET from the dropped beam. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. X-ray spectroscopic signatures of ion species separation in ICF implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott; Herrmann, Hans; Kim, Yong Ho; Schmitt, Mark; Kagan, Grigory; McEvoy, Aaron; Colgan, James; Fontes, Christopher; Kilcrease, David; Sherrill, Manolo; Rauenzahn, Rick

    2015-11-01

    This work aims to provide a direct measurement of the species separation through experimental inference of the ion density profiles, and comparisons of the data with simulations that explicitly model multi-ion-species diffusion. We also describe the development of a new code capable of modeling x-ray spectral emission from ICF capsules that accounts for the effects of spatial gradients in species distributions throughout the target. This new code named FESTR also allows the inclusion of NLTE, opacity, and Stark broadening effects on x-ray spectral line emissions. We show preliminary results from an OMEGA campaign to obtain direct measurements of ion species separation via advanced analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and spectrally resolved imaging data. These were symmetric direct-drive implosions of CH capsules with deuterium and trace argon gas fills. The implosions were designed to be in a collisional, diffusive regime and to take advantage of interspecies diffusion between the D and Ar driven by temperature gradients in the hot spot. X-ray spectral line emissions and narrowband images from He-like and H-like Ar ions are used to infer the spatial separation of Ar from D.

  14. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  15. X-ray drive of beryllium capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Olson, R. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Celliers, P. M.; Schneider, M. B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.

    2016-05-01

    National Ignition Facility experiments with beryllium capsules have followed a path begun with “high-foot” plastic capsule implosions. Three shock timing keyhole targets, one symmetry capsule, a streaked backlit capsule, and a 2D backlit capsule were fielded before the DT layered shot. After backscatter subtraction, laser drive degradation is needed to match observed X-ray drives. VISAR measurements determined drive degradation for the picket, trough, and second pulse. Time dependence of the total Dante flux reflects degradation of the of the third laser pulse. The same drive degradation that matches Dante data for three beryllium shots matches Dante and bangtimes for plastic shots N130501 and N130812. In the picket of both Be and CH hohlraums, calculations over-estimate the x-ray flux > 1.8 keV by ∼100X, while calculating the total flux correctly. In beryllium calculations these X-rays cause an early expansion of the beryllium/fuel interface at ∼3 km/s. VISAR measurements gave only ∼0.3 km/s. The X-ray drive on the Be DT capsule was further degraded by an unplanned decrease of 9% in the total picket flux. This small change caused the fuel adiabat to rise from 1.8 to 2.3. The first NIF beryllium DT implosion achieved 29% of calculated yield, compared to CH capsules with 68% and 21%.

  16. Radiation-Hydromagnetic Models of a Z-Pinch Implosion with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Terry, R.; Davis, J.; Velikovich, A. L.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental results on a 1MA pulser suggest that axial magnetic fields can stabilize z-pinch implosions and enhance the compression ratio(S. Sorokin and S. Chaikovsky, Dense Z-Pinches, AIP Conf. Proc. 299, p.83 (1993).). The present theoretical work calculates the effects of an axial magnetic field on the plasma and field profiles in an imploding z-pinch. The initial mass configuration is an annular shell of krypton. The 1-D simulation model includes: resistive diffusion (skin effect) for both the azimuthal and axial fields, ionization dynamics, and non-LTE radiation transport. Unlike the constant pulser current of self-similar models for the screw-pinch, a transmission line is used to model the circuit of a realistic ~10MA pulser. The implosion dynamics resulting from an axial field generated by a twisted return current cage will be compared with results due to an initial field from external Helmholtz coils. The dependence of the radiative performance on compression ratio, which in turn is a function of inital field strength or cage twist, will be discussed.

  17. Z-pinch Plasma Temperature and Implosion Velocity from Laboratory Plasma Jets using Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasek, Jacob; Byvank, Tom; Kusse, Bruce; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of collective Thomson scattering to determine the implosion velocity and other properties of laboratory plasma jets. The plasma jet is created using a 1 MA pulsed power machine with a 15 μm Al radial foil load. The Thomson scattering laser has a maximum energy of 10 J at 526.5 nm with a pulse duration of 3 ns. Using a time gated ICCD camera and spectrometer system we are able to record the scattered spectrum from 9 or 18 regions along the laser path with sub-mm spatial resolution. Collecting scattered radiation from the same area at two different angles simultaneously enables determination of both the radial and azimuthal velocities. The scattered spectrum for non-magnetized jets indicates a radial implosion velocity of 27 km/s into the jets. A determination of ion and electron temperatures from the scattered spectrum is in progress. Comparing results using a laser energy of 10 J and 1 J shows noticeable effects on plasma jet properties when using 10 J. Therefore the lower laser energy must be used to determine the plasma properties. This research is supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836.

  18. Metrics for comparing drive on the capsule for indirect drive implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra; Hurricane, Omar; Moody, John; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Divol, Laurent; Doeppner, Tilo; Dewald, Eduard; Hinkel, Denise; Khan, Shahab; Kritcher, Andrea; Lepape, Sebastien; Ma, Tammy; Meezan, Nathan; Ralph, Joseph; Ross, Steven

    2016-10-01

    Radiation drive on the capsule is an important parameter in ICF because it determines the implosion velocity. For indirect drive, the effective capsule drive is a combination of hohlraum and capsule physics. The hohlraum converts the laser energy into xrays - both flux and spectrum. The xray drive is a function of the hohlraum size, material, and hohlraum fill in addition to being a function of the laser power and energy. The timing of the drive with respect to the capsule implosion trajectory plays a role in the way in the way the capsule absorbs the energy as does the choice of ablator material and capsule dopant. In this presentation, we will look at trends in the data from both hohlraum (Dante, SXI) and capsule diagnostics (bangtime, capsule xray yield) as a method for comparing the drive on the capsule for a variety of designs. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  19. Radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums performed on PTS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian Bin; Ren, Xiao Dong; Dan, Jia Kun; Wang, Kun Lun; Xu, Qiang; Zhou, Shao Tong; Zhang, Si Qun; Cai, Hong Chun; Li, Jing; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei Ping; Deng, Jian Jun

    2017-09-01

    The preliminary experimental results of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums conducted on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) facility are presented herein. Six different types of dynamic hohlraums were used in order to study the influence of load parameters on radiation characteristics and implosion dynamics, including dynamic hohlraums driven by single and nested arrays with different array parameters and different foams. The PTS facility can deliver a current of 6-8 MA in the peak current and 60-70 ns in the 10%-90% rising time to dynamic hohlraum loads. A set of diagnostics monitor the implosion dynamics of plasmas, the evolution of shock waves in the foam and the axial/radial X-ray radiation, giving the key parameters characterizing the features of dynamic hohlraums, such as the trajectory and related velocity of shock waves, radiation temperature, and so on. The experimental results presented here put our future study on Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums on the PTS facility on a firm basis.

  20. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Bellei, C.; Amendt, P.; Landen, O.; Rygg, J. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-05-19

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or ''exploding pushers,'' generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D3He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure 3He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations

  1. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; ...

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity andmore » to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.« less

  2. Impact of Inner Surface Perturbations on the Stability of Cylindrical Liner Implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark; Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of initial perturbations on the inner liner surface (ILS) of an imploding cylindrical liner. In MagLIF, nonuniform preheat of the fuel could provide an additional source of spatial nonuniformity on the ILS. A blast wave generated by the laser preheat might trigger the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RM) on the ILS which then serves as another seed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RT) during the stagnation (deceleration) phase of the implosion. Another scenario is that the shock initiated from the outer liner surface, during current rise, propagates inward and is reflected at the ILS. This reflected shock would carry the initial ILS perturbations which then serve as an additional seed for the magneto-RT (MRT) during the acceleration phase of the implosion. These potentially dangerous interactions are analyzed using the 2D HYDRA code. The effects of axial magnetic fields, of the initial surface roughness spectrum, and of gas fill or water fill (to examine deceleration phase RT) are studied. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories. This work was also supported by DoE Grant DE-SC0012328.

  3. A Kirkpatrick-Baez Microscope for Core Implosion Imaging at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickworth, Louisa; Bradley, David; Pardini, Tommaso; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Pivovaroff, Michael; Vogel, Julia; Walton, Christopher; Mirkarimi, Paul; Bell, Perry; Decker, Todd; McCarville, Thomas; Ayers, Marion; Kilkenny, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    ICF experiments have typical core diameters raging from 50 μ m, in layered implosions, to 100 μ m in SymCaps. The emission spectrum is peaked between 8 and 10 keV. Current X-ray imaging at NIF uses time resolved pinhole cameras with 10-20 μ m pinholes that limit resolution and throughput to the detector. Selection of observed photon energy requires filtering that further reduces transmission. Low resolution, in combination with poor signal to noise ratio, limits the observable features during the later stages of capsule implosion. Using grazing incidence mirrors in a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) configuration, a focusing x-ray microscope is in design for NIF. The system will have x12 magnification, detector limited resolution and x10 higher throughput in comparison to pinhole systems. A KB microscope for imaging ICF experiments will be described, utilizing multilayer mirrors to enhance reflectivity for the core emission. Optimization of the multilayer coating allows observation of extended sources and high reflectivity in a selected energy band > 0 . 2 keV. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-640864.

  4. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium-tritium micro-implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ˜40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 102 or 103 g/cm3 densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm3), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  5. Preliminary results from direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-dong, Pu; Tian-Xuan, Huang; Ping, Li; Hai-le, Lei; Jun, Li; Shao-En, Jiang; Huang, Li; Zhi-Wen, Yang; Jian, Teng; Bo, Wu; Kai, Wang; Wei, Lin; Ming, Su; Xia-Yu, Zhan; Li, Chen; Xiao-Shi, Peng; Tang-Qi,; Zi-Feng, Song; Jia-Bin, Chen; Ming, Chen; and others

    2014-01-15

    Since ignition target design with layered deuterium and triterium ice had been proposed several decades ago, much effort was devoted to fabricate and implode cryogenic targets. Until recently, direct-drive cryogenic target implosion experiment was carried out on SGIII prototype laser facility. The target consisted of a plastic capsule supported by fill tube. Cryogenic helium gas was used to cool the capsule to a few degrees below the deuterium triple point. The resulting deuterium ice layer was characterized by optical shadowgraph and smoothed by applied temperature gradient. Eight laser beams with total energy of 7 kJ were used to directly drive the implosion. On the path of laser light to the capsule, there were 500 nm sealing film and helium gas of mm length. X-ray pinhole images were analyzed to confirm that the sealing film, and helium gas had little effect on aiming accuracy but caused some loss of laser energy especially when condensation on the sealing film was observed.

  6. New tuning method of the low-mode asymmetry for ignition capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Jianfa Dai, Zhensheng; Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun

    2015-12-15

    In the deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility, the hot spot and the surrounding main fuel layer show obvious P2 asymmetries. This may be caused by the large positive P2 radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse resulting form the poor propagation of the inner laser beam in the gas-filled hohlraum. The symmetry evolution of ignition capsule implosions is investigated by applying P2 radiation flux asymmetries during different time intervals. A series of two-dimensional simulation results show that a positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak pulse results in a positive P2 shell ρR asymmetry; while an early time positive P2 flux asymmetry causes a negative P2 in the fuel ρR shape. The opposite evolution behavior of shell ρR asymmetry is used to develop a new tuning method to correct the radiation flux asymmetry during the peak pulse by adding a compensating same-phased P2 drive asymmetry during the early time. The significant improvements of the shell ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and neutron yield indicate that the tuning method is quite effective. The similar tuning method can also be used to control the early time drive asymmetries.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Plasma-Liner Formation and Implosion for the PLX- α Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Samulyak, Roman; Schillo, Kevin; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulations of the propagation, merging, and implosion of supersonic plasma jets have been performed using the FronTier and smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes in support of the PLX- α project. The physics includes radiation, heat conduction using Braginskii thermal conductivities, ion viscosity, and tabular equations of state using LTE and non-LTE models. A parametric analysis provides scaling of peak ram pressure and Mach number vs. number of jets, initial density, initial jet velocity, and species including nitrogen, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. Conical simulations of 6 and 7 jets support near-term experiments, which facilitate diagnostic access for assessing the quality of the liner during merge. Solid angle averaged and standard deviation of ram pressure and Mach number reveal the variation in these properties during formation and implosion. Spherical harmonic mode-number analysis of spherical slices of ram pressure at various radii and times provide a quantitative means to assess the evolution of liner non-uniformity. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  8. Solid liner implosions on Z for producing multi-megabar, shockless compressions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; McBride, R. D.; Davis, J. P.; Dolan, D. H.; Knudson, M. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Flicker, D. G.; Herrmann, M. C.; Cochrane, K. R.; Killebrew, K.

    2012-05-15

    Current pulse shaping techniques, originally developed for planar dynamic material experiments on the Z-machine [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)], are adapted to the design of controlled cylindrical liner implosions. By driving these targets with a current pulse shape that prevents shock formation inside the liner, shock heating is avoided along with the corresponding decrease in electrical conductivity ahead of the magnetic diffusion wave penetrating the liner. This results in an imploding liner with a significant amount of its mass in the solid phase and at multi-megabar pressures. Pressures in the solid region of a shaped pulse driven beryllium liner fielded on the Z-machine are inferred to 5.5 Mbar, while simulations suggest implosion velocities greater than 50kms{sup -1}. These solid liner experiments are diagnosed with multi-frame monochromatic x-ray backlighting which is used to infer the material density and pressure. This work has led to a new platform on the Z-machine that can be used to perform off-Hugoniot measurements at higher pressures than are accessible through magnetically driven planar geometries.

  9. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  10. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hoffman, N.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Betti, R.; Yu Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Bellei, C.; Amendt, P.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or “exploding pushers,” generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D{sup 3}He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure {sup 3}He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important in the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations.

  11. High-{rho}R Implosions for Fast-Ignition Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C. D.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Theobald, W.; Radha, P. B.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.

    2007-01-12

    Thick, 40 {mu}m plastic shells filled with 25-35 atm of D{sub 2} or D{sup 3}He were imploded on a low-adiabat ({alpha}{approx_equal}1.3) and with a low-implosion velocity ({approx}2x10{sup 7} cm/s) on the OMEGA laser to generate massive cores of compressed plasma with high areal densities optimal for fast ignition. The targets are driven by 20-kJ relaxation adiabat-shaping laser pulses to keep the inner portion of the shell nearly Fermi degenerate. The measured kinetic energy downshift of proton spectra is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions yielding burn-averaged areal densities of 0.130{+-}0.017 g/cm{sup 2} and peak {rho}R during the burn of about 0.24{+-}0.018 g/cm{sup 2}, the largest {rho}R measured on OMEGA to date. The same implosions with empty plastic shells are expected to reach 1.3 g/cm{sup 2} across the core (i.e., 2{rho}R) enough to stop fast electrons with energies up to 4.5 MeV typical of fast ignition scenarios.

  12. Simulation and analysis of time-gated monochromatic radiographs of cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Goncharov, V. N.; McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Regan, S. P.; Betti, R.; Bittle, W.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R. T.; Kelly, J. H.; Kosc, T. Z.; Mileham, C.; Morse, S. F. B.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J., III; Shmayda, W. T.; Sorce, C.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.

    2017-06-01

    Spherical polymer shells containing cryogenic DT ice layers have been imploded on the OMEGA Laser System and radiographed using Si backlighter targets (hν = 1.865 keV) driven with 20-ps IR pulses from the OMEGA EP Laser System. We report on a series of implosions in which the deuterium-tritium (DT) shell is imaged for a range of convergence ratios and in-flight aspect ratios. The shadows of the converging DT ice and polymer shells are recorded while the self-emission is minimized using a time-resolved (40-ps) monochromatic crystal imaging system. The images acquired have been analyzed for the level of ablator mixing into the DT fuel (even 0.1% of carbon mix can be reliably inferred). Simulations are compared with measured x-ray radiographs to provide insight into the early time and stagnation stages of an implosion, to guide the modeling efforts to improve the target designs, and to guide the development of this and other imagining techniques, such as Compton radiography.

  13. Radiative shocks produced from spherical cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Divol, L.; Gregori, G.; Weber, S.; Atherton, J.; Bennedetti, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D.; Dewald, E.; Doppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenn, S.; Hicks, D.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lindl, J.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Masse, L.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E. I.; Olson, R. E.; Ralph, J. E.; Park, H. -S.; Remmington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Smalyuk, V.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hsing, W. W.; Robey, H. F.; Grim, G. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Johnson, M. G.

    2013-05-20

    Spherically expanding radiative shock waves have been observed from inertially confined implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In these experiments, a spherical fusion target, initially 2 mm in diameter, is compressed via the pressure induced from the ablation of the outer target surface. At the peak compression of the capsule, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics indicate the formation of a central core, with a radius and ion temperature of ~20 μm and ~ 2 keV, respectively. This central core is surrounded by a cooler compressed shell of deuterium-tritium fuel that has an outer radius of ~40 μm and a density of >500 g/cm3. Using inputs from multiple diagnostics, the peak pressure of the compressed core has been inferred to be of order 100 Gbar for the implosions discussed here. Furthermore, the shock front, initially located at the interface between the high pressure compressed fuel shell and surrounding in-falling low pressure ablator plasma, begins to propagate outwards after peak compression has been reached.

  14. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hoffman, N.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Meezan, N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, P.; Munro, D. H.; Olson, R. E.; Nikroo, A.; Regan, S. P.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Wilson, D. C.

    2011-05-01

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  15. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.

    2011-05-15

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  16. Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Lassalle, F.; Loyen, A.; Zucchini, F.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hamann, F.; Maury, P.; Georges, A.; Bedoch, J. P.; Morell, A.

    2008-01-15

    The Sphinx machine [F. Lassalle et al., 'Status on the SPHINX machine based on the 1microsecond LTD technology'] based on microsecond linear transformer driver (LTD) technology is used to implode an aluminium wire array with an outer diameter up to 140 mm and maximum current from 3.5 to 5 MA. 700 to 800 ns implosion Z-pinch experiments are performed on this driver essentially with aluminium. Best results obtained before the improvement described in this paper were 1-3 TW radial total power, 100-300 kJ total yield, and 20-30 kJ energy above 1 keV. An auxiliary generator was added to the Sphinx machine in order to allow a multi microsecond current to be injected through the wire array load before the start of the main current. Amplitude and duration of this current prepulse are adjustable, with maxima {approx}10 kA and 50 {mu}s. This prepulse dramatically changes the ablation phase leading to an improvement of the axial homogeneity of both the implosion and the final radiating column. Total power was multiplied by a factor of 6, total yield by a factor of 2.5 with a reproducible behavior. This paper presents experimental results, magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and analysis of the effect of such a long current prepulse.

  17. The effects of implosives and prenasalized stops on pitch in Shona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Peon, Mario E.

    2005-04-01

    It is well known that F0 at vowel onset can be influenced by a preceding consonant. That influence varies significantly across languages and consonant types, and may function as a perceptual signal to consonant manner. It has further been suggested that tone languages may behave differently from non-tone languages in this respect, with a shorter duration of consonantal perturbation [Hombert, Studies in African Linguistics, 1977]. Previous studies include a limited range of consonant types, and too few tone languages to test Hombert's proposal. This study presents the results of an acoustical investigation of the effects of implosives and prenasalized stops on the F0 of a following vowel in Shona, a tone language. It is found that implosives have a similar raising effect on F0 at vowel onset than that of voiceless (aspirated) stops, contrary to expectations based on previous studies [Wright and Shryock, Journal of the Phonetic Association, 1993]. It is also found that prenasalized consonants behave as nasals, having no effect on the F0 of the following vowel, again contrary to expectation [cf. Trithart, Studies in Bantu Tonology, 1976; and Hombert, Studies in Bantu Tonology, 1976]. Finally, duration results do not support Hombert's position regarding tone languages.

  18. Progress towards the development and testing of source reconstruction methods for neutron imaging of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Grim, Gary; Wilde, Carl; Wilke, Mark; Wilson, Doug; Morgan, George; Tregillis, Ian; Clark, David; Finch, Joshua; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D

    2010-01-01

    Development of analysis techniques for neutron imaging at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important and difficult task for the detailed understanding or high neutron yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. These methods, once developed, must provide accurate images of the hot and cold fuel so that information about the implosion, such as symmetry and areal density, can be extracted. We are currently considering multiple analysis pathways for obtaining this source distribution of neutrons given a measured pinhole image with a scintillator and camera system. One method under development involves the numerical inversion of the pinhole image using knowledge of neutron transport through the pinhole aperture from Monte Carlo simulations [E. Loomis et al. IFSA 2009]. We are currently striving to apply the technique to real data by applying a series of realistic effects that will be present for experimental images. These include various sources of noise, misalignment uncertainties at both the source and image planes, as well as scintillator and camera blurring. Some tests on the quality of image reconstructions have also been performed based on point resolution and Legendre mode improvement of recorded images. So far, the method has proven sufficient to overcome most of these experimental effects with continued devlopment.

  19. Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer in symmetric implosions on OMEGA using wavelength detuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J. G.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-06-01

    The effects of frequency detuning laser beams in direct-drive symmetric implosions were investigated with a 3-D cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) model. The model shows that interactions between beams with relative angles between 45° and 90° are most significant for CBET in OMEGA direct-drive implosions. There is no net exchange in power between beams, but there is significant redistribution of power from the ingoing central portion of the beam profile to the outgoing edge as it is exiting the plasma, reducing the total absorbed power. Redistribution of laser power because of CBET increased the root-mean-square (rms) absorption nonuniformity by an order of magnitude. CBET mitigation by shifting relative wavelengths of three groups of laser beams fed by each of the different beamlines was modeled. At an on-target wavelength shift of Δλ ˜ 10 Å, the total laser absorption was maximized, and the rms absorption nonuniformity was near minimum. To completely decouple the three groups of beams from each other requires wavelength shifts Δλ > 30 Å.

  20. Radiative shocks produced from spherical cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Pak, A.; Divol, L.; Gregori, G.; ...

    2013-05-20

    Spherically expanding radiative shock waves have been observed from inertially confined implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In these experiments, a spherical fusion target, initially 2 mm in diameter, is compressed via the pressure induced from the ablation of the outer target surface. At the peak compression of the capsule, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics indicate the formation of a central core, with a radius and ion temperature of ~20 μm and ~ 2 keV, respectively. This central core is surrounded by a cooler compressed shell of deuterium-tritium fuel that has an outer radius of ~40 μm and a densitymore » of >500 g/cm3. Using inputs from multiple diagnostics, the peak pressure of the compressed core has been inferred to be of order 100 Gbar for the implosions discussed here. Furthermore, the shock front, initially located at the interface between the high pressure compressed fuel shell and surrounding in-falling low pressure ablator plasma, begins to propagate outwards after peak compression has been reached.« less

  1. Controlling Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in solid liner implosions with rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; McBride, R. D.; Robertson, G. K.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report calculations demonstrating that a remarkable reduction in the growth of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) in initially solid, cylindrical metal shells can be achieved by applying a magnetic drive with a tilted, dynamic polarization, forming a solid-liner dynamic screw pinch (SLDSP). Using a self-consistent analytic framework, we demonstrate that MRTI growth factors of the most detrimental modes may be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude relative to conventional z-pinch implosions. One key application of this technique is to enable increasingly stable, higher performance liner implosions to achieve fusion. We weigh the potentially dramatic benefits of the SLDSP against the practical tradeoffs required to achieve the desired drive field history and identify promising target designs for future experimental and computational investigations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DoE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Surrogate models for identifying robust, high yield regions of parameter space for ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbird, Kelli; Peterson, J. Luc; Brandon, Scott; Field, John; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Next-generation supercomputer architecture and in-transit data analysis have been used to create a large collection of 2-D ICF capsule implosion simulations. The database includes metrics for approximately 60,000 implosions, with x-ray images and detailed physics parameters available for over 20,000 simulations. To map and explore this large database, surrogate models for numerous quantities of interest are built using supervised machine learning algorithms. Response surfaces constructed using the predictive capabilities of the surrogates allow for continuous exploration of parameter space without requiring additional simulations. High performing regions of the input space are identified to guide the design of future experiments. In particular, a model for the yield built using a random forest regression algorithm has a cross validation score of 94.3% and is consistently conservative for high yield predictions. The model is used to search for robust volumes of parameter space where high yields are expected, even given variations in other input parameters. Surrogates for additional quantities of interest relevant to ignition are used to further characterize the high yield regions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL-ABS-697277.

  3. The Equation-of-State Dependence of Nonuniformity Growth in Cryogenic-DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Skupsky, S.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-11-01

    This work reports on the analysis of low-adiabat, cryogenic deuterium--tritium (DT), high-compression implosion experimentsootnotetext V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010). performed on OMEGA using 2-D DRACO simulations.ootnotetext S. X. Hu et al., ``Two-Dimensional Simulations of the Neutron-Yield in Cryogenic-DT Implosions on OMEGA,'' submitted to Phys. Plasmas. The growth of various target and laser perturbations has been investigated using 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with different fuel equation-of-states (EOS) such as the SESAME-EOS, the Thomas--Fermi model, as well as the FPEOS tableootnotetext S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010). recently created by the path-integral Monte Carlo method. It has been shown that uniform 1-D hydro simulations using the FPEOS table predicted ˜20% lower neutron yield than the SESAME-EOS case.^3 In this work, we will present the dependence of RT growth and neutron-yield reduction on these different equation of states from 2-D hydro simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  4. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Polarization Effects on Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Beamlet spot images are used to diagnose cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA direct-drive implosions. The spots are, in essence, the end point of beamlets of light originating from different regions of each beam profile and following paths determined by refraction. The intensity of each spot varies because of absorption and CBET along that path. When each beam is linearly polarized, the image is asymmetric in terms of spot intensities. A 3-D CBET postprocessor for hydrodynamics codes is used to model the intensity, wavelength, and polarization of light from each beam. Rotation of polarization caused by CBET is tracked. The model is benchmarked using a 3-D wave-based solver for simplified CBET geometries. For linearly polarized beams in OMEGA implosions, the model predicts that polarization effects will result in asymmetric polarization and unabsorbed light profiles that are different for each beam. An asymmetric beamlet spot image similar to that recorded is predicted by the CBET model for linearly polarized beams. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Numerical demonstration of high-Z doping scheme on ignition-relevant scale implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroto, T.; Ohnishi, N.; Sunahara, A.; Fujioka, S.; Sasaki, A.

    2016-12-01

    Although it has been demonstrated that high-Z doped plastic can suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, its usability in direct-drive implosion design on mega-joule class reactors is still controversial. In this study, the radiation hydrodynamics code was validated by a planar target experiment of a brominated plastic target, since the result including high-Z strongly depends on the opacity model. Opacity for bromine ion based on the detailed configuration accounting model has better agreement with the experimental results compared to that of the average-ion model. Two-dimensional implosion simulations assuming a mega-joule driver were also conducted to estimate whether a brominated plastic ablator can suppress the hydrodynamic instability. It was revealed that a brominated plastic, which has an appropriate fraction of doping, can assist the generation of a high-density core by suppression of the hydrodynamic instability. A high-Z doped target can suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the foot-drive phase when the laser intensity is relatively low.

  6. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  7. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  8. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Tregillis, I. L.; Batha, S. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (˜5-100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  9. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Tregillis, I. L.; Batha, S. H.; Knauer, J. P.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2015-08-25

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (~ 5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions,and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 x and 0.33 x the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  10. Stabilization of Thin-Shell Implosions Using a High-Foot Adiabat-Shaped Drive on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Marion; Gauthier, Pascal; Masse, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    The High Foot (HF) campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has improved the neutron yield by an order of magnitude as compared to the implosions reported during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) while dramatically lowering the ablation-front instability growth. However, this yield increase came at the expense of reduced fuel compression due to higher fuel adiabat. Thinner shell adiabat-shaped HF implosions have been designed to combine the ablation front stability benefits of the current HF pulses with the demonstrated high fuel compressibility of the NIC implosions and increased implosion velocity. This is accomplished by using a hybrid adiabat-shaping technique which both lowers the laser power between the first and second pulses to enhance the ablative stabilization at early times and precisely tailors the rise-to-peak drive to prevent undesired shocks from propagating in the fuel and depositing additional entropy. Ablation front growth factor spectra are generated from two-dimensional simulations with the FCI2 radiation hydrodynamics code. Linear analysis of the instability growth demonstrates that adiabat-shaped pulses provide a path to control and reduce ablation front instability growth while placing the fuel on a lower adiabat to achieve the alpha-heating-dominated regime. Adiabat-shaped pulses without picket are also investigated as a potential way to enhance the stability of the holhraum walls at early times.

  11. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weilacher, F.; Radha, P. B.; Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of 10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  12. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weilacher, F.; Radha, P. B. Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of ∼10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  13. The Generation of Pressure Waves by the Implosion of Light Bulbs in a High-Pressure Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, C.; Czechanowski, M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2007-11-01

    The implosion of light bulbs in a high-pressure water environment was studied experimentally in a nearly spherical implosion tank with a nominal internal diameter of 1.77 m. During an experimental run, the light bulb was tethered in the center of the tank which was then filled with water and slowly pressurized by adding nitrogen gas into a small ullage above the water. The gas pressure in the ullage was measured with a slow response transducer and the high-frequency pressure waves in the water were recorded at 14 positions in the tank with underwater blast sensors. The motion of the light bulb was recorded with a high-speed digital movie camera. The implosions occurred at ambient pressures (Pa) ranging from 6.1 bar to 11.6 bar. The collapse times of the light bulbs were found to be about 1.3 times the theoretical collapse time of a spherical bubble at the same ambient pressure and with the same radius as the light bulb. The ratio of the peak pressure increase due to the pressure wave at a fixed distance (r) from the bubble to the ambient pressure at implosion ((P(r)-Pa)/Pa) increased from about 0.5 to 2.7 as the ambient pressure increased over the above-mentioned range.

  14. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T

    2012-05-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  15. Observation of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion asymmetry on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang

    2016-10-01

    Three kinds of hohlraum lengths were used to study the symmetry scaling on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility. Hot spot radiography was taken by an x-ray framing camera and the hot spot ellipticity a/b which showd a ``P2 like'' implosion distortion was measured. The indirect-drive implosion asymmetry is determined by the hohlraum radiation uniformity. Most factors affecting hohlraum radiation uniformity can be taken into account by a view-factor code IRAD 3D, so time-resolved difference between polar and equatorial radiation flux can by calculated by IRAD 3D. Then, the time-resolved a/b evolution can be calculated by a simplified analytic model integrating the total difference between polar and equatorial radiation flux before each moment, because during the acceleration phase the capsule distortion at some time is the accumulation effect of total radiation drive before that time. The calculated results of the time-resolved implosion asymmetry are basically in agreement with experimental results. Meanwhile, the physical mechanism for how hohlraum radiation nonuniformity evolution induces the variations of implosion asymmetry with hohlraum length and time is analyzed.

  16. Studying shock dynamics and in-flight ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions using proton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Ignition-scale, indirect-drive implosions of CH capsules filled with D3He gas have been studied with proton spectroscopy at the NIF. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time provide information about the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of these implosions. The observed energy downshift of the D3He-proton spectra are interpreted with a self-consistent 1-D model to infer ρR, shell Rcm, and yield at this time. The observed ρR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions where the laser drive is on until near the compression-bang time (``short-coast'') while longer-coasting implosions generate lower ρR at shock-bang time. This is most likely due to a larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (~800 ps) than in the short-coast implosions (~400 ps). These differences are determined from the D3He proton spectra and in-flight x-ray radiography data, and it is found to contradict radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict a 700-800 ps temporal difference independent of coasting time. A large variation in the shock proton yield is also observed in the dataset, which is interpreted with a Guderley shock model and found to correspond to ~2× variation in incipient hot-spot adiabat caused by shock heating. This variation may affect the compressibility of NIF implosions. Finally, data from multiple proton spectrometers placed at the pole and equator reveal large ρR asymmetries, which are interpreted as mode-2 polar or azimuthal asymmetries. At the shock-bang time (CR ~ 3-5), asymmetry amplitudes >=10% are routinely observed. Compared to compression-bang time x-ray self-emission symmetry, no apparent asymmetry-amplitude growth is observed, which is in contradiction to several growth models. This is attributed to a lack of correspondence between shell and hot-spot symmetry at peak compression, as discussed in recent computational studies. This work was

  17. An initial assessment of three-dimensional polar direct drive capsule asymmetries for implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Finnegan, Sean M.; Schmitt, Mark J.

    2012-01-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides a unique opportunity to study implosion physics with nuclear yield. The use of polar direct drive (PDD) [A. M. Cok, R. S. Craxton, and P. W. McKenty, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082705 (2008)] provides a simple platform for the experimental studies without expensive optics upgrades to NIF. To determine the optimum PDD laser pointing geometry on NIF and provide a baseline for validating inertial confinement fusion codes against experiments for symmetric and asymmetric implosions, computer simulations using the 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code hydra[M. M. Marinak, R. E. Tipton, O. L. Landen, T. J. Murphy, P. Amendt, S. W. Haan, S. P. Hatchett, C. J. Keane, R. McEachern, and R. Wallace, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)] were preformed. The upper hemisphere of a DT-filled CH capsule was imploded by 96 NIF beams in a PDD configuration. Asymmetries in both polar and equatorial directions around the capsule were observed, with the former dominating the latter. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that the lack of symmetry in the initial power density profile (during the first 200 ps of the implosion) is a primary cause of late-time asymmetry in the implosion as well as decreased yield. By adjusting the laser pointings, the symmetry and total neutron yield were improved. Simulations with dropped quads (four of the NIF laser system's 192 beamlines) without repointing worsen the overall symmetry by a factor of 10 (with respect to rms radial variation around the capsule) and reduce neutron yield by a factor of 2. Both of these degraded implosion characteristics are restored by azimuthal repointing of the remaining quads.

  18. Neutron yield study of direct-drive, low-adiabat cryogenic D{sub 2} implosions on OMEGA laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Elbaz, Y.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-15

    Neutron yields of direct-drive, low-adiabat ({alpha}{approx_equal}2 to 3) cryogenic D{sub 2} target implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have been systematically investigated using the two-dimensional (2D) radiation hydrodynamics code DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)]. Low-mode (l{<=}12) perturbations, including initial target offset, ice-layer roughness, and laser-beam power imbalance, were found to be the primary source of yield reduction for thin-shell (5 {mu}m), low-{alpha}, cryogenic targets. The 2D simulations of thin-shell implosions track experimental measurements for different target conditions and peak laser intensities ranging from 2.5x10{sup 14}-6x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Simulations indicate that the fusion yield is sensitive to the relative phases between the target offset and the ice-layer perturbations. The results provide a reasonable good guide to understanding the yield degradation in direct-drive, low-adiabat, cryogenic, thin-shell-target implosions. Thick-shell (10 {mu}m) implosions generally give lower yield over clean than low-l-mode DRACO simulation predictions. Simulations including the effect of laser-beam nonuniformities indicate that high-l-mode perturbations caused by laser imprinting further degrade the neutron yield of thick-shell implosions. To study ICF compression physics, these results suggest a target specification with a {<=}30 {mu}m offset and ice-roughness of {sigma}{sub rms}<3 {mu}m are required.

  19. Neutron Yield Study of Direct-Drive, Low-Adiabat Cryogenic D2 Implosions on OMEGA Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Radha, P.B.; Marozas, J.A.; Betti, R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V.N.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-11-17

    Neutron yields of direct-drive, low-adiabat (alpha ~~ 2 to 3) cryogenic D2 target implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have been systematically investigated using the two-dimensional (2D) radiation hydrodynamics code DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)]. Low-mode (ell <- 12) perturbations, including initial target offset, ice-layer roughness, and laser-beam power imbalance, were found to be the primary source of yield reduction for thin-shell (5 um), low-alpha, cryogenic targets. The 2D simulations of thin-shell implosions track experimental measurements for different target conditions and peak laser intensities ranging from 2.5 x 10^14–6 x 10^14 W/cm^2. Simulations indicate that the fusion yield is sensitive to the relative phases between the target offset and the ice-layer perturbations. The results provide a reasonable good guide to understanding the yield degradation in direct-drive, low-adiabat, cryogenic, thin-shell-target implosions. Thick-shell (10 um) implosions generally give lower yield over clean than low-ell-mode DRACO simulation predictions. Simulations including the effect of laser-beam nonuniformities indicate that high-ell-mode perturbations caused by laser imprinting further degrade the neutron yield of thick-shell implosions. To study ICF compression physics, these results suggest a target specification with a <-30 um offset and ice-roughness of sigma_rms < 3 um are required.

  20. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and

  1. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  2. Time-dependent nuclear measurements of fuel-shell mix in ICF implosions at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. Ryan

    2006-10-01

    Fuel-shell mix remains a pivotal concern in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), as it can preclude ignition. Mix is the result of saturation of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth at a density interface that leads to small-scale, turbulent eddies and atomic-level mixing of cool, high-density fuel in the shell with hot, low-density fuel in the core. If sufficient mixing occurs, it will disrupt the formation of the ``hot-spot'' required for ignition. To sensitively probe the evolution and extent of mix in spherical implosions, the time dependence of the D^3He nuclear reaction rate was measured from implosions of capsules filled with pure ^3He. The capsule shell was comprised of a 1-μm layer of CD inside a 19-μm layer of CH. Nuclear burn will only occur in such capsules if there is sufficient mixing of D from the shell with hot ^3He in the core. By utilizing novel D^3He reaction-rate and proton spectrometers, all sensitive to the 14.7 MeV D^3He protons, a comprehensive, time dependent picture of mix was constructed. Important qualitative features were immediately evident: first, the shock burn of D^3He, always present for gas fills of D^3He, was absent, enabling a strong limit to be set on the amount and extent of D penetration into the ^3He. Second, the time necessary for RT instabilities to induce mix and to be heated by the hot core resulted in a 90 ps delay in the D^3He bang time as compared to bang time for implosions with D^3He fills. And third, when the gas pressure of ^3He was reduced from 20 to 4 atm, the extent of mix was enhanced by about a factor of 5. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, and the N.Y. State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  3. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; ...

    2015-01-14

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, asmore » predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.« less

  4. In-Flight Measurements of Capsule Adiabats in Laser Driven Spherical Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A L; Doppner, T; Fortman, C; Ma, T; Landen, O L; Wallace, R; Glenzer, S H

    2011-03-07

    We present the first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from spherically imploding matter. The shape of the Compton downscattered spectrum provides a first-principles measurement of the electron velocity distribution function, dependent on T{sub e} and the Fermi temperature T{sub F} {approx} n{sub e}{sup 2/3}. In flight compressions of Be and CH targets reach 6-13 times solid density, with T{sub e}/T{sub F} {approx} 0.4-0.7, resulting in minimum adiabats of {approx}1.6-2. These measurements are consistent with low-entropy implosions and predictions by simulations using radiation-hydrodynamic modeling.

  5. Differential ablator-fuel adiabat tuning in indirect-drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O. S.; Clark, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a design adjustment to the high foot laser pulse [T. R. Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.055002] that is predicted to lower the fuel adiabat, increase compression and neutron production, but maintain similar ablation front growth. This is accomplished by lowering the laser power between the first and the second pulses (the "trough") so that the first shock remains strong initially but decays as it transits the ablator and enters the capsule fuel in a process similar to direct-drive "adiabat shaping" [S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2298 (2000), 10.1063/1.874063]. Integrated hohlraum simulations show that hohlraum cooling is sufficient to launch decaying shocks with adequate symmetry control, suggesting that adiabat shaping may be possible with indirect-drive implosions. Initial experiments show the efficacy of this technique.

  6. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Dixit, S N; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, J; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindle, J D; LePape, S; Moody, J D; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Schneider, M B; Town, R J; Wegner, P; Widmann, K; Whitman, P; Young, B F; Van Wonterghem, B; Atherton, J E; Moses, E I

    2009-12-03

    The first indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 MJ. 192 simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million Kelvin compressing 1.8-millimeter capsules by the soft x rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma-optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum producing symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from capsule self-emission measurements. These experiments indicate conditions suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium filled capsules with the goal to achieve burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory.

  7. Change in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions upon Using an Ab Initio Multiphase DT Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Caillabet, L.; Canaud, B.; Salin, G.; Mazevet, S.; Loubeyre, P.

    2011-09-09

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion.

  8. Capsule implosions for continuum x-ray backlighting of opacity samples at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opachich, Y. P.; Heeter, R. F.; Barrios, M. A.; Garcia, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; King, J. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; May, M. J.; Zhang, R.; Ross, P. W.; Kline, J. L.; Moore, A. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-06-01

    Direct drive implosions of plastic capsules have been performed at the National Ignition Facility to provide a broad-spectrum (500-2000 eV) X-ray continuum source for X-ray transmission spectroscopy. The source was developed for the high-temperature plasma opacity experimental platform. Initial experiments using 2.0 mm diameter polyalpha-methyl styrene capsules with ˜20 μm thickness have been performed. X-ray yields of up to ˜1 kJ/sr have been measured using the Dante multichannel diode array. The backlighter source size was measured to be ˜100 μm FWHM, with ˜350 ps pulse duration during the peak emission stage. Results are used to simulate transmission spectra for a hypothetical iron opacity sample at 150 eV, enabling the derivation of photometrics requirements for future opacity experiments.

  9. Performance and Mix Measurements of Indirect Drive Cu-Doped Be Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D.  T.; Woods, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hurricane, O.  A.; Glebov, V.  Y.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Wallace, R.; Nikroo, A.; Schoff, M.; Shuldberg, C.; Wu, K. J.; Frenje, J.  A.; Landen, O.  L.; Remington, B.  A.; Glendinning, G.

    2015-05-19

    The ablator couples energy between the driver and fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Because of its low opacity, high solid density, and material properties, beryllium has long been considered an ideal ablator for ICF ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We report here the first indirect drive Be implosions driven with shaped laser pulses and diagnosed with fusion yield at the OMEGA laser. The results show good performance with an average DD neutron yield of ~2 × 10⁹ at a convergence ratio of R₀/R ~ 10 and little impact due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities and mix. In addition, the effect of adding an inner liner of W between the Be and DD is demonstrated.

  10. Thomson Scattering and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for Low Frequency Turbulence Produced in Dual-wire Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechaty, Christopher; Hamilton, Andy; Main, Daniel; Zechar, Nate; Sotnikov, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Low frequency plasma turbulence can be driven by the presence of inhomogeneity in density, temperature, magnetic field, or by velocity shear. Low Frequency instabilities can play an important role in many different types of processes, such as magnetic reconnection, plasma structuring in the ionosphere's F-layer, structuring of laser-produced plasmas in external magnetic field, and anomalous diffusion processes in theta-pinch and Z-pinch plasmas. We plan to carry out experiments at the Air Force Research Laboratory using a pulsed power generator to study two-wire implosions and the generation of the Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability in the vicinity of the reconnection region. In this work, we develop the Thomson scattering and visible spectroscopy diagnostics that will be ultimately used to characterize the plasma in these types of experiments. Work was performed under the auspices of the Air Force Research Laboratory by Riverside Research, under contract BAA-RQKS-2014-0009.

  11. Hot spot formation and stagnation properties in simulations of direct-drive NIF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Andrew J.; Obenschain, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate different proposed methods of increasing the hot spot energy and radius in inertial confinement fusion implosions. In particular, shock mistiming (preferentially heating the inner edge of the target's fuel) and increasing the initial vapor gas density are investigated as possible control mechanisms. We find that only the latter is effective in substantially increasing the hot spot energy and dimensions while achieving ignition. In all cases an increase in the hot spot energy is accompanied by a decrease in the hot spot energy density (pressure) and both the yield and the gain of the target drop substantially. 2D simulations of increased vapor density targets predict an increase in the robustness of the target with respect to surface perturbations but are accompanied by significant yield degradation.

  12. Interaction of complex fluids and solids: theory, algorithms and application to phase-change-driven implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Jesus; Bona-Casas, Carles; Bazilevs, Yuri; Gomez, Hector

    2015-06-01

    There is a large body of literature dealing with the interaction of solids and classical fluids, but the mechanical coupling of solids and complex fluids remains practically unexplored, at least from the computational point of view. Yet, complex fluids produce much richer physics than classical fluids when they interact with solids, especially at small scales. Here, we couple a nonlinear hyperelastic solid with a single-component two-phase flow, where the fluid can condensate and evaporate naturally due to temperature and/or pressure changes. We propose a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction algorithm to solve the problem. We illustrate the viability of the theoretical framework and the effectiveness of our algorithms by solving several problems of phase-change-driven implosion, a physical process in which a thin structure collapses due to the condensation of a fluid.

  13. Direct measurement of the inertial confinement time in a magnetically driven implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Martin, M. R.; Dolan, D. H.; Cochrane, K.; Dalton, D.; Davis, J.-P.; Jennings, C. A.; Loisel, G. P.; Romero, D. H.; Smith, I. C.; Yu, E. P.; Weis, M. R.; Mattsson, T. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schwarz, J.; Sinars, D. B.

    2017-04-01

    We report on direct, radiographic measurement of the stagnation phase of a magnetically driven liner implosion. The liner is filled with liquid deuterium and imploded to a minimum radius of 440 μ m (radial convergence ratio of 7.7) over 300 ns, achieving a density of ≈10 g/cm 3 . The measured confinement time is ≈14 ns, compared to 16 ns from 1D simulations. A comparison of measured density profiles with 1D and 2D simulations shows a deviation in the reflected shock trajectory and the liner areal density. Additionally, the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes enhanced compression with shorter confinement in the bubble region compared to the spikes. These effects combine to reduce the pressure-confinement time product, P τ , by 25% compared to the simulations.

  14. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser; Haynes, Donald A; Cooley, James H; Sherrill, Manolo E; Mancini, Roberto C; Tommasini, Riccardo; Golovkin, Igor E; Haan, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  15. Investigation of linear ponderomotor units, used as drivers in magnetic implosion system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyaev, A.I.; Buyko, A.M.; Vakhrushev, V.V.

    1993-12-31

    A system design for the feasibility of controlled inertial thermonuclear fusion (ITF), based on target implosion by fast-rising magnetic field was published in 1979. The base of this design became the realization of a powerful explosive-magnetic generator (EMG) of disc type by that time. Only the disc EMG was capable to be employed as a current source for the energy releasing unit, a ponderomotor unit (PU) , in which the magnetic field energy is converted into a kinetic one of axial symmetric shells-liners, imploding and heating a thermonuclear target. Theoretical, physical, and technical aspects of the development of different PU have been extensively investigated in the scope of this project.

  16. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies.

    PubMed

    Glenzer, S H; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Dixit, S N; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; LePape, S; Moody, J D; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Schneider, M B; Town, R P J; Wegner, P; Widmann, K; Whitman, P; Young, B K F; Van Wonterghem, B; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I

    2010-03-05

    Indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 megajoule. One hundred and ninety-two simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition-emulate hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million kelvin, compressing 1.8-millimeter-diameter capsules by the soft x-rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum, which produces a symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from the shape of the capsule self-emission. These experiments indicate that the conditions are suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium-filled capsules, with the goal of achieving burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory.

  17. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R.P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  18. Shock wave, fluid instability and implosion studies with a kinetic particle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagert, Irina; Even, Wesley P.; Strother, Terrance T.

    2016-10-01

    Many problems in laboratory plasma physics are subject to flows that move between the continuum and the kinetic regime. The correct description of these flows is crucial in order to capture their impact on the system's dynamical evolution. Examples are capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Although their dynamics is predominantly shaped by shock waves and fluid instabilities, non-equilibrium flows in form of deuterium/tritium ions have been shown to play a significant role. We present recent studies with our Monte Carlo kinetic particle code that is designed to capture continuum and kinetic flows in large physical systems with possible applications in ICF studies. Discussed results will include standard shock wave and fluid instability tests and simulations that are adapted towards future ICF studies with comparisons to hydrodynamic simulations. This work used the Wolf TriLAB Capacity Cluster at LANL. I.S. acknowledges support through a Director's fellowship (20150741PRD3) from Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Multispectral x-ray imaging for core temperature and density maps retrieval in direct drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, Riccardo; Koch, Jeffrey A.; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Welser, Leslie A.; Mancini, Roberto C.; Delettrez, Jacques; Regan, Sean; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2006-10-15

    We report on the experiments aimed at obtaining core temperature and density maps in direct drive implosions at the Omega laser facility using multimonochromatic x-ray imagers. These instruments use an array of pinholes and a flat multilayer mirror to provide unique multispectral images distributed over a wide spectral range. Using argon as a dopant in the direct-drive filled plastic shells produces emission images in the Ar He-{beta} and Ly-{beta} spectral regions. These images allow the retrieval of temperature and density maps of the plasma. We deployed three identical multimonochromatic x-ray imagers in a quasiorthogonal line-of-sight configuration to allow tomographic reconstruction of the structure of the imploding core.

  20. High-areal-density fuel assembly in direct-drive cryogenic implosions.

    PubMed

    Sangster, T C; Goncharov, V N; Radha, P B; Smalyuk, V A; Betti, R; Craxton, R S; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Seka, W; Short, R W; Skupsky, S; Soures, J M; Stoeckl, C; Yaakobi, B; Shvarts, D; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Séguin, F H

    2008-05-09

    The first observation of ignition-relevant areal-density deuterium from implosions of capsules with cryogenic fuel layers at ignition-relevant adiabats is reported. The experiments were performed on the 60-beam, 30-kJUV OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2]. Neutron-averaged areal densities of 202+/-7 mg/cm2 and 182+/-7 mg/cm2 (corresponding to estimated peak fuel densities in excess of 100 g/cm3) were inferred using an 18-kJ direct-drive pulse designed to put the converging fuel on an adiabat of 2.5. These areal densities are in good agreement with the predictions of hydrodynamic simulations indicating that the fuel adiabat can be accurately controlled under ignition-relevant conditions.

  1. Differential ablator-fuel adiabat tuning in indirect-drive implosions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J L; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Jones, O S; Clark, D S

    2015-03-01

    We propose a design adjustment to the high foot laser pulse [T. R. Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014)] that is predicted to lower the fuel adiabat, increase compression and neutron production, but maintain similar ablation front growth. This is accomplished by lowering the laser power between the first and the second pulses (the "trough") so that the first shock remains strong initially but decays as it transits the ablator and enters the capsule fuel in a process similar to direct-drive "adiabat shaping" [S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2298 (2000)]. Integrated hohlraum simulations show that hohlraum cooling is sufficient to launch decaying shocks with adequate symmetry control, suggesting that adiabat shaping may be possible with indirect-drive implosions. Initial experiments show the efficacy of this technique.

  2. Assembly of high-areal-density deuterium-tritium fuel from indirectly driven cryogenic implosions.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, A J; Kline, J L; Dixit, S N; Glenzer, S H; Edwards, M J; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Haan, S W; Kilkenny, J D; Döppner, T; Farley, D R; Moody, J D; Ralph, J E; MacGowan, B J; Landen, O L; Robey, H F; Boehly, T R; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Krauter, K; Frieders, G; Ross, G F; Hicks, D G; Olson, R E; Weber, S V; Spears, B K; Salmonsen, J D; Michel, P; Divol, L; Hammel, B; Thomas, C A; Clark, D S; Jones, O S; Springer, P T; Cerjan, C J; Collins, G W; Glebov, V Y; Knauer, J P; Sangster, C; Stoeckl, C; McKenty, P; McNaney, J M; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A G; Chandler, G G A; Hahn, K D; Moran, M J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Bionta, R M; Hartouni, E P; LePape, S; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Fittinghoff, D N; Guler, N; Drury, O; Wilson, D C; Herrmann, H W; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D T; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Zylestra, A; Rinderknecht, H; Kalantar, D H; Dzenitis, J M; Di Nicola, P; Eder, D C; Courdin, W H; Gururangan, G; Burkhart, S C; Friedrich, S; Blueuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Eckart, M J; Munro, D H; Hatchett, S P; Macphee, A G; Edgell, D H; Bradley, D K; Bell, P M; Glenn, S M; Simanovskaia, N; Barrios, M A; Benedetti, R; Kyrala, G A; Town, R P J; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Widmann, K; Moore, A S; LaCaille, G; Regan, S P; Suter, L J; Felker, B; Ashabranner, R C; Jackson, M C; Prasad, R; Richardson, M J; Kohut, T R; Datte, P S; Krauter, G W; Klingman, J J; Burr, R F; Land, T A; Hermann, M R; Latray, D A; Saunders, R L; Weaver, S; Cohen, S J; Berzins, L; Brass, S G; Palma, E S; Lowe-Webb, R R; McHalle, G N; Arnold, P A; Lagin, L J; Marshall, C D; Brunton, G K; Mathisen, D G; Wood, R D; Cox, J R; Ehrlich, R B; Knittel, K M; Bowers, M W; Zacharias, R A; Young, B K; Holder, J P; Kimbrough, J R; Ma, T; La Fortune, K N; Widmayer, C C; Shaw, M J; Erbert, G V; Jancaitis, K S; DiNicola, J M; Orth, C; Heestand, G; Kirkwood, R; Haynam, C; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P K; Hamza, A; Dzenitis, E G; Wallace, R J; Bhandarkar, S D; Parham, T G; Dylla-Spears, R; Mapoles, E R; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Fair, J; Nikroo, A; Giraldez, E; Moreno, K; Vanwonterghem, B; Kauffman, R L; Batha, S; Larson, D W; Fortner, R J; Schneider, D H; Lindl, J D; Patterson, R W; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I

    2012-05-25

    The National Ignition Facility has been used to compress deuterium-tritium to an average areal density of ~1.0±0.1 g cm(-2), which is 67% of the ignition requirement. These conditions were obtained using 192 laser beams with total energy of 1-1.6 MJ and peak power up to 420 TW to create a hohlraum drive with a shaped power profile, peaking at a soft x-ray radiation temperature of 275-300 eV. This pulse delivered a series of shocks that compressed a capsule containing cryogenic deuterium-tritium to a radius of 25-35 μm. Neutron images of the implosion were used to estimate a fuel density of 500-800 g cm(-3).

  3. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-01

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μ m in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Early results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1 /2 the neutron yield coming from α -particle self-heating.

  4. Multispectral X-ray Imagaing for Core Temperature and Density Maps Retrieval in Direct Drive Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Izumi, N; Welser, L A; Mancini, R C; Delettrez, J; Regan, S; Smalyuk, V

    2006-04-26

    We report on the experiments aimed at obtaining core temperature and density maps in direct drive implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility using multi-monochromatic X-ray imagers. These instruments use an array of pinholes and a flat multilayer mirror to provide unique multi-spectral images distributed over a wide spectral range. Using Argon as a dopant in the DD-filled plastic shells produces emission images in the Ar He-b and Ly-b spectral regions. These images allow the retrieval of temperature and density maps of the plasma. We deployed three identical multi-monochromatic X-ray imagers in a quasi-orthogonal line-of-sight configuration to allow tomographic reconstruction of the structure of the imploding core.

  5. Performance and Mix Measurements of Indirect Drive Cu-Doped Be Implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Woods, D T; Smalyuk, V A; Hurricane, O A; Glebov, V Y; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Wallace, R; Nikroo, A; Schoff, M; Shuldberg, C; Wu, K J; Frenje, J A; Landen, O L; Remington, B A; Glendinning, G

    2015-05-22

    The ablator couples energy between the driver and fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Because of its low opacity, high solid density, and material properties, beryllium has long been considered an ideal ablator for ICF ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We report here the first indirect drive Be implosions driven with shaped laser pulses and diagnosed with fusion yield at the OMEGA laser. The results show good performance with an average DD neutron yield of ∼2×10^{9} at a convergence ratio of R_{0}/R∼10 and little impact due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities and mix. In addition, the effect of adding an inner liner of W between the Be and DD is demonstrated.

  6. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-01-14

    Here, anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in D3He-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and 3He populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, as predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.

  7. Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Welser-sherrill, Leslie; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Doug C

    2008-01-01

    Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

  8. Experimental configuration of direct drive cylindrical implosions on the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Tubbs, D.L.; Beck, J.B.

    1998-12-31

    Details about the cylindrical implosions using direct-drive irradiation on the OMEGA Laser facility are provided. The experimental configuration, including orientation, construction, and mounting of the targets is described. An attempt to characterize the modulation transfer function of the primary x-ray framing camera diagnostic results in insufficient exposure contrast but relative agreement with other determinations. The x-ray intensity of the titanium backlighter driven by the 2.5-nsec linear ramp of the laser beams is described, and the relative intensity on film is compared to similar Nova experiments. The parallax effects of different length marker layers of high-opacity dichloropolystyrene is measured, resulting in the conclusion that the marker layer length should be matched to the laser drive illumination profile.

  9. Implosion and explosion of electrostatic cylindrical and spherical shocks in asymmetric pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.

    2011-04-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic shock waves are studied in unmagnetized, dissipative pair-ion plasmas. The dissipation in the system is taken into account by considering the effect of kinematic viscosity of both positive and negative ions in plasmas. The system of fluid equations for asymmetric pair-ion plasma is reduced to Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation in the limit of small amplitude perturbation. It is observed that the system under consideration admits rarefactive shocks. Keeping in view the practical applications, the nonlinear propagation of both the exploding and imploding shocks is investigated and the differences are expounded in detail. The present study may have relevance in the study of the formation of electrostatic shocks in laser-induced implosion devices, star formation, supernovae explosion, etc.

  10. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  11. Designing symmetric polar direct drive implosions on the Omega laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Cobble, James A.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Bradley, Paul A.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Kyrala, George A.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-04-15

    Achieving symmetric capsule implosions with Polar Direct Drive [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004); R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005); F. J. Marshall et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 153–157 (2006)] has been explored during recent Defect Induced Mix Experiment campaign on the Omega facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To minimize the implosion asymmetry due to laser drive, optimized laser cone powers, as well as improved beam pointings, were designed using 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. Experimental back-lit radiographic and self-emission images revealed improved polar symmetry and increased neutron yield which were in good agreement with 2D HYDRA simulations. In particular, by reducing the energy in Omega's 21.4° polar rings by 16.75%, while increasing the energy in the 58.9° equatorial rings by 8.25% in such a way as to keep the overall energy to the target at 16 kJ, the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}) was reduced by a factor of 2, to less than 4% at bang time. At the same time the neutron yield increased by 62%. The polar symmetry was also improved relative to nominal DIME settings by a more radical repointing of OMEGA's 42.0° and 58.9° degree beams, to compensate for oblique incidence and reduced absorption at the equator, resulting in virtually no P{sub 2} around bang time and 33% more yield.

  12. Integrated simulations of implosion, electron transport, and heating for direct-drive fast-ignition targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A. A.; Anderson, K. S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-05-15

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP[D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  13. Understanding the effects of laser imprint on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-03

    Understanding the effects of laser imprint on target performance is critical to the success of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Directly measuring the disruption caused by laser imprints to the imploding shell and hot-spot formation, in comparison with multidimensional radiation–hydrodynamic simulations, can provide a clear picture of how laser nonuniformities cause target performance to degrade. With the recently developed x-ray self-emission imaging technique and the state-of-the-art physics models recently implemented in the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on warm target implosions on OMEGA has been performed using both experimental results and simulations. By varying the laser-picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats (from α = 2 to α = 6). As the shell adiabats decreased, it was observed that (1) the measured shell thickness at the time the hot spot lit up became larger than the uniform one-dimensional (1-D) predictions; (2) the hot-spot core emitted earlier than the corresponding 1-D predictions; (3) the measured neutron yield first increased then decreased as the shell adiabat α was reduced; and (4) the hot-spot size reduced as α decreased for cases where SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) was on but became larger for low-α shots in cases where SSD was off. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by DRACO simulations with laser imprints including modes up to λmax = 200. In addition, these studies identify the importance of laser imprint as the major source of degrading target performance for OMEGA implosions of adiabat α ≤ 3. Mitigating laser imprints is required to improve low-α target performance.

  14. Integrated Simulations of Implosion, Electron Transport, and Heating for Direct-Drive Fast-Ignition Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, A.A.; Anderson, K.S.; Betti, R.; Gotcheva, V.; Myatt, J.; Delettrez, J.A.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-04-28

    A thorough understanding of future integrated fast-ignition experiments combining compression and heating of high-density thermonuclear fuel requires hybrid (fluid+particle) simulations of the implosion and ignition process. Different spatial and temporal scales need to be resolved to model the entire fast-ignition experiment. The two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] and the 2D/three-dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP [D. R. Welch et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 464, 134 (2001)] have been integrated to simulate the implosion and heating of direct-drive, fast-ignition fusion targets. DRACO includes the physics required to simulate compression, ignition, and burn of fast-ignition targets. LSP simulates the transport of hot electrons from the place where they are generated to the dense fuel core where their energy is absorbed. The results from integrated simulations of cone-in-shell CD targets designed for fast-ignition experiments on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997); C. Stoeckl et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 49, 367 (2006)] are presented. Target heating and neutron yields are computed. The results from LSP simulations of electron transport in solid-density plastic targets are also presented. They confirm an increase in the electron divergence angle with the laser intensity in the current experiments. The self-generated resistive magnetic field is found to collimate the hot-electron beam and increase the coupling efficiency of hot electrons with the target. Resistive filamentation of the hot-electron beam is also observed.

  15. Understanding the effects of laser imprint on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the effects of laser imprint on target performance is critical to the success of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Directly measuring the disruption caused by laser imprints to the imploding shell and hot-spot formation, in comparison with multidimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, can provide a clear picture of how laser nonuniformities cause target performance to degrade. With the recently developed x-ray self-emission imaging technique and the state-of-the-art physics models recently implemented in the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on warm target implosions on OMEGA has been performed using both experimental results and simulations. By varying the laser-picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats (from α = 2 to α = 6). As the shell adiabats decreased, it was observed that (1) the measured shell thickness at the time the hot spot lit up became larger than the uniform one-dimensional (1-D) predictions; (2) the hot-spot core emitted earlier than the corresponding 1-D predictions; (3) the measured neutron yield first increased then decreased as the shell adiabat α was reduced; and (4) the hot-spot size reduced as α decreased for cases where SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) was on but became larger for low-α shots in cases where SSD was off. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by DRACO simulations with laser imprints including modes up to λmax = 200. These studies identify the importance of laser imprint as the major source of degrading target performance for OMEGA implosions of adiabat α ≤ 3. Mitigating laser imprints is required to improve low-α target performance.

  16. Effects of inhomogeneity at stagnation in 3D simulations of ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The stagnation phase of an ICF implosion is characterized by a hotspot and dense fuel layer that are spatially and temporally inhomogeneous. Perturbation growth during the implosion results in significant asymmetry at stagnation while the hotspot size, density and temperature change rapidly, even in non-igniting capsules. Diagnosing these inhomogeneities is necessary to increase yield in ICF experiments. In this work, 3D radiation hydrodynamic simulations of perturbed indirect drive ICF capsules are carried out using the CHIMERA code. During the stagnation phase a suite of novel and computationally efficient simulation tools are used to produce synthetic time-resolved neutron spectra and images. These tools allow a detailed study of the effects of hotspot inhomogeneities on diagnostic signals. Results show that the burn-averaged ion temperature drops rapidly during thermonuclear burn as the hotspot evolves from a localised, shock-heated region to a more massive, non-uniform plasma. Primary DD and DT neutron spectra show that there is significant residual bulk fluid motion at stagnation, complicating the measurement of ion temperature. Different perturbation modes cause different levels of anisotropic spectra shifts and broadening. However, in all cases the discrepancies between the DD and DT spectra are a reliable indicator of residual motion at stagnation. The simulations are used to examine the relationship between neutron scattering and areal density (ρR). Three measures of areal density are simulated: downscattered neutron ratio, attenuated primary neutron yield and nT backscatter edge. Each of these diagnoses the magnitude and anisotropy of the ρR with varying success, with accuracy decreasing for higher mode perturbations. Contributions to the neutron energy spectra from T +T reactions, secondary DT reactions and deuteron break-up are also evaluated.

  17. Anomalous DD and TT yields relative to the DT yield in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Daniel T.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (DD), T(t,2n)4He (TT) and D(t,n)4He (DT) reactions have been conducted using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, which were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility, absolute spectral measurements of the DD protons and TT neutrons were conducted and compared to neutron-time-of-flight measured DT-neutron yields. From these measurements, it is concluded that the DD yield is anomalously low and the TT yield is anomalously high relative to the DT yield, an effect that is enhanced with increasing ion temperature. These results can be explained by an enrichment of tritium in the core of an ICF implosion, which may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. In addition, the spectral measurements of the TT-neutron spectrum were conducted for the first time at reactant central-mass energies in the range of 15-30 keV. The results from these measurements indicate that the TT reaction proceeds primarily through the direct three-body reaction channel, producing a continuous TT-neutron spectrum in the range 0 - 9.5 MeV. This work was conducted in collaboration with J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, M. J.-E. Manuel, H. G. Rinderknecht, N. Sinenian, F. H. Seguin, C. K. Li, R. D. Petrasso, P. B. Radha, J. A. Delettrez, V. Yu Glebov, D. D. Meyerhofer, T. C. Sangster, D. P. McNabb, P. A. Amendt, R. N. Boyd, J. R. Rygg, H. W. Herrmann, Y. H. Kim, G. P. Grim and A. D. Bacher. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG03-03SF22691), LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974).

  18. High-resolution modeling of indirectly driven high-convergence layered inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Haines, Brian M.; Aldrich, C. H.; Campbell, J. M.; ...

    2017-04-24

    In this study, we present the results of high-resolution simulations of the implosion of high-convergence layered indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules of the type fielded on the National Ignition Facility using the xRAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code. In order to evaluate the suitability of xRAGE to model such experiments, we benchmark simulation results against available experimental data, including shock-timing, shock-velocity, and shell trajectory data, as well as hydrodynamic instability growth rates. We discuss the code improvements that were necessary in order to achieve favorable comparisons with these data. Due to its use of adaptive mesh refinement and Eulerian hydrodynamics, xRAGE is particularlymore » well suited for high-resolution study of multi-scale engineering features such as the capsule support tent and fill tube, which are known to impact the performance of high-convergence capsule implosions. High-resolution two-dimensional (2D) simulations including accurate and well-resolved models for the capsule fill tube, support tent, drive asymmetry, and capsule surface roughness are presented. These asymmetry seeds are isolated in order to study their relative importance and the resolution of the simulations enables the observation of details that have not been previously reported. We analyze simulation results to determine how the different asymmetries affect hotspot reactivity, confinement, and confinement time and how these combine to degrade yield. Yield degradation associated with the tent occurs largely through decreased reactivity due to the escape of hot fuel mass from the hotspot. Drive asymmetries and the fill tube, however, degrade yield primarily via burn truncation, as associated instability growth accelerates the disassembly of the hotspot. Finally, modeling all of these asymmetries together in 2D leads to improved agreement with experiment but falls short of explaining the experimentally observed yield degradation

  19. High-resolution modeling of indirectly driven high-convergence layered inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Brian M.; Aldrich, C. H.; Campbell, J. M.; Rauenzahn, R. M.; Wingate, C. A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present the results of high-resolution simulations of the implosion of high-convergence layered indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion capsules of the type fielded on the National Ignition Facility using the xRAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code. In order to evaluate the suitability of xRAGE to model such experiments, we benchmark simulation results against available experimental data, including shock-timing, shock-velocity, and shell trajectory data, as well as hydrodynamic instability growth rates. We discuss the code improvements that were necessary in order to achieve favorable comparisons with these data. Due to its use of adaptive mesh refinement and Eulerian hydrodynamics, xRAGE is particularly well suited for high-resolution study of multi-scale engineering features such as the capsule support tent and fill tube, which are known to impact the performance of high-convergence capsule implosions. High-resolution two-dimensional (2D) simulations including accurate and well-resolved models for the capsule fill tube, support tent, drive asymmetry, and capsule surface roughness are presented. These asymmetry seeds are isolated in order to study their relative importance and the resolution of the simulations enables the observation of details that have not been previously reported. We analyze simulation results to determine how the different asymmetries affect hotspot reactivity, confinement, and confinement time and how these combine to degrade yield. Yield degradation associated with the tent occurs largely through decreased reactivity due to the escape of hot fuel mass from the hotspot. Drive asymmetries and the fill tube, however, degrade yield primarily via burn truncation, as associated instability growth accelerates the disassembly of the hotspot. Modeling all of these asymmetries together in 2D leads to improved agreement with experiment but falls short of explaining the experimentally observed yield degradation, consistent with previous

  20. Understanding the effects of laser imprint on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Understanding the effects of laser imprint on target performance is critical to the success of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Directly measuring the disruption caused by laser imprints to the imploding shell and hot-spot formation, in comparison with multidimensional radiation–hydrodynamic simulations, can provide a clear picture of how laser nonuniformities cause target performance to degrade. With the recently developed x-ray self-emission imaging technique and the state-of-the-art physics models recently implemented in the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on warm target implosions on OMEGA has been performed using both experimental results and simulations. By varying the laser-picket intensity,more » the imploding shells were set at different adiabats (from α = 2 to α = 6). As the shell adiabats decreased, it was observed that (1) the measured shell thickness at the time the hot spot lit up became larger than the uniform one-dimensional (1-D) predictions; (2) the hot-spot core emitted earlier than the corresponding 1-D predictions; (3) the measured neutron yield first increased then decreased as the shell adiabat α was reduced; and (4) the hot-spot size reduced as α decreased for cases where SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) was on but became larger for low-α shots in cases where SSD was off. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by DRACO simulations with laser imprints including modes up to λmax = 200. In addition, these studies identify the importance of laser imprint as the major source of degrading target performance for OMEGA implosions of adiabat α ≤ 3. Mitigating laser imprints is required to improve low-α target performance.« less

  1. Understanding the effects of laser imprint on plastic-target implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-03

    Understanding the effects of laser imprint on target performance is critical to the success of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Directly measuring the disruption caused by laser imprints to the imploding shell and hot-spot formation, in comparison with multidimensional radiation–hydrodynamic simulations, can provide a clear picture of how laser nonuniformities cause target performance to degrade. With the recently developed x-ray self-emission imaging technique and the state-of-the-art physics models recently implemented in the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO, a systematic study of laser-imprint effects on warm target implosions on OMEGA has been performed using both experimental results and simulations. By varying the laser-picket intensity, the imploding shells were set at different adiabats (from α = 2 to α = 6). As the shell adiabats decreased, it was observed that (1) the measured shell thickness at the time the hot spot lit up became larger than the uniform one-dimensional (1-D) predictions; (2) the hot-spot core emitted earlier than the corresponding 1-D predictions; (3) the measured neutron yield first increased then decreased as the shell adiabat α was reduced; and (4) the hot-spot size reduced as α decreased for cases where SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) was on but became larger for low-α shots in cases where SSD was off. Most of these experimental observations are well reproduced by DRACO simulations with laser imprints including modes up to λmax = 200. In addition, these studies identify the importance of laser imprint as the major source of degrading target performance for OMEGA implosions of adiabat α ≤ 3. Mitigating laser imprints is required to improve low-α target performance.

  2. Precision Shock Timing Measurements to set the Fuel Adiabat in Ignition Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celliers, Peter

    2011-10-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements both in the target design and in the physics packages in the radiation-hydrodynamic codes used to design and model these targets. We can set an accurately tuned pulse shape within a series of approximately 5 shots. The results and interpretation of these tuning experiments will be described. In collaboration with: T.R. Boehly, H.F. Robey, J.L. Kline, D.R. Farley, S. Le Pape, J.D. Moody, R.E. Olson, D.H. Munro, J.L. Milovich, P.A. Sterne, O.S. Jones, D.A. Callahan, A. Nikroo, J.J. Kroll, J.B. Horner, A.V. Hamza, S.D. Bhandarkar, J.H. Eggert, R.F. Smith, D.G. Hicks, H.-S Park, B.K. Young, W.W. Hsing, G.W. Collins, O.L. Landen and the NIC team. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Development of a krypton-doped gas symmetry capsule platform for x-ray spectroscopy of implosion cores on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, T.; Chen, H.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Chung, H.-K.; Hammel, B. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S. F.; Lahmann, B.; Nora, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Pak, A.; Regan, S. P.; Scott, H. A.; Sio, H.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-11-01

    The electron temperature at stagnation of an ICF implosion can be measured from the emission spectrum of high-energy x-rays that pass through the cold material surrounding the hot stagnating core. Here we describe a platform developed on the National Ignition Facility where trace levels of a mid-Z dopant (krypton) are added to the fuel gas of a symcap (symmetry surrogate) implosion to allow for the use of x-ray spectroscopy of the krypton line emission.

  4. Development of a krypton-doped gas symmetry capsule platform for x-ray spectroscopy of implosion cores on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Chen, H; Patel, P K; Schneider, M B; Barrios, M A; Casey, D T; Chung, H-K; Hammel, B A; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Jarrott, L C; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B; Nora, R; Rosenberg, M J; Pak, A; Regan, S P; Scott, H A; Sio, H; Spears, B K; Weber, C R

    2016-11-01

    The electron temperature at stagnation of an ICF implosion can be measured from the emission spectrum of high-energy x-rays that pass through the cold material surrounding the hot stagnating core. Here we describe a platform developed on the National Ignition Facility where trace levels of a mid-Z dopant (krypton) are added to the fuel gas of a symcap (symmetry surrogate) implosion to allow for the use of x-ray spectroscopy of the krypton line emission.

  5. Development of a krypton-doped gas symmetry capsule platform for x-ray spectroscopy of implosion cores on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T. Chen, H.; Patel, P. K.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Hammel, B. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S. F.; Nora, R.; Pak, A.; Scott, H. A.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, C. R.; Chung, H.-K.; Lahmann, B.; Sio, H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-11-15

    The electron temperature at stagnation of an ICF implosion can be measured from the emission spectrum of high-energy x-rays that pass through the cold material surrounding the hot stagnating core. Here we describe a platform developed on the National Ignition Facility where trace levels of a mid-Z dopant (krypton) are added to the fuel gas of a symcap (symmetry surrogate) implosion to allow for the use of x-ray spectroscopy of the krypton line emission.

  6. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; ...

    2015-08-25

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (~ 5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosionsmore » on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions,and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 x and 0.33 x the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.« less

  7. Measurement of High-Pressure Shock Waves in Cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layered Capsule Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Moody, J. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Parham, T.; Sater, J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G.; Bowers, M. W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Dzenitis, B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Young, B.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Boehly, T. R.

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  8. X-ray self-emission imaging used to diagnose 3-D nonuniformities in direct-drive ICF implosions.

    PubMed

    Davis, A K; Michel, D T; Craxton, R S; Epstein, R; Hohenberger, M; Mo, T; Froula, D H

    2016-11-01

    As hydrodynamics codes develop to increase understanding of three-dimensional (3-D) effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions, diagnostics must adapt to evaluate their predictive accuracy. A 3-D radiation postprocessor was developed to investigate the use of soft x-ray self-emission images of an imploding target to measure the size of nonuniformities on the target surface. Synthetic self-emission images calculated from 3-D simulations showed a narrow ring of emission outside the ablation surface of the target. Nonuniformities growing in directions perpendicular to the diagnostic axis were measured through angular variations in the radius of the steepest intensity gradient on the inside of the ring and through changes in the peak x-ray intensity in the ring as a function of angle. The technique was applied to an implosion to measure large 3-D nonuniformities resulting from two dropped laser beam quads at the National Ignition Facility.

  9. Measurements of an ablator-gas atomic mix in indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Smalyuk, V A; Tipton, R E; Pino, J E; Casey, D T; Grim, G P; Remington, B A; Rowley, D P; Weber, S V; Barrios, M; Benedetti, L R; Bleuel, D L; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D A; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Edgell, D H; Edwards, M J; Frenje, J A; Gatu-Johnson, M; Glebov, V Y; Glenn, S; Haan, S W; Hamza, A; Hatarik, R; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J; Knauer, J; Landen, O L; Ma, T; McNaney, J M; Mintz, M; Moore, A; Nikroo, A; Pak, A; Parham, T; Petrasso, R; Sayre, D B; Schneider, M B; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Widmann, K; Wilson, D C; Yeamans, C B

    2014-01-17

    We present the first results from an experimental campaign to measure the atomic ablator-gas mix in the deceleration phase of gas-filled capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Plastic capsules containing CD layers were filled with tritium gas; as the reactants are initially separated, DT fusion yield provides a direct measure of the atomic mix of ablator into the hot spot gas. Capsules were imploded with x rays generated in hohlraums with peak radiation temperatures of ∼294  eV. While the TT fusion reaction probes conditions in the central part (core) of the implosion hot spot, the DT reaction probes a mixed region on the outer part of the hot spot near the ablator-hot-spot interface. Experimental data were used to develop and validate the atomic-mix model used in two-dimensional simulations.

  10. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; ...

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  11. Effects of the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams on the implosion of a cone-guided target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.

    2016-03-01

    In direct drive laser fusion, the non-uniformity of the laser absorption on the target surface caused by the irradiation of a finite number of laser beams is a sever problem. GekkoXII laser at Osaka University has twelve laser beams and is irradiated to the target with a dodecahedron orientation, in which the distribution of the laser absorption on the target surface becomes non-uniform. Furthermore, in the case of a cone-guided target, the laser irradiation orientation is more limited. In this paper, we conducted implosion simulations of the cone- guided target based on GekkoXII irradiation orientation and compared the case of using the twelve beams and nine beams where the three beams irradiating the cone region are cut. The implosion simulations were conducted by a three-dimensional pure hydro code.

  12. Physics of Multi-Planar and Compact Cylindrical Wire Arrays Implosions on University-Scale Z-pinch Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Wilcox, P. G.; Osborne, G. C.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Greenly, J. B.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Blessener, I. C.; Bell, K. S.; Chalenski, D. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2009-01-01

    The presented research focuses on investigation of Z-pinch plasma formation, implosion, and radiation characteristics as a function of the load configuration. The single planar and multi-planar wire arrays as well as compact cylindrical wire arrays were studied on the 1.3 MA UNR Zebra and 1 MA Cornell COBRA generators. The largest yields and powers were found for W and Mo double planar and compact wire arrays. A possibility of radiation pulse shaping was demonstrated. Two types of bright spots were observed in plasmas. A comparison of Mo double planar and compact wire array data indicates the possibility that the same heating mechanism operates during the final implosion and stagnation stages.

  13. Influence of the radiation of the plasma-focus current sheath on the implosion dynamics of condensed targets

    SciTech Connect

    Krauz, V. I.; Levashova, M. G.; Karakin, M. A.; Krokhin, O. N.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Mokeev, A. N.; Myalton, V. V.; Nikulin, V. Ya.; Oginov, A. V.; Smirnov, V. P.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-01-15

    Results are presented from experimental and theoretical studies of the influence of the radiation of the plasma-focus current sheath on the implosion dynamics of condensed targets. Radiative losses from the current sheath of a plasma focus in neon, argon, and hydrogen with a 2% admixture of Xe are calculated with allowance for the line, bremsstrahlung, and recombination radiation. It is shown that the temperature of the neon plasma (10-15 eV) is quite sufficient to evaporate Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains of radii 10-20 {mu}m. The use of neon as a working gas makes it possible to alter the cold-start condition in experiments on the implosion of foam liners.

  14. X-ray self-emission imaging used to diagnose 3-D nonuniformities in direct-drive ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.; Michel, D. T.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Mo, T.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    As hydrodynamics codes develop to increase understanding of three-dimensional (3-D) effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions, diagnostics must adapt to evaluate their predictive accuracy. A 3-D radiation postprocessor was developed to investigate the use of soft x-ray self-emission images of an imploding target to measure the size of nonuniformities on the target surface. Synthetic self-emission images calculated from 3-D simulations showed a narrow ring of emission outside the ablation surface of the target. Nonuniformities growing in directions perpendicular to the diagnostic axis were measured through angular variations in the radius of the steepest intensity gradient on the inside of the ring and through changes in the peak x-ray intensity in the ring as a function of angle. The technique was applied to an implosion to measure large 3-D nonuniformities resulting from two dropped laser beam quads at the National Ignition Facility.

  15. Direct Drive Cylindrical Implosions on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.

    1999-05-10

    The primary goals of this report are to (1) understand experimental radiography better (radiograph known static targets); and (2) to better understand the sources and effects of short wavelength perturbations on the long wavelength RT growth. Some secondary goals are to initiate Richtmyer-Meshkov mix targets; test beryllium cylinder implosions (if available); and observe emission spectroscopy from chlorinated foam to study implosions. To achieve these goals the authors: (1) shot mix targets with late backlighter and confirmed set up of radiography, begin static targets; (2) did a sequence of unperturbed and perturbed targets of different smoothness and thickness, fill in static, beryllium, and chlorinated foam targets; and (3) repeated step number 2 at a different backlighter time.

  16. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-09

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy for Doppler-broadening ion temperature measurements of implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J. A.; Stewart, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Shepherd, R.; Schneider, M. B.; Miles, A. R.; Scott, H. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hsing, W. W.

    2012-10-15

    Future implosion experiments at the national ignition facility (NIF) will endeavor to simultaneously measure electron and ion temperatures with temporal and spatial resolution in order to explore non-equilibrium temperature distributions and their relaxation toward equilibrium. In anticipation of these experiments, and with understanding of the constraints of the NIF facility environment, we have explored the use of Doppler broadening of mid-Z dopant emission lines, such as krypton He-{alpha} at 13 keV, as a diagnostic of time- and potentially space-resolved ion temperature. We have investigated a number of options analytically and with numerical raytracing, and we have identified several promising candidate spectrometer designs that meet the expected requirements of spectral and temporal resolution and data signal-to-noise ratio for gas-filled exploding pusher implosions, while providing maximum flexibility for use on a variety of experiments that potentially include burning plasma.

  18. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Bunn, T. L.; Carlson, L. C.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Sater, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments—either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  19. Measurements of Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Fractionation from Kinetic Effects in Ignition-Relevant Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of DT and DD reaction yields have been studied using ignition-relevant, cryogenically cooled deuterium-tritium gas-filled cryogenic DT targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In these experiments, carried out at the Omega Laser Facility, highresolution time-of-flight spectroscopy was used to measure the primary neutron peak distribution required to infer the DT and DD reaction yields. From these measurements, it will be shown that the yield ratio has a χ2/per degree of freedom of 0.67 as compared with the measured fraction of the target fuel composition. This observation indicates that kinetic effects leading to species separation are insignificant in ICF ignition-relevant DT implosions on OMEGA. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Physics of Multi-Planar and Compact Cylindrical Wire Arrays Implosions on University-Scale Z-pinch Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Wilcox, P. G.; Osborne, G. C.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Greenly, J. B.; McBride, R. D.; Knapp, P. F.; Blessener, I. C.; Bell, K. S.; Chalenski, D. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2009-01-21

    The presented research focuses on investigation of Z-pinch plasma formation, implosion, and radiation characteristics as a function of the load configuration. The single planar and multi-planar wire arrays as well as compact cylindrical wire arrays were studied on the 1.3 MA UNR Zebra and 1 MA Cornell COBRA generators. The largest yields and powers were found for W and Mo double planar and compact wire arrays. A possibility of radiation pulse shaping was demonstrated. Two types of bright spots were observed in plasmas. A comparison of Mo double planar and compact wire array data indicates the possibility that the same heating mechanism operates during the final implosion and stagnation stages.

  1. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, R. W.; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Tomlinson, K.; Robertson, G. R.; Knudson, M. D.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Blue, B. E.; Robinson, A. C.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ˜1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. These experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.

  2. Measurements of Sensitivity of Implosion-Phase Mixing to Low-Mode Symmetry at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, S. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Tipton, R. E.; Pino, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Casey, D. T.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a non-igniting indirect-drive target designed to produce a near 1D-like implosion for hydro-code validation. This is accomplished with a sub-scale (675 µm radius) capsule in a nominal (2.875 mm radius) near-vacuum hohlraum, providing a case-to-capsule ratio 63% larger that that of a standard ignition target. Additionally, the low aspect ratio (3.9) of the capsule shell combined with the temperature of the foot pulse essentially eliminates ablation front instability growth. The result is a platform that is well suited to the study of mixing at the gas-ablator interface without these complicating factors. A layer of CD plastic on the inner 3.2 µm of the CH capsule shell filled with a mixture of hydrogen and tritium allows us to infer the mixture of ablator material into the gas through the ratio of DT to TT neutron production. In 2015, we used the 2-Shock platform to measure the sensitivity of ablator-gas mixing to inner surface roughness and implosion convergence ratio. This year we developed the capability to deliberately adjust the low-mode in-flight symmetry of the implosion in both the prolate and oblate directions. We present the initial results of mix measurements from deliberately low-mode asymmetric implosions aimed at determining the relationship between this type of asymmetry and mix. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Effects of various axial flow profiles on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ding, N.

    2006-06-01

    The stabilizing effect of different axial flow profiles on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MTR) instability in Z-pinch implosions is investigated with a compressible skin-current model. The numerical results show that the mitigation effect of the axial flow on the MRT instability is caused by the radial velocity shear, and it is highly susceptible to the shear value nearby the plasma outer surface. By adjusting the flow profile, the mitigation effect can be improved markedly.

  4. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Lemke, R. W.; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; ...

    2016-01-07

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as itmore » implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ~1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. Lastly, these experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.« less

  5. Probing off-Hugoniot states in Ta, Cu, and Al to 1000 GPa compression with magnetically driven liner implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Lemke, R. W.; Dolan, D. H.; Dalton, D. G.; Brown, J. L.; Tomlinson, K.; Robertson, G. R.; Knudson, M. D.; Harding, E.; Mattsson, A. E.; Carpenter, J. H.; Drake, R. R.; Cochrane, K.; Blue, B. E.; Robinson, A. C.; Mattsson, T. R.

    2016-01-07

    We report on a new technique for obtaining off-Hugoniot pressure vs. density data for solid metals compressed to extreme pressure by a magnetically driven liner implosion on the Z-machine (Z) at Sandia National Laboratories. In our experiments, the liner comprises inner and outer metal tubes. The inner tube is composed of a sample material (e.g., Ta and Cu) whose compressed state is to be inferred. The outer tube is composed of Al and serves as the current carrying cathode. Another aluminum liner at much larger radius serves as the anode. A shaped current pulse quasi-isentropically compresses the sample as it implodes. The iterative method used to infer pressure vs. density requires two velocity measurements. Photonic Doppler velocimetry probes measure the implosion velocity of the free (inner) surface of the sample material and the explosion velocity of the anode free (outer) surface. These two velocities are used in conjunction with magnetohydrodynamic simulation and mathematical optimization to obtain the current driving the liner implosion, and to infer pressure and density in the sample through maximum compression. This new equation of state calibration technique is illustrated using a simulated experiment with a Cu sample. Monte Carlo uncertainty quantification of synthetic data establishes convergence criteria for experiments. Results are presented from experiments with Al/Ta, Al/Cu, and Al liners. Symmetric liner implosion with quasi-isentropic compression to peak pressure ~1000 GPa is achieved in all cases. Lastly, these experiments exhibit unexpectedly softer behavior above 200 GPa, which we conjecture is related to differences in the actual and modeled properties of aluminum.

  6. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  7. Numerical Modeling of the Sensitivity of X-Ray Driven Implosions to Low-Mode Flux Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R. H. H.; Clark, D. S.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Spears, B. K.; Marinak, M. M.; Town, R. P. J.; Norreys, P. A.; Suter, L. J.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1] to low-mode flux asymmetries has been investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from associated low order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the DT “ice” layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of kinetic to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images indicate that the P4 component of hot spot self-emission shape is insensitive to P4 hot spot shapes, and a positive P4 asymmetry aliases itself as a negative or oblate P2 in these images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed post-shot 2D simulations.

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Sensitivity of X-Ray Driven Implosions to Low-Mode Flux Asymmetries

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, R. H. H.; Clark, D. S.; Bradley, D. K.; ...

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion implosions of the type performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1] to low-mode flux asymmetries has been investigated numerically. It is shown that large-amplitude, low-order mode shapes (Legendre polynomial P4), resulting from associated low order flux asymmetries, cause spatial variations in capsule and fuel momentum that prevent the DT “ice” layer from being decelerated uniformly by the hot spot pressure. This reduces the transfer of kinetic to internal energy of the central hot spot, thus reducing neutron yield. Furthermore, synthetic gated x-ray images indicate that the P4 component of hotmore » spot self-emission shape is insensitive to P4 hot spot shapes, and a positive P4 asymmetry aliases itself as a negative or oblate P2 in these images. Correction of this apparent P2 distortion can further distort the implosion while creating a round x-ray image. Long wavelength asymmetries may be playing a significant role in the observed yield reduction of NIF DT implosions relative to detailed post-shot 2D simulations.« less

  9. Comparison of measured soft x-ray drive with shock and capsule implosion velocity for ignition tuning experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Callahan, D.; Meezan, N.; Glenzer, S.; MacKinnon, A.; Dixit, S.; Kyrala, G.; Widmann, K.; Robey, H.; Clark, D.; Jones, O.; Hicks, D.; Celliers, P.; Farley, D.; Town, R.; Kalantar, D.; Dewald, E.; Moore, A.; Olson, R.; Doeppner, T.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Thomas, C.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M.

    2011-10-01

    Indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments use high-Z hohlraums to convert laser energy to soft x-ray energy. The soft x-rays then drive the capsule via material ablation to compress the fuel payload and heat the central hot spot to initiate ignition. To achieve the highest fuel compression, a shaped radiation drive is used launching multiple shocks timed minimizes fuel entropy. The strength and velocity of these shocks depend directly on the radiation drive. The main laser pulse is then used to drive the implosion such that the PdV work can heat the central core to fusion conditions. To diagnose the soft x-ray drive in the hohlraum, Dante, an 18 channel soft x-ray spectrometer, measures the flux escaping the laser entrance hole. Measurements of this flux are used to assess the conditions for the capsule implosion. In this presentation, we will examine correlations between the soft x-ray measurements and shock velocity, as well as implosion velocity for recent ignition tuning experiments on NIF.

  10. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited).

    PubMed

    Kyrala, G A; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D; Bradley, D; Izumi, N; Meezan, N; Landen, O L; Callahan, D; Weber, S V; Holder, J P; Glenn, S; Edwards, M J; Bell, P; Kimbrough, J; Koch, J; Prasad, R; Suter, L; Kline, J L; Kilkenny, J

    2010-10-01

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  11. Development of a polar direct-drive platform for studying inertial confinement fusion implosion mix on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Mark J.; Bradley, Paul A.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James R.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Kyrala, George A.; Magelssen, Glenn R.; Montgomery, David S.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Shah, Rahul C.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Wysocki, Frederick J.; Batha, Steven H.; Stephen Craxton, R.; McKenty, Patrick W.; Fitzsimmons, Paul; and others

    2013-05-15

    Experiments were performed to develop a platform for the simultaneous measurement of mix and its effects on fusion burn. Two polar direct drive implosions of all-plastic capsules were conducted for the first time on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To measure implosion trajectory and symmetry, area image backlighting of these capsules was also employed for the first time on NIF, an advance over previous 1-D slit imaging experiments, providing detailed symmetry data of the capsules as they imploded. The implosion trajectory and low-mode asymmetry seen in the resultant radiographs agreed with pre-shot predictions even though the 700 kJ drive energy produced laser beam intensities exceeding laser-plasma instability thresholds. Post-shot simulations indicate that the capsule yield was reduced by a factor of two compared to pre-shot predictions owing to as-shot laser drive asymmetries. The pre-shot predictions of bang time agreed within 200 ps with the experimental results. The second shot incorporated a narrow groove encircling the equator of the capsule. A predicted yield reduction factor of three was not observed.

  12. Measurement of hydrodynamic growth near peak velocity in an inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion using a self-radiography technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Hoppe, Jr., M.; Kohut, T.; Holunga, D.; Walters, C.; Haid, B.; Dayton, M.

    2016-07-11

    First measurements of hydrodynamic growth near peak implosion velocity in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion at the National Ignition Facility were obtained using a self-radiographing technique and a preimposed Legendre mode 40, λ = 140 μm, sinusoidal perturbation. These are the first measurements of the total growth at the most unstable mode from acceleration Rayleigh-Taylor achieved in any ICF experiment to date, showing growth of the areal density perturbation of ~7000×. Measurements were made at convergences of ~5 to ~10× at both the waist and pole of the capsule, demonstrating simultaneous measurements of the growth factors from both lines of sight. The areal density growth factors are an order of magnitude larger than prior experimental measurements and differed by ~2× between the waist and the pole, showing asymmetry in the measured growth factors. As a result, these new measurements significantly advance our ability to diagnose perturbations detrimental to ICF implosions, uniquely intersecting the change from an accelerating to decelerating shell, with multiple simultaneous angular views.

  13. Performance metrics for Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions: aspects of the technical framework for measuring progress in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, B K; Glenzer, S; Edwards, M J; Brandon, S; Clark, D; Town, R; Cerjan, C; Dylla-Spears, R; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S; Weber, S; Hatchett, S; Haan, S; Springer, P; Moses, E; Mapoles, E; Munro, D; Salmonson, J; Sepke, S

    2011-12-16

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) uses non-igniting 'THD' capsules to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel without burn. These capsules are designed to simultaneously reduce DT neutron yield and to maintain hydrodynamic similarity with the DT ignition capsule. We will discuss nominal THD performance and the associated experimental observables. We will show the results of large ensembles of numerical simulations of THD and DT implosions and their simulated diagnostic outputs. These simulations cover a broad range of both nominal and off nominal implosions. We will focus on the development of an experimental implosion performance metric called the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFX). We will discuss the relationship between ITFX and other integrated performance metrics, including the ignition threshold factor (ITF), the generalized Lawson criterion (GLC), and the hot spot pressure (HSP). We will then consider the experimental results of the recent NIC THD campaign. We will show that we can observe the key quantities for producing a measured ITFX and for inferring the other performance metrics. We will discuss trends in the experimental data, improvement in ITFX, and briefly the upcoming tuning campaign aimed at taking the next steps in performance improvement on the path to ignition on NIF.

  14. Measurement of Hydrodynamic Growth near Peak Velocity in an Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsule Implosion using a Self-Radiography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Hoppe, M.; Kohut, T.; Holunga, D.; Walters, C.; Haid, B.; Dayton, M.

    2016-07-01

    First measurements of hydrodynamic growth near peak implosion velocity in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion at the National Ignition Facility were obtained using a self-radiographing technique and a preimposed Legendre mode 40, λ =140 μ m , sinusoidal perturbation. These are the first measurements of the total growth at the most unstable mode from acceleration Rayleigh-Taylor achieved in any ICF experiment to date, showing growth of the areal density perturbation of ˜7000 × . Measurements were made at convergences of ˜5 to ˜10 × at both the waist and pole of the capsule, demonstrating simultaneous measurements of the growth factors from both lines of sight. The areal density growth factors are an order of magnitude larger than prior experimental measurements and differed by ˜2 × between the waist and the pole, showing asymmetry in the measured growth factors. These new measurements significantly advance our ability to diagnose perturbations detrimental to ICF implosions, uniquely intersecting the change from an accelerating to decelerating shell, with multiple simultaneous angular views.

  15. Measurement of hydrodynamic growth near peak velocity in an inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion using a self-radiography technique

    DOE PAGES

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; ...

    2016-07-11

    First measurements of hydrodynamic growth near peak implosion velocity in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion at the National Ignition Facility were obtained using a self-radiographing technique and a preimposed Legendre mode 40, λ = 140 μm, sinusoidal perturbation. These are the first measurements of the total growth at the most unstable mode from acceleration Rayleigh-Taylor achieved in any ICF experiment to date, showing growth of the areal density perturbation of ~7000×. Measurements were made at convergences of ~5 to ~10× at both the waist and pole of the capsule, demonstrating simultaneous measurements of the growth factors from both linesmore » of sight. The areal density growth factors are an order of magnitude larger than prior experimental measurements and differed by ~2× between the waist and the pole, showing asymmetry in the measured growth factors. As a result, these new measurements significantly advance our ability to diagnose perturbations detrimental to ICF implosions, uniquely intersecting the change from an accelerating to decelerating shell, with multiple simultaneous angular views.« less

  16. Development of Lower Energy Neutron Spectroscopy for Areal Density Measurement in Implosion Experiment at NIF and Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Isumi, N; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W; Schmid, G J; Moran, M J; Sangster, T C

    2001-08-02

    Areal density ({rho}R) is a fundamental parameter that characterizes the performance of an ICF implosion. For high areal densities ({rho}R> 0.1 g/cm{sup 2}), which will be realized in implosion experiments at NIF and LMJ, the target areal density exceeds the stopping range of charged particles and measurements with charged particle spectroscopy will be difficult. In this region, an areal density measurement method using down shifted neutron counting is a promising alternative. The probability of neutron scattering in the imploded plasma is proportional to the areal density of the plasma. The spectrum of neutrons scattered by the specific target nucleus has a characteristic low energy cut off. This enables separate, simultaneous measurements of fuel and pusher {rho}Rs. To apply this concept in implosion experiments, the detector should have extremely large dynamic range. Sufficient signal output for low energy neutrons is also required. A lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate (LG-SCIFI) is a promising candidate for this application. In this paper we propose a novel technique based on downshifted neutron measurements with a lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate. The details of instrumentation and background estimation with Monte Carlo calculation are reported.

  17. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  18. Measurement of hydrodynamic growth near peak velocity in an inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion using a self-radiography technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Schneider, M. B.; Hoppe, Jr., M.; Kohut, T.; Holunga, D.; Walters, C.; Haid, B.; Dayton, M.

    2016-07-11

    First measurements of hydrodynamic growth near peak implosion velocity in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion at the National Ignition Facility were obtained using a self-radiographing technique and a preimposed Legendre mode 40, λ = 140 μm, sinusoidal perturbation. These are the first measurements of the total growth at the most unstable mode from acceleration Rayleigh-Taylor achieved in any ICF experiment to date, showing growth of the areal density perturbation of ~7000×. Measurements were made at convergences of ~5 to ~10× at both the waist and pole of the capsule, demonstrating simultaneous measurements of the growth factors from both lines of sight. The areal density growth factors are an order of magnitude larger than prior experimental measurements and differed by ~2× between the waist and the pole, showing asymmetry in the measured growth factors. As a result, these new measurements significantly advance our ability to diagnose perturbations detrimental to ICF implosions, uniquely intersecting the change from an accelerating to decelerating shell, with multiple simultaneous angular views.

  19. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; ...

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  20. Performance metrics for inertial confinement fusion implosions: Aspects of the technical framework for measuring progress in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Brian K.; Glenzer, S.; Edwards, M. J.; Brandon, S.; Clark, D.; Town, R.; Cerjan, C.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Mapoles, E.; Munro, D.; Salmonson, J.; Sepke, S.; Weber, S.; Hatchett, S.; Haan, S.; Springer, P.; Moses, E.; Kline, J.; Kyrala, G.; Wilson, D.

    2012-05-15

    The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) uses non-igniting 'tritium hydrogen deuterium (THD)' capsules to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel without burn. These capsules are designed to simultaneously reduce DT neutron yield and to maintain hydrodynamic similarity with the DT ignition capsule. We will discuss nominal THD performance and the associated experimental observables. We will show the results of large ensembles of numerical simulations of THD and DT implosions and their simulated diagnostic outputs. These simulations cover a broad range of both nominal and off-nominal implosions. We will focus on the development of an experimental implosion performance metric called the experimental ignition threshold factor (ITFX). We will discuss the relationship between ITFX and other integrated performance metrics, including the ignition threshold factor (ITF), the generalized Lawson criterion (GLC), and the hot spot pressure (HSP). We will then consider the experimental results of the recent NIC THD campaign. We will show that we can observe the key quantities for producing a measured ITFX and for inferring the other performance metrics. We will discuss trends in the experimental data, improvement in ITFX, and briefly the upcoming tuning campaign aimed at taking the next steps in performance improvement on the path to ignition on NIF.

  1. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  2. Sensitivity study of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jianfa; Zou Shiyang; Li Yongsheng; Dai Zhensheng; Ye Wenhua

    2012-12-15

    The paper investigates theoretically the sensitivities of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum. In the simulation, the hohlraum radiation is represented by a Planckian spectrum for the main drive plus a gaussian bump centered at energy E{sub c} for preheating x-rays. Simulation results show that with the increasing of center energy E{sub c}, the Atwood number at the fuel-ablator interface increases rapidly due to the preheating and expanding of the inner undoped CH layer. The growing of Atwood number indicates the hydrodynamic instability (HI) growth and mixing at this interface. On the other hand, the increasing of E{sub c} results in a large density gradient scale length of ablation front and stabilizes the HI growth at ablation front. The changes of the hard x-ray spectrum have significant influences on other important implosion parameters including the ablator mass remaining, shock timing, implosion velocity, and yield as well. High-precision results on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum are thus critical for optimizing the ignition capsule design to limit the HI growth.

  3. High-foot Implosion Workshop (March 22-24, 2016) Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.

    2016-05-06

    From March 22-24, 2016 at Workshop was held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory bringing together international experts in inertial confinement fusion research for the purpose of discussing the results from the ‘high-foot implosion campaign.’ The Workshop topics covered a retrospective of the first two years of experiments, a discussion of our best present understanding of what the data and our models imply, a discussion about remaining mysteries that are not understood at this time, and a discussion of our strategy moving forward. The material herein contains information from published and unpublished sources and is distributed solely for the purposes of this Workshop. Key assessments and conclusions resulting from the Workshop are: “The high foot campaign is extremely well documented and the interested reader is urged to go directly to the peer-reviewed journal literature for details.” – D. Haynes (LANL) “Overall progress in understanding of fuel and hot-spot properties near peak burn is excellent.” – V. Goncharov (LLE) “I would say that given the constraints of using the same hohlraum and similar capsule designs to the National Ignition Campaign, the High Foot Campaign achieved as much as could be expected. Indeed the demonstration of significant alpha particle heating remains a landmark achievement.” – J. Chittenden (Imperial College) “One of the principal points of discussion at the meeting was the importance of the roll over in inferred pressure that occurs with reducing coast time for different ablator thicknesses and the idea of repeating shot N140819 to confirm this. I would be very interested to see a return to the High Foot platform as a way to exercise the improved radiographic capabilities such as the curved crystal imaging system and as a way to examine the hypothesis of ‘burn truncation by aneurism.’ ” – J. Chittenden (Imperial College) “It is clear from the quality of the data presented during this workshop

  4. Application of 2-D simulations to hollow Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D. L.; Bowers, R. L.; Brownell, J. H.; Lund, C.; Matuska, W.; McLenithan, K.; Oona, H.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.; Spielman, R. B.; Nash, T. J.; Chandler, G.; Mock, R. C.; Sanford, T. W. L.; Matzen, M. K.; Roderick, N. F.

    1997-05-05

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, we have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy (1,2,3). This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters (such as the resistivity) are required (1). Limitations in the use of this approach include the use of the 3-T, gray diffusion treatment of radiation and the fact that the initial perturbation conditions are not known a priori. Nonetheless, the approach has been successful in reproducing important experimental features of such implosions over a wide variety of timescales (tens of nanoseconds to microseconds), current drives (3 to 16 MA), masses (submilligram to tens of milligrams), initial radii (<1 cm to 5 cm), materials (Al and W) and initial configurations (thin foils and wire arrays with 40 to 240 wires). Currently we are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments (4,5). The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has

  5. Application of 2-D simulations to hollow Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Lund, C.; Matuska, W.; McLenithan, K.; Oona, H.; Deeney, C.; Derzon, M.; Spielman, R.B.; Nash, T.J.; Chandler, G.; Mock, R.C.; Sanford, T.W.; Matzen, M.K.; Roderick, N.F.

    1997-05-01

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus I and Pegasus II capacitor banks, we have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy (1,2,3). This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters (such as the resistivity) are required (1). Limitations in the use of this approach include the use of the 3-T, gray diffusion treatment of radiation and the fact that the initial perturbation conditions are not known {ital a priori}. Nonetheless, the approach has been successful in reproducing important experimental features of such implosions over a wide variety of timescales (tens of nanoseconds to microseconds), current drives (3 to 16 MA), masses (submilligram to tens of milligrams), initial radii ({lt}1cm to 5 cm), materials (Al and W) and initial configurations (thin foils and wire arrays with 40 to 240 wires). Currently we are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments (4,5). The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D

  6. Modeling of the merging, liner formation, implosion of hypervelocity plasma jets for the PLX- α project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; Schillo, Kevin; Samulyak, Roman; Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kris

    2015-11-01

    A suite of numerical tools will support the conical and 4 π plasma-liner-formation experiments for the PLX- α project. A new Lagrangian particles (LP) method will provide detailed studies of the merging of plasma jets and plasma-liner formation/convergence. A 3d smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code will simulate conical (up to 9 jets) and 4 π spherical (up to 60 jets) liner formation and implosion. Both LP and SPH will use the same tabular EOS generated by Propaceos, thermal conductivity, optically thin radiation and physical viscosity models. With LP and SPH,the major objectives are to study Mach-number degradation during jet merging, provide RMS amplitude and wave number of the liner nonuniformity at the leading edge, and develop scaling laws for ram pressure and liner uniformity as a function of jet parameters. USIM, a 3D multi-fluid plasma code, will be used to perform 1D and 2D simulations of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) to identify initial conditions in which the ``liner gain'' exceeds unity. A brief overview of the modeling program will be provided. Results from SPH modeling to support the PLX- α experimental design will also be presented, including preliminary ram-pressure scaling and non-uniformity characterization.

  7. Mitigating laser imprint in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions with high-Z dopants.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Fiksel, G; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S; Meyerhofer, D D; Smalyuk, V A

    2012-05-11

    Nonuniformities seeded by both long- and short-wavelength laser perturbations can grow via Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion, leading to performance reduction in low-adiabat implosions. To mitigate the effect of laser imprinting on target performance, spherical RT experiments have been performed on OMEGA using Si- or Ge-doped plastic targets in a cone-in-shell configuration. Compared to a pure plastic target, radiation preheating from these high-Z dopants (Si/Ge) increases the ablation velocity and the standoff distance between the ablation front and laser-deposition region, thereby reducing both the imprinting efficiency and the RT growth rate. Experiments showed a factor of 2-3 reduction in the laser-imprinting efficiency and a reduced RT growth rate, leading to significant (3-5 times) reduction in the σ(rms) of shell ρR modulation for Si- or Ge-doped targets. These features are reproduced by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations using the two-dimensional hydrocode DRACO.

  8. Two Dimensional Simulations of Plastic-Shell, Direct-Drive Implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P B; Goncharov, V N; Collins, T B; Delettrez, J A; Elbaz, Y; Glebov, V Y; Keck, R L; Keller, D E; Knauer, J P; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Srebro, Y; Town, R J; Stoeckl, C

    2004-09-27

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength ({ell} < 10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20 {le} {ell} {le} 50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1-D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda} {approx} {Delta}, where {Delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1-D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  9. Two-dimensional simulations of plastic-shell, direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Radha, P.B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Elbaz, Y.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Keck, R.L.; Keller, D.E.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Srebro, Y.; Town, R.P.J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2005-03-01

    Multidimensional hydrodynamic properties of high-adiabat direct-drive plastic-shell implosions on the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are investigated using the multidimensional hydrodynamic code, DRACO [D. Keller et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 37 (1999)]. Multimode simulations including the effects of nonuniform illumination and target roughness indicate that shell stability during the acceleration phase plays a critical role in determining target performance. For thick shells that remain integral during the acceleration phase, target yields are significantly reduced by the combination of the long-wavelength (l<10) modes due to surface roughness and beam imbalance and the intermediate modes (20{<=}l{<=}50) due to single-beam nonuniformities. The neutron-production rate for these thick shells truncates relative to one-dimensional (1D) predictions. The yield degradation in the thin shells is mainly due to shell breakup at short wavelengths ({lambda}{approx}{delta}, where {delta} is the in-flight shell thickness). The neutron-rate curves for the thinner shells have significantly lower amplitudes and a fall-off that is less steep than 1D rates. DRACO simulation results are consistent with experimental observations.

  10. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Le Pape, S; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Ho, D D; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Benedetti, L R; Biener, J; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D; Caggiano, J; Callahan, D; Cerjan, C; Church, J; Clark, D; Döppner, T; Dylla-Spears, R; Eckart, M; Edgell, D; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Haan, S; Hamza, A; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hinkel, D; Hoover, D; Huang, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kozioziemski, B; Kroll, J; Ma, T; MacPhee, A; McNaney, J; Merrill, F; Moody, J; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Robey, H F; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Sepke, S; Stadermann, M; Stoeffl, W; Thomas, C; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wild, C; Wilde, C; Woerner, E; Yeamans, C; Yoxall, B; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O L; Hsing, W; Edwards, M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α∼3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8×10(15) neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ∼27×.

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of Nova high growth factor capsule implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, M. M.; Tipton, R. E.; Landen, O. L.; Murphy, T. J.; Amendt, P.; Haan, S. W.; Hatchett, S. P.; Keane, C. J.; McEachern, R.; Wallace, R.

    1996-05-01

    Capsule implosion experiments carried out on the Nova laser [E. M. Campbell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 57, 2101 (1986)] are simulated with the three-dimensional HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code [NTIS Document No. DE-96004569 (M. M. Marinak et al. in UCRL-LR-105821-95-3)]. Simulations of ordered, near single mode perturbations indicate that structures which evolve into round spikes can penetrate farthest into the hot spot. Bubble-shaped perturbations can burn through the capsule shell fastest, in which case they cause even more damage. A simulation of a capsule with a multimode perturbation of moderate amplitude shows spike amplitudes evolving in good agreement with a saturation model during the deceleration phase. The presence of sizable low mode asymmetry, caused either by drive asymmetry or perturbations in the capsule shell, can dramatically affect the manner in which spikes approach the center of the hot spot. Three-dimensional coupling between the low mode shell perturbations intrinsic to Nova capsules and the drive asymmetry is found to be important, bringing the simulated neutron yields into closer agreement with the experimental values.

  12. Application of 2-D simulations to hollow z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.L.; Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.

    1997-12-01

    The application of simulations of z-pinch implosions should have at least two goals: first, to properly model the most important physical processes occurring in the pinch allowing for a better understanding of the experiments and second, provide a design capability for future experiments. Beginning with experiments fielded at Los Alamos on the Pegasus 1 and Pegasus 2 capacitor banks, the authors have developed a methodology for simulating hollow z-pinches in two dimensions which has reproduced important features of the measured experimental current drive, spectrum, radiation pulse shape, peak power and total radiated energy. This methodology employs essentially one free parameter, the initial level of the random density perturbations imposed at the beginning of the 2-D simulation, but in general no adjustments to other parameters are required. Currently the authors are applying this capability to the analysis of recent Saturn and PBFA-Z experiments. The code results provide insight into the nature of the pinch plasma prior to arrival on-axis, during thermalization and development after peak pinch time. Among other things, the simulation results provide an explanation for the production of larger amounts of radiated energy than would be expected from a simple slug-model kinetic energy analysis and the appearance of multiple peaks in the radiation power. The 2-D modeling has also been applied to the analysis of Saturn dynamic hohlraum experiments and is being used in the design of this and other Z-Pinch applications on PBFA-Z.

  13. Implosion and heating experiments of fast ignition targets by Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Hosoda, H.; Nagai, T.; Koga, M.; Kikuchi, H.; Ishii, Y.; Sogo, T.; Shigemori, K.; Nishimura, H.; Zhang, Z.; Tanabe, M.; Ohira, S.; Fujii, Y.; Namimoto, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Maegawa, O.; Ozaki, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Shimada, K.; Key, M.; Norreys, P.; Pasley, J.; Nagatomo, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Murakami, M.; Sakagami, H.; Taguchi, T.; Norimatsu, T.; Homma, H.; Fujimoto, Y.; Iwamoto, A.; Miyanaga, N.; Kawanaka, J.; Kanabe, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Nakata, Y.; Tsubakimoto, K.; Sueda, K.; Kodama, R.; Kondo, K.; Morio, N.; Matsuo, S.; Kawasaki, T.; Sawai, K.; Tsuji, K.; Murakami, H.; Sarukura, N.; Shimizu, T.; Mima, K.; Azechi, H.

    2013-11-01

    The FIREX-1 project, the goal of which is to demonstrate fuel heating up to 5 keV by fast ignition scheme, has been carried out since 2003 including construction and tuning of LFEX laser and integrated experiments. Implosion and heating experiment of Fast Ignition targets have been performed since 2009 with Gekko-XII and LFEX lasers. A deuterated polystyrene shell target was imploded with the 0.53- μm Gekko-XII, and the 1.053- μm beam of the LFEX laser was injected through a gold cone attached to the shell to generate hot electrons to heat the imploded fuel plasma. Pulse contrast ratio of the LFEX beam was significantly improved. Also a variety of plasma diagnostic instruments were developed to be compatible with harsh environment of intense hard x-rays (γ rays) and electromagnetic pulses due to the intense LFEX beam on the target. Large background signals around the DD neutron signal in time-of-flight record of neutron detector were found to consist of neutrons via (γ,n) reactions and scattered gamma rays. Enhanced neutron yield was confirmed by carefully eliminating such backgrounds. Neutron enhancement up to 3.5 × 107 was observed. Heating efficiency was estimated to be 10-20% assuming a uniform temperature rise model.

  14. Effect of the mounting membrane on shape in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Haan, S. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-02-15

    The performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets relies on the symmetric implosion of highly compressed fuel. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to assess in-flight low mode 2D asymmetries of the shell. These time-resolved images of the shell exhibit features that can be related to the lift-off position of the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum. Here, we describe a systematic study of this membrane or “tent” thickness and its impact on the measured low modes for in-flight and self-emission images. The low mode amplitudes of the shell in-flight shape (P{sub 2} and P{sub 4}) are weakly affected by the tent feature in time-resolved, backlit data. By contrast, time integrated self-emission images along the same axis exhibit a reversal in perceived P{sub 4} mode due to growth of a feature seeded by the tent, which can explain prior inconsistencies between the in-flight P{sub 4} and core P{sub 4}, leading to a reevaluation of optimum hohlraum length. Simulations with a tent-like feature normalized to match the feature seen in the backlit images predict a very large impact on the capsule performance from the tent feature.

  15. Investigation of Inter-Ion Species Diffusion in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Kim, Yongho; Hoffman, Nelson M.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Kagan, Grigory; Batha, Steven H.; Garbett, Warren J.; Horsfield, Colin J.; Rubery, Michael S.; Gales, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Anomalous fusion yield degradation has been observed for gas fill mixtures in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. These mixtures have included D/3He [Rygg et al., Phys Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)], D/T/3He [Herrmann et al., Phys Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)], D/Ar [Lindl et al., Phys Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] and even D/T [Casey et al., PRL 108, 075005 (2012)]. Fuel ion segregation has been suggested as a possible cause [Amendt et al., PRL 18, 056308 (2011); Kagan et al., Phys Lett. A 10.1016 (2014)]. Segregation may be caused by inter-ion species diffusion driven by gradients in plasma pressure, temperature and electric field, either across a relatively narrow shock boundary or across the entire interior of the compressed capsule. It is expected that lower Z &/or A ions will diffuse outward while higher Z &/or A diffuse inward. In the case of D/T/3He, the 3He diffuses inward to the hotter core, reducing the DT reactivity. A D/T/H mixture should result in H diffusing outward, leaving the hotter core D & T rich and hence enhance reactivity over the simulated expectation. Past results will be reviewed and plans for a hydro-equivalent comparison D/T/3He and D/T/H will be presented. Research conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Turbulent mix or ion diffusion? Hypothesis testing in ICF capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Vander Wiel, S. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent mixing at a contact surface combines materials that are initially separated across the contact. While the mixing layer may contain the initially separate materials (each assumed to be composed of a number of distinct ion species) in a range of concentrations, from zero to 100%, the concentration of individual ion species within each material, relative to one another, is not altered by turbulent mixing alone. Ion diffusion likewise causes mixing at a contact, but does alter the relative concentration of ion species within each material, since the relative diffusivity of ions, in a fixed background plasma, varies as A 1 / 2/Z2. Recent hydrodynamically equivalent capsule implosions allow a test of the influence of these processes on observed capsule behavior. We use numerical simulations and hypothesis-testing methods to show quantitatively that turbulent mixing with ion diffusion is a better explanation of observed behavior than turbulent mixing alone (subject to the assumptions inherent in the computational models of these processes.) Research supported by US DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. Impact of flows on ion temperatures inferred from neutron spectra in asymmetrically driven OMEGA DT implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Aappelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.; Walsh, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Marshall, F.; Michel, T.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-10-01

    Ion temperatures (Tion) in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments have traditionally been inferred from the broadening of primary neutron spectra. Directional motion (flow) of the fuel at burn, expected to arise due to asymmetries imposed by engineering features (such as stalks, fill tubes, tents, or capsule imperfections) or drive non-uniformity, also impacts broadening and may lead to artificially inflated ``Tion'' values. Flow due to low-mode asymmetries is expected to give rise to line-of-sight variations in measured Tion, as observed in OMEGA cryogenic DT implosions but not in similar experiments at the NIF. In this presentation we report on an OMEGA experiment with intentionally asymmetric drive, designed to test the ability to accurately predict and measure line-of-sight differences in apparent Tion due to low-mode asymmetry-seeded flows. The results provide insight into the complexity of hot-spot dynamics, which is a problem that must be mastered to achieve ICF ignition. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  18. Instability growth seeded by ablator material inhomogeneity in implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S. W.; Baxamusa, S. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Clark, D. S.; Nikroo, A.; Stadermann, M.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Smalyuk, V.; Weber, C. R.; Huang, H.; Hoover, D. E.; Nguyen, A. Q. L.; Requieron, W.; Youngblood, K. P.; Kline, J. L.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work [Physics of Plasmas 22, 032708 (2015)] on instability growth seeded by oxygen in CH NIF capsules has been extended. Oxygenation of CH can be caused by exposure to X-rays, UV, or visible light, such that irregularities in oxygen are very likely to dominate surface roughness as seed for instabilities in CH NIF implosions. 3D Rayleigh-Taylor experiments show structure that can most plausibly be explained as resulting from this oxygen. Experiments are planned on Omega and NIF to validate this phenomenon, which is still primarily simulation-motivated. Design work and available results for these experiments will be described. The oxygenation of CH might be mitigated by a coating of aluminum oxide on the outside of the shells. Growth is also seeded in Be shells, by density and composition non-uniformity from both oxygen and Ar, and in High Density Carbon shells by density nonuniformity. We present updated requirements for these nonuniformites, and compare to characterization of current shells. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenberger, M.; Shvydky, A.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Nikroo, A.; Wallace, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) is an alternative, direct-drive inertial confinement fusion platform being developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Shell stability of the target is of key importance for an optimized performance. We have begun an experimental campaign to characterize Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth and laser imprint in spherical PDD implosions on the NIF. Plastic, cone-in-shell targets with an outer diameter of ~ 2 . 2 mm were imploded, and the RT-amplified shell mass modulations were tracked via measurements of the 2-D optical depth variations using soft x-ray radiography. The RT growth of discrete modes was investigated by machining single-mode, sinusoidal corrugations onto the target surface, which acted as well-characterized seeds. We will present platform characterization and backlighter optimization data as well as experimental results of instability growth in spherical PDD experiments on the NIF. The experimental data will be compared to 2-D DRACO simulations and strategies for measuring high l-mode perturbations > 300 and for mitigating imprint in future PDD experiments will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Ion separation effects in mixed-species ablators for inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Bellei, Claudio; Ross, J. Steven; Salmonson, Jay

    2015-02-01

    Recent efforts to demonstrate significant self-heating of the fuel and eventual ignition at the National Ignition Facility make use of plastic (CH) ablators [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014), 10.1063/1.4874330]. Mainline simulation techniques for modeling CH capsule implosions treat the ablator as an average-atom fluid and neglect potential species separation phenomena. The mass-ablation process for a mixture is shown to lead to the potential for species separation, parasitic energy loss according to thermodynamic arguments, and reduced rocket efficiency. A generalized plasma barometric formula for a multispecies concentration gradient that includes collisionality and steady flows in spherical geometry is presented. A model based on plasma expansion into a vacuum is used to interpret reported experimental evidence for ablator species separation in an inertial-confinement-fusion target [J. S. Ross et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E323 (2012)]. The possibility of "runaway" hydrogen ions in the thermoelectric field of the ablation front is conjectured.