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Sample records for imprinted igf2 expression

  1. Promoter-Specific Expression and Imprint Status of Marsupial IGF2

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, Jessica M.; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J.; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2012-01-01

    In mice and humans, IGF2 has multiple promoters to maintain its complex tissue- and developmental stage-specific imprinting and expression. IGF2 is also imprinted in marsupials, but little is known about its promoter region. In this study, three IGF2 transcripts were isolated from placental and liver samples of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Each transcript contained a unique 5' untranslated region, orthologous to the non-coding exons derived from promoters P1–P3 in the human and mouse IGF2 locus. The expression of tammar IGF2 was predominantly from the P2 promoter, similar to humans. Expression of IGF2 was higher in pouch young than in the adult and imprinting was highly tissue and developmental-stage specific. Interestingly, while IGF2 was expressed throughout the placenta, imprinting seemed to be restricted to the vascular, trilaminar region. In addition, IGF2 was monoallelically expressed in the adult mammary gland while in the liver it switched from monoalleleic expression in the pouch young to biallelic in the adult. These data suggest a complex mode of IGF2 regulation in marsupials as seen in eutherian mammals. The conservation of the IGF2 promoters suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians, and have been selectively maintained for at least 160 million years. PMID:22848567

  2. Modulation of Igf2 genomic imprinting in mice induced by 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Hu, J F; Nguyen, P H; Pham, N V; Vu, T H; Hoffman, A R

    1997-12-01

    The adjacent genes, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) and H19, are imprinted in both mouse and human. While Igf2 is expressed from the paternal allele, H19 is transcribed exclusively from the maternal allele. To explore the underlying mechanism of Igf2 and H19 imprinting, we studied the effect of DNA demethylation on allelic expression by injecting mice with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-aza-C). We observed a > or = 2-fold increase in the abundance of Igf2 mRNA in liver from treated mice compared with that of control mice. There was no significant change in Igf2 or H19 expression in brain. In the 5-aza-C-treated mice, there was dramatic modulation of Igf2 imprinting. In some tissues, Igf2 was expressed biallelically, while in other tissues, the paternal allele was silenced and the normally imprinted maternal allele was expressed, an example of allelic switching. There was no change in the normal biallelic pattern of Igf2 expression in brain. H19, on the other hand, remained imprinted in all tissues in mice treated with 5-aza-C. These results provide the first example of a pharmacological manipulation of genomic imprinting of an endogenous gene in vivo and further implicate DNA methylation as an important factor in maintaining the differential allelic expression of the Igf2 gene.

  3. Alterations in expression of imprinted genes from the H19/IGF2 loci in a multigenerational model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Pablo; Cantu, Jessica; O'Neil, Derek; Seferovic, Maxim D; Goodspeed, Danielle M; Suter, Melissa A; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2016-05-01

    The H19/IGF2 imprinted loci have attracted recent attention because of their role in cellular differentiation and proliferation, heritable gene regulation, and in utero or early postnatal growth and development. Expression from the imprinted H19/IGF2 locus involves a complex interplay of 3 means of epigenetic regulation: proper establishment of DNA methylation, promoter occupancy of CTCF, and expression of microRNA-675. We have demonstrated previously in a multigenerational rat model of intrauterine growth restriction the epigenetic heritability of adult metabolic syndrome in a F2 generation. We have further demonstrated abrogation of the F2 adult metabolic syndrome phenotype with essential nutrient supplementation of intermediates along the 1-carbon pathway and shown that alterations in the metabolome precede the adult onset of metabolic syndrome. The upstream molecular and epigenomic mediators underlying these observations, however, have yet to be elucidated fully. In the current study, we sought to characterize the impact of the intrauterine growth-restricted lineage and essential nutrient supplementation on both levels and molecular mediators of H19 and IGF2 gene expression in the F2 generation. F2 intrauterine growth-restricted and sham lineages were obtained by exposing P1 (grandmaternal) pregnant dams to bilateral uterine artery ligation or sham surgery at gestational day 19.5. F1 pups were allocated to the essential nutrient supplemented or control diet at postnatal day 21, and bred at 6-7 weeks of age. Hepatic tissues from the resultant F2 offspring at birth and at weaning (day 21) were obtained. Bisulfite modification and sequencing was employed for methylation analysis. H19 and IGF2 expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Promoter occupancy was quantified by the use of chromatin immunoprecipitation, or ChIP, against CTCF insulator proteins. Growth-restricted F2 on control diet demonstrated significant down-regulation in H19

  4. Relaxation of IGF2/H19 imprinting in Wilms tumour is associated with a switch in DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, A.E.; Taniguchi, T.; Sullivan, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    We and others have recently shown that the normal imprinting of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene is disrupted in Wilms tumor. The process of relaxation of IGF2 imprinting leads to the activation of transcription of the normally silent maternally inherited IGF2 allele such that both alleles of the IGF2 gene are transcribed. Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting has also been detected as a constitutional event in patients with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrom and a patient with gigantism and Wilms tumor. We have now shown that in Wilms tumors in which imprinting is relaxed, IGF2 is transcribed from the maternal allelemore » and there is a concomitant transcriptional inactivation of the H19 maternal allele. Furthermore, the patterns of methylation of the IGF2 and H19 gene are reversed on the maternal chromosome. Relaxation of imprinting in Wilms tumors appear, therefore, to be associated with a switch in gene expression and methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. The data supports the notion of a disrupted IGF2/H19 imprinting switch in Wilms tumor.« less

  5. Genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaël; Hagège, Hélène; Murrell, Adele; Brunel, Claude; Reik, Wolf; Cathala, Guy; Forné, Thierry

    2003-12-01

    Genomic imprinting at the Igf2/H19 locus originates from allele-specific DNA methylation, which modifies the affinity of some proteins for their target sequences. Here, we show that AT-rich DNA sequences located in the vicinity of previously characterized differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the imprinted Igf2 gene are conserved between mouse and human. These sequences have all the characteristics of matrix attachment regions (MARs), which are known as versatile regulatory elements involved in chromatin structure and gene expression. Combining allele-specific nuclear matrix binding assays and real-time PCR quantification, we show that retention of two of these Igf2 MARs (MAR0 and MAR2) in the nuclear matrix fraction depends on the tissue and is specific to the paternal allele. Furthermore, on this allele, the Igf2 MAR2 is functionally linked to the neighboring DMR2 while, on the maternal allele, it is controlled by the imprinting-control region. Our work clearly demonstrates that genomic imprinting controls matrix attachment regions in the Igf2 gene.

  6. Conservation of the H19 noncoding RNA and H19-IGF2 imprinting mechanism in therians.

    PubMed

    Smits, Guillaume; Mungall, Andrew J; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Smith, Paul; Beury, Delphine; Matthews, Lucy; Rogers, Jane; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; VandeBerg, John L; McCarrey, John R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Reik, Wolf; Dunham, Ian

    2008-08-01

    Comparisons between eutherians and marsupials suggest limited conservation of the molecular mechanisms that control genomic imprinting in mammals. We have studied the evolution of the imprinted IGF2-H19 locus in therians. Although marsupial orthologs of protein-coding exons were easily identified, the use of evolutionarily conserved regions and low-stringency Bl2seq comparisons was required to delineate a candidate H19 noncoding RNA sequence. The therian H19 orthologs show miR-675 and exon structure conservation, suggesting functional selection on both features. Transcription start site sequences and poly(A) signals are also conserved. As in eutherians, marsupial H19 is maternally expressed and paternal methylation upstream of the gene originates in the male germline, encompasses a CTCF insulator, and spreads somatically into the H19 gene. The conservation in all therians of the mechanism controlling imprinting of the IGF2-H19 locus suggests a sequential model of imprinting evolution.

  7. More than insulator: multiple roles of CTCF at the H19-Igf2 imprinted domain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Szabó, Piroska E.

    2012-01-01

    CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor)-mediated insulation at the H19-Insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) imprinted domain is a classic example for imprinted gene regulation. DNA methylation difference in the imprinting control region (ICR) is inherited from the gametes and subsequently determines parental allele-specific enhancer blocking and imprinted expression in the soma. Recent genetic studies showed that proper monoallelic enhancer blocking at the H19-Igf2 ICR is critical for development. Strict biallelic insulation at this locus causes perinatal lethality, whereas leaky biallelic insulation results in smaller size but no lethality. Apart from enhancer blocking, CTCF is also the master organizer of chromatin composition in the maternal allele along this imprinted domain, affecting not only histone tail covalent modifications but also those in the histone core. Additionally, CTCF binding in the soma protects the maternal allele from de novo DNA methylation. CTCF binding is not involved in the establishment of the gametic marks at the ICR, but it slightly delays de novo methylation in the maternally inherited ICR allele in prospermatogonia. This review focuses on the developmental and epigenetic consequences of CTCF binding at the H19-Igf2 ICR. PMID:23087708

  8. Genomic Imprinting of the M6P/IGF2 Receptor: A Novel Breast Cancer Susceptibility Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    i.e. echidna and platypus ), marsupials (i.e. opossum) and eutherian mammals (i.e. mouse, rat, pig, cow, bat, flying lemur, tree shrew, ringtail lemur...and humans). Our findings demonstrate that M6P/IGF2R is not imprinted in the egg-laying platypus and echidna, whereas it is imprinted in the opossum

  9. Allele-specific transcriptional elongation regulates monoallelic expression of the IGF2BP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Random monoallelic expression contributes to phenotypic variation of cells and organisms. However, the epigenetic mechanisms by which individual alleles are randomly selected for expression are not known. Taking cues from chromatin signatures at imprinted gene loci such as the insulin-like growth factor 2 gene 2 (IGF2), we evaluated the contribution of CTCF, a zinc finger protein required for parent-of-origin-specific expression of the IGF2 gene, as well as a role for allele-specific association with DNA methylation, histone modification and RNA polymerase II. Results Using array-based chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified 293 genomic loci that are associated with both CTCF and histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3). A comparison of their genomic positions with those of previously published monoallelically expressed genes revealed no significant overlap between allele-specifically expressed genes and colocalized CTCF/H3K9me3. To analyze the contributions of CTCF and H3K9me3 to gene regulation in more detail, we focused on the monoallelically expressed IGF2BP1 gene. In vitro binding assays using the CTCF target motif at the IGF2BP1 gene, as well as allele-specific analysis of cytosine methylation and CTCF binding, revealed that CTCF does not regulate mono- or biallelic IGF2BP1 expression. Surprisingly, we found that RNA polymerase II is detected on both the maternal and paternal alleles in B lymphoblasts that express IGF2BP1 primarily from one allele. Thus, allele-specific control of RNA polymerase II elongation regulates the allelic bias of IGF2BP1 gene expression. Conclusions Colocalization of CTCF and H3K9me3 does not represent a reliable chromatin signature indicative of monoallelic expression. Moreover, association of individual alleles with both active (H3K4me3) and silent (H3K27me3) chromatin modifications (allelic bivalent chromatin) or with RNA polymerase II also fails to identify monoallelically expressed gene loci. The selection

  10. The effects of depression and use of antidepressive medicines during pregnancy on the methylation status of the IGF2 imprinted control regions in the offspring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In utero exposures to environmental factors may result in persistent epigenetic modifications affecting normal development and susceptibility to chronic diseases in later life. We explored the relationship between exposure of the growing fetus to maternal depression or antidepressants and DNA methylation at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of the imprinted Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene. Aberrant DNA methylation at the IGF2 and neighboring H19 DMRs has been associated with deregulated IGF2 expression, childhood cancers and several chronic diseases during adulthood. Our study population is comprised of pregnant mothers and their newborns (n = 436), as part of the Newborn Epigenetics Study (NEST). A standardized questionnaire was completed and medical record data were abstracted to ascertain maternal depression and antidepressive drug use. DMR methylation levels in umbilical cord blood leukocytes were quantified using pyrosequencing. From the 436 newborns, laboratory data were obtained for 356 individuals at the IGF2 DMRs, and for 411 individuals at the H19 DMRs; about half of each group was African American or Caucasian. While overall no association between depression and methylation profiles was found, we observed a significant hypermethylation of the H19 DMRs in newborns of African American (n = 177) but not Caucasian (n = 168) mothers who reported the use of antidepressive drugs during pregnancy (β = +6.89, p = 0.01). Of note, our data reveal a race-independent association between smoking during pregnancy and methylation at the IGF2 DMR (+3.05%, p = 0.01). In conclusion, our findings suggest a race-dependent response related to maternal use of antidepressants at one of the IGF2 DMRs in the offspring. PMID:22414206

  11. Identification of transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring human lactoferrin and methylation status of the imprinted gene IGF2R in their lungs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, G M; Wan, Y J; Jia, R X; Li, P Z; Han, L; Wang, F; Huang, M R

    2015-09-22

    Dairy goat is a good model for production of transgenic proteins in milk using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, animals produced from SCNT are often associated with lung deficiencies. We recently produced six transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring the human lactoferrin gene, including three live transgenic clones and three deceased transgenic clones that died from respiratory failure during the perinatal period. Imprinted genes are important regulators of lung growth, and may be subjected to faulty reprogramming. In the present study, first, microsatellite analysis, PCR, and DNA sequence identification were conducted to confirm that these three dead kids were genetically identical to the transgenic donor cells. Second, the CpG island methylation profile of the imprinted insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R) gene was assessed in the lungs of the three dead transgenic kids and the normally produced kids using bisulfite sequencing PCR. In addition, the relative mRNA level of IGF2R was also determined by real-time PCR. Results showed that the IGF2R gene in the lungs of the dead cloned kids showed abnormal hypermethylation and higher mRNA expression levels than the control, indicating that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming is one of the important factors in the death of transgenic cloned animals.

  12. Autoimmunity against INS-IGF2 Protein Expressed in Human Pancreatic Islets*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kanatsuna, Norio; Taneera, Jalal; Vaziri-Sani, Fariba; Wierup, Nils; Larsson, Helena Elding; Delli, Ahmed; Skärstrand, Hanna; Balhuizen, Alexander; Bennet, Hedvig; Steiner, Donald F.; Törn, Carina; Fex, Malin; Lernmark, Åke

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is a major autoantigen in islet autoimmunity and progression to type 1 diabetes. It has been suggested that the insulin B-chain may be critical to insulin autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 consists of the preproinsulin signal peptide, the insulin B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide in addition to 138 amino acids from the IGF2 gene. We aimed to determine the expression of INS-IGF2 in human pancreatic islets and autoantibodies in newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and controls. INS-IGF2, expressed primarily in beta cells, showed higher levels of expression in islets from normal compared with donors with either type 2 diabetes (p = 0.006) or high HbA1c levels (p < 0.001). INS-IGF2 autoantibody levels were increased in newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes (n = 304) compared with healthy controls (n = 355; p < 0.001). Displacement with cold insulin and INS-IGF2 revealed that more patients than controls had doubly reactive insulin-INS-IGF2 autoantibodies. These data suggest that INS-IGF2, which contains the preproinsulin signal peptide, the B-chain, and eight amino acids of the C-peptide may be an autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. INS-IGF2 and insulin may share autoantibody-binding sites, thus complicating the notion that insulin is the primary autoantigen in type 1 diabetes. PMID:23935095

  13. Protein intake during gestation affects postnatal bovine skeletal muscle growth and relative expression of IGF1, IGF1R, IGF2 and IGF2R.

    PubMed

    Micke, G C; Sullivan, T M; McMillen, I C; Gentili, S; Perry, V E A

    2011-01-30

    Expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1 and IGF2 and their receptor (IGF1R and IGF2R) mRNA in fetal skeletal muscle are changed by variations in maternal nutrient intake. The persistence of these effects into postnatal life and their association with phenotype in beef cattle is unknown. Here we report that the cross-sectional areas of longissimus dorsi and semitendinosus (ST) muscles were greater for mature male progeny born to heifers fed low protein diets (70% vs. 240% of recommended) during the first trimester. In ST, this was accompanied by greater IGF1, IGF2 and IGF2R mRNA at 680 d. Females exposed to low protein diets during the first trimester had decreased IGF2 mRNA in ST at 680 d, however this did not result in an effect to phenotype. Exposure to low protein diets during the second trimester increased IGF1R mRNA in ST of all progeny at 680 d. Changes to expression of IGF genes in progeny skeletal muscle resulting from variations to maternal protein intake during gestation may have permanent and sex-specific effect on postnatal skeletal muscle growth. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complete Biallelic Insulation at the H19/Igf2 Imprinting Control Region Position Results in Fetal Growth Retardation and Perinatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Singh, Purnima; Tsark, Walter M. K.; Szabó, Piroska E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) functions as an insulator exclusively in the unmethylated maternal allele, where enhancer-blocking by CTCF protein prevents the interaction between the Igf2 promoter and the distant enhancers. DNA methylation inhibits CTCF binding in the paternal ICR allele. Two copies of the chicken β-globin insulator (ChβGI)2 are capable of substituting for the enhancer blocking function of the ICR. Insulation, however, now also occurs upon paternal inheritance, because unlike the H19 ICR, the (ChβGI)2 does not become methylated in fetal male germ cells. The (ChβGI)2 is a composite insulator, exhibiting enhancer blocking by CTCF and chromatin barrier functions by USF1 and VEZF1. We asked the question whether these barrier proteins protected the (ChβGI)2 sequences from methylation in the male germ line. Methodology/Principal Findings We genetically dissected the ChβGI in the mouse by deleting the binding sites USF1 and VEZF1. The methylation of the mutant versus normal (ChβGI)2 significantly increased from 11% to 32% in perinatal male germ cells, suggesting that the barrier proteins did have a role in protecting the (ChβGI)2 from methylation in the male germ line. Contrary to the H19 ICR, however, the mutant (mChβGI)2 lacked the potential to attain full de novo methylation in the germ line and to maintain methylation in the paternal allele in the soma, where it consequently functioned as a biallelic insulator. Unexpectedly, a stricter enhancer blocking was achieved by CTCF alone than by a combination of the CTCF, USF1 and VEZF1 sites, illustrated by undetectable Igf2 expression upon paternal transmission. Conclusions/Significance In this in vivo model, hypomethylation at the ICR position together with fetal growth retardation mimicked the human Silver-Russell syndrome. Importantly, late fetal/perinatal death occurred arguing that strict biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 ICR position is not tolerated in development

  15. Complete biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region position results in fetal growth retardation and perinatal lethality.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Singh, Purnima; Tsark, Walter M K; Szabó, Piroska E

    2010-09-08

    The H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) functions as an insulator exclusively in the unmethylated maternal allele, where enhancer-blocking by CTCF protein prevents the interaction between the Igf2 promoter and the distant enhancers. DNA methylation inhibits CTCF binding in the paternal ICR allele. Two copies of the chicken β-globin insulator (ChβGI)(2) are capable of substituting for the enhancer blocking function of the ICR. Insulation, however, now also occurs upon paternal inheritance, because unlike the H19 ICR, the (ChβGI)(2) does not become methylated in fetal male germ cells. The (ChβGI)(2) is a composite insulator, exhibiting enhancer blocking by CTCF and chromatin barrier functions by USF1 and VEZF1. We asked the question whether these barrier proteins protected the (ChβGI)(2) sequences from methylation in the male germ line. We genetically dissected the ChβGI in the mouse by deleting the binding sites USF1 and VEZF1. The methylation of the mutant versus normal (ChβGI)(2) significantly increased from 11% to 32% in perinatal male germ cells, suggesting that the barrier proteins did have a role in protecting the (ChβGI)(2) from methylation in the male germ line. Contrary to the H19 ICR, however, the mutant (mChβGI)(2) lacked the potential to attain full de novo methylation in the germ line and to maintain methylation in the paternal allele in the soma, where it consequently functioned as a biallelic insulator. Unexpectedly, a stricter enhancer blocking was achieved by CTCF alone than by a combination of the CTCF, USF1 and VEZF1 sites, illustrated by undetectable Igf2 expression upon paternal transmission. In this in vivo model, hypomethylation at the ICR position together with fetal growth retardation mimicked the human Silver-Russell syndrome. Importantly, late fetal/perinatal death occurred arguing that strict biallelic insulation at the H19/Igf2 ICR position is not tolerated in development.

  16. Maternal transmission of a humanised Igf2r allele results in an Igf2 dependent hypomorphic and non-viable growth phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer; Frago, Susana; Bühnemann, Claudia; Carter, Emma J; Hassan, A Bassim

    2013-01-01

    The cation independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) functions in the transportation and regulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and mannose 6-phosphate modified proteins. The relative and specific titration of IGF2 by high affinity binding of IGF2R represents a mechanism that supports the parental conflict theory of genomic imprinting. Imprinting of Igf2 (paternal allele expressed) and Igf2r (maternal allele expressed) arose to regulate the relative supply of both proteins. Experiments in the mouse have established that loss of the maternal allele of Igf2r results in disproportionate growth and peri-natal lethality. In order to systematically investigate the consequences of loss of function and of hypomorphic alleles of Igf2r on growth functions, we introduced a conditional human IGF2R exon 3-48 cDNA into the intron 2 region of murine Igf2r. Here we show that the knock-in construct resulted in over-growth when the humanised Igf2r allele was maternally transmitted, a phenotype that was rescued by either paternal transmission of the humanised allele, expression of a wild-type paternal allele or loss of function of Igf2. We also show that expression of IGF2R protein was reduced to less than 50% overall in tissues previously known to be Igf2 growth dependent. This occurred despite the detection of mouse derived peptides, suggesting that trans-splicing of the knock-in human cDNA with the endogenous maternal mouse Igf2r allele. The phenotype following maternal transmission of the humanised allele resulted in overgrowth of the embryo, heart and placenta with partial peri-natal lethality, suggesting that further generation of hypomorphic Igf2r alleles are likely to be at the borderline of maintaining Igf2 dependent viability.

  17. Genomic Imprinting of the M6P/IGF2 Receptor: A Novel Breast Cancer Susceptibility Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    E, Kay T, Ito J, Treder R: The Turner syndrome: cognitive 73. Williams CA, Angelman H , Clayton-Smith J, Driscoll DJ, Hendrickson deficits, affective...aleleforimpintd gnesiswas inherited from the father. This demonstrated thatlocus [1], the expressed allele for imprinted genes is te11 eei mrne n xrse nyfo h ...Br. J. Psychiatry 170, 162-166. 11. Vu, T. H ., and Hoffman, A. R. (1994). Promoter-specific imprint- 28. Kato, T., Winokur, G., Coryell, W., Keller, M

  18. Transcription factor ZBED6 mediates IGF2 gene expression by regulating promoter activity and DNA methylation in myoblasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zinc finger, BED-type containing 6 (ZBED6) is an important transcription factor in placental mammals, affecting development, cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we found that the expression of the ZBED6 and IGF2 were up regulated during C2C12 differentiation. The IGF2 expression levels wer...

  19. A Common Polymorphism within the IGF2 Imprinting Control Region Is Associated with Parent of Origin Specific Effects in Infantile Hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brent; Yao, Xiaopan; Deng, Yanhong; Waner, Milton; Spock, Christopher; Tom, Laura; Persing, John; Narayan, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Infantile hemangioma (IH) is the most common tumor of the pediatric age group, affecting up to 4% of newborns ranging from inconsequential blemishes, to highly aggressive tumors. Following well defined growth phases (proliferative, plateau involutional) IH usually regress into a fibro-fatty residuum. Despite the high prevalence of IH, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of disease. A reported six fold decrease in IGF2 expression (correlating with transformation of proliferative to involuted lesions) prompted us to study the IGF-2 axis further. We demonstrate that IGF2 expression in IH is strongly related to the expression of a cancer testes and suspected oncogene BORIS (paralog of CTCF), placing IH in the unique category of being the first known benign BORIS positive tumor. IGF2 expression was strongly and positively related to BORIS transcript expression. Furthermore, a stronger association was made when comparing BORIS levels against the expression of CTCF via either a percentage or difference between the two. A common C/T polymorphism at CTCF BS6 appeared to modify the correlation between CTCF/BORIS and IGF2 expression in a parent of origin specific manner. Moreover, these effects may have phenotypic consequences as tumor growth also correlates with the genotype at CTCF BS6. This may provide a framework for explaining the clinical variability seen in IH and suggests new insights regarding CTCF and BORIS related functionality in both normal and malignant states.

  20. Let-7b Regulates Myoblast Proliferation by Inhibiting IGF2BP3 Expression in Dwarf and Normal Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shumao; Luo, Wen; Ye, Yaqiong; Bekele, Endashaw J.; Nie, Qinghua; Li, Yugu; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    The sex-linked dwarf chicken is caused by the mutation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene and characterized by shorter shanks, lower body weight, smaller muscle fiber diameter and fewer muscle fiber number. However, the precise regulatory pathways that lead to the inhibition of skeletal muscle growth in dwarf chickens still remain unclear. Here we found a let-7b mediated pathway might play important role in the regulation of dwarf chicken skeletal muscle growth. Let-7b has higher expression in the skeletal muscle of dwarf chicken than in normal chicken, and the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3), which is a translational activator of IGF2, showed opposite expression trend to let-7b. In vitro cellular assays validated that let-7b directly inhibits IGF2BP3 expression through binding to its 3′UTR region, and the protein level but not mRNA level of IGF2 would be reduced in let-7b overexpressed chicken myoblast. Let-7b can inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell cycle arrest in chicken myoblast through let-7b-IGF2BP3-IGF2 signaling pathway. Additionally, let-7b can also regulate skeletal muscle growth through let-7b-GHR-GHR downstream genes pathway, but this pathway is non-existent in dwarf chicken because of the deletion mutation of GHR 3′UTR. Notably, as the loss binding site of GHR for let-7b, let-7b has enhanced its binding and inhibition on IGF2BP3 in dwarf myoblast, suggesting that the miRNA can balance its inhibiting effect through dynamic regulate its binding to target genes. Collectively, these results not only indicate that let-7b can inhibit skeletal muscle growth through let-7b-IGF2BP3-IGF2 signaling pathway, but also show that let-7b regulates myoblast proliferation by inhibiting IGF2BP3 expression in dwarf and normal chickens. PMID:28736533

  1. Alteration in Expression and Methylation of IGF2/H19 in Placenta and Umbilical Cord Blood Are Associated with Macrosomia Exposed to Intrauterine Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Su, Rina; Wang, Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Li; Liu, Xinyue; Wei, Yumei; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Macrosomia is one of the most common complications in gestational diabetes mellitus. Insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 are two of the imprinted candidate genes that are involved in fetal growth and development. Change in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 has been proved to be an early event related to the programming of metabolic profile, including macrosomia and small for gestational age in offspring. Here we hypothesize that alteration in methylation at differentially methylated region of the insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 is associated with macrosomia induced by intrauterine hyperglycemia. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in gestational diabetes mellitus group (GDM group) compared to normal glucose tolerance group (NGT group) both in umbilical cord blood and placenta, while the expression of H19 is significant lower in GDM group in umbilical cord blood. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 is significant higher in normal glucose tolerance with macrosomia group (NGT-M) compared to normal glucose tolerance with normal birthweight group (NGT-NBW group) both in placenta and umbilical cord blood. A model with interaction term of gene expression of IGF2 and H19 found that IGF2 and the joint action of IGF2 and H19 in placenta showed significantly relationship with GDM/NGT and GDM-NBW/NGT-NBW. A borderline significant association was seen among IGF2 and H19 in cord blood and GDM-M/NGT-M. The methylation level at different CpG sites of insulin-like growth factor 2 and H19 in umbilical cord blood was also significantly different among groups. Based on the multivariable linear regression analysis, the methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 / H19 is closely related to birth weight and intrauterine hyperglycemia. We confirmed the existence of alteration in DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and reported a

  2. Loss of insulin-like growth factor II imprinting is a hallmark associated with enhanced chemo/radiotherapy resistance in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Xiaoliang; Wang, Guanjun; Wen, Xue; Zhang, Xiaoying; Hoffman, Andrew R; Li, Wei; Hu, Ji-Fan; Cui, Jiuwei

    2016-08-09

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2) is maternally imprinted in most tissues, but the epigenetic regulation of the gene in cancer stem cells (CSCs) has not been defined. To study the epigenetic mechanisms underlying self-renewal, we isolated CSCs and non-CSCs from colon cancer (HT29, HRT18, HCT116), hepatoma (Hep3B), breast cancer (MCF7) and prostate cancer (ASPC) cell lines. In HT29 and HRT18 cells that show loss of IGF2 imprinting (LOI), IGF2 was biallelically expressed in the isolated CSCs. Surprisingly, we also found loss of IGF2 imprinting in CSCs derived from cell lines HCT116 and ASPC that overall demonstrate maintenance of IGF2 imprinting. Using chromatin conformation capture (3C), we found that intrachromosomal looping between the IGF2 promoters and the imprinting control region (ICR) was abrogated in CSCs, in parallel with loss of IGF2 imprinting in these CSCs. Loss of imprinting led to increased IGF2 expression in CSCs, which have a higher rate of colony formation and greater resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in vitro. These studies demonstrate that IGF2 LOI is a common feature in CSCs, even when the stem cells are derived from a cell line in which the general population of cells maintain IGF2 imprinting. This finding suggests that aberrant IGF2 imprinting may be an intrinsic epigenetic control mechanism that enhances stemness, self-renewal and chemo/radiotherapy resistance in cancer stem cells.

  3. Embryos aggregation improves development and imprinting gene expression in mouse parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Guang-Yu; Song, Si-Hang; Wang, Zhen-Dong; Shan, Zhi-Yan; Sun, Rui-Zhen; Liu, Chun-Jia; Wu, Yan-Shuang; Li, Tong; Lei, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Mouse parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells (PgESCs) could be applied to study imprinting genes and are used in cell therapy. Our previous study found that stem cells established by aggregation of two parthenogenetic embryos at 8-cell stage (named as a2 PgESCs) had a higher efficiency than that of PgESCs, and the paternal expressed imprinting genes were observably upregulated. Therefore, we propose that increasing the number of parthenogenetic embryos in aggregation may improve the development of parthenogenetic mouse and imprinting gene expression of PgESCs. To verify this hypothesis, we aggregated four embryos together at the 4-cell stage and cultured to the blastocyst stage (named as 4aPgB). qPCR detection showed that the expression of imprinting genes Igf2, Mest, Snrpn, Igf2r, H19, Gtl2 in 4aPgB were more similar to that of fertilized blastocyst (named as fB) compared to 2aPgB (derived from two 4-cell stage parthenogenetic embryos aggregation) or PgB (single parthenogenetic blastocyst). Post-implantation development of 4aPgB extended to 11 days of gestation. The establishment efficiency of GFP-a4 PgESCs which derived from GFP-4aPgB is 62.5%. Moreover, expression of imprinting genes Igf2, Mest, Snrpn, notably downregulated and approached the level of that in fertilized embryonic stem cells (fESCs). In addition, we acquired a 13.5-day fetus totally derived from GFP-a4 PgESCs with germline contribution by 8-cell under zona pellucida (ZP) injection. In conclusion, four embryos aggregation improves parthenogenetic development, and compensates imprinting genes expression in PgESCs. It implied that a4 PgESCs could serve as a better scientific model applied in translational medicine and imprinting gene study. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. LncRNAAC132217.4, a KLF8-regulated long non-coding RNA, facilitates oral squamous cell carcinoma metastasis by upregulating IGF2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojie; Ma, Changhong; Zhang, Li; Li, Na; Zhang, Xiaohong; He, Jianya; He, Ruiping; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Junling; Kang, Lan; Han, Chuanchun

    2017-10-28

    Increasing evidence has revealed the aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in many cancer types, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, limited investigations report metastasis-related lncRNAs in OSCC. Herein, we report the identification of dysregulated intergenic lncRNAs in the highly metastatic OSCC cell line, UM-SCC6H. One of the lncRNAs, termed AC132217.4, was remarkably upregulated and promoted cell migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by upregulating IGF2 expression. Further mechanistic studies revealed that AC132217.4 interacted with the 3'UTR of IGF2 mRNA and increased its stability, leading to increased IGF2 levels. Thereafter, we found that KLF8 binds to the upstream sequence of AC132217.4, activating its expression at the transcriptional level, which accelerated OSCC metastasis via the AC132217.4-IGF2 axis both in vitro and in vivo. We also revealed that the expression level of AC132217.4 was increased in OSCC tissues, and this elevation correlated with KLF8 and IGF2 expression. Thus, our data demonstrate that the KLF8-AC132217.4-IGF2 signalling pathway plays a critical role in OSCC metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CTCF mediates methylation-sensitive enhancer-blocking activity at the H19/Igf2 locus.

    PubMed

    Hark, A T; Schoenherr, C J; Katz, D J; Ingram, R S; Levorse, J M; Tilghman, S M

    2000-05-25

    The Insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) and H19 genes are imprinted, resulting in silencing of the maternal and paternal alleles, respectively. This event is dependent upon an imprinted-control region two kilobases upstream of H19 (refs 1, 2). On the paternal chromosome this element is methylated and required for the silencing of H19 (refs 2-4). On the maternal chromosome the region is unmethylated and required for silencing of the Igf2 gene 90 kilobases upstream. We have proposed that the unmethylated imprinted-control region acts as a chromatin boundary that blocks the interaction of Igf2 with enhancers that lie 3' of H19 (refs 5, 6). This enhancer-blocking activity would then be lost when the region was methylated, thereby allowing expression of Igf2 paternally. Here we show, using transgenic mice and tissue culture, that the unmethylated imprinted-control regions from mouse and human H19 exhibit enhancer-blocking activity. Furthermore, we show that CTCF, a zinc finger protein implicated in vertebrate boundary function, binds to several sites in the unmethylated imprinted-control region that are essential for enhancer blocking. Consistent with our model, CTCF binding is abolished by DNA methylation. This is the first example, to our knowledge, of a regulated chromatin boundary in vertebrates.

  6. Effects of Assisted Reproduction Technology on Placental Imprinted Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Yukiko; Aoki, Chizu; Tamaki-Ishihara, Yuko; Fukuda, Yusuke; Kitamura, Mamoru; Matsue, Yoichi; So, Akiko; Morita, Mineto

    2010-01-01

    We used placental tissue to compare the imprinted gene expression of IGF2, H19, KCNQ1OT1, and CDKN1C of singletons conceived via assisted reproduction technology (ART) with that of spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons. Of 989 singletons examined (ART n = 65; SC n = 924), neonatal weight was significantly lower (P < .001) in the ART group than in the SC group, but placental weight showed no significant difference. Gene expression analyzed by real-time PCR was similar for both groups with appropriate-for-date (AFD) birth weight. H19 expression was suppressed in fetal growth retardation (FGR) cases in the ART and SC groups compared with AFD cases (P < .02 and P < .05, resp.). In contrast, CDKN1C expression was suppressed in FGR cases in the ART group (P < .01), while KCNQ1OT1 expression was hyperexpressed in FGR cases in the SC group (P < .05). As imprinted gene expression patterns differed between the ART and SC groups, we speculate that ART modifies epigenetic status even though the possibilities always exist. PMID:20706653

  7. Evaluation of Allelic Expression of Imprinted Genes in Adult Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Jennifer M.; Monk, Dave; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Woodfine, Kathryn; Chitty, Lyn S.; Murrell, Adele; Stanier, Philip; Moore, Gudrun E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Imprinted genes are expressed from only one allele in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Loss of imprinted (LOI) expression can result in a variety of human disorders and is frequently reported in cancer. Biallelic expression of imprinted genes in adult blood has been suggested as a useful biomarker and is currently being investigated in colorectal cancer. In general, the expression profiles of imprinted genes are well characterised during human and mouse fetal development, but not in human adults. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated quantitative expression of 36 imprinted genes in adult human peripheral blood leukocytes obtained from healthy individuals. Allelic expression was also investigated in B and T lymphocytes and myeloid cells. We found that 21 genes were essentially undetectable in adult blood. Only six genes were demonstrably monoallelic, and most importantly, we found that nine genes were either biallelic or showed variable expression in different individuals. Separated leukocyte populations showed the same expression patterns as whole blood. Differential methylation at each of the imprinting control loci analysed was maintained, including regions that contained biallelically expressed genes. This suggests in some cases methylation has become uncoupled from its role in regulating gene expression. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that only a limited set of imprinted genes, including IGF2 and SNRPN, may be useful for LOI cancer biomarker studies. In addition, blood is not a good tissue to use for the discovery of new imprinted genes. Finally, lymphocyte DNA methylation status in the adult may not always be a reliable indicator of monoallelic gene expression. PMID:21042416

  8. IGF2 ameliorates amyloidosis, increases cholinergic marker expression and raises BMP9 and neurotrophin levels in the hippocampus of the APPswePS1dE9 Alzheimer's disease model mice.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Tiffany J; Pender, Sarah M; Burke, Rebecca M; Langley, Erika A; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The development of an effective therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major challenge to biomedical sciences. Because much of early AD pathophysiology includes hippocampal abnormalities, a viable treatment strategy might be to use trophic factors that support hippocampal integrity and function. IGF2 is an attractive candidate as it acts in the hippocampus to enhance memory consolidation, stimulate adult neurogenesis and upregulate cholinergic marker expression and acetylcholine (ACh) release. We performed a seven-day intracerebroventricular infusion of IGF2 in transgenic APPswe.PS1dE9 AD model mice that express green fluorescent protein in cholinergic neurons (APP.PS1/CHGFP) and in wild type WT/CHGFP littermates at 6 months of age representing early AD-like disease. IGF2 reduced the number of hippocampal Aβ40- and Aβ42-positive amyloid plaques in APP.PS1/CHGFP mice. Moreover, IGF2 increased hippocampal protein levels of the ACh-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in both WT/CHGFP and APP.PS1/CHGFP mice. The latter effect was likely mediated by increased protein expression of the cholinergic differentiating factor, BMP9, observed in IGF2-treated mice as compared to controls. IGF2 also increased the protein levels of hippocampal NGF, BDNF, NT3 and IGF1 and of doublecortin, a marker of neurogenesis. These data show that IGF2 administration is effective in reversing and preventing several pathophysiologic processes associated with AD and suggest that IGF2 may constitute a therapeutic target for AD.

  9. Prenatal low-protein and postnatal high-fat diets induce rapid adipose tissue growth by inducing Igf2 expression in Sprague Dawley rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Claycombe, Kate J; Uthus, Eric O; Roemmich, James N; Johnson, Luann K; Johnson, W Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Maternal low-protein diets result in lower birth weight followed by accelerated catch-up growth that is accompanied by the development of obesity and glucose intolerance in later life. Whether postnatal high-fat (HF) diets further contribute to the development of obesity and insulin resistance in offspring by affecting adipose tissue metabolism and DNA methylation is currently unknown. Obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 8% low protein (LP) or 20% normal protein diets for 3 wk prior to conception and throughout pregnancy and lactation to investigate whether prenatal LP and postnatal HF diets affect the rate of adipose tissue growth, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) expression, and DNA methylation in male offspring. At weaning, the offspring were fed 10% normal fat or 45% HF diets for 12 wk. The adipose tissue growth rate was increased (up to 26-fold) by the LP prenatal and HF postnatal diets. Adipose tissue Igf2 mRNAs and DNA methylation were increased by the LP prenatal and HF postnatal diets. The LP prenatal and HF postnatal diet increased the number of small adipocytes in adipose tissue and decreased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest that prenatal LP and postnatal HF intake result in adipose tissue catch-up growth through alterations in the expression of the Igf2 gene and DNA methylation within adipocytes. These alterations in adiposity are accompanied by an increased risk of development of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Risk factors for breast cancer and expression of insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) in women with breast cancer in Wuhan City, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jun; Yang, Rong; Rao, Yanhua; Du, Yukai; Kalembo, Fatch W

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors for breast cancer and establish the expression rate of IGF-2 in female patients. A case control study with 500 people in case group and 500 people in control group. A self-administered questionnaire was used to investigate risk factors for breast cancer. All cases were interviewed during a household survey. Immune-histochemical method was used to inspect the expression of IGF-2 in different tissues (benign breast lesions, breast cancer and tumor-adjacent tissue). Multivariate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. High body mass index (OR = 1.012,95%CI = 1.008-1.016), working attributes (OR = 1.004, 95%CI = 1.002 = 1.006), long menstrual period (OR = 1.007, 95%CI = 1.005-1.009), high parity OR = 1.003, 95%CI = 1.001-1.005) , frequent artificial abortion (OR = 1.004, 95%CI = 1.001-1.005), family history of cancer (OR = 1.003, 95%CI = 1.000-1.005), period of night shift (OR = 1.003, 95%CI = 1.001-1.006), live in high risk environment (OR = 1.005, 95%CI = 1.002-1.008), and family problems (OR = 1.010, 95%CI = 1.005-1.014) were associated with increased risk for breast cancer. In this study, good sleeping status, positive coping strategies, subjective support, and utility degree of social support were associated with reduced risk for breast cancer (OR = 0.998, 0.997, 0.985, 0.998 respectively; 95%CI = 0.996-1.000, 0.994-1.000, 0.980-0.989, 0.996-1.000, respectively). In benign breast lesions, breast cancer and tumor-adjacent tissue, IGF-2 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm, but its expression rate was different (p<0.05). The incidence of breast cancer is a common result of multiple factors. IGF-2 is involved in the development of breast cancer, and its expression varies in different tissues (benign breast lesions, breast cancer and tumor-adjacent tissue).

  11. Cell type and context-specific function of PLAG1 for IGF2 P3 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Monira; Holmgren, Claes; Göndör, Anita; Vesterlund, Mattias; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Larsson, Catharina; Ekström, Tomas J

    2012-12-01

    The fetal transcription factor PLAG1 is found to be overexpressed in cancers, and has been suggested to bind the insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) P3 promoter, and to activate the IGF2 gene. The expression of IGF2 has partly been linked to loss of CTCF-dependent chromatin insulator function at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). We investigated the role of PLAG1 for IGF2 regulation in Hep3B and JEG-3 cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed cell type-specific binding of PLAG1 to the IGF2 P3 promoter, which was substantially insensitive to recombinant PLAG1 overexpression in the endogenous context. We hypothesized that the H19 chromatin insulator may be involved in the cell type-specific PLAG1 response. By using a GFP reporter gene/insulator assay plasmid construct with and without the H19 ICR and/or an SV40 enhancer, we confirm that the effect of the insulator is specifically associated with the activity of the IGF2 P3 promoter in the GFP reporter system, and furthermore, that the reporter insulator is functional in JEG-3 but not in Hep3B cells. FACS analysis was used to assess the function of PLAG1 in low endogenously expressing, but Zn-inducible stable PLAG1 expressing JEG-3 cell clones. Considerable increase in IGF2 expression upon PLAG1 induction with a partial insulator overriding activity was found using the reporter constructs. This is in contrast to the effect of the endogenous IGF2 gene which was insensitive to PLAG1 expression in JEG-3, while modestly induced the already highly expressed IGF2 gene in Hep3B cells. We suggest that the PLAG1 binding to the IGF2 P3 promoter and IGF2 expression is cell type-specific, and that the PLAG1 transcription factor acts as a transcriptional facilitator that partially overrides the insulation by the H19 ICR.

  12. Cell type and context-specific function of PLAG1 for IGF2 P3 promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    AKHTAR, MONIRA; HOLMGREN, CLAES; GÖNDÖR, ANITA; VESTERLUND, MATTIAS; KANDURI, CHANDRASEKHAR; LARSSON, CATHARINA; EKSTRÖM, TOMAS J.

    2012-01-01

    The fetal transcription factor PLAG1 is found to be overexpressed in cancers, and has been suggested to bind the insulin like growth factor 2 (IGF2) P3 promoter, and to activate the IGF2 gene. The expression of IGF2 has partly been linked to loss of CTCF-dependent chromatin insulator function at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). We investigated the role of PLAG1 for IGF2 regulation in Hep3B and JEG-3 cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed cell type-specific binding of PLAG1 to the IGF2 P3 promoter, which was substantially insensitive to recombinant PLAG1 overexpression in the endogenous context. We hypothesized that the H19 chromatin insulator may be involved in the cell type-specific PLAG1 response. By using a GFP reporter gene/insulator assay plasmid construct with and without the H19 ICR and/or an SV40 enhancer, we confirm that the effect of the insulator is specifically associated with the activity of the IGF2 P3 promoter in the GFP reporter system, and furthermore, that the reporter insulator is functional in JEG-3 but not in Hep3B cells. FACS analysis was used to assess the function of PLAG1 in low endogenously expressing, but Zn-inducible stable PLAG1 expressing JEG-3 cell clones. Considerable increase in IGF2 expression upon PLAG1 induction with a partial insulator overriding activity was found using the reporter constructs. This is in contrast to the effect of the endogenous IGF2 gene which was insensitive to PLAG1 expression in JEG-3, while modestly induced the already highly expressed IGF2 gene in Hep3B cells. We suggest that the PLAG1 binding to the IGF2 P3 promoter and IGF2 expression is cell type-specific, and that the PLAG1 transcription factor acts as a transcriptional facilitator that partially overrides the insulation by the H19 ICR. PMID:23023303

  13. Effects of endocrine disruptors on imprinted gene expression in the mouse embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Diana A; Rivas, Guillermo E; Singh, Purnima; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2011-01-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) are synthetic chemicals that resemble natural hormones and are known to cause epigenetic perturbations. EDs have profound effects on development and fertility. Imprinted genes had been identified as candidate susceptibility loci to environmental insults because they are functionally haploid, and because the imprints undergo epigenetic resetting between generations. To screen for possible epigenetic perturbations caused by EDs at imprinted loci, we treated pregnant mice daily between 8.5 and 12.5 days post coitum (dpc) with di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), bisphenol A (BPA), vinclozolin (VZ) or control oil vehicle. After isolating RNA from the placenta, yolk sac, amnion, head, body, heart, liver, lung, stomach and intestines of 13.5 dpc embryos we measured the allele-specific expression of 39 imprinted transcripts using multiplex single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE) assays. In this representative data set we identified only a small number of transcripts that exhibited a substantial relaxation of imprinted expression with statistical significance: Slc22a18 with 10% relaxation in the embryo after BPA treatment; Rtl1as with 11 and 16% relaxation in the lung and placenta, respectively after BPA treatment; and Rtl1 with 12% relaxation in the yolk sac after DEHP treatment. Additionally, the standard deviation of allele-specificity increased in various organs after ED treatment for several transcripts including Igf2r, Rasgrf1, Usp29, Slc38a4 and Xist. Our data suggest that the maintenance of strongly biased monoallelic expression of imprinted genes is generally insensitive to EDs in the 13.5 dpc embryo and extra-embryonic organs, but is not immune to those effects. PMID:21636974

  14. Evolution of the CDKN1C-KCNQ1 imprinted domain.

    PubMed

    Ager, Eleanor I; Pask, Andrew J; Gehring, Helen M; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2008-05-29

    Genomic imprinting occurs in both marsupial and eutherian mammals. The CDKN1C and IGF2 genes are both imprinted and syntenic in the mouse and human, but in marsupials only IGF2 is imprinted. This study examines the evolution of features that, in eutherians, regulate CDKN1C imprinting. Despite the absence of imprinting, CDKN1C protein was present in the tammar wallaby placenta. Genomic analysis of the tammar region confirmed that CDKN1C is syntenic with IGF2. However, there are fewer LTR and DNA elements in the region and in intron 9 of KCNQ1. In addition there are fewer LINEs in the tammar compared with human and mouse. While the CpG island in intron 10 of KCNQ1 and promoter elements could not be detected, the antisense transcript KCNQ1OT1 that regulates CDKN1C imprinting in human and mouse is still expressed. CDKN1C has a conserved function, likely antagonistic to IGF2, in the mammalian placenta that preceded its acquisition of imprinting. CDKN1C resides in synteny with IGF2, demonstrating that imprinting of the two genes did not occur concurrently to balance maternal and paternal influences on the growth of the placenta. The expression of KCNQ1OT1 in the absence of CDKN1C imprinting suggests that antisense transcription at this locus preceded imprinting of this domain. These findings demonstrate the stepwise accumulation of control mechanisms within imprinted domains and show that CDKN1C imprinting cannot be due to its synteny with IGF2 or with its placental expression in mammals.

  15. Butyrate induced IGF2 activation correlated with distinct chromatin landscapes due to histone modification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Histone modification has emerged as a very important mechanism regulating the transcriptional status of the genome. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a peptide hormone controlling various cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis. IGF2 and H19 are reciprocally regulated imprinted ...

  16. MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome adversely affect lymphocyte growth, but do not affect imprinted gene expression in blood or brain.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Damina; Arredondo, Juan; Samaco, Rodney C; LaSalle, Janine M

    2002-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in MECP2, encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). As female somatic cells are mosaic for expression of mutant MECP2, we performed single cell cloning of T lymphocytes from four RTT patients with MECP2 mutations to isolate cells expressing mutant MECP2. Mutant-expressing clones were present at a significantly lower frequency (P<0.0001) than wild-type clones. These results demonstrate that although MECP2 is not essential for lymphocyte growth, expression of the MECP2 mutation causes a growth disadvantage in cultured clonal T cells by reducing the response to mitogenic stimulation. Mutant MECP2 was expressed at normal transcript and protein levels, and exhibited no significant effect on acetylated histones or methyl-binding protein 3 (MBD3) levels. Since MeCP2 was predicted to silence transcription of methylated genes, we hypothesized that MeCP2 may be required for silencing imprinted or methylated gene expression. The allelic expression of three different imprinted genes (SNRPN, IPW and IGF2) was examined by RT-PCR and RFLP analysis, and demonstrated normal monoallelic expression of all RTT clones. We also examined the expression of five imprinted genes (SNRPN, IPW, NECDIN, H19 and IGF2) in RTT brain samples and observed exclusive monoallelic expression. Expression levels were also normal in MECP2 mutant-expressing T cells for IFNG, a non-imprinted, but methylated gene differentially expressed in T cells, and LINE-1 retrotransposons hypothesized to be silenced by MeCP2. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A did not alter SNRPN expression, but did reverse silencing of IFNG in a MECP2-mutant-expressing clone. In conclusion, our results do not support an essential role for either MeCP2 or HDAC in the silencing of several imprinted genes.

  17. Imprinting status of DLK1 gene in brain tumors and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Xie, Dong; De Vos, Sven; Liu, Gentao; Miller, Carl W; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2004-04-01

    DLK1 and GTL2 are reciprocally imprinted genes on human chromosome 14q32. DLK1 encodes a transmembrane protein that is a paternally expressed gene. The maternally expressed GTL2 allele encodes a non-translated RNA. Many of features of DLK1/GTL2 are remarkably similar to those of the prototypical IGF2/H19 reciprocally imprinted gene pair. Imprinting status of IGF2 has been studied in many types of tumors, and loss of imprinting (LOI) leads to biallelic expression of IGF2 in most of these tumors. The imprinting status of DLK1 has seldom been investigated in clinical tumor samples. We examined whether DLK1 was imprinted in brain tumors and lymphomas by analyzing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs1802710. Analysis of 47 brain tumors and 55 lymphomas found that 23 and 29 of them were heterozygous for rs1802710, respectively. Monoallelic expression of DLK1 was detected in the heterozygous samples. These data show that imprinting of DLK1 is maintained in brain tumors and lymphomas, even though the DLK1 gene is very analogous to the IGF2 gene in its DNA structure and regulation. Also, the high frequency of heterozygosity (about 50%) showed that the polymorphic site that we chose is a good genomic marker for imprinting studies of the DLK1 gene in additional tumor types.

  18. The hepatic Igf2/H19 locus is not altered in 1-day old pups born to obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low protein diet containing adequate folic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gong et al. (Epigenetics, 2010) found, using diets low in folic acid, that compared to an 18% protein diet a 9% protein diet fed to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats resulted in increased Igf2 and H19 gene expression in the liver of day 0 male offspring. In addition DNA methylation in the Imprinting Cont...

  19. Imprinted gene expression in fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, L; Marsit, C J; Sharma, P; Maccani, M; Ma, Y; Hu, J; Chen, J

    2012-06-01

    Experimental studies showed that genomic imprinting is fundamental in fetoplacental development by timely regulating the expression of the imprinted genes to overlook a set of events determining placenta implantation, growth and embryogenesis. We examined the expression profile of 22 imprinted genes which have been linked to pregnancy abnormalities that may ultimately influence childhood development. The study was conducted in a subset of 106 placenta samples, overrepresented with small and large for gestational age cases, from the Rhode Island Child Health Study. We investigated associations between imprinted gene expression and three fetal development parameters: newborn head circumference, birth weight, and size for gestational age. Results from our investigation show that the maternally imprinted/paternally expressed gene ZNF331 inversely associates with each parameter to drive smaller fetal size, while paternally imprinted/maternally expressed gene SLC22A18 directly associates with the newborn head circumference promoting growth. Multidimensional Scaling analysis revealed two clusters within the 22 imprinted genes which are independently associated with fetoplacental development. Our data suggest that cluster 1 genes work by assuring cell growth and tissue development, while cluster 2 genes act by coordinating these processes. Results from this epidemiologic study offer solid support for the key role of imprinting in fetoplacental development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Imprinted gene expression in hybrids: perturbed mechanisms and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, J B; Oakey, R J; Feil, R

    2014-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms contribute to the evolution of reproductive barriers, a process that is critical in speciation. Amongst these are alterations in gene products and in gene dosage that affect development and reproductive success in hybrid offspring. Because of its strict parent-of-origin dependence, genomic imprinting is thought to contribute to the aberrant phenotypes observed in interspecies hybrids in mammals and flowering plants, when the abnormalities depend on the directionality of the cross. In different groups of mammals, hybrid incompatibility has indeed been linked to loss of imprinting. Aberrant expression levels have been reported as well, including imprinted genes involved in development and growth. Recent studies in humans emphasize that genetic diversity within a species can readily perturb imprinted gene expression and phenotype as well. Despite novel insights into the underlying mechanisms, the full extent of imprinted gene perturbation still remains to be determined in the different hybrid systems. Here we review imprinted gene expression in intra- and interspecies hybrids and examine the evolutionary scenarios under which imprinting could contribute to hybrid incompatibilities. We discuss effects on development and reproduction and possible evolutionary implications. PMID:24619185

  1. Imprinted gene expression in hybrids: perturbed mechanisms and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J B; Oakey, R J; Feil, R

    2014-08-01

    Diverse mechanisms contribute to the evolution of reproductive barriers, a process that is critical in speciation. Amongst these are alterations in gene products and in gene dosage that affect development and reproductive success in hybrid offspring. Because of its strict parent-of-origin dependence, genomic imprinting is thought to contribute to the aberrant phenotypes observed in interspecies hybrids in mammals and flowering plants, when the abnormalities depend on the directionality of the cross. In different groups of mammals, hybrid incompatibility has indeed been linked to loss of imprinting. Aberrant expression levels have been reported as well, including imprinted genes involved in development and growth. Recent studies in humans emphasize that genetic diversity within a species can readily perturb imprinted gene expression and phenotype as well. Despite novel insights into the underlying mechanisms, the full extent of imprinted gene perturbation still remains to be determined in the different hybrid systems. Here we review imprinted gene expression in intra- and interspecies hybrids and examine the evolutionary scenarios under which imprinting could contribute to hybrid incompatibilities. We discuss effects on development and reproduction and possible evolutionary implications.

  2. Imprinting.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Brian J

    2013-07-01

    Imprinting is a type of learning by which an animal restricts its social preferences to an object after exposure to that object. Filial imprinting occurs shortly after birth or hatching and sexual imprinting, around the onset of sexual maturity; both have sensitive periods. This review is concerned mainly with filial imprinting. Filial imprinting in the domestic chick is an effective experimental system for investigating mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Extensive evidence implicates a restricted part of the chick forebrain, the intermediate and medial mesopallium (IMM), as a memory store for visual imprinting. After imprinting to a visual stimulus, neuronal responsiveness in IMM is specifically biased toward the imprinting stimulus. Both this bias and the strength of imprinting measured behaviorally depend on uninterrupted sleep shortly after training. When learning-related changes in IMM are lateralized they occur predominantly or completely on the left side. Ablation experiments indicate that the left IMM is responsible for long-term storage of information about the imprinting stimulus; the right side is also a store but additionally is necessary for extra storage outside IMM, in a region necessary for flexible use of information acquired through imprinting. Auditory imprinting gives rise to biochemical, neuroanatomical, and electrophysiological changes in the medio-rostral nidopallium/mesopallium, anterior to IMM. Auditory imprinting has not been shown to produce learning-related changes in IMM. Imprinting may be facilitated by predispositions. Similar predispositions for faces and biological motion occur in domestic chicks and human infants. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:375-390. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1231 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. IGF2 DNA methylation is a modulator of newborn’s fetal growth and development

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Julie; Hivert, Marie-France; Perron, Patrice; Poirier, Paul; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene, located within a cluster of imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15, encodes a fetal and placental growth factor affecting birth weight. DNA methylation variability at the IGF2 gene locus has been previously reported but its consequences on fetal growth and development are still mostly unknown in normal pediatric population. We collected one hundred placenta biopsies from 50 women with corresponding maternal and cord blood samples and measured anthropometric indices, blood pressure and metabolic phenotypes using standardized procedures. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation and IGF2 circulating levels were assessed using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing and ELISA, respectively. Placental IGF2 (DMR0 and DMR2) DNA methylation levels were correlated with newborn’s fetal growth indices, such as weight, and with maternal IGF2 circulating concentration at the third trimester of pregnancy, whereas H19 (DMR) DNA methylation levels were correlated with IGF2 levels in cord blood. The maternal genotype of a known IGF2/H19 polymorphism (rs2107425) was associated with birth weight. Taken together, we showed that IGF2/H19 epigenotype and genotypes independently account for 31% of the newborn’s weight variance. No association was observed with maternal diabetic status, glucose concentrations or prenatal maternal body mass index. This is the first study showing that DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 genes locus may act as a modulator of IGF2 newborn’s fetal growth and development within normal range. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation could represent a cornerstone in linking birth weight and fetal metabolic programming of late onset obesity. PMID:22907587

  4. IGF2 DNA methylation is a modulator of newborn's fetal growth and development.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Julie; Hivert, Marie-France; Perron, Patrice; Poirier, Paul; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Brisson, Diane; Bouchard, Luigi

    2012-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene, located within a cluster of imprinted genes on chromosome 11p15, encodes a fetal and placental growth factor affecting birth weight. DNA methylation variability at the IGF2 gene locus has been previously reported but its consequences on fetal growth and development are still mostly unknown in normal pediatric population. We collected one hundred placenta biopsies from 50 women with corresponding maternal and cord blood samples and measured anthropometric indices, blood pressure and metabolic phenotypes using standardized procedures. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation and IGF2 circulating levels were assessed using sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing and ELISA, respectively. Placental IGF2 (DMR0 and DMR2) DNA methylation levels were correlated with newborn's fetal growth indices, such as weight, and with maternal IGF2 circulating concentration at the third trimester of pregnancy, whereas H19 (DMR) DNA methylation levels were correlated with IGF2 levels in cord blood. The maternal genotype of a known IGF2/H19 polymorphism (rs2107425) was associated with birth weight. Taken together, we showed that IGF2/H19 epigenotype and genotypes independently account for 31% of the newborn's weight variance. No association was observed with maternal diabetic status, glucose concentrations or prenatal maternal body mass index. This is the first study showing that DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 genes locus may act as a modulator of IGF2 newborn's fetal growth and development within normal range. IGF2/H19 DNA methylation could represent a cornerstone in linking birth weight and fetal metabolic programming of late onset obesity.

  5. Curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Binqiang; Zhao, Yingmei; Liang, Tao; Ye, Xuxiao; Li, Zuowei; Yan, Dongliang; Fu, Qiang; Li, Yonghui

    2017-08-01

    We have previously reported that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development in a rat bladder carcinogenesis model. In this study, we report that curcumin inhibits urothelial tumor development by suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Curcumin inhibits IGF2 expression at the transcriptional level and decreases the phosphorylation levels of IGF1R and IRS-1 in bladder cancer cells and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced urothelial tumor tissue. Ectopic expression of IGF2 and IGF1R, but not IGF1, in bladder cancer cells restored this process, suggesting that IGF2 is a target of curcumin. Moreover, introduction of constitutively active AKT1 abolished the inhibitory effect of curcumin on cell proliferation, migration, and restored the phosphorylation levels of 4E-BP1 and S6K1, suggesting that curcumin functions via suppressing IGF2-mediated AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. In summary, our results reveal that suppressing IGF2 and IGF2-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway is one of the mechanisms of action of curcumin. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy against human bladder cancer caused by aberrant activation of IGF2, which are useful for translational application of curcumin.

  6. Comparisons of mRNA expression for insulin-like growth factor (IGF) type 2 receptor (IGF2R) and IGF-1 in small ovarian follicles between cattle selected and not selected for twin ovulations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Both IGF-1 and -2 stimulate ovarian follicular cell proliferation and antral follicle development. Actions of IGF-1 and -2 are mediated through the IGF type 1 receptor, whereas binding of IGF-2 to the IGF2R results in its degradation. Information on the role of IGF2R in regulating bovine follicula...

  7. Paternal Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (Igf2) Regulates Stem Cell Activity During Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Lewandowski, Daniel; Jaracz-Ros, Agnieszka; Hardouin, Sylvie-Nathalie

    2017-02-01

    Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) belongs to the IGF/Insulin pathway, a highly conserved evolutionarily network that regulates growth, aging and lifespan. Igf2 is highly expressed in the embryo and in cancer cells. During mouse development, Igf2 is expressed in all sites where hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) successively expand, then its expression drops at weaning and becomes undetectable when adult HSC have reached their niches in bones and start to self-renew. In the present study, we aim to discover the role of IGF2 during adulthood. We show that Igf2 is specifically expressed in adult HSC and we analyze HSC from adult mice deficient in Igf2 transcripts. We demonstrate that Igf2 deficiency avoids the age-related attrition of the HSC pool and that Igf2 is necessary for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Our study reveals that the expression level of Igf2 is critical to maintain the balance between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, presumably by regulating the interaction between HSC and their niche. Our data have major clinical interest for transplantation: understanding the changes in adult stem cells and their environments will improve the efficacy of regenerative medicine and impact health- and life-span. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of Conserved and Nonconserved Imprinted Genes in Swine1

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Steve R.; Tsai, Shengdar; Hardison, Nicholas; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Freking, Brad A.; Nonneman, Dan; Rohrer, Gary; Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2009-01-01

    To increase our understanding of imprinted genes in swine, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of this gene family using two complementary approaches: expression and phenotypic profiling of parthenogenetic fetuses, and analysis of imprinting by pyrosequencing. The parthenote placenta and fetus were smaller than those of controls but had no obvious morphological differences at Day 28 of gestation. By Day 30, however, the parthenote placentas had decreased chorioallantoic folding, decreased chorionic ruggae, and reduction of fetal-maternal interface surface in comparison with stage-matched control fetuses. Using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip microarrays and/or semiquantitative PCR, brain, fibroblast, liver, and placenta of Day 30 fetuses were profiled, and 25 imprinted genes were identified as differentially expressed in at least one of the four tissue types: AMPD3, CDKN1C, COPG2, DHCR7, DIRAS3, IGF2 (isoform specific), IGF2AS, IGF2R, MEG3, MEST, NAP1L5, NDN, NNAT, OSBPL1A, PEG3, APEG3, PEG10, PLAGL1, PON2, PPP1R9A, SGCE, SLC38A4, SNORD107, SNRPN, and TFPI2. For DIRAS3, PLAGL1, SGCE, and SLC38A4, tissue-specific differences were detected. In addition, we examined the imprinting status of candidate genes by quantitative allelic pyrosequencing. Samples were collected from Day 30 pregnancies generated from reciprocal crosses of Meishan and White Composite breeds, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in candidate genes. Imprinting was confirmed for DIRAS3, DLK1, H19, IGF2AS, NNAT, MEST, PEG10, PHLDA2, PLAGL1, SGCE, and SNORD107. We also found no evidence of imprinting in ASB4, ASCL2, CD81, COMMD1, DCN, DLX5, and H13. Combined, these results represent the most comprehensive survey of imprinted genes in swine to date. PMID:19571260

  9. Administration of growth hormone and nandrolone decanoate alters mRNA expression of the GABAB receptor subunits as well as of the GH receptor, IGF-1, and IGF-2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Grönbladh, Alfhild; Johansson, Jenny; Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), especially among young adults, is of major concern. Among AAS users it is common to combine the AAS nandrolone decanoate (ND), with intake of growth hormone (GH) and a connection between gonadal steroids and the GH system has been suggested. Both AAS and GH affect functions in the brain, for example those associated with the hypothalamus and pituitary, and several GH actions are mediated by growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The GABAergic system is implicated in actions induced by AAS and previous studies have provided evidence for a link between GH and GABAB receptors in the brain. Our aim was to examine the impact of AAS administration and a subsequent administration of GH, on the expression of GABAB receptors and important GH mediators in rat brain. The aim was to investigate the CNS effects of a high-dose ND, and to study if a low, but physiological relevant, dose of GH could reverse the ND-induced effects. In the present study, male rats were administered a high dose of ND every third day during three weeks, and subsequently the rats were given recombinant human GH (rhGH) during ten days. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to analyze gene expression in hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. In the pituitary gland, the expression of GABAB receptor subunits was affected differently by the steroid treatment; the GABAB1 mRNA expression was decreased whereas a distinct elevation of the GABAB2 expression was found. Administration of ND also caused a decrease of GHR, IGF-1, and IGF-2 mRNA expression in the pituitary while the corresponding expression in the hypothalamus, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala was unaffected. The rhGH administration did not alter the GABAB2 expression but increased the GABAB1 gene expression in the hypothalamus as compared to the AAS treated group. These results

  10. Imprinting and expression of Dio3os mirrors Dio3 in rat

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, William H.; Masterson, Kevin; Sittig, Laura J.; Redei, Eva E.; Herzing, Laura B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, the preferential expression of maternal or paternal alleles of imprinted genes, is often maintained through expression of imprinted long non-coding (lnc) “antisense” RNAs. These may overlap imprinted transcripts, and are expressed from the opposite allele. Previously we have described brain region-specific imprinted expression of the Dio3 gene in rat, which is preferentially modified by fetal ethanol exposure. The Dio3os (opposite strand) transcript is transcribed in opposite orientation to Dio3 in mouse and human, partially overlaps the Dio3 promoter, and mirrors total Dio3 developmental expression levels. Here, we present that the rat Dio3os transcript(s) exhibits brain region-specific imprinted expression patterns similar to those of Dio3. Rat Dio3os transcript expression is also similarly modified by fetal ethanol exposure. Uniquely, both Dio3 and Dio3os expression occur on the same, rather than opposite, alleles, as determined by strand-specific RT-PCR. Future studies will require direct manipulation of the Dio3os transcript to determine whether the novel paralleling of total and allele-specific expression patterns of this sense/antisense imprinted gene pair reflects an as-yet undefined regulatory mechanism for lncRNA mediated tissue-specific imprinted expression, or rather is a consequence of a more straightforward, but previously undescribed transcriptional coregulation process. PMID:23230449

  11. IGF-2R-Gαq signaling and cardiac hypertrophy in the low-birth-weight lamb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kimberley C. W.; Tosh, Darran N.; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I. Caroline; Duffield, Jaime A.; Brooks, Doug A.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF-2R) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a heterotrimeric G protein receptor-coupled manner involving αq (Gαq) or αs (Gαs). We have previously shown increased left ventricular weight and cardiac IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression in low-birth-weight (LBW) compared with average-birth-weight (ABW) lambs. Here, we have investigated the cardiac expression of IGF-2 gene variants, the degree of histone acetylation, and the abundance of proteins in the IGF-2R downstream signaling pathway in ABW and LBW lambs. Samples from the left ventricle of ABW and LBW lambs were collected at 21 days of age. There was increased phospho-CaMKII protein with decreased HDAC 4 abundance in the LBW compared with ABW lambs. There was increased GATA 4 and decreased phospho-troponin I abundance in LBW compared with ABW lambs, which are markers of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and impaired or reduced contractility, respectively. There was increased histone acetylation of H3K9 at IGF-2R promoter and IGF-2R intron 2 differentially methylated region in the LBW lamb. In conclusion, histone acetylation of IGF-2R may lead to increased IGF-2R mRNA expression and subsequently mediate Gαq signaling early in life via CaMKII, resulting in an increased risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular disease in adult life. PMID:25632020

  12. IGF2BP1 enhances an aggressive tumor cell phenotype by impairing miRNA-directed downregulation of oncogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simon; Bley, Nadine; Glaß, Markus; Busch, Bianca; Rousseau, Vanessa; Misiak, Danny; Fuchs, Tommy; Lederer, Marcell; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2018-04-12

    The oncofetal IGF2 mRNA binding proteins (IGF2BPs) are upregulated in most cancers but their paralogue-specific roles in tumor cells remain poorly understood. In a panel of five cancer-derived cell lines, IGF2BP1 shows highly conserved oncogenic potential. Consistently, the deletion of IGF2BP1 impairs the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer-derived cells in nude mice. Gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer-derived cells reveal that the knockdown of IGF2BPs is associated with the downregulation of mRNAs that are prone to miRNA regulation. All three IGF2BPs preferentially associate upstream of miRNA binding sites (MBSs) in the 3'UTR of mRNAs. The downregulation of mRNAs co-regulated by miRNAs and IGF2BP1 is abrogated at low miRNA abundance or when miRNAs are depleted. IGF2BP1 associates with these target mRNAs in RISC-free complexes and its deletion enhances their association with AGO2. The knockdown of most miRNA-regulated target mRNAs of IGF2BP1 impairs tumor cell properties. In four primary cancers, elevated synthesis of these target mRNAs is largely associated with upregulated IGF2BP1 mRNA levels. In ovarian cancer, the enhanced expression of IGF2BP1 and most of its miRNA-controlled target mRNAs is associated with poor prognosis. In conclusion, these findings indicate that IGF2BP1 enhances an aggressive tumor cell phenotype by antagonizing miRNA-impaired gene expression.

  13. Characterisation of marsupial PHLDA2 reveals eutherian specific acquisition of imprinting.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Shaw, Geoffrey; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-08-19

    Genomic imprinting causes parent-of-origin specific gene expression by differential epigenetic modifications between two parental genomes. We previously reported that there is no evidence of genomic imprinting of CDKN1C in the KCNQ1 domain in the placenta of an Australian marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) whereas tammar IGF2 and H19, located adjacent to the KCNQ1 domain in eutherian mammals, are imprinted. We have now identified and characterised the marsupial orthologue of PHLDA2, another gene in the KCNQ1 domain (also known as IPL or TSSC3) that is imprinted in eutherians. In mice, Phlda2 is a dose-sensitive negative regulator of placental growth, as Cdkn1c is for embryonic growth. Tammar PHLDA2 is highly expressed in the yolk sac placenta compared to other fetal tissues, confirming a similar expression pattern to that of mouse Phlda2. However, tammar PHLDA2 is biallelically expressed in both the fetus and yolk sac placenta, so it is not imprinted. The lack of imprinting in tammar PHLDA2 suggests that the acquisition of genomic imprinting of the KCNQ1 domain in eutherian mammals, accompanied with gene dosage reduction, occurred after the split of the therian mammals into the marsupials and eutherians. Our results confirm the idea that acquisition of genomic imprinting in the KCNQ1 domain occurred specifically in the eutherian lineage after the divergence of marsupials, even though imprinting of the adjacent IGF2-H19 domain arose before the marsupial-eutherian split. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that genomic imprinting of the KCNQ1 domain may have contributed to the evolution of more complex placentation in the eutherian lineage by reduction of the gene dosage of negative regulators for both embryonic and placental growth.

  14. Analysis of the Role of Igf2 in Adrenal Tumour Development in Transgenic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Drelon, Coralie; Tissier, Frédérique; Bandiera, Roberto; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; de Joussineau, Cyrille; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Bertherat, Jérôme; Martinez, Antoine; Val, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Adrenal cortical carcinomas (ACC) are rare but aggressive tumours associated with poor prognosis. The two most frequent alterations in ACC in patients are overexpression of the growth factor IGF2 and constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Using a transgenic mouse model, we have previously shown that constitutive active β-catenin is a bona fide adrenal oncogene. However, although all these mice developed benign adrenal hyperplasia, malignant progression was infrequent, suggesting that secondary genetic events were required for aggressive tumour development. In the present paper, we have tested IGF2 oncogenic properties by developing two distinct transgenic mouse models of Igf2 overexpression in the adrenal cortex. Our analysis shows that despite overexpression levels ranging from 7 (basal) to 87 (ACTH-induced) fold, Igf2 has no tumour initiating potential in the adrenal cortex. However, it induces aberrant accumulation of Gli1 and Pod1-positive progenitor cells, in a hedgehog-independent manner. We have also tested the hypothesis that Igf2 may cooperate with Wnt signalling by mating Igf2 overexpressing lines with mice that express constitutive active β-catenin in the adrenal cortex. We show that the combination of both alterations has no effect on tumour phenotype at stages when β-catenin-induced tumours are benign. However, there is a mild promoting effect at later stages, characterised by increased Weiss score and proliferation. Formation of malignant tumours is nonetheless a rare event, even when Igf2 expression is further increased by ACTH treatment. Altogether these experiments suggest that the growth factor IGF2 is a mild contributor to malignant adrenocortical tumourigenesis. PMID:22952916

  15. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) modulates murine hematopoietic stem cell maintenance through upregulation of p57

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dolly D.; Sommer, Andreia Gianotti; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Beerman, Isabel; Murphy, George J.; Rossi, Derrick; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) rely on a highly regulated molecular network to balance self-renewal and lineage specification to sustain life-long hematopoiesis. Despite a plethora of studies aimed at identifying molecules governing HSC fate, our current knowledge of the genes responsible is limited. We have found Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) to be predominantly expressed within long-term HSC. This study examines IGF2 expression patterns and the effects of the gene in HSC. Through the overexpression and knockdown of IGF2 within purified HSC, we demonstrate that IGF2 expression increases HSC-derived multilineage colonies in vitro and enhances hematopoietic contribution in vivo upon competitive bone marrow transplantation. The effects of IGF2 are mediated by direct upregulation of the CDKi p57, exclusively within long-term HSC, via activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. Increased expression of p57 resulted in a concomitant increase of HSC in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation revealed that HSC exhibited a hypomethylated state within the promoter region of the CDKN1C (p57) gene, providing a potential mechanism for the exclusive effects of IGF2 within HSC. Our studies demonstrate a novel role for IGF2 in regulating HSC cell cycle and illustrate potential novel therapeutic targets for hematological diseases. PMID:26872540

  16. Lack of imprinting of the human dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Propping, P.

    1996-04-09

    The term genomic imprinting has been used to refer to the differential expression of genetic material depending on whether it has come from the male or female parent. In humans, the chromosomal region 11p15.5 has been shown to contain 2 imprinted genes (H19 and IGF2). The gene for the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4), which is of great interest for research into neuropsychiatric disorders and psychopharmacology, is also located in this area. In the present study, we have examined the imprinting status of the DRD4 gene in brain tissue of an epileptic patient who was heterozygous for a 12 bp repeatmore » polymorphism in exon 1 of the DRD4 gene. We show that both alleles are expressed in equivalent amounts. We therefore conclude that the DRD4 gene is not imprinted in the human brain. 30 refs., 1 fig.« less

  17. IGF-2R-Gαq signaling and cardiac hypertrophy in the low-birth-weight lamb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Tosh, Darran N; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Duffield, Jaime A; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-04-01

    The cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF-2R) can induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in a heterotrimeric G protein receptor-coupled manner involving αq (Gαq) or αs (Gαs). We have previously shown increased left ventricular weight and cardiac IGF-2 and IGF-2R gene expression in low-birth-weight (LBW) compared with average-birth-weight (ABW) lambs. Here, we have investigated the cardiac expression of IGF-2 gene variants, the degree of histone acetylation, and the abundance of proteins in the IGF-2R downstream signaling pathway in ABW and LBW lambs. Samples from the left ventricle of ABW and LBW lambs were collected at 21 days of age. There was increased phospho-CaMKII protein with decreased HDAC 4 abundance in the LBW compared with ABW lambs. There was increased GATA 4 and decreased phospho-troponin I abundance in LBW compared with ABW lambs, which are markers of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and impaired or reduced contractility, respectively. There was increased histone acetylation of H3K9 at IGF-2R promoter and IGF-2R intron 2 differentially methylated region in the LBW lamb. In conclusion, histone acetylation of IGF-2R may lead to increased IGF-2R mRNA expression and subsequently mediate Gαq signaling early in life via CaMKII, resulting in an increased risk of left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiovascular disease in adult life. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Association between birth weight and DNA methylation of IGF2, glucocorticoid receptor and repetitive elements LINE-1 and Alu.

    PubMed

    Burris, Heather H; Braun, Joe M; Byun, Hyang-Min; Tarantini, Letizia; Mercado, Adriana; Wright, Rosalind J; Schnaas, Lourdes; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M

    2013-06-01

    We examined the association between birth weight and methylation in the imprinted IGF/H19 loci, the nonimprinted gene NR3C1 and repetitive element DNA (LINE-1 and Alu). We collected umbilical cord venous blood from 219 infants born in Mexico City (Mexico) as part of a prospective birth cohort study and analyzed DNA methylation using pyrosequencing. Birth weight was not associated with DNA methylation of the regions studied. One of the CpG dinucleotides in the IGF2 imprinting control region (ICR)1 includes a potential C-T SNP. Among individuals with an absence of methylation at this site, probably due to a paternally inherited T allele, birth weight was associated with mean methylation status of both IGF2 ICR1 and ICR2. However, this association would not have survived adjustment for multiple testing. While we did not detect an association between DNA methylation and birth weight, our study suggests a potential gene-epigene interaction between a T allele in the IGF2 ICR1 and methylation of ICRs of IGF2, and fetal growth.

  19. Functional evolution of IGF2:IGF2R domain 11 binding generates novel structural interactions and a specific IGF2 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Susana; Nicholls, Ryan D.; Strickland, Madeleine; Hughes, Jennifer; Williams, Christopher; Garner, Lee; Maclean, Rory; Rezgui, Dellel; Prince, Stuart N.; Zaccheo, Oliver J.; Ebner, Daniel; Sanegre, Sabina; Yu, Sheng; Buffa, Francesca M.; Crump, Matthew P.; Hassan, Andrew Bassim

    2016-01-01

    Among the 15 extracellular domains of the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor (M6P/IGF2R), domain 11 has evolved a binding site for IGF2 to negatively regulate ligand bioavailability and mammalian growth. Despite the highly evolved structural loops of the IGF2:domain 11 binding site, affinity-enhancing AB loop mutations suggest that binding is modifiable. Here we examine the extent to which IGF2:domain 11 affinity, and its specificity over IGF1, can be enhanced, and we examine the structural basis of the mechanistic and functional consequences. Domain 11 binding loop mutants were selected by yeast surface display combined with high-resolution structure-based predictions, and validated by surface plasmon resonance. We discovered previously unidentified mutations in the ligand-interacting surface binding loops (AB, CD, FG, and HI). Five combined mutations increased rigidity of the AB loop, as confirmed by NMR. When added to three independently identified CD and FG loop mutations that reduced the koff value by twofold, these mutations resulted in an overall selective 100-fold improvement in affinity. The structural basis of the evolved affinity was improved shape complementarity established by interloop (AB-CD) and intraloop (FG-FG) side chain interactions. The high affinity of the combinatorial domain 11 Fc fusion proteins functioned as ligand-soluble antagonists or traps that depleted pathological IGF2 isoforms from serum and abrogated IGF2-dependent signaling in vivo. An evolved and reengineered high-specificity M6P/IGF2R domain 11 binding site for IGF2 may improve therapeutic targeting of the frequent IGF2 gain of function observed in human cancer. PMID:27140600

  20. IGF2BP3 functions as a potential oncogene and is a crucial target of miR-34a in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuhang; Huang, Tingting; Siu, Ho Lam; Wong, Chi Chun; Dong, Yujuan; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Bin; Wu, William K K; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; To, Ka Fai; Kang, Wei

    2017-04-11

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the frequent causes of cancer-related death in eastern Asian population. IGF2BP2 lists in the top rank up-regulated genes in GC, but its functional role is unclear. The expression of IGF2BP3 in GC cell lines and primary samples was examined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. The biological role of IGF2BP3 was revealed by a series of functional in vitro studies. Its regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) was predicted by TargetScan and confirmed by luciferase assays and rescue experiments. IGF2BP3 ranked the No.1 of the up-regulated genes by expression microarray analysis in GC cell lines. The expression level of IGF2BP3 was observed in GC tissues comparing with non-tumorous gastric epitheliums. The up-regulated IGF2BP3 expression was associated with poor disease specific survival. IGF2BP3 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion. Apart from copy number gain, IGF2BP3 has been confirmed to be negatively regulated by tumor-suppressive miRNA, namely miR-34a. The expression of miR-34a showed negative correlation with IGF2BP3 mRNA expression in primary GC samples and more importantly, re-overexpression of IGF2BP3 rescued the inhibitory effect of miR-34a. We compressively revealed the oncogenic role of IGF2BP3 in gastric tumorigenesis and confirmed its activation is partly due to the silence of miR-34a. Our findings identified useful prognostic biomarker and provided clinical translational potential.

  1. Expression and genomic imprinting of DCN, PON2 and PEG3 genes in porcine placenta.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q Y; Li, C C; Huo, J H; Zhao, S H

    2011-01-01

    Imprinted genes play vital roles in the placental development and fetal growth in eutherian mammals. DCN (decorin), PON2 (paraoxonase 2) and PEG3 (paternally expressed 3) genes have been identified as imprinted genes in the mouse. Here, we detected the imprinting status of three genes in the porcine placenta on DG90 (day 90 of gestation) and the expression differences in Yorkshire and Meishan placenta on DG26, DG55 and DG90. The results indicated that the DCN and PON2 genes were not imprinted genes, while the PEG3 gene showed paternal monoallelic expression in porcine placenta. The expression of the DCN gene increased from DG26 to DG90 in both Yorkshire and Meishan pig placenta. However, this gene expression was greater in Yorkshire than Meishan pig on DG55. The expression of the PON2 gene was greater in Meishan pig than that in Yorkshire on DG26 and DG90. The PEG3 gene expression was not affected by day of pregnancy or breed. Data from the present study contribute to function genomic of porcine placental development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. mTOR complex 2 phosphorylates IMP1 cotranslationally to promote IGF2 production and the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Finn C.; Avruch, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Lack of IGF2 in mice results in diminished embryonic growth due to diminished cell proliferation. Here we show that mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the RNA-binding protein IMP1 (IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 1) have defective splicing and translation of IGF2 mRNAs, markedly reduced IGF2 polypeptide production, and diminished proliferation. The proliferation of the IMP1-null fibroblasts can be restored to wild-type levels by IGF2 in vitro or by re-expression of IMP1, which corrects the defects in IGF2 RNA splicing and translation. The ability of IMP1 to correct these defects is dependent on IMP1 phosphorylation at Ser181, which is catalyzed cotranslationally by mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Phosphorylation strongly enhances IMP1 binding to the IGF2-leader 3 5′ untranslated region, which is absolutely required to enable IGF2-leader 3 mRNA translational initiation by internal ribosomal entry. These findings uncover a new mechanism by which mTOR regulates organismal growth by promoting IGF2 production in the mouse embryo through mTORC2-catalyzed cotranslational IMP1/IMP3 phosphorylation. Inasmuch as TORC2 is activated by association with ribosomes, the present results indicate that mTORC2-catalyzed cotranslational protein phosphorylation is a core function of this complex. PMID:23388827

  3. Expression and Imprinting Analysis of AK044800, a Transcript from the Dlk1-Dio3 Imprinted Gene Cluster during Mouse Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhengbin; Liu, Qi; Huang, Zhijun; Cui, Wei; Tian, Yijun; Yan, Weili; Wu, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has demonstrated that full development potential is closely related with the expression state of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted gene cluster. However, few of them, especially the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), have been characterized in detail. AK044800 is a transcript from the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted region with little known information. This study reports original data on the expression pattern of AK044800 during embryogenesis. Expression analysis showed that AK044800 was specifically expressed in the brain at mid-gestation, E9.5 and E11.5. And at E15.5, its expression was mainly concentrated in the forebrain. In the late-gestation stage (E18.5), AK044800 expression was weaker in the brain and began to emerge in some other tissues during this period. Notably, the expression of AK044800 was biallelic in the brain, unlike other non-coding transcripts from this imprinted region. In addition, its expression was dependent on inbred mouse strains. This may be the first lncRNA that has been identified with a different expression between inbred mouse strains. This study may provide useful clues for further investigations of expression regulation and functions of lncRNAs of the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted region. PMID:23515577

  4. The nucleotides responsible for the direct physical contact between the chromatin insulator protein CTCF and the H19 imprinting control region manifest parent of origin-specific long-distance insulation and methylation-free domains

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod; Mariano, Piero; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar; Mattsson, Anita; Lobanenkov, Victor; Heuchel, Rainer; Ohlsson, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    The repression of the maternally inherited Igf2 allele has been proposed to depend on a methylation-sensitive chromatin insulator organized by the 11 zinc finger protein CTCF at the H19 imprinting control region (ICR). Here we document that point mutations of the nucleotides in physical contact with CTCF within the endogenous H19 ICR lead to loss of CTCF binding and Igf2 imprinting only when passaged through the female germline. This effect is accompanied by a significant loss of methylation protection of the maternally derived H19 ICR. Because CTCF interacts with other imprinting control regions, it emerges as a central factor responsible for interpreting and propagating gamete-derived epigenetic marks and for organizing epigenetically controlled expression domains. PMID:12629040

  5. Early embryonic failure: Expression and imprinted status of candidate genes on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.S.; Bennett, P.R.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    Two cases of maternal uniparental (hetero)disomy for human chromosome 21 (mUPD21) have been identified in a systematic search for UPD in 23 cases of early embryonic failure (EEF). Bi-parental origin of the other chromosome pairs was confirmed using specific VNTR probes or dinucleotide repeat analysis. Both maternally and paternally derived isochromosomes 21q have previously been identified in two individuals with normal phenotypes. Full UPD21 has a different mechanism of origin than uniparental isochromosome 21q and its effect on imprinted genes and phenotypic outcome will therefore not necessarily be the same. EEF associated with mUPD21 suggests that developmentally important genes onmore » HSA 21 may be imprinted such that they are only expressed from either the maternally or paternally derived alleles. We have searched for monoallelic expression of candidate genes on HSA 21 in human pregnancy (CBS, IFNAR, COL6A1) using intragenic DNA polymorphisms. These genes were chosen either because their murine homologues lie in imprinted regions or because they are potentially important in embryogenesis. Once imprinted candidate genes have been identified, their methylation status and expression in normal, early embryonic failure and uniparental disomy 21 pregnancies will be studied. At the same time, a larger number of cases of EEF are being examined to further investigate the incidence of UPD21 in this group.« less

  6. Meg3 Non-coding RNA Expression Controls Imprinting by Preventing Transcriptional Upregulation in cis.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Ildem; Lalevée, Sébastien; Cammisa, Marco; Perrin, Aurélien; Rage, Florence; Llères, David; Riccio, Andrea; Bertrand, Edouard; Feil, Robert

    2018-04-10

    Although many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are imprinted, their roles often remain unknown. The Dlk1-Dio3 domain expresses the lncRNA Meg3 and multiple microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) on the maternal chromosome and constitutes an epigenetic model for development. The domain's Dlk1 (Delta-like-1) gene encodes a ligand that inhibits Notch1 signaling and regulates diverse developmental processes. Using a hybrid embryonic stem cell (ESC) system, we find that Dlk1 becomes imprinted during neural differentiation and that this involves transcriptional upregulation on the paternal chromosome. The maternal Dlk1 gene remains poised. Its protection against activation is controlled in cis by Meg3 expression and also requires the H3-Lys-27 methyltransferase Ezh2. Maternal Meg3 expression additionally protects against de novo DNA methylation at its promoter. We find that Meg3 lncRNA is partially retained in cis and overlaps the maternal Dlk1 in embryonic cells. Combined, our data evoke an imprinting model in which allelic lncRNA expression prevents gene activation in cis. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adult mouse brain gene expression patterns bear an embryologic imprint

    PubMed Central

    Zapala, Matthew A.; Hovatta, Iiris; Ellison, Julie A.; Wodicka, Lisa; Del Rio, Jo A.; Tennant, Richard; Tynan, Wendy; Broide, Ron S.; Helton, Rob; Stoveken, Barbara S.; Winrow, Christopher; Lockhart, Daniel J.; Reilly, John F.; Young, Warren G.; Bloom, Floyd E.; Lockhart, David J.; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-01-01

    The current model to explain the organization of the mammalian nervous system is based on studies of anatomy, embryology, and evolution. To further investigate the molecular organization of the adult mammalian brain, we have built a gene expression-based brain map. We measured gene expression patterns for 24 neural tissues covering the mouse central nervous system and found, surprisingly, that the adult brain bears a transcriptional “imprint” consistent with both embryological origins and classic evolutionary relationships. Embryonic cellular position along the anterior–posterior axis of the neural tube was shown to be closely associated with, and possibly a determinant of, the gene expression patterns in adult structures. We also observed a significant number of embryonic patterning and homeobox genes with region-specific expression in the adult nervous system. The relationships between global expression patterns for different anatomical regions and the nature of the observed region-specific genes suggest that the adult brain retains a degree of overall gene expression established during embryogenesis that is important for regional specificity and the functional relationships between regions in the adult. The complete collection of extensively annotated gene expression data along with data mining and visualization tools have been made available on a publicly accessible web site (www.barlow-lockhart-brainmapnimhgrant.org). PMID:16002470

  8. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Effects of Sex Chromosome Imprinting in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Bernardo; Branco, Alan T.; Jiang, Pan-Pan; Hartl, Daniel L.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Imprinting is well-documented in both plant and animal species. In Drosophila, the Y chromosome is differently modified when transmitted through the male and female germlines. Here, we report genome-wide gene expression effects resulting from reversed parent-of-origin of the X and Y chromosomes. We found that hundreds of genes are differentially expressed between adult male Drosophila melanogaster that differ in the maternal and paternal origin of the sex chromosomes. Many of the differentially regulated genes are expressed specifically in testis and midgut cells, suggesting that sex chromosome imprinting might globally impact gene expression in these tissues. In contrast, we observed much fewer Y-linked parent-of-origin effects on genome-wide gene expression in females carrying a Y chromosome, indicating that gene expression in females is less sensitive to sex chromosome parent-of-origin. Genes whose expression differs between females inheriting a maternal or paternal Y chromosome also show sex chromosome parent-of-origin effects in males, but the direction of the effects on gene expression (overexpression or underexpression) differ between the sexes. We suggest that passage of sex chromosome chromatin through male meiosis may be required for wild-type function in F1 progeny, whereas disruption of Y-chromosome function through passage in the female germline likely arises because the chromosome is not adapted to the female germline environment. PMID:24318925

  9. Otx2 expression and implications for olfactory imprinting in the anemonefish, Amphiprion percula

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Heather D.; Van Herwerden, Lynne; Cole, Nicholas J.; Don, Emily K.; De Santis, Christian; Dixson, Danielle L.; Wenger, Amelia S.; Munday, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The otx2 gene encodes a transcription factor (OTX2) essential in the formation of the brain and sensory systems. Specifically, OTX2-positive cells are associated with axons in the olfactory system of mice and otx2 is upregulated in odour-exposed zebrafish, indicating a possible role in olfactory imprinting. In this study, otx2 was used as a candidate gene to investigate the molecular mechanisms of olfactory imprinting to settlement cues in the coral reef anemonefish, Amphiprion percula. The A. percula otx2 (Ap-otx2) gene was elucidated, validated, and its expression tested in settlement-stage A. percula by exposing them to behaviourally relevant olfactory settlement cues in the first 24 hours post-hatching, or daily throughout the larval phase. In-situ hybridisation revealed expression of Ap-otx2 throughout the olfactory epithelium with increased transcript staining in odour-exposed settlement-stage larval fish compared to no-odour controls, in all scenarios. This suggests that Ap-otx2 may be involved in olfactory imprinting to behaviourally relevant settlement odours in A. percula. PMID:24143277

  10. Genomic Inprinting of the M6P/IGF2 Receptor: A Novel Breast Cancer Susceptibility Mechanism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    pertaining to human development, DNA methylation . Mol Endocrinol 12:220-232. cancer, and imprinting. These include: 1) de- Ikushima H, Munakata Y, Ishii...evolve. The M6P/IGF2R in both the monotremes and didelphid marsupials also lacks the differentially- methylated CpG island in intron 2 previously...withdrawn from adult chickens into heparinized syringes and frozen at -80’C. tion 936 of Accession no. AF218827; position 943 of DNA and total RNA were

  11. A Loss-of-Function Splice Acceptor Variant in IGF2 Is Protective for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Josep M; Liao, Rachel G; Bell, Avery D; Dymek, Zachary; Estrada, Karol; Tukiainen, Taru; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Hanson, Robert L; Walford, Geoffrey A; Moran, Ignasi; Chen, Ling; Agarwala, Vineeta; Ordoñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillen, Rosario; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Segura-Kato, Yayoi; García-Ortiz, Humberto; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Barajas-Olmos, Francisco; Caulkins, Lizz; Puppala, Sobha; Fontanillas, Pierre; Williams, Amy L; Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Hartl, Chris; Ripke, Stephan; Tooley, Katherine; Lane, Jacqueline; Zerrweck, Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Angélica; Córdova, Emilio J; Mendoza-Caamal, Elvia; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; González-Villalpando, María E; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Muñoz-Hernández, Liliana; Gómez-Velasco, Donaji; Alvirde, Ulises; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Riba, Laura; Harden, Maegan; Gabriel, Stacey; Abboud, Hanna E; Cortes, Maria L; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Soberon, Xavier; Curran, Joanne E; Jenkinson, Christopher P; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Lehman, Donna M; Hanis, Craig L; Bell, Graeme I; Boehnke, Michael; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Saxena, Richa; MacArthur, Daniel; Ferrer, Jorge; McCarroll, Steven A; Torrents, David; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Burtt, Noel; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Haiman, Christopher A; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Flannick, Jason; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Orozco, Lorena; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects more than 415 million people worldwide, and its costs to the health care system continue to rise. To identify common or rare genetic variation with potential therapeutic implications for T2D, we analyzed and replicated genome-wide protein coding variation in a total of 8,227 individuals with T2D and 12,966 individuals without T2D of Latino descent. We identified a novel genetic variant in the IGF2 gene associated with ∼20% reduced risk for T2D. This variant, which has an allele frequency of 17% in the Mexican population but is rare in Europe, prevents splicing between IGF2 exons 1 and 2. We show in vitro and in human liver and adipose tissue that the variant is associated with a specific, allele-dosage-dependent reduction in the expression of IGF2 isoform 2. In individuals who do not carry the protective allele, expression of IGF2 isoform 2 in adipose is positively correlated with both incidence of T2D and increased plasma glycated hemoglobin in individuals without T2D, providing support that the protective effects are mediated by reductions in IGF2 isoform 2. Broad phenotypic examination of carriers of the protective variant revealed no association with other disease states or impaired reproductive health. These findings suggest that reducing IGF2 isoform 2 expression in relevant tissues has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for T2D, even beyond the Latin American population, with no major adverse effects on health or reproduction. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. Dynamic expression of imprinted genes associates with maternally controlled nutrient allocation during maize endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mingming; Yang, Ruolin; Li, Guosheng; Chen, Hao; Laurie, John; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Dongfang; Yao, Yingyin; Larkins, Brian A; Sun, Qixin; Yadegari, Ramin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2013-09-01

    In angiosperms, the endosperm provides nutrients for embryogenesis and seed germination and is the primary tissue where gene imprinting occurs. To identify the imprintome of early developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of whole kernels at 0, 3, and 5 d after pollination (DAP) and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, using B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses. We observed gradually increased expression of paternal transcripts in 3- and 5-DAP kernels. In 7-DAP endosperm, the majority of the genes tested reached a 2:1 maternal versus paternal ratio, suggesting that paternal genes are nearly fully activated by 7 DAP. A total of 116, 234, and 63 genes exhibiting parent-specific expression were identified at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, respectively. The largest proportion of paternally expressed genes was at 7 DAP, mainly due to the significantly deviated parental allele expression ratio of these genes at this stage, while nearly 80% of the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were specific to 10 DAP and were primarily attributed to sharply increased expression levels compared with the other stages. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the imprinted genes suggested that 10-DAP endosperm-specific MEGs are involved in nutrient uptake and allocation and the auxin signaling pathway, coincident with the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation.

  13. Disturbed Placental Imprinting in Preeclampsia Leads to Altered Expression of DLX5, a Human-Specific Early Trophoblast Marker.

    PubMed

    Zadora, Julianna; Singh, Manvendra; Herse, Florian; Przybyl, Lukasz; Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Yung, Hong Wa; Huppertz, Berthold; Cartwright, Judith E; Whitley, Guy; Johnsen, Guro M; Levi, Giovanni; Isbruch, Annette; Schulz, Herbert; Luft, Friedrich C; Müller, Dominik N; Staff, Anne Cathrine; Hurst, Laurence D; Dechend, Ralf; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2017-11-07

    Preeclampsia is a complex and common human-specific pregnancy syndrome associated with placental pathology. The human specificity provides both intellectual and methodological challenges, lacking a robust model system. Given the role of imprinted genes in human placentation and the vulnerability of imprinted genes to loss of imprinting changes, there has been extensive speculation, but no robust evidence, that imprinted genes are involved in preeclampsia. Our study aims to investigate whether disturbed imprinting contributes to preeclampsia. We first aimed to confirm that preeclampsia is a disease of the placenta by generating and analyzing genome-wide molecular data on well-characterized patient material. We performed high-throughput transcriptome analyses of multiple placenta samples from healthy controls and patients with preeclampsia. Next, we identified differentially expressed genes in preeclamptic placentas and intersected them with the list of human imprinted genes. We used bioinformatics/statistical analyses to confirm association between imprinting and preeclampsia and to predict biological processes affected in preeclampsia. Validation included epigenetic and cellular assays. In terms of human specificity, we established an in vitro invasion-differentiation trophoblast model. Our comparative phylogenetic analysis involved single-cell transcriptome data of human, macaque, and mouse preimplantation embryogenesis. We found disturbed placental imprinting in preeclampsia and revealed potential candidates, including GATA3 and DLX5 , with poorly explored imprinted status and no prior association with preeclampsia. As a result of loss of imprinting, DLX5 was upregulated in 69% of preeclamptic placentas. Levels of DLX5 correlated with classic preeclampsia markers. DLX5 is expressed in human but not in murine trophoblast. The DLX5 high phenotype resulted in reduced proliferation, increased metabolism, and endoplasmic reticulum stress-response activation in

  14. Imprinting and expression status of isoforms 1 and 2 of PEG1/MEST gene in uterine leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yong-Suk; Park, Seon-Koo; Kim, Hong-Tae; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Choi, Youn Seok

    2010-01-01

    PEG1/MEST gene has been known to be an imprinting gene, which is associated with growth of mesodermal origin cells. Its expression was also reported to be increased in leiomyoma. Several reports showed that loss of imprinting is associated with carcinogenesis in some types of cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether overexpression of PEG1/MEST gene in leiomyoma is associated with loss of imprinting of the gene (biallelic), or whether the overexpression occurs while maintaining the imprinting (monoallelic). We investigated the expression and the imprinting status of PEG1/MEST and its isoforms in samples from 25 patients with uterine leiomyomas as well as in matched normal myometrial tissue. The isoform 1 transcripts were found to be more increased in uterine leiomyomas, compared to myometrium. However, there was no difference in the mRNA levels of isoform 2 between normal myometrium and leiomyoma. All normal myometrial tissues and 19 of 20 leiomyomas showed monoallelic expression of PEG1/MEST. Thus, these data demonstrated that tumorigenesis of leiomyoma is associated with overexpression of isoform 1 of PEG1/MEST gene, but not with loss of imprinting of the gene. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Territorial Behavior and Social Stability in the Mouse Require Correct Expression of Imprinted Cdkn1c.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Gráinne I; John, Rosalind M; Isles, Anthony R

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, the epigenetic process by which transcription occurs from a single parental allele, is believed to influence social behaviors in mammals. An important social behavior is group living, which is enriched in Eutherian mammals relative to monotremes and marsupials. Group living facilitates resource acquisition, defense of territory and co-care of young, but requires a stable social group with complex inter-individual relationships. Co-occurring with increased group living in Eutherians is an increase in the number of imprinted loci, including that spanning the maternally expressed Cdkn1c . Using a 'loss-of-imprinting' model of Cdkn1c ( Cdkn1c BACx1 ), we demonstrated that twofold over expression of Cdkn1c results in abnormal social behaviors. Although, our previous work indicated that male Cdkn1c BACx1 mice were more dominant as measured by tube test encounters with unfamiliar wild-type (WT) males. Building upon this work, using more ecologically relevant assessments of social dominance, indicated that within their normal social group, Cdkn1c BACx1 mice did not occupy higher ranking positions. Nevertheless, we find that presence of Cdkn1c BACx1 animals within a group leads to instability of the normal social hierarchy, as indicated by greater variability in social rank within the group over time and an increase in territorial behavior in WT cage-mates. Consequently, these abnormal behaviors led to an increased incidence of fighting and wounding within the group. Taken together these data indicate that normal expression of Cdkn1c is required for maintaining stability of the social group and suggests that the acquisition of monoallelic expression of Cdkn1c may have enhanced social behavior in Eutherian mammals to facilitate group living.

  16. Maternal distress associates with placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and IGF2: Role of obesity and sex.

    PubMed

    Mina, Theresia H; Räikkönen, Katri; Riley, Simon C; Norman, Jane E; Reynolds, Rebecca M

    2015-09-01

    Maternal emotional distress symptoms, including life satisfaction, anxiety and depressed mood, are worse in Severely Obese (SO) than lean pregnancy and may alter placental genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure and placental growth. We hypothesised that the associations between increased maternal distress symptoms and changes in placental gene expression including IGF2 and genes regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure are more pronounced in SO pregnancy. We also considered whether there were sex-specific effects. Placental mRNA levels of 11β-HSDs, NR3C1-α, NR3C2, ABC transporters, mTOR and the IGF2 family were measured in term placental samples from 43 lean (BMI≤25kg/m(2)) and 50 SO (BMI≥40kg/m(2)) women, in whom distress symptoms were prospectively evaluated during pregnancy. The mRNA levels of genes with a similar role in regulating fetal glucocorticoid exposure were strongly inter-correlated. Increased maternal distress symptoms associated with increased NR3C2 and IGF2 isoform 1(IGF2-1) in both lean and SO group (p≤0.05). Increased distress was associated with higher ABCB1 and ABCG2 mRNA levels in SO but lower ABCB1 and higher 11β-HSD1 mRNA levels in lean (p≤0.05) suggesting a protective adaptive response in SO placentas. Increased maternal distress associated with reduced mRNA levels of ABCB1, ABCG2, 11β-HSD2, NR3C1-α and IGF2-1 in placentas of female but not male offspring. The observed sex differences in placental responses suggest greater vulnerability of female fetuses to maternal distress with potentially greater fetal glucocorticoid exposure and excess IGF2. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings and to test whether this translates to potentially greater negative outcomes of maternal distress in female offspring in early childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A maternally methylated CpG island in KvLQT1 is associated with an antisense paternal transcript and loss of imprinting in Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smilinich, Nancy J.; Day, Colleen D.; Fitzpatrick, Galina V.; Caldwell, Germaine M.; Lossie, Amy C.; Cooper, P. R.; Smallwood, Allan C.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Schofield, Paul N.; Reik, Wolf; Nicholls, Robert D.; Weksberg, Rosanna; Driscoll, D. J.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Shows, Thomas B.; Higgins, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Loss of imprinting at IGF2, generally through an H19-independent mechanism, is associated with a large percentage of patients with the overgrowth and cancer predisposition condition Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). Imprinting control elements are proposed to exist within the KvLQT1 locus, because multiple BWS-associated chromosome rearrangements disrupt this gene. We have identified an evolutionarily conserved, maternally methylated CpG island (KvDMR1) in an intron of the KvLQT1 gene. Among 12 cases of BWS with normal H19 methylation, 5 showed demethylation of KvDMR1 in fibroblast or lymphocyte DNA; whereas, in 4 cases of BWS with H19 hypermethylation, methylation at KvDMRl was normal. Thus, inactivation of H19 and hypomethylation at KvDMR1 (or an associated phenomenon) represent distinct epigenetic anomalies associated with biallelic expression of IGF2. Reverse transcription–PCR analysis of the human and syntenic mouse loci identified the presence of a KvDMR1-associated RNA transcribed exclusively from the paternal allele and in the opposite orientation with respect to the maternally expressed KvLQT1 gene. We propose that KvDMR1 and/or its associated antisense RNA (KvLQT1-AS) represents an additional imprinting control element or center in the human 11p15.5 and mouse distal 7 imprinted domains. PMID:10393948

  18. Territorial Behavior and Social Stability in the Mouse Require Correct Expression of Imprinted Cdkn1c

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Gráinne I.; John, Rosalind M.; Isles, Anthony R.

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, the epigenetic process by which transcription occurs from a single parental allele, is believed to influence social behaviors in mammals. An important social behavior is group living, which is enriched in Eutherian mammals relative to monotremes and marsupials. Group living facilitates resource acquisition, defense of territory and co-care of young, but requires a stable social group with complex inter-individual relationships. Co-occurring with increased group living in Eutherians is an increase in the number of imprinted loci, including that spanning the maternally expressed Cdkn1c. Using a ‘loss-of-imprinting’ model of Cdkn1c (Cdkn1cBACx1), we demonstrated that twofold over expression of Cdkn1c results in abnormal social behaviors. Although, our previous work indicated that male Cdkn1cBACx1 mice were more dominant as measured by tube test encounters with unfamiliar wild-type (WT) males. Building upon this work, using more ecologically relevant assessments of social dominance, indicated that within their normal social group, Cdkn1cBACx1 mice did not occupy higher ranking positions. Nevertheless, we find that presence of Cdkn1cBACx1 animals within a group leads to instability of the normal social hierarchy, as indicated by greater variability in social rank within the group over time and an increase in territorial behavior in WT cage-mates. Consequently, these abnormal behaviors led to an increased incidence of fighting and wounding within the group. Taken together these data indicate that normal expression of Cdkn1c is required for maintaining stability of the social group and suggests that the acquisition of monoallelic expression of Cdkn1c may have enhanced social behavior in Eutherian mammals to facilitate group living. PMID:29535616

  19. The Testis-Specific Factor CTCFL Cooperates with the Protein Methyltransferase PRMT7 in H19 Imprinting Control Region Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Jelinic, Petar; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Shaw, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Expression of imprinted genes is restricted to a single parental allele as a result of epigenetic regulation—DNA methylation and histone modifications. Igf2/H19 is a reciprocally imprinted locus exhibiting paternal Igf2 and maternal H19 expression. Their expression is regulated by a paternally methylated imprinting control region (ICR) located between the two genes. Although the de novo DNA methyltransferases have been shown to be necessary for the establishment of ICR methylation, the mechanism by which they are targeted to the region remains unknown. We demonstrate that CTCFL/BORIS, a paralog of CTCF, is an ICR-binding protein expressed during embryonic male germ cell development, coinciding with the timing of ICR methylation. PRMT7, a protein arginine methyltransferase with which CTCFL interacts, is also expressed during embryonic testis development. Symmetrical dimethyl arginine 3 of histone H4, a modification catalyzed by PRMT7, accumulates in germ cells during this developmental period. This modified histone is also found enriched in both H19 ICR and Gtl2 differentially methylated region (DMR) chromatin of testis by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that CTCFL stimulates the histone-methyltransferase activity of PRMT7 via interactions with both histones and PRMT7. Finally, H19 ICR methylation is demonstrated by nuclear co-injection of expression vectors encoding CTCFL, PRMT7, and the de novo DNA methyltransferases, Dnmt3a, -b and -L, in Xenopus oocytes. These results suggest that CTCFL and PRMT7 may play a role in male germline imprinted gene methylation. PMID:17048991

  20. Genomic imprinting in mammals.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Denise P; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-02-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation.

  1. Genomic Imprinting in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Denise P.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting affects a subset of genes in mammals and results in a monoallelic, parental-specific expression pattern. Most of these genes are located in clusters that are regulated through the use of insulators or long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). To distinguish the parental alleles, imprinted genes are epigenetically marked in gametes at imprinting control elements through the use of DNA methylation at the very least. Imprinted gene expression is subsequently conferred through lncRNAs, histone modifications, insulators, and higher-order chromatin structure. Such imprints are maintained after fertilization through these mechanisms despite extensive reprogramming of the mammalian genome. Genomic imprinting is an excellent model for understanding mammalian epigenetic regulation. PMID:24492710

  2. Structural conservation versus functional divergence of maternally expressed microRNAs in the Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinting region

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Martin; Bock, Christoph; Paulsen, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs play an important functional role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. One of the largest known microRNA clusters is located within the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 region on human chromosome 14 and mouse chromosome 12. This cluster contains more than 40 microRNA genes that are expressed only from the maternal chromosome in mouse. Results To shed light on the function of these microRNAs and possible crosstalk between microRNA-based gene regulation and genomic imprinting, we performed extensive in silico analyses of the microRNAs in this imprinted region and their predicted target genes. Bioinformatic analysis reveals that these microRNAs are highly conserved in both human and mouse. Whereas the microRNA precursors at this locus mostly belong to large sequence families, the mature microRNAs sequences are highly divergent. We developed a target gene prediction approach that combines three widely used prediction methods and achieved a sufficiently high prediction accuracy. Target gene sets predicted for individual microRNAs derived from the imprinted region show little overlap and do not differ significantly in their properties from target genes predicted for a group of randomly selected microRNAs. The target genes are enriched with long and GC-rich 3' UTR sequences and are preferentially annotated to development, regulation processes and cell communication. Furthermore, among all analyzed human and mouse genes, the predicted target genes are characterized by consistently higher expression levels in all tissues considered. Conclusion Our results suggest a complex evolutionary history for microRNA genes in this imprinted region, including an amplification of microRNA precursors in a mammalian ancestor, and a rapid subsequent divergence of the mature sequences. This produced a broad spectrum of target genes. Further, our analyses did not uncover a functional relation between imprinted gene regulation of this microRNA-encoding region, expression patterns

  3. Aberrant methylation of imprinted genes is associated with negative hormone receptor status in invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Timothy M; Barault, Ludovic; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Harris, Holly R; Binder, Alexandra M; Valente, Allyson L; Shriver, Craig D; Michels, Karin B

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of imprinted genes enables monoallelic expression according to parental origin, and its disruption is implicated in many cancers and developmental disorders. The expression of hormone receptors is significant in breast cancer as they are indicators of cancer cell growth rate and determine response to endocrine therapies. We investigated the frequency of aberrant events and variation in DNA methylation at nine imprinted sites in invasive breast cancer and examined the association with estrogen and progesterone receptor status. Breast tissue and blood from patients with invasive breast cancer (n=38) and benign breast disease (n=30) were compared to those from healthy individuals (n=36), matched to the cancer patients by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, BMI, menopausal status, and familial history of cancer. DNA methylation and allele-specific expression were analyzed by pyrosequencing. Tumor-specific methylation changes at IGF2 DMR2 were observed in 59% of cancer patients, IGF2 DMR0 in 38%, DIRAS3 DMR in 36%, GRB10 ICR in 23%, PEG3 DMR in 21%, MEST ICR in 19%, H19 ICR in 18%, KvDMR in 8%, and SNRPN/SNURF ICR in 4%. Variation of methylation was significantly greater in breast tissue from cancer patients than healthy individuals and benign breast disease. Aberrant methylation of three or more sites was significantly associated with negative estrogen-alpha (Fisher’s Exact Test, p=0.02) and progesterone-A (p=0.02) receptor status. Aberrant events and increased variation of imprinted gene DNA methylation therefore appear to be frequent in invasive breast cancer and are associated with negative estrogen and progesterone receptor status, without loss of monoallelic expression. PMID:25560175

  4. Genomic Imprinting and the Expression of Affect in Angelman Syndrome: What's in the Smile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Horsler, Kate; Berg, Katy; Bellamy, Gail; Dick, Katie; Griffiths, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Background: Kinship theory (or the genomic conflict hypothesis) proposes that the phenotypic effects of genomic imprinting arise from conflict between paternally and maternally inherited alleles. A prediction arising for social behaviour from this theory is that imbalance in this conflict resulting from a deletion of a maternally imprinted gene,…

  5. Imp2 regulates GBM progression by activating IGF2/PI3K/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qingchun; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Fengbo; Gao, Haijun; Lei, Ting; Li, Peiwen; Liu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xitong; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sayari, Arash J; Shen, Jia; Huang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) are the most frequently occurring malignant brain cancers. Treatment for GBM consists of surgical resection and subsequent adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite this, GBM patient survival is limited to 12–15 months, and researchers are continually trying to develop improved therapy options. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (Imp2) is known to be upregulated in many cancers and is known to regulate the signaling activity of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). However, relatively little is known about its role in malignant development of GBM. In this study, we first found Imp2 is upregulated in GBM tissues by using clinical samples and public database search. Studies with loss and gain of Imp2 expression in in vitro GBM cell culture system demonstrated the role of Imp2 in promoting GBM cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, our results show that Imp2 regulates the activity of IGF2, which further activates PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby to promote GBM malignancy. Inhibition of Imp2 was also found to sensitize GBM to temozolomide treatment. These observations add to the current knowledge of GBM biology, and may prove useful in development of more effective GBM therapy. PMID:25719943

  6. Imp2 regulates GBM progression by activating IGF2/PI3K/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qingchun; Wang, Lijun; Yu, Fengbo; Gao, Haijun; Lei, Ting; Li, Peiwen; Liu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xu; Hu, Xitong; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Zhenfeng; Sayari, Arash J; Shen, Jia; Huang, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) are the most frequently occurring malignant brain cancers. Treatment for GBM consists of surgical resection and subsequent adjuvant radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Despite this, GBM patient survival is limited to 12-15 months, and researchers are continually trying to develop improved therapy options. Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (Imp2) is known to be upregulated in many cancers and is known to regulate the signaling activity of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2). However, relatively little is known about its role in malignant development of GBM. In this study, we first found Imp2 is upregulated in GBM tissues by using clinical samples and public database search. Studies with loss and gain of Imp2 expression in in vitro GBM cell culture system demonstrated the role of Imp2 in promoting GBM cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, our results show that Imp2 regulates the activity of IGF2, which further activates PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby to promote GBM malignancy. Inhibition of Imp2 was also found to sensitize GBM to temozolomide treatment. These observations add to the current knowledge of GBM biology, and may prove useful in development of more effective GBM therapy.

  7. Restoration of microRNA-708 sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin via IGF2BP1/Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuying; Sun, Linlin; Wang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    A previous study has shown that microRNA-708 (miR-708) functions as a metastasis suppressor in ovarian cancer. In this study, we aimed to explore its implication in regulating cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer cells. To this end, ovarian cancer cells were transfected with miR-708-expressing plasmids or vector before treatment with different concentrations of cisplatin for 48 h. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value was calculated. Apoptosis was analyzed by measuring caspase-3 activity. The target gene mediating the function of miR-708 was identified. Ectopic expression of miR-708 sensitized SKOV3 and A2780 cells to cisplatin, decreasing the IC 50 value by two- to threefold. miR-708 overexpression significantly augmented cisplatin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells, which was coupled with increased caspase-3 activity by two- to fourfold. Similarly, overexpression of miR-708 increased the sensitivity of cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP and A2780/DDP cells to cisplatin-induced toxicity, reducing the IC 50 by three- and fivefold, respectively. Delivery of miR-708 enhanced cisplatin-induced elevation in caspase-3 activity in both cisplatin-resistant and parental ovarian cancer cells. Mechanistically, miR-708 downregulated the expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 1 (IGF2BP1) and suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Silencing of IGF2BP1 markedly blocked the phosphorylation of Akt. Overexpression of IGF2BP1 restored cisplatin resistance and Akt phosphorylation in miR-708-overexpressing ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, miR-708 increases the susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by targeting IGF2BP1 and inhibiting Akt signaling. Delivery of miR-708 may represent a promising strategy for improving cisplatin chemotherapy. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Assisted Reproduction Causes Reduced Fetal Growth Associated with Downregulation of Paternally Expressed Imprinted Genes That Enhance Fetal Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Chen, Shuqiang; Tang, Na; Xiao, Xifeng; Huang, Jianlei; Jiang, Feng; Huang, Xiuying; Sun, Fangzhen; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-02-01

    Alteration of intrauterine growth trajectory is linked to metabolic diseases in adulthood. In mammalian and, specifically, human species, pregnancies through assisted reproductive technology (ART) are associated with changes in intrauterine growth trajectory. However, it is still unclear how ART alters intrauterine growth trajectory, especially reduced fetal growth in early to midgestation. In this study, using a mouse model, it was found that ART procedures reduce fetal and placental growth at Embryonic Day 10.5. Furthermore, ART leads to decreased methylation levels at H19, KvDMR1, and Snrpn imprinting control regions in the placentae, instead of fetuses. Furthermore, in the placenta, ART downregulated a majority of parentally expressed imprinted genes, which enhance fetal growth, whereas it upregulated a majority of maternally expressed genes which repress fetal growth. Additionally, the expression of genes that regulate placental development was also affected by ART. ART also downregulated a majority of placental nutrient transporters. Disruption of genomic imprinting and abnormal expression of developmentally and functionally relevant genes in placenta may influence the placental development and function, which affect fetal growth and reprogramming. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  9. Paternal BPA exposure in early life alters Igf2 epigenetic status in sperm and induces pancreatic impairment in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhenxing; Xia, Wei; Chang, Huailong; Huo, Wenqian; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Shunqing

    2015-11-04

    Exposure to endocrine disruptors in utero appears to alter epigenetics in the male germ-line and subsequently promote adult-onset disease in subsequent generations. Fetal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA), a highly prevalent endocrine disruptor in environment, has been shown to alter epigenetic modification and result in glucose intolerance in adulthood. However, whether fetal exposure to BPA can induce epigenetic modification and phenotypic changes in their subsequent offspring are still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether exposure to BPA in early life induced glucose intolerance in the offspring through male germ line, and the underlying epigenetic molecular basis. F0 pregnant SD rats were received corn oil or 40 μg/kg/day of BPA during gestation and lactation. F1 male rats were maintained to generate F2 offspring by mating with untreated female rats. Both the F1 rats after weaning and the F2 offspring were not received any other treatments. Our results showed that male F2 offspring in the BPA group exhibited glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction. Decreased expression of Igf2 and associated hypermethylation of Igf2 were observed in islets of male F2 offspring. In addition, similar effects were observed in female F2 animals, but the effects were more pronounced in males. Moreover, abnormal expression and methylation of Igf2 was observed in sperm of adult F1 male rats, indicating that epigenetic modification in germ cells can be partly progressed to the next generation. Overall, our study suggests that BPA exposure during early life can result in generational transmission of glucose intolerance and β-cell dysfunction in the offspring through male germ line, which is associated with hypermethylation of Igf2 in islets. The changes of epigenetics in germ cells may contribute to this generational transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Associations between birth and one year anthropometric measurements and IGF2 and IGF2R genetic variants in African American and Caucasian American infants

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Adriana C.; Overcash, Francine; Murphy, Susan K.; Murtha, Amy P.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Forman, Michele R; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Skaar, David; Jirtle, Randy L.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) genetic variants have been inconsistently associated with low birth weight and birth length in Caucasian and Asian infants, however few studies have included African Americans (AA). Generalized linear models and logistic regression models were used to examine associations between IGF2R single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) rs629849 and rs8191754, and IGF2 SNP rs680 and infant anthropometric measurements, in a racially diverse birth cohort in Durham County, North Carolina. Caucasian American (CA) carriers of the IGF2R SNP rs629849 were heavier (P = 0.02) and longer (P = 0.003) at birth, however body size at age 1 yr was similar to that of AA. Birth length significantly differed between carriers and non-carriers of the IGF2 rs680 variant in both AA (P = 0.04) and CA infants (P = 0.03). Both AA and CA carriers were 1 cm shorter at birth compared to non-carriers. We found no evidence for an association between rs8191754 and infant anthropometric measurements. Associations between SNPs and one year weight gain were only observed for rs680; CA infant carriers of rs680 variants weighed less than non-carriers at year one (P = 0.03); however, no associations were found in AA infants at year one. Larger studies using ancestral markers are required to disentangle these associations. PMID:26045971

  11. Pan-cancer analysis of somatic copy number alterations implicates IRS4 and IGF2 in enhancer hijacking

    PubMed Central

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Dubash, Taronish; Drainas, Alexandros P.; Mardin, Balca R.; Chen, Yuanyuan; Stütz, Adrian M.; Waszak, Sebastian M.; Bosco, Graziella; Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Raeder, Benjamin; Efthymiopoulos, Theocharis; Erkek, Serap; Siegl, Christine; Brenner, Hermann; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Dieter, Sebastian M.; Northcott, Paul A.; Petersen, Iver; Pfister, Stefan M.; Schneider, Martin; Solberg, Steinar K.; Thunissen, Erik; Weichert, Wilko; Zichner, Thomas; Thomas, Roman; Peifer, Martin; Helland, Aslaug; Ball, Claudia R.; Jechlinger, Martin; Sotillo, Rocio; Glimm, Hanno; Korbel, Jan O.

    2018-01-01

    Extensive prior research has focused on somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) affecting cancer genes, yet the extent to which recurrent SCNAs exert their influence through rearranging cis-regulatory elements remains unclear. Here, we present a framework for inferring cancer-related gene overexpression resulting from cis-regulatory element reorganization (e.g., enhancer hijacking), by integrating SCNAs, gene expression data, and information on chromatin interaction domains. Analysis of 7,416 cancer genomes uncovered several pan-cancer candidate genes, including IRS4, SMARCA1 and TERT. We demonstrate that IRS4 overexpression in lung cancer associates with recurrent deletions in cis, and present evidence supporting a tumor-promoting role. We additionally pursued cancer type-specific analyses, uncovering IGF2 as a target for enhancer hijacking in colorectal cancer. IGF2-containing tandem duplications result in the de novo formation of a 3D contact domain comprising IGF2 and a lineage-specific super-enhancer, which mediates high-level gene activation. Our framework enables systematic inference of cis-regulatory element rearrangements mediating dysregulation in cancer. PMID:27869826

  12. Prenatal exposure to maternal depression and anxiety on imprinted gene expression in placenta and infant neurodevelopment and growth.

    PubMed

    Litzky, Julia F; Deyssenroth, Maya A; Everson, Todd M; Lester, Barry M; Lambertini, Luca; Chen, Jia; Marsit, Carmen J

    2018-04-11

    BackgroundDepression and/or anxiety during pregnancy have been associated with impaired fetal growth and neurodevelopment. Because placental imprinted genes play a central role in fetal development and respond to environmental stressors, we hypothesized that imprinted gene expression would be affected by prenatal depression and anxiety.MethodsPlacental gene expression was compared between mothers with prenatal depression and/or anxiety/obsessive compulsive disorder/panic and control mothers without psychiatric history (n=458) in the Rhode Island Child Health Study.ResultsTwenty-nine genes were identified as being significantly differentially expressed between placentae from infants of mothers with both depression and anxiety (n=54), with depression (n=89), or who took perinatal psychiatric medications (n=29) and control mother/infant pairs, with most genes having decreased expression in the stressed group. Among placentae from infants of mothers with depression, we found no differences in expression by medication use, indicating that our results are related to the stressor rather than the treatments. We did not find any relationship between the stress-associated gene expression and neonatal neurodevelopment, as measured using the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Network Neurobehavioral Scale.ConclusionsThis variation in expression may be part of an adaptive mechanism by which the placenta buffers the infant from the effects of maternal stress.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 11 April 2018; doi:10.1038/pr.2018.27.

  13. Dynamic Expression of Imprinted Genes Associates with Maternally Controlled Nutrient Allocation during Maize Endosperm Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mingming; Yang, Ruolin; Li, Guosheng; Chen, Hao; Laurie, John; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Dongfang; Yao, Yingyin; Larkins, Brian A.; Sun, Qixin; Yadegari, Ramin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, the endosperm provides nutrients for embryogenesis and seed germination and is the primary tissue where gene imprinting occurs. To identify the imprintome of early developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of whole kernels at 0, 3, and 5 d after pollination (DAP) and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, using B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses. We observed gradually increased expression of paternal transcripts in 3- and 5-DAP kernels. In 7-DAP endosperm, the majority of the genes tested reached a 2:1 maternal versus paternal ratio, suggesting that paternal genes are nearly fully activated by 7 DAP. A total of 116, 234, and 63 genes exhibiting parent-specific expression were identified at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, respectively. The largest proportion of paternally expressed genes was at 7 DAP, mainly due to the significantly deviated parental allele expression ratio of these genes at this stage, while nearly 80% of the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were specific to 10 DAP and were primarily attributed to sharply increased expression levels compared with the other stages. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the imprinted genes suggested that 10-DAP endosperm-specific MEGs are involved in nutrient uptake and allocation and the auxin signaling pathway, coincident with the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. PMID:24058158

  14. Maternal nutrient restriction in mid-to-late gestation influences fetal mRNA expression in muscle tissues in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Francois; Wood, Katie M; Swanson, Kendall C; Miller, Stephen P; McBride, Brian W; Fitzsimmons, Carolyn

    2017-08-18

    Manipulating maternal nutrition during specific periods of gestation can result in re-programming of fetal and post-natal development. In this experiment we investigated how a feed restriction of 85% compared with 140% of total metabolizable energy requirements, fed to cows during mid-to-late gestation, influences phenotypic development of fetuses and mRNA expression of growth (Insulin-Like Growth Factor family and Insulin Receptor (INSR)), myogenic (Myogenic Differentiation 1 (MYOD1), Myogenin (MYOG), Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2A (MEF2A), Serum Response Factor (SRF)) and adipogenic (Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARG)) genes in fetal longissimus dorsi (LD) and semitendinosus (ST) muscle. DNA methylation of imprinted genes, Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) and Insulin Like Growth Factor 2 Receptor (IGF2R), and micro RNA (miRNA) expression, were also examined as potential consequences of poor maternal nutrition, but also potential regulators of altered gene expression patterns. While the nutrient restriction impacted dam body weight, no differences were observed in phenotypic fetal measurements (weight, crown-rump length, or thorax circumference). Interestingly, LD and ST muscles responded differently to the differential pre-natal nutrient levels. While LD muscle of restricted fetal calves had greater mRNA abundances for Insulin Like Growth Factor 1 and its receptor (IGF1 and IGF1R), IGF2R, INSR, MYOD1, MYOG, and PPARG, no significant differences were observed for gene expression in ST muscle. Similarly, feed restriction had a greater impact on the methylation level of IGF2 Differentially Methylated Region 2 (DMR2) in LD muscle as compared to ST muscle between treatment groups. A negative correlation existed between IGF2 mRNA expression and IGF2 DMR2 methylation level in both LD and ST muscles. Differential expression of miRNAs 1 and 133a were also detected in LD muscle. Our data suggests that a nutrient restriction of 85% as compared to 140

  15. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and IGF-2R Activation via Estrogen Receptors to Suppress Angiotensin II-Induced H9c2 Cardiomyoblast Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fang; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lee, Nien-Hung; Chen, Yu-Feng; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Chen, Ray-Jade; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy involves changes in the myocardial ultra-structure, hypertrophy, apoptosis, fibrosis and inflammation. Angiotensin II (AngII) stimulates the expression of insulin like-growth factors (IGF-2) and IGF-2 receptor (IGF-2R) in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts and subsequently leads to apoptosis. Estrogen receptors protect cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and fibrosis. Tanshinone IIA (TSN), a main active ingredient from Danshen, has been shown to protect cardiomyocytes from death caused by different stress signals. Estrogen receptor α (ER) is required for the rapid activation of the IGF-1R signaling cascade. This study aimed to investigate whether TSN protected H9c2 cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced activation of IGF-2R pathway and hypertrophy via ERs. We found that AngII caused the reduction in IGF-1R phosphorylation and the elevation of β-catenin and IGF-2R levels. This was reversed by increasing doses of TSN and of caspase-3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation mediated by ERs. The phytoestrogen significantly attenuated AngII-induced apoptosis and suppressed the subsequent cardiac remodeling effect. Therefore, TSN reduced the AngII-induced activation of β-catenin and IGF-2R pathways, apoptosis and cardiac remodeling via ERs in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

  16. p53 Stabilization Induces Cell Growth Inhibition and Affects IGF2 Pathway in Response to Radiotherapy in Adrenocortical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampaoli, Camilla; Cerquetti, Lidia; Gawhary, Randa El; Bucci, Barbara; Amendola, Donatella; Marchese, Rodolfo; Misiti, Silvia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Toscano, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare endocrine tumour, with variable prognosis, depending on tumour stage and time of diagnosis. However, it is generally fatal, with an overall survival of 5 years from detection. Radiotherapy usefulness for ACC treatment has been widely debated and seems to be dependent on molecular alterations, which in turn lead to increased radio-resistance. Many studies have shown that p53 loss is an important risk factor for malignant adrenocortical tumour onset and it has been reported that somatic mutations in TP53 gene occur in 27 to 70% of adult sporadic ACCs. In this study, we investigated the role of somatic mutations of the TP53 gene in response to ionizing radiation (IR). We studied the status of p53 in two adrenocortical cell lines, H295R and SW-13, harbouring non-functioning forms of this protein, owing to the lack of exons 8 and 9 and a point mutation in exon 6, respectively. Moreover, these cell lines show high levels of p-Akt and IGF2, especially H295R. We noticed that restoration of p53 activity led to inhibition of growth after transient transfection of cells with wild type p53. Evaluation of their response to IR in terms of cell proliferation and viability was determined by means of cell count and TUNEL assay.wtp53 over-expression also increased cell death by apoptosis following radiation in both cell lines. Moreover, RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis of some p53 target genes, such as BCL2, IGF2 and Akt demonstrated that p53 activation following IR led to a decrease in IGF2 expression. This was associated with a reduction in the active form of Akt. Taken together, these results highlight the role of p53 in response to radiation of ACC cell lines, suggesting its importance as a predictive factor for radiotherapy in malignant adrenocortical tumours cases. PMID:23028800

  17. Allele-specific histone lysine methylation marks regulatory regions at imprinted mouse genes

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Cécile; Goto, Yuji; Ballestar, Esteban; Delaval, Katia; Hever, Ann M.; Esteller, Manel; Feil, Robert

    2002-01-01

    In different eukaryotic model systems, chromatin and gene expression are modulated by post-translational modification of histone tails. In this in vivo study, histone methylation and acetylation are investigated along the imprinted mouse genes Snrpn, Igf2r and U2af1-rs1. These imprinted genes all have a CpG-rich regulatory element at which methylation is present on the maternal allele, and originates from the female germ line. At these ‘differentially methylated regions’ (DMRs), histone H3 on the paternal allele has lysine-4 methylation and is acetylated. On the maternally inherited allele, in contrast, chromatin is marked by hypermethylation on lysine-9 of H3. Allele-specific patterns of lysine-4 and lysine-9 methylation are also detected at other regions of the imprinted loci. For the DMR at the U2af1-rs1 gene, we establish that the methyl-CpG-binding-domain (MBD) proteins MeCP2, MBD1 and MBD3 are associated with the maternal allele. These data support the hypothesis that MBD protein-associated histone deacetylase/chromatin-remodelling complexes are recruited to the parental allele that has methylated DNA and H3-K9 methylation, and are prevented from binding to the opposite allele by H3 lysine-4 methylation. PMID:12456662

  18. Fluid shear promotes chondrosarcoma cell invasion by activating matrix metalloproteinase 12 via IGF-2 and VEGF signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Chen, S-H; Hung, W-C; Paul, C; Zhu, F; Guan, P-P; Huso, D L; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A; Konstantopoulos, K

    2015-08-27

    Interstitial fluid flow in and around the tumor tissue is a physiologically relevant mechanical signal that regulates intracellular signaling pathways throughout the tumor. Yet, the effects of interstitial flow and associated fluid shear stress on the tumor cell function have been largely overlooked. Using in vitro bioengineering models in conjunction with molecular cell biology tools, we found that fluid shear (2 dyn/cm(2)) markedly upregulates matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) expression and its activity in human chondrosarcoma cells. MMP-12 expression is induced in human chondrocytes during malignant transformation. However, the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 expression and its potential role in human chondrosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis have yet to be delineated. We discovered that fluid shear stress induces the synthesis of insulin growth factor-2 (IGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B and D, which in turn transactivate MMP-12 via PI3-K, p38 and JNK signaling pathways. IGF-2-, VEGF-B- or VEGF-D-stimulated chondrosarcoma cells display markedly higher migratory and invasive potentials in vitro, which are blocked by inhibiting MMP-12, PI3-K, p38 or JNK activity. Moreover, recombinant human MMP-12 or MMP-12 overexpression can potentiate chondrosarcoma cell invasion in vitro and the lung colonization in vivo. By reconstructing and delineating the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 activation, potential therapeutic strategies that interfere with chondrosarcoma cell invasion may be identified.

  19. Fluid shear promotes chondrosarcoma cell invasion by activating matrix metalloproteinase 12 via IGF-2 and VEGF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P; Chen, S-H; Hung, W-C; Paul, C; Zhu, F; Guan, P-P; Huso, DL; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A; Konstantopoulos, K

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow in and around the tumor tissue is a physiologically relevant mechanical signal that regulates intracellular signaling pathways throughout the tumor. Yet, the effects of interstitial flow and associated fluid shear stress on the tumor cell function have been largely overlooked. Using in vitro bioengineering models in conjunction with molecular cell biology tools, we found that fluid shear (2 dyn/cm2) markedly upregulates matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP-12) expression and its activity in human chondrosarcoma cells. MMP-12 expression is induced in human chondrocytes during malignant transformation. However, the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 expression and its potential role in human chondrosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis have yet to be delineated. We discovered that fluid shear stress induces the synthesis of insulin growth factor-2 (IGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) B and D, which in turn transactivate MMP-12 via PI3-K, p38 and JNK signaling pathways. IGF-2-, VEGF-B- or VEGF-D-stimulated chondrosarcoma cells display markedly higher migratory and invasive potentials in vitro, which are blocked by inhibiting MMP-12, PI3-K, p38 or JNK activity. Moreover, recombinant human MMP-12 or MMP-12 overexpression can potentiate chondrosarcoma cell invasion in vitro and the lung colonization in vivo. By reconstructing and delineating the signaling pathway regulating MMP-12 activation, potential therapeutic strategies that interfere with chondrosarcoma cell invasion may be identified. PMID:25435370

  20. Evolution and function of genomic imprinting in plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jessica A.; Zilberman, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, an inherently epigenetic phenomenon defined by parent of origin-dependent gene expression, is observed in mammals and flowering plants. Genome-scale surveys of imprinted expression and the underlying differential epigenetic marks have led to the discovery of hundreds of imprinted plant genes and confirmed DNA and histone methylation as key regulators of plant imprinting. However, the biological roles of the vast majority of imprinted plant genes are unknown, and the evolutionary forces shaping plant imprinting remain rather opaque. Here, we review the mechanisms of plant genomic imprinting and discuss theories of imprinting evolution and biological significance in light of recent findings. PMID:26680300

  1. MicroRNA-129-1 acts as tumour suppressor and induces cell cycle arrest of GBM cancer cells through targeting IGF2BP3 and MAPK1.

    PubMed

    Kouhkan, Fatemeh; Mobarra, Naser; Soufi-Zomorrod, Mina; Keramati, Farid; Hosseini Rad, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Fathi-Roudsari, Mehrnoosh; Tavakoli, Rezvan; Hajarizadeh, Athena; Ziaei, Said; Lahmi, Reyhaneh; Hanif, Hamed; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-129-1 (miR-129-1) seems to behave as a tumour suppressor since its decreased expression is associated with different tumours such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is the most common form of brain tumours originating from glial cells. The impact of miR-129-1 downregulation on GBM pathogenesis has yet to be elucidated. MiR-129-1 was overexpressed in GBM cells, and its effect on proliferation was investigated by cell cycle assay. MiR-129-1 predicted targets (CDK6, IGF1, HDAC2, IGF2BP3 and MAPK1) were also evaluated by western blot and luciferase assay. Restoration of miR-129-1 reduced cell proliferation and induced G1 accumulation, significantly. Several functional assays confirmed IGF2BP3, MAPK1 and CDK6 as targets of miR-129-1. Despite the fact that IGF1 expression can be suppressed by miR-129-1, through 3'-untranslated region complementary sequence, we could not find any association between IGF1 expression and GBM. MiR-129-1 expression inversely correlates with CDK6, IGF2BP3 and MAPK1 in primary clinical samples. This is the first study to propose miR129-1 as a negative regulator of IGF2BP3 and MAPK1 and also a cell cycle arrest inducer in GBM cells. Our data suggests miR-129-1 as a potential tumour suppressor and presents a rationale for the use of miR-129-1 as a novel strategy to improve treatment response in GBM. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Erasure of methylation imprint at the promoter and CTCF-binding site upstream of H19 in human testicular germ cell tumors of adolescents indicate their fetal germ cell origin.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Zhang, C; Okada, Y; Okamoto, K

    2006-06-01

    Genome-wide epigenetic modification plays a crucial role in regulating genome functions at critical stages of development. In particular, DNA methylation is known to be reprogrammed on a genome-wide level in germ cells and in preimplantation embryos, although it is relatively stable in somatic cells. In this reprogramming process, the genome becomes demethylated, and methylated de novo during later stages of development. Reprogramming of DNA methylation in male germ cells has not been fully investigated. Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) possess a pluripotential nature and display protean histology from germ cells to embryonal and somatic cell differentiation. These properties make TGCT a unique model for studying germ cell development and gametogenesis in respect of DNA reprogramming. In order to obtain an insight into the epigenetic dynamics of TGCTs, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of differential methylated regions (DMRs) on H19 and IGF2 in TGCTs compared with testicular malignant lymphomas. In the present study, we show that methylation imprint at the promoter and CTCF-binding site upstream of H19 was completely erased in both seiminomatous and non-seminomatous TGCTs, whereas differential methylation was observed in testicular lymphomas. The erasure of methylation imprint was also observed in TGCTs with malignant transformation. We found biallelic unmethylation at the promoter and the CTCF-binding site upstream of H19 is required, but not sufficient for the biallelic expression of H19 in TGCTs. These data suggest that factors other than methylation contribute to transcriptional regulation of imprinted genes in TGCTs. The present data have shown that TGCTs carry distinctive epigenetic profiles at the core-imprinting domain of H19/IGF2 from other neoplasms of somatic cell origin. The data also suggest that both seminomatous and non-seminomatous TGCTs carry methylation profiles similar to fetal germ cells, but not adult germ cells, indicating the origin

  3. Variant calling from RNA-seq data of the brain transcriptome of pigs and its application for allele-specific expression and imprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Oczkowicz, Maria; Szmatoła, Tomasz; Piórkowska, Katarzyna; Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna

    2018-01-30

    Identification of new polymorphic variants from RNA-seq data is difficult mainly because of the errors arising during bioinformatic analysis. Therefore, new experiments in this area are very profitable for improving new statistical methods. In our study of the porcine brain transcriptome, we have identified 10966 polymorphic variants, among which 7277 were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Further, we have calculated allelic ratios for the SNPs identified and estimated that 52% of genes in porcine brain are subjected to allele-specific expression (ASE), a phenomenon in which one allele is preferentially expressed. Our investigation presents the first estimates of ASE in porcine brain. In addition, we have used the results of RNA-seq for the identification of SNPs in putatively imprinted genes. Finally, we have used these SNPs for the verification of the imprinted status of the INPP5f variant 2, LRRTM1 and HM13 genes in pigs by Sanger sequencing. We observed that INPP5f variant 2 is paternally expressed, while HM13 and LRRTM1 are biallelically expressed in porcine brain. We have also confirmed maternal expression of the MEG3 gene in pigs. Our results present how RNA-seq data may be used for imprinting studies without sequencing of parental genomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SNP and haplotype analysis reveal IGF2 variants associated with growth traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Zhan, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xin-Yi; Wu, Sheng-Ru; Sun, Yu-Jia; Xue, Jing; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Jia, Yu-Tang; Chen, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a potent cell growth and differentiation factor and is implicated in mammals' growth and development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the mutations in the bovine IGF2 with growth traits in Chinese Qinchuan cattle. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected of the bovine IGF2 by DNA pool sequencing and forced polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (forced PCR-RFLP) methods. We also investigated haplotype structure and linkage disequilibrium (LD) coefficients for four SNPs in 817 individuals representing two main cattle breeds from China. The result of haplotype analysis showed eight different haplotypes and 27 combined genotypes within the study population. The statistical analyses indicated that the four SNPs, combined genotypes and haplotypes are associated with the withers height, body length, chest breadth, chest depth and body weight in Qinchuan cattle population (P < 0.05 or <0.01). The mutant-type variants and mutant haplotype (Hap 8: ATGG; likely to be the beneficial QTN allele) was superior for growth traits; the heterozygote diplotype was associated with higher growth traits compared to wild-type homozygote. Our results provide evidence that polymorphisms in the IGF2 gene are associated with growth traits, and may be used for marker-assisted selection in beef cattle breeding program.

  5. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K; Skaar, David; Nye, Monica; Vidal, Adriana C; Cecil, Kim M; Dietrich, Kim N; Puga, Alvaro; Jirtle, Randy L; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2016-05-01

    Lead exposure during early development causes neurodevelopmental disorders by unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic studies have focused recently on determining associations between lead exposure and global DNA methylation; however, such approaches preclude the identification of loci that may alter human disease risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal, postnatal, and early childhood lead exposure can alter the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that control the monoallelic expression of imprinted genes involved in metabolism, growth, and development. Questionnaire data and serial blood lead levels were obtained from 105 participants (64 females, 41 males) of the Cincinnati Lead Study from birth to 78 months. When participants were adults, we used Sequenom EpiTYPER assays to test peripheral blood DNA to quantify CpG methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at DMRs of 22 human imprinted genes. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear regression. Mean blood lead concentration from birth to 78 months was associated with a significant decrease in PEG3 DMR methylation (β = -0.0014; 95% CI: -0.0023, -0.0005, p = 0.002), stronger in males (β = -0.0024; 95% CI: -0.0038, -0.0009, p = 0.003) than in females (β = -0.0009; 95% CI: -0.0020, 0.0003, p = 0.1). Elevated mean childhood blood lead concentration was also associated with a significant decrease in IGF2/H19 (β = -0.0013; 95% CI: -0.0023, -0.0003, p = 0.01) DMR methylation, but primarily in females, (β = -0.0017; 95% CI: -0.0029, -0.0006, p = 0.005) rather than in males, (β = -0.0004; 95% CI: -0.0023, 0.0015, p = 0.7). Elevated blood lead concentration during the neonatal period was associated with higher PLAGL1/HYMAI DMR methylation regardless of sex (β = 0.0075; 95% CI: 0.0018, 0.0132, p = 0.01). The magnitude of associations between cumulative lead exposure and CpG methylation remained unaltered from 30 to 78 months. Our findings provide evidence that early childhood lead

  6. The PEG13-DMR and brain-specific enhancers dictate imprinted expression within the 8q24 intellectual disability risk locus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is the epigenetic marking of genes that results in parent-of-origin monoallelic expression. Most imprinted domains are associated with differentially DNA methylated regions (DMRs) that originate in the gametes, and are maintained in somatic tissues after fertilization. This allelic methylation profile is associated with a plethora of histone tail modifications that orchestrates higher order chromatin interactions. The mouse chromosome 15 imprinted cluster contains multiple brain-specific maternally expressed transcripts including Ago2, Chrac1, Trappc9 and Kcnk9 and a paternally expressed gene, Peg13. The promoter of Peg13 is methylated on the maternal allele and is the sole DMR within the locus. To determine the extent of imprinting within the human orthologous region on chromosome 8q24, a region associated with autosomal recessive intellectual disability, Birk-Barel mental retardation and dysmorphism syndrome, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of allelic expression and DNA methylation of genes mapping within an approximately 2 Mb region around TRAPPC9. Results Utilizing allele-specific RT-PCR, bisulphite sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation and chromosome conformation capture (3C) we show the reciprocal expression of the novel, paternally expressed, PEG13 non-coding RNA and maternally expressed KCNK9 genes in brain, and the biallelic expression of flanking transcripts in a range of tissues. We identify a tandem-repeat region overlapping the PEG13 transcript that is methylated on the maternal allele, which binds CTCF-cohesin in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and possesses enhancer-blocker activity. Using 3C, we identify mutually exclusive approximately 58 and 500 kb chromatin loops in adult frontal cortex between a novel brain-specific enhancer, marked by H3K4me1 and H3K27ac, with the KCNK9 and PEG13 promoters which we propose regulates brain-specific expression. Conclusions We have characterised the molecular

  7. The PEG13-DMR and brain-specific enhancers dictate imprinted expression within the 8q24 intellectual disability risk locus.

    PubMed

    Court, Franck; Camprubi, Cristina; Garcia, Cristina Vicente; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Sparago, Angela; Seruggia, Davide; Sandoval, Juan; Esteller, Manel; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Riccio, Andrea; Montoliu, Lluis; Monk, David

    2014-03-25

    Genomic imprinting is the epigenetic marking of genes that results in parent-of-origin monoallelic expression. Most imprinted domains are associated with differentially DNA methylated regions (DMRs) that originate in the gametes, and are maintained in somatic tissues after fertilization. This allelic methylation profile is associated with a plethora of histone tail modifications that orchestrates higher order chromatin interactions. The mouse chromosome 15 imprinted cluster contains multiple brain-specific maternally expressed transcripts including Ago2, Chrac1, Trappc9 and Kcnk9 and a paternally expressed gene, Peg13. The promoter of Peg13 is methylated on the maternal allele and is the sole DMR within the locus. To determine the extent of imprinting within the human orthologous region on chromosome 8q24, a region associated with autosomal recessive intellectual disability, Birk-Barel mental retardation and dysmorphism syndrome, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of allelic expression and DNA methylation of genes mapping within an approximately 2 Mb region around TRAPPC9. Utilizing allele-specific RT-PCR, bisulphite sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation and chromosome conformation capture (3C) we show the reciprocal expression of the novel, paternally expressed, PEG13 non-coding RNA and maternally expressed KCNK9 genes in brain, and the biallelic expression of flanking transcripts in a range of tissues. We identify a tandem-repeat region overlapping the PEG13 transcript that is methylated on the maternal allele, which binds CTCF-cohesin in chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and possesses enhancer-blocker activity. Using 3C, we identify mutually exclusive approximately 58 and 500 kb chromatin loops in adult frontal cortex between a novel brain-specific enhancer, marked by H3K4me1 and H3K27ac, with the KCNK9 and PEG13 promoters which we propose regulates brain-specific expression. We have characterised the molecular mechanism responsible for

  8. Novel polymorphisms within the Dlk1-Dio3 imprinted locus in rat: a putative genetic basis for strain-specific allelic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Laura J.; Redei, Eva E.

    2012-01-01

    The imprinted iodothyronine deiodinase-III (Dio3) thyroid hormone metabolizing gene exhibits paternal expression in most fetal tissues, yet exhibits aberrant, maternal expression in the hippocampus in F1 offspring of Sprague Dawley (SD) × Brown Norway (BN) rats. The maternal hippocampal expression is associated with lower Dio3 mRNA levels specifically in the hippocampus. Here, we tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms between the SD and BN parent strains cause this aberrant allelic Dio3 expression and contribute to behavioral sequelae of higher thyroid hormone levels locally in the hippocampus, including anxiety-related behavior. We mapped and sequenced the Dio3 gene and several previously unmapped regions in the Dlk1-Dio3 locus that could regulate imprinting of the Dio3 gene. In the Dio3 promoter we identified four novel polymorphisms between the BN and SD strains. Next we took advantage of the fact that the Long Evans (LE) strain exhibits identical polymorphisms as the SD strain in the region 5' and including the Dio3 gene. By reciprocally crossing LE and BN strains we tested the relationship among Dio3 promoter region polymorphisms and Dio3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus. Aberrant strain-specific hippocampal Dio3 allelic expression replicated in the LE-BN reciprocal crosses, suggesting that hippocampal-specific imprinting of the Dio3 gene is not the result of a unique genetic or epigenetic characteristic of the SD rat strain, or a unique epistatic interaction between SD and BN. To our knowledge no other studies have reported a genetic × epigenetic interaction of genetic origin in the brain. PMID:23248649

  9. Genomic matrix attachment region and chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays identify novel putative regulatory elements at the imprinted Dlk1/Gtl2 locus.

    PubMed

    Braem, Caroline; Recolin, Bénédicte; Rancourt, Rebecca C; Angiolini, Christopher; Barthès, Pauline; Branchu, Priscillia; Court, Franck; Cathala, Guy; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Forné, Thierry

    2008-07-04

    We previously showed that genomic imprinting regulates matrix attachment region activities at the mouse Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) locus and that these activities are functionally linked to neighboring differentially methylated regions (DMRs). Here, we investigate the similarly structured Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinted domain and show that in the mouse liver, the G/C-rich intergenic germ line-derived DMR, a sequence involved in domain-wide imprinting, is highly retained within the nuclear matrix fraction exclusively on the methylated paternal copy, reflecting its differential function on that chromosome. Therefore, not only "classical" A/T-rich matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences but also other important regulatory DNA elements (such as DMRs) can be recovered from genomic MAR assays following a high salt treatment. Interestingly, the recovery of one A/T-rich sequence (MAR4) from the "nuclear matrix" fraction is strongly correlated with gene expression. We show that this element possesses an intrinsic activity that favors transcription, and using chromosome conformation capture quantitative real time PCR assays, we demonstrate that the MAR4 interacts with the intergenic germ line-derived DMR specifically on the paternal allele but not with the Dlk1/Gtl2 promoters. Altogether, our findings shed a new light on gene regulation at this locus.

  10. Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Velotta, Jonathan P.; Wegrzyn, Jill L.; Ginzburg, Samuel; Kang, Lin; Czesny, Sergiusz J.; O'Neill, Rachel J.; McCormick, Stephen; Michalak, Pawel; Schultz, Eric T.

    2017-01-01

    Comparative approaches in physiological genomics offer an opportunity to understand the functional importance of genes involved in niche exploitation. We used populations of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to explore the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie adaptation to fresh water. Ancestrally anadromous Alewives have recently formed multiple, independently derived, landlocked populations, which exhibit reduced tolerance of saltwater and enhanced tolerance of fresh water. Using RNA-seq, we compared transcriptional responses of an anadromous Alewife population to two landlocked populations after acclimation to fresh (0 ppt) and saltwater (35 ppt). Our results suggest that the gill transcriptome has evolved in primarily discordant ways between independent landlocked populations and their anadromous ancestor. By contrast, evolved shifts in the transcription of a small suite of well-characterized osmoregulatory genes exhibited a strong degree of parallelism. In particular, transcription of genes that regulate gill ion exchange has diverged in accordance with functional predictions: freshwater ion-uptake genes (most notably, the ‘freshwater paralog’ of Na+/K+-ATPase α-subunit) were more highly expressed in landlocked forms, whereas genes that regulate saltwater ion secretion (e.g. the ‘saltwater paralog’ of NKAα) exhibited a blunted response to saltwater. Parallel divergence of ion transport gene expression is associated with shifts in salinity tolerance limits among landlocked forms, suggesting that changes to the gill's transcriptional response to salinity facilitate freshwater adaptation.

  11. Transcriptomic imprints of adaptation to fresh water: parallel evolution of osmoregulatory gene expression in the Alewife.

    PubMed

    Velotta, Jonathan P; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Ginzburg, Samuel; Kang, Lin; Czesny, Sergiusz; O'Neill, Rachel J; McCormick, Stephen D; Michalak, Pawel; Schultz, Eric T

    2017-02-01

    Comparative approaches in physiological genomics offer an opportunity to understand the functional importance of genes involved in niche exploitation. We used populations of Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) to explore the transcriptional mechanisms that underlie adaptation to fresh water. Ancestrally anadromous Alewives have recently formed multiple, independently derived, landlocked populations, which exhibit reduced tolerance of saltwater and enhanced tolerance of fresh water. Using RNA-seq, we compared transcriptional responses of an anadromous Alewife population to two landlocked populations after acclimation to fresh (0 ppt) and saltwater (35 ppt). Our results suggest that the gill transcriptome has evolved in primarily discordant ways between independent landlocked populations and their anadromous ancestor. By contrast, evolved shifts in the transcription of a small suite of well-characterized osmoregulatory genes exhibited a strong degree of parallelism. In particular, transcription of genes that regulate gill ion exchange has diverged in accordance with functional predictions: freshwater ion-uptake genes (most notably, the 'freshwater paralog' of Na + /K + -ATPase α-subunit) were more highly expressed in landlocked forms, whereas genes that regulate saltwater ion secretion (e.g. the 'saltwater paralog' of NKAα) exhibited a blunted response to saltwater. Parallel divergence of ion transport gene expression is associated with shifts in salinity tolerance limits among landlocked forms, suggesting that changes to the gill's transcriptional response to salinity facilitate freshwater adaptation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The impact of assisted reproductive technologies on genomic imprinting and imprinting disorders

    PubMed Central

    Uyar, Asli; Seli, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic imprinting refers to preferential allele-specific gene expression. DNA methylation-based molecular mechanisms regulate establishment and maintenance of parental imprints during early embryo development and gametogenesis. Because of the coincident timing, a potential association between assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures and imprinting defects has been investigated in various studies. In this review, we provide an overview of genomic imprinting and present a summary of the relevant clinical data. Recent findings ART procedures affect DNA methylation pattern, parental imprinting status, and imprinted gene expression in the mouse embryo. In humans, several case series suggested an association between ART and imprinting disorders, with a three-fold to six-fold higher prevalence of ART use among children born with Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome compared to the general population. However, more recent studies failed to support these findings and could not demonstrate an association between imprinting disorders and ARTs, independent of subfertility. Summary ART procedures may affect methylation status of imprinted regions in the DNA, leading to imprinting disorders. Although the low prevalence of imprinting disorders makes it challenging to perform conclusive clinical trials, further studies in large registries are required to determine the real impact of ARTs on their occurrence. PMID:24752003

  13. Loss of non-coding RNA expression from the DLK1-DIO3 imprinted locus correlates with reduced neural differentiation potential in human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chu-Fan; Wu, Fang-Chun; Tai, Kang-Yu; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chang, Kai-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Chen, Hsin-Fu; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2015-01-05

    Pluripotent stem cells are increasingly used to build therapeutic models, including the transplantation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including delta-like homolog 1 gene and the type III iodothyronine deiodinase gene (DLK1-DIO3) imprinted locus-derived maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), were found to be expressed during neural development. The deregulation of these lncRNAs is associated with various neurological diseases. The imprinted locus DLK1-DIO3 encodes abundant non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are regulated by differential methylation of the locus. We aim to study the correlation between the DLK1-DIO3-derived ncRNAs and the capacity of hESCs to differentiate into neural lineages. We classified hESC sublines into MEG3-ON and MEG3-OFF based on the expression levels of MEG3 and its downstream microRNAs as detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). A cDNA microarray was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of hESCs. To investigate the capacity of neural differentiation in MEG3-ON and MEG3-OFF hESCs, we performed neural lineage differentiation followed by neural lineage marker expression and neurite formation analyses via qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. MEG3-knockdown via small interfering RNA (siRNA) and small hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to investigate the potential causative effect of MEG3 in regulating neural lineage-related gene expression. DLK1-DIO3-derived ncRNAs were repressed in MEG3-OFF hESCs compared with those in the MEG3-ON hESCs. The transcriptome profile indicated that many genes related to nervous system development and neural-type tumors were differentially expressed in MEG3-OFF hESCs. Three independent MEG3-knockdown assays using different siRNA and shRNA constructs consistently resulted in downregulation of some neural lineage genes. Lower expression levels of stage-specific neural lineage markers and

  14. Maternal undernutrition in late gestation increases IGF2 signalling molecules and collagen deposition in the right ventricle of the fetal sheep heart.

    PubMed

    Darby, Jack R T; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2018-03-31

    Exposure of the fetus to a range of environmental stressors, including maternal undernutrition, is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adult life. This study aimed to determine the effect of maternal nutrient restriction in late gestation on the molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiac growth and development of the fetal heart. Maternal undernutrition resulted in a decrease in fetal glucose concentrations across late gestation, whilst fetal arterial PO 2 remained unchanged between the control and late gestation undernutrition (LGUN) groups. There was evidence of an up-regulation of IGF2/IGF2R signalling through the CAMKII pathway in the fetal right ventricle in the LGUN group, suggesting an increase in hypertrophic signalling. LGUN also resulted in an increased mRNA expression of COL1A, TIMP1 and TIMP3 in the right ventricle of the fetal heart. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between fetal glucose concentrations and COL1A expression. The presence of interstitial fibrosis in the heart of the LGUN group was confirmed through the quantification of picrosirius red stained sections of the right ventricle. We have therefore shown that maternal undernutrition in late gestation may drive the onset of myocardial remodelling in the fetal right ventricle and thus have negative implications for right ventricle function and cardiac health in later life. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Plasschaert, Robert N.; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes. PMID:24757003

  16. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-05-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes.

  17. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggestingmore » that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.« less

  18. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Here, lead exposure during early development causes neurodevelopmental disorders by unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic studies have focused recently on determining associations between lead exposure and global DNA methylation; however, such approaches preclude the identification of loci that may alter human disease risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal, postnatal, and early childhood lead exposure can alter the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that control the monoallelic expression of imprinted genes involved in metabolism, growth, and development. Questionnaire data and serial blood lead levels were obtained from 105 participants (64 females, 41 males) of the Cincinnati Lead Study frommore » birth to 78 months. When participants were adults, we used Sequenom EpiTYPER assays to test peripheral blood DNA to quantify CpG methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at DMRs of 22 human imprinted genes. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear regression. Mean blood lead concentration from birth to 78 months was associated with a significant decrease in PEG3 DMR methylation (β = –0.0014; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0005, p = 0.002), stronger in males (β = –0.0024; 95% CI: –0.0038, –0.0009, p = 0.003) than in females (β = –0.0009; 95% CI: –0.0020, 0.0003, p = 0.1). Elevated mean childhood blood lead concentration was also associated with a significant decrease in IGF2/H19 (β = –0.0013; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0003, p = 0.01) DMR methylation, but primarily in females, (β = –0.0017; 95% CI: –0.0029, –0.0006, p = 0.005) rather than in males, (β = –0.0004; 95% CI: –0.0023, 0.0015, p = 0.7). Elevated blood lead concentration during the neonatal period was associated with higher PLAGL1/HYMAI DMR methylation regardless of sex (β = 0.0075; 95% CI: 0.0018, 0.0132, p = 0.01). The magnitude of associations between cumulative lead exposure and CpG methylation remained unaltered from 30 to 78 months. Our

  19. Imprinted genes: important regulators in development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Feng, Xu; Gao, Lan; Jiao, Bao-wei

    2016-06-20

    The imprinted genes are characterized for their allele-specific expression, which present a unique phenomenon in the epigenetic and developmental studies. The field had dramatically progress in terms of establishment, maintainance and function of imprinted genes in organ development. The imprinting was primarily discovered in neuro-transplantation studies, and thereafter focused on a few well-known imprinted cluster. With increasing application of omics techniques, more imprinted genes were screened and identified, which drawn great attentions and discussions by scientists in the field. One of wonderful example is peculiars extrapolation and debate of evolutional conservation of imprinted genes based on the data analysis of the whole genome DNA methylome and histone modification. In this review, the current research of imprinted genes in mammals were summarized from the feature of the genes, the roles in development, the mechanism of regulation, the advances of research methods, the evolution of parental relationship and the interaction between imprinted genes and environmental factors. This review will be helpful for general understanding and research approach of imprinted genes.

  20. Post-natal imprinting: evidence from marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, J M; Pask, A J; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been identified in therian (eutherian and marsupial) mammals but not in prototherian (monotreme) mammals. Imprinting has an important role in optimising pre-natal nutrition and growth, and most imprinted genes are expressed and imprinted in the placenta and developing fetus. In marsupials, however, the placental attachment is short-lived, and most growth and development occurs post-natally, supported by a changing milk composition tailor-made for each stage of development. Therefore there is a much greater demand on marsupial females during post-natal lactation than during pre-natal placentation, so there may be greater selection for genomic imprinting in the mammary gland than in the short-lived placenta. Recent studies in the tammar wallaby confirm the presence of genomic imprinting in nutrient-regulatory genes in the adult mammary gland. This suggests that imprinting may influence infant post-natal growth via the mammary gland as it does pre-natally via the placenta. Similarly, an increasing number of imprinted genes have been implicated in regulating feeding and nurturing behaviour in both the adult and the developing neonate/offspring in mice. Together these studies provide evidence that genomic imprinting is critical for regulating growth and subsequently the survival of offspring not only pre-natally but also post-natally. PMID:24595366

  1. The role of imprinted genes in humans.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Miho; Moore, Gudrun E

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting, a process of epigenetic modification which allows the gene to be expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner, has an essential role in normal growth and development. Imprinting is found predominantly in placental mammals, and has potentially evolved as a mechanism to balance parental resource allocation to the offspring. Therefore, genetic and epigenetic disruptions which alter the specific dosage of imprinted genes can lead to various developmental abnormalities often associated with fetal growth and neurological behaviour. Over the past 20 years since the first imprinted gene was discovered, many different mechanisms have been implicated in this special regulatory mode of gene expression. This review includes a brief summary of the current understanding of the key molecular events taking place during imprint establishment and maintenance in early embryos, and their relationship to epigenetic disruptions seen in imprinting disorders. Genetic and epigenetic causes of eight recognised imprinting disorders including Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), and also their association with Assisted reproductive technology (ART) will be discussed. Finally, the role of imprinted genes in fetal growth will be explored by investigating their relationship to a common growth disorder, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and also their potential role in regulating normal growth variation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Prismo imprint.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the constructability and performance of Prismo Imprint synthetic overlays (manufacturer later changed to Ennis Paint, Inc.). Imprint is being evaluated as an alternative to brick pavers. This produc...

  3. Possible role of IGF2 receptors in regulating selection of 2 dominant follicles in cattle selected for twin ovulations and births

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abundance of IGF-2 receptor (IGF2R), FSH receptor (FSHR), and LH receptor (LHCGR) mRNA in granulosa cells (GCs) or theca cells (TCs) or both cells as well as estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione concentrations in follicular fluid were compared in cows genetically selected (Twinner)...

  4. Successful Computational Prediction of Novel Imprinted Genes from Epigenomic Features▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brideau, Chelsea M.; Eilertson, Kirsten E.; Hagarman, James A.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 100 mouse genes undergo genomic imprinting, whereby one of the two parental alleles is epigenetically silenced. Imprinted genes influence processes including development, X chromosome inactivation, obesity, schizophrenia, and diabetes, motivating the identification of all imprinted loci. Local sequence features have been used to predict candidate imprinted genes, but rigorous testing using reciprocal crosses validated only three, one of which resided in previously identified imprinting clusters. Here we show that specific epigenetic features in mouse cells correlate with imprinting status in mice, and we identify hundreds of additional genes predicted to be imprinted in the mouse. We used a multitiered approach to validate imprinted expression, including use of a custom single nucleotide polymorphism array and traditional molecular methods. Of 65 candidates subjected to molecular assays for allele-specific expression, we found 10 novel imprinted genes that were maternally expressed in the placenta. PMID:20421412

  5. Evolutionary theories of imprinting--enough already!

    PubMed

    Moore, Tom; Mills, Walter

    2008-01-01

    In our view, the conflict theory of imprinting explains the evolution of parental allele-specific gene expression patterns in the somatic tissues of mammals and angiosperms. Not surprisingly, given its importance in mammalian development and pathology, the evolution of imprinting continues to attract considerable interest from theoretical and experimental biologists. However, we contend that much of the ensuing debate is of poor quality. We discuss several problems with the manner in which workers in the field engage in this debate and we argue for a more formal approach to the discussion of theories of the evolution of imprinting.

  6. The evolution of imprinting: chromosomal mapping of orthologues of mammalian imprinted domains in monotreme and marsupial mammals.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Carol A; Rens, Willem; Clarke, Oliver; Mungall, Andrew J; Hore, Timothy; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Dunham, Ian; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2007-09-06

    The evolution of genomic imprinting, the parental-origin specific expression of genes, is the subject of much debate. There are several theories to account for how the mechanism evolved including the hypothesis that it was driven by the evolution of X-inactivation, or that it arose from an ancestrally imprinted chromosome. Here we demonstrate that mammalian orthologues of imprinted genes are dispersed amongst autosomes in both monotreme and marsupial karyotypes. These data, along with the similar distribution seen in birds, suggest that imprinted genes were not located on an ancestrally imprinted chromosome or associated with a sex chromosome. Our results suggest imprinting evolution was a stepwise, adaptive process, with each gene/cluster independently becoming imprinted as the need arose.

  7. GRB10 imprinting is eutherian mammal specific.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-12-01

    GRB10 is an imprinted gene differently expressed from two promoters in mouse and human. Mouse Grb10 is maternally expressed from the major promoter in most tissues and paternally expressed from the brain-specific promoter within specific regions of the fetal and adult central nervous system. Human GRB10 is biallelically expressed from the major promoter in most tissues except in the placental villus trophoblast where it is maternally expressed, whereas the brain-specific promoter is paternally expressed in the fetal brain. This study characterized the ortholog of GRB10 in a marsupial, the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) to investigate the origin and evolution of imprinting at this locus. The protein coding exons and predicted amino acid sequence of tammar GRB10 were highly conserved with eutherian GRB10. The putative first exon, which is located in the orthologous region to the eutherian major promoter, was found in the tammar, but no exon was found in the downstream region corresponding to the eutherian brain-specific promoter, suggesting that marsupials only have a single promoter. Tammar GRB10 was widely expressed in various tissues including the brain but was not imprinted in any of the tissues examined. Thus, it is likely that GRB10 imprinting evolved in eutherians after the eutherian-marsupial divergence approximately 160 million years ago, subsequent to the acquisition of a brain-specific promoter, which resides within the imprinting control region in eutherians.

  8. Prenatal unhealthy diet, insulin-like growth factor 2 gene (IGF2) methylation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in youth with early-onset conduct problems.

    PubMed

    Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Cecil, Charlotte A M; Walton, Esther; Mesirow, Maurissa S C; Relton, Caroline L; Gaunt, Tom R; McArdle, Wendy; Barker, Edward D

    2017-01-01

    Conduct problems (CP) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are often comorbid and have each been linked to 'unhealthy diet'. Early-life diet also associates with DNA methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 gene (IGF2), involved in fetal and neural development. We investigated the degree to which prenatal high-fat and -sugar diet might relate to ADHD symptoms via IGF2 DNA methylation for early-onset persistent (EOP) versus low CP youth. Participants were 164 youth with EOP (n = 83) versus low (n = 81) CP drawn from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. We assessed if the interrelationships between high-fat and -sugar diet (prenatal, postnatal), IGF2 methylation (birth and age 7, collected from blood), and ADHD symptoms (age 7-13) differed for EOP versus low CP youth. Prenatal 'unhealthy diet' was positively associated with IGF2 methylation at birth for both the EOP and low CP youth. For EOP only: (a) higher IGF2 methylation predicted ADHD symptoms; and (b) prenatal 'unhealthy diet' was associated with higher ADHD symptoms indirectly via higher IGF2 methylation. Preventing 'unhealthy diet' in pregnancy might reduce the risk of ADHD symptoms in EOP youth via lower offspring IGF2 methylation. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  9. Genomic imprinting effects on complex traits in domesticated animal species

    PubMed Central

    O’Doherty, Alan M.; MacHugh, David E.; Spillane, Charles; Magee, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoallelically expressed genes that exert their phenotypic effect in a parent-of-origin specific manner are considered to be subject to genomic imprinting, the most well understood form of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in mammals. The observed differences in allele specific gene expression for imprinted genes are not attributable to differences in DNA sequence information, but to specific chemical modifications of DNA and chromatin proteins. Since the discovery of genomic imprinting some three decades ago, over 100 imprinted mammalian genes have been identified and considerable advances have been made in uncovering the molecular mechanisms regulating imprinted gene expression. While most genomic imprinting studies have focused on mouse models and human biomedical disorders, recent work has highlighted the contributions of imprinted genes to complex trait variation in domestic livestock species. Consequently, greater understanding of genomic imprinting and its effect on agriculturally important traits is predicted to have major implications for the future of animal breeding and husbandry. In this review, we discuss genomic imprinting in mammals with particular emphasis on domestic livestock species and consider how this information can be used in animal breeding research and genetic improvement programs. PMID:25964798

  10. GWAS of DNA methylation variation within imprinting control regions suggests parent-of-origin association.

    PubMed

    Rentería, Miguel E; Coolen, Marcel W; Statham, Aaron L; Choi, R Seong Min; Qu, Wenjia; Campbell, Megan J; Smith, Sara; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Clark, Susan J; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E

    2013-08-01

    Imprinting control regions (ICRs) play a fundamental role in establishing and maintaining the non-random monoallelic expression of certain genes, via common regulatory elements such as non-coding RNAs and differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of DNA. We recently surveyed DNA methylation levels within four ICRs (H19-ICR, IGF2-DMR, KvDMR, and NESPAS-ICR) in whole-blood genomic DNA from 128 monozygotic (MZ) and 128 dizygotic (DZ) human twin pairs. Our analyses revealed high individual variation and intra-domain covariation in methylation levels across CpGs and emphasized the interaction between epigenetic variation and the underlying genetic sequence in a parent-of-origin fashion. Here, we extend our analysis to conduct two genome-wide screenings of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) underlying either intra-domain covariation or parent-of-origin-dependent association with methylation status at individual CpG sites located within ICRs. Although genome-wide significance was not surpassed due to sample size limitations, the most significantly associated SNPs found through multiple-trait genome-wide association (MQFAM) included the previously described rs10732516, which is located in the vicinity of the H19-ICR. Similarly, we identified an association between rs965808 and methylation status within the NESPAS-ICR. This SNP is positioned within an intronic region of the overlapping genes GNAS and GNAS-AS1, which are imprinted genes regulated by the NESPAS-ICR. Sixteen other SNPs located in regions apart from the analyzed regions displayed suggestive association with intra-domain methylation. Additionally, we identified 13 SNPs displaying parent-of-origin association with individual methylation sites through family-based association testing. In this exploratory study, we show the value and feasibility of using alternative GWAS approaches in the study of the interaction between epigenetic state and genetic sequence within imprinting regulatory domains. Despite the

  11. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K.; Skaar, David; Nye, Monica; Vidal, Adriana C.; Cecil, Kim M.; Dietrich, Kim N.; Puga, Alvaro; Jirtle, Randy L.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lead exposure during early development causes neurodevelopmental disorders by unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic studies have focused recently on determining associations between lead exposure and global DNA methylation; however, such approaches preclude the identification of loci that may alter human disease risk. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal, postnatal, and early childhood lead exposure can alter the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that control the monoallelic expression of imprinted genes involved in metabolism, growth, and development. Methods: Questionnaire data and serial blood lead levels were obtained from 105 participants (64 females, 41 males) of the Cincinnati Lead Study from birth to 78 months. When participants were adults, we used Sequenom EpiTYPER assays to test peripheral blood DNA to quantify CpG methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at DMRs of 22 human imprinted genes. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear regression. Results: Mean blood lead concentration from birth to 78 months was associated with a significant decrease in PEG3 DMR methylation (β = –0.0014; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0005, p = 0.002), stronger in males (β = –0.0024; 95% CI: –0.0038, –0.0009, p = 0.003) than in females (β = –0.0009; 95% CI: –0.0020, 0.0003, p = 0.1). Elevated mean childhood blood lead concentration was also associated with a significant decrease in IGF2/H19 (β = –0.0013; 95% CI: –0.0023, –0.0003, p = 0.01) DMR methylation, but primarily in females, (β = –0.0017; 95% CI: –0.0029, –0.0006, p = 0.005) rather than in males, (β = –0.0004; 95% CI: –0.0023, 0.0015, p = 0.7). Elevated blood lead concentration during the neonatal period was associated with higher PLAGL1/HYMAI DMR methylation regardless of sex (β = 0.0075; 95% CI: 0.0018, 0.0132, p = 0.01). The magnitude of associations between cumulative lead exposure and CpG methylation remained unaltered from

  12. Periconceptional Maternal Folic Acid Use of 400 µg per Day Is Related to Increased Methylation of the IGF2 Gene in the Very Young Child

    PubMed Central

    Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P.; Obermann-Borst, Sylvia A.; Kremer, Dennis; Lindemans, Jan; Siebel, Cissy; Steegers, Eric A.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Countries worldwide recommend women planning pregnancy to use daily 400 µg of synthetic folic acid in the periconceptional period to prevent birth defects in children. The underlying mechanisms of this preventive effect are not clear, however, epigenetic modulation of growth processes by folic acid is hypothesized. Here, we investigated whether periconceptional maternal folic acid use and markers of global DNA methylation potential (S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine blood levels) in mothers and children affect methylation of the insulin-like growth factor 2 gene differentially methylation region (IGF2 DMR) in the child. Moreover, we tested whether the methylation of the IGF2 DMR was independently associated with birth weight. Methodology/Principal Findings IGF2 DMR methylation in 120 children aged 17 months (SD 0.3) of whom 86 mothers had used and 34 had not used folic acid periconceptionally were studied. Methylation was measured of 5 CpG dinucleotides covering the DMR using a mass spectrometry-based method. Children of mother who used folic acid had a 4.5% higher methylation of the IGF2 DMR than children who were not exposed to folic acid (49.5% vs. 47.4%; p = 0.014). IGF2 DMR methylation of the children also was associated with the S-adenosylmethionine blood level of the mother but not of the child (+1.7% methylation per SD S-adenosylmethionine; p = 0.037). Finally, we observed an inverse independent association between IGF2 DMR methylation and birth weight (−1.7% methylation per SD birthweight; p = 0.034). Conclusions Periconceptional folic acid use is associated with epigenetic changes in IGF2 in the child that may affect intrauterine programming of growth and development with consequences for health and disease throughout life. These results indicate plasticity of IGF2 methylation by periconceptional folic acid use. PMID:19924280

  13. Fetal growth restriction and the programming of heart growth and cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 expression in the lamb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Zhang, Lei; McMillen, I Caroline; Botting, Kimberley J; Duffield, Jaime A; Zhang, Song; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2011-10-01

    Reduced growth in fetal life together with accelerated growth in childhood, results in a ~50% greater risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. It is unclear why changes in patterns of body and heart growth in early life can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factors in heart growth in the growth-restricted fetus and lamb. Hearts were collected from control and placentally restricted (PR) fetuses at 137-144 days gestation and from average (ABW) and low (LBW) birth weight lambs at 21 days of age. We quantified cardiac mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-2 and their receptors, IGF-1R and IGF-2R, using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression of IGF-1R and IGF-2R using Western blotting. Combined bisulphite restriction analysis was used to assess DNA methylation in the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the IGF-2/H19 locus and of the IGF-2R gene. In PR fetal sheep, IGF-2, IGF-1R and IGF-2R mRNA expression was increased in the heart compared to controls. LBW lambs had a greater left ventricle weight relative to body weight as well as increased IGF-2 and IGF-2R mRNA expression in the heart, when compared to ABW lambs. No changes in the percentage of methylation of the DMRs of IGF-2/H19 or IGF-2R were found between PR and LBW when compared to their respective controls. In conclusion, a programmed increased in cardiac gene expression of IGF-2 and IGF-2R may represent an adaptive response to reduced substrate supply (e.g. glucose and/or oxygen) in order to maintain heart growth and may be the underlying cause for increased ventricular hypertrophy and the associated susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to ischaemic damage later in life.

  14. Fetal growth restriction and the programming of heart growth and cardiac insulin-like growth factor 2 expression in the lamb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Zhang, Lei; McMillen, I Caroline; Botting, Kimberley J; Duffield, Jaime A; Zhang, Song; Suter, Catherine M; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Reduced growth in fetal life together with accelerated growth in childhood, results in a ∼50% greater risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. It is unclear why changes in patterns of body and heart growth in early life can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. We aimed to investigate the role of the insulin-like growth factors in heart growth in the growth-restricted fetus and lamb. Hearts were collected from control and placentally restricted (PR) fetuses at 137–144 days gestation and from average (ABW) and low (LBW) birth weight lambs at 21 days of age. We quantified cardiac mRNA expression of IGF-1, IGF-2 and their receptors, IGF-1R and IGF-2R, using real-time RT-PCR and protein expression of IGF-1R and IGF-2R using Western blotting. Combined bisulphite restriction analysis was used to assess DNA methylation in the differentially methylated region (DMR) of the IGF-2/H19 locus and of the IGF-2R gene. In PR fetal sheep, IGF-2, IGF-1R and IGF-2R mRNA expression was increased in the heart compared to controls. LBW lambs had a greater left ventricle weight relative to body weight as well as increased IGF-2 and IGF-2R mRNA expression in the heart, when compared to ABW lambs. No changes in the percentage of methylation of the DMRs of IGF-2/H19 or IGF-2R were found between PR and LBW when compared to their respective controls. In conclusion, a programmed increased in cardiac gene expression of IGF-2 and IGF-2R may represent an adaptive response to reduced substrate supply (e.g. glucose and/or oxygen) in order to maintain heart growth and may be the underlying cause for increased ventricular hypertrophy and the associated susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to ischaemic damage later in life. PMID:21807611

  15. Subcutaneous glucagon infusion and continuous glucose monitoring enable effective management of hypoglycemia in a patient with IGF-2-producing hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Buras, Eric D; Weatherup, Emily; Wyckoff, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Ectopic insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 production is a rare complication of an array of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors, and can clinically manifest as life-threatening hypoglycemia. A 49-year-old woman with 13-year history of metastatic hemangiopericytoma, previously treated with multiple rounds of chemotherapy and palliative radiation, presented to the emergency department after a hypoglycemic seizure. On arrival, glucose was 18 mg/dL (1.0 mmol/L) and required continuous dextrose infusion for maintenance within normal limits. Insulin was <2.0 μU/mL, C-peptide 0.1 ng/mL, and beta-hydroxybutyrate <0.2 mmol/L. Random cortisol was 21 μg/dL; sulfonylurea screen, and insulin antibodies were negative. IGF-2 level was 1320 ng/mL; IGF-1 was within normal limits and IGF binding protein (BP)-3 suppressed. Dexamethasone, started at 6 mg twice daily, allowed discontinuation of the glucose infusion. Given concern for nocturnal hypoglycemia, and patient interest in steroid-sparing anti-hypoglycemic regimen, she was also started on overnight continuous subcutaneous glucagon infusion via insulin pump. She was discharged with instructions to maintain a diet high in complex carbohydrates during the day, while utilizing glucagon pump at night. She was also started on continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) with an alarm to warn of hypoglycemia. Glucagon infusion rate was later titrated based on CGMS readings. Abdominal CT revealed increasing size of a right upper quadrant mass not previously subjected to radiotherapy. After radiation to this area, hypoglycemia improved, allowing further glucagon titration. In parallel, IGF-2 level declined to 380 ng/mL. Ectopic IGF-2 production is a rare but often fatal complication of many cancers, and should be considered on the differential diagnosis in patients with malignancy and unexplained hypoglycemia. Once hypoglycemia is diagnosed, patients often have end-stage disease. While treatment of the causative tumor is the only

  16. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor alters the growth characteristics and genomic imprinting of mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoon Hee; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar, E-mail: goops@konkuk.ac.kr; Oh, Shin Hye

    2010-03-10

    This study evaluated the essentiality of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for in vitro culture of established mouse multipotent adult germline stem (maGS) cell lines by culturing them in the presence of GDNF, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) or both. We show that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF slows the proliferation of maGS cells and result in smaller sized colonies without any change in distribution of cells to different cell-cycle stages, expression of pluripotency genes and in vitro differentiation potential. Furthermore, in the absence of LIF, GDNF increased the expression of male germ-line genes and repopulated the empty seminiferousmore » tubule of W/W{sup v} mutant mouse without the formation of teratoma. GDNF also altered the genomic imprinting of Igf2, Peg1, and H19 genes but had no effect on DNA methylation of Oct4, Nanog and Stra8 genes. However, these effects of GDNF were masked in the presence of LIF. GDNF also did not interfere with the multipotency of maGS cells if they are cultured in the presence of LIF. In conclusion, our results suggest that, in the absence of LIF, GDNF alters the growth characteristics of maGS cells and partially impart them some of the germline stem (GS) cell-like characteristics.« less

  17. Regulatory links between imprinted genes: evolutionary predictions and consequences.

    PubMed

    Patten, Manus M; Cowley, Michael; Oakey, Rebecca J; Feil, Robert

    2016-02-10

    Genomic imprinting is essential for development and growth and plays diverse roles in physiology and behaviour. Imprinted genes have traditionally been studied in isolation or in clusters with respect to cis-acting modes of gene regulation, both from a mechanistic and evolutionary point of view. Recent studies in mammals, however, reveal that imprinted genes are often co-regulated and are part of a gene network involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, a subset of imprinted genes acts in trans on the expression of other imprinted genes. Numerous studies have modulated levels of imprinted gene expression to explore phenotypic and gene regulatory consequences. Increasingly, the applied genome-wide approaches highlight how perturbation of one imprinted gene may affect other maternally or paternally expressed genes. Here, we discuss these novel findings and consider evolutionary theories that offer a rationale for such intricate interactions among imprinted genes. An evolutionary view of these trans-regulatory effects provides a novel interpretation of the logic of gene networks within species and has implications for the origin of reproductive isolation between species. © 2016 The Authors.

  18. Regulatory links between imprinted genes: evolutionary predictions and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Manus M.; Cowley, Michael; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Feil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is essential for development and growth and plays diverse roles in physiology and behaviour. Imprinted genes have traditionally been studied in isolation or in clusters with respect to cis-acting modes of gene regulation, both from a mechanistic and evolutionary point of view. Recent studies in mammals, however, reveal that imprinted genes are often co-regulated and are part of a gene network involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, a subset of imprinted genes acts in trans on the expression of other imprinted genes. Numerous studies have modulated levels of imprinted gene expression to explore phenotypic and gene regulatory consequences. Increasingly, the applied genome-wide approaches highlight how perturbation of one imprinted gene may affect other maternally or paternally expressed genes. Here, we discuss these novel findings and consider evolutionary theories that offer a rationale for such intricate interactions among imprinted genes. An evolutionary view of these trans-regulatory effects provides a novel interpretation of the logic of gene networks within species and has implications for the origin of reproductive isolation between species. PMID:26842569

  19. The role of imprinted genes in fetal growth abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics, and in particular imprinted genes, play a critical role in the development and function of the placenta, which in turn, plays a central role in the regulation of fetal growth and development. A unique characteristic of imprinted genes is their expression from only one allele, maternal or paternal, dependent on parent-of-origin. This unique expression pattern may have arisen as a mechanism to control the flow of nutrients from the mother to the fetus/offspring, with maternally expressed imprinted genes reducing the flow of resources and paternally expressed genes increasing resources to the fetus. As a result, any epigenetic deregulation affecting this balance can result in fetal growth abnormalities. In humans, imprinting- associated disorders such as Beckwith-Wiedemann and Angelman syndrome, support the role of imprinted genes in fetal growth. Similarly, assisted reproductive technologies in animals have been shown to affect the epigenome of the early embryo as well as expression of imprinted genes. Their role in disorders such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) appears to be more complex in that imprinted gene expression can be seen as both causative and protective of fetal growth restriction. This protective or compensatory effect needs to be more fully explored. PMID:21648055

  20. The epigenetic control of transposable elements and imprinted genes in newborns is affected by the mode of conception: ART versus spontaneous conception without underlying infertility.

    PubMed

    Choux, C; Binquet, C; Carmignac, V; Bruno, C; Chapusot, C; Barberet, J; Lamotte, M; Sagot, P; Bourc'his, D; Fauque, P

    2018-02-01

    Do assisted reproductive technologies alter DNA methylation and/or transcription of transposable elements and imprinted genes in cord blood and placenta? After ART, DNA methylation and/or transcription changes of some transposable elements and imprinted genes were found in placenta samples while transcription modifications for some transposable elements were also discovered in cord blood. Recent studies have confirmed the increased risk of placenta-related adverse pregnancy outcomes and the excess of imprinted disorders with abnormal methylation patterns after ART, which raises the issue of a potential ART-induced epigenetic risk. A total of 51 IVF/ICSI (15 conventional and 36 ICSI) singleton pregnancies were prospectively included from January 2013 to April 2015 and compared to 48 spontaneously conceived singleton pregnancies. The DNA methylation and transcription of three imprinted loci (H19/IGF2, KCNQ1OT1 and SNURF DMRs) and four transposon families (LINE-1, ERVFRD, AluYa5 and ERVW) in cord blood and placenta obtained at birth were assessed by pyrosequencing and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. All data were adjusted for gestational age at delivery, sex of the newborn, parity and maternal age. DNA methylation levels of H19/IGF2, KCNQ1OT1, LINE-1Hs and ERVFRD-1 were significantly lower in IVF/ICSI placentas than in control placentas, while there was no difference for cord blood. Moreover, the expression of ERVFRD-1 and LINE-1 ORF2 in cord blood and ERVFRD-1 in placenta was lower in the IVF/ICSI group than in controls. The expression of ERVFRD-1 in placenta correlated positively with birth weight and placenta weight, but only in the control group, thus pointing to the potential deregulation of syncytin function after ART. N/A. The control group of fertile couples having conceived within 1 year prevented us from deciphering the distinct roles of ART and infertility. These novel findings of ERVFRD (syncytin-2) expression correlating with birth weight and placenta

  1. Do social insects support Haig's kin theory for the evolution of genomic imprinting?

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, Mirko; Marshall, Hollie; Lonsdale, Zoë N.; Mallon, Eamonn B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although numerous imprinted genes have been described in several lineages, the phenomenon of genomic imprinting presents a peculiar evolutionary problem. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain gene imprinting, the most supported being Haig's kinship theory. This theory explains the observed pattern of imprinting and the resulting phenotypes as a competition for resources between related individuals, but despite its relevance it has not been independently tested. Haig's theory predicts that gene imprinting should be present in eusocial insects in many social scenarios. These lineages are therefore ideal for testing both the theory's predictions and the mechanism of gene imprinting. Here we review the behavioral evidence of genomic imprinting in eusocial insects, the evidence of a mechanism for genomic imprinting and finally we evaluate recent results showing parent of origin allele specific expression in honeybees in the light of Haig's theory. PMID:28703654

  2. Theory of genomic imprinting conflict in social insects

    PubMed Central

    Queller, David C

    2003-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting refers to the differential expression of genes inherited from the mother and father (matrigenes and patrigenes). The kinship theory of genomic imprinting treats parent-specific gene expression as products of within-genome conflict. Specifically, matrigenes and patrigenes will be in conflict over treatment of relatives to which they are differently related. Haplodiploid females have many such relatives, and social insects have many contexts in which they affect relatives, so haplodiploid social insects are prime candidates for tests of the kinship theory of imprinting. Results Matrigenic and patrigenic relatednesses are derived for individuals affected in a variety of contexts, including queen competition, sex ratio, worker laying of male eggs and policing, colony fission, and adoption of new queens. Numerous predictions emerge for what contexts should elicit imprinting, which individuals and tissues will show it, and the direction of imprinting effects. The predictions often vary for different genetic structures (varying queen and mate number) and often contrast with predictions for diploids. Conclusion Because the contexts differ from the normal imprinting case, and because nothing is currently known about imprinting in social insects, these predictions can serve as a strong a priori test of the kinship theory of imprinting. If the predictions are correct, then social insects, which have long served as exemplars of cooperation between individuals, will also be shown to be extraordinary examples of competition within individual genomes. PMID:12871603

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Bertero, Alice; Bifone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are promising carriers for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine applications. Molecu- lar imprinting is a potential strategy to target polymer nanoparticles through binding of endogenous ligands that may promote recognition and active transport into specific cells and tissues. However, the lock-and-key mechanism of molecular imprinting requires relatively rigid cross-linked structures, unlike those of many biodegradable polymers. To date, no fully biodegradable molecularly imprinted particles have been reported in the literature. This paper reports the synthesis of a novel molecularly- imprinted nanocarrier, based on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and acrylic acid, that combines biodegradability and molec- ular recognition properties. A novel three-arm biodegradable cross-linker was synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of glycolide and lactide initiated by glycerol. The resulting macromer was functionalized by introduction of end-functions through reaction with acryloyl chloride. Macromer and acrylic acid were used for the synthesis of narrowly-dispersed nanoparticles by radical polymerization in diluted conditions in the presence of biotin as template molecule. The binding capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles towards biotin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was twentyfold that of non-imprinted nanoparti- cles. Degradation rates and functional performances were assessed in in vitro tests and cell cultures, demonstrating effective biotin-mediated cell internalization.

  4. Genomic Imprinting in the Arabidopsis Embryo Is Partly Regulated by PRC2

    PubMed Central

    Raissig, Michael T.; Bemer, Marian; Baroux, Célia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene expression in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and is regulated by the differential epigenetic marking of the parental alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has been primarily described for genes expressed in the endosperm, a tissue nourishing the developing embryo that does not contribute to the next generation. In Arabidopsis, the genes MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1), which are imprinted in the endosperm, are also expressed in the embryo; whether their embryonic expression is regulated by imprinting or not, however, remains controversial. In contrast, the maternally expressed in embryo 1 (mee1) gene of maize is clearly imprinted in the embryo. We identified several imprinted candidate genes in an allele-specific transcriptome of hybrid Arabidopsis embryos and confirmed parent-of-origin-dependent, monoallelic expression for eleven maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and one paternally expressed gene (PEG) in the embryo, using allele-specific expression analyses and reporter gene assays. Genetic studies indicate that the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) but not the DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) is involved in regulating imprinted expression in the embryo. In the seedling, all embryonic MEGs and the PEG are expressed from both parents, suggesting that the imprint is erased during late embryogenesis or early vegetative development. Our finding that several genes are regulated by genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo clearly demonstrates that this epigenetic phenomenon is not a unique feature of the endosperm in both monocots and dicots. PMID:24339783

  5. Genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo is partly regulated by PRC2.

    PubMed

    Raissig, Michael T; Bemer, Marian; Baroux, Célia; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene expression in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and is regulated by the differential epigenetic marking of the parental alleles. In plants, genomic imprinting has been primarily described for genes expressed in the endosperm, a tissue nourishing the developing embryo that does not contribute to the next generation. In Arabidopsis, the genes MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1), which are imprinted in the endosperm, are also expressed in the embryo; whether their embryonic expression is regulated by imprinting or not, however, remains controversial. In contrast, the maternally expressed in embryo 1 (mee1) gene of maize is clearly imprinted in the embryo. We identified several imprinted candidate genes in an allele-specific transcriptome of hybrid Arabidopsis embryos and confirmed parent-of-origin-dependent, monoallelic expression for eleven maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and one paternally expressed gene (PEG) in the embryo, using allele-specific expression analyses and reporter gene assays. Genetic studies indicate that the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) but not the DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1) is involved in regulating imprinted expression in the embryo. In the seedling, all embryonic MEGs and the PEG are expressed from both parents, suggesting that the imprint is erased during late embryogenesis or early vegetative development. Our finding that several genes are regulated by genomic imprinting in the Arabidopsis embryo clearly demonstrates that this epigenetic phenomenon is not a unique feature of the endosperm in both monocots and dicots.

  6. X-linked imprinting: effects on brain and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Davies, William; Isles, Anthony R; Burgoyne, Paul S; Wilkinson, Lawrence S

    2006-01-01

    Imprinted genes are monoallelically expressed in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner and can affect brain and behavioural phenotypes. The X chromosome is enriched for genes affecting neurodevelopment and is donated asymmetrically to male and female progeny. Hence, X-linked imprinted genes could potentially influence sexually dimorphic neurobiology. Consequently, investigations into such loci may provide new insights into the biological basis of behavioural differences between the sexes and into why men and women show different vulnerabilities to certain mental disorders. In this review, we summarise recent advances in our knowledge of X-linked imprinted genes and the brain substrates that they may act upon. In addition, we suggest strategies for identifying novel X-linked imprinted genes and their downstream effects and discuss evolutionary theories regarding the origin and maintenance of X-linked imprinting. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genomic imprinting and the social brain

    PubMed Central

    Isles, Anthony R; Davies, William; Wilkinson, Lawrence S

    2006-01-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the parent-of-origin-specific epigenetic marking of a number of genes. This epigenetic mark leads to a bias in expression between maternally and paternally inherited imprinted genes, that in some cases results in monoallelic expression from one parental allele. Genomic imprinting is often thought to have evolved as a consequence of the intragenomic conflict between the parental alleles that occurs whenever there is an asymmetry of relatedness. The two main examples of asymmetry of relatedness are when there is partiality of parental investment in offspring (as is the case for placental mammals, where there is also the possibility of extended postnatal care by one parent), and in social groups where there is a sex-biased dispersal. From this evolutionary starting point, it is predicted that, at the behavioural level, imprinted genes will influence what can broadly be termed bonding and social behaviour. We examine the animal and human literature for examples of imprinted genes mediating these behaviours, and divide them into two general classes. Firstly, mother–offspring interactions (suckling, attachment and maternal behaviours) that are predicted to occur when partiality in parental investment in early postnatal offspring occurs; and secondly, adult social interactions, when there is an asymmetry of relatedness in social groups. Finally, we return to the evolutionary theory and examine whether there is a pattern of behavioural functions mediated by imprinted genes emerging from the limited data, and also whether any tangible predictions can be made with regards to the direction of action of genes of maternal or paternal origin. PMID:17118935

  8. Alcohol, one-carbon nutrient intake, and risk of colorectal cancer according to tumor methylation level of IGF2 differentially methylated region123456

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Reiko; Wang, Molin; Qian, Zhi Rong; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mai; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although a higher consumption of alcohol, which is a methyl-group antagonist, was previously associated with colorectal cancer risk, mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective: We hypothesized that excess alcohol consumption might increase risk of colorectal carcinoma with hypomethylation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) differentially methylated region-0 (DMR0), which was previously associated with a worse prognosis. Design: With the use of a molecular pathologic epidemiology database in 2 prospective cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we examined the association between alcohol intake and incident colorectal cancer according to the tumor methylation level of IGF2 DMR0. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression for competing risk data were used to compute HRs and 95% CIs. In addition, we investigated intakes of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, methionine, and folate as exposures. Results: During 3,206,985 person-years of follow-up, we identified 993 rectal and colon cancer cases with an available tumor DNA methylation status. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the consumption of ≥15 g alcohol/d was associated with elevated risk of colorectal cancer with lower levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation [within the first and second quartiles: HRs of 1.55 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.24) and 2.11 (95% CI: 1.44, 3.07), respectively]. By contrast, alcohol consumption was not associated with cancer with higher levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol and cancer risk differed significantly by IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity = 0.006). The association of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and folate intakes with cancer risk did not significantly differ according to IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity > 0.2). Conclusions: Higher alcohol consumption was associated with risk of colorectal cancer with IGF2 DMR0 hypomethylation but not risk of cancer with high

  9. Alcohol, one-carbon nutrient intake, and risk of colorectal cancer according to tumor methylation level of IGF2 differentially methylated region.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Reiko; Wang, Molin; Qian, Zhi Rong; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yamauchi, Mai; Mima, Kosuke; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Kim, Sun A; Inamura, Kentaro; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Giovannucci, Edward L; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Schernhammer, Eva S

    2014-12-01

    Although a higher consumption of alcohol, which is a methyl-group antagonist, was previously associated with colorectal cancer risk, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that excess alcohol consumption might increase risk of colorectal carcinoma with hypomethylation of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) differentially methylated region-0 (DMR0), which was previously associated with a worse prognosis. With the use of a molecular pathologic epidemiology database in 2 prospective cohort studies, the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we examined the association between alcohol intake and incident colorectal cancer according to the tumor methylation level of IGF2 DMR0. Duplication-method Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression for competing risk data were used to compute HRs and 95% CIs. In addition, we investigated intakes of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, methionine, and folate as exposures. During 3,206,985 person-years of follow-up, we identified 993 rectal and colon cancer cases with an available tumor DNA methylation status. Compared with no alcohol consumption, the consumption of ≥15 g alcohol/d was associated with elevated risk of colorectal cancer with lower levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation [within the first and second quartiles: HRs of 1.55 (95% CI: 1.08, 2.24) and 2.11 (95% CI: 1.44, 3.07), respectively]. By contrast, alcohol consumption was not associated with cancer with higher levels of IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol and cancer risk differed significantly by IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity = 0.006). The association of vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and folate intakes with cancer risk did not significantly differ according to IGF2 DMR0 methylation level (P-heterogeneity > 0.2). Higher alcohol consumption was associated with risk of colorectal cancer with IGF2 DMR0 hypomethylation but not risk of cancer with high-level IGF2 DMR0 methylation. The association between alcohol

  10. Maternal 5mCpG Imprints at the PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML Differentially Methylated Regions Are Decoupled From Parent-of-Origin Expression Effects in Multiple Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    de Sá Machado Araújo, Graziela; da Silva Francisco Junior, Ronaldo; Dos Santos Ferreira, Cristina; Mozer Rodrigues, Pedro Thyago; Terra Machado, Douglas; Louvain de Souza, Thais; Teixeira de Souza, Jozimara; Figueiredo Osorio da Silva, Cleiton; Alves da Silva, Antônio Francisco; Andrade, Claudia Caixeta Franco; da Silva, Alan Tardin; Ramos, Victor; Garcia, Ana Beatriz; Machado, Filipe Brum; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    A hallmark of imprinted genes in mammals is the occurrence of parent-of-origin-dependent asymmetry of DNA cytosine methylation (5 m C) of alleles at CpG islands (CGIs) in their promoter regions. This 5 m CpG asymmetry between the parental alleles creates allele-specific imprinted differentially methylated regions (iDMRs). iDMRs are often coupled to the transcriptional repression of the methylated allele and the activation of the unmethylated allele in a tissue-specific, developmental-stage-specific and/or isoform-specific fashion. iDMRs function as regulatory platforms, built through the recruitment of chemical modifications to histones to achieve differential, parent-of-origin-dependent chromatin segmentation states. Here, we used a comparative computational data mining approach to identify 125 novel constitutive candidate iDMRs that integrate the maximal number of allele-specific methylation region records overlapping CGIs in human methylomes. Twenty-nine candidate iDMRs display gametic 5 m CpG asymmetry, and another 96 are candidate secondary iDMRs. We established the maternal origin of the 5 m CpG imprints of one gametic ( PARD6G-AS1 ) and one secondary ( GCSAML ) iDMRs. We also found a constitutively hemimethylated, nonimprinted domain at the PWWP2AP1 promoter CGI with oocyte-derived methylation asymmetry. Given that the 5 m CpG level at the iDMRs is not a sufficient criterion to predict active or silent locus states and that iDMRs can regulate genes from a distance of more than 1 Mb, we used RNA-Seq experiments from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and public archives to assess the transcriptional expression profiles of SNPs across 4.6 Mb spans around the novel maternal iDMRs. We showed that PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML are expressed biallelically in multiple tissues. We found evidence of tissue-specific monoallelic expression of ZNF124 and OR2L13 , located 363 kb upstream and 419 kb downstream, respectively, of the GCSAML iDMR. We hypothesize that the GCSAML

  11. Maternal 5mCpG Imprints at the PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML Differentially Methylated Regions Are Decoupled From Parent-of-Origin Expression Effects in Multiple Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Machado Araújo, Graziela; da Silva Francisco Junior, Ronaldo; dos Santos Ferreira, Cristina; Mozer Rodrigues, Pedro Thyago; Terra Machado, Douglas; Louvain de Souza, Thais; Teixeira de Souza, Jozimara; Figueiredo Osorio da Silva, Cleiton; Alves da Silva, Antônio Francisco; Andrade, Claudia Caixeta Franco; da Silva, Alan Tardin; Ramos, Victor; Garcia, Ana Beatriz; Machado, Filipe Brum; Medina-Acosta, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    A hallmark of imprinted genes in mammals is the occurrence of parent-of-origin-dependent asymmetry of DNA cytosine methylation (5mC) of alleles at CpG islands (CGIs) in their promoter regions. This 5mCpG asymmetry between the parental alleles creates allele-specific imprinted differentially methylated regions (iDMRs). iDMRs are often coupled to the transcriptional repression of the methylated allele and the activation of the unmethylated allele in a tissue-specific, developmental-stage-specific and/or isoform-specific fashion. iDMRs function as regulatory platforms, built through the recruitment of chemical modifications to histones to achieve differential, parent-of-origin-dependent chromatin segmentation states. Here, we used a comparative computational data mining approach to identify 125 novel constitutive candidate iDMRs that integrate the maximal number of allele-specific methylation region records overlapping CGIs in human methylomes. Twenty-nine candidate iDMRs display gametic 5mCpG asymmetry, and another 96 are candidate secondary iDMRs. We established the maternal origin of the 5mCpG imprints of one gametic (PARD6G-AS1) and one secondary (GCSAML) iDMRs. We also found a constitutively hemimethylated, nonimprinted domain at the PWWP2AP1 promoter CGI with oocyte-derived methylation asymmetry. Given that the 5mCpG level at the iDMRs is not a sufficient criterion to predict active or silent locus states and that iDMRs can regulate genes from a distance of more than 1 Mb, we used RNA-Seq experiments from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and public archives to assess the transcriptional expression profiles of SNPs across 4.6 Mb spans around the novel maternal iDMRs. We showed that PARD6G-AS1 and GCSAML are expressed biallelically in multiple tissues. We found evidence of tissue-specific monoallelic expression of ZNF124 and OR2L13, located 363 kb upstream and 419 kb downstream, respectively, of the GCSAML iDMR. We hypothesize that the GCSAML iDMR regulates

  12. Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40–50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed. PMID:24958291

  13. Molecularly imprinted membranes.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Francesco; Biasizzo, Miriam; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2012-07-19

    Although the roots of molecularly imprinted polymers lie in the beginning of 1930s in the past century, they have had an exponential growth only 40-50 years later by the works of Wulff and especially by Mosbach. More recently, it was also proved that molecular imprinted membranes (i.e., polymer thin films) that show recognition properties at molecular level of the template molecule are used in their formation. Different procedures and potential application in separation processes and catalysis are reported. The influences of different parameters on the discrimination abilities are also discussed.

  14. Loss of genomic imprinting in Drosophila clones.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Andrew J; Lloyd, Vett K

    2006-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is a process that genetically distinguishes maternal and paternal genomes, and can result in parent-of-origin-dependent monoallelic expression of a gene that is dependent on the parent of origin. As such, an otherwise functional maternally inherited allele may be silenced so that the gene is expressed exclusively from the paternal allele, or vice versa. Once thought to be restricted to mammals, genomic imprinting has been documented in angiosperm plants (J.L. Kermicle. 1970. Genetics, 66: 69-85), zebrafish (C.C. Martin and R. McGowan. 1995. Genet. Res. 65: 21-28), insects, and C. elegans (C.J. Bean, C.E. Schaner, and W.G. Kelly. 2004. Nat. Genet. 36: 100-105.). In each case, it appears to rely on differential chromatin structure. Aberrant imprinting has been implicated in various human cancers and has been detected in a number of cloned mammals, potentially limiting the usefulness of somatic nuclear transfer. Here we show that genomic imprinting associated with a mini-X chromosome is lost in Drosophila melanogaster clones.

  15. Transcriptome-wide investigation of genomic imprinting in chicken.

    PubMed

    Frésard, Laure; Leroux, Sophie; Servin, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Dehais, Patrice; Cristobal, Magali San; Marsaud, Nathalie; Vignoles, Florence; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Coville, Jean-Luc; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Beaumont, Catherine; Zerjal, Tatiana; Vignal, Alain; Morisson, Mireille; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Pitel, Frédérique

    2014-04-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism by which alleles of some specific genes are expressed in a parent-of-origin manner. It has been observed in mammals and marsupials, but not in birds. Until now, only a few genes orthologous to mammalian imprinted ones have been analyzed in chicken and did not demonstrate any evidence of imprinting in this species. However, several published observations such as imprinted-like QTL in poultry or reciprocal effects keep the question open. Our main objective was thus to screen the entire chicken genome for parental-allele-specific differential expression on whole embryonic transcriptomes, using high-throughput sequencing. To identify the parental origin of each observed haplotype, two chicken experimental populations were used, as inbred and as genetically distant as possible. Two families were produced from two reciprocal crosses. Transcripts from 20 embryos were sequenced using NGS technology, producing ∼200 Gb of sequences. This allowed the detection of 79 potentially imprinted SNPs, through an analysis method that we validated by detecting imprinting from mouse data already published. However, out of 23 candidates tested by pyrosequencing, none could be confirmed. These results come together, without a priori, with previous statements and phylogenetic considerations assessing the absence of genomic imprinting in chicken.

  16. Genomic imprinting in farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiuchun Cindy

    2014-02-01

    The mouse is the first species in which genomic imprinting was studied. Imprinting research in farm species has lagged behind owing to a lack of sequencing and genetic background information, as well as long generation intervals and high costs in tissue collection. Since the creation of Dolly, the first cloned mammal from an adult sheep, studies on genomic imprinting in domestic species have accelerated because animals from cloning and other assisted reproductive technologies exhibit phenotypes of imprinting disruptions. Although this review focuses on new developments in farm animals, most of the imprinting mechanism information was derived from the mouse.

  17. [Evolution of genomic imprinting in mammals: what a zoo!].

    PubMed

    Proudhon, Charlotte; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2010-05-01

    Genomic imprinting imposes an obligate mode of biparental reproduction in mammals. This phenomenon results from the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. This specific gene regulation mechanism affects viviparous mammals, especially eutherians, but also marsupials to a lesser extent. Oviparous mammals, or monotremes, do not seem to demonstrate monoparental allele expression. This phylogenic confinement suggests that the evolution of the placenta imposed a selective pressure for the emergence of genomic imprinting. This physiological argument is now complemented by recent genomic evidence facilitated by the sequencing of the platypus genome, a rare modern day case of a monotreme. Analysis of the platypus genome in comparison to eutherian genomes shows a chronological and functional coincidence between the appearance of genomic imprinting and transposable element accumulation. The systematic comparative analyses of genomic sequences in different species is essential for the further understanding of genomic imprinting emergence and divergent evolution along mammalian speciation.

  18. A 1-Mb physical map and PAC contig of the imprinted domain in 11p15.5 that contains TAPA1 and the BWSCR1/WT2 region.

    PubMed

    Reid, L H; Davies, C; Cooper, P R; Crider-Miller, S J; Sait, S N; Nowak, N J; Evans, G; Stanbridge, E J; deJong, P; Shows, T B; Weissman, B E; Higgins, M J

    1997-08-01

    We have constructed a 1-Mb contig in human chromosomal band 11p15.5, a region implicated in the etiology of several embryonal tumors, including Wilms tumor, and in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Cosmid, P1, PAC, and BAC clones were characterized by NotI/SalI digestion and hybridized to a variety of probes to generate a detailed physical map that extends from D11S517 to L23MRP. Included in the map are the CARS, NAP2, p57/KIP2, KVLQT1, ASCL2, TH, INS, IGF2, H19, and L23MRP genes as well as end probes isolated from PACs. The TAPA1 gene, whose protein product can transmit an antiproliferative signal, was also localized in the contig. However, Northern blot analysis demonstrated that its expression did not correlate with tumorigenicity in G401 Wilms tumor hybrids, suggesting that TAPA1 is not responsible for the tumor suppression associated with 11p15.5. Genomic clones were used as probes in FISH analysis to map the breakpoints from three Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome patients and a rhabdoid tumor. Interestingly, each of the breakpoints disrupts the KVLQT1 gene, which is spread over a 400-kb region of the contig. Since 11p15.5 contains several genes with imprinted expression and one or more tumor suppressor genes, our contig and map provide a framework for characterizing this intriguing genetic environment.

  19. Analysis of the platypus genome suggests a transposon origin for mammalian imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Pask, Andrew J; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Ager, Eleanor I; McColl, Kaighin A; Speed, Terence P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that results in monoallelic gene expression. Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain why genomic imprinting evolved in mammals, but few have examined how it arose. The host defence hypothesis suggests that imprinting evolved from existing mechanisms within the cell that act to silence foreign DNA elements that insert into the genome. However, the changes to the mammalian genome that accompanied the evolution of imprinting have been hard to define due to the absence of large scale genomic resources between all extant classes. The recent release of the platypus genome has provided the first opportunity to perform comparisons between prototherian (monotreme; which appear to lack imprinting) and therian (marsupial and eutherian; which have imprinting) mammals. Results We compared the distribution of repeat elements known to attract epigenetic silencing across the entire genome from monotremes and therian mammals, particularly focusing on the orthologous imprinted regions. There is a significant accumulation of certain repeat elements within imprinted regions of therian mammals compared to the platypus. Conclusions Our analyses show that the platypus has significantly fewer repeats of certain classes in the regions of the genome that have become imprinted in therian mammals. The accumulation of repeats, especially long terminal repeats and DNA elements, in therian imprinted genes and gene clusters is coincident with, and may have been a potential driving force in, the development of mammalian genomic imprinting. These data provide strong support for the host defence hypothesis. PMID:19121219

  20. Analysis of the platypus genome suggests a transposon origin for mammalian imprinting.

    PubMed

    Pask, Andrew J; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Ager, Eleanor I; McColl, Kaighin A; Speed, Terence P; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon that results in monoallelic gene expression. Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain why genomic imprinting evolved in mammals, but few have examined how it arose. The host defence hypothesis suggests that imprinting evolved from existing mechanisms within the cell that act to silence foreign DNA elements that insert into the genome. However, the changes to the mammalian genome that accompanied the evolution of imprinting have been hard to define due to the absence of large scale genomic resources between all extant classes. The recent release of the platypus genome has provided the first opportunity to perform comparisons between prototherian (monotreme; which appear to lack imprinting) and therian (marsupial and eutherian; which have imprinting) mammals. We compared the distribution of repeat elements known to attract epigenetic silencing across the entire genome from monotremes and therian mammals, particularly focusing on the orthologous imprinted regions. There is a significant accumulation of certain repeat elements within imprinted regions of therian mammals compared to the platypus. Our analyses show that the platypus has significantly fewer repeats of certain classes in the regions of the genome that have become imprinted in therian mammals. The accumulation of repeats, especially long terminal repeats and DNA elements, in therian imprinted genes and gene clusters is coincident with, and may have been a potential driving force in, the development of mammalian genomic imprinting. These data provide strong support for the host defence hypothesis.

  1. Different mechanisms and recurrence risks of imprinting defects in Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, J; Buiting, K; Dittrich, B; Gross, S; Lich, C; Sperling, K; Horsthemke, B; Reis, A

    1997-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder that appears to be caused by the loss of function of an imprinted gene expressed from maternal chromosome 15 only. Approximately 6% of patients have a paternal imprint on the maternal chromosome. In the few cases, this is due to an inherited microdeletion, in the 15q11-q13 imprinting center (IC), that blocks the paternal-->maternal imprint switch in the maternal germ line. We have determined the segregation of 15q11-q13 haplotypes in nine families with AS and with an imprinting defect. One family, with two affected siblings, has a microdeletion affecting the IC transcript. In the other eight patients, no mutation was found at this locus. In two families, the patient and a healthy sibling share the same maternal alleles. In one of these families and in two others, grandparental DNA samples were available, and the chromosomes with the imprinting defect were found to be of grandmaternal origin. These findings suggest that germ-line mosaicism or de novo mutations account for a significant fraction of imprinting defects, among patients who have an as-yet-undetected mutation in a cis-acting element. Alternatively, these data may indicate that some imprinting defects are caused by a failure to maintain or to reestablish the maternal imprint in the maternal germ line or by a failure to replicate the imprint postzygotically. Depending on the underlying cause of the imprinting defect, different recurrence risks need to be considered. PMID:9245988

  2. Characterization of the imprinting signature of mouse embryo fibroblasts by RNA deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tran, Diana A; Bai, Angela Y; Singh, Purnima; Wu, Xiwei; Szabó, Piroska E

    2014-02-01

    Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) are convenient sources for biochemical studies when cell number in mouse embryos is limiting. To derive the imprinting signature of MEFs and potentially detect novel imprinted genes we performed strand- and allele-specific RNA deep sequencing. We used sequenom allelotyping in embryo and adult organs to verify parental allele-specific expression. Thirty-two known ubiquitously imprinted genes displayed correct parental allele-specific transcripts in MEFs. Our analysis did not reveal any novel imprinted genes, but detected extended parental allele-specific transcripts in several known imprinted domains: maternal allele-specific transcripts downstream of Grb10 and downstream of Meg3, Rtl1as and Rian in the Dlk1-Dio3 cluster, an imprinted domain implicated in development and pluripotency. We detected paternal allele-specific transcripts downstream of Nespas, Peg3, Peg12 and Snurf/Snrpn. These imprinted transcript extensions were not unique to MEFs, but were also present in other somatic cells. The 5' end points of the imprinted transcript extensions did not carry opposing chromatin marks or parental allele-specific DNA methylation, suggesting that their parental allele-specific transcription is under the control of the extended imprinted genes. Based on the imprinting signature of MEFs, these cells provide valid models for understanding the biochemical aspects of genomic imprinting.

  3. Characterization of the imprinting signature of mouse embryo fibroblasts by RNA deep sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Diana A.; Bai, Angela Y.; Singh, Purnima; Wu, Xiwei; Szabó, Piroska E.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) are convenient sources for biochemical studies when cell number in mouse embryos is limiting. To derive the imprinting signature of MEFs and potentially detect novel imprinted genes we performed strand- and allele-specific RNA deep sequencing. We used sequenom allelotyping in embryo and adult organs to verify parental allele-specific expression. Thirty-two known ubiquitously imprinted genes displayed correct parental allele-specific transcripts in MEFs. Our analysis did not reveal any novel imprinted genes, but detected extended parental allele-specific transcripts in several known imprinted domains: maternal allele-specific transcripts downstream of Grb10 and downstream of Meg3, Rtl1as and Rian in the Dlk1-Dio3 cluster, an imprinted domain implicated in development and pluripotency. We detected paternal allele-specific transcripts downstream of Nespas, Peg3, Peg12 and Snurf/Snrpn. These imprinted transcript extensions were not unique to MEFs, but were also present in other somatic cells. The 5′ end points of the imprinted transcript extensions did not carry opposing chromatin marks or parental allele-specific DNA methylation, suggesting that their parental allele-specific transcription is under the control of the extended imprinted genes. Based on the imprinting signature of MEFs, these cells provide valid models for understanding the biochemical aspects of genomic imprinting. PMID:24217910

  4. Mom Knows Best: Imprinted Control of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Cancelas, Jose A

    2016-02-04

    The mechanisms by which imprinted loci control activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are not known. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Qian et al. (2016) demonstrate that non-coding RNAs expressed by the maternal-imprinted locus Dlk1-Gtl2 maintain HSC self-renewal through the inhibition of PI3K-mTOR signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and metabolic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic imprinting in psoriasis and atopic dermatitis: A review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Catherine M; Liao, Wilson

    2015-11-01

    Genomic imprinting is a genetic process where only one allele of a particular gene is expressed in a parent-of-origin dependent manner. Epigenetic changes in the DNA, such as methylation or acetylation of histones, are primarily thought to be responsible for silencing of the imprinted allele. Recently, global CpG methylation changes have been identified in psoriatic skin in comparison to normal skin, particularly near genes known to be upregulated in psoriasis such as KYNU, OAS2, and SERPINB3. Furthermore, imprinting has been associated with multi-chromosomal human disease, including diabetes and multiple sclerosis. This paper is the first to review the clinical and genetic evidence that exists in the literature for the association between imprinting and general skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis and psoriatic disease. Atopy was found to have evidence of imprinting on chromosomes 6, 11, 14, and 13. The β subunit of the IgE receptor on chromosome 11q12-13 may be imprinted. Psoriatic disease may be related to imprinting effects on chromosome 6 for psoriasis and 16 for psoriatic arthritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests.

    PubMed

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-08-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal-offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal-offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted.

  7. The evolution of genomic imprinting: theories, predictions and empirical tests

    PubMed Central

    Patten, M M; Ross, L; Curley, J P; Queller, D C; Bonduriansky, R; Wolf, J B

    2014-01-01

    The epigenetic phenomenon of genomic imprinting has motivated the development of numerous theories for its evolutionary origins and genomic distribution. In this review, we examine the three theories that have best withstood theoretical and empirical scrutiny. These are: Haig and colleagues' kinship theory; Day and Bonduriansky's sexual antagonism theory; and Wolf and Hager's maternal–offspring coadaptation theory. These theories have fundamentally different perspectives on the adaptive significance of imprinting. The kinship theory views imprinting as a mechanism to change gene dosage, with imprinting evolving because of the differential effect that gene dosage has on the fitness of matrilineal and patrilineal relatives. The sexual antagonism and maternal–offspring coadaptation theories view genomic imprinting as a mechanism to modify the resemblance of an individual to its two parents, with imprinting evolving to increase the probability of expressing the fitter of the two alleles at a locus. In an effort to stimulate further empirical work on the topic, we carefully detail the logic and assumptions of all three theories, clarify the specific predictions of each and suggest tests to discriminate between these alternative theories for why particular genes are imprinted. PMID:24755983

  8. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jullien, Pauline E; Berger, Frédéric

    2010-03-19

    In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2) and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA) controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA) and PHERES1 (PHE1) controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  9. Human imprinting disorders: Principles, practice, problems and progress.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Deborah J G; Temple, I Karen

    2017-11-01

    Epigenetic regulation orchestrates gene expression with exquisite precision, over a huge dynamic range and across developmental space and time, permitting genomically-homogeneous humans to develop and adapt to their surroundings. Every generation, these epigenetic marks are re-set twice: in the germline, to enable differentiation of sperm and eggs, and at fertilisation, to create the totipotent zygote that then begins growth and differentiation into a new human. A small group of genes evades the second, zygotic wave of epigenetic reprogramming, and these genes retain an epigenetic 'imprint' of the parent from whom they were inherited. Imprinted genes are (as a general rule) expressed from one parental allele only. Some imprinted genes are critical regulators of growth and development, and thus disruption of their normal monoallelic expression causes congenital imprinting disorders, with clinical features impacting growth, development, behaviour and metabolism. Imprinting disorders as a group have characteristics that challenge diagnosis and management, including clinical and molecular heterogeneity, overlapping clinical features, somatic mosaicism, and multi-locus involvement. New insights into the biology and epigenomics of the early embryo offers new clues about the origin and importance of imprinting disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. An imprinted GFP insertion reveals long-range epigenetic regulation in embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meaghan J; Lefebvre, Louis

    2009-12-01

    Imprinted genes are often grouped in clusters at defined chromosomal locations. Long-range regulatory effects are implicated in the control of imprinting and these could be co-opted in the emergence of novel imprinted genes during evolution. We present a detailed analysis of a novel imprinted GFP mouse line. Tel7KI is a new insertion allele near the Ins2 locus within a cluster of imprinted genes on distal mouse Chr7. The GFP reporter becomes regulated by the host domain in two notable fashions. First, transcription of GFP is imprinted and active exclusively from the maternally inherited allele in the embryo. Second, the expressed maternal allele is subject to position effects reflecting a distinct pattern of expression. The GFP reporter acquires silencing DNA methylation marks on the paternal allele after fertilization. This imprinting is not acquired in the placenta, where GFP is active from both parental alleles, demonstrating key epigenetic differences between embryonic and extraembryonic lineages. Our analysis shows that imprinted clusters can provide environments conducive to the acquisition of imprinting upon novel inserted transcriptional units. The Tel7KI line offers new powerful avenues to explore both genetic and environmental factors implicated in the acquisition and maintenance of imprinted transcription in mammals.

  11. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions.more » Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.« less

  12. Genomic imprinting, methylation and parent-of-origin effects in reciprocal hybrid endosperm of castor bean

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Dai, Mengyuan; Li, Fei; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting often results in parent-of-origin specific differential expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles. In plants, the triploid endosperm is where gene imprinting occurs most often, but aside from studies on Arabidopsis, little is known about gene imprinting in dicotyledons. In this study, we inspected genomic imprinting in castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm, which persists throughout seed development. After mapping out the polymorphic SNP loci between accessions ZB306 and ZB107, we generated deep sequencing RNA profiles of F1 hybrid seeds derived from reciprocal crosses. Using polymorphic SNP sites to quantify allele-specific expression levels, we identified 209 genes in reciprocal endosperms with potential parent-of-origin specific expression, including 200 maternally expressed genes and 9 paternally expressed genes. In total, 57 of the imprinted genes were validated via reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction sequencing, and analysis of the genomic DNA methylation distribution between embryo and endosperm tissues showed significant hypomethylation in the endosperm and an enrichment of differentially methylated regions around the identified genes. Curiously, the expression of the imprinted genes was not tightly linked to DNA methylation. These results largely extended gene imprinting information existing in plants, providing potential directions for further research in gene imprinting. PMID:24799438

  13. dsPIG: a tool to predict imprinted genes from the deep sequencing of whole transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Su, Xiao; Gallegos, Juan; Lu, Yue; Ji, Yuan; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Liang, Shoudan

    2012-10-19

    Dysregulation of imprinted genes, which are expressed in a parent-of-origin-specific manner, plays an important role in various human diseases, such as cancer and behavioral disorder. To date, however, fewer than 100 imprinted genes have been identified in the human genome. The recent availability of high-throughput technology makes it possible to have large-scale prediction of imprinted genes. Here we propose a Bayesian model (dsPIG) to predict imprinted genes on the basis of allelic expression observed in mRNA-Seq data of independent human tissues. Our model (dsPIG) was capable of identifying imprinted genes with high sensitivity and specificity and a low false discovery rate when the number of sequenced tissue samples was fairly large, according to simulations. By applying dsPIG to the mRNA-Seq data, we predicted 94 imprinted genes in 20 cerebellum samples and 57 imprinted genes in 9 diverse tissue samples with expected low false discovery rates. We also assessed dsPIG using previously validated imprinted and non-imprinted genes. With simulations, we further analyzed how imbalanced allelic expression of non-imprinted genes or different minor allele frequencies affected the predictions of dsPIG. Interestingly, we found that, among biallelically expressed genes, at least 18 genes expressed significantly more transcripts from one allele than the other among different individuals and tissues. With the prevalence of the mRNA-Seq technology, dsPIG has become a useful tool for analysis of allelic expression and large-scale prediction of imprinted genes. For ease of use, we have set up a web service and also provided an R package for dsPIG at http://www.shoudanliang.com/dsPIG/.

  14. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Obesity due to Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Merlin G

    2011-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder due to errors in genomic imprinting with loss of imprinted genes that are paternally expressed from the chromosome 15q11-q13 region. Approximately 70% of individuals with PWS have a de novo deletion of the paternally derived 15q11-q13 region in which there are two subtypes (i.e., larger Type I or smaller Type II), maternal disomy 15 (both 15s from the mother) in about 25% of cases, and the remaining subjects have either defects in the imprinting center controlling the activity of imprinted genes or due to other chromosome 15 rearrangements. PWS is characterized by a particular facial appearance, infantile hypotonia, a poor suck and feeding difficulties, hypogonadism and hypogenitalism in both sexes, short stature and small hands and feet due to growth hormone deficiency, mild learning and behavioral problems (e.g., skin picking, temper tantrums) and hyperphagia leading to early childhood obesity. Obesity is a significant health problem, if uncontrolled. PWS is considered the most common known genetic cause of morbid obesity in children. The chromosome 15q11-q13 region contains approximately 100 genes and transcripts in which about 10 are imprinted and paternally expressed. This region can be divided into four groups: 1) a proximal non-imprinted region; 2) a PWS paternal-only expressed region containing protein-coding and non-coding genes; 3) an Angelman syndrome region containing maternally expressed genes and 4) a distal non-imprinted region. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic causes, the natural history and clinical presentation of individuals with PWS. PMID:22043168

  15. IGF2BP2 rs11705701 polymorphisms are associated with prediabetes in a Chinese population: A population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liyuan; Li, Yuanyuan; Tang, Linlin; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Sihan; Liu, Shengyuan; Peng, Xiaolin; Mai, Yifeng; Zhuo, Renjie; Wang, Changyi; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Associations between insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) rs11705701, insulin receptor substrate 1 rs7578326, gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor rs10423928 and transcription factor 7-like 2 rs12255372 gene polymorphisms with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have not been evaluated in the Han Chinese population. These four genetic variants were investigated for their associations with prediabetes and T2D among 490 unrelated patients with T2D, 471 patients with prediabetes and 575 healthy controls. Sequenom MassARRAY software was used to genotype the patients for these variants. The Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction method was used to analyze the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A breakdown analysis by gender revealed a significant association of IGF2BP2 rs11705701 with prediabetes under the dominant genetic model in females following application of the Bonferroni correction (odds ratio = 0.26; 95% confidence interval = 0.10–0.67; P=0.005). However, no significant associations were reported between any of the other three polymorphisms and T2D under any genetic models. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant gene-gene or gene-environment interactions when evaluated with the above association tests. The present case-control study reveals a significant association between IGF2BP2 rs11705701 and prediabetes in female patients. PMID:27588103

  16. Improving gene targeting efficiency on pig IGF2 mediated by ZFNs and CRISPR/Cas9 by using SSA reporter system.

    PubMed

    Jinqing, Wu; Gui, Mei; Zhiguo, Liu; Yaosheng, Chen; Peiqing, Cong; Zuyong, He

    2015-01-01

    IGF2 (Insulin-like growth factor 2) is a major growth factor affecting porcine fetal and postnatal development. We propose that the precise modification of IGF2 gene of Chinese indigenous pig breed--Lantang pig by genome editing technology could reduce its backfat thickness, and increase its lean meat content. Here, we tested the genome editing activities of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and CRISPR/Cas9 system on IGF2 gene in the Lantang porcine fetal fibroblasts (PEF). The results indicated that CRISPR/Cas9 presented cutting efficiency up to 9.2%, which was significantly higher than that generated by ZFNs with DNA cutting efficiency lower than 1%. However, even by using CRISPR/Cas9, the relatively lower percentage of genetically modified cells in the transfected population was not satisfied for somatic nuclear transfer (SCNT). Therefore, we used a SSA (Single-strand annealing) reporter system to enrich genetically modified cells induced by ZFN or CRISPR/Cas9. T7 endonuclease I assay revealed that this strategy improved genome editing activity of CRISPR/Cas9 by 5 folds, and was even more effective for improving genome editing efficiency of ZFN.

  17. Methods of epigenome editing for probing the function of genomic imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Rienecker, Kira DA; Hill, Matthew J; Isles, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    The curious patterns of imprinted gene expression draw interest from several scientific disciplines to the functional consequences of genomic imprinting. Methods of probing the function of imprinting itself have largely been indirect and correlational, relying heavily on conventional transgenics. Recently, the burgeoning field of epigenome editing has provided new tools and suggested strategies for asking causal questions with site specificity. This perspective article aims to outline how these new methods may be applied to questions of functional imprinting and, with this aim in mind, to suggest new dimensions for the expansion of these epigenome-editing tools. PMID:27625199

  18. Genomic imprinting and conflict-induced decanalization.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jon F

    2011-02-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon in which the expression pattern of an allele depends on its parental origin. When maternally expressed and paternally expressed imprinted loci affect the same trait, the result is an arms race, with each locus under selection to increase its level of expression. This article develops a model of the deleterious consequences of this escalation, deriving from an increase in the variance in gene expression level, and resulting increase in phenotypic variance in the population. This phenomenon is referred to here as "conflict-induced decanalization." Modifiers that canalize gene expression are selectively favored, but these induce further escalation from both loci, resulting in a net increase in phenotypic variance and a reduction in population mean fitness. This results in a feedback loop, where increasing canalization of gene expression leads to increasing decanalization of the phenotype. This phenomenon may explain the surprisingly high frequency of certain diseases. Disorders to which this decanalization process might contribute include growth- and metabolism-related phenomena such as preterm birth, as well as certain major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  20. Genomic imprinting, action, and interaction of maternal and fetal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Keverne, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian viviparity (intrauterine development of the fetus) introduced a new dimension to brain development, with the fetal hypothalamus and fetal placenta developing at a time when the fetal placenta engages hypothalamic structures of the maternal generation. Such transgenerational interactions provide a basis for ensuring optimal maternalism in the next generation. This success has depended on genomic imprinting and a biased role of the matriline. Maternal methylation imprints determine parent of origin expression of genes fundamental to both placental and hypothalamic development. The matriline takes a further leading role for transgenerational reprogramming of these imprints. Developmental errors are minimized by the tight control that imprinted genes have on regulation of downstream evolutionary expanded gene families important for placental and hypothalamic development. Imprinted genes themselves have undergone purifying selection, providing a framework of stability for in utero development with most growth variance occurring postnatally. Mothers, not fathers, take the lead in the endocrinological and behavior adaptations that nurture, feed, and protect the infant. In utero coadaptive development of the placenta and hypothalamus has thus required a concomitant development to ensure male masculinization. Only placental male mammals evolved the sex determining SRY, which activates Sox9 for testes formation. SRY is a hybrid gene of Dgcr8 expressed in the developing placenta and Sox3 expressed in hypothalamic development. This hybridization of genes that take their origin from the placenta and hypothalamus has enabled critical in utero timing for the development of fetal Leydig cells, and hence testosterone production for hypothalamic masculinization. PMID:25404322

  1. Programmable imprint lithography template

    DOEpatents

    Cardinale, Gregory F [Oakland, CA; Talin, Albert A [Livermore, CA

    2006-10-31

    A template for imprint lithography (IL) that reduces significantly template production costs by allowing the same template to be re-used for several technology generations. The template is composed of an array of spaced-apart moveable and individually addressable rods or plungers. Thus, the template can be configured to provide a desired pattern by programming the array of plungers such that certain of the plungers are in an "up" or actuated configuration. This arrangement of "up" and "down" plungers forms a pattern composed of protruding and recessed features which can then be impressed onto a polymer film coated substrate by applying a pressure to the template impressing the programmed configuration into the polymer film. The pattern impressed into the polymer film will be reproduced on the substrate by subsequent processing.

  2. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  3. Novel retrotransposed imprinted locus identified at human 6p25

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Skaar, David A.; Li, Yue; Huang, Dale; Price, Thomas M.; Murphy, Susan K.; Jirtle, Randy L.

    2011-01-01

    Differentially methylated regions (DMRs) are stable epigenetic features within or in proximity to imprinted genes. We used this feature to identify candidate human imprinted loci by quantitative DNA methylation analysis. We discovered a unique DMR at the 5′-end of FAM50B at 6p25.2. We determined that sense transcripts originating from the FAM50B locus are expressed from the paternal allele in all human tissues investigated except for ovary, in which expression is biallelic. Furthermore, an antisense transcript, FAM50B-AS, was identified to be monoallelically expressed from the paternal allele in a variety of tissues. Comparative phylogenetic analysis showed that FAM50B orthologs are absent in chicken and platypus, but are present and biallelically expressed in opossum and mouse. These findings indicate that FAM50B originated in Therians after divergence from Prototherians via retrotransposition of a gene on the X chromosome. Moreover, our data are consistent with acquisition of imprinting during Eutherian evolution after divergence of Glires from the Euarchonta mammals. FAM50B expression is deregulated in testicular germ cell tumors, and loss of imprinting occurs frequently in testicular seminomas, suggesting an important role for FAM50B in spermatogenesis and tumorigenesis. These results also underscore the importance of accounting for parental origin in understanding the mechanism of 6p25-related diseases. PMID:21421564

  4. Xist imprinting is promoted by the hemizygous (unpaired) state in the male germ line.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sha; Payer, Bernhard; Namekawa, Satoshi; An, Jee Young; Press, William; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Sunwoo, Hongjae; Lee, Jeannie T

    2015-11-24

    The long noncoding X-inactivation-specific transcript (Xist gene) is responsible for mammalian X-chromosome dosage compensation between the sexes, the process by which one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in the female soma. Xist is essential for both the random and imprinted forms of X-chromosome inactivation. In the imprinted form, Xist is paternally marked to be expressed in female embryos. To investigate the mechanism of Xist imprinting, we introduce Xist transgenes (Tg) into the male germ line. Although ectopic high-level Xist expression on autosomes can be compatible with viability, transgenic animals demonstrate reduced fitness, subfertility, defective meiotic pairing, and other germ-cell abnormalities. In the progeny, paternal-specific expression is recapitulated by the 200-kb Xist Tg. However, Xist imprinting occurs efficiently only when it is in an unpaired or unpartnered state during male meiosis. When transmitted from a hemizygous father (+/Tg), the Xist Tg demonstrates paternal-specific expression in the early embryo. When transmitted by a homozygous father (Tg/Tg), the Tg fails to show imprinted expression. Thus, Xist imprinting is directed by sequences within a 200-kb X-linked region, and the hemizygous (unpaired) state of the Xist region promotes its imprinting in the male germ line.

  5. Genetic imprinting during impaired spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sonja; Bergmann, Martin; Bohle, Rainer M; Weidner, Wolfgang; Steger, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    Disorders in genetic imprinting are discussed as potential genetic risk in assisted reproduction technology (ART), where most of the natural selection mechanisms are bypassed. As currently only limited information about genomic imprinting in disruptive spermatogenesis is available, we analysed the imprinting state of the paternally methylated gene H19 in various germ cell populations derived from seminiferous tubules exhibiting impaired spermatogenesis. Different germ cell types were isolated by laser microdissection from human testicular paraffin sections. Although the methylation state of the maternally imprinted gene SNRPN was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (M-PCR) to establish the isolation method, methylation of H19 was analysed by a single-strand conformation-based method. Contamination by somatic Sertoli cells was excluded because of Sertoli cell-specific vimentin immunohistochemistry before germ cell laser microdissection. We demonstrate correct genetic imprints for H19 even in spermatogonia selected from seminiferous tubules exhibiting spermatogenic arrest at the level of spermatogonia, providing no evidence for incorrect genomic imprinting in spermatozoa from infertile men used for ICSI.

  6. Synthesis of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Ahluwalia, Arti; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Shih, Neng-Lang; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles incorporating magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated for their selective adsorption properties. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of magnetic cytosine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (CIPs) for gene delivery. In particular, CIPs carrying the mammalian expression plasmid of enhanced green fluorescent protein were prepared by the co-precipitation of MNPs, chitosan and a template nucleobase (cytosine). The results show that the selective reabsorption of cytosine to magnetic CIPs was at least double that of non-imprinted polymers and other nucleobases (such as adenine and thymine). The gene carrier CIPs were used for the transfection of human embryonic kidney 293 cells showing dramatic increase their efficiency with that of conventional chitosan nanoparticles. Furthermore, the gene carrier magnetic CIPs also exhibit low toxicity compared to that of commercially available cationic lipids.

  7. Mapping the mouse Allelome reveals tissue-specific regulation of allelic expression

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, Daniel; Dotter, Christoph P; Wenzel, Daniel; Sigl, Verena; Bammer, Philipp C; Muckenhuber, Markus; Mayer, Daniela; Kulinski, Tomasz M; Theussl, Hans-Christian; Penninger, Josef M; Bock, Christoph; Barlow, Denise P; Pauler, Florian M; Hudson, Quanah J

    2017-01-01

    To determine the dynamics of allelic-specific expression during mouse development, we analyzed RNA-seq data from 23 F1 tissues from different developmental stages, including 19 female tissues allowing X chromosome inactivation (XCI) escapers to also be detected. We demonstrate that allelic expression arising from genetic or epigenetic differences is highly tissue-specific. We find that tissue-specific strain-biased gene expression may be regulated by tissue-specific enhancers or by post-transcriptional differences in stability between the alleles. We also find that escape from X-inactivation is tissue-specific, with leg muscle showing an unexpectedly high rate of XCI escapers. By surveying a range of tissues during development, and performing extensive validation, we are able to provide a high confidence list of mouse imprinted genes including 18 novel genes. This shows that cluster size varies dynamically during development and can be substantially larger than previously thought, with the Igf2r cluster extending over 10 Mb in placenta. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25125.001 PMID:28806168

  8. Endosperm imprinting: a child custody battle?

    PubMed

    Becraft, Philip W

    2012-02-07

    Endosperm gene imprinting has long been speculated to control nutrient allocation to seeds. For the first time, an imprinted gene directly involved in this process has been identified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression and DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN in Prader-Willi patients

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, C.C.; Jong, M.T.C.; Driscoll, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The human SNRPN gene is one of a gene family that encode proteins involved in pre-mRNA splicing and maps to the Prader-Willi syndrome critical region in 15q11-q13. We have previously demonstrated functional imprinting of SNRPN, with absent expression in PWS skin fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. We now show a similar lack of expression in blood of PWS patients, which appear to correlate with DNA methylation of NotI sites in the 5{prime} region of the gene. RNA and DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) deletion patients to be used for RT-PCR with SNRPN gene-specificmore » primers and DNA methylation analysis. Either no or highly reduced levels of SNRPN RT-PCR product were detected in nine PWS samples but was present in normals, AS patients, and one clinically typical PWS patient. Parent-of-origin DNA methylation imprints are also present within the SNRPN gene. PWS patients having only a maternal contribution of SNRPN have several NotI restriction sites near the transcription start site which are methylated, while these same sites are unmethylated on the paternal chromosome (i.e., AS samples). Several CpG sites approximately 22 kb downstream of the transcription start site are methylated preferentially on the paternal allele. These observations for human SNRPN are similar to those of the mouse imprinted gene Igf2r, which exhibits DNA methylation of a CpG island 27 kb from the transcription start site on the expressed allele, and DNA methylation in the promoter region of the repressed allele. We suggest that RT-PCR and/or DNA methylation analysis from blood of PWS patients may be the most accurate means of diagnosing classical PWS. These results further indicate a role for SNRPN in the pathogenesis of PWS, and may serve as a model to study other human imprinted genes.« less

  10. High Gestational Folic Acid Supplementation Alters Expression of Imprinted and Candidate Autism Susceptibility Genes in a sex-Specific Manner in Mouse Offspring.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Kuizon, Salomon; Brown, W Ted; Junaid, Mohammed A

    2016-02-01

    Maternal nutrients play critical roles in modulating epigenetic events and exert long-term influences on the progeny's health. Folic acid (FA) supplementation during pregnancy has decreased the incidence of neural tube defects in newborns, but the influence of high doses of maternal FA supplementation on infants' brain development is unclear. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of a high dose of gestational FA on the expression of genes in the cerebral hemispheres (CHs) of 1-day-old pups. One week prior to mating and throughout the entire period of gestation, female C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet, containing FA at either 2 mg/kg (control diet (CD)) or 20 mg/kg (high maternal folic acid (HMFA)). At postnatal day 1, pups from different dams were sacrificed and CH tissues were collected. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed sex-specific alterations in the expression of several genes that modulate various cellular functions (P < 0.05) in pups from the HMFA group. Genomic DNA methylation analysis showed no difference in the level of overall methylation in pups from the HMFA group. These findings demonstrate that HMFA supplementation alters offsprings' CH gene expression in a sex-specific manner. These changes may influence infants' brain development.

  11. Dormancy-specific imprinting underlies maternal inheritance of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Piskurewicz, Urszula; Iwasaki, Mayumi; Susaki, Daichi; Megies, Christian; Kinoshita, Tetsu; Lopez-Molina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Mature seed dormancy is a vital plant trait that prevents germination out of season. In Arabidopsis, the trait can be maternally regulated but the underlying mechanisms sustaining this regulation, its general occurrence and its biological significance among accessions are poorly understood. Upon seed imbibition, the endosperm is essential to repress the germination of dormant seeds. Investigation of genomic imprinting in the mature seed endosperm led us to identify a novel set of imprinted genes that are expressed upon seed imbibition. Remarkably, programs of imprinted gene expression are adapted according to the dormancy status of the seed. We provide direct evidence that imprinted genes play a role in regulating germination processes and that preferential maternal allelic expression can implement maternal inheritance of seed dormancy levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19573.001 PMID:28005006

  12. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. The imprinting marks are protected from global demethylation taking place during pre-implantation development before being reset in primordial germ cells. However, it...

  13. Kin Recognition in Aleochara bilineata Could Support the Kinship Theory of Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Lizé, Anne; Cortesero, Anne Marie; Atlan, Anne; Poinsot, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Genomic imprinting corresponds to the differential expression of a gene according to its paternal or maternal origin. The kinship theory of genomic imprinting proposes that maternally or paternally inherited genes may be in conflict over their effects on kin differently related along the paternal or maternal line. Most examples supporting the kinship theory of imprinting deal with competition between offspring for maternal resources. However, genomic imprinting may also explain differential behavioral expression toward kin whenever sibs are more related to each other via one parental sex than the other. Unfortunately, nothing is currently known about imprinting associated with a behavioral phenotype in insects. Here we report the first evidence of such a maternally imprinted behavior. We show that the solitary parasitoid larvae of Aleochara bilineata Gyll (Coleoptera; Staphylinidae), which avoid superparasitizing their full sibs, also avoid their cousins when they are related to them through their father, but not when they are related to them through their mother. A genetic kin recognition mechanism is proposed to explain this result and we conclude that genomic imprinting could control the avoidance of kin superparasitism in this species and have a profound influence on decision-making processes. PMID:17237504

  14. Imprinted genes and the environment: links to the toxic metals arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury.

    PubMed

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E; Nye, Monica D; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K; Fry, Rebecca C

    2014-06-11

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology.

  15. Imprinted Genes and the Environment: Links to the Toxic Metals Arsenic, Cadmium and Lead

    PubMed Central

    Smeester, Lisa; Yosim, Andrew E.; Nye, Monica D.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Murphy, Susan K.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes defy rules of Mendelian genetics with their expression tied to the parent from whom each allele was inherited. They are known to play a role in various diseases/disorders including fetal growth disruption, lower birth weight, obesity, and cancer. There is increasing interest in understanding their influence on environmentally-induced disease. The environment can be thought of broadly as including chemicals present in air, water and soil, as well as food. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), some of the highest ranking environmental chemicals of concern include metals/metalloids such as arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The complex relationships between toxic metal exposure, imprinted gene regulation/expression and health outcomes are understudied. Herein we examine trends in imprinted gene biology, including an assessment of the imprinted genes and their known functional roles in the cell, particularly as they relate to toxic metals exposure and disease. The data highlight that many of the imprinted genes have known associations to developmental diseases and are enriched for their role in the TP53 and AhR pathways. Assessment of the promoter regions of the imprinted genes resulted in the identification of an enrichment of binding sites for two transcription factor families, namely the zinc finger family II and PLAG transcription factors. Taken together these data contribute insight into the complex relationships between toxic metals in the environment and imprinted gene biology. PMID:24921406

  16. Effects of culture conditions and nuclear transfer protocols on blastocyst formation and mRNA expression in pre-implantation porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    McElroy, S L; Kim, J H; Kim, S; Jeong, Y W; Lee, E G; Park, S M; Hossein, M S; Koo, O J; Abul Hashem, M D; Jang, G; Kang, S K; Lee, B C; Hwang, W S

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of culture conditions and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) protocols on in vitro development of porcine SCNT embryos and on expression patterns of genes involved in stress (heat shock protein 70.2, HSP70.2), trophoblastic function (integrin beta1, ITGB1), metabolism (phosphoglycerate kinase 1, PGK1), apoptosis (BAX), and imprinted gene (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, IGF2R). In Experiment 1, supplementing modified North Carolina State University (mNCSU) medium with 10% FBS at Day 4 of culture increased SCNT blastocyst formation (22.9 vs. 10.7%, P<0.05), number of inner cell mass cells (13.3+/-4.3 vs. 7.6+/-2.2, P<0.05), and total cells (57.9+/-19.5 vs. 36.3+/-8.2, P<0.05) in cloned blastocysts. In Experiment 2, using culture medium with 10% FBS, 1.0mM calcium in fusion/activation medium (1.0C), and 7.5mug/mL cytochalasin B treatment (0.1C&CB) yielded higher rates (P<0.05) of blastocysts (33.6 and 33.3%, respectively) relative to the control (0.1mM calcium fusion medium, 0.1C; 18.3%). Total cell numbers of blastocysts were increased (P<0.05) in 1.0C (77.4+/-28.9) compared to the control (58.5+/-22.6). In vitro-derived blastocysts had higher expression levels of BAX and lower levels of HSP70.2, IGF2R compared to their in vivo-derived counterparts. Supplementing culture medium with 10% FBS increased relative abundances of BAX mRNA in SCNT blastocysts relative to in vivo-derived blastocysts. The transcript level of ITGB1 in blastocyst from 0.1C&CB was lower than in vivo blastocysts. In conclusion, different culture conditions or SCNT protocols affected in vitro development of SCNT embryos and altered several important genes (BAX, HSP70.2, IGTB1, and IGF2R) compared to conventional in vivo-derived blastocysts.

  17. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: immunohistochemical expression of p57 identifies loss of heterozygosity and abnormal imprinting of the 11p15.5.

    PubMed

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Boldrini, Renata; Benedetti, Maria Chiara; Inserra, Alessandro; De Pasquale, Maria Debora; Francalanci, Paola

    2017-03-01

    Diagnosis of adrenocortical neoplasms (ACN), in pediatric age, is based on Wieneke criteria. The p57, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, acts to negatively regulate cell proliferation and is frequently found dysregulated in cancer. The identification of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 11p15, containing the p57 gene, could be a tool for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ACN. Immunohistochemistry with anti-p57 and microsatellite markers analysis of 11p15 region to value LOH were made in both ACN and surrounded normal adrenal cortex. Nine ACN, two clinically benign, two uncertain, and five malignant, were diagnosed. Positive p57 cells were evident in normal adrenal cortex and in one histologically benign ACN. A low/absent expression of p57 was documented in eight ACN independently from the classification on the basis of pathological and clinical criteria. Microsatellite marker analysis confirmed the LOH of 11p15 region in the same ACN. LOH of 11p15 has a high prognostic value suggesting the p57 gene is important in ACN pathogenesis. Immunohistochemistry for p57 is a simple and cheap tool that can be used to quickly identify LOH of 11p15 in ACN.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of patients with imprinting disorders identifies differentially methylated regions associated with novel candidate imprinted genes

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Louise E; Rezwan, Faisal I; Poole, Rebecca L; Jagoe, Hannah; Lake, Hannah; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Arshad, Hasan; Wilson, David I; Holloway, John W; Temple, I Karen; Mackay, Deborah J G

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is allelic restriction of gene expression potential depending on parent of origin, maintained by epigenetic mechanisms including parent of origin-specific DNA methylation. Among approximately 70 known imprinted genes are some causing disorders affecting growth, metabolism and cancer predisposition. Some imprinting disorder patients have hypomethylation of several imprinted loci (HIL) throughout the genome and may have atypically severe clinical features. Here we used array analysis in HIL patients to define patterns of aberrant methylation throughout the genome. Design We developed a novel informatic pipeline capable of small sample number analysis, and profiled 10 HIL patients with two clinical presentations (Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome and neonatal diabetes) using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 BeadChip array to identify candidate imprinted regions. We used robust statistical criteria to quantify DNA methylation. Results We detected hypomethylation at known imprinted loci, and 25 further candidate imprinted regions (nine shared between patient groups) including one in the Down syndrome critical region (WRB) and another previously associated with bipolar disorder (PPIEL). Targeted analysis of three candidate regions (NHP2L1, WRB and PPIEL) showed allelic expression, methylation patterns consistent with allelic maternal methylation and frequent hypomethylation among an additional cohort of HIL patients, including six with Silver–Russell syndrome presentations and one with pseudohypoparathyroidism 1B. Conclusions This study identified novel candidate imprinted genes, revealed remarkable epigenetic convergence among clinically divergent patients, and highlights the potential of epigenomic profiling to expand our understanding of the normal methylome and its disruption in human disease. PMID:24501229

  19. An Unbiased Assessment of the Role of Imprinted Genes in an Intergenerational Model of Developmental Programming

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Elizabeth J.; Isganaitis, Elvira; Jimenez-Chillaron, Josep; Schroeder, Joshua; Molla, Michael; Andrews, Simon; Didier, Nathalie; Charalambous, Marika; McEwen, Kirsten; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental factors during early life are critical for the later metabolic health of the individual and of future progeny. In our obesogenic environment, it is of great socioeconomic importance to investigate the mechanisms that contribute to the risk of metabolic ill health. Imprinted genes, a class of functionally mono-allelic genes critical for early growth and metabolic axis development, have been proposed to be uniquely susceptible to environmental change. Furthermore, it has also been suggested that perturbation of the epigenetic reprogramming of imprinting control regions (ICRs) may play a role in phenotypic heritability following early life insults. Alternatively, the presence of multiple layers of epigenetic regulation may in fact protect imprinted genes from such perturbation. Unbiased investigation of these alternative hypotheses requires assessment of imprinted gene expression in the context of the response of the whole transcriptome to environmental assault. We therefore analyse the role of imprinted genes in multiple tissues in two affected generations of an established murine model of the developmental origins of health and disease using microarrays and quantitative RT–PCR. We demonstrate that, despite the functional mono-allelicism of imprinted genes and their unique mechanisms of epigenetic dosage control, imprinted genes as a class are neither more susceptible nor protected from expression perturbation induced by maternal undernutrition in either the F1 or the F2 generation compared to other genes. Nor do we find any evidence that the epigenetic reprogramming of ICRs in the germline is susceptible to nutritional restriction. However, we propose that those imprinted genes that are affected may play important roles in the foetal response to undernutrition and potentially its long-term sequelae. We suggest that recently described instances of dosage regulation by relaxation of imprinting are rare and likely to be highly regulated. PMID:22511876

  20. Polyandry, Life-History Trade-Offs and the Evolution of Imprinting at Mendelian Loci

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Walter; Moore, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Genomic imprinting causes parental origin-dependent differential expression of a small number of genes in mammalian and angiosperm plant embryos, resulting in non-Mendelian inheritance of phenotypic traits. The “conflict” theory of the evolution of imprinting proposes that reduced genetic relatedness of paternally, relative to maternally, derived alleles in offspring of polygamous females supports parental sex-specific selection at gene loci that influence maternal investment. While the theory's physiological predictions are well supported by observation, the requirement of polyandry in the evolution of imprinting from an ancestral Mendelian state has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we use diallelic models to examine the influence of various degrees of polyandry on the evolution of both Mendelian and imprinted autosomal gene loci that influence trade-offs between maternal fecundity and offspring viability. We show that, given a plausible assumption on the physiological relationship between maternal fecundity and offspring viability, low levels of polyandry are sufficient to reinforce exclusively the fixation of “greedy” paternally imprinted alleles that increase offspring viability at the expense of maternal fecundity and “thrifty” maternally imprinted alleles of opposite effect. We also show that, for all levels of polyandry, Mendelian alleles at genetic loci that influence the trade-off between maternal fecundity and offspring viability reach an evolutionary stable state, whereas pairs of reciprocally imprinted alleles do not. PMID:15611195

  1. Polyandry, life-history trade-offs and the evolution of imprinting at Mendelian loci.

    PubMed

    Mills, Walter; Moore, Tom

    2004-12-01

    Genomic imprinting causes parental origin-dependent differential expression of a small number of genes in mammalian and angiosperm plant embryos, resulting in non-Mendelian inheritance of phenotypic traits. The "conflict" theory of the evolution of imprinting proposes that reduced genetic relatedness of paternally, relative to maternally, derived alleles in offspring of polygamous females supports parental sex-specific selection at gene loci that influence maternal investment. While the theory's physiological predictions are well supported by observation, the requirement of polyandry in the evolution of imprinting from an ancestral Mendelian state has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we use diallelic models to examine the influence of various degrees of polyandry on the evolution of both Mendelian and imprinted autosomal gene loci that influence trade-offs between maternal fecundity and offspring viability. We show that, given a plausible assumption on the physiological relationship between maternal fecundity and offspring viability, low levels of polyandry are sufficient to reinforce exclusively the fixation of "greedy" paternally imprinted alleles that increase offspring viability at the expense of maternal fecundity and "thrifty" maternally imprinted alleles of opposite effect. We also show that, for all levels of polyandry, Mendelian alleles at genetic loci that influence the trade-off between maternal fecundity and offspring viability reach an evolutionary stable state, whereas pairs of reciprocally imprinted alleles do not.

  2. New insights into establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation imprints in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kelsey, Gavin; Feil, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental to genomic imprinting in mammals is the acquisition of epigenetic marks that differ in male and female gametes at ‘imprinting control regions’ (ICRs). These marks mediate the allelic expression of imprinted genes in the offspring. Much has been learnt about the nature of imprint marks, the times during gametogenesis at which they are laid down and some of the factors responsible especially for DNA methylation. Recent work has revealed that transcription and histone modifications are critically involved in DNA methylation acquisition, and these findings allow us to propose rational models for methylation establishment. A completely novel perspective on gametic DNA methylation has emerged from epigenomic profiling. Far more differentially methylated loci have been identified in gametes than known imprinted genes, which leads us to revise the notion that methylation of ICRs is a specifically targeted process. Instead, it seems to obey default processes in germ cells, giving rise to distinct patterns of DNA methylation in sperm and oocytes. This new insight, together with the identification of proteins that preserve DNA methylation after fertilization, emphasizes the key role played by mechanisms that selectively retain differential methylation at imprinted loci during early development. Addressing these mechanisms will be essential to understanding the specificity and evolution of genomic imprinting. PMID:23166397

  3. Development of a Biosensor for Detection of Pleural Mesothelioma Cancer Biomarker Using Surface Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Aabhas; Blais, Steven; Goparaju, Chandra M. V.; Neubert, Thomas; Pass, Harvey; Levon, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronan-linked protein 1 (HAPLN1) which has been shown to be highly expressed in malignant pleural mesotheliomas (MPM), was detected in serum using an electrochemical surface-imprinting method. First, the detection method was optimized using Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein to mimic the optimal conditions required to imprint the similar molecular weight protein HAPLN1. BSA was imprinted on the gold electrode with hydroxyl terminated alkane thiols, which formed a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) around BSA. The analyte (BSA) was then washed away and its imprint (empty cavity with shape-memory) was used for detection of BSA in a solution, using electrochemical open-circuit potential method, namely potentiometry. Factors considered to optimize the conditions include incubation time, protein concentration, limit of detection and size of electrode. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to confirm selectivity of imprints. With the obtained imprinting control parameters, HAPLN1 was imprinted in duplicate and the detection of spiked HAPLN1 was successfully conducted in serum. PMID:23516416

  4. A computational framework for the inheritance pattern of genomic imprinting for complex traits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenguang; Wang, Zhong; Prows, Daniel R; Wu, Rongling

    2012-01-01

    Genetic imprinting, by which the expression of a gene depends on the parental origin of its alleles, may be subjected to reprogramming through each generation. Currently, such reprogramming is limited to qualitative description only, lacking more precise quantitative estimation for its extent, pattern and mechanism. Here, we present a computational framework for analyzing the magnitude of genetic imprinting and its transgenerational inheritance mode. This quantitative model is based on the breeding scheme of reciprocal backcrosses between reciprocal F(1) hybrids and original inbred parents, in which the transmission of genetic imprinting across generations can be tracked. We define a series of quantitative genetic parameters that describe the extent and transmission mode of genetic imprinting and further estimate and test these parameters within a genetic mapping framework using a new powerful computational algorithm. The model and algorithm described will enable geneticists to identify and map imprinted quantitative trait loci and dictate a comprehensive atlas of developmental and epigenetic mechanisms related to genetic imprinting. We illustrate the new discovery of the role of genetic imprinting in regulating hyperoxic acute lung injury survival time using a mouse reciprocal backcross design.

  5. Effect of maternal dietary energy types on placenta nutrient transporter gene expressions and intrauterine fetal growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhuo, Yong; Fang, Zheng-feng; Che, Lian-qiang; Wu, De

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of maternal dietary energy types on the mRNA expressions of the placental nutrient transporter and intrauterine fetal growth and to examine whether altered intrauterine fetal growth could be associated with different gene expressions relating to fetal energy metabolism and DNA methylation. Seventy-two 3-mo-old rats were allocated to one of four groups: low fat/low fiber (L-L), low fat/high fiber, high fat/low fiber (H-L), or high fat/high fiber. Rats were fed the treatment diets 4 wk before mating and continued in pregnancy until sample collections were obtained on days 13.5 and 17.5 of pregnancy. The fetal weight in the L-L group was significantly lower than that in the H-L group (P < 0.05). The placental nutrient transporter mRNA expressions of glucose transporter-3 (Slc2a3) and cationic amino acid transporter-1 (Slc7a1) in the L-L group with a decreased fetal weight were downregulated compared with that in the H-L group with an increased fetal weight. However, placental Slc2a1 and the system A amino acid transporter gene Slc38a4 mRNA expressions were adaptively upregulated by the L-L diet with a decreased fetal weight (P < 0.05). For the placental imprinted gene Igf-2 and H19 expressions, lower Igf-2 and higher H19 expressions were associated with the decreased fetal growth in the L-L group compared with the H-L group with an increased fetal weight. Different fetal growth was associated with different DNA methyltransferase-1 and methyltransferase-3a expressions (P > 0.05) and energy metabolism-related genes. Collectively, these results demonstrated that intrauterine fetal growth could be affected by different energy intake types through placenta nutrient transporter gene expressions, and different fetal growths were associated with altered fetal genes related to DNA methylation and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Yilmaz, Fatma; Özgür, Erdoğan; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-04-19

    Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting.

  7. Molecular Imprinting of Macromolecules for Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Yilmaz, Fatma; Özgür, Erdoğan; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2017-01-01

    Molecular recognition has an important role in numerous living systems. One of the most important molecular recognition methods is molecular imprinting, which allows host compounds to recognize and detect several molecules rapidly, sensitively and selectively. Compared to natural systems, molecular imprinting methods have some important features such as low cost, robustness, high recognition ability and long term durability which allows molecularly imprinted polymers to be used in various biotechnological applications, such as chromatography, drug delivery, nanotechnology, and sensor technology. Sensors are important tools because of their ability to figure out a potentially large number of analytical difficulties in various areas with different macromolecular targets. Proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, antibodies, viruses and cells are defined as macromolecules that have wide range of functions are very important. Thus, macromolecules detection has gained great attention in concerning the improvement in most of the studies. The applications of macromolecule imprinted sensors will have a spacious exploration according to the low cost, high specificity and stability. In this review, macromolecules for molecularly imprinted sensor applications are structured according to the definition of molecular imprinting methods, developments in macromolecular imprinting methods, macromolecular imprinted sensors, and conclusions and future perspectives. This chapter follows the latter strategies and focuses on the applications of macromolecular imprinted sensors. This allows discussion on how sensor strategy is brought to solve the macromolecules imprinting. PMID:28422082

  8. A Protocol for Epigenetic Imprinting Analysis with RNA-Seq Data.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinfeng; Xiang, Daoquan; Datla, Raju; Wang, Edwin

    2018-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic regulatory mechanism that operates through expression of certain genes from maternal or paternal in a parent-of-origin-specific manner. Imprinted genes have been identified in diverse biological systems that are implicated in some human diseases and in embryonic and seed developmental programs in plants. The molecular underpinning programs and mechanisms involved in imprinting are yet to be explored in depth in plants. The recent advances in RNA-Seq-based methods and technologies offer an opportunity to systematically analyze epigenetic imprinting that operates at the whole genome level in the model and crop plants. We are interested using Arabidopsis model system, to investigate gene expression patterns associated with parent of origin and their implications to imprinting during embryo and seed development. Toward this, we have generated early embryo development RNA-Seq-based transcriptome datasets in F1s from a genetic cross between two diverse Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Tsu-1. With the data, we developed a protocol for evaluating the maternal and paternal contributions of genes during the early stages of embryo development after fertilization. This protocol is also designed to consider the contamination from other potential seed tissues, sequencing quality, proper processing of sequenced reads and variant calling, and appropriate inference of the parental contributions based on the parent-of-origin-specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the expressed genes. The approach, methods and the protocol developed in this study can be used for evaluating the effects of epigenetic imprinting in plants.

  9. Rapid Evolution of Genomic Imprinting in Two Species of the Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Hatorangan, Marcelinus R; Laenen, Benjamin; Steige, Kim A; Slotte, Tanja; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic phenomenon occurring in mammals and flowering plants that causes genes to adopt a parent-of-origin-specific mode of expression. While the imprinting status of genes is well conserved in mammals, clear estimates for the degree of conservation were lacking in plants. We therefore analyzed the genome-wide imprinting status of Capsella rubella, which shared a common recent ancestor with Arabidopsis thaliana ∼10 to 14 million years ago. However, only ∼14% of maternally expressed genes (MEGs) and ∼29% of paternally expressed genes (PEGs) in C. rubella were commonly imprinted in both species, revealing that genomic imprinting is a rapidly evolving phenomenon in plants. Nevertheless, conserved PEGs exhibited signs of selection, suggesting that a subset of imprinted genes play an important functional role and are therefore maintained in plants. Like in Arabidopsis, PEGs in C. rubella are frequently associated with the presence of transposable elements that preferentially belong to helitron and MuDR families. Our data further reveal that MEGs and PEGs differ in their targeting by 24-nucleotide small RNAs and asymmetric DNA methylation, suggesting different mechanisms establishing DNA methylation at MEGs and PEGs. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Oocyte-Derived Methylation Differences Persist in the Placenta Revealing Widespread Transient Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Court, Franck; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Tayama, Chiharu; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Poo-Llanillo, Maria Eugenia; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Simón, Carlos; Monk, David

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of regions in gametes have opposing methylation profiles that are largely resolved during the post-fertilization epigenetic reprogramming. However some specific sequences associated with imprinted loci survive this demethylation process. Here we present the data describing the fate of germline-derived methylation in humans. With the exception of a few known paternally methylated germline differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with known imprinted domains, we demonstrate that sperm-derived methylation is reprogrammed by the blastocyst stage of development. In contrast a large number of oocyte-derived methylation differences survive to the blastocyst stage and uniquely persist as transiently methylated DMRs only in the placenta. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is exclusive to primates, since no placenta-specific maternal methylation was observed in mouse. Utilizing single cell RNA-seq datasets from human preimplantation embryos we show that following embryonic genome activation the maternally methylated transient DMRs can orchestrate imprinted expression. However despite showing widespread imprinted expression of genes in placenta, allele-specific transcriptional profiling revealed that not all placenta-specific DMRs coordinate imprinted expression and that this maternal methylation may be absent in a minority of samples, suggestive of polymorphic imprinted methylation. PMID:27835649

  11. Dissecting genomic imprinting and genetic conflict from a game theory prospective. Comment on: ;Epigenetic game theory: How to compute the epigenetic control of maternal-to-zygotic transition; by Qian Wang et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuehua; Yang, Haitao

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetics typically refers to changes in the structure of a chromosome that affect gene activity and expression. Genomic imprinting is a special type of epigenetic phenomenon in which the expression of an allele depends on its parental origin. When an allele inherited from the mother (or father) is imprinted (i.e., silent), it is termed as maternal (or paternal) imprinting. Imprinting is often resulted from DNA methylation and tends to cluster together in the genome [1]. It has been shown to play a key role in many genetic disorders in humans [2]. Imprinting is heritable and undergoes a reprogramming process in gametes before and after fertilization [1]. Sometimes the reprogramming process is not reversible, leading to the loss of imprinting [3]. Although efforts have been made to experimentally or computationally infer imprinting genes, the underlying molecular mechanism that leads to unbalanced allelic expression is still largely unknown.

  12. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C.; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting. PMID:23754418

  13. Paternally expressed genes predominate in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Miller, Donald C; Harman, Rebecca; Antczak, Douglas F; Clark, Andrew G

    2013-06-25

    The discovery of genomic imprinting through studies of manipulated mouse embryos indicated that the paternal genome has a major influence on placental development. However, previous research has not demonstrated paternal bias in imprinted genes. We applied RNA sequencing to trophoblast tissue from reciprocal hybrids of horse and donkey, where genotypic differences allowed parent-of-origin identification of most expressed genes. Using this approach, we identified a core group of 15 ancient imprinted genes, of which 10 were paternally expressed. An additional 78 candidate imprinted genes identified by RNA sequencing also showed paternal bias. Pyrosequencing was used to confirm the imprinting status of six of the genes, including the insulin receptor (INSR), which may play a role in growth regulation with its reciprocally imprinted ligand, histone acetyltransferase-1 (HAT1), a gene involved in chromatin modification, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus G6C, a newly identified imprinted gene in the major histocompatibility complex. The 78 candidate imprinted genes displayed parent-of-origin expression bias in placenta but not fetus, and most showed less than 100% silencing of the imprinted allele. Some displayed variability in imprinting status among individuals. This variability results in a unique epigenetic signature for each placenta that contributes to variation in the intrauterine environment and thus presents the opportunity for natural selection to operate on parent-of-origin differential regulation. Taken together, these features highlight the plasticity of imprinting in mammals and the central importance of the placenta as a target tissue for genomic imprinting.

  14. IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 gene variants are associated with obesity-related risk phenotypes in Brazilian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, E M; Cândido, A P C; Castro, I M; Bastos, A Q A; Machado-Coelho, G L L; Freitas, R N

    2015-07-01

    Association studies of genetic variants and obesity and/or obesity-related risk factors have yielded contradictory results. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IGF2, LEPR, POMC, PPARG, and PPARGC1 genes with obesity or obesity-related risk phenotypes. This case-control study assessed overweight (n=192) and normal-weight (n=211) children and adolescents. The SNPs were analyzed using minisequencing assays, and variables and genotype distributions between the groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and gender was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for selected phenotype risks in each group. No difference in SNP distribution was observed between groups. In children, POMC rs28932472(C) was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (P=0.001), higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P=0.014), and higher risk in overweight children of altered total cholesterol (OR=7.35, P=0.006). In adolescents, IGF2 rs680(A) was associated with higher glucose (P=0.012) and higher risk in overweight adolescents for altered insulin (OR=10.08, P=0.005) and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (OR=6.34, P=0.010). PPARG rs1801282(G) conferred a higher risk of altered insulin (OR=12.31, P=0.003), and HOMA-IR (OR=7.47, P=0.005) in overweight adolescents. PARGC1 rs8192678(A) was associated with higher triacylglycerols (P=0.005), and LEPR rs1137101(A) was marginally associated with higher LDL cholesterol (P=0.017). LEPR rs1137101(A) conferred higher risk for altered insulin, and HOMA-IR in overweight adolescents. The associations observed in this population suggested increased risk for cardiovascular diseases and/or type 2 diabetes later in life for individuals carrying these alleles.

  15. [Molecular imprinted polymers for penicillins and tetracyclines].

    PubMed

    Iakhkind, M I; Tarantseva, K R; Marynova, M A; Storozhenko, P A; Rasulov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) for penicillins and tetracyclines described in the literature were analysed with a purpose of evaluating their possible use for the antibiotic sorption isolation.

  16. Tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation at the imprinted gene Mest regulates allelic usage at Copg2

    PubMed Central

    MacIsaac, Julia L.; Bogutz, Aaron B.; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Lefebvre, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The gene Mest (also known as Peg1) is regulated by genomic imprinting in the mouse and only the paternal allele is active for transcription. MEST is similarly imprinted in humans, where it is a candidate for the growth retardation Silver-Russell syndrome. The MEST protein belongs to an ancient family of hydrolases but its function is still unknown. It is highly conserved in vertebrates although imprinted expression is only observed in marsupials and eutherians, thus a recent evolutionary event. Here we describe the identification of new imprinted RNA products at the Mest locus, longer variants of the RNA, called MestXL, transcribed >10 kb into the downstream antisense gene Copg2. During development MestXL is produced exclusively in the developing central nervous system (CNS) by alternative polyadenylation. Copg2 is biallelically expressed in the embryo except in MestXL-expressing tissues, where we observed preferential expression from the maternal allele. To analyze the function of the MestXL transcripts in Copg2 regulation, we studied the effects of a targeted allele at Mest introducing a truncation in the mRNA. We show that both the formation of the MestXL isoforms and the allelic bias at Copg2 are lost in the CNS of mutants embryos. Our results propose a new mechanism to regulate allelic usage in the mammalian genome, via tissue-specific alternative polyadenylation and transcriptional interference in sense–antisense pairs at imprinted loci. PMID:22053079

  17. DNA methylation and gene expression changes derived from assisted reproductive technologies can be decreased by reproductive fluids

    PubMed Central

    Canovas, Sebastian; Ivanova, Elena; Romar, Raquel; García-Martínez, Soledad; Soriano-Úbeda, Cristina; García-Vázquez, Francisco A; Saadeh, Heba; Andrews, Simon; Kelsey, Gavin; Coy, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The number of children born since the origin of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) exceeds 5 million. The majority seem healthy, but a higher frequency of defects has been reported among ART-conceived infants, suggesting an epigenetic cost. We report the first whole-genome DNA methylation datasets from single pig blastocysts showing differences between in vivo and in vitro produced embryos. Blastocysts were produced in vitro either without (C-IVF) or in the presence of natural reproductive fluids (Natur-IVF). Natur-IVF embryos were of higher quality than C-IVF in terms of cell number and hatching ability. RNA-Seq and DNA methylation analyses showed that Natur-IVF embryos have expression and methylation patterns closer to in vivo blastocysts. Genes involved in reprogramming, imprinting and development were affected by culture, with fewer aberrations in Natur-IVF embryos. Methylation analysis detected methylated changes in C-IVF, but not in Natur-IVF, at genes whose methylation could be critical, such as IGF2R and NNAT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23670.001 PMID:28134613

  18. Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Muhammad; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Afzal, Adeel; Hussain, Tajamal; Sharif, Ahsan; Ahmad, Ejaz; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors. PMID:28348356

  19. The imprinted polycomb group gene Sfmbt2 is required for trophoblast maintenance and placenta development

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Kamelia; Latham, Keith; Panning, Barbara; Zhong, Zhisheng; Andersen, Angela; Varmuza, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Imprinted genes play important roles in placenta development and function. Parthenogenetic embryos, deficient in paternally expressed imprinted genes, lack extra-embryonic tissues of the trophoblast lineage. Parthenogenetic trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) are extremely difficult to derive, suggesting that an imprinted gene(s) is necessary for TSC establishment or maintenance. In a candidate study, we were able to narrow the list to one known paternally expressed gene, Sfmbt2. We show that mouse embryos inheriting a paternal Sfmbt2 gene trap null allele have severely reduced placentae and die before E12.5 due to reduction of all trophoblast cell types. We infected early embryos with lentivirus vectors expressing anti-Sfmbt2 shRNAs and found that TSC derivation was significantly reduced. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that loss of SFMBT2 results in defects in maintenance of trophoblast cell types necessary for development of the extra-embryonic tissues, the placenta in particular. PMID:24154523

  20. Absence of imprinting in U2AFBPL, a human homologue of the imprinted mouse gene U2afbp-rs.

    PubMed

    Pearsall, R S; Shibata, H; Brozowska, A; Yoshino, K; Okuda, K; deJong, P J; Plass, C; Chapman, V M; Hayashizaki, Y; Held, W A

    1996-05-06

    The mouse gene U2 auxiliary factor binding protein related sequence (U2afbp-rs) has previously been shown to be genomically imprinted with monoallelic expression from the paternal allele. To determine if the human homologue is imprinted and contains conserved structural features which regulate imprinting, we isolated genomic clones from a human P1-derived artificial chromosome (PAC) library that map to human chromosome 5q22-31, a region syntenic to the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 11 where U2afbp-rs resides. A genomic subclone was isolated which contained an open reading frame with high homology to the mouse gene. This subclone also maintained the intronless character of the mouse gene. A KpnI polymorphism within the open reading frame of the gene was found to occur in 21% (8/38) of the alleles tested from human placental tissue samples. RT-PCR analysis of human placentas using the KpnI polymorphism to determine the parental origin of the alleles indicates biallelic expression of the human chromosome 5 U2AFBPL gene.

  1. Molecular characterization of cytogenetic alterations associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) phenotype refines the localization and suggests the gene for BWS is imprinted.

    PubMed

    Weksberg, R; Teshima, I; Williams, B R; Greenberg, C R; Pueschel, S M; Chernos, J E; Fowlow, S B; Hoyme, E; Anderson, I J; Whiteman, D A

    1993-05-01

    To define the region of 11p15 involved in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), we have carried out a molecular genetic analysis of six patients with features of BWS and constitutional cytogenetic abnormalities involving chromosome band 11p15. Molecular analysis confirmed the 11p origin of the duplicated material and defined the smallest region of overlap for such duplications, within which a gene involved in BWS must be located. This region encompasses the beta-globin gene complex (HBB) to 11pter. In both of our informative cases, the 11p duplication was found to be of paternal origin. Two BWS associated balanced translocations of 11p15 were studied to localize the breakpoints on 11p15. Somatic cell hybrids, Southern blotting and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that both breakpoints were between D11S12 and the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene. A non-BWS translocation breakpoint was more proximal, between HBB and calcitonin-A (CALCA). Pedigree analysis showed that both BWS associated 11p15 translocations were transmitted by phenotypically normal mothers. The data are compatible with the hypothesis that the BWS gene is imprinted and that the maternally inherited BWS gene is normally suppressed whereas the paternally inherited allele is active. Thus, duplications of paternal origin would lead to increased dosage of the BWS gene. Similarly increased dosage of the BWS gene could account for the findings in maternally inherited 11p15 translocations by altering normal imprinting, so that the translocated maternal allele remains active. This study defines one or more gene loci for BWS on 11p15.5 in the genomic region from D11S12 to IGF2.

  2. Prenatal low protein and postnatal high fat diets induce rapid adipose tissue growth by inducing Igf2 expression in Sprague Dawley rat offspring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maternal low protein diets during prenatal development contribute to the development of obesity and insulin resistance in offspring. In this study, obese-prone Sprague -Dawley rats were fed diets having either 8% (low protein, LP) or 20% (normal protein, NP) protein for 3-wk prior to conception and...

  3. Loss of Gnas imprinting differentially affects REM/NREM sleep and cognition in mice.

    PubMed

    Lassi, Glenda; Ball, Simon T; Maggi, Silvia; Colonna, Giovanni; Nieus, Thierry; Cero, Cheryl; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Peters, Jo; Tucci, Valter

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that imprinted genes are important in the regulation of sleep. However, the fundamental question of whether genomic imprinting has a role in sleep has remained elusive up to now. In this work we show that REM and NREM sleep states are differentially modulated by the maternally expressed imprinted gene Gnas. In particular, in mice with loss of imprinting of Gnas, NREM and complex cognitive processes are enhanced while REM and REM-linked behaviors are inhibited. This is the first demonstration that a specific overexpression of an imprinted gene affects sleep states and related complex behavioral traits. Furthermore, in parallel to the Gnas overexpression, we have observed an overexpression of Ucp1 in interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) and a significant increase in thermoregulation that may account for the REM/NREM sleep phenotypes. We conclude that there must be significant evolutionary advantages in the monoallelic expression of Gnas for REM sleep and for the consolidation of REM-dependent memories. Conversely, biallelic expression of Gnas reinforces slow wave activity in NREM sleep, and this results in a reduction of uncertainty in temporal decision-making processes.

  4. Mechanisms of avian imprinting: a review.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, J J

    1991-11-01

    Filial imprinting is the process through which early social preferences become restricted to a particular object or class of objects. Evidence is presented showing that filial preferences are formed not only as a result of learning through exposure to an object, but also under the influence of visual and auditory predispositions. The development of these predispositions is dependent upon certain non-specific experience. There is little evidence for an endogenously affected sensitive period for imprinting. It is more likely that the end of sensitivity is a result of the imprinting process itself. Similarly, it is now firmly established that filial and sexual preferences are reversible. Evidence suggests, however, that the first stimulus to which the young animal is exposed may exert a greater influence on filial preferences than subsequent stimuli. The learning process of imprinting is often regarded as being different from conventional associative learning. However, the imprinting object itself can function as a reinforcer. Recent studies have attempted to test predictions from an interpretation of filial imprinting as a form of associative learning. The first results suggest that 'blocking' may occur in imprinting, whilst there is no evidence for 'overshadowing'. Social interactions with siblings and parent(-surrogates) have been shown to affect the formation of filial and sexual preferences. The influence of these interactions is particularly prominent in sexual imprinting, making earlier claims about naïve species-specific biases unlikely. Although auditory stimuli play an important role in the formation of social attachments, there is little evidence for auditory imprinting per se. Auditory preferences formed as a result of mere (pre- or postnatal) exposure are relatively weak and short-lasting. Exposure to visual stimuli during auditory training significantly improves auditory learning, possibly through a process of reinforcement. It is becoming increasingly

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of UBE3A is not imprinted in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hope, Kevin A; LeDoux, Mark S; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, expression of UBE3A is epigenetically regulated in neurons and expression is restricted to the maternal copy of UBE3A. A recent report claimed that Drosophila melanogaster UBE3A homolog (Dube3a) is preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly brain, inferring an imprinting mechanism. However, complex epigenetic regulatory features of the mammalian imprinting center are not present in Drosophila, and allele specific expression of Dube3a has not been documented. We used behavioral and electrophysiological analysis of the Dube3a loss-of-function allele (Dube3a 15b ) to investigate Dube3a imprinting in fly neurons. We found that motor impairment (climbing ability) and a newly-characterized defect in synaptic transmission are independent of parental inheritance of the Dube3a 15b allele. Furthermore, expression analysis of coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Dube3a did not reveal allele specific expression differences among reciprocal crosses. These data indicate that Dube3a is neither imprinted nor preferentially expressed from the maternal allele in fly neurons.

  6. The imprinted brain: how genes set the balance between autism and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Badcock, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The imprinted brain theory proposes that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represents a paternal bias in the expression of imprinted genes. This is reflected in a preference for mechanistic cognition and in the corresponding mentalistic deficits symptomatic of ASD. Psychotic spectrum disorder (PSD) would correspondingly result from an imbalance in favor of maternal and/or X-chromosome gene expression. If differences in gene expression were reflected locally in the human brain as mouse models and other evidence suggests they are, ASD would represent not so much an 'extreme male brain' as an extreme paternal one, with PSD correspondingly representing an extreme maternal brain. To the extent that copy number variation resembles imprinting and aneuploidy in nullifying or multiplying the expression of particular genes, it has been found to conform to the diametric model of mental illness peculiar to the imprinted brain theory. The fact that nongenetic factors such as nutrition in pregnancy can mimic and/or interact with imprinted gene expression suggests that the theory might even be able to explain the notable effect of maternal starvation on the risk of PSD - not to mention the 'autism epidemic' of modern affluent societies. Finally, the theory suggests that normality represents balanced cognition, and that genius is an extraordinary extension of cognitive configuration in both mentalistic and mechanistic directions. Were it to be proven correct, the imprinted brain theory would represent one of the biggest single advances in our understanding of the mind and of mental illness that has ever taken place, and would revolutionize psychiatric diagnosis, prevention and treatment - not to mention our understanding of epigenomics.

  7. Automated visual inspection of imprinted pharmaceutical tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovec, Marko; Špiclin, Žiga; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2007-09-01

    This paper is on automated visual inspection of tablets that may, in contrast to manual tablet sorting, provide objective and reproducible tablet quality assurance. Visual inspection of the ever-increasing numbers of produced imprinted tablets, regulatory enforced for unambiguous identification of active ingredients and dosage strength of each tablet, is especially demanding. The problem becomes more tractable by incorporating some a priori knowledge of the imprint shape and/or appearance. For this purpose, we consider two alternative automated tablet defect detection methods. The geometrical method, incorporating geometrical a priori knowledge of the imprint shape, enables specific inspection of the imprinted and non-imprinted tablet surface, while the statistical method exploits statistical a priori knowledge of tablet surface appearance, derived from a training image database. The two methods were evaluated on a large tablet image database, consisting of 3445 images of four types of imprinted tablets, with and without typical production defects. A 'gold standard' for testing the performances of the two inspection methods was established by manually classifying the tablets into good and five defective classes. The results, obtained by ROC (receiver operating characteristics) analysis, indicate that the statistical method yields better defect detection sensitivity and specificity than the geometrical method. Both presented image analysis methods are quite general and promising tools for automated visual inspection of imprinted pharmaceutical tablets.

  8. At Least Ten Genes Define the Imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 Cluster on Mouse Chromosome 12qF1

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, John P.; O'Neill, Brittany L.; Stewart, Colin L.; Kozlov, Serguei V.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic imprinting is an exception to Mendelian genetics in that imprinted genes are expressed monoallelically, dependent on parental origin. In mammals, imprinted genes are critical in numerous developmental and physiological processes. Aberrant imprinted gene expression is implicated in several diseases including Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes and cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify novel imprinted genes, transcription profiling was performed on two uniparentally derived cell lines, androgenetic and parthenogenetic primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. A maternally expressed transcript termed Imprinted RNA near Meg3/Gtl2 (Irm) was identified and its expression studied by Northern blotting and whole mounts in situ hybridization. The imprinted region that contains Irm has a parent of origin effect in three mammalian species, including the sheep callipyge locus. In mice and humans, both maternal and paternal uniparental disomies (UPD) cause embryonic growth and musculoskeletal abnormalities, indicating that both alleles likely express essential genes. To catalog all imprinted genes in this chromosomal region, twenty-five mouse mRNAs in a 1.96Mb span were investigated for allele specific expression. Conclusions/Significance Ten imprinted genes were elucidated. The imprinting of three paternally expressed protein coding genes (Dlk1, Peg11, and Dio3) was confirmed. Seven noncoding RNAs (Meg3/Gtl2, Anti-Peg11, Meg8, Irm/“Rian”, AK050713, AK053394, and Meg9/Mirg) are characterized by exclusive maternal expression. Intriguingly, the majority of these noncoding RNA genes contain microRNAs and/or snoRNAs within their introns, as do their human orthologs. Of the 52 identified microRNAs that map to this region, six are predicted to regulate negatively Dlk1, suggesting an additional mechanism for interactions between allelic gene products. Since several previous studies relied heavily on in silico analysis and RT-PCR, our findings from Northerns

  9. Control elements within the PWS/AS imprinting box and their function in the imprinting process.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Boris; Makedonski, Kirill; Green-Finberg, Yael; Shemer, Ruth; Razin, Aharon

    2004-04-01

    A cluster of imprinted genes on human chromosome 15q11-q13 (the PWS/AS domain) and its ortholog on mouse chromosome 7c is believed to be regulated by an imprinting control center. Although minideletions in this region in Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) patients revealed that two elements, shortest deletion regions of overlap in AS families and PWS families (AS-SRO and PWS-SRO), respectively, constitute the IC, the molecular mechanism that governs this regional control remains obscure. To understand how this imprinting center works, a mouse model was sought. The striking similarity between the human and mouse sequences allowed the generation of a minitransgene (AS-SMP) composed of AS-SRO and the Snrpn minimal promoter (SMP) the mouse ortholog of PWS-SRO. This minitransgene carries out, in a highly reliable and reproducible manner, all steps of the imprinting process. In an attempt to decipher the molecular mechanism of the imprinting process, we generated and tested for imprinting five minitransgenes based on AS-SMP, in which various parts of the 160 bp SMP were deleted. These experiments revealed a set of five cis elements that carry out the various steps of the imprinting process. This set includes: (i). two copies of a de novo methylation signal (DNS) that establish the maternal imprint during oogenesis; (ii). an allele discrimination signal that establishes the paternal imprint; and (iii). two elements that act together to maintain the paternal imprint. Two functionally redundant sets of the five elements were found on the respective endogenous mouse sequence explaining the previously published contradictory results of targeted deletion experiments. Together with the fact that all five elements bind specific proteins that are presumably the factors acting in trans in the imprinting process, our observations set the stage for a comprehensive study of the molecular mechanism involved in the control of the imprinting process.

  10. Molecular subtypes and phenotypic expression of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Wendy N; Luharia, Anita; Evans, Gail A; Raza, Hussain; Haire, Antonita C; Grundy, Richard; Bowdin, Sarah C; Riccio, Andrea; Sebastio, Gianfranco; Bliek, Jet; Schofield, Paul N; Reik, Wolf; Macdonald, Fiona; Maher, Eamonn R

    2005-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) results from mutations or epigenetic events involving imprinted genes at 11p15.5. Most BWS cases are sporadic and uniparental disomy (UPD) or putative imprinting errors predominate in this group. Sporadic cases with putative imprinting defects may be subdivided into (a) those with loss of imprinting (LOI) of IGF2 and H19 hypermethylation and silencing due to a defect in a distal 11p15.5 imprinting control element (IC1) and (b) those with loss of methylation at KvDMR1, LOI of KCNQ1OT1 (LIT1) and variable LOI of IGF2 in whom there is a defect at a more proximal imprinting control element (IC2). We investigated genotype/epigenotype-phenotype correlations in 200 cases with a confirmed molecular genetic diagnosis of BWS (16 with CDKN1C mutations, 116 with imprinting centre 2 defects, 14 with imprinting centre 1 defects and 54 with UPD). Hemihypertrophy was strongly associated with UPD (P<0.0001) and exomphalos was associated with an IC2 defect or CDKN1C mutation but not UPD or IC1 defect (P<0.0001). When comparing birth weight centile, IC1 defect cases were significantly heavier than the patients with CDKN1C mutations or IC2 defect (P=0.018). The risk of neoplasia was significantly higher in UPD and IC1 defect cases than in IC2 defect and CDKN1C mutation cases. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a risk of neoplasia for all patients of 9% at age 5 years, but 24% in the UPD subgroup. The risk of Wilms' tumour in the IC2 defect subgroup appears to be minimal and intensive screening for Wilms' tumour appears not to be indicated. In UPD patients, UPD extending to WT1 was associated with renal neoplasia (P=0.054). These findings demonstrate that BWS represents a spectrum of disorders. Identification of the molecular subtype allows more accurate prognostic predictions and enhances the management and surveillance of BWS children such that screening for Wilms' tumour and hepatoblastoma can be focused on those at highest risk.

  11. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  12. Genomic Imprinting in the Endosperm Is Systematically Perturbed in Abortive Hybrid Tomato Seeds.

    PubMed

    Florez-Rueda, Ana M; Paris, Margot; Schmidt, Anja; Widmer, Alex; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Städler, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid seed failure represents an important postzygotic barrier to interbreeding among species of wild tomatoes (Solanum section Lycopersicon) and other flowering plants. We studied genome-wide changes associated with hybrid seed abortion in the closely related Solanum peruvianum and S. chilense where hybrid crosses yield high proportions of inviable seeds due to endosperm failure and arrested embryo development. Based on differences of seed size in reciprocal hybrid crosses and developmental evidence implicating endosperm failure, we hypothesized that perturbed genomic imprinting is involved in this strong postzygotic barrier. Consequently, we surveyed the transcriptomes of developing endosperms from intra- and inter-specific crosses using tissues isolated by laser-assisted microdissection. We implemented a novel approach to estimate parent-of-origin-specific expression using both homozygous and heterozygous nucleotide differences between parental individuals and identified candidate imprinted genes. Importantly, we uncovered systematic shifts of "normal" (intraspecific) maternal:paternal transcript proportions in hybrid endosperms; the average maternal proportion of gene expression increased in both crossing directions but was stronger with S. peruvianum in the maternal role. These genome-wide shifts almost entirely eliminated paternally expressed imprinted genes in S. peruvianum hybrid endosperm but also affected maternally expressed imprinted genes and all other assessed genes. These profound, systematic changes in parental expression proportions suggest that core processes of transcriptional regulation are functionally compromised in hybrid endosperm and contribute to hybrid seed failure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Genomic Imprinting in the Endosperm Is Systematically Perturbed in Abortive Hybrid Tomato Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Florez-Rueda, Ana M.; Paris, Margot; Schmidt, Anja; Widmer, Alex; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Städler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid seed failure represents an important postzygotic barrier to interbreeding among species of wild tomatoes (Solanum section Lycopersicon) and other flowering plants. We studied genome-wide changes associated with hybrid seed abortion in the closely related Solanum peruvianum and S. chilense where hybrid crosses yield high proportions of inviable seeds due to endosperm failure and arrested embryo development. Based on differences of seed size in reciprocal hybrid crosses and developmental evidence implicating endosperm failure, we hypothesized that perturbed genomic imprinting is involved in this strong postzygotic barrier. Consequently, we surveyed the transcriptomes of developing endosperms from intra- and inter-specific crosses using tissues isolated by laser-assisted microdissection. We implemented a novel approach to estimate parent-of-origin–specific expression using both homozygous and heterozygous nucleotide differences between parental individuals and identified candidate imprinted genes. Importantly, we uncovered systematic shifts of “normal” (intraspecific) maternal:paternal transcript proportions in hybrid endosperms; the average maternal proportion of gene expression increased in both crossing directions but was stronger with S. peruvianum in the maternal role. These genome-wide shifts almost entirely eliminated paternally expressed imprinted genes in S. peruvianum hybrid endosperm but also affected maternally expressed imprinted genes and all other assessed genes. These profound, systematic changes in parental expression proportions suggest that core processes of transcriptional regulation are functionally compromised in hybrid endosperm and contribute to hybrid seed failure. PMID:27601611

  14. Genomic imprinting and the units of adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, A

    2014-01-01

    Two guiding principles identify which biological entities are able to evolve adaptations. Williams' principle holds that, in order for an entity to evolve adaptations, there must be selection between such entities. Maynard Smith's principle holds that, in order for an entity to evolve adaptations, selection within such entities must be absent or negligible. However, although the kinship theory of genomic imprinting suggests that parent-of-origin-specific gene expression evolves as a consequence of natural selection acting between—rather than within—individuals, it evades adaptive interpretation at the individual level and is instead viewed as an outcome of an intragenomic conflict of interest between an individual's genes. Here, I formalize the idea that natural selection drives intragenomic conflicts of interest between genes originating from different parents. Specifically, I establish mathematical links between the dynamics of natural selection and the idea of the gene as an intentional, inclusive-fitness-maximizing agent, and I clarify the role that information about parent of origin plays in mediating conflicts of interest between genes residing in the same genome. These results highlight that the suppression of divisive information may be as important as the suppression of lower levels of selection in maintaining the integrity of units of adaptation. PMID:24496091

  15. Distributed feedback imprinted electrospun fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Persano, Luana; Camposeo, Andrea; Del Carro, Pompilio; Fasano, Vito; Moffa, Maria; Manco, Rita; D'Agostino, Stefania; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-10-01

    Imprinted, distributed feedback lasers are demonstrated on individual, active electrospun polymer nanofibers. In addition to advantages related to miniaturization, optical confinement and grating nanopatterning lead to a significant threshold reduction compared to conventional thin-film lasers. The possibility of imprinting arbitrary photonic crystal geometries on electrospun lasing nanofibers opens new opportunities for realizing optical circuits and chips. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Role of ART in imprinting disorders.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ali; Layman, Lawrence C

    2012-04-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) offer revolutionary infertility treatments for millions of childless couples around the world. Currently, ART accounts for 1 to 3% of annual births in industrialized countries and continues to expand rapidly. Except for an increased incidence of premature births, these technologies are considered safe. However, new evidence published during the past decade has suggested an increased incidence of imprinting disorders in children conceived by ART. Specifically, an increased risk was reported for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Angelman syndrome (AS), Silver-Russell syndrome, and retinoblastoma. In contrast, some studies have found no association between ART and BWS, AS, Prader-Willi syndrome, transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, and retinoblastoma. The variability in ART protocols and the rarity of imprinting disorders complicate determining the causative relationship between ART and an increased incidence of imprinting disorders. Nevertheless, compelling experimental data from animal studies also suggest a link between increased imprinting disorders and ART. Further comprehensive, appropriately powered studies are needed to better address the magnitude of the risk for ART-associated imprinting disorders. Large longitudinal studies are particularly critical to evaluate long-term effects of ART not only during the perinatal period but also into adulthood. An important consideration is to determine if the implicated association between ART and imprinting disorders is actually related to the procedures or to infertility itself. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Present and Future Prospective

    PubMed Central

    Vasapollo, Giuseppe; Sole, Roberta Del; Mergola, Lucia; Lazzoi, Maria Rosaria; Scardino, Anna; Scorrano, Sonia; Mele, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Imprinting Technology (MIT) is a technique to design artificial receptors with a predetermined selectivity and specificity for a given analyte, which can be used as ideal materials in various application fields. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs), the polymeric matrices obtained using the imprinting technology, are robust molecular recognition elements able to mimic natural recognition entities, such as antibodies and biological receptors, useful to separate and analyze complicated samples such as biological fluids and environmental samples. The scope of this review is to provide a general overview on MIPs field discussing first general aspects in MIP preparation and then dealing with various application aspects. This review aims to outline the molecularly imprinted process and present a summary of principal application fields of molecularly imprinted polymers, focusing on chemical sensing, separation science, drug delivery and catalysis. Some significant aspects about preparation and application of the molecular imprinting polymers with examples taken from the recent literature will be discussed. Theoretical and experimental parameters for MIPs design in terms of the interaction between template and polymer functionalities will be considered and synthesis methods for the improvement of MIP recognition properties will also be presented. PMID:22016636

  18. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  19. Epitope imprinting of iron binding protein of Neisseria meningitidis bacteria through multiple monomers imprinting approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Singh, Roop Shikha; Shah, Kavita; Prasad, Rajniti; Singh, Meenakshi

    2018-04-06

    Epitope imprinting is a promising technique for fabrication of novel diagnostic tools. In this study, an epitope imprinted methodology for recognition of target epitope sequence as well as targeted protein infused by bacterial infection in blood samples of patients suffering from brain fever is developed. Template sequence chosen is a ferric iron binding fbp A protein present in Neisseria meningitidis bacteria. To orient the imprinting template peptide sequence on gold surface of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), thiol chemistry was utilized to form the self-assembled monolayer on EQCM electrode. Here, synergistic effects induced by various noncovalent interactions extended by multiple monomers (3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium-salt and benzyl methacrylate) were used in fabricating the imprinting polymeric matrix with additional firmness provided by N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide as cross-linker and azo-isobutyronitrile as initiator. Extraction of template molecule was carried out with phosphate buffer solution. After extraction of epitope molecules from the polymeric film, epitope molecularly imprinted polymeric films were fabricated on EQCM electrode surface. Nonimprinted polymers were also synthesized in the similar manner without epitope molecule. Detection limit of epitope molecularly imprinted polymers and imprinting factor (epitope molecularly imprinted polymers/nonimprinted polymers) was calculated 1.39 ng mL -1 and 12.27 respectively showing high binding capacity and specific recognition behavior toward template molecule. Simplicity of present method would put forward a fast, facile, cost-effective diagnostic tool for mass health care. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Genomic imprinting, sibling solidairity and the logic of collective action.

    PubMed Central

    Haig, D; Wilkins, J F

    2000-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been proposed to evolve when a gene's expression has fitness consequences for individuals with different coefficients of matrilineal and patrilineal relatedness, especially in the context of competition between offspring for maternal resources. Previous models have focused on pre-emptive hierarchies, where conflict arises with respect to resource allocation between present and future offspring. Here we present a model in which imprinting arises from scramble competition within litters. The model predicts paternal-specific expression of a gene that increases an offspring's fractional share of resources but reduces the size of the resource pool, and maternal-specific expression of a gene with opposite effects. These predictions parallel the observation in economic models that individuals tend to underprovide public goods, and that the magnitude of this shortfall increases with the number of individuals in the group. Maternally derived alleles are more willing than their paternally derived counterparts to contribute to public goods because they have a smaller effective group size. PMID:11127904

  1. Imprinting mutations suggested by abnormal DNA methylation patterns in familial angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A.; Dittrich, B.; Buiting, K.

    1994-05-01

    The D15S9 and D15S63 loci in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region on chromosome 15 are subject to parent-of-origin-specific DNA methylation. The authors have found two Prader-Willi syndrome families in which the patients carry a maternal methylation imprint on the paternal chromosome. In one of these families, the patients have a small deletion encompassing the gene for the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N, which maps 130 kb telomeric to D15S63. Furthermore, they have identified a pair of nondeletion Angelman syndrome sibs and two isolated Angelman syndrome patients who carry a paternal methylation imprint on the maternal chromosome. These Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromemore » patients may have a defect in the imprinting process in 15q11-13. The authors propose a model in which a cis-acting mutation prevents the resetting of the imprinting signal in the germ line and thus disturbs the expression of imprinted genes in this region. 39 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  2. Is there a maternally induced immunological imprinting phase à la Konrad Lorenz?

    PubMed

    Lemke, H; Lange, H

    1999-10-01

    In mammals, IgG antibodies are transferred from mothers to the offspring. Since these maternal antibodies result mainly from thymus-dependent immune responses which have undergone immune maturation through somatic hypermutations, they represent the highest quality of the collective maternal immunological experience. Maternal antibodies not only confer passive immunity as long as the newborn's immune system has not fully developed, but also exert an active stimulation as indicated by their regulatory influence on isotype expression, long-term idiotypic alterations, determination of the adult B and T cell repertoire, induction of antigen reactive IgM as well as an affinity enhancement of a proportion of early primary antibodies. The fact that several of these features can only be induced during limited sensitive periods shortly after birth is reminiscent of the behavioural imprinting as defined by Konrad Lorenz. We therefore propose that during early ontogeny there is an immunological imprinting phase with characteristics analogous to behavioural imprinting: (i) the internal imprinting effect is induced by external signals, (ii) in contrast to normal learning, immunological imprinting is also only possible during certain development phases and (iii) it is characterised by an (almost) irreversible result. Hence, if particular immunological experiences are only possible during such sensitive phases, maternal immunoglobulins and consequently the mother's immunological experience is of prime importance for the start of the ontogenetic development of the immune system.

  3. Strand-specific CpG hemimethylation, a novel epigenetic modification functional for genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Parrado, Iris; Gómez-Jiménez, Álvaro; López-Sánchez, Noelia; Frade, José M

    2017-09-06

    Imprinted genes are regulated by allele-specific differentially DNA-methylated regions (DMRs). Epigenetic methylation of the CpGs constituting these DMRs is established in the germline, resulting in a 5-methylcytosine-specific pattern that is tightly maintained in somatic tissues. Here, we show a novel epigenetic mark, characterized by strand-specific hemimethylation of contiguous CpG sites affecting the germline DMR of the murine Peg3, but not Snrpn, imprinted domain. This modification is enriched in tetraploid cortical neurons, a cell type where evidence for a small proportion of formylmethylated CpG sites within the Peg3-controlling DMR is also provided. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based transcriptional analysis indicated that these epigenetic modifications participate in the maintainance of the monoallelic expression pattern of the Peg3 imprinted gene. Our results unexpectedly demonstrate that the methylation pattern observed in DMRs controlling defined imprinting regions can be modified in somatic cells, resulting in a novel epigenetic modification that gives rise to strand-specific hemimethylated domains functional for genomic imprinting. We anticipate the existence of a novel molecular mechanism regulating the transition from fully methylated CpGs to strand-specific hemimethylated CpGs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Maternal and paternal periconceptional nutrition as an indicator of offspring metabolic syndrome risk in later life through epigenetic imprinting: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dunford, Ashley R; Sangster, Janice M

    2017-12-01

    This review examined whether maternal and paternal periconceptional nutrition effects an offspring's likelihood of developing chronic metabolic related conditions due to epigenetic imprinting. A literature search was conducted in multiple science databases and limited to studies published after 2012, in English language and peer reviewed. The data from selected articles were extracted and a qualitative approach was employed due to heterogeneity of results. Newborns from obese fathers showed altered methylation overall and significant hypomethylation at the Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2) gene. High maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was associated with altered offspring DNA methylation levels and gestational diabetes mellitus induced significantly increased methylation levels in offspring. Gestational weight gain was not associated with differentially methylated cord blood. Birth weight was higher in offspring exposed to famine in early gestation. Offspring born post maternal bariatric surgery showed a lower percentage of body fat and improved fasting insulin levels compared to siblings born pre-maternal bariatric surgery. The available evidence suggests that poor maternal and paternal periconceptional nutrition can increase the risk of metabolic syndrome in offspring, through epigenetic imprinting. Potential parents should be advised that maintaining a healthy diet and BMI is likely to reduce the risk of metabolic syndrome in offspring. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human exposure to flame-retardants is associated with aberrant DNA methylation at imprinted genes in sperm

    PubMed Central

    Soubry, Adelheid; Hoyo, Cathrine; Butt, Craig M.; Fieuws, Steffen; Price, Thomas M.; Murphy, Susan K.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence suggests that early exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals has long-term consequences that can influence disease risk in offspring. During gametogenesis, imprinted genes are reasonable epigenetic targets with the ability to retain and transfer environmental messages. We hypothesized that exposures to organophosphate (OP) flame-retardants can alter DNA methylation in human sperm cells affecting offspring's health. Sperm and urine samples were collected from 67 men in North Carolina, USA. Urinary metabolites of a chlorinated OP, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, and two non-chlorinated OPs, triphenyl phosphate and mono-isopropylphenyl diphenyl phosphate, were measured using liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry. Sperm DNA methylation at multiple CpG sites of the regulatory differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes GRB10, H19, IGF2, MEG3, NDN, NNAT, PEG1/MEST, PEG3, PLAGL1, SNRPN, and SGCE/PEG10 was quantified using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Regression models were used to determine potential associations between OP concentrations and DNA methylation. We found that men with higher concentrations of urinary OP metabolites, known to originate from flame-retardants, have a slightly higher fraction of sperm cells that are aberrantly methylated. After adjusting for age, obesity-status and multiple testing, exposure to mono-isopropylphenyl diphenyl phosphate was significantly related to hypermethylation at the MEG3, NDN, SNRPN DMRs. Exposure to triphenyl phosphate was associated with hypermethylation at the GRB10 DMR; and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate exposure was associated with altered methylation at the MEG3 and H19 DMRs. Although measured methylation differences were small, implications for public health can be substantial. Interestingly, our data indicated that a multiplicity of OPs in the human body is associated with increased DNA methylation aberrancies in sperm, compared to exposure to few OPs

  6. Imprint lithography with degradable elastomeric polyanhydrides.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qin; Shipp, Devon A

    2012-09-26

    A photocurable, degradable polyanhydride cross-linked elastomer that can be used as a stamp in imprint lithography applications has been developed. The degradable stamp materials are based on polyanhydrides synthesized using thiol-ene polymerization. In this study, curing the monomers 4-pentenoic anhydride and pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) on a master mold yields low modulus, elastomeric, degradable polyanhydride polymer stamps that are a negative of the master. These stamps can be then used as a sacrificial template during the fabrication of a replica of the master, and can be readily degraded away from the replica using water. The resultant imprinted materials exhibited excellent uniformity over a large area. Compared with other conventional imprint lithography stamp materials, the thiol-ene polymerized polyanhydrides are degradable, master mold safe, show great release properties, have fast cure rates, are relatively low cost, and can be fabricated onto variety of substrates and materials.

  7. Producing superfluid circulation states using phase imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Dubessy, Romain; Badr, Thomas; De Rossi, Camilla; de Goër de Herve, Mathieu; Longchambon, Laurent; Perrin, Hélène

    2018-04-01

    We propose a method to prepare states of given quantized circulation in annular Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a ring trap using the method of phase imprinting without relying on a two-photon angular momentum transfer. The desired phase profile is imprinted on the atomic wave function using a short light pulse with a tailored intensity pattern generated with a spatial light modulator. We demonstrate the realization of "helicoidal" intensity profiles suitable for this purpose. Due to the diffraction limit, the theoretical steplike intensity profile is not achievable in practice. We investigate the effect of imprinting an intensity profile smoothed by a finite optical resolution onto the annular BEC with a numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. This allows us to optimize the intensity pattern for a given target circulation to compensate for the limited resolution.

  8. Gas Sensors Based on Molecular Imprinting Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Qingju

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technology (MIT); often described as a method of designing a material to remember a target molecular structure (template); is a technique for the creation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with custom-made binding sites complementary to the target molecules in shape; size and functional groups. MIT has been successfully applied to analyze; separate and detect macromolecular organic compounds. Furthermore; it has been increasingly applied in assays of biological macromolecules. Owing to its unique features of structure specificity; predictability; recognition and universal application; there has been exploration of the possible application of MIPs in the field of highly selective gas sensors. In this present study; we outline the recent advances in gas sensors based on MIT; classify and introduce the existing molecularly imprinted gas sensors; summarize their advantages and disadvantages; and analyze further research directions. PMID:28677616

  9. Exercise-associated DNA methylation change in skeletal muscle and the importance of imprinted genes: a bioinformatics meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, William M

    2015-12-01

    Epigenetics is the study of processes--beyond DNA sequence alteration--producing heritable characteristics. For example, DNA methylation modifies gene expression without altering the nucleotide sequence. A well-studied DNA methylation-based phenomenon is genomic imprinting (ie, genotype-independent parent-of-origin effects). We aimed to elucidate: (1) the effect of exercise on DNA methylation and (2) the role of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle gene networks (ie, gene group functional profiling analyses). Gene ontology (ie, gene product elucidation)/meta-analysis. 26 skeletal muscle and 86 imprinted genes were subjected to g:Profiler ontology analysis. Meta-analysis assessed exercise-associated DNA methylation change. g:Profiler found four muscle gene networks with imprinted loci. Meta-analysis identified 16 articles (387 genes/1580 individuals) associated with exercise. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation could elevate effect size bias. Only skeletal muscle gene networks including imprinted genes were reported. Exercise-associated effect sizes were calculated by gene. Age, method, sample size, sex and tissue variation were moderators. Six imprinted loci (RB1, MEG3, UBE3A, PLAGL1, SGCE, INS) were important for muscle gene networks, while meta-analysis uncovered five exercise-associated imprinted loci (KCNQ1, MEG3, GRB10, L3MBTL1, PLAGL1). DNA methylation decreased with exercise (60% of loci). Exercise-associated DNA methylation change was stronger among older people (ie, age accounted for 30% of the variation). Among older people, genes exhibiting DNA methylation decreases were part of a microRNA-regulated gene network functioning to suppress cancer. Imprinted genes were identified in skeletal muscle gene networks and exercise-associated DNA methylation change. Exercise-associated DNA methylation modification could rewind the 'epigenetic clock' as we age. CRD42014009800. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymers with multi-functionality.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imprinting is a very powerful synthetic method for preparation of robust materials with pre-designed molecular selectivity. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are attractive substitutes for antibodies in many analytical and bioanalytical applications, e.g. for development of biosensors and for drug assays. In addition to selective molecular binding, new functions are being added to MIPs to make the synthetic materials responsive to different environmental conditions, making it possible to modulate the binding and release of different molecular targets and to simplify affinity separation. Introduction of signal-transduction functionality into MIPs also brings in new, more easily operated chemical sensors for detection and quantification of important analytical targets.

  11. Patterns of Hybrid Loss of Imprinting Reveal Tissue- and Cluster-Specific Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Christopher D.; Matundan, Harry H.; Duselis, Amanda R.; Isaacs, Alison T.; Vrana, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Crosses between natural populations of two species of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus (BW), and P. polionotus (PO), produce parent-of-origin effects on growth and development. BW females mated to PO males (bw×po) produce growth-retarded but otherwise healthy offspring. In contrast, PO females mated to BW males (PO×BW) produce overgrown and severely defective offspring. The hybrid phenotypes are pronounced in the placenta and include PO×BW conceptuses which lack embryonic structures. Evidence to date links variation in control of genomic imprinting with the hybrid defects, particularly in the PO×BW offspring. Establishment of genomic imprinting is typically mediated by gametic DNA methylation at sites known as gDMRs. However, imprinted gene clusters vary in their regulation by gDMR sequences. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we further assess imprinted gene expression and DNA methylation at different cluster types in order to discern patterns. These data reveal PO×BW misexpression at the Kcnq1ot1 and Peg3 clusters, both of which lose ICR methylation in placental tissues. In contrast, some embryonic transcripts (Peg10, Kcnq1ot1) reactivated the silenced allele with little or no loss of DNA methylation. Hybrid brains also display different patterns of imprinting perturbations. Several cluster pairs thought to use analogous regulatory mechanisms are differentially affected in the hybrids. Conclusions/Significance These data reinforce the hypothesis that placental and somatic gene regulation differs significantly, as does that between imprinted gene clusters and between species. That such epigenetic regulatory variation exists in recently diverged species suggests a role in reproductive isolation, and that this variation is likely to be adaptive. PMID:18958286

  12. A custody battle for the mind: evidence for extensive imprinting in the brain.

    PubMed

    Tollkuhn, Jessica; Xu, Xiaohong; Shah, Nirao M

    2010-08-12

    Relatively few genes (approximately 100) have previously been shown to be imprinted such that their expression in progeny derives from either the maternal or paternal copy. Two recent studies by Gregg et al. (2010a, 2010b) in Science expand this list by an order of magnitude, revealing complex patterns of parent-of-origin bias in gene expression in the brain that are developmentally and regionally restricted, and in many cases, sexually dimorphic. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imprinting control regions (ICRs) are marked by mono-allelic bivalent chromatin when transcriptionally inactive

    PubMed Central

    Maupetit-Méhouas, Stéphanie; Montibus, Bertille; Nury, David; Tayama, Chiharu; Wassef, Michel; Kota, Satya K.; Fogli, Anne; Cerqueira Campos, Fabiana; Hata, Kenichiro; Feil, Robert; Margueron, Raphael; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Parental allele-specific expression of imprinted genes is mediated by imprinting control regions (ICRs) that are constitutively marked by DNA methylation imprints on the maternal or paternal allele. Mono-allelic DNA methylation is strictly required for the process of imprinting and has to be faithfully maintained during the entire life-span. While the regulation of DNA methylation itself is well understood, the mechanisms whereby the opposite allele remains unmethylated are unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse, at maternally methylated ICRs, the paternal allele, which is constitutively associated with H3K4me2/3, is marked by default by H3K27me3 when these ICRs are transcriptionally inactive, leading to the formation of a bivalent chromatin signature. Our data suggest that at ICRs, chromatin bivalency has a protective role by ensuring that DNA on the paternal allele remains unmethylated and protected against spurious and unscheduled gene expression. Moreover, they provide the proof of concept that, beside pluripotent cells, chromatin bivalency is the default state of transcriptionally inactive CpG island promoters, regardless of the developmental stage, thereby contributing to protect cell identity. PMID:26400168

  14. Pairing of Homologous Regions in the Mouse Genome Is Associated with Transcription but Not Imprinting Status

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Christel; King, Michelle R.; Krueger, Felix; Branco, Miguel R.; Osborne, Cameron S.; Niakan, Kathy K.; Higgins, Michael J.; Reik, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    Although somatic homologous pairing is common in Drosophila it is not generally observed in mammalian cells. However, a number of regions have recently been shown to come into close proximity with their homologous allele, and it has been proposed that pairing might be involved in the establishment or maintenance of monoallelic expression. Here, we investigate the pairing properties of various imprinted and non-imprinted regions in mouse tissues and ES cells. We find by allele-specific 4C-Seq and DNA FISH that the Kcnq1 imprinted region displays frequent pairing but that this is not dependent on monoallelic expression. We demonstrate that pairing involves larger chromosomal regions and that the two chromosome territories come close together. Frequent pairing is not associated with imprinted status or DNA repair, but is influenced by chromosomal location and transcription. We propose that homologous pairing is not exclusive to specialised regions or specific functional events, and speculate that it provides the cell with the opportunity of trans-allelic effects on gene regulation. PMID:22802932

  15. Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Nanorods for Homogeneous Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rongning; Wang, Tiantian; Zhang, Huan; Yao, Ruiqing; Qin, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, it is still difficult for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) to achieve homogeneous recognition since they cannot be easily dissolved in organic or aqueous phase. To address this issue, soluble molecularly imprinted nanorods have been synthesized by using soluble polyaniline doped with a functionalized organic protonic acid as the polymer matrix. By employing 1-naphthoic acid as a model, the proposed imprinted nanorods exhibit an excellent solubility and good homogeneous recognition ability. The imprinting factor for the soluble imprinted nanoroads is 6.8. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the apparent maximum number of the proposed imprinted nanorods are 248.5 μM and 22.1 μmol/g, respectively. We believe that such imprinted nanorods may provide an appealing substitute for natural receptors in homogeneous recognition related fields. PMID:29662877

  16. Molecular Recognition Effects in Atomistic Models of Imprinted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Dourado, Eduardo M. A.; Herdes, Carmelo; van Tassel, Paul R.; Sarkisov, Lev

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present a model for molecularly imprinted polymers, which considers both complexation processes in the pre-polymerization mixture and adsorption in the imprinted structures within a single consistent framework. As a case study we investigate MAA/EGDMA polymers imprinted with pyrazine and pyrimidine. A polymer imprinted with pyrazine shows substantial selectivity towards pyrazine over pyrimidine, thus exhibiting molecular recognition, whereas the pyrimidine imprinted structure shows no preferential adsorption of the template. Binding sites responsible for the molecular recognition of pyrazine involve one MAA molecule and one EGDMA molecule, forming associations with the two functional groups of the pyrazine molecule. Presence of these specific sites in the pyrazine imprinted system and lack of the analogous sites in the pyrimidine imprinted system is directly linked to the complexation processes in the pre-polymerization solution. These processes are quite different for pyrazine and pyrimidine as a result of both enthalpic and entropic effects. PMID:21954325

  17. 77 FR 25082 - Picture Permit Imprint Indicia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... customers to include business-related color images, such as corporate logos, company brand or trademarks, in... contain business-related color images, such as corporate logos, brand, trademarks and other pictorial... Prohibitions Color images used in picture permit imprint indicia must maintain neutrality on social or...

  18. Molecular Imprinting Applications in Forensic Science

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Garipcan, Bora; Patra, Hirak K.; Uzun, Lokman

    2017-01-01

    Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food industry, environmental monitoring, and medicine for diverse purposes like sample pretreatment, sensing, and separation/purification. A versatile usage, stability and recognition capabilities also make them perfect candidates for use in forensic sciences. Forensic science is a demanding area and there is a growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in this field. In this review, recent molecular imprinting applications in the related areas of forensic sciences are discussed while considering the literature of last two decades. Not only direct forensic applications but also studies of possible forensic value were taken into account like illicit drugs, banned sport drugs, effective toxins and chemical warfare agents in a review of over 100 articles. The literature was classified according to targets, material shapes, production strategies, detection method, and instrumentation. We aimed to summarize the current applications of MIPs in forensic science and put forth a projection of their potential uses as promising alternatives for benchmark competitors. PMID:28350333

  19. Molecular Imprinting Applications in Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Garipcan, Bora; Patra, Hirak K; Uzun, Lokman

    2017-03-28

    Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food industry, environmental monitoring, and medicine for diverse purposes like sample pretreatment, sensing, and separation/purification. A versatile usage, stability and recognition capabilities also make them perfect candidates for use in forensic sciences. Forensic science is a demanding area and there is a growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in this field. In this review, recent molecular imprinting applications in the related areas of forensic sciences are discussed while considering the literature of last two decades. Not only direct forensic applications but also studies of possible forensic value were taken into account like illicit drugs, banned sport drugs, effective toxins and chemical warfare agents in a review of over 100 articles. The literature was classified according to targets, material shapes, production strategies, detection method, and instrumentation. We aimed to summarize the current applications of MIPs in forensic science and put forth a projection of their potential uses as promising alternatives for benchmark competitors.

  20. Atomic-Scale Imprinting into Amorphous Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Udo; Li, Rui; Simon, Georg; Kinser, Emely; Liu, Ze; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Chao; Singer, Jonathan; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan

    Nanoimprinting by thermoplastic forming (TPF) has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its promise of low-cost fabrication of nanostructured devices. Usually performed using polymers, amorphous metals have been identified as a material class that might be even better suited for nanoimprinting due to a combination of mechanical properties and processing ability. Commonly referred to as metallic glasses, their featureless atomic structure suggests that there may not be an intrinsic size limit to the material's ability to replicate a mold. To study this hypothesis, we demonstrate atomic-scale imprinting into amorphous metals by TPF under ambient conditions. Atomic step edges of a SrTiO3 (STO) single crystal used as mold were successfully imprinted into Pt-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high fidelity. Terraces on the BMG replicas possess atomic smoothness with sub-Angstrom roughness that is identical to the one measured on the STO mold. Systematic studies revealed that the quality of the replica depends on the loading rate during imprinting, that the same mold can be used multiple times without degradation of mold or replicas, and that the atomic-scale features on as-imprinted BMG surfaces has impressive long-term stability (months).

  1. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Frasco, Manuela F.; Truta, Liliana A. A. N. A.; Sales, M. Goreti F.; Moreira, Felismina T. C.

    2017-01-01

    Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out. PMID:28272314

  2. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Frasco, Manuela F; Truta, Liliana A A N A; Sales, M Goreti F; Moreira, Felismina T C

    2017-03-06

    Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out.

  3. Plastic Antibodies: Molecular Recognition with Imprinted Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Furmanski, Brian; Shimizu, Ken D.

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are prepared and tested in a study for their molecular recognition properties of an adenine derivative, ethyl adenine-9-acetate (EA9A), within two laboratory periods. The procedure introduces undergraduate chemistry students to noncovalent molecular imprinting as well as the analytical techniques for assessing their recognition…

  4. Elevated insulin-like growth factor 2 expression may contribute to the hypermuscular phenotype of myostatin null mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel L; Clark, Diana I; Hogan, Elizabeth K; Kroscher, Kellie A; Dilger, Anna C

    2015-10-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) inhibits while insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (Igf1 and Igf2) increase skeletal muscle growth. However, there is little known regarding Mstn regulation of Igf1 and Igf2 expression. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify the expression of IGF family members in skeletal muscle and liver throughout the growth phase of Mstn null (MN) mice. Further, differences between male and female mice were investigated. Male and female wild type (WT) and MN mice were euthanized at birth (0 d), 7 days (7 d), weaning (21 d), sexual maturity (42 d), and 70 d. For the neonatal periods, 0 d and 7 d, all muscles from the hind limbs were compiled for RNA extraction. At 21 d, 42 d, and 70 d, biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior, triceps brachii (TB), and gastrocnemius-soleus complex were collected. As expected, muscle weights were up to 90% greater in MN mice compared with WT mice at 21 d, 42 d and 70 d. However, Igf1 expression was reduced (P ≤ 0.04) at 7d and 21 d in MN mice compared to WT mice. Expression of Igf2 did not differ between genotypes at 0 d and 7d, but, at 21 d, 42 d and 70 d in BF and TB muscles, Igf2 expression was 1.9-2.9 fold greater (P<0.01) in MN compared to WT mice. Hepatic Igf1 and Igf2 levels were minimally affected by genotype; with the exception of a 1.4-fold reduction (P=0.04) in Igf1 expression in 21 d MN mice compared with WT mice. Though male mice were heavier than females starting at 21 d of age, expression differences in Igf1, Igf2, their receptors and binding proteins do not account for growth differences. In every case, when expression was different between sexes, female expression was increased despite increased growth in male mice. This study is the first to provide evidence that Mstn may negatively regulate Igf2 expression to control postnatal skeletal muscle growth, however differences in growth between male and female mice are not readily explained by changes in expression of Igf family members. Copyright

  5. Genome-wide mRNA profiling reveals heterochronic allelic variation and a new imprinted gene in hybrid maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Danilevskaya, Olga N; Yang, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zihua

    2003-10-01

    We have taken a genomic approach to examine global gene expression in the maize endosperm in relation to dosage and parental effects. Endosperm of eight hybrids generated by reciprocal crosses and their seven inbred parents were sampled at three developmental stages: 10, 14, and 21 days after pollination (DAP). These samples were subjected to GeneCalling, an open-ended mRNA-profiling technology, which simultaneously analyzes thousands of genes. Results indicated that the overall level of gene expression in the maize endosperm was dosage-dependent, that is, the gene expression was proportional to the parental genome contribution of 2n maternal : 1n paternal. However, approximately 8% of the genes deviated from such allelic additive expression and exhibited differential expression in hybrids of reciprocal crosses, resembling either maternally or paternally expressed genes. There were more genes with maternal-like expression (MLE) than those with paternal-like expression (PLE). Allele-specific expression analysis of four selected genes using the WAVE denaturing HPLC (dHPLC) system revealed several mechanisms responsible for the deviation from the allelic additive expression in the hybrid endosperm: heterochronic allelic variation, allelic variation in the level of expression, and genomic imprinting. We discovered a novel imprinted gene no-apical-meristem (NAM) related protein1 (nrp1) that was expressed only in the endosperm and regulated by gene-specific imprinting. The nrp1 gene, a putative transcriptional factor, may play an important role in endosperm development.

  6. Three siblings with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by imprinting center microdeletions and review.

    PubMed

    Hartin, Samantha N; Hossain, Waheeda A; Weisensel, Nicolette; Butler, Merlin G

    2018-04-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic imprinting disorder characterized by childhood obesity, short stature, hypogonadism/hypogenitalism, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems. Usually PWS occurs sporadically due to the loss of paternally expressed genes on chromosome 15 with the majority of individuals having the 15q11-q13 region deleted. Examples of familial PWS have been reported but rarely. To date 13 families have been reported with more than one child with PWS and without a 15q11-q13 deletion secondary to a chromosome 15 translocation, inversion, or uniparental maternal disomy 15. Ten of those 13 families were shown to carry microdeletions in the PWS imprinting center. The microdeletions were found to be of paternal origin in nine of the ten cases in which family studies were carried out. Using a variety of techniques, the microdeletions were identified in regions within the complex SNRPN gene locus encompassing the PWS imprinting center. Here, we report the clinical and genetic findings in three adult siblings with PWS caused by a microdeletion in the chromosome 15 imprinting center inherited from an unaffected father that controls the activity of genes in the 15q11-q13 region and summarize the 13 reported cases in the literature. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Asymmetric DNA methylation of CpG dyads is a feature of secondary DMRs associated with the Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinting cluster in mouse.

    PubMed

    Guntrum, Megan; Vlasova, Ekaterina; Davis, Tamara L

    2017-01-01

    Differential DNA methylation plays a critical role in the regulation of imprinted genes. The differentially methylated state of the imprinting control region is inherited via the gametes at fertilization, and is stably maintained in somatic cells throughout development, influencing the expression of genes across the imprinting cluster. In contrast, DNA methylation patterns are more labile at secondary differentially methylated regions which are established at imprinted loci during post-implantation development. To investigate the nature of these more variably methylated secondary differentially methylated regions, we adopted a hairpin linker bisulfite mutagenesis approach to examine CpG dyad methylation at differentially methylated regions associated with the murine Dlk1/Gtl2 imprinting cluster on both complementary strands. We observed homomethylation at greater than 90% of the methylated CpG dyads at the IG-DMR, which serves as the imprinting control element. In contrast, homomethylation was only observed at 67-78% of the methylated CpG dyads at the secondary differentially methylated regions; the remaining 22-33% of methylated CpG dyads exhibited hemimethylation. We propose that this high degree of hemimethylation could explain the variability in DNA methylation patterns at secondary differentially methylated regions associated with imprinted loci. We further suggest that the presence of 5-hydroxymethylation at secondary differentially methylated regions may result in hemimethylation and methylation variability as a result of passive and/or active demethylation mechanisms.

  8. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  9. Immunoendocrinology: faulty hormonal imprinting in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2014-06-01

    Hormonal imprinting is an epigenetic process which is taking place perinatally at the first encounter between the developing hormone receptors and their target hormones. The hormonal imprinting influences the binding capacity of receptors, the hormone synthesis of the cells, and other hormonally regulated functions, as sexual behavior, aggressivity, empathy, etc. However, during the critical period, when the window for imprinting is open, molecules similar to the physiological imprinters as synthetic hormone analogs, other members of the hormone families, environmental pollutants, etc. can cause faulty imprinting with life-long consequences. The developing immune system, the cells of which also have receptors for hormones, is very sensitive to faulty imprinting, which causes alterations in the antibody and cytokine production, in the ratio of immune cells, in the defense against bacterial and viral infections as well as against malignant tumors. Immune cells (lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and mast cells) are also producing hormones which are secreted into the blood circulation as well as are transported locally (packed transport). This process is also disturbed by faulty imprinting. As immune cells are differentiating during the whole life, faulty imprinting could develop any time, however, the most decisive is the perinatal imprinting. The faulty imprinting is inherited to the progenies in general and especially in the case of immune system. In our modern world the number and amount of artificial imprinters (e.g. endocrine disruptors and drugs) are enormously increasing. The effects of the faulty imprinters most dangerous to the immune system are shown in the paper. The present and future consequences of the flood of faulty imprintings are unpredictable however, it is discussed.

  10. Impact of Common Variants of PPARG, KCNJ11, TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX, CDKN2A, IGF2BP2, and CDKAL1 on the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in 5,164 Indians

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ganesh; Spurgeon, Charles J.; Tabassum, Rubina; Bhaskar, Seema; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Mahajan, Anubha; Chavali, Sreenivas; Kumar, M.V. Kranthi; Prakash, Swami; Dwivedi, Om Prakash; Ghosh, Saurabh; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Tandon, Nikhil; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Chandak, Giriraj R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Common variants in PPARG, KCNJ11, TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX, CDKN2A, IGF2BP2, and CDKAL1 genes have been shown to be associated with type 2 diabetes in European populations by genome-wide association studies. We have studied the association of common variants in these eight genes with type 2 diabetes and related traits in Indians by combining the data from two independent case–control studies. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We genotyped eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (PPARG-rs1801282, KCNJ11-rs5219, TCF7L2-rs7903146, SLC30A8-rs13266634, HHEX-rs1111875, CDKN2A-rs10811661, IGF2BP2-rs4402960, and CDKAL1-rs10946398) in 5,164 unrelated Indians of Indo-European ethnicity, including 2,486 type 2 diabetic patients and 2,678 ethnically matched control subjects. RESULTS We confirmed the association of all eight loci with type 2 diabetes with odds ratio (OR) ranging from 1.18 to 1.89 (P = 1.6 × 10−3 to 4.6 × 10−34). The strongest association with the highest effect size was observed for TCF7L2 (OR 1.89 [95% CI 1.71–2.09], P = 4.6 × 10−34). We also found significant association of PPARG and TCF7L2 with homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (P = 6.9 × 10−8 and 3 × 10−4, respectively), which looked consistent with recessive and under-dominant models, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Our study replicates the association of well-established common variants with type 2 diabetes in Indians and shows larger effect size for most of them than those reported in Europeans. PMID:20424228

  11. Molecularly imprinted polymers for bioanalytical sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Gama, Mariana Roberto; Bottoli, Carla Beatriz Grespan

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are stable polymers with molecular recognition abilities, provided by the presence of a template during their synthesis, and are excellent materials with high selectivity for sample preparation in bioanalytical methods. This short review discusses aspects of MIP preparation and its applications as a sorbent material in pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis. MIP in different extraction configurations, including classical solid-phase extraction, solid-phase microextraction, magnetic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction, microextraction by packed sorbent and solid-phase extraction in pipette tips, are used to illustrate the good performance of this type of sorbent for sample preparation procedures of complex matrices, especially prior to bioanalytical approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications. PMID:28218689

  13. Bolt Cutter Blade's Imprint in Toolmarks Examination.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Nikolai; Finkelstein, Nir; Novoselsky, Yehuda; Tsach, Tsadok

    2015-11-01

    Bolt cutters are known as cutting tools which are used for cutting hard objects and materials, such as padlocks and bars. Bolt cutter blades leave their imprint on the cut objects. When receiving a cut object from a crime scene, forensic toolmarks examiners can determine whether the suspected cutting tool was used in a specific crime or not based on class characteristic marks and individual marks that the bolt cutter blades leave on the cut object. The paper presents preliminary results of a study on ten bolt cutters and suggests a quick preliminary examination-the comparison between the blade thickness and the width of the imprint left by the tool on the cut object. Based on the comparison result, if there is not a match, the examiner can eliminate the feasibility of the use of the suspected cutting tool in a specific crime. This examination simplifies and accelerates the comparison procedure. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Current Progress of Nanomaterials in Molecularly Imprinted Electrochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chunju; Yang, Bin; Jiang, Xinxin; Li, Jianping

    2018-01-02

    Nanomaterials have received much attention during the past decade because of their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. Nanomaterials possess high chemical reactivity, also high surface energy. Thus, provide a stable immobilization platform for biomolecules, while preserving their reactivity. Due to the conductive and catalytic properties, nanomaterials can also enhance the sensitivity of molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensors by amplifying the electrode surface, increasing the electron transfer, and catalyzing the electrochemical reactions. Molecularly imprinted polymers that contain specific molecular recognition sites can be designed for a particular target analyte. Incorporating nanomaterials into molecularly imprinted polymers is important because nanomaterials can improve the response signal, increase the sensitivity, and decrease the detection limit of the sensors. This study describes the classification of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers, their analytical properties, and their applications in the electrochemical sensors. The progress of the research on nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers and the application of nanomaterials in molecularly imprinted polymers is also reviewed.

  15. A molecular-imprint nanosensor for ultrasensitive detection of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dong; Ren, Lu; Zhao, Huaizhou; Xu, Chenjia; Zhang, Lu; Yu, Ying; Wang, Hengzhi; Lan, Yucheng; Roberts, Mary F.; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Naughton, Michael J.; Ren, Zhifeng; Chiles, Thomas C.

    2010-08-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique for preparing polymer scaffolds that function as synthetic receptors. Imprinted polymers that can selectively bind organic compounds have proven useful in sensor development. Although creating synthetic molecular-imprinting polymers that recognize proteins remains challenging, nanodevices and nanomaterials show promise in this area. Here, we show that arrays of carbon-nanotube tips with an imprinted non-conducting polymer coating can recognize proteins with subpicogram per litre sensitivity using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We have developed molecular-imprinting sensors specific for human ferritin and human papillomavirus derived E7 protein. The molecular-imprinting-based nanosensor can also discriminate between Ca2+-induced conformational changes in calmodulin. This ultrasensitive, label-free electrochemical detection of proteins offers an alternative to biosensors based on biomolecule recognition.

  16. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Bradley R [Brentwood, CA; Talley, Chad E [Brentwood, CA

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  17. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers.

    PubMed

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-03-17

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers - the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production.

  18. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-03-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers - the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production.

  19. Seal imprint verification using edge difference histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jin; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Tiegen

    2012-11-01

    An algorithm based on the histogram of edge difference between MS (model seal) and SS (sample seal) was proposed to verify Chinese seal imprints in bank checks. Difference between MS and an elaborate fake SS may be slight, while that between MS and a genuine SS may be not small due to the variety of imprinting conditions. Edge differences wholly reflect geometrical differences between SS and MS. To evaluate similarities between MS and SS, edge difference was quantified as two parameters, the distance between non-overlapped corresponding edges and the length of each piece of non-overlapped seal edges. A histogram on the product of the two parameters is proposed as the input feature vectors of SVM (support vector machine). SS was verified as true or false by Support Vector Machine (SVM). In Experiments, 4810 (2450 genuine and 2360 fake) seal imprints were verified, and the correct recognition rate is 99.42%. Moreover, the classification results can be customized according to the requirements of users. When the false-acceptance error rate and the false-rejection error rate are both required to be close to 0, the rejection rate is about 3%.

  20. The complex genetics of human insulin-like growth factor 2 are not reflected in public databases.

    PubMed

    Rotwein, Peter

    2018-03-23

    Recent advances in genetics present unique opportunities for enhancing knowledge about human physiology and disease susceptibility. Understanding this information at the individual gene level is challenging and requires extracting, collating, and interpreting data from a variety of public gene repositories. Here, I illustrate this challenge by analyzing the gene for human insulin-like growth factor 2 ( IGF2 ) through the lens of several databases. IGF2, a 67-amino acid secreted peptide, is essential for normal prenatal growth and is involved in other physiological and pathophysiological processes in humans. Surprisingly, none of the genetic databases accurately described or completely delineated human IGF2 gene structure or transcript expression, even though all relevant information could be found in the published literature. Although IGF2 shares multiple features with the mouse Igf2 gene, it has several unique properties, including transcription from five promoters. Both genes undergo parental imprinting, with IGF2 / Igf2 being expressed primarily from the paternal chromosome and the adjacent H19 gene from the maternal chromosome. Unlike mouse Igf2 , whose expression declines after birth, human IGF2 remains active throughout life. This characteristic has been attributed to a unique human gene promoter that escapes imprinting, but as shown here, it involves several different promoters with distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. Because new testable hypotheses could lead to critical insights into IGF2 actions in human physiology and disease, it is incumbent that our fundamental understanding is accurate. Similar challenges affecting knowledge of other human genes should promote attempts to critically evaluate, interpret, and correct human genetic data in publicly available databases. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. A possible role for imprinted genes in inbreeding avoidance and dispersal from the natal area in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Isles, Anthony R; Baum, Michael J; Ma, Dan; Szeto, Abigail; Keverne, Eric B; Allen, Nicholas D

    2002-01-01

    The expression of a subset of mammalian genes is subject to parent of origin effects (POE), most of which can be explained by genomic imprinting. Analysis of mutant animals has demonstrated that a number of imprinted genes influence brain development and behaviour. Here we provide evidence for POE on olfactory related behaviour and sensitivity to maternal odour cues. This was investigated by examining the odour preference behaviour of reciprocal cross F(1) mice made by embryo transfer to genetically unrelated foster parents. We determined that both adult males and females show an avoidance of female urinary odours of their genetic maternal but not paternal origin. This was found not to be due to any previous exposure to these odours or due to self-learning, but may be related to direct effects on the olfactory system, as reciprocal F(1) males show differential sensitivity to female odour cues. Currently the most robust theory to explain the evolution of imprinting is the conflict hypothesis that focuses on maternal resource allocation to the developing foetus. Kinship considerations are also likely to be important in the selection of imprinted genes and we discuss our findings within this context, suggesting that imprinted genes act directly on the olfactory system to promote post-weaning dispersal from the natal area. PMID:11934356

  2. [Biological decontamination of the imprints obtained from different dental materials].

    PubMed

    Brekhlichuk, P P; Petrov, V O; Bati, V V; Levchuk, O B; Boĭko, N V

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of the imprints made of alginate ("Ypeen") and silicone material ("Speedex") with and without the correction supplement has been investigated. Streptococcus and Staphylococcus have been estimated to be the most survivable species on the imprint surface, however their concentration differ depending on the type of imprints' material. The strains resistant to antibiotics dominated among all the isolated microorganisms. Bacterial preparations based on Bacillus - Biosporin and Subalin and some extracts of edible plants, fruits and berries can be used in dentistry for the decontamination of imprints obtained by the use of different materials.

  3. Food imprinting, new evidence from the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Darmaillacq, Anne-Sophie; Chichery, Raymond; Dickel, Ludovic

    2006-09-22

    Imprinting provides precocial offspring with an efficient means to optimize their subsequent behaviours. We discovered food imprinting using a sophisticated invertebrate model: the cuttlefish. We showed that early juveniles preferred the prey to which they have been visually familiarized, when the amount of information was sufficient and only if such familiarization occurred during a short sensitive period. We also demonstrated that the effects of visual food imprinting overcame those of the first food ingested. Our study shows that visual imprinting is a critical process in animals, surpassing more direct reward experiences that occur outside the critical exposure period.

  4. Food imprinting, new evidence from the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Darmaillacq, Anne-Sophie; Chichery, Raymond; Dickel, Ludovic

    2006-01-01

    Imprinting provides precocial offspring with an efficient means to optimize their subsequent behaviours. We discovered food imprinting using a sophisticated invertebrate model: the cuttlefish. We showed that early juveniles preferred the prey to which they have been visually familiarized, when the amount of information was sufficient and only if such familiarization occurred during a short sensitive period. We also demonstrated that the effects of visual food imprinting overcame those of the first food ingested. Our study shows that visual imprinting is a critical process in animals, surpassing more direct reward experiences that occur outside the critical exposure period. PMID:17148399

  5. Preparation of protein imprinted materials by hierarchical imprinting techniques and application in selective depletion of albumin from human serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxiang; Deng, Qiliang; Tao, Dingyin; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-06-30

    Hierarchical imprinting was developed to prepare the protein imprinted materials, as the artificial antibody, for the selective depletion of HSA from the human serum proteome. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) was employed as the dummy template for the fabrication of the recognition sites. To demonstrate the advantages of the hierarchical imprinting, molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique (h-MIPs) were compared with those obtained by bulk imprinting (b-MIPs), in terms of the binding capacity, adsorption kinetics, selectivity and synthesis reproducibility. The binding capacity of h-MIPs could reach 12 mg g(-1). And saturation binding could be reached in less than 20 min for the h-MIPs. In the protein mixture, h-MIPs exhibit excellent selectivity for PSA, with imprinting factors as about 3.6, much higher than those for non-template proteins. For the proteomic application, the identified protein group number in serum treated by h-MIPs was increased to 422, which is 21% higher than that obtained from the original serum, meanwhile the identified protein group number for the Albumin Removal kit was only 376. The results demonstrate that protein imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique, might become the artificial antibodies for the selective depletion of high abundance proteins in proteome study.

  6. Epigenetic reprogramming and imprinting in origins of disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wan-yee

    2014-01-01

    The traditional view that gene and environment interactions control disease susceptibility can now be expanded to include epigenetic reprogramming as a key determinant of origins of human disease. Currently, epigenetics is defined as heritable changes in gene expression that do not alter DNA sequence but are mitotically and trans-generationally inheritable. Epigenetic reprogramming is the process by which an organism’s genotype interacts with the environment to produce its phenotype and provides a framework for explaining individual variations and the uniqueness of cells, tissues, or organs despite identical genetic information. The main epigenetic mediators are histone modification, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNAs. They regulate crucial cellular functions such as genome stability, X-chromosome inactivation, gene imprinting, and reprogramming of non-imprinting genes, and work on developmental plasticity such that exposures to endogenous or exogenous factors during critical periods permanently alter the structure or function of specific organ systems. Developmental epigenetics is believed to establish “adaptive” phenotypes to meet the demands of the later-life environment. Resulting phenotypes that match predicted later-life demands will promote health, while a high degree of mismatch will impede adaptability to later-life challenges and elevate disease risk. The rapid introduction of synthetic chemicals, medical interventions, environmental pollutants, and lifestyle choices, may result in conflict with the programmed adaptive changes made during early development, and explain the alarming increases in some diseases. The recent identification of a significant number of epigenetically regulated genes in various model systems has prepared the field to take on the challenge of characterizing distinct epigenomes related to various diseases. Improvements in human health could then be redirected from curative care to personalized, preventive medicine based, in

  7. High-resolution map and imprinting analysis of the Gtl2-Dnchc1 domain on mouse chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Tierling, Sascha; Dalbert, Simone; Schoppenhorst, Sandra; Tsai, Chen-En; Oliger, Sven; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Paulsen, Martina; Walter, Jörn

    2006-02-01

    The imprinted Dlk1-Dio3 region on mouse chromosome 12 contains six imprinted genes and a number of maternally expressed snoRNAs and miRNAs. Here we present a high-resolution sequence analysis of the 1.1-Mb segment telomeric to Gtl2 in mouse and a homology comparison to the human. Ppp2r5c and Dnchc1 at the telomeric end of the analyzed sequence are biallelically expressed, suggesting that the imprinted domain does not extend beyond the paternally expressed Dio3 gene. RT-PCR experiments support the predicted presence of a maternally expressed intergenic transcript(s) encompassing Gtl2, Rian, and Mirg. These maternally expressed genes, and also the intergenic transcript(s), show pronounced expression in the adult mouse brain, whereas the paternally transcribed Dio3 and the nonimprinted Ppp2r5c and Dnchc1 are expressed in different tissues. Hence, tissue-specific coregulation of maternally expressed genes might be an important feature of this domain.

  8. Expression of insulin-like growth factor system genes during the early postnatal neurogenesis in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihui; Moats-Staats, Billie M; Ye, Ping; D'Ercole, A Joseph

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is essential to hippocampal neurogenesis and the neuronal response to hypoxia/ischemia injury. IGF (IGF-1 and -2) signaling is mediated primarily by the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and modulated by six high-affinity binding proteins (IGFBP) and the type 2 IGF receptor (IGF-2R), collectively termed IGF system proteins. Defining the precise cells that express each is essential to understanding their roles. With the exception of IGFBP-1, we found that mouse hippocampus expresses mRNA for each of these proteins during the first 2 weeks of postnatal life. Compared to postnatal day 14 (P14), mRNA abundance at P5 was higher for IGF-1, IGFBP-2, -3, and -5 (by 71%, 108%, 100%, and 98%, respectively), lower for IGF-2, IGF-2R, and IGFBP-6 (by 65%, 78%, and 44%, respectively), and unchanged for IGF-1R and IGFBP-4. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM), we found that granule neurons and pyramidal neurons exhibited identical patterns of expression of IGF-1, IGF-1R, IGF-2R, IGFBP-2, and -4, but did not express other IGF system genes. We then compared IGF system expression in mature granule neurons and their progenitors. Progenitors exhibited higher mRNA levels of IGF-1 and IGF-1R (by 130% and 86%, respectively), lower levels of IGF-2R (by 72%), and similar levels of IGFBP-4. Our data support a role for IGF in hippocampal neurogenesis and provide evidence that IGF actions are regulated within a defined in vivo milieu. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Heat-induced release of epigenetic silencing reveals the concealed role of an imprinted plant gene.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diego H; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2014-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms suppress the transcription of transposons and DNA repeats; however, this suppression can be transiently released under prolonged heat stress. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana imprinted gene SDC, which is silent during vegetative growth due to DNA methylation, is activated by heat and contributes to recovery from stress. SDC activation seems to involve epigenetic mechanisms but not canonical heat-shock perception and signaling. The heat-mediated transcriptional induction of SDC occurs particularly in young developing leaves and is proportional to the level of stress. However, this occurs only above a certain window of absolute temperatures and, thus, resembles a thermal-sensing mechanism. In addition, the re-silencing kinetics during recovery can be entrained by repeated heat stress cycles, suggesting that epigenetic regulation in plants may conserve memory of stress experience. We further demonstrate that SDC contributes to the recovery of plant biomass after stress. We propose that transcriptional gene silencing, known to be involved in gene imprinting, is also co-opted in the specific tuning of SDC expression upon heat stress and subsequent recovery. It is therefore possible that dynamic properties of the epigenetic landscape associated with silenced or imprinted genes may contribute to regulation of their expression in response to environmental challenges.

  10. Investigation of imprinting parameters and their recognition nature for quinine-molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian-feng; Zhu, Quan-hong; Deng, Qin-ying

    2007-08-01

    A series of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was prepared using quinine as the template molecules by bulk polymerization. The presence of monomer-template solution complexes in non-covalent MIPs systems has been verified by both fluorescence and UV-vis spectrometric detection. The influence of different synthetic conditions (porogen, functional monomer, cross-linkers, initiation methods, monomer-template ratio, etc.) on recognition properties of the polymers was investigated. Scatchard analysis revealed that two classes of binding sites were formed in the imprinted polymer. The corresponding dissociation constants were estimated to be 45.00 μmol l -1 and 1.42 mmol l -1, respectively, by utilizing a multi-site recognition model. The binding characteristics of the imprinted polymers were explored in various solvents using equilibrium binding experiments. In the organic media, results suggested that polar interactions (hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, etc.) between acidic monomer/polymer and template molecules were mainly responsible for the recognition, whereas in aqueous media, hydrophobic interactions had a remarkable non-specific contribution to the overall binding. The specificity of MIP was evaluated by rebinding the other structurally similar compounds. The results indicated that the imprinted polymers exhibited an excellent stereo-selectivity toward quinine.

  11. Imprinting alterations in sperm may not significantly influence ART outcomes and imprinting patterns in the cord blood of offspring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li; Liu, Zichao; Zhang, Ruopeng; Su, Cunmei; Yang, Wenjuan; Yao, Youlin; Zhao, Shuhua

    2017-01-01

    An increase in imprinting disorders in children conceived though assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has been the subject of several reports. The transmission of imprinting errors from the sperm of infertile fathers is believed to be a possible reason for the increased occurrence of these disorders. However, whether the imprinting alterations in sperm affect ART outcomes and the imprinting of offspring is unclear. In the current study, we analyzed the methylation of H19, SNRPN and KCNQ1OT1 by pyrosequencing sperm samples from 97 infertile patients and 31 proven fertile males as well as cord blood samples from 13 infantswho were conceived by infertile parents through intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and 30 healthy newborns who were conceived naturally. After four cases were excluded owing to the lack of a sequencing signal, the infertile patients were subgrouped into normal (69 cases) and abnormal (24 cases) imprinting groups according to the reference range set by the control group. Between the groups, there were no significant differences in ART outcomes. Significantly different levels of methylation were detected in H19, but none of the imprinted genes were determined to be outside of the methylation reference range set by the values derived from the naturally conceived controls. Three CpG loci were found to be significantly hypomethylated in the maternally imprinted gene KCNQ1OT1 in two patients from the abnormal imprinting group, none of which were caused by sperm imprinting errors. In addition, the paternal H19 gene exhibited discrepant methylation patterns between the sperm controls and the cord blood controls. Our data suggest that increased imprinting errors in the sperm of infertile patients do not have an obvious influence on ART outcomes or the imprinting of offspring.

  12. Imprinting can cause a maladaptive preference for infectious conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jessica F; Reynolds, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Recognizing and associating with specific individuals, such as conspecifics or kin, brings many benefits. One mechanism underlying such recognition is imprinting: the long-term memory of cues encountered during development. Typically, juveniles imprint on cues of nearby individuals and may later associate with phenotypes matching their 'recognition template'. However, phenotype matching could lead to maladaptive social decisions if, for instance, individuals imprint on the cues of conspecifics infected with directly transmitted diseases. To investigate the role of imprinting in the sensory ecology of disease transmission, we exposed juvenile guppies,Poecilia reticulata, to the cues of healthy conspecifics, or to those experiencing disease caused by the directly transmitted parasite Gyrodactylus turnbulli In a dichotomous choice test, adult 'disease-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with the chemical cues of G. turnbulli-infected conspecifics, whereas 'healthy-imprinted' guppies preferred to associate with cues of uninfected conspecifics. These responses were only observed when stimulus fish were in late infection, suggesting imprinted fish responded to cues of disease, but not of infection alone. We discuss how maladaptive imprinting may promote disease transmission in natural populations of a social host. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required. (a) Unless exempted under § 206.7, no drug product in solid oral dosage form may be introduced or...

  14. 21 CFR 206.10 - Code imprint required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL IMPRINTING OF SOLID ORAL DOSAGE FORM DRUG PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE § 206.10 Code imprint required. (a) Unless exempted under § 206.7, no drug product in solid oral dosage form may be introduced or...

  15. DNA replication: stalling a fork for imprinting and switching.

    PubMed

    Egel, Richard

    2004-11-09

    Mating-type switching in fission yeast has long been known to be directed by a DNA 'imprint'. This imprint has now been firmly characterized as a protected site-specific and strand-specific nick. New work also links the widely conserved Swi1-Swi3 complex to the protection of stalled replication forks in general.

  16. Mycotoxin analysis using imprinted materials technology: Recent developments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Molecular imprinting technology is an attractive, cost effective, and robust alternative to address the limitations of highly selective natural receptors, such as antibodies and aptamers. The field of molecular imprinting has seen a recent surge in growth with several commercially available products...

  17. Imprinting of Microorganisms for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Idil, Neslihan; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for selective recognition of microorganisms in complex samples due to the rapidly emerging importance of detecting them in various matrices. Most of the conventional methods used to identify microorganisms are time-consuming, laborious and expensive. In recent years, many efforts have been put forth to develop alternative methods for the detection of microorganisms. These methods include use of various components such as silica nanoparticles, microfluidics, liquid crystals, carbon nanotubes which could be integrated with sensor technology in order to detect microorganisms. In many of these publications antibodies were used as recognition elements by means of specific interactions between the target cell and the binding site of the antibody for the purpose of cell recognition and detection. Even though natural antibodies have high selectivity and sensitivity, they have limited stability and tend to denature in conditions outside the physiological range. Among different approaches, biomimetic materials having superior properties have been used in creating artificial systems. Molecular imprinting is a well suited technique serving the purpose to develop highly selective sensing devices. Molecularly imprinted polymers defined as artificial recognition elements are of growing interest for applications in several sectors of life science involving the investigations on detecting molecules of specific interest. These polymers have attractive properties such as high bio-recognition capability, mechanical and chemical stability, easy preparation and low cost which make them superior over natural recognition reagents. This review summarizes the recent advances in the detection and quantification of microorganisms by emphasizing the molecular imprinting technology and its applications in the development of sensor strategies. PMID:28353629

  18. Olfactory imprinting is triggered by MHC peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Cornelia; Namekawa, Iori; Namekawa, Ri; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca; Oppelt, Claus; Jaeschke, Aaron; Müller, Anke; Friedrich, Rainer W; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2013-09-30

    Olfactory imprinting on environmental, population- and kin-specific cues is a specific form of life-long memory promoting homing of salmon to their natal rivers and the return of coral reef fish to natal sites. Despite its ecological significance, natural chemicals for olfactory imprinting have not been identified yet. Here, we show that MHC peptides function as chemical signals for olfactory imprinting in zebrafish. We found that MHC peptides consisting of nine amino acids elicit olfactory imprinting and subsequent kin recognition depending on the MHC genotype of the fish. In vivo calcium imaging shows that some olfactory bulb neurons are highly sensitive to MHC peptides with a detection threshold at 1 pM or lower, indicating that MHC peptides are potent olfactory stimuli. Responses to MHC peptides overlapped spatially with responses to kin odour but not food odour, consistent with the hypothesis that MHC peptides are natural signals for olfactory imprinting.

  19. Matrix molecularly imprinted mesoporous sol-gel sorbent for efficient solid-phase extraction of chloramphenicol from milk.

    PubMed

    Samanidou, Victoria; Kehagia, Maria; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-31

    Highly selective and efficient chloramphenicol imprinted sol-gel silica based inorganic polymeric sorbent (sol-gel MIP) was synthesized via matrix imprinting approach for the extraction of chloramphenicol in milk. Chloramphenicol was used as the template molecule, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) and triethoxyphenylsilane (TEPS) as the functional precursors, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) as the cross-linker, isopropanol as the solvent/porogen, and HCl as the sol-gel catalyst. Non-imprinted sol-gel polymer (sol-gel NIP) was synthesized under identical conditions in absence of template molecules for comparison purpose. Both synthesized materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry, which unambiguously confirmed their significant structural and morphological differences. The synthesized MIP and NIP materials were evaluated as sorbents for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) of chloramphenicol in milk. The effect of critical extraction parameters (flow rate, elution solvent, sample and eluent volume, selectivity coefficient, retention capacity) was studied in terms of retention and desorption of chloramphenicol. Competition and cross reactivity tests have proved that sol-gel MIP sorbent possesses significantly higher specific retention and enrichment capacity for chloramphenicol compared to its non-imprinted analogue. The maximum imprinting factor (IF) was found as 9.7, whereas the highest adsorption capacity of chloramphenicol by sol-gel MIP was 23 mg/g. The sol-gel MIP was found to be adequately selective towards chloramphenicol to provide the necessary minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 μg/kg set forth by European Commission after analysis by LC-MS even without requiring time consuming solvent evaporation and sample reconstitution step, often considered as an integral part in solid phase extraction work-flow. Intra and

  20. Submicroscopic deletion in cousins with Prader-Willi syndrome causes a grandmatrilineal inheritance pattern: effects of imprinting.

    PubMed

    Ming, J E; Blagowidow, N; Knoll, J H; Rollings, L; Fortina, P; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Spinner, N B; Zackai, E H

    2000-05-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) critical region on 15q11-q13 is subject to imprinting. PWS becomes apparent when genes on the paternally inherited chromosome are not expressed. Familial PWS is rare. We report on a family in which a male and a female paternal first cousin both have PWS with cytogenetically normal karyotypes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis shows a submicroscopic deletion of SNRPN, but not the closely associated loci D15S10, D15S11, D15S63, and GABRB3. The cousins' fathers and two paternal aunts have the same deletion and are clinically normal. The grandmother of the cousins is deceased and not available for study, and their grandfather is not deleted for SNRPN. DNA methylation analysis of D15S63 is consistent with an abnormality of the imprinting center associated with PWS. "Grandmatrilineal" inheritance occurs when a woman with deletion of an imprinted, paternally expressed gene is at risk of having affected grandchildren through her sons. In this case, PWS does not become evident as long as the deletion is passed through the matrilineal line. This represents a unique inheritance pattern due to imprinting. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Imprints of reionization in galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Beutler, Florian

    2017-10-01

    Reionization, the only phase transition in the Universe since recombination, is a key event in the cosmic history of baryonic matter. We derive, in the context of the large-scale bias expansion, the imprints of the epoch of reionization in the large-scale distribution of galaxies and identify two contributions of particular importance. First, the Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons off the free electrons lead to a drag force on the baryon fluid. This drag induces a relative velocity between baryons and cold dark matter, which is of the same order of magnitude as the primordially induced relative velocity, and enters in the evolution of the relative velocity as calculated by Boltzmann codes. This leads to a unique contribution to galaxy bias involving the matter velocity squared. The second important effect is a modulation of the galaxy density by the ionizing radiation field through radiative-transfer effects, which is captured in the bias expansion by so-called higher-derivative terms. We constrain both of these imprints using the power spectrum of the BOSS DR12 galaxy sample. While they do not lead to a shift in the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, including these terms is important for unbiased cosmology constraints from the shape of the galaxy power spectrum.

  2. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Avoiding medication mixups. Identifiable imprint codes.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, P; Del Gianni, T; Robertson, W O

    1996-01-01

    This study was done to determine if current imprinting of solid medication forms permits health care professionals to identify the manufacturers involved so as to be able to activate the hierarchic identification system mandated by the Food and Drug Administration. We tested 15 representatives of 6 groups of health professionals for their ability to identify the manufacturer after having examined 30 solid-dosage forms drawn from a pseudo-random sample of stock hospital formulary products. The correct identification of the manufacturer was the sole criterion. Of the 2,700 opportunities, the manufacturer was able to be identified for only 43%. Nurses and medical students had a 35% success rate, pharmacists and poison center specialists a 55% success rate, and residents and attending physicians a 40% rate. None approached 95% accuracy. Currently employed imprints fail in their objective to permit health care professionals--or the general public--to rapidly identify prescription drugs. The manufacturers' logotypes need to be modified if this identification system is to be implemented. We propose a simple voluntary collaborative effort by the pharmaceutical industry to solve the problem. PMID:9000855

  4. Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility in the Greek-Cypriot Population: Replication of Associations with TCF7L2, FTO, HHEX, SLC30A8 and IGF2BP2 Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Votsi, Christina; Toufexis, Costas; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Antoniades, Athos; Skordis, Nicos; Karaolis, Minas; Pattichis, Constantinos S.; Christodoulou, Kyproula

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been the subject of numerous genetic studies in recent years which revealed associations of the disease with a large number of susceptibility loci. We hereby initiate the evaluation of T2D susceptibility loci in the Greek-Cypriot population by performing a replication case-control study. One thousand and eighteen individuals (528 T2D patients, 490 controls) were genotyped at 21 T2D susceptibility loci, using the allelic discrimination method. Statistically significant associations of T2D with five of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (TCF7L2 rs7901695, FTO rs8050136, HHEX rs5015480, SLC30A8 rs13266634 and IGF2BP2 rs4402960) were observed in this study population. Furthermore, 14 of the tested SNPs had odds ratios (ORs) in the same direction as the previously published studies, suggesting that these variants can potentially be used in the Greek-Cypriot population for predictive testing of T2D. In conclusion, our findings expand the genetic assessment of T2D susceptibility loci and reconfirm five of the worldwide established loci in a distinct, relatively small, newly investigated population. PMID:28067832

  5. The loss of imprinted DNA methylation in mouse blastocysts is inflicted to a similar extent by in vitro follicle culture and ovulation induction.

    PubMed

    Saenz-de-Juano, M D; Billooye, K; Smitz, J; Anckaert, E

    2016-06-01

    Does in vitro follicle culture (IFC) have an effect on maintenance of imprinted DNA methylation in preimplantation mouse embryos? We report similar alterations in the methylation pattern of H19 imprinted maternally expressed transcript (H19), small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptide N (Snrpn) and mesoderm specific transcript (Mest) imprinted genes in mouse blastocysts obtained after ovulation induction and IFC. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the gene expression of maternal effect proteins related with imprinting maintenance between superovulated in vivo grown or IFC oocytes. Assisted reproductive technology is associated with adverse post-natal outcomes such as increased risk of premature birth, altered birthweight, congenital anomalies and genomic imprinting syndromes in human and in animal models. Previous studies have shown that ovulation induction allowed normal imprinting establishment in mouse oocytes, but interfered with imprinting maintenance during preimplantation . Normal imprinting establishment was also observed in mouse oocytes derived from a standardized IFC from the early pre-antral follicle stage. The methylation profiles of differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of three key imprinted genes (H19, Snrpn and Mest) were compared at hatched blastocyst stage between embryos obtained from IFC or superovulated oocytes, each subjected to IVF and preimplantation in vitro culture (IVC); in non-manipulated in vivo produced late blastocyst (control) and in in vivo produced 2-cell embryos that were in vitro cultured until the hatched blastocyst stage (to assess the effect of IVC). Two different mice strains (Mus musculus C57BL/6J X CBA/Ca and Mus musculus B6 (CAST7)) were used to discriminate between maternal and paternal alleles of imprinted genes. Additionally, a limiting-dilution bisulfite-sequencing technique was carried out on individual embryos in order to avoid amplification bias. To assess whether IFC and ovulation induction

  6. A Case-by-Case Evolutionary Analysis of Four Imprinted Retrogenes

    PubMed Central

    McCole, Ruth B; Loughran, Noeleen B; Chahal, Mandeep; Fernandes, Luis P; Roberts, Roland G; Fraternali, Franca; O'Connell, Mary J; Oakey, Rebecca J

    2011-01-01

    Retroposition is a widespread phenomenon resulting in the generation of new genes that are initially related to a parent gene via very high coding sequence similarity. We examine the evolutionary fate of four retrogenes generated by such an event; mouse Inpp5f_v2, Mcts2, Nap1l5, and U2af1-rs1. These genes are all subject to the epigenetic phenomenon of parental imprinting. We first provide new data on the age of these retrogene insertions. Using codon-based models of sequence evolution, we show these retrogenes have diverse evolutionary trajectories, including divergence from the parent coding sequence under positive selection pressure, purifying selection pressure maintaining parent-retrogene similarity, and neutral evolution. Examination of the expression pattern of retrogenes shows an atypical, broad pattern across multiple tissues. Protein 3D structure modeling reveals that a positively selected residue in U2af1-rs1, not shared by its parent, may influence protein conformation. Our case-by-case analysis of the evolution of four imprinted retrogenes reveals that this interesting class of imprinted genes, while similar in regulation and sequence characteristics, follow very varied evolutionary paths. PMID:21166792

  7. Deletion of the Imprinted Gene Grb10 Promotes Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiao; Himburg, Heather A; Pohl, Katherine; Quarmyne, Mamle; Tran, Evelyn; Zhang, Yurun; Fang, Tiancheng; Kan, Jenny; Chao, Nelson J; Zhao, Liman; Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2016-11-01

    Imprinted genes are differentially expressed by adult stem cells, but their functions in regulating adult stem cell fate are incompletely understood. Here we show that growth factor receptor-bound protein 10 (Grb10), an imprinted gene, regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and regeneration. Deletion of the maternal allele of Grb10 in mice (Grb10 m/+ mice) substantially increased HSC long-term repopulating capacity, as compared to that of Grb10 +/+ mice. After total body irradiation (TBI), Grb10 m/+ mice demonstrated accelerated HSC regeneration and hematopoietic reconstitution, as compared to Grb10 +/+ mice. Grb10-deficient HSCs displayed increased proliferation after competitive transplantation or TBI, commensurate with upregulation of CDK4 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, the enhanced HSC regeneration observed in Grb10-deficient mice was dependent on activation of the Akt/mTORC1 pathway. This study reveals a function for the imprinted gene Grb10 in regulating HSC self-renewal and regeneration and suggests that the inhibition of Grb10 can promote hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A fascination with chromosome rescue in uniparental disomy: Mendelian recessive outlaws and imprinting copyrights infringements.

    PubMed

    Engel, Eric

    2006-11-01

    With uniparental disomy (UPD), the presence in a diploid genome of a chromosome pair derived from one genitor carries two main types of developmental risk: the inheritance of a recessive trait or the occurrence of an imprinting disorder. When the uniparentally derived pair carries two homozygous sequences (isodisomy) with a duplicated mutant, this 'reduction to homozygosity' determines a recessive phenotype solely inherited from one heterozygote. Thus far, some 40 examples of such recessive trait transmission have been reported in the medical literature and, among the current 32 known types of UPDs, UPD of chromosomes 1, 2, and 7 have contributed to the larger contingent of these conditions. Being at variance with the traditional mode of transmission, they constitute a group of 'Mendelian outlaws'. Several imprinted chromosome domains and loci have been, for a large part, identified through different UPDs. Thus, disomies for paternal 6, maternal 7, paternal 11, paternal and maternal 14 and 15, maternal 20 (and paternal 20q) and possibly maternal 16 cause as many syndromes, as at the biological level the loss or duplication of monoparentally expressed allele sequences constitutes 'imprinting rights infringements'. The above pitfalls represent the price to pay when, instead of a Mendelian even segregation and independent assortment of the chromosomes, the fertilized product with a nondisjunctional meiotic error undergoes correction (for unknown or fortuitous reasons) through a mitotic adjustment as a means to restore euploidy, thereby resulting in UPD. Happily enough, UPDs leading to the healthy rescue from some chromosomal mishaps also exist.

  9. Neuronal Plasticity and Multisensory Integration in Filial Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Town, Stephen Michael; McCabe, Brian John

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms sample their environment through multiple sensory systems and the integration of multisensory information enhances learning. However, the mechanisms underlying multisensory memory formation and their similarity to unisensory mechanisms remain unclear. Filial imprinting is one example in which experience is multisensory, and the mechanisms of unisensory neuronal plasticity are well established. We investigated the storage of audiovisual information through experience by comparing the activity of neurons in the intermediate and medial mesopallium of imprinted and naïve domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus) in response to an audiovisual imprinting stimulus and novel object and their auditory and visual components. We find that imprinting enhanced the mean response magnitude of neurons to unisensory but not multisensory stimuli. Furthermore, imprinting enhanced responses to incongruent audiovisual stimuli comprised of mismatched auditory and visual components. Our results suggest that the effects of imprinting on the unisensory and multisensory responsiveness of IMM neurons differ and that IMM neurons may function to detect unexpected deviations from the audiovisual imprinting stimulus. PMID:21423770

  10. Characterization of the Binding Properties of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The defining characteristic of the binding sites of any particular molecularly imprinted material is heterogeneity: that is, they are not all identical. Nonetheless, it is useful to study their fundamental binding properties, and to obtain average properties. In particular, it has been instructive to compare the binding properties of imprinted and non-imprinted materials. This chapter begins by considering the origins of this site heterogeneity. Next, the properties of interest of imprinted binding sites are described in brief: affinity, selectivity, and kinetics. The binding/adsorption isotherm, the graph of concentration of analyte bound to a MIP versus concentration of free analyte at equilibrium, over a range of total concentrations, is described in some detail. Following this, the techniques for studying the imprinted sites are described (batch-binding assays, radioligand binding assays, zonal chromatography, frontal chromatography, calorimetry, and others). Thereafter, the parameters that influence affinity, selectivity and kinetics are discussed (solvent, modifiers of organic solvents, pH of aqueous solvents, temperature). Finally, mathematical attempts to fit the adsorption isotherms for imprinted materials, so as to obtain information about the range of binding affinities characterizing the imprinted sites, are summarized.

  11. Targeted deletion of the Nesp55 DMR defines another Gnas imprinting control region and provides a mouse model of autosomal dominant PHP-Ib.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Leopold F; Mrakovcic, Maria; Steinborn, Ralf; Chung, Ung-Il; Bastepe, Murat; Jüppner, Harald

    2010-05-18

    Approximately 100 genes undergo genomic imprinting. Mutations in fewer than 10 imprinted genetic loci, including GNAS, are associated with complex human diseases that differ phenotypically based on the parent transmitting the mutation. Besides the ubiquitously expressed Gsalpha, which is of broad biological importance, GNAS gives rise to an antisense transcript and to several Gsalpha variants that are transcribed from the nonmethylated parental allele. We previously identified two almost identical GNAS microdeletions extending from exon NESP55 to antisense (AS) exon 3 (delNESP55/delAS3-4). When inherited maternally, both deletions are associated with erasure of all maternal GNAS methylation imprints and autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib, a disorder characterized by parathyroid hormone-resistant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. As for other imprinting disorders, the mechanisms resulting in abnormal GNAS methylation are largely unknown, in part because of a paucity of suitable animal models. We now showed in mice that deletion of the region equivalent to delNESP55/delAS3-4 on the paternal allele (DeltaNesp55(p)) leads to healthy animals without Gnas methylation changes. In contrast, mice carrying the deletion on the maternal allele (DeltaNesp55(m)) showed loss of all maternal Gnas methylation imprints, leading in kidney to increased 1A transcription and decreased Gsalpha mRNA levels, and to associated hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Besides representing a murine autosomal-dominant pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ib model and one of only few animal models for imprinted human disorders, our findings suggest that the Nesp55 differentially methylated region is an additional principal imprinting control region, which directs Gnas methylation and thereby affects expression of all maternal Gnas-derived transcripts.

  12. Imprinting at the PLAGL1 domain is contained within a 70-kb CTCF/cohesin-mediated non-allelic chromatin loop

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Platas, Isabel; Court, Franck; Camprubi, Cristina; Sparago, Angela; Guillaumet-Adkins, Amy; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Riccio, Andrea; Moore, Gudrun E.; Monk, David

    2013-01-01

    Paternal duplications of chromosome 6q24, a region that contains the imprinted PLAGL1 and HYMAI transcripts, are associated with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus. A common feature of imprinted genes is that they tend to cluster together, presumably as a result of sharing common cis-acting regulatory elements. To determine the extent of this imprinted cluster in human and mouse, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of allelic expression and DNA methylation of the genes mapping within an ∼1.4-Mb region flanking PLAGL1/Plagl1. We confirm that all nine neighbouring genes are biallelically expressed in both species. In human we identify two novel paternally expressed PLAGL1 coding transcripts that originate from unique promoter regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation for CTCF and the cohesin subunits RAD21 and SMC3 reveals evolutionarily conserved binding sites within unmethylated regions ∼5 kb downstream of the PLAGL1 differentially methylated region and within the PLAGL1 3′ untranslated region (UTR). Higher-order chromatin looping occurs between these regions in both expressing and non-expressing tissues, forming a non-allelic chromatin loop around the PLAGL1/Plagl1 gene. In placenta and brain tissues, we identify an additional interaction between the PLAGL1 P3/P4 promoters and the unmethylated element downstream of the PLAGL1 differentially methylated region that we propose facilitates imprinted expression of these alternative isoforms. PMID:23295672

  13. Hypothesis: gonadal temperature influences sex-specific imprinting

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Various explanations have been advanced for the evolution of genomic imprinting, the most popular of these being the parental conflict hypothesis. However, while this theory may explain why there has been selection for imprinting certain genes, it does not explain how the maternal and paternal genomes can be distinguished from each other. Here, we hypothesize that the temperature at which male and female gonads are physiologically exposed could be, at least for some loci, the primary factor leading to the different imprinting between the sexes. PMID:25202325

  14. Changes in allele-specific association of histone modifications at the imprinting control regions during mouse preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Moon; Ogura, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    Allele-specific association of histone modification is observed at the regulatory region of imprinted genes and has been suggested to work as an epigenetic marker for monoallelic gene expression, along with the allelic CpG methylation of DNA. Although the parent-origin-specific epigenetic status in imprinted genes is thought to be established during preimplantation development, little is known about the allelic specificity of histone modifications during this period because of the limited volume of material available for analysis. In this study, we first revealed the allelic enrichment of histone modifications and variant histones at the imprinting control regions (ICRs) of four-cell to blastocyst stage preimplantation embryos by using carrier chromatin immunoprecipitation and sequence polymorphism analysis of immunoprecipitated DNA. We found relative enrichment of histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation at the imprinted alleles of ICRs and obtained the results suggesting that histone modifications at ICRs are established during a late preimplantation stage. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The Origin of the RB1 Imprint

    PubMed Central

    Kanber, Deniz; Buiting, Karin; Roos, Christian; Gromoll, Jörg; Kaya, Sabine; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Lohmann, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to a differentially methylated CpG island in intron 2. This CpG island is part of PPP1R26P1, a truncated retrocopy of PPP1R26, and serves as a promoter for an alternative RB1 transcript. We show here by in silico analyses that the parental PPP1R26 gene is present in the analysed members of Haplorrhini, which comprise Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys, Small apes, Great Apes and Human), Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys) and tarsier, and Strepsirrhini (galago). Interestingly, we detected the retrocopy, PPP1R26P1, in all Anthropoidea (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini) that we studied but not in tarsier or galago. Additional retrocopies are present in human and chimpanzee on chromosome 22, but their distinct composition indicates that they are the result of independent retrotransposition events. Chimpanzee and marmoset have further retrocopies on chromosome 8 and chromosome 4, respectively. To examine the origin of the RB1 imprint, we compared the methylation patterns of the parental PPP1R26 gene and its retrocopies in different primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, marmoset and galago). Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite sequencing showed that PPP1R26 is methylated whereas the retrocopy in RB1 intron 2 is differentially methylated in all primates studied. All other retrocopies are fully methylated, except for the additional retrocopy on marmoset chromosome 4, which is also differentially methylated. Using an informative SNP for the methylation analysis in marmoset, we could show that the differential methylation pattern of the retrocopy on chromosome 4 is allele-specific. We conclude that the epigenetic fate of a PPP1R26 retrocopy after integration depends on the DNA sequence and selective forces at the integration site. PMID:24282601

  16. The origin of the RB1 imprint.

    PubMed

    Kanber, Deniz; Buiting, Karin; Roos, Christian; Gromoll, Jörg; Kaya, Sabine; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Lohmann, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to a differentially methylated CpG island in intron 2. This CpG island is part of PPP1R26P1, a truncated retrocopy of PPP1R26, and serves as a promoter for an alternative RB1 transcript. We show here by in silico analyses that the parental PPP1R26 gene is present in the analysed members of Haplorrhini, which comprise Catarrhini (Old World Monkeys, Small apes, Great Apes and Human), Platyrrhini (New World Monkeys) and tarsier, and Strepsirrhini (galago). Interestingly, we detected the retrocopy, PPP1R26P1, in all Anthropoidea (Catarrhini and Platyrrhini) that we studied but not in tarsier or galago. Additional retrocopies are present in human and chimpanzee on chromosome 22, but their distinct composition indicates that they are the result of independent retrotransposition events. Chimpanzee and marmoset have further retrocopies on chromosome 8 and chromosome 4, respectively. To examine the origin of the RB1 imprint, we compared the methylation patterns of the parental PPP1R26 gene and its retrocopies in different primates (human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque, marmoset and galago). Methylation analysis by deep bisulfite sequencing showed that PPP1R26 is methylated whereas the retrocopy in RB1 intron 2 is differentially methylated in all primates studied. All other retrocopies are fully methylated, except for the additional retrocopy on marmoset chromosome 4, which is also differentially methylated. Using an informative SNP for the methylation analysis in marmoset, we could show that the differential methylation pattern of the retrocopy on chromosome 4 is allele-specific. We conclude that the epigenetic fate of a PPP1R26 retrocopy after integration depends on the DNA sequence and selective forces at the integration site.

  17. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: energy of the cell-imprint interaction.

    PubMed

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  18. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  19. Increased dosage of the imprinted Ascl2 gene restrains two key endocrine lineages of the mouse Placenta.

    PubMed

    Tunster, S J; McNamara, G I; Creeth, H D J; John, R M

    2016-10-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed primarily from one parental allele by virtue of a germ line epigenetic process. Achaete-scute complex homolog 2 (Ascl2 aka Mash2) is a maternally expressed imprinted gene that plays a key role in placental and intestinal development. Loss-of-function of Ascl2 results in an expansion of the parietal trophoblast giant cell (P-TGC) lineage, an almost complete loss of Trophoblast specific protein alpha (Tpbpa) positive cells in the ectoplacental cone and embryonic failure by E10.5. Tpbpa expression marks the progenitors of some P-TGCs, two additional trophoblast giant cell lineages (spiral artery and canal), the spongiotrophoblast and the glycogen cell lineage. Using a transgenic model, here we show that elevated expression of Ascl2 reduced the number of P-TGC cells by 40%. Elevated Ascl2 also resulted in a marked loss of the spongiotrophoblast and a substantial mislocalisation of glycogen cells into the labyrinth. In addition, Ascl2-Tg placenta contained considerably more placental glycogen than wild type. Glycogen cells are normally located within the junctional zone in close contact with spongiotrophoblast cells, before migrating through the P-TGC layer into the maternal decidua late in gestation where their stores of glycogen are released. The failure of glycogen cells to release their stores of glycogen may explain both the inappropriate accumulation of glycogen and fetal growth restriction observed late in gestation in this model. In addition, using in a genetic cross we provide evidence that Ascl2 requires the activity of a second maternally expressed imprinted gene, Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family a, member 2 (Phlda2) to limit the expansion of the spongiotrophoblast. This "belts and braces" approach demonstrates the importance of genomic imprinting in regulating the size of the placental endocrine compartment for optimal placental development and fetal growth. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Evidence for a Peripheral Olfactory Memory in Imprinted Salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A.; Dittman, Andrew H.; Quinn, Thomas P.; Moody, William J., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    The remarkable homing ability of salmon relies on olfactory cues, but its cellular basis is unknown. To test the role of peripheral olfactory receptors in odorant memory retention, we imprinted coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to micromolar concentrations of phenyl ethyl alcohol during parr-smolt transformation. The following year, we measured phenyl ethyl alcohol responses in the peripheral receptor cells using patch clamp. Cells from imprinted fish showed increased sensitivity to phenyl ethyl alcohol compared either to cells from naive fish or to sensitivity to another behaviorally important odorant (L-serine). Field experiments verified an increased behavioral preference for phenyl ethyl alcohol by imprinted salmon as adults. Thus, some component of the imprinted olfactory homestream memory appears to be retained peripherally.

  1. Novel approach for extraction of quercetin using molecular imprinted membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Siti Fatimah; Ahmad, Mohd Noor; Dzahir, Irfan Hatim Mohamed; Nasir, Azalina Mohamed; Ishak, Noorhidayah; Halim, Nurul Farhanah

    2017-12-01

    Quercetin imprinted membrane (QIM) was synthesized and applied for the extraction of quercetin. The quercetin imprinted membranes (QIM) were fabricated through a non-covalent approach via surface thermal polymerization. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration membrane was used as a support to improve mechanical stability of the membrane. The thin imprinted layer was formed by copolymerization of acrylamide (AA) as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker in the presence of quercetin as template in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution. The Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) were used to visualize the surface of membrane. Batch rebinding and binding kinetic experiments proved that the binding properties of the QIM are higher than non-imprinted membranes (NIM). QIM also have higher selectivity towards quercetin compared to sinensetin and rosmarinic acid.

  2. Investigating the Incorporation of Personality Constructs into IMPRINT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    challenges that are driving the need for human performance models. For example, the Department of Defense (DoD) is requiring that future Navy ships... stressors , training, and personnel moderators would enhance IMPRINT’s ability to simulate human behavior and define the complete Warfighter...IMPRINT provides data both on task-time-to-complete and on task accuracy. IMPRINT stressor algorithms currently built into the tool impact performance

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Intelligent Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mariana I; Wechsler, Marissa E; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Granja, Pedro L; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2017-02-01

    The development of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using biocompatible production methods enables the possibility to further exploit this technology for biomedical applications. Tissue engineering (TE) approaches use the knowledge of the wound healing process to design scaffolds capable of modulating cell behavior and promote tissue regeneration. Biomacromolecules bear great interest for TE, together with the established recognition of the extracellular matrix, as an important source of signals to cells, both promoting cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions during the healing process. This review focuses on exploring the potential of protein molecular imprinting to create bioactive scaffolds with molecular recognition for TE applications based on the most recent approaches in the field of molecular imprinting of macromolecules. Considerations regarding essential components of molecular imprinting technology will be addressed for TE purposes. Molecular imprinting of biocompatible hydrogels, namely based on natural polymers, is also reviewed here. Hydrogel scaffolds with molecular memory show great promise for regenerative therapies. The first molecular imprinting studies analyzing cell adhesion report promising results with potential applications for cell culture systems, or biomaterials for implantation with the capability for cell recruitment by selectively adsorbing desired molecules.

  4. Dopamine-imprinted monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Aşır, Süleyman; Sarı, Duygu; Derazshamshir, Ali; Yılmaz, Fatma; Şarkaya, Koray; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    A dopamine-imprinted monolithic column was prepared and used in capillary electrochromatography as stationary phase for the first time. Dopamine was selectively separated from aqueous solution containing the competitor molecule norepinephrine, which is similar in size and shape to the template molecule. Morphology of the dopamine-imprinted column was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of the organic solvent content of mobile phase, applied pressure and pH of the mobile phase on the recognition of dopamine by the imprinted monolithic column has been evaluated, and the imprinting effect in the dopamine-imprinted monolithic polymer was verified. Developed dopamine-imprinted monolithic column resulted in excellent separation of dopamine from structurally related competitor molecule, norepinephrine. Separation was achieved in a short period of 10 min, with the electrophoretic mobility of 5.81 × 10 -5  m 2 V -1 s -1 at pH 5.0 and 500 mbar pressure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nonallelic transvection of multiple imprinted loci is organized by the H19 imprinting control region during germline development

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Shi, Chengxi; Sjölinder, Mikael; Zhao, Zhihu; Göndör, Anita; Liu, Liang; Tiwari, Vijay K.; Guibert, Sylvain; Emilsson, Lina; Imreh, Marta P.; Ohlsson, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations highlight that the mammalian genome extensively communicates with itself via long-range chromatin interactions. The causal link between such chromatin cross-talk and epigenetic states is, however, poorly understood. We identify here a network of physically juxtaposed regions from the entire genome with the common denominator of being genomically imprinted. Moreover, CTCF-binding sites within the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) not only determine the physical proximity among imprinted domains, but also transvect allele-specific epigenetic states, identified by replication timing patterns, to interacting, nonallelic imprinted regions during germline development. We conclude that one locus can directly or indirectly pleiotropically influence epigenetic states of multiple regions on other chromosomes with which it interacts. PMID:19933149

  6. Nonallelic transvection of multiple imprinted loci is organized by the H19 imprinting control region during germline development.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Shi, Chengxi; Sjölinder, Mikael; Zhao, Zhihu; Göndör, Anita; Liu, Liang; Tiwari, Vijay K; Guibert, Sylvain; Emilsson, Lina; Imreh, Marta P; Ohlsson, Rolf

    2009-11-15

    Recent observations highlight that the mammalian genome extensively communicates with itself via long-range chromatin interactions. The causal link between such chromatin cross-talk and epigenetic states is, however, poorly understood. We identify here a network of physically juxtaposed regions from the entire genome with the common denominator of being genomically imprinted. Moreover, CTCF-binding sites within the H19 imprinting control region (ICR) not only determine the physical proximity among imprinted domains, but also transvect allele-specific epigenetic states, identified by replication timing patterns, to interacting, nonallelic imprinted regions during germline development. We conclude that one locus can directly or indirectly pleiotropically influence epigenetic states of multiple regions on other chromosomes with which it interacts.

  7. Sporadic imprinting defects in Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome: implications for imprint-switch models, genetic counseling, and prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Buiting, K; Dittrich, B; Gross, S; Lich, C; Färber, C; Buchholz, T; Smith, E; Reis, A; Bürger, J; Nöthen, M M; Barth-Witte, U; Janssen, B; Abeliovich, D; Lerer, I; van den Ouweland, A M; Halley, D J; Schrander-Stumpel, C; Smeets, H; Meinecke, P; Malcolm, S; Gardner, A; Lalande, M; Nicholls, R D; Friend, K; Schulze, A; Matthijs, G; Kokkonen, H; Hilbert, P; Van Maldergem, L; Glover, G; Carbonell, P; Willems, P; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Horsthemke, B

    1998-01-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and the Angelman syndrome (AS) are caused by the loss of function of imprinted genes in proximal 15q. In approximately 2%-4% of patients, this loss of function is due to an imprinting defect. In some cases, the imprinting defect is the result of a parental imprint-switch failure caused by a microdeletion of the imprinting center (IC). Here we describe the molecular analysis of 13 PWS patients and 17 AS patients who have an imprinting defect but no IC deletion. Heteroduplex and partial sequence analysis did not reveal any point mutations of the known IC elements, either. Interestingly, all of these patients represent sporadic cases, and some share the paternal (PWS) or the maternal (AS) 15q11-q13 haplotype with an unaffected sib. In each of five PWS patients informative for the grandparental origin of the incorrectly imprinted chromosome region and four cases described elsewhere, the maternally imprinted paternal chromosome region was inherited from the paternal grandmother. This suggests that the grandmaternal imprint was not erased in the father's germ line. In seven informative AS patients reported here and in three previously reported patients, the paternally imprinted maternal chromosome region was inherited from either the maternal grandfather or the maternal grandmother. The latter finding is not compatible with an imprint-switch failure, but it suggests that a paternal imprint developed either in the maternal germ line or postzygotically. We conclude (1) that the incorrect imprint in non-IC-deletion cases is the result of a spontaneous prezygotic or postzygotic error, (2) that these cases have a low recurrence risk, and (3) that the paternal imprint may be the default imprint. PMID:9634532

  8. Synthesis of a molecularly imprinted sorbent for selective solid-phase extraction of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Pavel; Combes, Audrey; Petit, Julia; Nováková, Lucie; Pichon, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the work was to synthesize a molecularly imprinted material for the selective solid-phase extraction (SPE) of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-2-amino-3-methylpropionic acid; BMAA) from cyanobacterial extracts. BMAA and its structural analogs that can be used as template are small, polar and hydrophilic molecules. These molecules are poorly soluble in organic solvents that are commonly used for the synthesis of acrylic-based polymers. Therefore, a sol gel approach was chosen to carry out the synthesis and the resulting sorbents were evaluated with different extraction procedures in order to determine their ability to selectively retain BMAA. The presence of imprinted cavities in the sorbent was demonstrated by comparing elution profiles obtained by using molecularly imprinted silica (MIS) and non-imprinted silica (NIS) as a control. The molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was first developed in a pure medium (acetonitrile) and further optimized for the treatment of cyanobacterial samples. It was characterized by high elution recoveries (89% and 77% respectively in pure and in real media).The repeatability of the extraction procedure in pure medium, in real medium and the reproducibility of MIS synthesis all expressed as RSD values of extraction recovery of BMAA were equal to 3%, 12% and 5%, respectively. A MIS capacity of 0.34 µmol/g was measured. The matrix effects, which affected the quantification of BMAA when employing a mixed mode sorbent, were completely removed by adding a clean-up step of the mixed-mode sorbent extract on the MIS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Evolution of Mammalian Genomic Imprinting Was Accompanied by the Acquisition of Novel CpG Islands

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Shaw, Geoffrey; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B.

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin–dependent expression of imprinted genes is mostly associated with allele-specific DNA methylation of the CpG islands (CGIs) called germ line differentially methylated regions (gDMRs). Although the essential role of gDMRs for genomic imprinting has been well established, little is known about how they evolved. In several imprinted loci, the CGIs forming gDMRs may have emerged with the insertion of a retrotransposon or retrogene. To examine the generality of the hypothesis that the CGIs forming gDMRs were novel CGIs recently acquired during mammalian evolution, we reviewed the time of novel CGI emergence for all the maternal gDMR loci using the novel data analyzed in this study combined with the data from previous reports. The comparative sequence analyses using mouse, human, dog, cow, elephant, tammar, opossum, platypus, and chicken genomic sequences were carried out for Peg13, Meg1/Grb10, Plagl1/Zac1, Gnas, and Slc38a4 imprinted loci to obtain comprehensive results. The combined data showed that emergence of novel CGIs occurred universally in the maternal gDMR loci at various time points during mammalian evolution. Furthermore, the analysis of Meg1/Grb10 locus provided evidence that gradual base pair–wise sequence change was involved in the accumulation of CpG sequence, suggesting the mechanism of novel CGI emergence is more complex than the suggestion that CpG sequences originated solely by insertion of CpG-rich transposable elements. We propose that acquisition of novel CGIs was a key genomic change for the evolution of imprinting and that it usually occurred in the maternal gDMR loci. PMID:22016334

  10. The evolution of mammalian genomic imprinting was accompanied by the acquisition of novel CpG islands.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunsuke; Shaw, Geoffrey; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2011-01-01

    Parent-of-origin-dependent expression of imprinted genes is mostly associated with allele-specific DNA methylation of the CpG islands (CGIs) called germ line differentially methylated regions (gDMRs). Although the essential role of gDMRs for genomic imprinting has been well established, little is known about how they evolved. In several imprinted loci, the CGIs forming gDMRs may have emerged with the insertion of a retrotransposon or retrogene. To examine the generality of the hypothesis that the CGIs forming gDMRs were novel CGIs recently acquired during mammalian evolution, we reviewed the time of novel CGI emergence for all the maternal gDMR loci using the novel data analyzed in this study combined with the data from previous reports. The comparative sequence analyses using mouse, human, dog, cow, elephant, tammar, opossum, platypus, and chicken genomic sequences were carried out for Peg13, Meg1/Grb10, Plagl1/Zac1, Gnas, and Slc38a4 imprinted loci to obtain comprehensive results. The combined data showed that emergence of novel CGIs occurred universally in the maternal gDMR loci at various time points during mammalian evolution. Furthermore, the analysis of Meg1/Grb10 locus provided evidence that gradual base pair-wise sequence change was involved in the accumulation of CpG sequence, suggesting the mechanism of novel CGI emergence is more complex than the suggestion that CpG sequences originated solely by insertion of CpG-rich transposable elements. We propose that acquisition of novel CGIs was a key genomic change for the evolution of imprinting and that it usually occurred in the maternal gDMR loci.

  11. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  12. The "silent" imprint of musical training.

    PubMed

    Klein, Carina; Liem, Franziskus; Hänggi, Jürgen; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-02-01

    Playing a musical instrument at a professional level is a complex multimodal task requiring information integration between different brain regions supporting auditory, somatosensory, motor, and cognitive functions. These kinds of task-specific activations are known to have a profound influence on both the functional and structural architecture of the human brain. However, until now, it is widely unknown whether this specific imprint of musical practice can still be detected during rest when no musical instrument is used. Therefore, we applied high-density electroencephalography and evaluated whole-brain functional connectivity as well as small-world topologies (i.e., node degree) during resting state in a sample of 15 professional musicians and 15 nonmusicians. As expected, musicians demonstrate increased intra- and interhemispheric functional connectivity between those brain regions that are typically involved in music perception and production, such as the auditory, the sensorimotor, and prefrontal cortex as well as Broca's area. In addition, mean connectivity within this specific network was positively related to musical skill and the total number of training hours. Thus, we conclude that musical training distinctively shapes intrinsic functional network characteristics in such a manner that its signature can still be detected during a task-free condition. Hum Brain Mapp 37:536-546, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Imprinting and flexibility in human face cognition

    PubMed Central

    Marcinkowska, Urszula M.; Terraube, Julien; Kaminski, Gwenaël

    2016-01-01

    Faces are an important cue to multiple physiological and psychological traits. Human preferences for exaggerated sex typicality (masculinity or femininity) in faces depend on multiple factors and show high inter-subject variability. To gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying facial femininity preferences in men, we tested the interactive effect of family structure (birth order, sibling sex-ratio and number of siblings) and parenthood status on these preferences. Based on a group of 1304 heterosexual men, we have found that preference for feminine faces was not only influenced by sibling age and sex, but also that fatherhood modulated this preference. Men with sisters had a weaker preference for femininity than men with brothers, highlighting a possible effect of a negative imprinting-like mechanism. What is more, fatherhood increased strongly the preference for facial femininity. Finally, for fathers with younger sisters only, the more the age difference increased between them, the more femininity preference increased. Overall our findings bring new insight into how early-acquired experience at the individual level may determine face preference in adulthood, and what is more, how these preferences are flexible and potentially dependent on parenthood status in adult men. PMID:27680495

  14. Comparison of binding behavior for molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting or Pickering emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Giovannoli, Cristina; Passini, Cinzia; Anfossi, Laura; Nardo, Fabio Di; Spano, Giulia; Maurino, Valter; Baggiani, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the binding performances and selectivity of molecularly imprinted beads prepared toward several penicillins (i) by hierarchical bulk polymerization in the pores of template-grafted silica microbeads (hMIPs) and (ii) by Pickering emulsion polymerization in the presence of template-decorated silica nanobeads (pMIPs). 6-Aminopenicillanic acid was chosen as the common fragmental mimic template. Both approaches produced micron-sized polymeric beads with good recognition properties toward the target ligands whereas the selectivity pattern appeared quite different. The polymer prepared by the Pickering emulsion approach showed binding properties similar to imprinted beads prepared by hierarchical approach. Equilibrium binding constants changed their values from 0.1-0.2 × 10(6) (hMIPs) to 0.2-0.6 × 10(6) M(-1) (pMIPs), while the binding site densities changed from 3.7-4.8 (hMIPs) to 0.3-0.55 μmol/g (pMIPs). Compared to the hierarchical polymerization, Pickering emulsion polymerization represents a more practical approach when a template mimic needs to be used. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A connection between the binding properties of imprinted and nonimprinted polymers: a change of perspective in molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Baggiani, Claudio; Giovannoli, Cristina; Anfossi, Laura; Passini, Cinzia; Baravalle, Patrizia; Giraudi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-25

    In the current paradigm for molecular imprinting, the imprinted binding sites exist as a consequence of the polymerization process around templates, and the properties of nonimprinted polymers (NIPs) have largely been overlooked. Thus, nothing can be affirmed a priori concerning the binding properties of NIPs. We propose an alternative view where the imprinting effect is due to the presence of a template molecule that enhances the pre-existing binding properties of a polymer. If a NIP shows no binding properties toward a target molecule, the corresponding imprinted polymer (MIP) will show a weak imprinting effect. On the other hand, if a NIP shows binding properties toward a target molecule, the corresponding MIP will show a significant imprinting effect. To verify this hypothesis, we prepared a 96-member combinatorial polymeric library in the absence of any template molecule. This library was screened for several potential ligands, and with no exceptions, the composition of the best-binding NIP produced a MIP with excellent binding properties, whereas a low-binding NIP formulation produced a MIP with comparable low binding. To validate these results, the binding properties toward naproxen and ibuprofen were measured for two combinatorial libraries of polymers prepared in the presence (MIP library) and the absence (NIP library) of the template molecule. The experiment's results showed a correlation between the apparent affinity constants measured for the NIP and MIP libraries, confirming the proposed hypothesis. Moreover, for closely related molecules, it was shown that binding selectivity is an emergent property derived from the imprinting process and not a property of NIPs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Chitosan in Molecularly-Imprinted Polymers: Current and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Huang, Yun-An; Zhu, Qiu-Jin; Ye, Chun

    2015-08-07

    Chitosan is widely used in molecular imprinting technology (MIT) as a functional monomer or supporting matrix because of its low cost and high contents of amino and hydroxyl functional groups. The various excellent properties of chitosan, which include nontoxicity, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and attractive physical and mechanical performances, make chitosan a promising alternative to conventional functional monomers. Recently, chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers have gained considerable attention and showed significant potential in many fields, such as curbing environmental pollution, medicine, protein separation and identification, and chiral-compound separation. These extensive applications are due to the polymers' desired selectivity, physical robustness, and thermal stability, as well as their low cost and easy preparation. Cross-linkers, which fix the functional groups of chitosan around imprinted molecules, play an important role in chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers. This review summarizes the important cross-linkers of chitosan molecularly-imprinted polymers and illustrates the cross-linking mechanism of chitosan and cross-linkers based on the two glucosamine units. Finally, some significant attempts to further develop the application of chitosan in MIT are proposed.

  17. Innovative Design and Performance Evaluation of Bionic Imprinting Toothed Wheel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyang; Tong, Jin; Stephen, Carr

    2018-01-01

    A highly efficient soil-burrowing dung beetle possesses an intricate outer contour curve on its foreleg end-tooth. This study was carried out based on evidence that this special outer contour curve has the potential of reducing soil penetration resistance and could enhance soil-burrowing efficiency. A toothed wheel is a typical agricultural implement for soil imprinting, to increase its working efficiency; the approach of the bionic geometrical structure was utilized to optimize the innovative shape of imprinting toothed wheel. Characteristics in the dung beetle's foreleg end-tooth were extracted and studied by the edge detection technique. Then, this special outer contour curve was modeled by a nine-order polynomial function and used for the innovative design of imprinting the tooth's cutting edge. Both the conventional and bionic teeth were manufactured, and traction tests in a soil bin were conducted. Taking required draft force and volume of imprinted microbasin as the evaluating indexes, operating efficiency and quality of different toothed wheels were compared and investigated. Results indicate that compared with the conventional toothed wheel, a bionic toothed wheel possesses a better forward resistance reduction property against soil and, meanwhile, can enhance the quality of soil imprinting by increasing the volume of the created micro-basin. PMID:29515651

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymers as the future drug delivery devices.

    PubMed

    Luliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the investigations of new drug delivery systems have been directed on the development of some "intelligent" drug delivery devices that are able to directly respond to the patient's individual needs. New drug delivery systems should maximize the efficiency of administrated therapeutic agents and improve the patient's quality of life. Introduction of the new drug delivery devices is an important scientific goal, which could be achieved by combining new technologies and intelligent biomaterials. Molecular imprinting technology has a high potential for the preparation of optimized drug delivery forms. Here, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are promising new materials for such purposes, but their application in this field is nowadays at a developing stage. In this review, the principles of molecular imprinting and the recognition-release mechanisms of polymeric matrices are discussed. The potential application of molecularly imprinted materials as the future drug delivery systems with various administering routes (transdermal, ocular or oral) are presented, and some future prospects for the imprinted polymers are outlined.

  19. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  20. Insulin receptor is expressed in normal canine mammary gland and benign adenomas but decreased in metastatic canine mammary carcinomas similar to human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klopfleisch, R; Hvid, H; Klose, P; da Costa, A; Gruber, A D

    2010-12-01

    Insulin receptor (INSR) or insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling is speculated to be involved in mammary tumour development. Expression levels of members of the insulin receptor family (INSR, IGF1R, IGF2R, GHR) and their ligands IGF1and IGF2 were quantified in macro- and microdissected tissue samples of normal canine mammary gland, adenomas, carcinomas and their lymph node metastases to evaluate their potential impact on the carcinogenesis of canine mammary tumours. Normal mammary gland and adenomas had strong INSR expression, while carcinomas and metastases had significantly decreased expression. No differences were observed for IGF1R expression. IGF1, IGF2 and GHR mRNA expressions were strongly decreased in adenomas, carcinomas and metastases. INSR and IGF1R are therefore expressed in normal gland and adenomas and an increased stimulus by their ligands may be a proliferative stimulus in those tissues. However, decreased INSR expression carcinomas and their metastases render questionable its impact at late stages of carcinogenesis. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Eggs, embryos and the evolution of imprinting: insights from the platypus genome.

    PubMed

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Shaw, Geoff; Pask, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is widespread in eutherian and marsupial mammals. Although there have been many hypotheses to explain why genomic imprinting evolved in mammals, few have examined how it arose. The host defence hypothesis suggests that imprinting evolved from existing mechanisms within the cell that act to silence foreign DNA elements that insert into the genome. However, the changes to the mammalian genome that accompanied the evolution of imprinting have been hard to define due to the absence of large-scale genomic resources from all extant classes. The recent release of the platypus genome sequence has provided the first opportunity to make comparisons between prototherian (monotreme, which show no signs of imprinting) and therian (marsupial and eutherian, which have imprinting) mammals. We compared the distribution of repeat elements known to attract epigenetic silencing across the genome from monotremes and therian mammals, particularly focusing on the orthologous imprinted regions. Our analyses show that the platypus has significantly fewer repeats of certain classes in the regions of the genome that have become imprinted in therian mammals. The accumulation of repeats, especially long-terminal repeats and DNA elements, in therian imprinted genes and gene clusters therefore appears to be coincident with, and may have been a potential driving force in, the development of mammalian genomic imprinting. Comparative platypus genome analyses of orthologous imprinted regions have provided strong support for the host defence hypothesis to explain the origin of imprinting.

  2. Determination of fusaric acid in maize using molecularly imprinted SPE clean-up

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new liquid chromatography method to detect fusaric acid in maize is reported based on molecularly imprinted polymer solid phase extraction clean-up (MISPE) using mimic-templated molecularly-imprinted polymers. Picolinic acid was used as a toxin analog for imprinting polymers during a thermolytic s...

  3. An atypical case of hypomethylation at multiple imprinted loci

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L; Poole, Rebecca L; Mansour, Sahar; Willoughby, Catherine; Temple, I Karen; Docherty, Louise E; Taylor, Rohan; Mackay, Deborah J G

    2011-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) are caused by genetic and epigenetic mutations of the imprinted gene cluster on chromosome 15q13. Although the imprinting mutations causing PWS and AS are essentially opposite in nature, remarkably, a small number of patients have been reported with clinical features of PWS but epigenetic mutations consistent with AS. We report here a patient who presented with clinical features partially consistent with both PWS and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). Epimutations were found at both the AS/PWS and BWS loci, and additionally at the H19, PEG3, NESPAS and GNAS loci. This patient is therefore the first described case with a primary epimutation consistent with AS accompanied by hypomethylation of other imprinted loci. PMID:21206512

  4. Molecularly imprinted cryogels for carbonic anhydrase purification from bovine erythrocyte.

    PubMed

    Uygun, Murat; Karagözler, A Alev; Denizli, Adil

    2014-04-01

    Molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogels were synthesized and used for purification of carbonic anhydrase from bovine erythrocyte. Cryogels were prepared with free radical cryopolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and methacryloylamido histidine and characterized by swelling degree, macroporosity, FTIR, SEM, surface area and elemental analysis. Maximum carbonic anhydrase adsorption of molecularly imprinted PHEMAH cryogel was found to be 3.16 mg/g. Selectivity of the molecularly imprinted cryogel was investigated using albumin, hemoglobin, IgG, γ-globulin, and lysozyme as competitor proteins and selectivity ratios were found to be 15.26, 60.05, 21.88, 17.61, and 17.42, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase purity was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and zymogram results.

  5. The Effect of Laser Imprint in OMEGA Cryogenic Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2017-10-01

    Single laser beam nonuniformity (laser imprint) can potentially compromise direct-drive implosion performance. Rayleigh-Taylor growth of short-wavelength nonuniformity imposed by laser speckle can grow during the acceleration phase of an implosion, resulting in a tenuous in-flight shell. Significant laser imprint can result in a thicker in-flight shell; reduced fusion yield, areal density, and ion temperature; wider burn; and a larger hot-spot radius than a stable shell. Simulations with the hydrodynamic code DRACO are presented for OMEGA cryogenic implosions spanning a range in adiabat and implosion velocity. These simulations include a three-dimensional ray trace. These simulations also include the effect of nonlocal heat conduction and cross-beam energy transfer. Signatures of laser imprint in cryogenic implosions are identified and comparisons to experimental observables are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA000194.

  6. Genomic imprinting and the evolutionary psychology of human kinship

    PubMed Central

    Haig, David

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is predicted to influence behaviors that affect individuals to whom an actor has different degrees of matrilineal and patrilineal kinship (asymmetric kin). Effects of imprinted genes are not predicted in interactions with nonrelatives or with individuals who are equally related to the actor's maternally and paternally derived genes (unless a gene also has pleiotropic effects on fitness of asymmetric kin). Long-term mating bonds are common in most human populations, but dissolution of marriage has always affected a significant proportion of mated pairs. Children born in a new union are asymmetric kin of children born in a previous union. Therefore, the innate dispositions of children toward parents and sibs are expected to be sensitive to cues of marital stability, and these dispositions may be subject to effects of imprinted genes. PMID:21690414

  7. Recognition of lysozyme using surface imprinted bacterial cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Saylan, Yeşeren; Tamahkar, Emel; Denizli, Adil

    2017-11-01

    Here, we developed the lysozyme imprinted bacterial cellulose (Lyz-MIP/BC) nanofibers via the surface imprinting strategy that was designed to recognize lysozyme. This study includes the molecular imprinting method onto the surface of bacterial cellulose nanofibers in the presence of lysozyme by metal ion coordination, as well as further characterizations methods FTIR, SEM and contact angle measurements. The maximum lysozyme adsorption capacity of Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers was found to be 71 mg/g. The Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers showed high selectivity for lysozyme towards bovine serum albumin and cytochrome c. Overall, the Lyz-MIP/BC nanofibers hold great potential for lysozyme recognition due to the high binding capacity, significant selectivity and excellent reusability.

  8. High expression of insulin receptor on tumour-associated blood vessels in invasive bladder cancer predicts poor overall and progression-free survival.

    PubMed

    Roudnicky, Filip; Dieterich, Lothar C; Poyet, Cedric; Buser, Lorenz; Wild, Peter; Tang, Dave; Camenzind, Peter; Ho, Chien Hsien; Otto, Vivianne I; Detmar, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Bladder cancer is a frequently recurring disease with a very poor prognosis once progressed to invasive stages, and tumour-associated blood vessels play a crucial role in this process. In order to identify novel biomarkers associated with progression, we isolated blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) from human invasive bladder cancers and matched normal bladder tissue, and found that tumour-associated BECs greatly up-regulated the expression of insulin receptor (INSR). High expression of INSR on BECs of invasive bladder cancers was significantly associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival. Furthermore, increased expression of the INSR ligand IGF-2 in invasive bladder cancers was associated with reduced overall survival. INSR may therefore represent a novel biomarker to predict cancer progression. Mechanistically, we observed pronounced hypoxia in human bladder cancer tissue, and found a positive correlation between the expression of the hypoxia marker gene GLUT1 and vascular INSR expression, indicating that hypoxia drives INSR expression in tumour-associated blood vessels. In line with this, exposure of cultured BECs and human bladder cancer cell lines to hypoxia led to increased expression of INSR and IGF-2, respectively, and IGF-2 increased BEC migration through the activation of INSR in vitro. Taken together, we identified vascular INSR expression as a potential biomarker for progression in bladder cancer. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGF-2/INSR mediated paracrine crosstalk between bladder cancer cells and endothelial cells is functionally involved in tumour angiogenesis and may thus represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  10. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  11. Defect reduction progress in step and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selenidis, K.; Maltabes, J.; McMackin, I.; Perez, J.; Martin, W.; Resnick, D. J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective method for the replication of nanometer-scale structures from a template mold. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is unique in its ability to address both resolution and alignment. Recently overlay across a 200 mm wafer of less than 20nm, 3σ has been demonstrated. Current S-FIL resolution and alignment performance motivates the consideration of nano-imprint lithography as Next Generation Lithography (NGL) solution for IC production. During the S-FIL process, a transferable image, an imprint, is produced by mechanically molding a liquid UV-curable resist on a wafer. The novelty of this process immediately raises questions about the overall defectivity level of S-FIL. Acceptance of imprint lithography for CMOS manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This report specifically focuses on this challenge and presents the current status of defect reduction in S-FIL technology and will summarize the result of defect inspections of wafers patterned using S-FIL. Wafer inspections were performed with a KLA Tencor- 2132 (KT-2132) automated patterned wafer inspection tool. Recent results show wafer defectivity to be less 5 cm -2. Mask fabrication and inspection techniques used to obtain low defect template will be described. The templates used to imprint wafers for this study were designed specifically to facilitate automated defect inspection and were made by employing CMOS industry standard materials and exposure tools. A KT-576 tool was used for template defect inspection.

  12. Electrochemically synthesized polymers in molecular imprinting for chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Piyush S; Pietrzyk-Le, Agnieszka; D'Souza, Francis; Kutner, Wlodzimierz

    2012-04-01

    This critical review describes a class of polymers prepared by electrochemical polymerization that employs the concept of molecular imprinting for chemical sensing. The principal focus is on both conducting and nonconducting polymers prepared by electropolymerization of electroactive functional monomers, such as pristine and derivatized pyrrole, aminophenylboronic acid, thiophene, porphyrin, aniline, phenylenediamine, phenol, and thiophenol. A critical evaluation of the literature on electrosynthesized molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) applied as recognition elements of chemical sensors is presented. The aim of this review is to highlight recent achievements in analytical applications of these MIPs, including present strategies of determination of different analytes as well as identification and solutions for problems encountered.

  13. Non-conflict theories for the evolution of genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H G; Clark, A G

    2014-08-01

    Theories focused on kinship and the genetic conflict it induces are widely considered to be the primary explanations for the evolution of genomic imprinting. However, there have appeared many competing ideas that do not involve kinship/conflict. These ideas are often overlooked because kinship/conflict is entrenched in the literature, especially outside evolutionary biology. Here we provide a critical overview of these non-conflict theories, providing an accessible perspective into this literature. We suggest that some of these alternative hypotheses may, in fact, provide tenable explanations of the evolution of imprinting for at least some loci.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Phenoxyacetic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiting; Song, Tao; Zong, Fulin; Chen, Tiechun; Pan, Canping

    2008-01-01

    2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (2-MPA), 2-methyl-4-chlorophenxyacetic acid (MCPA) and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (4-CPA) were imprinted to investigate the cross-selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The result indicates that 2-MPA, which is similar in shape, size and functionality with phenoxyacetic herbicides, are suitable to be used as a suitable template to prepare the MIPs for retaining phenoxyacetic herbicides. To study the ion-pair interactions between template molecules and functional monomer 4-vinylpiridine (4-VP), computational molecular modeling was employed. The data indicate that the cross-selectivities of MIPs for phenoxyacetic acid herbicides depend on the binding energies of complexes. PMID:19325723

  15. Supramolecular recognition of estrogens via molecularly imprinted polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ričanyová, Júlia; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Szumski, Michał

    2010-01-01

    The isolation and preconcentration of estrogens from new types of biological samples (acellular and protein-free simulated body fluid) by molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction has been described. In this technique, supramolecular receptors, namely molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used as a sorbent material. The recognition sites of MIPs were prepared by non-covalent multiple interactions and formed with the target 17β-estradiol as a template molecule. High-performance liquid chromatography with spectroscopic UV, selective, and a sensitive electrochemical CoulArray detector was used for the determination of 17β-estradiol, estrone, and estriol in simulated body fluid which mimicked human plasma. PMID:20549493

  16. Diagnosis of an imprinted-gene syndrome by a novel bioinformatics analysis of whole-genome sequences from a family trio

    PubMed Central

    Bodian, Dale L; Solomon, Benjamin D; Khromykh, Alina; Thach, Dzung C; Iyer, Ramaswamy K; Link, Kathleen; Baker, Robin L; Baveja, Rajiv; Vockley, Joseph G; Niederhuber, John E

    2014-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing and whole-exome sequencing are becoming more widely applied in clinical medicine to help diagnose rare genetic diseases. Identification of the underlying causative mutations by genome-wide sequencing is greatly facilitated by concurrent analysis of multiple family members, most often the mother–father–proband trio, using bioinformatics pipelines that filter genetic variants by mode of inheritance. However, current pipelines are limited to Mendelian inheritance patterns and do not specifically address disorders caused by mutations in imprinted genes, such as forms of Angelman syndrome and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome. Using publicly available tools, we implemented a genetic inheritance search mode to identify imprinted-gene mutations. Application of this search mode to whole-genome sequences from a family trio led to a diagnosis for a proband for whom extensive clinical testing and Mendelian inheritance-based sequence analysis were nondiagnostic. The condition in this patient, IMAGe syndrome, is likely caused by the heterozygous mutation c.832A>G (p.Lys278Glu) in the imprinted gene CDKN1C. The genotypes and disease status of six members of the family are consistent with maternal expression of the gene, and allele-biased expression was confirmed by RNA-Seq for the heterozygotes. This analysis demonstrates that an imprinted-gene search mode is a valuable addition to genome sequence analysis pipelines for identifying disease-causative variants. PMID:25614875

  17. Copper-dependent and -independent hypoxia-inducible factor-1 regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Liying; Lin, Chen; Yang, Hong; Fu, Haiying; Li, Rui; Kang, Y James

    2014-10-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) regulates the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a process requiring copper (Cu) participation. HIF-1 is also involved in the expression of more than a hundred of genes, but it is unknown how HIF-1 differentially controls the expression of these genes timely and spatially. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that Cu is not required for the expression of all HIF-1-regulated genes, thus exploring mechanistic insights into the differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with siRNA targeting HIF-1α to define the essential role of HIF-1 in the regulation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) expression. A Cu chelator, tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), was used to reduce intracellular availability of Cu. In comparison, a zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), was used to reduce intracellular zinc concentration. The expression of both BNIP3 and IGF-2 was completely suppressed in the HIF-1α deficient cells. The removal of Cu suppressed the expression of BNIP3, but did not affect that of IGF-2. The reduction of intracellular zinc did not cause the same effect. Further screening identified a group of genes whose expression required Cu and the others did not need Cu. The present study thus demonstrates Cu-dependent and -independent HIF-1 regulation of gene expression, indicating a mechanism for differential control of multiple gene expression by one transcription factor.

  18. Synthesis of glycylglycine-imprinted silica microspheres through different water-in-oil emulsion techniques.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Mariana; Loureiro, Dianne; Araújo, Maria João; Marques, Eduardo; Dias-Cabral, Cristina; Azenha, Manuel; Silva, Fernando

    2013-07-05

    Sol-gel molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs) are traditionally obtained by grinding and sieving of a monolith formed by bulk polymerization. However, this process has several drawbacks that can be overcome if these materials are synthesized directly in the spherical format. This work aimed at the development of two efficient methods to prepare spherical glycylglycine-templated silica ("whole-imprinted" and surface-imprinted) through a combination of sol-gel and emulsion techniques. The synthesis of the microspheres was optimized regarding emulsion and sol-gel parameters. Imprinting efficiency of the prepared materials was studied by solid phase extraction and flow microcalorimetry. The particles prepared with glycylglycine and functional monomer, in basic medium (using cyclohexane as non-polar continuous medium) presented the highest imprinting factor - 2.5 - and the respective surface-imprinted material presented an imprinting factor of 1.5. The results of flow microcalorimetry confirmed the action of different mechanisms of glycylglycine adsorption: entropically-controlled interactions were present for the "whole-imprinted" material, indicating adsorption inside small imprinted pores; enthalpically-controlled interactions were observed for the surface-imprinted material, a behaviour more compatible with a template/surface-only interaction. Globally, the two approaches allowed for a successful imprinting effect which was more extensive for the "whole-imprinted" material, whereas the surface-imprinting feature confers to the surface-imprinted xerogel advantages regarding mass transfer kinetics. Overall, the spherical particles obtained by both approaches presented characteristics, such as sphericity, mesoporosity, easy/fast accessibility to imprinted sites, important indicators that these materials may be candidates for stationary phases for efficient, selective chromatographic separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Early imprinting in wild and game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos): genotype and arousal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, K.M.; Shoffner, R.N.; Phillips, R.E.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Early imprinting was studied under laboratory conditions in five lines of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) with different degrees of wildness obtained through pedigreed breeding. Data were analyzed by the least squares method. Wild ducklings imprinted better than game-farm (domesticated) ducklings, and heterosis was demonstrated to exist in imprinting traits. Nonadditive genetic variations and genotype-environmental interactions are discussed as possible causes for the heterosis observed. Differences in imprinting between genetic lines are attributed, at least partly, to differences in arousal level during the ducklings' first exposure to the imprinting stimulus.

  20. Unravelling the Wolbachia evolutionary role: the reprogramming of the host genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Negri, Ilaria; Franchini, Antonella; Gonella, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Mazzoglio, Peter John; Mandrioli, Mauro; Alma, Alberto

    2009-07-07

    Environmental factors can induce significant epigenetic changes that may also be inherited by future generations. The maternally inherited symbiont of arthropods Wolbachia pipientis is an excellent candidate as an 'environmental' factor promoting trans-generational epigenetic changes: by establishing intimate relationships with germ-line cells, epigenetic effects of Wolbachia symbiosis would be manifested as a 'maternal effect', in which infection of the mother modulates the offspring phenotype. In the leafhopper Zyginidia pullula, Wolbachia feminizes genetic males, leaving them as intersexes. With the exception of male chitinous structures that are present in the last abdominal segment, feminized males display phenotypic features that are typical of females. These include ovaries that range from a typical histological architecture to an altered structure. Methylation-sensitive random amplification of polymorphic DNA profiles show that they possess a female genomic imprint. On the other hand, some rare feminized males bear testes instead of ovaries. These specimens possess a Wolbachia density approximately four orders of magnitude lower than feminized males with ovaries and maintain a male genome-methylation pattern. Our results indicate that Wolbachia infection disrupts male imprinting, which dramatically influences the expression of genes involved in sex differentiation and development, and the alteration occurs only if Wolbachia exceeds a density threshold. Thus, a new Wolbachia's role as an environmental evolutionary force, inducing epigenetic trans-generational changes, should now be considered.

  1. Separation of Sudan dyes from chilli powder by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Piao, Chunying; Chen, Ligang

    2012-12-14

    A simple method based on magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) for the separation of Sudan dyes from chilli powder samples has been developed. The MMIPs were synthesized as follows: the Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were encapsulated with a SiO(2) shell and functionalized with -CH=CH(2), then the polymers were further fabricated by surface-imprinted polymerization using Sudan IV as template molecule, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linking agent. The prepared MMIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and physical property measurement system. The isothermal absorption experiment, kinetics absorption experiment and selectivity of MMIPs were tested. The analytes were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection of the four Sudan dyes are 6.2, 1.6, 4.3 and 4.5 ng g(-1), respectively. The precision expressed as relative standard deviation ranging from 4.8% to 9.1% was obtained. In all three fortified levels (25, 250 and 2500 ng g(-1)), recoveries of Sudan dyes were in the range of 79.9-87.8%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pending templates imprinted polymers-hypothesis, synthesis, adsorption, and chromatographic properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Luan, Xinjie; Zhao, Meifeng; Liu, Guofeng; Wang, Jian; Qu, Qishu; Hu, Xiaoya

    2013-05-01

    This is the first time when protein-imprinted polymers are prepared with "pending templates." The polymers were synthesized in the presence of a real sample (chicken egg white), rather than any known commercial proteins. Compared with a simultaneously synthesized nonimprinted control polymer, the polymers show higher adsorption capacity for abundant components (as "pending templates") in the original sample. Chromatography experiments indicated that the columns made of the imprinted polymers could retain abundant species (imprinted) and separate them from those not imprinted. Thus, the sample could be split into dimidiate subfractions with reduced complexities. "Pending template imprinting" suggests a new way to investigate molecular imprinting, especially to dissect, simplify, and analyze complicated samples through a series of polymers just imprinted by the samples per se. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The Interaction Systems Generated by the Teacher's Didactic Imprinting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Nadia S.; Roselli, Néstor D.

    2015-01-01

    The current study aimed to identify and analyze the systems of interaction implemented by teachers in university classes, based on their teaching imprints. It focused on the interactions occurred in scholar natural contexts and the construction of knowledge based on said interaction. A form to observe the different behaviors was designed in order…

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymer nanocarriers for sustained release of erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Kempe, Henrik; Parareda Pujolràs, Anna; Kempe, Maria

    2015-02-01

    To develop and evaluate molecularly imprinted nanocarriers for sustained release of erythromycin in physiological buffer media. Erythromycin-imprinted poly(methacrylic acid-co-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) nanocarriers and corresponding control nanocarriers were prepared by free-radical precipitation polymerization. The nanocarriers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and nitrogen sorption analysis. Binding studies were carried out with erythromycin and five structurally unrelated drugs. Molecular descriptors of the drugs were computed and correlated to measured binding data by multivariate data analysis. Loading with erythromycin and in vitro release studies were carried out in physiological buffer media. Kinetic models were fitted to drug release data. The template affected the size and morphology of the nanocarriers. Binding isotherms showed that erythromycin-imprinted nanocarriers had a higher erythromycin binding capacity than corresponding control nanocarriers. Multivariate data analysis, correlating binding to molecular descriptors of the drugs, indicated a molecular imprinting effect. Erythromycin loading capacity was 76 mg/g with a loading efficiency of 87%. Release studies in physiological buffer showed an initial burst release of a quarter of loaded erythromycin during the first day and an 82% release after a week. The release was best described by the Korsmeyer-Peppas model. Sustained release of erythromycin in physiological buffer was demonstrated.

  5. Exploring the peptide retention mechanism in molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Cecilia; Ore, Odd Gøran; Sellergren, Börje; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug; Reubsaet, Léon

    2017-09-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been used as useful sorbents in solid-phase extraction for a wide range of molecules and sample matrices. Their unique selectivity can be fine-tuned in the imprinting process and is crucial for the extraction of macromolecules from complex matrices such as serum. A relevant example of this is the application of MIPs to peptides in diagnostic assays. In this article the selectivity of MIPs, previously implemented in a quantitative mass-spectrometric assay for the biomarker pro-gastrin-releasing peptide, is investigated. Partial least squares regression was used to generate models for the evaluation and prediction of the retention mechanism of MIPs. A hypothesis on interactions of MIPs with the target peptide was verified by ad hoc experiments considering the relevant peptide physicochemical properties highlighted from the multivariate analysis. Novel insights into and knowledge of the driving forces responsible for the MIP selectivity have been obtained and can be directly used for further optimization of MIP imprinting strategies. Graphical Abstract Applied analytical strategy: the Solid Phase Extraction (SPE) of digested Bovin Serum Albumin (BSA), using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIP), is followed by the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis for the identification of the retained peptides. The further application of multivariate analysis allows setting up a Partial Least Square (PLS) model, which describes the peptide retention into the MIP and gives additional knowledge to be used in the optimization of the MIP and the whole SPE method.

  6. PERSPECTIVE VIEW SOUTH WEST FROM STREET, NOTE IMPRINT FROM GREENHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW SOUTH WEST FROM STREET, NOTE IMPRINT FROM GREENHOUSE ROOF LINE WHEN STRUCTURE WAS USED AS NURSERY-GREENHOUSE - New York State Soldiers & Sailors Home, Sign Shop, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 76 Veterans Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  7. Optical scanning apparatus for indicia imprinted about a cylindrical axis

    DOEpatents

    Villarreal, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation.

  8. Chemical point detection using differential fluorescence from molecularly imprinted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Nelson, Jean; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most attractive approaches for chemical sensing due to the abundant light produced by most fluorophores, resulting in excellent detection sensitivity. However, the broad and overlapping emission spectra of target and background species have made it difficult to perform species identification in a field instrument because of the need to perform spectral decomposition and analysis. This paper describes a new chemical sensing strategy based on differential fluorescence measurements from molecularly imprinted polymers, which eliminates the need to perform any spectral analysis. Species identification is accomplished by measuring the differential light output from a pair of polymers-one imprinted to a target species and the other identical, but not imprinted. The imprinted polymer selectively concentrates the target molecule and controls the energy (wavelength) of the emitted fluorescence signal and the differential output eliminates common mode signals associated with non-specific background interference. Because no spectral analysis is required, the sensors can be made extremely small and require very little power. Preliminary performance parameters from a prototype sensor are presented and discussed.

  9. Imprinting of confining sites for cell cultures on thermoplastic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D.; Fleenor, E. N.

    1969-01-01

    Prevention of test cell migration beyond the field of observation involves confining cells or cultures in microlagoons made in either a layer of grease or a thermoplastic substrate. Thermoplastic films or dishes are easily imprinted with specifically designed patterns of microlagoons.

  10. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED ELECTROPOLYMERIZED CARBON ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) selective for fluorescein, rhodamine or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) were electropolymerized onto graphite electrodes using an aqueous solution equimolar in resorsinol/ortho-phenylenediamine and in the presence of the template mole...

  11. Prader-Willi syndrome and atypical submicroscopic 15q11-q13 deletions with or without imprinting defects.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Maaz; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-11-01

    We report a 20 year follow up on a Caucasian female, now 26 years of age, with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) harboring an atypical 15q11-q13 submicroscopic deletion of 100-200 kb in size first detected in 1996 involving the imprinting center, SNRPN gene and surrounding region. PWS is a rare complex disorder caused by the loss of paternally expressed genes in the 15q11-q13 region. With high resolution chromosomal microarray and methylation - specific MLPA analysis, we updated the genetic findings on our patient and found a 209,819bp deletion including the SNURF-SNRPN gene complex which includes the imprinting center and the SNORD116 region. We compared with four other similarly reported individuals in the literature with atypical submicroscopic deletions within this region but without imprinting center involvement to better characterize the specific genetic lesions causing PWS clinical findings. Clinically, our patient met the diagnostic criteria of PWS including infantile hypotonia, a poor suck with feeding difficulties, global developmental delays and later food foraging, childhood obesity, small hands and skin picking. Small atypical deletions of comparable sizes were seen in the 15q11-q13 region in all five cases and similar behavioral/physical characteristics were found despite an imprinting defect in our patient. These results further support an overlapping critical deletion region involving the non-coding snoRNA SNORD116 in common in the five individuals playing a key role in contributing to the PWS phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-Based Sensor for the Electrochemical Determination of Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP)

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Samuel Kassahun; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Jose

    2014-01-01

    The explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP), which can be prepared from commercially readily available reagents following an easy synthetic procedure, is one of the most common components of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Molecularly-imprinted polymer (MIP) electrochemical sensors have proved useful for the determination of different compounds in different matrices with the required sensitivity and selectivity. In this work, a highly sensitive and selective molecularly imprinted polymer with electrochemical capabilities for the determination of TATP has been developed. The molecular imprinting has been performed via electropolymerisation onto a glassy carbon electrode surface by cyclic voltammetry from a solution of pyrrole functional monomer, TATP template and LiClO4. Differential Pulse Voltammetry of TATP, with LiClO4 as supporting electrolyte, was performed in a potential range of −2.0 V to +1.0 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Three-factor two-level factorial design was used to optimise the monomer concentration at 0.1 mol·L−1, template concentration at 100 mmol·L−1 and the number of cyclic voltammetry scan cycles to 10. The molecularly imprinted polymer-modified glassy carbon electrode demonstrated good performance at low concentrations for a linear range of 82–44,300 μg·L−1 and a correlation coefficient of r2 = 0.996. The limits of detection (LoD) and quantification (LoQ) achieved were 26.9 μg·L−1 and 81.6 μg·L−1, respectively. The sensor demonstrated very good repeatability with precision values (n = 6, expressed as %RSD) of 1.098% and 0.55% for 1108 and 2216 μg·L−1, respectively. It also proved selective for TATP in the presence of other explosive substances such as PETN, RDX, HMX, and TNT. PMID:25490589

  13. Towards the cloning of imprinted genes in the Prader-Willi/Angelman region of chromosome 15q11-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, M.; Sutcliffe, J.S.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct clinical phenotypes resulting from paternal and maternal deficiencies respectively in human chromosome 15q11-q13. The data suggest the presence of oppositely imprinted genes in the region, and the gene for small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N (SNRPN) has been identified as a candidate gene for PWS. Previous strategies for positional cloning identified a number of transcripts from the PWS/AS region, and two of them, PAR-5 (D15S226E) and PAR-1 (D15S227E), are paternally expressed in cultured human cells from patients deleted for 15q11-q13 as is SNRPN. Cosmid contig maps have been developed from the followingmore » YACs (contained loci in parentheses): 307A12 (D15S13), 457B4 (SNRPN), 132D4 (D15S10), A229A2, and 378A12 (D15S113), to facilitate molecular studies of PWS and AS. Exon trapping has been employed to isolate putative exons from these overlapping cosmids. Two trapped fragments from the D15S113 region and one fragment from the SNRPN region has been isolated. Sequence information is available for all of the fragments. In addition to imprinting analysis in cultured human cells, we have developed a method to detect imprinting in mouse and human using a GC-clamped denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis strategy, in combination with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The imprinting analyses of putative exons are in progress to investigate their possible candidacy for involvement in PWS or AS phenotypes.« less

  14. Reversible adsorption of calcium ions by imprinted temperature sensitive gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Guney, Orhan; Oya, Taro; Sakai, Yasuzo; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Enoki, Takashi; Takeoka, Yukikazu; Ishibashi, Toru; Kuroda, Kenichi; Tanaka, Kazunori; Wang, Guoqiang; Grosberg, Alexander Yu.; Masamune, Satoru; Tanaka, Toyoichi

    2001-02-01

    With the aim of developing polymeric gels sensitive to external stimuli and able to reversibly adsorb and release divalent ions, copolymer gels of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) and methacrylic (MAA) monomers were prepared. We chose calcium as a target divalent ion. Two MAAs form a complex with a calcium ion, and the NIPA component allows the polymers to swell and shrink reversibly in response to temperature. The adsorbing site develops an affinity to target ions when the adsorbing molecules come into proximity, but when they are separated, the affinity diminishes. To enhance the affinity to calcium, an imprinting technique was applied using Ca2+ and Pb2+ ions as templates in methylsulfoxide and dioxane media, respectively. The adsorption capacity of the imprinted gels was compared with that of the nonimprinted gels, and the effects of the templates, the solvents, and the amount of methacrylic monomers used in the synthesis and the medium temperature over the Ca2+ adsorption capacity of the gels from aqueous solutions were evaluated. The analysis of the adsorption revealed that (a) the adsorption can be described by the Langmuir isotherms; (b) there is an approximately linear relationship between saturation and methacrylic monomer concentration; (c) the affinity depends on the degree of gel swelling or shrinkage that can be switched on and off by temperature; (d) in the shrunken state, the affinity depends approximately linearly on the MAA concentration in the imprinted gels, whereas in the nonimprinted gels it is proportional to the square of MAA concentration; (e) the imprinted gels adsorb more than the nonimprinted gels when MAA concentration is less than that of permanent cross linkers. The success of imprinting of CaMAA2 and PbMAA2 complex is evidence for memory of such complex onto the weakly cross-linked gel.

  15. Synthesis of naproxen-imprinted polymer using Pickering emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kujawska, Małgorzata; Zhou, Tongchang; Trochimczuk, Andrzej W; Ye, Lei

    2018-03-01

    For the last decades, molecular imprinting is developing intensively, especially in the case of the application of new imprinting techniques. In this work, for the first time, a Pickering emulsion polymerization was used to synthesize the S-naproxen-imprinted polymer spheres following a noncovalent protocol. To enhance the knowledge about imprinting process using mentioned technique, thorough analysis of the synthesis process was performed. Optimization of polymerization conditions included the selection of functional monomer, cross-linking agent, type of porogen, surfactant, and the choice of appropriate amount of the template and porogen. Prepared materials were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. To study the binding properties, the sorption studies, including adsorption isotherms and competitive binding, were performed. Investigation of the effect of the functional monomer on the selective recognition of S-naproxen showed that the interactions between the template molecule and 4-vinylpyridine resulted in the best recognizing ability. Moreover, the synthesis with application of ethylene glycol dimethacrylae as a cross-linker, toluene as a porogen, and Tween 20 as an additional emulsion stabilizer gave the most desired result. The optimal ratio of the porogen to monomers mixture was 0.1, due to the fact that the increase of the porogen volume resulted in the significant increase of nonspecific uptake. In addition, the tenfold molar excess of functional monomer relative to the template turned out to be optimal. Subsequent binding studies demonstrated that the material synthesized using optimized polymerization conditions consists of imprinted sites that are sensitive for the S-naproxen. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Fingerprint-imprinted polymer: rational selection of peptide epitope templates for the determination of proteins by molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Bossi, Alessandra M; Sharma, Piyush S; Montana, Luca; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Laub, Orgad; Levi, Raphael

    2012-05-01

    The pool of peptides composing a protein allows for its distinctive identification in a process named fingerprint (FP) analysis. Here, the FP concept is used to develop a method for the rational preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for protein recognition. The fingerprint imprinting (FIP) is based on the following: (1) the in silico cleavage of the protein sequence of interest with specific agents; (2) the screening of all the peptide sequences generated against the UniProtKB database in order to allow for the rational selection of distinctive and unique peptides (named as epitopes) of the target protein; (3) the selected epitopes are synthesized and used as templates for the molecular imprinting process. To prove the principle, NT-proBNP, a marker of the risk of cardiovascular events, was chosen as an example. The in silico analysis of the NT-proBNP sequence allowed us to individuate the peptide candidates, which were next used as templates for the preparation of NT-pro-BNP-specific FIPs and tested for their ability to bind the NT-proBNP peptides in complex samples. Results indicated an imprinting factor, IF, of ~10, a binding capacity of 0.5-2 mg/g, and the ability to rebind 40% of the template in a complex sample, composed of the whole digests of NT-proBNP.

  17. A sensitive and selective molecularly imprinted sensor combined with magnetic molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction for determination of dibutyl phthalate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Luo, Lijuan; Cai, Rong; Chen, Hongjun

    2013-11-15

    A highly sensitive and selective molecularly imprinted (MIP) sensor combined with magnetic molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MMISPE) was developed for the determination of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) in complex matrixes. The magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP) was synthesized as solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbet to extract DBP from complex matrixes and as sensing element to improve the selectivity of the imprinted sensor. The morphologies of MMIP and MIP-sensor were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical performances of MIP-sensor were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The conditions of preconcentration, elution and electrochemical determination were studied in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the response currents of the MIP-sensor exhibited a linear relationship towards DBP concentrations ranging from 1.0 × 10(-8)g/L to 1.0 × 10(-3)g/L. The limit of detection of the MMIP-sensor coupled with the MMISPE was calculated as 0.052 ng/L. The MMIP-sensor coupled with the MMISPE was applied to detect DBP in complex samples successfully. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Essential role of DNA methyltransferase 1-mediated transcription of insulin-like Growth Factor 2 in Resistance to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Jin; Park, Kwan Hee; Jeong, Hae Min; Hyun, Seung Yeob; Cho, Jaebeom; Lee, Wooin; Park, Ji Eun; Kwon, So Jung; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Ni, Xiao; Shin, Young Kee; Johnson, Faye M.; Duvic, Madeleine; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) are promising anticancer therapies; however, drug resistance limits their efficacy. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying HDI resistance, focusing on the mechanism of HDI-mediated induction of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) based on our previous study. Experimental design The methylation status of CCCTC binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites in the IGF2/H19 imprinting control region (ICR) were determined by methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. The effectiveness of single or combinatorial blockade of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) was evaluated using cell viability assay and patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) model. Results HDAC inhibition by vorinostat increased acetylated STAT3 (K685), resulting in transcriptional upregulation of DNMT1. DNMT1-mediated hypermethylation of CTCF-binding sites in the IGF2/H19 ICR decreased CTCF insulator activity, leading to a transcriptional upregulation of IGF2 and activation of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) pathway in cells with acquired or de novo vorinostat resistance. Strategies targeting DNMT1 or STAT3 diminished the IGF2 expression and potentiated vorinostat sensitivity in preclinical models of lung cancer with hypermethylation in the H19/IGF2 ICR. The degree of ICR hypermethylation correlated with vorinostat resistance in patient-derived lung tumors and in patients with hematological malignancies. Conclusions DNMT1-mediated transcriptional upregulation of IGF2 is a novel mechanism of resistance to HDIs, highlighting the role of epigenetic deregulation of IGF2 in HDI resistance and the potential value of the H19/IGF2 ICR hypermethylation and DNMT1 expression as predictive biomarkers in HDI-based anticancer therapies. PMID:27582487

  19. Perinatal photoperiod imprints the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Ciarleglio, Christopher M; Axley, John C; Strauss, Benjamin R; Gamble, Karen L; McMahon, Douglas G

    2010-01-01

    Using real-time gene expression imaging and behavioral analysis, we found that perinatal photoperiod has lasting effects on the circadian rhythms expressed by clock neurons as well as on mouse behavior, and sets the responsiveness of the biological clock to subsequent changes in photoperiod. These developmental gene x environment interactions tune circadian clock responses to subsequent seasonal photoperiods and may contribute to the influence of season on neurobehavioral disorders in humans. PMID:21131951

  20. Expression-based GWAS identifies variants, gene interactions and key regulators affecting intramuscular fatty acid content and composition in porcine meat.

    PubMed

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Revilla, Manuel; Castelló, Anna; Fernández, Ana I; Folch, Josep M; Ballester, Maria

    2016-08-18

    The aim of this work is to better understand the genetic mechanisms determining two complex traits affecting porcine meat quality: intramuscular fat (IMF) content and its fatty acid (FA) composition. With this purpose, expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) of 45 lipid-related genes associated with meat quality traits in swine muscle (Longissimus dorsi) of 114 Iberian × Landrace backcross animals was performed. The eGWAS identified 241 SNPs associated with 11 genes: ACSM5, CROT, FABP3, FOS, HIF1AN, IGF2, MGLL, NCOA1, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and PPARA. Three expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) for IGF2, ACSM5 and MGLL were identified, showing cis-acting effects, whereas 16 eQTLs had trans regulatory effects. A polymorphism in the ACSM5 promoter region associated with its expression was identified. In addition, strong candidate genes regulating ACSM5, FOS, PPARA, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and HIF1AN gene expression were also seen. Notably, the analysis highlighted the NR3C1 transcription factor as a strong candidate gene involved in the regulation of the 45 genes analysed. Finally, the IGF2, MGLL, MC2R, ARHGAP6, and NR3C1 genes were identified as potential regulators co-localizing within QTLs for fatness and growth traits in the IBMAP population. The results obtained increase our knowledge in the functional regulatory mechanisms involved in these complex traits.

  1. Polarization imprint effects on the photovoltaic effect in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhengwei; Tian, Junjiang; Fan, Zhen; Lu, Zengxing; Zhang, Luyong; Zheng, Dongfeng; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Deyang; Qin, Minghui; Zeng, Min; Lu, Xubing; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The polarization imprint along with the photovoltaic (PV) effect has been studied in Pt/Pb(Zr0.3Ti0.7)O3/SrRuO3 ferroelectric capacitors. It is shown that the positive DC poling induces the imprint with a downward direction whereas the negative DC poling suppresses the imprint (i.e., rejuvenation). In the polarization up state, the imprinted capacitor exhibits degraded PV properties compared with the rejuvenated one. This may be because the imprint reduces the number of upward domains, thus lowering the driving force for the PV effect. In the polarization down state, however, the rejuvenated capacitor enters the imprinted state spontaneously. This rejuvenation-to-imprint transition can be further aggravated by applying positive voltages and ultraviolet illumination. It is proposed that the domain pinning/depinning, which are associated with the oxygen vacancies and trapped electrons modulated by polarization, voltage, and illumination, may be responsible for the polarization imprint and rejuvenation. Our study therefore sheds light on the correlation between the polarization imprint and the PV effect in the ferroelectrics and also provides some viable suggestions to address the imprint-induced degradation of PV performance.

  2. Pharmacological extension of the sensitive period for imprinting in Gallus domesticus.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    1997-12-01

    Precocial animals, such as the chick, exhibit a form of learning termed filial imprinting. The chick's sensitive period for filial imprinting is restricted to the first few days after hatching. The neural mechanism that terminates the sensitive period is not fully understood. It is thought to be an experience-dependent event because once a chick has imprinted, it will not readily imprint on another stimulus. However, even dark-reared chicks eventually lose the ability to imprint, which suggests that the ending of the sensitive period may not be entirely experience-dependent. The present study investigates factors that may contribute to the ending of the sensitive period. In our experiments, dark-reared chicks were unable to imprint after Day 2 posthatching, but chicks treated 10 h after hatching with an intramuscular injection of the noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) (KX) imprinted on a stuffed hen 8 days after hatching. Similarly treated chicks did not imprint on a red and black box, although the box was an effective imprinting stimulus for Day 2 chicks. Chicks treated with KX at 20 or 40 h posthatching or on Day 4 or 7 as well as controls treated with pyrogen-free saline were unable to imprint on Day 8.

  3. Maintenance of Mest imprinted methylation in blastocyst-stage mouse embryos is less stable than other imprinted loci following superovulation or embryo culture

    PubMed Central

    Velker, Brenna A. M.; Denomme, Michelle M.; Krafty, Robert T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Assisted reproductive technologies are fertility treatments used by subfertile couples to conceive their biological child. Although generally considered safe, these pregnancies have been linked to genomic imprinting disorders, including Beckwith–Wiedemann and Silver–Russell Syndromes. Silver–Russell Syndrome is a growth disorder characterized by pre- and post-natal growth retardation. The Mest imprinted domain is one candidate region on chromosome 7 implicated in Silver–Russell Syndrome. We have previously shown that maintenance of imprinted methylation was disrupted by superovulation or embryo culture during pre-implantation mouse development. For superovulation, this disruption did not originate in oogenesis as a methylation acquisition defect. However, in comparison to other genes, Mest exhibits late methylation acquisition kinetics, possibly making Mest more vulnerable to perturbation by environmental insult. In this study, we present a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of superovulation and in vitro culture on genomic imprinting at the Mest gene. Superovulation resulted in disruption of imprinted methylation at the maternal Mest allele in blastocysts with an equal frequency of embryos having methylation errors following low or high hormone treatment. This disruption was not due to a failure of imprinted methylation acquisition at Mest in oocytes. For cultured embryos, both the Fast and Slow culture groups experienced a significant loss of maternal Mest methylation compared to in vivo-derived controls. This loss of methylation was independent of development rates in culture. These results indicate that Mest is more susceptible to imprinted methylation maintenance errors compared to other imprinted genes. PMID:29492315

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymers prepared using protein-conjugated cleavable monomers followed by site-specific post-imprinting introduction of fluorescent reporter molecules.

    PubMed

    Suga, Yusuke; Sunayama, Hirobumi; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-10-04

    Molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared using a protein-conjugated disulfide cleavable monomer. After removing the protein by disulfide reduction, a thiol-reactive fluorophore was introduced into the thiol residue located only inside the imprinted cavity, resulting in specific transduction of the binding events into fluorescence spectral change.

  5. SH2B1 modulates chromatin state and MyoD occupancy to enhance expressions of myogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung; Yeh, Chia-Ming; Lian, Yen-Ling; Chan, Michael W Y; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Chen, Linyi

    2017-02-01

    As mesoderm-derived cell lineage commits to myogenesis, a spectrum of signaling molecules, including insulin growth factor (IGF), activate signaling pathways and ultimately instruct chromatin remodeling and the transcription of myogenic genes. MyoD is a key transcription factor during myogenesis. In this study, we have identified and characterized a novel myogenic regulator, SH2B1. Knocking down SH2B1 delays global chromatin condensation and decreases the formation of myotubes. SH2B1 interacts with histone H1 and is required for the removal of histone H1 from active transcription sites, allowing for the expressions of myogenic genes, IGF2 and MYOG. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest the requirement of SH2B1 for the induction of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation as well as the reduction of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation at the promoters and/or enhancers of IGF2 and MYOG genes during myogenesis. Furthermore, SH2B1 is required for the transcriptional activity of MyoD and MyoD occupancy at the enhancer/promoter regions of IGF2 and MYOG during myogenesis. Together, this study demonstrates that SH2B1 fine-tunes global-local chromatin states, expressions of myogenic genes and ultimately promotes myogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Progress in mask replication using jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta S.; Brooks, Cynthia B.; Doyle, Gary F.; Brown, Laura; Jones, Chris; Imhof, Joseph; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2011-04-01

    The Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process uses drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for memory markets including Flash memory and patterned media for hard disk drives. It is anticipated that the lifetime of a single template (for patterned media) or mask (for semiconductor) will be on the order of 104 - 105imprints. This suggests that tens of thousands of templates/masks will be required to satisfy the needs of a manufacturing environment. Electron-beam patterning is too slow to feasibly deliver these volumes, but instead can provide a high quality "master" mask which can be replicated many times with an imprint lithography tool. This strategy has the capability to produce the required supply of "working" templates/masks. In this paper, we review the development of the mask form factor, imprint replication tools and processes specifically for semiconductor applications. The requirements needed for semiconductors dictate the need for a well defined form factor for both master and replica masks which is also compatible with the existing mask infrastructure established for the 6025 semi standard, 6" x 6" x 0.25" photomasks. Complying with this standard provides the necessary tooling needed for mask fabrication processes, cleaning, metrology, and inspection. The replica form factor has additional features specific to imprinting such as a pre-patterned mesa. A PerfectaTM MR5000 mask replication tool has been developed specifically to pattern replica masks from an e-beam written master. The system specifications include a throughput of four replicas per hour with an added image placement component of 5nm, 3sigma and a critical dimension uniformity error of less than 1nm, 3sigma. A new process has been developed to fabricate replicas with high contrast alignment marks so that designs for imprint can fit within current

  7. The imprinted Phlda2 gene modulates a major endocrine compartment of the placenta to regulate placental demands for maternal resources.

    PubMed

    Tunster, S J; Creeth, H D J; John, R M

    2016-01-01

    Imprinted genes, which are expressed from a single parental allele in response to epigenetic marks first established in the germline, function in a myriad of processes to regulate mammalian development. Recent work suggests that imprinted genes may regulate the signalling function of the placenta by modulating the size of the endocrine compartment. Here we provide in vivo evidence that this hypothesis is well founded. Elevated expression of the imprinted Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family a, member 2 (Phlda2) gene drives a reduction of the spongiotrophoblast endocrine compartment, diminished placental glycogen and asymmetric foetal growth restriction. Using both loss-of-function and gain-in-expression mouse models, here we further show that Phlda2 exclusively modulates the spongiotrophoblast compartment of the placenta without significantly altering the composition of the trophoblast giant cell endocrine lineages that share a common progenitor with this lineage. Additionally, we show that Phlda2 loss-of-function placentae contain nearly three times more placental glycogen than non-transgenic placentae. Remarkably, relative to a fully wild type scenario, wild type placentae also accumulate excessive glycogen. While loss-of-function of Phlda2 increased both placental weight and placental glycogen, the weight of both mutant and non-transgenic fetuses was lower than that found in a fully wild type scenario indicating that excessive glycogen accumulation comes at the cost of foetal growth. This work firstly highlights a novel signalling function for the spongiotrophoblast in stimulating the global accumulation of placental glycogen. Furthermore, this work suggests that Phlda2 manipulates the placenta's demands for maternal resources, a process that must be tightly regulated by epigenetic marks to ensure optimal foetal growth. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An engineered cell-imprinted substrate directs osteogenic differentiation in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kamguyan, Khorshid; Katbab, Ali Asghar; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Thormann, Esben; Zajforoushan Moghaddam, Saeed; Moradi, Lida; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2017-12-19

    A cell-imprinted poly(dimethylsiloxane)/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite substrate was fabricated to engage topographical, mechanical, and chemical signals to stimulate and boost stem cell osteogenic differentiation. The physicochemical properties of the fabricated substrates, with nanoscale resolution of osteoblast morphology, were probed using a wide range of techniques including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and water contact angle measurements. The osteogenic differentiation capacity of the cultured stem cells on these substrates was probed by alizarin red staining, ALP activity, osteocalcin measurements, and gene expression analysis. The outcomes revealed that the concurrent roles of the surface patterns and viscoelastic properties of the substrate provide the capability of directing stem cell differentiation toward osteogenic phenotypes. Besides the physical and mechanical effects, we found that the chemical signaling of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, embedded in the nanocomposite substrates, could further improve and optimize stem cell osteogenic differentiation.

  9. A saliva molecular imprinted localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for wine astringency estimation.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, J Rafaela L; Teixeira, Natércia; De Freitas, Victor; Sales, M Goreti F; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2017-10-15

    Wine astringency was evaluated based on the interaction of two complex matrices (red wine and saliva) by combining localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) at gold nanodisks as an alternative to sensorial analysis. The main objective of the work was to simulate wine astringency inside the mouth by mimicking this biological system. The LSPR/MIP sensor provided a linear response for astringency expressed in pentagalloyl glucose (PGG) units in concentrations ranging from 1 to 140μmol/L. The sensor was also applied to wine samples correlating well with sensorial analysis obtained by a trained panel. The correlation of astringency and wine composition was also evaluated showing that anthocyanins may have an important role, not only for pigmentation but also in astringency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation and characterization of macroporous monoliths imprinted with erythromycin.

    PubMed

    Vlakh, E G; Stepanova, M A; Pisarev, O A; Tennikova, T B

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of macroporous molecularly imprinted monoliths was performed using the monomers system 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and erythromycin as a template. The copolymerization was carried out in situ inside 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. stainless-steel tubing. The morphology of the monoliths was examined with scanning electron microscopy. The porous characteristics were determined both from the data of hydrodynamic permeability of monoliths and by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. The retention parameters of target substance (erythromycin), values of calculated imprinting factors and apparent dynamic dissociation constants were obtained for monoliths prepared with the application of different amount of template (4, 8 and 12 mol%). The separations of the mixtures azithromycin/erythromycin and ciprofloxacin/erythromycin were demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of erythromycin quantification in human blood plasma was shown. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Preparation of Molecularly Imprinted Microspheres by Precipitation Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Renkecz, Tibor; Horvath, Viola

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) gained an expansively growing interest in the past few decades. After an initial, explorative period of preparing MIPs exclusively with bulk polymerization, new polymer synthesis routes have been adapted to overcome the drawbacks of the traditional method. Among these the most appealing is precipitation polymerization that results in nano- and microspheres with narrow size distribution and makes the production of MIPs more straightforward. Here, we describe a precipitation polymerization protocol for a common small molecule template, propranolol that is carried out in the conventional way, in dilute monomer solution. Moreover, a modified precipitation polymerization protocol from concentrated monomer solution is presented for a diclofenac imprinted polymer which makes the synthesis even more versatile and circumvents the disadvantages of the dilute solution conditions.

  12. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Xianwen; Geng, Zhirong; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Zhilin; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  13. Composite vascular repair grafts via micro-imprinting and electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuan-liu@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Qingxi, E-mail: huqingxi@shu.edu.cn; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Intelligent Manufacturing and Robotics, Shanghai 200072

    2015-04-15

    Composite vascular grafts formed by micro-imprinting and electrospinning exhibited improved mechanical properties relative to those formed by electrospinning alone. The three-layered composite grafts mimic the three-layered structure of natural blood vessels. The middle layer is made by micro-imprinting poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO), while the inner and outer layers are electrospun mixtures of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol. The graft morphology is characterized with scanning electron microscopy. For constant graft thicknesses, the PPDO increases the mechanical strength. Cells cultivated on the vascular grafts adhere and proliferate better because of the natural, biological chitosan in the inner and outer layers. Overall, the composite scaffolds couldmore » be good candidates for blood vessel repair.« less

  14. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert, E-mail: r.streubel@ifw-dresden.de; Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys, E-mail: d.makarov@ifw-dresden.de

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamicsmore » are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.« less

  15. Hierarchically imprinted mesoporous silica polymer: an efficient solid-phase extractant for bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenjing; Ma, Haotian; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Improving the site accessibility of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) is one of the biggest challenges for application of MIP in solid-phase extraction (SPE). Hierarchically imprinted mesoporous silica polymer was prepared with semicovalently bond imprinting methods based on MCM-41 and SBA-15 mesostructures, aiming to improve the site accessibility of MIP and increase the efficiency of molecularly imprinted-SPE. Characterization and performance tests of the obtained products revealed that molecularly imprinted SBA-15 (MIP-SBA-15) not only retained the mesoporous structure of SBA-15, but also displayed excellent selectivity of MIP to the target molecule. As the MIP-SBA-15 were adopted as the adsorbents of solid-phase extraction for detecting bisphenol A in spiked water samples, the recoveries of spiked samples more than 87%, which reveals that the molecularly imprinted SBA-15 were efficient SPE adsorbents for bisphenol A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Imprint of DES superstructures on the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Kovács, A.; Sánchez, C.; García-Bellido, J.

    2016-11-17

    Here, small temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background can be sourced by density perturbations via the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Large voids and superclusters are excellent environments to make a localized measurement of this tiny imprint. In some cases excess signals have been reported. We probed these claims with an independent data set, using the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey in a different footprint, and using a different super-structure finding strategy. We identified 52 large voids and 102 superclusters at redshiftsmore » $0.2 < z < 0.65$. We used the Jubilee simulation to a priori evaluate the optimal ISW measurement configuration for our compensated top-hat filtering technique, and then performed a stacking measurement of the CMB temperature field based on the DES data. For optimal configurations, we detected a cumulative cold imprint of voids with $$\\Delta T_{f} \\approx -5.0\\pm3.7~\\mu K$$ and a hot imprint of superclusters $$\\Delta T_{f} \\approx 5.1\\pm3.2~\\mu K$$ ; this is $$\\sim1.2\\sigma$$ higher than the expected $$|\\Delta T_{f}| \\approx 0.6~\\mu K$$ imprint of such super-structures in $$\\Lambda$$CDM. If we instead use an a posteriori selected filter size ($$R/R_{v}=0.6$$), we can find a temperature decrement as large as $$\\Delta T_{f} \\approx -9.8\\pm4.7~\\mu K$$ for voids, which is $$\\sim2\\sigma$$ above $$\\Lambda$$CDM expectations and is comparable to previous measurements made using SDSS super-structure data.« less

  17. Imprints of spinning particles on primordial cosmological perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franciolini, Gabriele; Kehagias, Alex; Riotto, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    If there exist higher-spin particles during inflation which are light compared to the Hubble rate, they may leave distinct statistical anisotropic imprints on the correlators involving scalar and graviton fluctuations. We characterise such signatures using the dS/CFT3 correspondence and the operator product expansion techniques. In particular, we obtain generic results for the case of partially massless higher-spin states.

  18. Imprint of DES superstructures on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, A.; Sánchez, C.; García-Bellido, J.; Nadathur, S.; Crittenden, R.; Gruen, D.; Huterer, D.; Bacon, D.; Clampitt, J.; DeRose, J.; Dodelson, S.; Gaztañaga, E.; Jain, B.; Kirk, D.; Lahav, O.; Miquel, R.; Naidoo, K.; Peacock, J. A.; Soergel, B.; Whiteway, L.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Giannantonio, T.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    Small temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be sourced by density perturbations via the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. Large voids and superclusters are excellent environments to make a localized measurement of this tiny imprint. In some cases excess signals have been reported. We probed these claims with an independent data set, using the first year data of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) in a different footprint, and using a different superstructure finding strategy. We identified 52 large voids and 102 superclusters at redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.65. We used the Jubilee simulation to a priori evaluate the optimal ISW measurement configuration for our compensated top-hat filtering technique, and then performed a stacking measurement of the CMB temperature field based on the DES data. For optimal configurations, we detected a cumulative cold imprint of voids with ΔTf ≈ -5.0 ± 3.7 μK and a hot imprint of superclusters ΔTf ≈ 5.1 ± 3.2 μK; this is ∼1.2σ higher than the expected |ΔTf| ≈ 0.6 μK imprint of such superstructures in Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM). If we instead use an a posteriori selected filter size (R/Rv = 0.6), we can find a temperature decrement as large as ΔTf ≈ -9.8 ± 4.7 μK for voids, which is ∼2σ above ΛCDM expectations and is comparable to previous measurements made using Sloan Digital Sky Survey superstructure data.

  19. A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for...ARL-RP-0536 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)- Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Molecularly Imprinted Polymer (MIP)-Coated Microbeam MEMS Sensor for Chemical Detection 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  20. Quantification of the memory imprint effect for a charged particle environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhuva, B. L.; Johnson, R. L., Jr.; Gyurcsik, R. S.; Kerns, S. E.; Fernald, K. W.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of total accumulated dose on the single-event vulnerability of NMOS resistive-load SRAMs are investigated. The bias-dependent shifts in device parameters can imprint the memory state present during exposure or erase the imprinted state. Analysis of these effects is presented along with an analytic model developed for the quantification of these effects. The results indicate that the imprint effect is dominated by the difference in the threshold voltage of the n-channel devices.

  1. Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Imprint Lithography Templates by Colloidal Dispersions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-06

    imprint lithography, stamps , fluorothermoplastics, latex Self-aligned imprint lithography (SAIL) enables patterning and alignment of submicron-sized...features on flexible substrates in the roll-to roll (R2R) environment. Soft molds made of elastomers have been used as stamps to pattern three...dimensional masks. Durability of these stamps is one factor that limits their efficiency in a R2R process. Fluorothermoplastics are low cost imprint stamp

  2. Morpho peleides butterfly wing imprints as structural colour stamp.

    PubMed

    Zobl, Sigrid; Salvenmoser, Willi; Schwerte, Thorsten; Gebeshuber, Ille C; Schreiner, Manfred

    2016-02-02

    This study presents the replication of a color-causing nanostructure based on the upper laminae of numerous cover scales of Morpho peleides butterfly wings and obtained solely by imprinting their upper-wing surfaces. Our results indicate that a simple casting technique using a novel integrated release agent can obtain a large positive replica using negative imprints via Polyvinylsiloxane. The developed method is low-tech and high-yield and is thus substantially easier and less expensive than previous methods. The microstructures were investigated with light microscopy, the nanostructures with both scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and the reflections with UV visible spectrometry. The influence of the release agent and the quality of the master stamp were determined by comparing measurements of the cover-scale sizes and their chromaticity values obtained by their images and with their positive imprints. The master stamp provided multiple positive replicas up to 3 cm(2) in just 1 h with structural coloration effects visible to the naked eye. Thus, the developed method proves the accuracy of the replicated nanostructure and its potential industrial application as a color-producing nanostamp.

  3. Cocaine abuse determination by ion mobility spectrometry using molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Sorribes-Soriano, A; Esteve-Turrillas, F A; Armenta, S; de la Guardia, M; Herrero-Martínez, J M

    2017-01-20

    A cocaine-based molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) has been produced by bulk polymerization and employed as selective solid-phase extraction support for the determination of cocaine in saliva samples by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The most appropriate conditions for washing and elution of cocaine from MIPs were studied and MIPs were characterized in terms of analyte binding capacity, reusability in water and saliva analysis, imprinting factor and selectivity were established and compared with non-imprinted polymers. The proposed MIP-IMS method provided a LOD of 18μgL -1 and quantitative recoveries for blank saliva samples spiked from 75 to 500μgL -1 cocaine. Oral fluid samples were collected from cocaine consumers and analysed by the proposed MIP-IMS methodology. Results, ranging from below the LOD to 51±2mgL -1 , were statistically comparable to those obtained by a confirmatory gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Moreover, results were compared to a qualitative lateral flow immunoassay procedure providing similar classification of the samples. Thus, MIP-IMS can be considered an useful alternative that provided fast, selective and sensitive results with a cost affordable instrumentation that does not require skilled operators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Feature detection on 3D images of dental imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Laurendeau, Denis

    1994-09-01

    A computer vision approach for the extraction of feature points on 3D images of dental imprints is presented. The position of feature points are needed for the measurement of a set of parameters for automatic diagnosis of malocclusion problems in orthodontics. The system for the acquisition of the 3D profile of the imprint, the procedure for the detection of the interstices between teeth, and the approach for the identification of the type of tooth are described, as well as the algorithm for the reconstruction of the surface of each type of tooth. A new approach for the detection of feature points, called the watershed algorithm, is described in detail. The algorithm is a two-stage procedure which tracks the position of local minima at four different scales and produces a final map of the position of the minima. Experimental results of the application of the watershed algorithm on actual 3D images of dental imprints are presented for molars, premolars and canines. The segmentation approach for the analysis of the shape of incisors is also described in detail.

  5. Detour behaviour, imprinting and visual lateralization in the domestic chick.

    PubMed

    Vallortigara, G; Regolin, L; Pagni, P

    1999-01-01

    Detour behaviour was studied in chicks faced with a vertical-bar barrier behind where an imprinting object (a red ball) was located. Right-eyed chicks took less time to detour the barrier than left-eyed chicks, and binocular chicks showed a bias to detour the barrier on the left side, thus maintaining visual contact with the imprinting object using the lateral field of the right eye, while circling around the barrier. In males, the asymmetries were consistent all along the first two weeks of life, whereas in females they disappeared on days 8 and 11. When tested with a slightly novel version of the original imprinting object (i.e., a ball of a different color), binocular chicks showed a bias to detour the barrier on the right side, thus showing preferential use of the left eye. The same bias occurred when unfamiliar conspecifics were used as goal-objects. Results suggest that cerebral lateralization in birds can directly affect visually-guided motor responses through selective use of the lateral field of vision of the eye contralateral to the hemisphere which has to be put in charge of control of overt behaviour. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Modular Polymer Biosensors by Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Jayven S.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a rapid benchtop microsystem prototyping technique, including polymer functionalization, imprinting and bonding. Here, we focus on the realization of planar polymer sensors using SIIL through simple solvent immersion without imprinting. We describe SIIL’s impregnation characteristics, including an inherent mechanism that not only achieves practical doping concentrations, but their unexpected 4-fold enhancement compared to the immersion solution. Subsequently, we developed and characterized optical sensors for detecting molecular O2. To this end, a high dynamic range is reported, including its control through the immersion duration, a manifestation of SIIL’s modularity. Overall, SIIL exhibits themore » potential of improving the operating characteristics of polymer sensors, while significantly accelerating their prototyping, as it requires a few seconds of processing and no need for substrates or dedicated instrumentation. These are critical for O2 sensing as probed by way of example here, as well as any polymer permeable reactant.« less

  7. Cholesterol-imprinted macroporous monoliths: Preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Mariia А; Kinziabulatova, Lilia R; Nikitina, Anna A; Korzhikova-Vlakh, Evgenia G; Tennikova, Tatiana B

    2017-11-01

    The development of sorbents for selective binding of cholesterol, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has a great importance for analytical science and medicine. In this work, two series of macroporous cholesterol-imprinted monolithic sorbents differing in the composition of functional monomers (methacrylic acid, butyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and ethylene dimethacrylate), amount of a template (4, 6 and 8 mol%) used for molecular imprinting, as well as mean pore size were synthesized by in situ free-radical process in stainless steel housing of 50 mm × 4.6 mm i.d. All prepared materials were characterized regarding to their hydrodynamic permeability and porous properties, as well as examined by BET and SEM methods. Imprinting factors, apparent dynamic dissociation constants, the maximum binding capacity, the number of theoretical plates and the height equivalent to a theoretical palate of MIP monoliths at different mobile phase flow rates were determined. The separation of a mixture of structural analogues, namely, cholesterol and prednisolone, was demonstrated. Additionally, the possibility of using the developed monoliths for cholesterol solid-phase extraction from simulated biological solution was shown. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Photo-imprinted diffraction gratings for controlling terahertz radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzakis, Ioannis; Tassin, Philippe; Luo, Liang; Shen, Nian-Hai; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jigang; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the diffraction of terahertz radiation by photo-imprinted conductive periodic structures. The diffraction gratings are created by optically projecting the image of a metal mask on a high-resistivity GaAs substrate, resulting in a periodic structure of photo-excited charge carriers that scatter terahertz waves. Using terahertz time domain spectroscopy, we show that the terahertz transmission spectra depend characteristically on the lattice constant of the photo-imprinted linear gratings and on the polarization state of the incident terahertz wave, but the transmitted radiation does not depend on the duty cycle of the projected gratings. These experimental results, combined with computer simulations of the structure, confirm that the gratings are purely diffraction-based and are not caused by surface modes or quasistatic resonances. We also demonstrate two-dimensional photo-imprinted diffraction gratings. We anticipate that our findings will have significant impact on the development of reconfigurable components for controlling the terahertz radiation. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE (Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award No. N00014-10-1-0925).

  9. Genetic evidence for Dnmt3a-dependent imprinting during oocyte growth obtained by conditional knockout with Zp3-Cre and complete exclusion of Dnmt3b by chimera formation.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Masahiro; Hirasawa, Ryutaro; Chiba, Hatsune; Okano, Masaki; Li, En; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    In the male and female germ-lines of mice, both of the two de novo DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are expressed. By the conditional knockout experiments using the Tnap-Cre gene, we previously showed that deletion of Dnmt3a in primordial germ cells disrupts paternal and maternal imprinting, however, Dnmt3b mutants did not show any defect. Here, we have knocked out Dnmt3a after birth in growing oocytes by using the Zp3-Cre gene and obtained genetic evidence that de novo methylation by Dnmt3a during the oocyte growth stage is indispensable for maternal imprinting. We also carried out DNA methylation analysis in the mutant oocytes and embryos and found that hypomethylation of imprinted genes in Dnmt3a-deficient oocytes was directly inherited to the embryos, but repetitive elements were re-methylated during development. Furthermore, we show that Dnmt3b-deficient cells can contribute to the male and female germ-lines in chimeric mice and can produce normal progeny, establishing that Dnmt3b is dispensable for mouse gametogenesis and imprinting. Finally, Dnmt3-related protein Dnmt3L is not only essential for methylation of imprinted genes but also enhances de novo methylation of repetitive elements in growing oocytes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Determination of clenbuterol in pork and potable water samples by molecularly imprinted polymer through the use of covalent imprinting method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiwei; Lan, Jianxing; Gao, Xue; Liu, Xiuying; Zhang, Defu; Wei, Liqiao; Gao, Ziyuan; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for efficient separation and concentration of clenbuterol (CLB) was synthesized by covalent imprinting approach using CLB derivative as functional monomer. The MIPs synthesized were characterized by scanning electron microscope, nitrogen adsorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and thermo-gravimetric analysis. The binding experimental results showed that the MIPs synthesized had fast adsorption kinetic (20 min at 25 mg L(-1)), high adsorption capacity and specific recognition ability for the analyte. In addition, the MIPs synthesized were successfully used as solid-phase sorbent for CLB sample preparation to be analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detector. Under optimized experimental conditions, the linear range of the calibration curve was 5-80 μg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9938). The proposed method was also applied to the analysis of CLB in pork and potable water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of molecularly imprinted polymers as sorbents of moniliformin.

    PubMed

    Appell, M; Kendra, D F; Kim, E K; Maragos, C M

    2007-01-01

    Moniliformin is a low molecular weight mycotoxin that has worldwide potential to contaminate cereal grains. Although several traditional methods have been developed to detect moniliformin, the lack of anti-moniliformin antibodies has created a need for materials that recognize moniliformin at the molecular level through a binding mechanism. To address this issue, the authors synthesized molecularly imprinted polymers that bind moniliformin. Imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were evaluated by equilibrium binding assays and moniliformin concentrations were measured by LC analysis using ultraviolet light detection. Successful polymers were imprinted with toxin analogues as the templates; non-imprinted polymers exhibited minimal binding in acetonitrile under the assay conditions. Selected imprinted polymers also bound moniliformin in ethanol, methanol and dimethyl formamide. Significant differences in moniliformin binding by the polymers were dependent on polymer composition, and these differences were highly dependent on the template used to imprint the polymer. Polymers were further evaluated as sorbents for molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE), and an imprinted polymer was used for preconcentration and clean-up of a moniliformin spiked corn extract.

  12. Selective enrichment and separation of phosphotyrosine peptides by thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Xia, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Novel thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers were successfully prepared using the epitope imprinting approach in the presence of the mimic template phenylphosphonic acid, the functional monomer vinylphosphonic acid-Ti(4+) , the temperature-sensitive monomer N-isopropylacrylamide and the crosslinker N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide. The ratio of the template/thermosensitive monomers/crosslinker was optimized, and when the ratio was 2:2:1, the prepared thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers had the highest imprinting factor. The synthetic thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to reveal the combination and elution processes of the template. Then, the adsorption capacity and thermosensitivity was measured. When the temperature was 28°C, the imprinting factor was the highest. The selectivity and adsorption capacity of the thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers for phosphotyrosine peptides from a mixture of three tailor-made peptides were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the thermosensitive molecularly imprinted polymers have good selectivity for phosphotyrosine peptides. Finally, the imprinted hydrogels were applied to specifically adsorb phosphotyrosine peptides from a sample mixture containing phosphotyrosine and a tryptic digest of β-casein, which demonstrated high selectivity. After four rebinding cycles, 78.9% adsorption efficiency was still retained. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Cultural relativism: maintenance of genomic imprints in pluripotent stem cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Maxim Vc; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in culture have become a widely used model for studying events occurring during mammalian development; they also present an exciting avenue for therapeutics. However, compared to their in vivo counterparts, cultured PSC derivatives have unique properties, and it is well established that their epigenome is sensitive to medium composition. Here we review the specific effects on genomic imprints in various PSC types and culture systems. Imprinted gene regulation is developmentally important, and imprinting defects have been associated with several human diseases. Therefore, imprint abnormalities in PSCs may have considerable consequences for downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer for trace triamterene in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Gong, Cheng-Bin; Wei, Yu-Bo; Liu, Lan-Tao; Zheng, An-Xun; Yang, Yue-Hong; Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Tang, Qian

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports a photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer for the determination of trace triamterene in biological sample. The photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer was prepared on sacrificial silica microspheres via surface imprinting technique through atom transfer radical polymerization using a novel water-soluble azobenzene derivative, 4-[(4-methacryloyloxy)phenylazo]-3,5-dimethyl benzenesulfonic acid, as the functional monomer, and the sacrificial silica core was subsequently removed using HF etching method with 1.25vol.% HF ethanolic solution. The morphologies and properties of the photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer were further characterized and compared systematically with the corresponding photoresponsive surface molecularly imprinted polymer. Compared with surface imprinted polymer, the hollow material displayed higher binding capacity, better recognition ability, faster mass-transfer rate, and larger isomerization rate constants toward triamterene. The static binding properties of the imprinted materials were investigated under three irradiation conditions. The photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer showed better specificity toward triamterene than its structural analogues (folic acid and caffeine) as examined by UV-vis and HPLC. The photoresponsive hollow molecularly imprinted polymer was utilized for the determination of trace triamterene in biological samples (human urine and serum) with advantages of simple sample pre-treatment, good recovery and good sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [The peculiar morphological features of the imprints of straight and wavy head hair dirtied with blood].

    PubMed

    Leonova, E N; Nagornov, M N; Prokhorenko, A S

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific morphological features of the imprints of blood-soaked straight and wavy head hair. The contact imprints of straight and wavy head hair dirtied with blood were obtained experimentally. The imprints of straight hair were shown to exhibit the elements in the form of the rectilinear and bow-shaped slightly bent stripes. The imprints of wavy hair were shaped as the arches, waves, circles, and a large number of various small elements, such as dashes and commas.

  16. Regulation of visual Wulst cell responsiveness by imprinting causes stimulus-specific activation of rostral cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Kato, Tomomi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Imprinting behaviour in chicks can be induced exclusively during a short period after hatching. During this period, visual information on the imprinting stimulus is conveyed to the visual Wulst (VW) in the telencephalon, which corresponds to the visual cortex of mammals, and then to the memory-storing region known as the intermediate medial mesopallium. These two regions are indispensable for imprinting. We previously showed that imprinting training altered the response pattern of the VW to the imprinting stimulus; however, the precise distribution of cells and the mechanism involved with this altered response remains unclear. Here we showed that a specific population of rostral VW cells responded to the imprinting stimulus by analysing the subcellular localization of Arc/arg3.1 transcripts in VW cells. GABAergic parvalbumin (PV) cells are abundant in the dorsal region of this area, and imprinting training doubled the number of activated PV-positive neurons. An injection of bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in the dorsal VW disturbed the rostral distribution of responsive cells and thus resulted in a lack of imprinting. These results suggest that activated PV cells restrict VW cells response to dorsal area to form a specific imprinting pathway. PMID:28230107

  17. Evidence of Olfactory Imprinting at an Early Life Stage in Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Bett, Nolan N; Hinch, Scott G; Dittman, Andrew H; Yun, Sang-Seon

    2016-11-09

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) navigate towards spawning grounds using olfactory cues they imprinted on as juveniles. The timing at which imprinting occurs has been studied extensively, and there is strong evidence that salmon imprint on their natal water during the parr-smolt transformation (PST). Researchers have noted, however, that the life histories of some species of Pacific salmon could necessitate imprinting prior to the PST. Juvenile pink salmon (O. gorbuscha) spend less time in fresh water than any other species of Pacific salmon, and presumably must imprint on their natal water at a very young age. The time at which imprinting occurs in this species, however, has not been experimentally tested. We exposed juvenile pink salmon as alevins to phenethyl alcohol (PEA) or control water, reared these fish to adulthood, and then tested their behavioural responses to PEA to determine whether the fish successfully imprinted. We found that pink salmon exposed to PEA as alevins were attracted to the chemical as adults, suggesting that imprinting can occur during this stage. Our finding provides some of the first evidence to support the long-standing belief that imprinting can occur in pink salmon prior to the PST.

  18. Expression of genes involved in the embryo-maternal interaction in the early-pregnant canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Kautz, E; Gram, A; Aslan, S; Ay, S S; Selçuk, M; Kanca, H; Koldaş, E; Akal, E; Karakaş, K; Findik, M; Boos, A; Kowalewski, M P

    2014-05-01

    Although there is no acute luteolytic mechanism in the absence of pregnancy in the bitch, a precise and well-timed embryo-maternal interaction seems to be required for the initiation and maintenance of gestation. As only limited information is available about these processes in dogs, in this study, the uterine expression of possible decidualization markers was investigated during the pre-implantation stage (days 10-12) of pregnancy and in the corresponding nonpregnant controls. In addition, the expression of selected genes associated with blastocyst development and/or implantation was investigated in embryos flushed from the uteri of bitches used for this study (unhatched and hatched blastocysts). There was an upregulated expression of prolactin receptor (PRLR) and IGF2 observed pre-implantation. The expression of PRL and of IGF1 was unaffected, and neither was the expression of progesterone- or estrogen receptor β (ESR2). In contrast, (ESR1) levels were elevated during early pregnancy. Prostaglandin (PG)-system revealed upregulated expression of PGE2-synthase and its receptors, PTGER2 and PTGER4, and of the PG-transporter. Elevated levels of AKR1C3 mRNA, but not the protein itself, were noted. Expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) remained unaffected. Most of the transcripts were predominantly localized to the uterine epithelial cells, myometrium and, to a lesser extent, to the uterine stroma. PGES (PTGES) mRNA was abundantly expressed in both groups of embryos and appeared higher in the hatched ones. The expression level of IGF2 mRNA appeared higher than that of IGF1 mRNA in hatched embryos. In unhatched embryos IGF1, IGF2, and PTGS2 mRNA levels were below the detection limit.

  19. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor gene expression prior to the development of the pituitary gland in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) embryos reared at two temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Greenaway, James; Raine, Jason; Petrik, James; Hahnel, Ann; Leatherland, John

    2006-04-01

    Real time RT-PCR was used to measure the changes in the rates of synthesis of mRNA encoding for growth hormone-1 (GH1) and -2 (GH2) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and -2 (IGF-2), and whole embryo GH content was measured in early stage rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) embryos reared at two incubation temperatures (8.5 and 6.0 degrees C). Particular attention was paid to the phase of embryo development that preceded the appearance of the pituitary gland. GH was present in zygotes, and there were no significant changes in whole embryo GH content of the two temperature treatment groups from fertilization (t0) until the time at which GH was detectable in the pituitary gland by immunostaining. The expression of the two GH genes decreased during the first 24 h post-fertilization, and then increased significantly by 17 dpf in embryos reared at both temperatures. There was a subsequent steep increase in the number of copies of GH1 and GH2 mRNA associated with the formation of the pituitary gland evident at 23 and 34 dpf in the 8.5 and 6.0 degrees C groups, respectively. The number of copies of mRNA encoding for IGF-1 and IGF-2 did not change during the first 24 h post-fertilization; however, there was a significant increase in the numbers of transcripts for both genes evident by 13 dpf in embryos reared at the two incubation temperatures. The differences in the timing of the increases in GH and IGF mRNA may suggest that IGF gene expression is not GH-dependent at that stage. Moreover, the increased expression of the GH genes prior to the formation of the pituitary gland suggests that tissues other than the pituitary are expressing these genes in early embryos. The pattern of changes in GH content was similar to the pattern of GH gene expression in embryos reared at the two incubation temperatures when the age of embryos was plotted using degree-days. There were no apparent compensatory responses in GH1, GH2, IGF-1 or IGF-2 gene expression related to altered

  20. Perturbation of Parentally Biased Gene Expression during Interspecific Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Burkart-Waco, Diana; Ngo, Kathie; Lieberman, Meric; Comai, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization often induces epigenetic remodeling that leads to transposon activation, gene expression changes, and loss of imprinting. These genomic changes can be deleterious and contribute to postzygotic hybrid incompatibility. In Arabidopsis, loss of genomic imprinting of PHERES1 and presumed failure of Polycomb Repressive Complex contributes to seed inviability observed in A. thaliana X A. arenosa interspecific hybrids. We used this species pair to further analyze the relationship between parentally biased gene expression and postzygotic hybrid incompatibility using two A. thaliana accessions, Col-0 and C24, with differential seed survival. We found that parentally biased expression was perturbed to a similar degree in both A. thaliana hybrids for PHERES1, HDG3, and six other normally paternally expressed genes. We propose that early genome remodeling and loss of imprinting of seed development genes induces lethality in both compatible and incompatible hybrids. PMID:25719202

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence of incomplete maternal imprinting in myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Richard J; Foncke, Elisabeth M J; van der Meer, Johan N; Veltman, Dick J; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2011-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia is an autosomal dominantly inherited movement disorder, clinically characterized by myoclonic jerks and dystonic postures or movements. A previous functional magnetic resonance imaging study showed altered cortical activation patterns in clinically affected SGCE mutation carriers when compared with controls consistent with defective sensorimotor integration. Genetically, the disorder is characterized by the maternal imprinting mechanism; ie, patients who inherit the mutation from their fathers will develop symptoms. However, several clinically manifest patients with myoclonus-dystonia who inherited the mutation from their mother have been described. To compare cerebral activation patterns of paternally inherited SGCE mutation carriers are with maternally inherited mutation carriers and a control group. Case-control study using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight paternally inherited SGCE mutation carriers, 8 asymptomatic or slightly affected (4 of 8) symptomatic maternally inherited mutation carriers, and 11 control subjects. Participants were studied using a 3-T functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a finger tapping task. When paternal and maternal gene mutation carriers were compared, hyperresponsiveness was seen in the contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex. When maternal mutation carriers and control subjects were compared, hyperresponsiveness of the ipsilateral cerebellum and supplementary motor area were found. Using a nonparametric analysis to study only the 4 clinically asymptomatic patients, no significant differences were found between groups. Contrast estimates were plotted for the known affected sensorimotor brain areas, showing intermediate activation in maternally inherited mutation carriers, even when this was performed for only the 4 clinically unaffected mutation carriers. The results suggest biased gene expression based on parent of origin rather than a strictly dichotomous maternal imprinting

  2. Allele-Specific Binding of CTCF to the Multipartite Imprinting Control Region KvDMR1▿

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Galina V.; Pugacheva, Elena M.; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Yang, Youwen; Khatod, Kavita; Lobanenkov, Victor V.; Higgins, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Paternal deletion of the imprinting control region (ICR) KvDMR1 results in loss of expression of the Kcnq1ot1 noncoding RNA and derepression of flanking paternally silenced genes. Truncation of Kcnq1ot1 also results in the loss of imprinted expression of these genes in most cases, demonstrating a role for the RNA or its transcription in gene silencing. However, enhancer-blocking studies indicate that KvDMR1 also contains chromatin insulator or silencer activity. In this report we demonstrate by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation the existence of two CTCF binding sites within KvDMR1 that are occupied in vivo only on the unmethylated paternally derived allele. Methylation interference and mutagenesis allowed the precise mapping of protein-DNA contact sites for CTCF within KvDMR1. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we mapped the putative transcriptional promoter for Kcnq1ot1 upstream and to a site functionally separable from enhancer-blocking activity and CTCF binding sites. Luciferase reporter assays also suggest the presence of an additional cis-acting element in KvDMR1 upstream of the putative promoter that can function as an enhancer. These results suggest that the KvDMR1 ICR consists of multiple, independent cis-acting modules. Dissection of KvDMR1 into its functional components should help elucidate the mechanism of its function in vivo. PMID:17242189

  3. The role of maternal-specific H3K9me3 modification in establishing imprinted X-chromosome inactivation and embryogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Tomikawa, Junko; Miura, Takumi; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Eggan, Kevin; Akutsu, Hidenori; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Maintaining a single active X-chromosome by repressing Xist is crucial for embryonic development in mice. Although the Xist activator RNF12/RLIM is present as a maternal factor, maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) is repressed during preimplantation phases to establish imprinted X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Here we show, using a highly reproducible chromatin immunoprecipitation method that facilitates chromatin analysis of preimplantation embryos, that H3K9me3 is enriched at the Xist promoter region, preventing Xm-Xist activation by RNF12. The high levels of H3K9me3 at the Xist promoter region are lost in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and ES-cloned embryos show RNF12-dependent Xist expression. Moreover, lack of Xm-XCI in the trophectoderm, rather than loss of paternally expressed imprinted genes, is the primary cause of embryonic lethality in 70-80% of parthenogenotes immediately after implantation. This study reveals that H3K9me3 is involved in the imprinting that silences Xm-Xist. Our findings highlight the role of maternal-specific H3K9me3 modification in embryo development.

  4. Involvement of hormones in olfactory imprinting and homing in chum salmon.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shingo; Nakamura, Taro; Inada, Kaoru; Okubo, Takashi; Furukawa, Naohiro; Murakami, Reiichi; Tsuchida, Shigeo; Zohar, Yonathan; Konno, Kotaro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-02-16

    The olfactory hypothesis for salmon imprinting and homing to their natal stream is well known, but the endocrine hormonal control mechanisms of olfactory memory formation in juveniles and retrieval in adults remain unclear. In brains of hatchery-reared underyearling juvenile chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression increased immediately after release from a hatchery into the natal stream, and the expression of the essential NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor increased during downstream migration. Gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) and NR1 increased in the adult chum salmon brain during homing from the Bering Sea to the natal hatchery. Thyroid hormone treatment in juveniles enhanced NR1 gene activation, and GnRHa treatment in adults improved stream odour discrimination. Olfactory memory formation during juvenile downstream migration and retrieval during adult homing migration of chum salmon might be controlled by endocrine hormones and could be clarified using NR1 as a molecular marker.

  5. Involvement of hormones in olfactory imprinting and homing in chum salmon

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Shingo; Nakamura, Taro; Inada, Kaoru; Okubo, Takashi; Furukawa, Naohiro; Murakami, Reiichi; Tsuchida, Shigeo; Zohar, Yonathan; Konno, Kotaro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory hypothesis for salmon imprinting and homing to their natal stream is well known, but the endocrine hormonal control mechanisms of olfactory memory formation in juveniles and retrieval in adults remain unclear. In brains of hatchery-reared underyearling juvenile chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression increased immediately after release from a hatchery into the natal stream, and the expression of the essential NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor increased during downstream migration. Gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) and NR1 increased in the adult chum salmon brain during homing from the Bering Sea to the natal hatchery. Thyroid hormone treatment in juveniles enhanced NR1 gene activation, and GnRHa treatment in adults improved stream odour discrimination. Olfactory memory formation during juvenile downstream migration and retrieval during adult homing migration of chum salmon might be controlled by endocrine hormones and could be clarified using NR1 as a molecular marker. PMID:26879952

  6. Zac1 (Lot1), a Potential Tumor Suppressor Gene, and the Gene for ɛ-Sarcoglycan Are Maternally Imprinted Genes: Identification by a Subtractive Screen of Novel Uniparental Fibroblast Lines

    PubMed Central

    Piras, Graziella; El Kharroubi, Aboubaker; Kozlov, Serguei; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Hernandez, Lidia; Copeland, Neal G.; Gilbert, Debra J.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Stewart, Colin L.

    2000-01-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from one allele according to their parent of origin, and many are essential to mammalian embryogenesis. Here we show that the ɛ-sarcoglycan gene (Sgce) and Zac1 (Lot1) are both paternally expressed imprinted genes. They were identified in a subtractive screen for imprinted genes using a cDNA library made from novel parthenogenetic and wild-type fibroblast lines. Sgce is a component of the dystrophin-sarcoglycan complex, Zac1 is a nuclear protein inducing growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and Zac1 is a potential tumor suppressor gene. Sgce and Zac1 are expressed predominantly from their paternal alleles in all adult mouse tissues, except that Zac1 is biallelic in the liver and Sgce is weakly expressed from the maternal allele in the brain. Sgce and Zac1 are broadly expressed in embryos, with Zac1 being highly expressed in the liver primordium, the umbilical region, and the neural tube. Sgce, however, is strongly expressed in the allantoic region on day 9.5 but becomes more widely expressed throughout the embryo by day 11.5. Sgce is located at the proximal end of mouse chromosome 6 and is a candidate gene for embryonic lethality associated with uniparental maternal inheritance of this region. Zac1 maps to the proximal region of chromosome 10, identifying a new imprinted locus in the mouse, homologous with human chromosome 6q24-q25. In humans, unipaternal disomy for this region is associated with fetal growth retardation and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus. In addition, loss of expression of ZAC has been described for a number of breast and ovarian carcinomas, suggesting that ZAC is a potential tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10757814

  7. Polycarbonate as an elasto-plastic material model for simulation of the microstructure hot imprint process.

    PubMed

    Narijauskaitė, Birutė; Palevičius, Arvydas; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Janušas, Giedrius; Sakalys, Rokas

    2013-08-22

    The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC), as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc.) must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  8. Magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer nanocomposite for the recognition of bovine hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junxia; Wang, Yuzhi; Liu, Yanjin; Zhang, Cenjin; Zhou, Yigang

    2015-11-01

    The protein imprinted technique combining surface imprinting and nanomaterials has been an attractive strategy for recognition and rapid separation of proteins. In this work, magnetic-graphene (MG) was chosen as the supporting substrate for the magnetic nanomaterials, which served to absorb the targeting imprinting molecules, bovine hemoglobin (BHb). Acryl amide (AAm) with a high affinity to BHb and N,N'- methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) were selected as the functional monomer and cross-linking agent, respectively. After in-situ polymerization, the proposed magnetic-graphene based molecularly imprinted polymer (MG-MIP) was obtained with a further extraction step of imprinted BHb. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), raman spectroscopy(RS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the resulted MG-MIP. The maximum adsorption capability (Qmax) was determined by Langmuir Isotherm Plots and was 186.73 mg/g for imprinted nanomaterials (MIP) with an imprinting factor of 1.96. The selectivity of MG-MIP was investigated by using several proteins that are different in molecular mass and isoelectric points as the reference. The results showed that the shape memory effect of imprinted cavities, the size of proteins and the charge effect of proteins were the major factors for the selective recognition. The proposed method was also employed to specifically capture BHb from a binary protein mixture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of molecularly imprinted polymers using a new polar solvent titration method.

    PubMed

    Song, Di; Zhang, Yagang; Geer, Michael F; Shimizu, Ken D

    2014-07-01

    A new method of characterizing molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed and tested, which provides a more accurate means of identifying and measuring the molecular imprinting effect. In the new polar solvent titration method, a series of imprinted and non-imprinted polymers were prepared in solutions containing increasing concentrations of a polar solvent. The polar solvent additives systematically disrupted the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solutions, and the extent of disruption was captured by the polymerization process. The changes in binding capacity within each series of polymers were measured, providing a quantitative assessment of the templation and monomer aggregation processes in the imprinted and non-imprinted polymers. The new method was tested using three different diphenyl phosphate imprinted polymers made using three different urea functional monomers. Each monomer had varying efficiencies of templation and monomer aggregation. The new MIP characterization method was found to have several advantages. To independently verify the new characterization method, the MIPs were also characterized using traditional binding isotherm analyses. The two methods appeared to give consistent conclusions. First, the polar solvent titration method is less susceptible to false positives in identifying the imprinting effect. Second, the method is able to differentiate and quantify changes in binding capacity, as measured at a fixed guest and polymer concentration, arising from templation or monomer aggregation processes in the prepolymerization solution. Third, the method was also easy to carry out, taking advantage of the ease of preparing MIPs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Removal of Toxic Mercury from Petroleum Oil by Newly Synthesized Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Khairi, Nor Ain Shahera; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Mohammad, Faruq

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II) imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it) with methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen) and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II) imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II) imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II) imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II) ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II) imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity. PMID:26006226

  11. Sb(III)-Imprinted Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Sorbent Prepared by Hydrothermal-Assisted Surface Imprinting Technique for Selective Adsorption of Sb(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Hong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    Sb(III)-imprinted organic-inorganic hybrid sorbent was prepared by hydrothermal-assisted surface imprinting technique and was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled to an energy dispersive spectrometer and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. Hydrothermal-assisted process can improve the selectivity of the Sb(III)-imprinted hybrid sorbent for Sb(III) due to stable control of temperature and pressure. The Sb(III)-imprinted hybrid sorbent IIS indicated higher selectivity for Sb(III), had high static adsorption capacity of 37.3 mg g-1 for Sb(III), displayed stable adsorption capacity in pH range from 4 to 8, reached an rapid adsorption equilibrium within 30 min. According to the correlation coefficient ( r 2 > 0.99), the experimental data fitted better the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir equilibrium isotherm.

  12. Microcontact imprinted quartz crystal microbalance nanosensor for protein C recognition.

    PubMed

    Bakhshpour, Monireh; Özgür, Erdoğan; Bereli, Nilay; Denizli, Adil

    2017-03-01

    Detection of protein C (PC) in human serum was performed by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based on molecular imprinting technique (MIP). The high-resolution and mass-sensitive QCM based sensor was integrated with high sensitivity and selectivity of the MIP technique. The PC microcontact imprinted (PC-μCIP) nanofilm was prepared on the glass surface. Then, the PC-μCIP/QCM sensor was prepared with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and N-methacryloyl l-histidine methylester (MAH) as the functional monomer with copper(II) ions. The polymerization was performed under UV light (100W and 365nm) for 20-25min under nitrogen atmosphere. The characterization studies of QCM sensor were done by observation using atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle measurements, ellipsometry and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Detection of PC was investigated in a concentration range of 0.1-30μg/mL. Selectivity of PC-μCIP and PC non-imprinted/QCM (PC-non-μCIP) sensors for PC determination was investigated by using proteins namely hemoglobin (Hb), human serum albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen solutions. QCM sensor was also used for detection of PC molecules in aqueous solutions and human plasma. The detection limit was determined as 0.01μg/mL for PC analysis. The PC-μCIP/QCM sensor was used for five consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. According to the results, the PC-μCIP/QCM sensor had obtained high selectivity and sensitivity for detection of PC molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Chitosan-Glutaraldehyde for Monosodium Glutamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyasuryani, Ani; Haryanto, Edi; Sulistyarti, Hermin; Rumhayati, Barlah

    2018-01-01

    Chitosan has been used as a functional monomer in the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) for monosodium glutamate (MSG). MIP is made from a mixture of 5 g chitosan, 50 mg glutaraldehyde and 2 g MSG, MIP is formed as flakes and beads. MIPs are identified by the FTIR spectrum, SEM image and their adsorption capabilities. MIP flakes and beads have no structural differences if they are based on FTIR or SEM spectra, but MIP adsorption capacity of beads higher than flakes. Adsorption capacity of MIP flakes is 548 mg/g and MIP beads 627 mg/g.

  14. Ultrafast imprinting of topologically protected magnetic textures via pulsed electrons

    DOE PAGES

    Schaffer, A. F.; Durr, H. A.; Berakdar, J.

    2017-07-17

    Short electron pulses are demonstrated to trigger and control magnetic excitations, even at low electron current densities. We show that the tangential magnetic field surrounding a picosecond electron pulse can imprint topologically protected magnetic textures such as skyrmions in a sample with a residual Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya spin-orbital coupling. Characteristics of the created excitations such as the topological charge can be steered via the duration and the strength of the electron pulses. Here, the study points to a possible way for a spatiotemporally controlled generation of skyrmionic excitations.

  15. A taste sensor based on surface imprinted TiO2 membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenxiang; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Xingguo; Zhao, Hongtian; Chu, Fugang; Hou, Hongbin

    2012-03-01

    Surface imprinted TiO2 membranes had been prepared and used as sensing membranes for basic tastes discrimination. Four basic taste molecules (citric acid, D-glucose, quinine hydrochloride and sodium L-glutamate for sour, sweet, bitter and umami respectively) were used as templates for imprinting. The sensor was fabricated in light-addressable potentiometric principle. Experimental results show that membranes imprinted by citric acid and quinine hydrochloride exhibit similar response behaviors towards four taste substances, that is citric acid > quinine hydrochloride > sodium L-glutamate > D-glucose. Membrane imprinted by sodium L-glutamate is sensitive towards quinine hydrochloride. Except for D-glucose imprinting membrane, other three membranes are inert to glucose. Combined with principal component analysis, four basic tastes can be well distinguished.

  16. A taste sensor based on surface imprinted TiO2 membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wenxiang; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Xingguo; Zhao, Hongtian; Chu, Fugang; Hou, Hongbin

    2011-11-01

    Surface imprinted TiO2 membranes had been prepared and used as sensing membranes for basic tastes discrimination. Four basic taste molecules (citric acid, D-glucose, quinine hydrochloride and sodium L-glutamate for sour, sweet, bitter and umami respectively) were used as templates for imprinting. The sensor was fabricated in light-addressable potentiometric principle. Experimental results show that membranes imprinted by citric acid and quinine hydrochloride exhibit similar response behaviors towards four taste substances, that is citric acid > quinine hydrochloride > sodium L-glutamate > D-glucose. Membrane imprinted by sodium L-glutamate is sensitive towards quinine hydrochloride. Except for D-glucose imprinting membrane, other three membranes are inert to glucose. Combined with principal component analysis, four basic tastes can be well distinguished.

  17. Molecular receptors in metal oxide sol-gel materials prepared via molecular imprinting

    DOEpatents

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Daitch, Charles E.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Rush, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for molecularly imprinting the surface of a sol-gel material, by forming a solution comprised of a sol-gel material, a solvent, an imprinting molecule, and a functionalizing siloxane monomer of the form Si(OR).sub.3-n X.sub.n, wherein n is an integer between zero and three and X is a functional group capable of reacting with the imprinting molecule, evaporating the solvent, and removing the imprinting molecule to form the molecularly imprinted metal oxide sol-gel material. The use of metal oxide sol-gels allows the material porosity, pore size, density, surface area, hardness, electrostatic charge, polarity, optical density, and surface hydrophobicity to be tailored and be employed as sensors and in catalytic and separations operations.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of oxytetracycline imprinted magnetic polymer for application in food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Sneha; Rajput, Yudhishthir Singh; Singh, Gulab; Sharma, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic imprinted polymer was prepared by polymerization of methacrylate and ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate in the presence of oxytetracycline on the surface of iron magnetite. Selectivity of prepared polymer was calculated from ratio of partition coefficient of oxytetracycline for imprinted and non- imprinted polymer in water, acetonitrile, methanol and at different pH in aqueous buffer. pH of solvent exhibited pronounced effect on selectivity. Selectivity at pH 7.0, 6.0 and 5.0 was 36.0, 2.25 and 1.61 fold higher than at pH 4.0. Imprinted polymer was not selective for oxytetracycline in methanol. However, selectivity in water and acetonitrile was 19.42 and 2.86, respectively. Oxytetracycline did bind to imprinted polymer in water or aqueous buffer (pH 7.0) and could be eluted with methanol. Prepared polymer extracted 75-80 % oxytetracycline from water, honey and egg white.

  19. Aberrant silencing of imprinted genes on chromosome 12qF1 in mouse induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Stadtfeld, Matthias; Apostolou, Effie; Akutsu, Hidenori; Fukuda, Atsushi; Follett, Patricia; Natesan, Sridaran; Kono, Tomohiro; Shioda, Toshi; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been generated by enforced expression of defined sets of transcription factors in somatic cells. It remains controversial whether iPSCs are molecularly and functionally equivalent to blastocyst-derived embryonic stem cells (ESCs). By comparing genetically identical mouse ESCs and iPSCs, we show here that the overall mRNA and miRNA expression patterns of these cell types are indistinguishable with the exception of a few transcripts and miRNAs encoded on chromosome 12qF1. Specifically, maternally expressed imprinted genes in the Dlk1-Dio3 cluster including Gtl2, Rian and Mirg as well as a larger number of miRNAs encoded within this region were aberrantly silenced in the majority of iPSC clones, irrespective of their cell type of origin. Consistent with a developmental role of the Dlk1-Dio3 gene cluster, iPSC clones with repressed Gtl2 contributed poorly to chimeras and failed to support the development of entirely iPSC-derived animals (“all-iPSC mice”). In contrast, iPSC clones with normal expression levels of these genes contributed to high-grade chimeras and generated viable all-iPSC mice. Importantly, treatment of an iPSC clone that had silenced Dlk1-Dio3 and failed to give rise to all-iPSC animals with a histone deacetylase inhibitor reactivated the locus and rescued its ability to support full-term development of exclusively iPSC-derived mice. Thus, the expression state of a single imprinted gene cluster distinguishes most murine iPSCs from ESCs and allows for the prospective identification of iPSC clones that have the full development potential of ESCs. PMID:20418860

  20. Improvement of imprinting effect of ionic liquid molecularly imprinted polymers by use of a molecular crowding agent.

    PubMed

    Jia, Man; Yang, Jian; Sun, Ya Kun; Bai, Xi; Wu, Tao; Liu, Zhao Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to improve the imprinting effect of ionic liquid molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) by use of a molecular crowding agent. The ionic liquid 1-vinyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([VEIm][BF 4 ]) was used as the functional monomer and aesculetin was used as the template molecule in a crowding environment, which was made up of a tetrahydrofuran solution of polystyrene. The ionic liquid MIPs that were prepared in the crowding environment displayed an enhanced imprinting effect. NMR peak shifts of active hydrogen of aesculetin suggested that interaction between the functional monomer and the template could be increased by the use of a crowding agent in the self-assembly process. The retention and selectivity of aesculetin were affected greatly by high molecular crowding, the amount of high molecular weight crowding agent, and the ratio of [VEIm][BF 4 ] to aesculetin. The optimal MIPs were used as solid-phase extraction sorbents to extract aesculetin from Cichorium glandulosum. A calibration curve was obtained with aesculetin concentrations from 0.0005 to 0.05 mg mL -1 (correlation coefficient R 2 of 0.9999, y = 1519x + 0.0923). The limit of quantification was 0.12 μg mL -1 , and the limit of detection was 0.05 μg mL -1 . The absolute recovery of aesculetin was (80 ± 2)% (n = 3), and the purity of aesculetin was (92 ± 0.5)% (n = 5). As a conclusion, molecular crowding is an effective approach to obtain ionic liquid MIPs with high selectivity even in a polar solvent environment.

  1. Chromatin conformation of the H19 epigenetic mark.

    PubMed

    Hark, A T; Tilghman, S M

    1998-11-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals is an epigenetic process that results in differential expression of the two parental alleles. The tightly linked murine H19 and Igf2 genes are reciprocally imprinted: H19 is expressed from the maternal chromosome while Igf2 is expressed from the paternal chromosome. A single regulatory region in the 5' flank of the H19 gene has been implicated in silencing both genes. On the paternal chromosome, this region is heavily methylated at CpG residues, leading to repression of the H19 gene. The mechanism by which the same region in an unmethylated state on the maternal chromosome silences Igf2 is less well understood. We have probed the chromatin structure of the region by assessing its sensitivity to nuclease digestion. Two regions of nuclease hypersensitivity that are specific to the maternal chromosome were identified. These coincide with the region that is most heavily methylated on the paternal chromosome. As is the case with paternal methylation, hypersensitivity is present in all tissues surveyed, irrespective of H19 expression. We suggest that the chromatin structure of the maternal 5' flank of the H19 gene may represent an epigenetic mark involved in the silencing of Igf2.

  2. Diabetic uterus environment may play a key role in alterations of DNA methylation of several imprinted genes at mid-gestation in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal diabetes mellitus not only has severe deleterious effects on fetal development, but also it affects transmission to the next generation. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects are still not clear. Methods We investigated the methylation patterns and expressions of the imprinted genes Peg3, Snrpn, and H19 in mid-gestational placental tissues and on the whole fetus utilizing the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic mouse model for quantitative analysis of methylation by PCR and quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expression of Peg3 was evaluated by Western blot. Results We found that the expression of H19 was significantly increased, while the expression of Peg3 was significantly decreased in dpc10.5 placentas of diabetic mice. We further found that the methylation level of Peg3 was increased and that of H19 was reduced in dpc10.5 placentas of diabetic mice. When pronuclear embryos of normal females were transferred to normal/diabetic (NN/ND) pseudopregnant females, the methylation and expression of Peg3 in placentas was also clearly altered in the ND group compared to the NN group. However, when the pronuclear embryos of diabetic female were transferred to normal pesudopregnant female mice (DN), the methylation and expression of Peg3 and H19 in dpc10.5 placentas was similar between the two groups. Conclusions We suggest that the effects of maternal diabetes on imprinted genes may primarily be caused by the adverse uterus environment. PMID:24378208

  3. Conservation of Repeats at the Mammalian KCNQ1OT1-CDKN1C Region Suggests a Role in Genomic Imprinting

    PubMed Central

    De Donato, Marcos; Hussain, Tanveer; Rodulfo, Hectorina; Peters, Sunday O; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Thomas, Bolaji N

    2017-01-01

    regulation of imprinted gene expression. PMID:28659711

  4. RETRACTED: Modeling and imprint fabrication of an infrared wire-grid polarizer with an antireflection grating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Itsunari; Yamashita, Naoto; Einishi, Toshihiko; Saito, Mitsunori; Fukumi, Kouhei; Nishii, Junji

    2014-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor and the authors as they/the authors acknowledged extensive overlap between an earlier published article of Applied Physics Express1 and the current article. The authors would like to apologize to the Editors and readers for this situation. 1Itsunari Yamada, Naoto Yamashita, Kunihiko Tani, Toshihiko Einishi, Mitsunori Saito, Kouhei Fukumi and Junji Nishii, Infrared Wire-Grid Polarizer with Antireflection Structure by Imprinting on Both Sides. Appl. Phys. Express (2012). http://dx.doi.org/10.1143/APEX.5.082502

  5. Detection of Waterborne Viruses Using High Affinity Molecularly Imprinted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Zeynep; Gittens, Micah; Guerreiro, Antonio; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Walker, Jimmy; Piletsky, Sergey; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2015-07-07

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptor ligands which can recognize and specifically bind to a target molecule. They are more resistant to chemical and biological damage and inactivation than antibodies. Therefore, target specific-MIP nanoparticles are aimed to develop and implemented to biosensors for the detection of biological toxic agents such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi toxins that cause many diseases and death due to the environmental contamination. For the first time, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) targeting the bacteriophage MS2 as the template was investigated using a novel solid-phase synthesis method to obtain the artificial affinity ligand for the detection and removal of waterborne viruses through optical-based sensors. A high affinity between the artificial ligand and the target was found, and a regenerative MIP-based virus detection assay was successfully developed using a new surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-biosensor which provides an alternative technology for the specific detection and removal of waterborne viruses that lead to high disease and death rates all over the world.

  6. Duplex-imprinted nano well arrays for promising nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangping; Manz, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    A large area nano-duplex-imprint technique is presented in this contribution using natural cicada wings as stamps. The glassy wings of the cicada, which are abundant in nature, exhibit strikingly interesting nanopillar structures over their membrane. This technique, with excellent performance despite the nonplanar surface of the wings, combines both top-down and bottom-up nanofabrication techniques. It transitions micro-nanofabrication from a cleanroom environment to the bench. Two different materials, dicing tape with an acrylic layer and a UV optical adhesive, are used to make replications at the same time, thus achieving duplex imprinting. The promise of a large volume of commercial manufacturing of these nanostructure elements can be envisaged through this contribution to speeding up the fabrication process and achieving a higher throughput. The contact angle of the replicated nanowell arrays before and after oxygen plasma was measured. Gold nanoparticles (50 nm) were used