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Sample records for improve symbiotic system

  1. Symbiotic systems: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Gerardo

    2016-07-01

    Although there is wide concensus about the binary nature of symbiotic stars, the nature of their central engine, the structure of the accretion flow and the accretion rate are poorly known. Modern observatories are now providing, for the first time, direct information about the central source of power and how it is fueled. The detection of hard (E > 20 keV) X-ray emission from a handful of symbiotics indicates that some symbiotics accrete at a low enough rate for a ˜10^{8} K accretion-disk boundary layer to remain optically thin and generate hard X-rays. Such high temperature is possible if the white dwarf is massive; symbiotics could thus be SNIa progenitors, the pilars of the current cosmological paradigm.

  2. The Hot Stars in Symbiotic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muerset, Urs

    1995-01-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries, consisting of a late giant and a very hot companion, whose radiation ionizes the wind from the cool star. They strike the observers by their complex spectra and variability. A small subgroup, the symbiotic novae, undergo outbursts with an amplitude of several magnitudes and a duration of several decades. The ionizing binary component is usually too hot to be observed in the optical light. It emits mainly EUV photons, and in spectral regions better accessible to observers, nebula and cool star are much brighter than the hot star. Direct observations of hot components have therefore been restricted to special cases. Consequently, our knowledge about the hot components was poor. This thesis presents indirect methods allowing to extract crucial information on the ionizing star from the spectrum of the ionized nebula. Fundamental characteristics such as temperature, radius, and outburst energy are determined. They characterize the nature of the hot star, its outbursts, and the evolutionary status of the system. The IUE archive proved best suited as observational base. It contains thousands of far UV spectra of symbiotic stars. The UV continuum and the He II lambda-1640 recombination line turned out to be particularly sensitive to the hot star's parameters. For one object ROSAT observations of photospheric X-ray emission exist. They confirm the results obtained from IUE spectra. Unfortunately, only a subset of the symbiotics are bright enough to be observable in the UV, and moreover, the outburst of most symbiotic novae started long before the advent of space observatories. Possibilities to use optical spectroscopy are explored for these cases. T* can be derived from the observed ionization stages, and L* can be estimated from UBV magnitudes. The main result is displayed in Figure 1. Typically, the hot component of a symbiotic system has a radius ~0.1~R\\odot, a surface temperature ~100,000~K, and a luminosity ~1000~L\\odot. They

  3. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  4. Physiological limitations and the genetic improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, F.O.; Manian, S. ); Drevon, J.J. )

    1988-01-01

    The rhizobium legume symbiosis continues to be of strategic importance particularly in the context of food production. As the world population grows, it is necessary that new developments take place in crop improvement. The development and application of new technologies in biological sciences over past years has made the entire area of plant-microbial interaction an exciting and challenging research area to be involved in. In view of the importance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it is not surprising that it still represents one of the priority areas for commercial development in agricultural biotechnology. Since this symbiosis involves an association between procaryotic and eucaryhotic partners, it requires of necessity a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach. This book focuses on physiological limitations affecting symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the potential for overcoming such limitations by using genetic technologies.

  5. Dynamic task allocation for a man-machine symbiotic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. E.; Pin, F. G.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a methodological approach to the dynamic allocation of tasks in a man-machine symbiotic system in the context of dexterous manipulation and teleoperation. This report addresses a symbiotic system containing two symbiotic partners which work toward controlling a single manipulator arm for the execution of a series of sequential manipulation tasks. It is proposed that an automated task allocator use knowledge about the constraints/criteria of the problem, the available resources, the tasks to be performed, and the environment to dynamically allocate task recommendations for the man and the machine. The presentation of the methodology includes discussions concerning the interaction of the knowledge areas, the flow of control, the necessary communication links, and the replanning of the task allocation. Examples of task allocation are presented to illustrate the results of this methodolgy.

  6. Multi Agent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution using GNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, Toru; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Murata, Junichi

    Recently, various attempts relevant to Multi Agent Systems (MAS) which is one of the most promising systems based on Distributed Artificial Intelligence have been studied to control large and complicated systems efficiently. In these trends of MAS, Multi Agent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution named Masbiole has been proposed. In Masbiole, symbiotic phenomena among creatures are considered in the process of learning and evolution of MAS. So we can expect more flexible and sophisticated solutions than conventional MAS. In this paper, we apply Masbiole to Iterative Prisoner’s Dilemma Games (IPD Games) using Genetic Network Programming (GNP) which is a newly developed evolutionary computation method for constituting agents. Some characteristics of Masbiole using GNP in IPD Games are clarified.

  7. Symbiotically integrated organic recycling/renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburg, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Two operating systems designed for the integrated recycling of organic materials and production of renewable energy are described. Both systems include the Chinese design, water-pressure biogas digesters, a solar greenhouse and algae/aquatic plant ponds, all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of high technology sophistication. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer many possibilities for expanded integration.

  8. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renier, J. P.; Hoffman, T. J.

    An analysis of systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders is presented. Metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing were used. Neutronics depletion calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and a cost analysis code. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at the maximum rate of grid expansion and for a given nuclear power demand. Attractive schemes are identified based on D-T driven fusion-drivers operated with low plasma performance parameters.

  9. Outburst Activity of the Symbiotic System AG Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gális, R.; Hric, L.; Leedjärv, L.; Kundra, E.

    2015-07-01

    AG Dra is one of the best studied symbiotic systems. A period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods — about 550 days, caused by orbital motion, and around 350 days, related to pulsations of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts recur with periods from 359 to 375 days.

  10. The Symbiotic System SS73 17 seen with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Mushotzky, Richard; Kallman, Tim; Tueller, Jack; Mukai, Koji; Markwardt, Craig

    2007-01-01

    We observed with Suzaku the symbiotic star SS73 17, motivated by the discovery by the INTEGRAL satellite and the Swift BAT survey that it emits hard X-rays. Our observations showed a highly-absorbed X-ray spectrum with NH > loz3 emp2, equivalent to Av > 26, although the source has B magnitude 11.3 and is also bright in UV. The source also shows strong, narrow iron lines including fluorescent Fe K as well as Fe xxv and Fe XXVI. The X-ray spectrum can be fit with a thermal model including an absorption component that partially covers the source. Most of the equivalent width of the iron fluorescent line in this model can be explained as a combination of reprocessing in a dense absorber plus reflection off a white dwarf surface, but it is likely that the continuum is partially seen in reflection as well. Unlike other symbiotic systems that show hard X-ray emission (CH Cyg, RT Cru, T CrB, GX1+4), SS73 17 is not known to have shown nova-like optical variability, X-ray flashes, or pulsations, and has always shown faint soft X-ray emission. As a result, although it is likely a white dwarf, the nature of the compact object in SS73 17 is still uncertain. SS73 17 is probably an extreme example of the recently discovered and relatively small class of hard X-ray emitting symbiotic systems.

  11. Termite symbiotic systems: efficient bio-recycling of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Ohkuma, M

    2003-03-01

    Termites thrive in great abundance in terrestrial ecosystems and play important roles in biorecycling of lignocellulose. Together with their microbial symbionts, they efficiently decompose lignocellulose. In so-called lower termites, a dual decomposing system, consisting of the termite's own cellulases and those of its gut protists, was elucidated at the molecular level. Higher termites degrade cellulose apparently using only their own enzymes, because of the absence of symbiotic protists. Termite gut prokaryotes efficiently support lignocellulose degradation. However, culture-independent molecular studies have revealed that the majority of these gut symbionts have not yet been cultivated, and that the gut symbiotic community shows a highly structured spatial organization. In situ localization of individual populations and their functional interactions are important to understand the nature of symbioses in the gut. In contrast to cellulose, lignin degradation does not appear to be important in the gut of wood-feeding termites. Soil-feeding termites decompose humic substances in soil at least partly, but little is known about the decomposition. Fungus-growing termites are successful in the almost complete decomposition of lignocellulose in a sophisticated cooperation with basidiomycete fungi cultivated in their nest. A detailed understanding of efficient biorecycling systems, such as that for lignocellulose, and the symbioses that provide this efficiency will benefit applied microbiology and biotechnology.

  12. Nitrogen nutrition and the role of root-shoot nitrogen signalling particularly in symbiotic systems.

    PubMed

    Parsons, R; Sunley, R J

    2001-03-01

    To obtain and concentrate reduced N from the environment, plants have evolved a diverse array of adaptations to utilize soil, biotic and atmospheric N. In symbiotic N(2)-fixing systems the potential for oversupply exists and regulation of activity to match demand is crucial. N status in plants is likely to be most strongly sensed in the shoot and signals translocated to the roots may involve phloem transported amino compounds or very low concentrations of specific signal molecules. The mechanism for sensing N status in plant cells is not understood at the molecular level although it may be expected to be similar in all plants. Mechanisms for the regulation of symbiotic N(2) fixation may be very different in the different symbiotic types. Rhizobia, Frankia and cyanobacteria are all symbiotic with different species of plants and the provision of O(2), carbohydrate or other nutrients may control symbiotic activity to varying extents in the different symbioses.

  13. Multi Groups Cooperation based Symbiotic Evolution for TSK-type Neuro-Fuzzy Systems Design

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a TSK-type neuro-fuzzy system with multi groups cooperation based symbiotic evolution method (TNFS-MGCSE) is proposed. The TNFS-MGCSE is developed from symbiotic evolution. The symbiotic evolution is different from traditional GAs (genetic algorithms) that each chromosome in symbiotic evolution represents a rule of fuzzy model. The MGCSE is different from the traditional symbiotic evolution; with a population in MGCSE is divided to several groups. Each group formed by a set of chromosomes represents a fuzzy rule and cooperate with other groups to generate the better chromosomes by using the proposed cooperation based crossover strategy (CCS). In this paper, the proposed TNFS-MGCSE is used to evaluate by numerical examples (Mackey-Glass chaotic time series and sunspot number forecasting). The performance of the TNFS-MGCSE achieves excellently with other existing models in the simulations. PMID:21709856

  14. Evolution of the symbiotic binary system AG Dranconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikolajewska, Joanna; Kenyon, Scott J; Mikolajewski, Maciej; Garcia, Michael R.; Polidan, Ronald S.

    1995-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and archival photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic star AG Draconis. This binary has undergone several 1 - 3 mag optical and ultraviolet eruptions during the past 15 years. Our combination of optical and ultraviolet spectroscopic data allow a more complete analysis of this system than in previous papers. AG Dra is composed of a K-type bright giant M(sub g) approximately 1.5 solar mass) and a hot, compact star M(sub h approximatelly 0.4 - 0.6 solar mass) embedded in a dense, low metallicity nebula. The hot component undergoes occasional thermonuclear runaways that produce 2 - 3 mag optical/ultraviolet eruptions. During these eruptions, the hot component develops a low velocity wind that quenches x-ray emission from the underlying hot white dwarf. The photoionized nebula changes its volume by a factor of 5 throughout an eruptin cycle. The K bright giant occults low ionization emission lines during superior conjunctions at all outburst phases but does not occult high ionization lines in outburst (and perhaps quiescence). This geometry and the component masses suggest a system inclination of i approximately 30 deg - 45 deg.

  15. THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF SYMBIOTICS

    PubMed Central

    FLESCH, Aline Gamarra Taborda; POZIOMYCK, Aline Kirjner; DAMIN, Daniel De Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Functional foods are health promoters and their use is associated with reduced risk of chronic degenerative and non-transmissible diseases. Examples are symbiotic. The association of one (or more) probiotic with a one (or more) prebiotic is called symbiotic, being the prebiotics complementary and probiotics synergistic, thus presenting a multiplicative factor on their individual actions. Objective To assess the evidences on the benefits of the use of symbiotics in the treatment of clinical and surgical situations. Methods The headings symbiotic, probiotic and prebiotic were searched in Pubmed/Medline in the last 15 years, and were selected 25 articles, used for database. Results The use of symbiotic may promote an increase in the number of bifidobacteria, glycemic control, reduction of blood cholesterol, balancing the intestinal flora which aids in reducing constipation and/or diarrhea, improves intestinal permeability and stimulation of the immune system. Clinical indications for these products has been expanded, in order to maximize the individual's physiological functions to provide greater. So, with the high interest in the clinical and nutritional control of disease, many studies have been conducted demonstrating the effectiveness of using symbiotic in improving and/or preventing various and/or symptoms of gastrointestinal diseases. Conclusion Symbiotic behave differently and positively in various pathological situations. PMID:25184774

  16. Symbiotic Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernecky, Robert; Herhut, Stephan; Scholz, Sven-Bodo

    We introduce symbiotic expressions, a method for algebraic simplification within a compiler, in lieu of an SMT solver, such as Yices or the Omega Calculator. Symbiotic expressions are compiler-generated expressions, temporarily injected into a program's abstract syntax tree (AST). The compiler's normal optimizations interpret and simplify those expressions, making their results available for the compiler to use as a basis for decisions about further optimization of the source program. The expressions are symbiotic, in the sense that both parties benefit: an optimization benefits, by using the compiler itself to simplify expressions that have been attached, lamprey-like, to the AST by the optimization; the program being compiled benefits, from improved run-time in both serial and parallel environments.

  17. Job planning and execution monitoring for a human-robot symbiotic system

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1989-11-01

    The human-robot symbiosis concept has the fundamental objective of bridging the gap between fully human-controlled and fully autonomous systems to achieve true human-robot cooperative control and intelligence. Such a system would allow improved speed, accuracy, and efficiency of task execution, while retaining the human in the loop for innovative reasoning and decision-making. Earlier research has resulted in the development of a robotic system architecture facilitating the symbiotic integration of teleoperative and automated modes of task execution. This architecture reflects a unique blend of many disciplines of artificial intelligence into a working system, including job or mission planning, dynamic task allocation, human-robot communication, automated monitoring, and machine learning. This report focuses on two elements of this architecture: the Job Planner and the Automated Monitor. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Chemical abundance analysis of symbiotic giants - III. Metallicity and CNO abundance patterns in 24 southern systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, Cezary; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants are essential to address the role of chemical composition in the evolution of symbiotic binaries, to map their parent population, and to trace their mass transfer history. However, the number of symbiotic giants with fairly well determined photospheric composition is still insufficient for statistical analyses. This is the third in a series of papers on the chemical composition of symbiotic giants determined from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000), near-infrared spectra. Here we present results for 24 S-type systems. Spectrum synthesis methods employing standard local thermal equilibrium analysis and atmosphere models were used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Fe, Ti, Ni, and Sc). Our analysis reveals metallicities distributed in a wide range from slightly supersolar ([Fe/H] ˜ +0.35 dex) to significantly subsolar ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.8 dex) but principally with near-solar and slightly subsolar metallicity ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.4 to -0.3 dex). The enrichment in 14N isotope, found in all these objects, indicates that the giants have experienced the first dredge-up. This was confirmed in a number of objects by the low 12C/13C ratio (5-23). We found that the relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  19. Light Curves of Symbiotic Stars in Massive Photometric Surveys I: D-Type Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromadzki, M.; Mikołajewska, J.; Whitelock, P.; Marang, F.

    2009-06-01

    ASAS, MACHO, OGLE and SAAO JHKL light curves of 13 stars, that have at some time been classified as D-type symbiotic stars, are analyzed. Most of the near-IR light curves that have been monitored over many years show long-term changes due to variable dust obscuration, in addition to the stellar pulsation. The distances to these objects are derived from the period-luminosity relation and estimates of the mass-loss rates made from the K_0-[12] color. We reclassify AS 245 as an S-type symbiotic star with a semi-regular cool component and a pulsation period of about one year. The periods of the large amplitude pulsations of SS73 38 (463 days), AS 210 (423 days) and H2-38 (395 days) are estimated for the first time, confirming that they are symbiotic Miras. A comparison of the symbiotic Miras with normal Miras of similar pulsation period shows that the symbiotic stars have on average higher values of K_0-[12]. This may indicate that they have higher mass-loss rates, or more likely that the dust which is being lost by the Mira is trapped within the binary system.

  20. Linear polarization of a group of symbiotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, E.; García, L. G.; Piirola, V.; Scaltriti, F.; Quiroga, C.

    2000-08-01

    We report linear polarization measurements of a set of symbiotic stars, made at several epochs during the period 1994-1998. Evidence of intrinsic polarization is looked for from the wavelength dependence of the polarization degree and position angle in UBVRI bands. The results have also been analysed to search for temporal variability of polarization. Several objects have shown a polarization spectrum different from that produced by interstellar dust grains and/or polarimetric variations on time scales as short as several days or months, indicating the presence of polarization component of circumstellar origin. Based on observations taken at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under an agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina, the Secretaría de Ciencia y Tecnología de la Nación and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  1. A PRECESSING JET IN THE CH Cyg SYMBIOTIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P.; Carilli, Christopher L.; Hack, Warren

    2010-02-20

    Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from {approx}300 AU to {approx}1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity <100 km s{sup -1}. The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at {approx}170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to {approx}750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of {approx}500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

  2. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  3. Improved Phytophthora resistance in commercial chickpea (Cicer arietinum) varieties negatively impacts symbiotic gene signalling and symbiotic potential in some varieties.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Plett, Krista L; Bithell, Sean L; Mitchell, Chris; Moore, Kevin; Powell, Jeff R; Anderson, Ian C

    2016-08-01

    Breeding disease-resistant varieties is one of the most effective and economical means to combat soilborne diseases in pulse crops. Commonalities between pathogenic and mutualistic microbe colonization strategies, however, raises the concern that reduced susceptibility to pathogens may simultaneously reduce colonization by beneficial microbes. We investigate here the degree of overlap in the transcriptional response of the Phytophthora medicaginis susceptible chickpea variety 'Sonali' to the early colonization stages of either Phytophthora, rhizobial bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. From a total of 6476 genes differentially expressed in Sonali roots during colonization by any of the microbes tested, 10.2% were regulated in a similar manner regardless of whether it was the pathogenic oomycete or a mutualistic microbe colonizing the roots. Of these genes, 49.7% were oppositely regulated under the same conditions in the moderately Phytophthora resistant chickpea variety 'PBA HatTrick'. Chickpea varieties with improved resistance to Phytophthora also displayed lower colonization by rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi leading to an increased reliance on N and P from soil. Together, our results suggest that marker-based breeding in crops such as chickpea should be further investigated such that plant disease resistance can be tailored to a specific pathogen without affecting mutualistic plant:microbe interactions.

  4. Improved Phytophthora resistance in commercial chickpea (Cicer arietinum) varieties negatively impacts symbiotic gene signalling and symbiotic potential in some varieties.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Plett, Krista L; Bithell, Sean L; Mitchell, Chris; Moore, Kevin; Powell, Jeff R; Anderson, Ian C

    2016-08-01

    Breeding disease-resistant varieties is one of the most effective and economical means to combat soilborne diseases in pulse crops. Commonalities between pathogenic and mutualistic microbe colonization strategies, however, raises the concern that reduced susceptibility to pathogens may simultaneously reduce colonization by beneficial microbes. We investigate here the degree of overlap in the transcriptional response of the Phytophthora medicaginis susceptible chickpea variety 'Sonali' to the early colonization stages of either Phytophthora, rhizobial bacteria or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. From a total of 6476 genes differentially expressed in Sonali roots during colonization by any of the microbes tested, 10.2% were regulated in a similar manner regardless of whether it was the pathogenic oomycete or a mutualistic microbe colonizing the roots. Of these genes, 49.7% were oppositely regulated under the same conditions in the moderately Phytophthora resistant chickpea variety 'PBA HatTrick'. Chickpea varieties with improved resistance to Phytophthora also displayed lower colonization by rhizobial bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi leading to an increased reliance on N and P from soil. Together, our results suggest that marker-based breeding in crops such as chickpea should be further investigated such that plant disease resistance can be tailored to a specific pathogen without affecting mutualistic plant:microbe interactions. PMID:27103212

  5. Symbiotic performance of herbaceous legumes in tropical cover cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Ibewiro, B; Onuh, M; Sanginga, N; Bernard, V; Merckx, R

    2001-11-10

    Increasing use of herbaceous legumes such as mucuna ( Mucuna pruriens var. utilis [Wright] Bruck) and lablab ( Lablab purpureus [L.] Sweet) in the derived savannas of West Africa can be attributed to their potential to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2). The effects of management practices on N2 fixation in mucuna and lablab were examined using 15N isotope dilution technique. Dry matter yield of both legumes at 12 weeks was two to five times more in in situ mulch (IM) than live mulch (LM) systems. Land Equivalent Ratios, however, showed 8 to 30% more efficient utilization of resources required for biomass production under LM than IM systems. Live mulching reduced nodule numbers in the legumes by one third compared to values in the IM systems. Similarly, nodule mass was reduced by 34 to 58% under LM compared to the IM systems. The proportion of fixed N2 in the legumes was 18% higher in LM than IM systems. Except for inoculated mucuna, the amounts of N fixed by both legumes were greater in IM than LM systems. Rhizobia inoculation of the legumes did not significantly increase N2 fixation compared to uninoculated plots. Application of N fertilizer reduced N2 fixed in the legumes by 36 to 51% compared to inoculated or uninoculated systems. The implications of cover cropping, N fertilization, and rhizobia inoculation on N contributions of legumes into tropical low-input systems were discussed. PMID:12805778

  6. Models of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedjung, Michael

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important features of symbiotic stars is the coexistence of a cool spectral component that is apparently very similar to the spectrum of a cool giant, with at least one hot continuum, and emission lines from very different stages of ionization. The cool component dominates the infrared spectrum of S-type symbiotics; it tends to be veiled in this wavelength range by what appears to be excess emission in D-type symbiotics, this excess usually being attributed to circumstellar dust. The hot continuum (or continua) dominates the ultraviolet. X-rays have sometimes also been observed. Another important feature of symbiotic stars that needs to be explained is the variability. Different forms occur, some variability being periodic. This type of variability can, in a few cases, strongly suggest the presence of eclipses of a binary system. One of the most characteristic forms of variability is that characterizing the active phases. This basic form of variation is traditionally associated in the optical with the veiling of the cool spectrum and the disappearance of high-ionization emission lines, the latter progressively appearing (in classical cases, reappearing) later. Such spectral changes recall those of novae, but spectroscopic signatures of the high-ejection velocities observed for novae are not usually detected in symbiotic stars. However, the light curves of the 'symbiotic nova' subclass recall those of novae. We may also mention in this connection that radio observations (or, in a few cases, optical observations) of nebulae indicate ejection from symbiotic stars, with deviations from spherical symmetry. We shall give a historical overview of the proposed models for symbiotic stars and make a critical analysis in the light of the observations of symbiotic stars. We describe the empirical approach to models and use the observational data to diagnose the physical conditions in the symbiotics stars. Finally, we compare the results of this empirical

  7. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  8. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene

    PubMed Central

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F.; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  9. The Symbiotic Performance of Chickpea Rhizobia Can Be Improved by Additional Copies of the clpB Chaperone Gene.

    PubMed

    Paço, Ana; Brígido, Clarisse; Alexandre, Ana; Mateos, Pedro F; Oliveira, Solange

    2016-01-01

    The ClpB chaperone is known to be involved in bacterial stress response. Moreover, recent studies suggest that this protein has also a role in the chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. In order to improve both stress tolerance and symbiotic performance of a chickpea microsymbiont, the Mesorhizobium mediterraneum UPM-Ca36T strain was genetically transformed with pPHU231 containing an extra-copy of the clpB gene. To investigate if the clpB-transformed strain displays an improved stress tolerance, bacterial growth was evaluated under heat and acid stress conditions. In addition, the effect of the extra-copies of the clpB gene in the symbiotic performance was evaluated using plant growth assays (hydroponic and pot trials). The clpB-transformed strain is more tolerant to heat shock than the strain transformed with pPHU231, supporting the involvement of ClpB in rhizobia heat shock tolerance. Both plant growth assays showed that ClpB has an important role in chickpea-rhizobia symbiosis. The nodulation kinetics analysis showed a higher rate of nodule appearance with the clpB-transformed strain. This strain also induced a greater number of nodules and, more notably, its symbiotic effectiveness increased ~60% at pH5 and 83% at pH7, compared to the wild-type strain. Furthermore, a higher frequency of root hair curling was also observed in plants inoculated with the clpB-transformed strain, compared to the wild-type strain. The superior root hair curling induction, nodulation ability and symbiotic effectiveness of the clpB-transformed strain may be explained by an increased expression of symbiosis genes. Indeed, higher transcript levels of the nodulation genes nodA and nodC (~3 folds) were detected in the clpB-transformed strain. The improvement of rhizobia by addition of extra-copies of the clpB gene may be a promising strategy to obtain strains with enhanced stress tolerance and symbiotic effectiveness, thus contributing to their success as crop inoculants, particularly under

  10. Application of plant genomics for improved symbiotic nitrogen fixation in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because genome sequencing, transcript profiling, proteome analysis, metabolite profiling, mutant analysis, and comparative genomics have progressed at a logarithmic pace, we know more about the plant genes involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) than could have been imagined a decade ago. Howe...

  11. Lichens as a Model-System for Symbiotic Organisms under Simulated Extreme Space Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, J.; Horneck, G.; Rettberg, P.; Ott, S.

    As a consequence of the symbiotic state of lichens both the bionts are able to colonize habitats where the separate bionts would not be able to survive. The symbiosis of lichens reflects a high degree of complexity and plasticity. The combination of the different bionts enables these organisms to colonize most extreme habitats worldwide from the Arctic and Alpine zones to the Antarctic. Besides the already well investigated microorganisms lichens are good model -systems to examine adaptation strategies to most extreme environments. Because of the symbiotic nature of the lichens a 3-component -system can be used for investigations: the mycobiont (fungi), the photobiont (algae) and the lichen itself. Our investigations are based on such a system related to simulated extreme conditions. The influence of different doses of UV A, B, C (>200nm) on the vitality of fungal (mycobiont) fruiting bodys and their spores and the germination process has been investigated. The spores are cultivated on a variety of different substrates, especially on a Martian Regolith Simulant JSC - 1-A g a r- Extract for testing the influence of the UV radiation related to the dependency of different soil-substrate-extracts. The influence of vacuum conditions has been investigated. The aim of this research is to test the reaction of a symbiotic organism complex and its respective bionts to highly extreme space conditions looking forward to a possibly survival strategy of lichenized associations in space; probably supporting the theory of Panspermia. For the interpretation of results especially refering to the vitality potential of the photobionts in damaged and healthy lichens the method of modern confocal lasermicroscopy (CLSM) - a novel method in lichenology is presented.

  12. Micro-particle transporting system using galvanotactically stimulated apo-symbiotic cells of Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shunsuke; Karaki, Chiaki; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that Paramecium species including green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) migrate towards the anode when exposed to an electric field in a medium. This type of a cellular movement is known as galvanotaxis. Our previous study revealed that an electric stimulus given to P bursaria is converted to a galvanotactic cellular movement by involvement of T-type calcium channel on the plasma membrane [Aonuma et al. (2007), Z. Naturforsch. 62c, 93-102]. This phenomenon has attracted the attention of bioengineers in the fields of biorobotics or micro-robotics in order to develop electrically controllable micromachineries. Here, we demonstrate the galvanotactic controls of the cellular migration of P bursaria in capillary tubes (diameter, 1-2 mm; length, 30-240 mm). Since the Paramecium cells take up particles of various sizes, we attempted to use the electrically stimulated cells of P bursaria as the vehicle for transportation of micro-particles in the capillary system. By using apo-symbiotic cells of P bursaria obtained after forced removal of symbiotic algae, the uptake of the particles could be maximized and visualized. Then, electrically controlled transportations of particle-filled apo-symbiotic P bursaria cells were manifested. The particles transported by electrically controlled cells (varying in size from nm to /m levels) included re-introduced green algae, fluorescence-labeled polystyrene beads, magnetic microspheres, emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-labeled cells of E. coli, Indian ink, and crystals of zeolite (hydrated aluminosilicate minerals with a micro-porous structure) and some metal oxides. Since the above demonstrations were successful, we concluded that P bursaria has a potential to be employed as one of the micro-biorobotic devices used in BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems).

  13. An Analysis on a Negotiation Model Based on Multiagent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Tofazzal

    This study explores an evolutionary analysis on a negotiation model based on Masbiole (Multiagent Systems with Symbiotic Learning and Evolution) which has been proposed as a new methodology of Multiagent Systems (MAS) based on symbiosis in the ecosystem. In Masbiole, agents evolve in consideration of not only their own benefits and losses, but also the benefits and losses of opponent agents. To aid effective application of Masbiole, we develop a competitive negotiation model where rigorous and advanced intelligent decision-making mechanisms are required for agents to achieve solutions. A Negotiation Protocol is devised aiming at developing a set of rules for agents' behavior during evolution. Simulations use a newly developed evolutionary computing technique, called Genetic Network Programming (GNP) which has the directed graph-type gene structure that can develop and design the required intelligent mechanisms for agents. In a typical scenario, competitive negotiation solutions are reached by concessions that are usually predetermined in the conventional MAS. In this model, however, not only concession is determined automatically by symbiotic evolution (making the system intelligent, automated, and efficient) but the solution also achieves Pareto optimal automatically.

  14. Changes in symbiotic and associative interrelations in a higher plant-bacterial system during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, V. A.; Man'ko, V. G.; Popova, A. F.; Shcherbak, O. H.; Mashinsky, A. L.; Nguen-Hgue-Thyok

    The miniature cenosis consisting of the water fern Azolla with its associated symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena and the concomitant bacteria was investigated. Ecological closure was shown to produce sharp quantitative and qualitative changes in the number and type of concomitant bacteria. Changes in the distribution of bacterial types grown on beef-extract broth after space flight were recorded. Anabaena azollae underwent the most significant changes under spaceflight conditions. Its cell number per Azolla biomass unit increased substantially. Thus closure of cenosis resulted in a weakening of control over microbial development by Azolla. This tendency was augmented by spaceflight factors. Reduction in control exerted by macro-organisms over development of associated micro-organisms must be taken into account in constructing closed ecological systems in the state of weightlessness.

  15. Where is the X-ray emission coming from in RT Cru Symbiotic System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karovska, Margarita

    2014-11-01

    RT Cru is a member of a new sub-class of symbiotic interacting binaries with copious hard X-ray emission. It consists of a high-mass WD (>1.3 Ms) accreting from the wind of an M giant, and it is an important system to study in order to constrain precursor conditions for asymmetric PN and SN Ia. The Chandra HRC-I observation (Dec 2012), and an overlapping Swift observation, detected intermittent soft X-ray flaring, and we find evidence for a significant soft component in the spectrum. The flaring could be a consequence of clumped absorption columns moving in and out of the line of sight, or the variations could be due to changes at the accretion boundary layer. Further observations are needed to determine the origin of the soft emission and its relation to the hard emission.

  16. The symbiotic binary system RX Puppis: a possible recurrent nova with a Mira companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewska, Joanna; Brandi, Estela; Hack, Warren; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Barba, Rodolfo; Garcia, Lia; Marang, Freddy

    1999-05-01

    We present an analysis of photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary system RX Pup with the aim of developing a reliable binary model for the system and identifying mechanisms responsible for its spectacular activity. The binary is composed of a long-period Mira variable surrounded by a thick dust shell and a hot ~ 0.8 M_sun white dwarf companion. The hot component produces practically all activity observed in the UV, optical and radio range, while variable obscuration of the Mira by circumstellar dust is responsible for long-term changes in the near-infrared magnitudes. The observations show that RX Pup underwent a nova-like eruption during the last three decades. The hot component contracted in radius at roughly constant luminosity from 1975 to 1986, and was the source of a strong stellar wind, which prevented it from accreting material lost in the Mira wind. Around 1988/9 the hot component turned over in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram and by 1991 its luminosity had faded by a factor of ~ 30 with respect to the maximum plateau value and the hot wind had practically ceased. By 1995 the nova remnant started to accrete material from the Mira wind, as indicated by a general increase in intensity of the optical continuum and H I emission. The quiescent spectrum resembles the quiescent spectra of symbiotic recurrent novae, and its intensity indicates that the hot component must accrete as much as ~ 1 per cent of the Mira wind, which is more or less the amount predicted by Bondi-Hoyle theory. The earliest observational records from the 1890s suggest that another nova-like eruption of RX Pup occurred around 1894.

  17. Comparative metagenomic analysis of microcosm structures and lignocellulolytic enzyme systems of symbiotic biomass-degrading consortia.

    PubMed

    Wongwilaiwalin, Sarunyou; Laothanachareon, Thanaporn; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Eurwilaichitr, Lily; Igarashi, Yasuo; Champreda, Verawat

    2013-10-01

    Decomposition of lignocelluloses by cooperative microbial actions is an essential process of carbon cycling in nature and provides a basis for biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals in biorefineries. In this study, structurally stable symbiotic aero-tolerant lignocellulose-degrading microbial consortia were obtained from biodiversified microflora present in industrial sugarcane bagasse pile (BGC-1), cow rumen fluid (CRC-1), and pulp mill activated sludge (ASC-1) by successive subcultivation on rice straw under facultative anoxic conditions. Tagged 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed that all isolated consortia originated from highly diverse environmental microflora shared similar composite phylum profiles comprising mainly Firmicutes, reflecting convergent adaptation of microcosm structures, however, with substantial differences at refined genus level. BGC-1 comprising cellulolytic Clostridium and Acetanaerobacterium in stable coexistence with ligninolytic Ureibacillus showed the highest capability on degradation of agricultural residues and industrial pulp waste with CMCase, xylanase, and β-glucanase activities in the supernatant. Shotgun pyrosequencing of the BGC-1 metagenome indicated a markedly high relative abundance of genes encoding for glycosyl hydrolases, particularly for lignocellulytic enzymes in 26 families. The enzyme system comprised a unique composition of main-chain degrading and side-chain processing hydrolases, dominated by GH2, 3, 5, 9, 10, and 43, reflecting adaptation of enzyme profiles to the specific substrate. Gene mapping showed metabolic potential of BGC-1 for conversion of biomass sugars to various fermentation products of industrial importance. The symbiotic consortium is a promising simplified model for study of multispecies mechanisms on consolidated bioprocessing and a platform for discovering efficient synergistic enzyme systems for biotechnological application. PMID:23381385

  18. Gut Microbiota-Induced Immunoglobulin G Controls Systemic Infection by Symbiotic Bacteria and Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Melody Y; Cisalpino, Daniel; Varadarajan, Saranyaraajan; Hellman, Judith; Warren, H Shaw; Cascalho, Marilia; Inohara, Naohiro; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-03-15

    The gut microbiota is compartmentalized in the intestinal lumen and induces local immune responses, but it remains unknown whether the gut microbiota can induce systemic response and contribute to systemic immunity. We report that selective gut symbiotic gram-negative bacteria were able to disseminate systemically to induce immunoglobulin G (IgG) response, which primarily targeted gram-negative bacterial antigens and conferred protection against systemic infections by E. coli and Salmonella by directly coating bacteria to promote killing by phagocytes. T cells and Toll-like receptor 4 on B cells were important in the generation of microbiota-specific IgG. We identified murein lipoprotein (MLP), a highly conserved gram-negative outer membrane protein, as a major antigen that induced systemic IgG homeostatically in both mice and humans. Administration of anti-MLP IgG conferred crucial protection against systemic Salmonella infection. Thus, our findings reveal an important function for the gut microbiota in combating systemic infection through the induction of protective IgG. PMID:26944199

  19. Isolation and characterisation of non-anaerobic butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06.

    PubMed

    Wang, Genyu; Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Ya; Mi, Shuo; Mai, Shuai; Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Børresen, Børre Tore; Mellemsæther, Evy; Kotlar, Hans Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Butanol-producing microorganisms are all obligate anaerobes. In this study, a unique symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated to be capable of producing butanol under non-anaerobic condition. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) revealed that two strains coexist in TSH06. The two strains were identical to Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus, respectively. They were isolated individually and named as C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2. C. acetobutylicum TSH1 is a butanol-producing, obligate anaerobic strain. Facultative anaerobic B. cereus TSH2 did not possess the ability of butanol production; however, it offered C. acetobutylicum TSH1 the viability under non-anaerobic condition. Moreover, B. cereus TSH2 enhanced butanol yield and speed of fermentation. TSH06 produced 12.97 g/L butanol and 15.39 g/L total solvent under non-anaerobic condition, which is 25 and 24 %, respectively, higher than those of C. acetobutylicum TSH1. In addition, TSH06 produced butanol faster under non-anaerobic condition than under anaerobic condition. Butanol accounted for more than 80 % of total solvent, which is higher than the known report. TSH06 was stable during passage. In all, TSH06 is a promising candidate for industrialisation of biobutanol with high yield, high butanol proportion, easy-handling and time-saving system. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of symbiosis. This study also provides a promising strategy for butanol fermentation. PMID:26272091

  20. A phosphate transport system is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, S; Dan, S; Osteras, M; Finan, T M

    1996-01-01

    The bacterium Rhizobium meliloti forms N2-fixing root nodules on alfalfa plants. The ndvF locus, located on the 1,700-kb pEXO megaplasmid of R. meliloti, is required for nodule invasion and N2 fixation. Here we report that ndvF contains four genes, phoCDET, which encode an ABC-type transport system for the uptake of Pi into the bacteria. The PhoC and PhoD proteins are homologous to the Escherichia coli phosphonate transport proteins PhnC and PhnD. The PhoT and PhoE proteins are homologous to each other and to the E. coli phosphonate transport protein PhnE. We show that the R. meliloti phoD and phoE genes are induced in response to phosphate starvation and that the phoC promoter contains two elements which are similar in sequence to the PHO boxes present in E. coli phosphate-regulated promoters. The R. meliloti ndvF mutants grow poorly at a phosphate concentration of 2 mM, and we hypothesize that their symbiotic phenotype results from their failure to grow during the nodule infection process. Presumably, the PhoCDET transport system is employed by the bacteria in the soil environment, where the concentration of available phosphate is normally 0.1 to 1 microM. PMID:8755882

  1. Isolation and characterisation of non-anaerobic butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06.

    PubMed

    Wang, Genyu; Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Ya; Mi, Shuo; Mai, Shuai; Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Børresen, Børre Tore; Mellemsæther, Evy; Kotlar, Hans Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Butanol-producing microorganisms are all obligate anaerobes. In this study, a unique symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated to be capable of producing butanol under non-anaerobic condition. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) revealed that two strains coexist in TSH06. The two strains were identical to Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus, respectively. They were isolated individually and named as C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2. C. acetobutylicum TSH1 is a butanol-producing, obligate anaerobic strain. Facultative anaerobic B. cereus TSH2 did not possess the ability of butanol production; however, it offered C. acetobutylicum TSH1 the viability under non-anaerobic condition. Moreover, B. cereus TSH2 enhanced butanol yield and speed of fermentation. TSH06 produced 12.97 g/L butanol and 15.39 g/L total solvent under non-anaerobic condition, which is 25 and 24 %, respectively, higher than those of C. acetobutylicum TSH1. In addition, TSH06 produced butanol faster under non-anaerobic condition than under anaerobic condition. Butanol accounted for more than 80 % of total solvent, which is higher than the known report. TSH06 was stable during passage. In all, TSH06 is a promising candidate for industrialisation of biobutanol with high yield, high butanol proportion, easy-handling and time-saving system. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of symbiosis. This study also provides a promising strategy for butanol fermentation.

  2. [Evolution of Root Nodule Bacteria: Reconstruction of the Speciation Processes Resulting from Genomic Rearrangements in a Symbiotic System].

    PubMed

    Provorov, N A; Andronov, E E

    2016-01-01

    The processes of speciation and macroevolution of root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), based on deep rearrangements of their genomes and occurring in the N₂-fixing symbiotic system, are reconstructed. At the first stage of rhizobial evolution, transformation of free-living diazotrophs (related to Rhodopseudomonas) to symbiotic N₂-fixers (Bradyrhizobium) occurred due to the acquisition of the fix gene system, which is responsible for providing nitrogenase with electrons and reducing equivalents, as well as for oxygen-dependent regulation of nitrogenase synthesis in planta, and then of the nod genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipo- chito-oligosaccharide Nod factors, which induce root nodule development. The subsequent rearrangements of bacterial genomes included: (1) increased volume of hereditary information supported by species, genera (pan-genome), and individual strains; (2) transition from the unitary genome to a multicomponent one; and (3) enhanced levels of bacterial genetic plasticity and horizontal gene transfer, resulting in formation of new genera, of which Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Sinorhizobium are the largest, and of over 100 species. Rhizobial evolution caused by development and diversification of the Nod factor synthesizing systems may result in both increased host specificity range (transition of Bradyrhizobium from autotrophic to symbiotrophic carbon metabolism in interaction with a broad spectrum of legumes) and to its contraction (transition of Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium to "altruistic" interaction with legumes of the galegoid clade). Reconstruction of the evolutionary pathway from symbiotic N₂-fixers to their free-living ancestors makes it possible to initiate the studies based on up-to-date genome screening technologies and aimed at the issues of genetic integration of organisms into supracpecies complexes, ratios of the macro- and microevolutionary mechanisms, and developmetn of cooperative adaptations based on altruistic

  3. Engineering and characterization of a symbiotic selection-marker-free vector-host system for therapeutic plasmid production.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinchang; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to develop a symbiotic selection-marker-free plasmid and host system that would allow successful plasmid maintenance and amplification for use in gene therapy. Initially, the chromosomal aspartate‑semialdehyde dehydrogenase (asd) gene was disrupted in DH10B Escherichia coli using Red recombinase‑mediated homologous recombination. This method required the use of linear DNA fragments carrying kan‑kil genes, and/or homologous extensions to the targeted locus. The resultant auxotrophic cell wall‑deficient strain (DH10BΔasd) was evaluated as a symbiotic host for amplification of the marker‑free plasmid, allowing it to supply ASD activity. In order to construct the plasmid, an asd expression cassette was inserted, under the control of the nirB promoter, into a eukaryotic expression vector, and its kanamycin resistance gene was subsequently removed. The symbiotic plasmid and host system was assessed for numerous plasmid production and stability parameters, including structure, yield, plasmid‑retention rate, and bacterial storability, under various conditions. The presence of the plasmid was subsequently confirmed by growth test, restriction enzyme mapping, and sequencing. The plasmid yield and copy number produced in the symbiotic cells, in the absence of antibiotic selection, were shown to be similar to those produced under kanamycin selection, in the cells containing the precursor plasmid and kanamycin resistance gene. Furthermore, the results of the present study demonstrated that when inoculated with <1% inoculant volume, >98% of the cells in the culture retained the plasmid regardless of the number of passages. The strain was stable when stored at ‑70˚C, with negligible viability loss over 12 months. The constructed plasmid is stable and has potential in future gene therapy, while much work is still required.

  4. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  5. Aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether in a closed symbiotic system containing a mixed culture of Chlorella ellipsoidea and Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weihong; Li, Yixiao; Sun, Kedan; Jin, Jing; Li, Xuanzhen; Zhang, Fuming; Chen, Jianmeng

    2011-01-30

    The contamination of groundwater by methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is one of the most serious environmental problems around the world. MTBE degradation in a closed algal-bacterial symbiotic system, containing a mixed culture of Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1 and Chlorella ellipsoidea, was investigated. The algal-bacterial symbiotic system showed increased MTBE degradation. The MTBE-degradation rate in the mixed culture (8.808 ± 0.007 mg l(-1) d(-1)) was higher than that in the pure bacterial culture (5.664 ± 0.017 mg l(-1) d(-1)). The level of dissolved oxygen was also higher in the mixed culture than that in the pure bacterial culture. However, the improved efficiency of MTBE degradation was not in proportional to the biomass of the alga. The optimal ratio of initial cell population of bacteria to algae was 100:1. An immobilized culture of mixed bacteria and algae also showed higher MTBE degradation rate than the immobilized pure bacterial culture. A mixed culture with algae and PM1 immobilized separately in different gel beads showed higher degradation rate (8.496 ± 0.636 mg l(-1) d(-1)) than that obtained with algae and PM1 immobilized in the same gel beads (5.424 ± 0.010 mg l(-1) d(-1)).

  6. The Recent Evolution of a Symbiotic Ion Channel in the Legume Family Altered Ion Conductance and Improved Functionality in Calcium Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Cosme, Ana; Han, Lu; Banba, Mari; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Schleiff, Enrico; Parniske, Martin; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza and the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are two major root endosymbioses that facilitate plant nutrition. In Lotus japonicus, two symbiotic cation channels, CASTOR and POLLUX, are indispensable for the induction of nuclear calcium spiking, one of the earliest plant responses to symbiotic partner recognition. During recent evolution, a single amino acid substitution in DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS1 (DMI1), the POLLUX putative ortholog in the closely related Medicago truncatula, rendered the channel solo sufficient for symbiosis; castor, pollux, and castor pollux double mutants of L. japonicus were rescued by DMI1 alone, while both Lj-CASTOR and Lj-POLLUX were required for rescuing a dmi1 mutant of M. truncatula. Experimental replacement of the critical serine by an alanine in the selectivity filter of Lj-POLLUX conferred a symbiotic performance indistinguishable from DMI1. Electrophysiological characterization of DMI1 and Lj-CASTOR (wild-type and mutants) by planar lipid bilayer experiments combined with calcium imaging in Human Embryonic Kidney-293 cells expressing DMI1 (the wild type and mutants) suggest that the serine-to-alanine substitution conferred reduced conductance with a long open state to DMI1 and improved its efficiency in mediating calcium oscillations. We propose that this single amino acid replacement in the selectivity filter made DMI1 solo sufficient for symbiosis, thus explaining the selective advantage of this allele at the mechanistic level. PMID:22706284

  7. The X-ray/radio and UV luminosity expected from symbiotic systems as the progenitor of SNe Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangcun; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-04-01

    Context. Symbiotic systems (i.e. a white dwarf + red giant star, WD + RG), which experience mass loss and form circumstellar material (CSM), have been suggested as being a possible progenitor system of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). After a supernova explosion, the supernova ejecta may interact with the CSM or the RG secondary. X-ray/radio emission (excess UV photons) is expected from the interaction between supernova ejecta and the CSM (RG secondary). However, no X-ray or radio emission that has originated from this type of system has been observationally detected, and only four SNe Ia have shown any possible signal of excess UV emission. These observational discrepancies need to be interpreted. Aims: We seek to determine the luminosity of these emissions, using detailed binary evolution algorithms to obtain the parameters of binary systems at the moment of the supernova explosion. Methods: We carried out a series of binary stellar evolution calculations, in which the effect of tidally enhanced wind on the evolution of WD + RG systems is incorporated. The WDs increase their mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and then explode as SNe Ia. Based on the binary evolution results, we estimated the X-ray/radio (the excess UV) luminosity from the interactions between supernova ejecta and the CSM (the secondary) using a variety of published standard models. Results: We found that the X-ray flux may be high enough to be detected for a nearby SN Ia from a symbiotic system, while the radio flux is more likely to de detected when the companion is an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, and for a first giant branch (FGB) companion, the radio flux is generally lower than the detection limit. For two well observed SNe Ia, 2011fe and 2014J, almost all symbiotic systems are excluded by X-ray observations, but WD + FGB systems may not be ruled out by radio observations. The excess UV luminosity that results from the collision of supernova ejecta with the RG secondary may be high

  8. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  9. Infrared studies of Nova Scorpii 2014: an outburst in a symbiotic system sans an accompanying blast wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vishal; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Ashok, N. M.; Venkataraman, V.; Walter, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    Near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy is presented for Nova Scorpii 2014. It is shown that the outburst occurred in a symbiotic binary system - an extremely rare configuration for a classical nova outburst to occur in but appropriate for the eruption of a recurrent nova of the T CrB class. We estimate the spectral class of secondary as M5III ± (two sub-classes). The maximum magnitude versus rate of decline relations give an unacceptably large value of 37.5 kpc for the distance. The spectra are typical of the He/N class of novae with strong He I and H lines. The profiles are broad and flat topped with full width at zero intensities approaching 9000-10 000 km s-1 and also have a sharp narrow component superposed which is attributable to emission from the giant's wind. Hot shocked gas, accompanied by X-rays and γ-rays, is expected to form when the high-velocity ejecta from the nova ploughs into the surrounding giant wind. Although X-ray emission was observed no γ-ray emission was reported. It is also puzzling that no signature of a decelerating shock is seen in the NIR, seen in similar systems like RS Oph, V745 Sco and V407 Cyg, as rapid narrowing of the line profiles. The small outburst amplitude and the giant secondary strongly suggest that Nova Sco 2014 could be a recurrent nova.

  10. Healthy effects exerted by prebiotics, probiotics, and symbiotics with special reference to their impact on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Jirillo, Emilio; Jirillo, Felicita; Magrone, Thea

    2012-06-01

    Pre-, pro-, and symbiotics are endowed with a broad spectrum of beneficial effects when administered to animals and humans. A series of experimental and clinical studies have clearly demonstrated that prebiotics, probiotics, or their combination are very effective in attenuating chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease or obesity. In addition, these natural products are able to prevent or arrest tumor development, acting on the intestinal microbiota as well as potentiating the immune response.Aging is characterized by a dramatic reduction of both innate and adaptive immune responses, the so-called immunosenescence. This leads to an increased incidence of infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer in the elderly. Pre-, pro-, and symbiotic administration has been shown to ameliorate the immune response in aging. In particular, administration of a symbiotic to free-living elderly was able to potentiate the release of interleukin-8, thus increasing neutrophils in the host, perhaps explaining the reduced frequency of winter infections in the elderly.

  11. Systems of symbiotic large FBRs and small CANDLE-Thorium-HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail; Liem, P. H.; Takaki, N.; Sekimoto, H.

    2006-07-01

    Multi-component nuclear system is a system in which several types of nuclear reactors and related fuel cycle facilities are operated with mutual material exchange. A mainstay of the system is a centralized nuclear park that consists of large-scale FBRs and nuclear fuel facilities for fabrication, reprocessing and cooling/storage of nuclear fuels. The role of the FBRs is simultaneously to produce electricity and support small satellite-reactors by providing nuclear fuel. The satellite-reactors can supply energy to remote small areas. In the present study, natural uranium and thorium are charged into the FBRs in distinct fuel pin types. Under the equilibrium state, the fuels are continually discharged and separated with a certain discharge constant. Actinides, excluding {sup 233}U-only or uranium-element, are returned to the FBRs while discharged-uranium is used for fresh fuels of small HTGR thorium cycle satellite-reactors. Fissile support capability of the FBR to the satellite-reactors is investigated as function of both the FBR uranium-thorium fraction and uranium discharge constant parameters. The system shows that larger number of uranium pins is better for the FBR criticality while larger number of thorium pins and larger uranium discharge constant give better support capability. (authors)

  12. How the insect immune system interacts with an obligate symbiotic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, A. E.; Bouvaine, S.; Russell, R. R.

    2011-01-01

    The animal immune system provides defence against microbial infection, and the evolution of certain animal–microbial symbioses is predicted to involve adaptive changes in the host immune system to accommodate the microbial partner. For example, the reduced humoral immune system in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, including an apparently non-functional immune deficiency (IMD) signalling pathway and absence of peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), has been suggested to be an adaptation for the symbiosis with the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola. To investigate this hypothesis, the interaction between Buchnera and non-host cells, specifically cultured Drosophila S2 cells, was investigated. Microarray analysis of the gene expression pattern in S2 cells indicated that Buchnera triggered an immune response, including upregulated expression of genes for antimicrobial peptides via the IMD pathway with the PGRP-LC as receptor. Buchnera cells were readily taken up by S2 cells, but were subsequently eliminated over 1–2 days. These data suggest that Buchnera induces in non-host cells a defensive immune response that is deficient in its host. They support the proposed contribution of the Buchnera symbiosis to the evolution of the apparently reduced immune function in the aphid host. PMID:20719775

  13. A synergistic interaction between salt-tolerant Pseudomonas and Mesorhizobium strains improves growth and symbiotic performance of liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fish.) under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Li, Li; Lindström, Kristina; Räsänen, Leena A

    2016-03-01

    Chinese liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fish.) is a salt-tolerant medicinal legume that could be utilized for bioremediation of salt-affected soils. We studied whether co-inoculation of the symbiotic Mesorhizobium sp. strain NWXJ19 or NWXJ31 with the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas extremorientalis TSAU20 could restore growth, nodulation, and shoot/root nitrogen contents of salt-stressed G. uralensis, which was grown in potting soil and irrigated with 0, 50, and 75 mM NaCl solutions under greenhouse conditions. Irrigation with NaCl solutions clearly retarded the growth of uninoculated liquorice, and the higher the NaCl concentration (75 and 100 mM NaCl), the more adverse is the effect. The two Mesorhizobium strains, added either alone or in combination with P. extremorientalis TSAU20, responded differently to the salt levels used. The strain NWXJ19 was a good symbiont for plants irrigated with 50 mM NaCl, whereas the strain NWXJ31 was more efficient for plants irrigated with water or 75 mM NaCl solution. P. extremorientalis TSAU20 combined with single Mesorhizobium strains alleviated the salt stress of liquorice plants and improved yield and nodule numbers significantly in comparison with single-strain-inoculated liquorice. Both salt stress and inoculation raised the nitrogen content of shoots and roots. The nitrogen contents were at their highest, i.e., 30 and 35 % greater compared to non-stressed uninoculated plants, when plants were inoculated with P. extremorientalis TSAU20 and Mesorhizobium sp. NWXJ31 as well as irrigated with 75 mM NaCl solution. From this study, we conclude that dual inoculation with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria could be a new approach to improve the tolerance of G. uralensis to salt stress, thereby improving its suitability for the remediation of saline lands.

  14. The Sexual and Mating System of the Shrimp Odontonia katoi (Palaemonidae, Pontoniinae), a Symbiotic Guest of the Ascidian Polycarpa aurata in the Coral Triangle

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, J. Antonio; Hemphill, Carrie A.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in the shrimp Odontonia katoi, which inhabits the atrial chamber of the ascidian Polycarpa aurata in the Coral Triangle. Preliminary observations in O. katoi indicated that males were smaller than females, which is suggestive of sex change (protandry) in some symbiotic organisms. Thus, we first investigated the sexual system of O. katoi to determine if this shrimp was sequentially hermaphroditic. Morphological identification and size frequency distributions indicated that the population comprised males that, on average, were smaller than females. Gonad dissections demonstrated the absence of transitional individuals. Thus, O. katoi is a gonochoric species with reverse sexual dimorphism. The population distribution of O. katoi in its ascidian host did not differ significantly from a random distribution and shrimps inhabiting the same host individual as pairs were found with a frequency similar to that expected by chance alone. This is in contrast to that reported for other socially monogamous crustaceans in which pairs of heterosexual conspecifics are found in host individuals more frequently than expected by chance alone. Thus, the available information argues against monogamy in O. katoi. Furthermore, that a high frequency of solitary females were found brooding embryos and that the sex ratio was skewed toward females suggests that males might be roaming among hosts in search of receptive females in O. katoi. Symbiotic crustaceans can be used as a model system to understand the adaptive value of sexual and mating systems in marine invertebrates. PMID:25799577

  15. The sexual and mating system of the shrimp Odontonia katoi (Palaemonidae, Pontoniinae), a symbiotic guest of the ascidian Polycarpa aurata in the Coral Triangle.

    PubMed

    Baeza, J Antonio; Hemphill, Carrie A; Ritson-Williams, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in the shrimp Odontonia katoi, which inhabits the atrial chamber of the ascidian Polycarpa aurata in the Coral Triangle. Preliminary observations in O. katoi indicated that males were smaller than females, which is suggestive of sex change (protandry) in some symbiotic organisms. Thus, we first investigated the sexual system of O. katoi to determine if this shrimp was sequentially hermaphroditic. Morphological identification and size frequency distributions indicated that the population comprised males that, on average, were smaller than females. Gonad dissections demonstrated the absence of transitional individuals. Thus, O. katoi is a gonochoric species with reverse sexual dimorphism. The population distribution of O. katoi in its ascidian host did not differ significantly from a random distribution and shrimps inhabiting the same host individual as pairs were found with a frequency similar to that expected by chance alone. This is in contrast to that reported for other socially monogamous crustaceans in which pairs of heterosexual conspecifics are found in host individuals more frequently than expected by chance alone. Thus, the available information argues against monogamy in O. katoi. Furthermore, that a high frequency of solitary females were found brooding embryos and that the sex ratio was skewed toward females suggests that males might be roaming among hosts in search of receptive females in O. katoi. Symbiotic crustaceans can be used as a model system to understand the adaptive value of sexual and mating systems in marine invertebrates. PMID:25799577

  16. IUE observations of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahade, J.; Brandi, E.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE observations suggest that the symbiotic stars can be placed in two broad groups. One of the groups is characterized by strong, narrow emissions arising from a wide range of excitation energies, while the other one typically shows a strong continuum with absorption lines and very few or no emissions at all. Both broad groups appear to suggest that these are binary systems and that they probably differ in the characteristics and extent of the chromosphere-corona formation that is present in the system.

  17. Towards Whole System Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between academies, and school autonomy more generally, and the wider system is a crucial issue in the battle to improve school-level education. International experience indicates that emphasising choice and competition to drive improvement is not effective and that changing structures does not yield better results for students. A…

  18. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SYMBIOTIC STARS. X. ORBITS FOR THREE S-TYPE SYSTEMS: V1044 CENTAURI, HEN 3-1213, AND SS 73-96

    SciTech Connect

    Fekel, Francis C.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.; Wood, Peter R. E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu E-mail: wood@mso.anu.edu.au

    2015-08-15

    Employing new infrared radial velocities, we have computed orbits of the cool giants in three southern S-type symbiotic systems. The orbit for V1044 Cen, an M5.5 giant, has a period of 985 days and a modest eccentricity of 0.16. Hen 3-1213 is a K4 giant, yellow symbiotic with an orbital period of 533 days and a similar eccentricity of 0.18. For the M2 giant SS 73-96 the orbital period is 828 days, and this system has a somewhat larger eccentricity of 0.26. Measurement of the H i Paschen δ emission lines, which may at least partially reflect the motion of the secondary in SS 73-96, results in a mass ratio of 2.4 for the M giant relative to the presumed white dwarf. The estimated orbital inclinations of V1044 Cen and Hen 3-1213 are low, about 40°. However, for SS 73-96 the predicted inclination is 90°, and so an ephemeris for eclipses of the secondary or the hot nebula surrounding it is provided. A search of the orbital velocity residuals of V1044 Cen and SS 73-96 for pulsation periods produced no realistic or convincing period for either star.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of Symbiotic Stars. X. Orbits for Three S-type Systems: V1044 Centauri, Hen 3-1213, and SS 73-96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekel, Francis C.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.; Wood, Peter R.

    2015-08-01

    Employing new infrared radial velocities, we have computed orbits of the cool giants in three southern S-type symbiotic systems. The orbit for V1044 Cen, an M5.5 giant, has a period of 985 days and a modest eccentricity of 0.16. Hen 3-1213 is a K4 giant, yellow symbiotic with an orbital period of 533 days and a similar eccentricity of 0.18. For the M2 giant SS 73-96 the orbital period is 828 days, and this system has a somewhat larger eccentricity of 0.26. Measurement of the H i Paschen δ emission lines, which may at least partially reflect the motion of the secondary in SS 73-96, results in a mass ratio of 2.4 for the M giant relative to the presumed white dwarf. The estimated orbital inclinations of V1044 Cen and Hen 3-1213 are low, about 40°. However, for SS 73-96 the predicted inclination is 90°, and so an ephemeris for eclipses of the secondary or the hot nebula surrounding it is provided. A search of the orbital velocity residuals of V1044 Cen and SS 73-96 for pulsation periods produced no realistic or convincing period for either star.

  20. AG Draconis - a symbiotic mystery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galis, R.; Hric, L.; Smelcer, L.

    2015-02-01

    Symbiotic system AG Draconis regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one (~550 d) is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one (~355 d) could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra. In addition, the active stages change distinctively, but the outbursts are repeated with periods from 359 - 375 d.

  1. The enigmatic life history of the symbiotic crab Tunicotheres moseri (Crustacea, Brachyura, Pinnotheridae): implications for its mating system and population structure.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J E; Bolaños, J A; Palazón, J L; Hernández, G; Lira, C; Baeza, J Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Resource-monopolization theory predicts the adoption of a solitary habit in species using scarce, discrete, and small refuges. Life-history theory suggests that temporarily stable parental dwellings favor extended parental care in species that brood embryos. We tested these two predictions with the symbiotic crab Tunicotheres moseri. This species exhibits abbreviated development and inhabits the atrial chamber of the scarce, structurally simple, long-lived, and relatively small ascidian Phalusia nigra in the Caribbean. These host characteristics should favor a solitary habit and extended parental care (EPC) in T. moseri. As predicted, males and females of T. moseri inhabited ascidians solitarily with greater frequency than expected by chance alone. The male-female association pattern and reverse sexual dimorphism (males < females) additionally suggests a promiscuous "pure-search" mating system in T. moseri. Also in agreement with theoretical considerations, T. moseri displays EPC; in addition to embryos, females naturally retain larval stages, megalopae, and juveniles within their brooding pouches. This is the first record of EPC in a symbiotic crab and the second confirmed record of EPC in a marine brachyuran crab. This study supports predictions central to resource-monopolization and life-history theories. PMID:23264474

  2. The enigmatic life history of the symbiotic crab Tunicotheres moseri (Crustacea, Brachyura, Pinnotheridae): implications for its mating system and population structure.

    PubMed

    Hernández, J E; Bolaños, J A; Palazón, J L; Hernández, G; Lira, C; Baeza, J Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Resource-monopolization theory predicts the adoption of a solitary habit in species using scarce, discrete, and small refuges. Life-history theory suggests that temporarily stable parental dwellings favor extended parental care in species that brood embryos. We tested these two predictions with the symbiotic crab Tunicotheres moseri. This species exhibits abbreviated development and inhabits the atrial chamber of the scarce, structurally simple, long-lived, and relatively small ascidian Phalusia nigra in the Caribbean. These host characteristics should favor a solitary habit and extended parental care (EPC) in T. moseri. As predicted, males and females of T. moseri inhabited ascidians solitarily with greater frequency than expected by chance alone. The male-female association pattern and reverse sexual dimorphism (males < females) additionally suggests a promiscuous "pure-search" mating system in T. moseri. Also in agreement with theoretical considerations, T. moseri displays EPC; in addition to embryos, females naturally retain larval stages, megalopae, and juveniles within their brooding pouches. This is the first record of EPC in a symbiotic crab and the second confirmed record of EPC in a marine brachyuran crab. This study supports predictions central to resource-monopolization and life-history theories.

  3. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  4. Improved solar heating systems

    DOEpatents

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  5. SS 383: A NEW S-TYPE YELLOW SYMBIOTIC STAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Baella, N. O.; Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    Symbiotic stars are key objects in understanding the formation and evolution of interacting binary systems, and are probably the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. However, the number of known symbiotic stars is much lower than predicted. We aim to search for new symbiotic stars, with particular emphasis on the S-type yellow symbiotic stars, in order to determine their total population, evolutionary timescales, and physical properties. The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) color-color diagram has been previously used to identify new symbiotic star candidates and show that yellow symbiotics are located in a particular region of that diagram. Candidate symbiotic stars are selected on the basis of their locus in the 2MASS (J – H) versus (H – K {sub s}) diagram and the presence of Hα line emission in the Stephenson and Sanduleak Hα survey. This diagram separates S-type yellow symbiotic stars from the rest of the S-type symbiotic stars, allowing us to select candidate yellow symbiotics. To establish the true nature of the candidates, intermediate-resolution spectroscopy is obtained. We have identified the Hα emission line source SS 383 as an S-type yellow symbiotic candidate by its position in the 2MASS color-color diagram. The optical spectrum of SS 383 shows Balmer, He I, He II, and [O III] emission lines, in combination with TiO absorption bands that confirm its symbiotic nature. The derived electron density (≅10{sup 8-9} cm{sup –3}), He I emission line intensity ratios, and position in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ versus [O III] λ4363/Hγ diagram indicate that SS 383 is an S-type symbiotic star, with a probable spectral type of K7-M0 deduced for its cool component based on TiO indices. The spectral type and the position of SS 383 (corrected for reddening) in the 2MASS color-color diagram strongly suggest that SS 383 is an S-type yellow symbiotic. Our result points out that the 2MASS color-color diagram is a powerful tool in

  6. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  7. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  8. Population control in symbiotic corals

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G. ); Dubinsky, Z. ); Muscatine, L. ); McCloskey, L. )

    1993-10-01

    Stability in symbiotic association requires control of population growth between symbionts. The population density of zooxanthellae per unit surface area of most symbiotic corals is remarkably consistant. How is the population density of zooxanthellae maintained and what happens to the symbiotic association if the balance between algae and host is perturbed. The answers to these question, examined in this paper, provide a framework for understanding how the size of the component populations is controlled in symbiotic associations. The topic areas covered include the following: carbon economy in a symbiotic coral; effects of nutrient enrichment; the chemostat model of population control; the effects of exposure to ammonium levels. Ammonium ions and organic materials are the factors which maintain the density of zooxanthellae. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Improving Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has many communications systems which are used throughout a typical mission. Given that the radio spectrum has become increasingly congested, the ability to hear extremely weak signals requires greater receiver sensitivity. Dryden Flight Research Center approached Angle Linear, a manufacturer of linear radio frequency products and peripherals for communications, to solve the problem. The solution was a receiving preamplifier specially crafted for NASA. Communications with the Space Shuttle are now more reliable,with Dryden being able to also support local missions without purchasing additional equipment. The work has carried over into the Mir Space Station communication support effort and is under evaluation by other NASA centers. The company's preamplifier line was greatly expanded to cover a broader range of frequencies, providing the same sensational improvement to other areas of communication including business, government, trucking, land mobile, cellular and broadcast.

  10. BPM System Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.

    1991-04-24

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90 through 1/91 the Accumulator BPM system was investigated in some detail in an effort to improve its reliability and accuracy in making closed orbit measurements. The motivation for this is to try and improve the beam energy resolution for E760. The relativistic {beta} of the {bar p} is given by {beta} = f{sub R}L/c where f{sub R} is the revolution frequency, L is the orbit length ({approx} 474050mm), and c is the speed of light. Hence, the error in {beta} is given by d{beta}/{beta} = df{sub R}/f{sub R} + dL/L. Since df{sub R}/f{sub R} is {approx} 2 x 10{sup -7}, the main contribution to the error comes from dL. During the E760 run of 5/90 to 9/90 dL was estimated to be {approx} 1mm. It is thought that this can be reduced to {approx} .25mm with proper use of the present BPM system. L is given by L = L{sub 0} + {delta}L where L{sub 0} is the accurately known orbit length of a reference orbit (extracted from an energy scan of the J/{Psi} or {Psi}{prime}), and {delta}L is the difference orbit between the current orbit and the reference orbit. SL is calculated in the 1st approximation by {delta}L = {Sigma}{sub i}C{sub i}{Sigma}{sub j}{Delta}BPM{sub ij} where {Delta}BPM{sub ij} is the horizontal difference orbit at the ith BPM in the jth sector and C{sub i} are constants depending upon the location of the BPM pickup and the strength of the quadrupoles. Table I lists the constants C{sub i}, and Fig. 1 shows a typical difference orbit, {Delta}BPM{sub ij}. These studies were all done with 'reverse protons' and concentrated on closed orbit measurements with the Accumulator horizontal BPMs. The low frequency (H=2) mode of the BPM system is used in all cases, therefore it is required that the beam be bunched with ARF3 at some level. The low frequency RF module in the BPM system had previously been modified to track the H=2 frequency.

  11. Unconscious symbiotic fantasy: a ubiquitous therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Silverman, L H

    Evidence is presented that supports the proposition that the deliberate or inadvertent activation of unconscious fantasies of symbiotic gratification can have an ameliorative effect on psychopathology of various kinds. The evidence includes (1) clinically based reports scattered in the psychoanalytic literature on the role of symbiotic gratification in everyday living, in nonanalytic therapies viewed as effecting transference improvements, in meditation, in group activity therapies, and in psychoanalytic treatment, and (2) data from a large number of laboratory experiments coonducted with double-blind procedures and other stringent investigatory controls. In addition to providing powerful support for the clinically derived proposition, the laboratory results allow for extending that proposition and for a more precise delineation of the fantasy that produces symptom amelioration, which when expressed in its verbal form, is most often conveyed by the words Mommy and I are one.

  12. Stress as a Normal Cue in the Symbiotic Environment.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Julia A; Ruby, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    All multicellular hosts form associations with groups of microorganisms. These microbial communities can be taxonomically diverse and dynamic, and their persistence is due to robust, and sometimes coevolved, host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. Chemical and physical sources of stress are prominently situated in this molecular exchange, as cues for cellular responses in symbiotic microbes. Stress in the symbiotic environment may arise from three sources: host tissues, microbe-induced immune responses, or other microbes in the host environment. The responses of microbes to these stresses can be general or highly specialized, and collectively may contribute to the stability of the symbiotic system. In this review, we highlight recent work that emphasizes the role of stress as a cue in the symbiotic environment of plants and animals. PMID:27004825

  13. DT2008: A Promising New Genetic Resource for Improved Drought Tolerance in Soybean When Solely Dependent on Symbiotic N2 Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Sulieman, Saad; Ha, Chien Van; Nasr Esfahani, Maryam; Watanabe, Yasuko; Nishiyama, Rie; Pham, Chung Thi Bao; Nguyen, Dong Van; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Water deficit is one of the major constraints for soybean production in Vietnam. The soybean breeding research efforts conducted at the Agriculture Genetics Institute (AGI) of Vietnam resulted in the development of promising soybean genotypes, suitable for the drought-stressed areas in Vietnam and other countries. Such a variety, namely, DT2008, was recommended by AGI and widely used throughout the country. The aim of this work was to assess the growth of shoots, roots, and nodules of DT2008 versus Williams 82 (W82) in response to drought and subsequent rehydration in symbiotic association as a means to provide genetic resources for genomic research. Better shoot, root, and nodule growth and development were observed in the cultivar DT2008 under sufficient, water deficit, and recovery conditions. Our results represent a good foundation for further comparison of DT2008 and W82 at molecular levels using high throughput omic technologies, which will provide huge amounts of data, enabling us to understand the genetic network involved in regulation of soybean responses to water deficit and increasing the chances of developing drought-tolerant cultivars. PMID:25685802

  14. Fire alarm system improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.G.

    1994-10-01

    This document contains the Fire Alarm System Test Procedure for Building 234-5Z, 200-West Area on the Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door by Pass Switches.

  15. Improved cryogenic refrigeration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Two-position shuttle valve simplifies valving arrangement and crank-shaft configuration in gas-balancing and Stirling-cycle refrigeration systems used to produce temperatures below 173 degrees K. It connects the displacer and regenerator alternately to the supply line or the return line of the compressor, and establishes constant pressure on the drive piston.

  16. [Construction of high-effective symbiotic bacteria: evolutionary models and genetic approaches].

    PubMed

    Provorov, N A; Onishchuk, O P; Iurgel', S N; Kurchak, O N; Chizhevskaia, E P; Vorob'ev, N I; Zatovskaia, T V; Simarov, B V

    2014-11-01

    Using the example of N2-fixing legume-rhizobial symbiosis, we demonstrated that the origin and evolution of bacteria symbiotic for plants involve the following: 1) the formation of novel sym gene systems based on reorganizations of the bacterial genomes and on the gene transfer from the distant organisms; 2) the loss of genes encoding for functions that are required for autonomous performance but interfere with symbiotic functions (negative regulators of symbiosis). Therefore, the construction of effective rhizobia strains should involve improvement of sym genes activities (for instance, nif, fix, and dct genes, encoding for nitrogenase synthesis or for the energy supply of N2 fixation), as well as the inactivation of negative regulators of symbiosis identified in our lab (eff genes encoding for the transport of sugars, and the production of polysaccharides, and storage compounds, as well as for oxidative-reductive processes).

  17. 3D Models of Symbiotic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Booth, R.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Maercker, M.

    2015-12-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, mass-losing giant and an accreting, compact companion. We present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of two such interacting binaries, RS Oph and Mira AB. RS Oph is also a recurrent nova system, thus we model multiple quiescent mass transfer-nova outburst cycles. The resulting circumstellar structures of both systems are highly complex with the formation of spirals, arcs, shells, equatorial and bipolar outflows. We compare the models to recent observations and discuss the implications of our results for related systems, e.g., bipolar nebulae and jets, chemically peculiar stars, and the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae.

  18. Spectral and timing nature of the symbiotic X-ray binary 4U 1954+319: The slowest rotating neutron star in an X-ray binary system

    SciTech Connect

    Enoto, Teruaki; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-10

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ∼5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (∼7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (∼60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (≳ 10{sup 12} G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10{sup 33}-10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ∼10{sup 13} G NS, this scheme can explain the ∼5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (∼10{sup 16} G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (∼50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ∼10{sup 13} G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  19. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in AN X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'Ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its approx. 5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (is approx. 7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-K alpha line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (approx. 60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (approx. greater than 10(exp12) G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (10(exp33)-10(exp35) erg s(exp-1)), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a approx. 10(exp13) G NS, this scheme can explain the approx. 5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (approx. 10(exp16) G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (approx. 50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfv´en shell for a approx. 10(exp13) G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  20. Spectral and Timing Nature of the Symbiotic X-Ray Binary 4U 1954+319: The Slowest Rotating Neutron Star in an X-Ray Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoto, Teruaki; Sasano, Makoto; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Makishima, Kazuo; Pottschmidt, Katja; Marcu, Diana; Corbet, Robin H. D.; Fuerst, Felix; Wilms, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The symbiotic X-ray binary (SyXB) 4U 1954+319 is a rare system hosting a peculiar neutron star (NS) and an M-type optical companion. Its ~5.4 hr NS spin period is the longest among all known accretion-powered pulsars and exhibited large (~7%) fluctuations over 8 yr. A spin trend transition was detected with Swift/BAT around an X-ray brightening in 2012. The source was in quiescent and bright states before and after this outburst based on 60 ks Suzaku observations in 2011 and 2012. The observed continuum is well described by a Comptonized model with the addition of a narrow 6.4 keV Fe-Kα line during the outburst. Spectral similarities to slowly rotating pulsars in high-mass X-ray binaries, its high pulsed fraction (~60%-80%), and the location in the Corbet diagram favor high B-field (gsim 1012 G) over a weak field as in low-mass X-ray binaries. The observed low X-ray luminosity (1033-1035 erg s-1), probable wide orbit, and a slow stellar wind of this SyXB make quasi-spherical accretion in the subsonic settling regime a plausible model. Assuming a ~1013 G NS, this scheme can explain the ~5.4 hr equilibrium rotation without employing the magnetar-like field (~1016 G) required in the disk accretion case. The timescales of multiple irregular flares (~50 s) can also be attributed to the free-fall time from the Alfvén shell for a ~1013 G field. A physical interpretation of SyXBs beyond the canonical binary classifications is discussed.

  1. Design and Numerical Simulation of a Symbiotic Thermoelectric Power Generation System Fed by a Low-Grade Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Amir Yadollah; Singh, Randeep; Mochizuki, Masataka; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2014-06-01

    All liquid heating systems, including solar thermal collectors and fossil-fueled heaters, are designed to convert low-temperature liquid to high-temperature liquid. In the presence of low- and high-temperature fluids, temperature differences can be created across thermoelectric devices to produce electricity so that the heat dissipated from the hot side of a thermoelectric device will be absorbed by the cold liquid and this preheated liquid enters the heating cycle and increases the efficiency of the heater. Consequently, because of the avoidance of waste heat on the thermoelectric hot side, the efficiency of heat-to-electricity conversion with this configuration is better than that of conventional thermoelectric power generation systems. This research aims to design and analyze a thermoelectric power generation system based on the concept described above and using a low-grade heat source. This system may be used to generate electricity either in direct conjunction with any renewable energy source which produces hot water (solar thermal collectors) or using waste hot water from industry. The concept of this system is designated "ELEGANT," an acronym from "Efficient Liquid-based Electricity Generation Apparatus iNside Thermoelectrics." The first design of ELEGANT comprised three rectangular aluminum channels, used to conduct warm and cold fluids over the surfaces of several commercially available thermoelectric generator (TEG) modules sandwiched between the channels. In this study, an ELEGANT with 24 TEG modules, referred to as ELEGANT-24, has been designed. Twenty-four modules was the best match to the specific geometry of the proposed ELEGANT. The thermoelectric modules in ELEGANT-24 were electrically connected in series, and the maximum output power was modeled. A numerical model has been developed, which provides steady-state forecasts of the electrical output of ELEGANT-24 for different inlet fluid temperatures.

  2. Improving an Imperfect Metric System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, E. Lewis

    1974-01-01

    Suggests some improvements and additional units necessary for the International Metric System to expand its use to all measureable entities and defined quantities, especially in the measurement of time and angles. Included are tables of proposed unit systems in contrast with the presently available systems. (CC)

  3. The Effect of Symbiotic Ant Colonies on Plant Growth: A Test Using an Azteca-Cecropia System

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Karla N.; Coley, Phyllis D.; Kursar, Thomas A.; Kaminski, Lucas A.; Moreira, Marcelo Z.; Campos, Ricardo I.

    2015-01-01

    In studies of ant-plant mutualisms, the role that ants play in increasing the growth rates of their plant partners is potentially a key beneficial service. In the field, we measured the growth of Cecropia glaziovii saplings and compared individuals that were naturally colonized by Azteca muelleri ants with uncolonized plants in different seasons (wet and dry). We also measured light availability as well as attributes that could be influenced by the presence of Azteca colonies, such as herbivory, leaf nutrients (total nitrogen and δ15N), and investments in defense (total phenolics and leaf mass per area). We found that colonized plants grew faster than uncolonized plants and experienced a lower level of herbivory in both the wet and dry seasons. Colonized plants had higher nitrogen content than uncolonized plants, although the δ15N, light environment, total phenolics and leaf mass per area, did not differ between colonized and uncolonized plants. Since colonized and uncolonized plants did not differ in the direct defenses that we evaluated, yet herbivory was lower in colonized plants, we conclude that biotic defenses were the most effective protection against herbivores in our system. This result supports the hypothesis that protection provided by ants is an important factor promoting plant growth. Since C. glaziovii is widely distributed among a variety of forests and ecotones, and since we demonstrated a strong relationship with their ant partners, this system can be useful for comparative studies of ant-plant interactions in different habitats. Also, given this study was carried out near the transition to the subtropics, these results help generalize the geographic distribution of this mutualism and may shed light on the persistence of the interactions in the face of climate change. PMID:25811369

  4. The effect of symbiotic ant colonies on plant growth: a test using an Azteca-Cecropia system.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Karla N; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A; Kaminski, Lucas A; Moreira, Marcelo Z; Campos, Ricardo I

    2015-01-01

    In studies of ant-plant mutualisms, the role that ants play in increasing the growth rates of their plant partners is potentially a key beneficial service. In the field, we measured the growth of Cecropia glaziovii saplings and compared individuals that were naturally colonized by Azteca muelleri ants with uncolonized plants in different seasons (wet and dry). We also measured light availability as well as attributes that could be influenced by the presence of Azteca colonies, such as herbivory, leaf nutrients (total nitrogen and δ(15)N), and investments in defense (total phenolics and leaf mass per area). We found that colonized plants grew faster than uncolonized plants and experienced a lower level of herbivory in both the wet and dry seasons. Colonized plants had higher nitrogen content than uncolonized plants, although the δ(15)N, light environment, total phenolics and leaf mass per area, did not differ between colonized and uncolonized plants. Since colonized and uncolonized plants did not differ in the direct defenses that we evaluated, yet herbivory was lower in colonized plants, we conclude that biotic defenses were the most effective protection against herbivores in our system. This result supports the hypothesis that protection provided by ants is an important factor promoting plant growth. Since C. glaziovii is widely distributed among a variety of forests and ecotones, and since we demonstrated a strong relationship with their ant partners, this system can be useful for comparative studies of ant-plant interactions in different habitats. Also, given this study was carried out near the transition to the subtropics, these results help generalize the geographic distribution of this mutualism and may shed light on the persistence of the interactions in the face of climate change. PMID:25811369

  5. Spatial Genetic Structure of a Symbiotic Beetle-Fungal System: Toward Multi-Taxa Integrated Landscape Genetics

    PubMed Central

    James, Patrick M. A.; Coltman, Dave W.; Murray, Brent W.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Sperling, Felix A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of genetic variation in interacting species can identify shared features that are important to gene flow and can elucidate co-evolutionary relationships. We assessed concordance in spatial genetic variation between the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and one of its fungal symbionts, Grosmanniaclavigera, in western Canada using neutral genetic markers. We examined how spatial heterogeneity affects genetic variation within beetles and fungi and developed a novel integrated landscape genetics approach to assess reciprocal genetic influences between species using constrained ordination. We also compared landscape genetic models built using Euclidean distances based on allele frequencies to traditional pair-wise Fst. Both beetles and fungi exhibited moderate levels of genetic structure over the total study area, low levels of structure in the south, and more pronounced fungal structure in the north. Beetle genetic variation was associated with geographic location while that of the fungus was not. Pinevolume and climate explained beetle genetic variation in the northern region of recent outbreak expansion. Reciprocal genetic relationships were only detectedin the south where there has been alonger history of beetle infestations. The Euclidean distance and Fst-based analyses resulted in similar models in the north and over the entire study area, but differences between methods in the south suggest that genetic distances measures should be selected based on ecological and evolutionary contexts. The integrated landscape genetics framework we present is powerful, general, and can be applied to other systems to quantify the biotic and abiotic determinants of spatial genetic variation within and among taxa. PMID:21991309

  6. Carbon budgets in symbiotic associations

    SciTech Connect

    Muscatine, L.; Falkowski, P.G.; Dubinsky, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are described which permit the estimation of daily budgets for photosynthetically fixed carbon in any alga-invertebrate symbiosis. Included is a method for estimating total daily translocation which does not involve the use of C-14. A daily carbon budget for a shallow water symbiotic reef coral is presented.

  7. Discussion on selected symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viotti, Roberto; Hack, Margherita

    1993-01-01

    Because of its large variety of aspects, the symbiotic phenomenon is not very suitable for a statistical treatment. It is also not clear whether symbiotic stars really represent a homogeneous group of astrophysical objects or a collection of objects of different natures but showing similar phenomena. However we are especially interested in the symbiotic phenomenon, i.e., in those physical processes occurring in the atmosphere of each individual object and in their time dependence. Such a research can be performed through the detailed analysis of individual objects. This study should be done for a time long enough to cover all the different phases of their activity, in all the spectral ranges. Since the typical time scale of the symbiotic phenomena is up to several years and decades, this represents a problem since, for instance, making astronomy outside the visual region is a quite new field of research. It was a fortunate case that a few symbiotic stars (Z And, AG Dra, CH Cyg, AX Per, and PU Vul) had undergone remarkable light variations (or 'outbursts') in recent years, which could have been followed in the space ultraviolet with IUE, and simultaneously in the optical and IR with ground-based telescopes. But, in general, the time coverage of most of the symbiotic objects is too short to have a complete picture of their behavior. In this regard, one should recall Mayall's remark about the light curve of Z And: 'Z Andromedae is another variable that shows it will require several hundred years of observations before a good analysis can be made of its variations'. This pessimistic remark should be considered as a note of caution for those involved in the interpretation of the observations. We shall discuss a number of individual symbiotic stars for which the amount of observational data is large enough to draw a rather complete picture of their general behavior and to make consistent models. We shall especially illustrate the necessary steps toward an empirical model

  8. [Significance of hydrobiont persistent properties for symbiotic interactions].

    PubMed

    Nemtseva, N V

    2012-01-01

    Significance of symbiotic relations formed by associative symbiosis type for autochthonous and allochthonous microflora of natural water bodies is shown. Generality of symbiotic interaction mechanisms of symbionts in limnetic and halophilous communities provided by secreted factors of natural resistance from the side of the host, and by factors of persistence from the side of symbionts is proven based on a set of examples. Features of operation of lysozyme-antilysozyme, histon-antihiston, hydrogen peroxide-catalase functional systems in symbiotic interactions of autotrophic and heterotrophic components of hydrobiocenosis with dominant and associative microflora are presented. Associative microflora of allochthonous origin was shown to actively use the ecologically formed system of interaction between hydrobionts that facilitates survival of these microorganisms and preservation of their persistent potential, and as a result leads to biocenosis disorders. The knowledge obtained open new possibilities and perspectives of research of sanitary and ecological aspects of vital activity of aquatic biocenoses. PMID:22937711

  9. Improved integrated sniper location system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figler, Burton D.; Spera, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    In July of 1995, Lockheed Martin IR Imaging Systems, of Lexington, Massachusetts began the development of an integrated sniper location system for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and for the Department of the Navy's Naval Command Control & Ocean Surveillance Center, RDTE Division in San Diego, California. The I-SLS integrates acoustic and uncooled infrared sensing technologies to provide an affordable and highly effective sniper detection and location capability. This system, its performance and results from field tests at Camp Pendleton, California, in October 1996 were described in a paper presented at the November 1996 SPIE Photonics East Symposium1 on Enabling Technologies for Law Enforcement and Security. The I-SLS combines an acoustic warning system with an uncooled infrared warning system. The acoustic warning system has been developed by SenTech, Inc., of Lexington, Massachusetts. This acoustic warning system provides sniper detection and coarse location information based upon the muzzle blast of the sniper's weapon and/or upon the shock wave produced by the sniper's bullet, if the bullet is supersonic. The uncooled infrared warning system provides sniper detection and fine location information based upon the weapon's muzzle flash. In addition, the uncooled infrared warning system can provide thermal imagery that can be used to accurately locate and identify the sniper. Combining these two technologies improves detection probability, reduces false alarm rate and increases utility. In the two years since the last report of the integrated sniper location system, improvements have been made and a second field demonstration was planned. In this paper, we describe the integrated sniper location system modifications in preparation for the new field demonstration. In addition, fundamental improvements in the uncooled infrared sensor technology continue to be made. These improvements include higher sensitivity (lower minimum resolvable temperature

  10. Outbursts In Symbiotic Binaries (FUSE 2000)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    with line variations - will yield physical parameters for the expanding shell of gas in the outer atmosphere of the hot component. We also worked on several diagnostic tools, including upgrades to photoionization programs developed by the PI and others. We plan to use these tools to derive electron densities and temperatures front intercombination and forbidden lines observed on optical and FUSE spectra. Preliminary results indicate a large electron density, n(sub e) is greater than or = 10(exp 10)/cc and a modest electron temperature, T(sub e) approx. 20,000 K. We see no evidence for shocked gas as observed in some other symbiotics. However, we have yet to include several important lines of [Fe VII] and [Ne V] in the analysis. Inclusion of these lines will yield an improved estimate of the electron temperature in the gas. Finally, we have one additional FUSE spectrum planned for acquisition during this cycle. These data will provide important information concerning the state of the system farther along in its decline. Once we have this spectrum in hand, we plan to complete our analysis and publish our results.

  11. Improvements to zero discharge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wyk, J.E.; Hall, R.

    1995-10-01

    Zero liquid discharge systems are favored by state regulatory agencies. The major reasons are: (1) the licensing is rather straight-forward and less time consuming, and (2) the minimization and/or total elimination of pollutants to both the receiving steam and air is a positive environmental step. Waste water minimization and zero liquid discharge options have been discussed in other papers. To achieve a zero liquid discharge, the treatment of a liquid brine stream by evaporation, crystallization, dewatering, and decanting of crystallized solids becomes necessary. These unit operations are well-known and constitute a conventional zero liquid discharge system. For the authors purposes they will identify it as CZD. Another method of zero liquid discharge is a somewhat different concept that is a patented system of staged evaporation. This system has also been discussed and is known in the industry. This paper presents improvements to the staged evaporation system which utilizes all of the benefits of the staged evaporation system while incorporating features which address issues such as air quality, integration into the main power plant, and disposal of the solid material in an acceptable environmental form. This system will be referred to as IZD (Improved Zero Discharge). The improvements to the system will not only take advantage of the lower capital and operating costs inherent in the system, but provide the advantages as stated above.

  12. Formation of broad Balmer wings in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seok-Jun; Heo, Jeong-Eun; Hong, Chae-Lin; Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are binary systems composed of a hot white dwarf and a mass losing giant. In addition to many prominent emission lines symbiotic stars exhibit Raman scattered O VI features at 6825 and 7088 Å. Another notable feature present in the spectra of many symbiotics is the broad wings around Balmer lines. Astrophysical mechanisms that can produce broad wings include Thomson scattering by free electrons and Raman scattering of Ly,β and higher series by neutral hydrogen. In this poster presentation we produce broad wings around Hα and H,β adopting a Monte Carlo techinique in order to make a quantitative comparison of these two mechanisms. Thomson wings are characterized by the exponential cutoff given by the termal width whereas the Raman wings are dependent on the column density and continuum shape in the far UV region. A brief discussion is provided.

  13. Innate immunity underlies symbiotic relationships.

    PubMed

    Kisseleva, E P

    2014-12-01

    Here, the modern data regarding interactions between normal microbiota and barrier tissues in plants, humans and animals are reviewed. The main homeostatic mechanisms responsible for interactions between epithelium and innate immune cells with symbiotic bacteria are described. A key step in this process is recognition of soluble microbial products by ligation to pattern-recognition receptors expressed on the host cells. As a result, epithelial cells secrete mucus, antibacterial peptides and immunoregulatory molecules. The main outcomes from immunological reactions towards symbiotic bacteria involve development of conditions for formation and maintenance of microbial biocenosis as well as providing safety for the host. Also, it is considered important to preserve and transfer beneficial bacteria to progeny.

  14. Innate immunity underlies symbiotic relationships.

    PubMed

    Kisseleva, E P

    2014-12-01

    Here, the modern data regarding interactions between normal microbiota and barrier tissues in plants, humans and animals are reviewed. The main homeostatic mechanisms responsible for interactions between epithelium and innate immune cells with symbiotic bacteria are described. A key step in this process is recognition of soluble microbial products by ligation to pattern-recognition receptors expressed on the host cells. As a result, epithelial cells secrete mucus, antibacterial peptides and immunoregulatory molecules. The main outcomes from immunological reactions towards symbiotic bacteria involve development of conditions for formation and maintenance of microbial biocenosis as well as providing safety for the host. Also, it is considered important to preserve and transfer beneficial bacteria to progeny. PMID:25716721

  15. Leading System-Wide Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Alma

    2012-01-01

    Around the world there is a preoccupation with improving the performance of schools and school systems. Comparisons made between countries through PISA and PERLs have led to a preoccupation, and in some cases, an obsession, with securing a high position in the international league tables. The minds of policy-makers and politicians alike are…

  16. Ozone measurement systems improvements studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. W.; Guard, K.; Holland, A. C.; Spurling, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Results are summarized of an initial study of techniques for measuring atmospheric ozone, carried out as the first phase of a program to improve ozone measurement techniques. The study concentrated on two measurement systems, the electro chemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde and the Dobson ozone spectrophotometer, and consisted of two tasks. The first task consisted of error modeling and system error analysis of the two measurement systems. Under the second task a Monte-Carlo model of the Dobson ozone measurement technique was developed and programmed for computer operation.

  17. Improved Verification for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Aerospace systems are subject to many stringent performance requirements to be verified with low risk. This report investigates verification planning using conditional approaches vice the standard classical statistical methods, and usage of historical surrogate data for requirement validation and in verification planning. The example used in this report to illustrate the results of these investigations is a proposed mission assurance requirement with the concomitant maximum acceptable verification risk for the NASA Constellation Program Orion Launch Abort System (LAS). This report demonstrates the following improvements: 1) verification planning using conditional approaches vice classical statistical methods results in plans that are more achievable and feasible; 2) historical surrogate data can be used to bound validation of performance requirements; and, 3) incorporation of historical surrogate data in verification planning using conditional approaches produces even less costly and more reasonable verification plans. The procedures presented in this report may produce similar improvements and cost savings in verification for any stringent performance requirement for an aerospace system.

  18. Monogamy in a Hyper-Symbiotic Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Baeza, J Antonio; Simpson, Lunden; Ambrosio, Louis J; Guéron, Rodrigo; Mora, Nathalia

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in resource-specialist symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in Pontonia manningi, a hyper-symbiotic shrimp that dwells in the mantle cavity of the Atlantic winged oyster Pteria colymbus that, in turn, infects gorgonians from the genus Pseudopterogorgia in the Caribbean Sea. In agreement with theory, P. manningi were found dwelling as heterosexual pairs in oysters more frequently than expected by chance alone. Males and females also inhabited the same host individual independent of the female gravid condition or of the developmental stage of brooded embryos. While the observations above argue in favor of monogamy in P. manningi, there is evidence to suggest that males of the studied species are moderately promiscuous. That females found living solitary in oysters most often brooded embryos, and that males allocated more to weaponry (major claw size) than females at any given size suggest that males might be roaming among host individuals in search of and, fighting for, receptive females. All available information depicts a rather complex mating system in P. manningi: primarily monogamous but with moderately promiscuous males. PMID:26934109

  19. Monogamy in a Hyper-Symbiotic Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, J. Antonio; Simpson, Lunden; Ambrosio, Louis J.; Guéron, Rodrigo; Mora, Nathalia

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in resource-specialist symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in Pontonia manningi, a hyper-symbiotic shrimp that dwells in the mantle cavity of the Atlantic winged oyster Pteria colymbus that, in turn, infects gorgonians from the genus Pseudopterogorgia in the Caribbean Sea. In agreement with theory, P. manningi were found dwelling as heterosexual pairs in oysters more frequently than expected by chance alone. Males and females also inhabited the same host individual independent of the female gravid condition or of the developmental stage of brooded embryos. While the observations above argue in favor of monogamy in P. manningi, there is evidence to suggest that males of the studied species are moderately promiscuous. That females found living solitary in oysters most often brooded embryos, and that males allocated more to weaponry (major claw size) than females at any given size suggest that males might be roaming among host individuals in search of and, fighting for, receptive females. All available information depicts a rather complex mating system in P. manningi: primarily monogamous but with moderately promiscuous males. PMID:26934109

  20. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  1. [Bioengineering of symbiotic systems: creation of new associative symbiosis with the use of lectins on the example of tobacco and colza].

    PubMed

    Vershinina, Z P; Baĭmiev, An Kh; Blagova, D K; Kniazev, A V; Baĭmiev, Al Kh; Chemeris, A V

    2011-01-01

    "Barbate roots" in tobacco and colza transgenic on lectin gene were obtained with the use of a wild strain of Agrobacterium rhizogenes 15834 transformed with pCAMBIA1305.1 plasmid containing the full-size lectin gene (psl) from the Pisum sativum. Influence of expression oflectin gene on colonization oftransgenic roots with symbiont of pea (Rhizobium leguminosarum) was investigated. The number of adhered bacteria onto the roots transformed with lectin gene was 14-fold and 37-fold higher in comparison with the control; this confirms the interaction of R. leguminosarum with pea lectin at the surface of the transformed roots of tobacco and colza. The developed experimental approach, based on the simulation of recognition processes and early symbiotic interactions with lectins of pea plants, may, in perspective, be used for obtaining stable associations of economically valuable, nonsymbiotrophic plant species with rhizobia.

  2. Discovery of true, likely and possible symbiotic stars in the dwarf spheroidal NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; de la Rosa, Ignacio G.; Akras, Stavros

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the photometric and spectroscopic observations of newly discovered (symbiotic) systems in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy NGC 205. The Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on-off band [O III] 5007 Å emission imaging highlighted several [O III] line emitters, for which optical spectra were then obtained. The detailed study of the spectra of three objects allows us to identify them as true, likely and possible symbiotic systems (SySts), the first ones discovered in this galaxy. SySt-1 is unambiguously classified as a symbiotic star, because of the presence of unique emission lines which belong only to symbiotic spectra, the well-known O VI Raman-scattered lines. SySt-2 is only possibly a SySt because the Ne VII Raman-scattered line at 4881 Å, recently identified in a well-studied Galactic symbiotic as another very conspicuous property of symbiotic, could as well be identified as N III or [Fe III]. Finally, SySt-3 is likely a symbiotic binary because in the red part of the spectrum it shows the continuum of a late giant, and forbidden lines of moderate to high ionization, like [Fe V] 4180 Å. The main source for scepticism on the symbiotic nature of the latter systems is their location in the planetary nebula region in the [O III]4363/Hγ versus [O III]5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram. It is worth mentioning that at least another two confirmed symbiotics, one of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal IC 10 and the other of the Galaxy, are also misplaced in this diagram.

  3. Diversification of the microtubule system in the early stage of eukaryote evolution: elongation factor 1 alpha and alpha-tubulin protein phylogeny of termite symbiotic oxymonad and hypermastigote protists.

    PubMed

    Moriya, S; Tanaka, K; Ohkuma, M; Sugano, S; Kudo, T

    2001-01-01

    The symbiotic protists of the lower termite have been regarded as a model of early-branched eukaryotes because of their simple cellular systems and morphological features. However, cultivation of these symbiotic protists is very difficult. For this reason, these interesting protists have not been well characterized in terms of their molecular biology. In research on these organisms which have not yet been cultivated, we developed a method for retrieving specific genes from a small number of cells, through micromanipulation without axenic cultivation, and we obtained EF-1 alpha and alpha-tubulin genes from members of the Hypermastigida--the parabasalid protist Trichonympha agilis and the oxymonad protists Pyrsonympha grandis and Dinenympha exilis--from the termite Reticulitermes speratus gut community. Results of phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of both proteins, EF-1 alpha and alpha-tubulin, indicate that the hypermastigid, parabasalid, and oxymonad protists do not share a close common ancestor. In addition, although the EF-1 alpha phylogeny indicates that these two groups of protists branched at an early stage of eukaryotic evolution, the alpha-tubulin phylogeny indicates that these protists can be assigned to two diversified clades. As shown in a recent investigation of alpha-tubulin phylogeny, eukaryotic organisms can be divided into three classes: an animal--parabasalids clade, a plant--protists clade, and the diplomonads. In this study, we show that parabasalids, including hypermastigids, can be classified as belonging to the animal--parabasalids clade and the early-branching eukaryote oxymonads can be classified as belonging to the plant--protists clade. Our findings suggest that these protists have a cellular microtubule system that has diverged considerably, and it seems that such divergence of the microtubule system occurred in the earliest stage of eukaryotic evolution.

  4. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  5. An improved criticality alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Tyree, W.H.; Gilpin, H.E.; Balmer, D.K.; Vennitti, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado is the primary facility for the production of plutonium components used in the US arsenal of nuclear weapons. It is operated by EG&G under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE). There are ten production buildings on plant site with neutron based criticality alarm systems. These systems have been in operation for the past seventeen years. Changes in the interpretation of A.N.S.I. standards and DOE orders have precipitated an evaluation of detector sensitivity and placement criteria. As a result of this evaluation, improvements in detector design and calibration have improved detector sensitivity by a factor of six. Testing performed on the design defined a minimum sensitivity as required by A.N.S.I. 8.3 and provided information for saturation and survivability for a fission event of up to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} fissions in 80 microseconds. A rigorous testing and calibration program has been developed and is in place. Neutron sensitivity is certified at a nearby reactor which is traceable to N.I.S.T.. 4 refs.

  6. Characteristics of the hot components of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Mari

    2010-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries whose components are a red giant and a small hot star, usually a white dwarf. The intensive stellar wind from the giant is captured by the companion, giving rise to strong emission lines in the spectra and a range of phenomena, which may include the formation of an accretion disk and the ejection of collimated jets. In this thesis, four symbiotic stars, as different as possible, were chosen for a spectral investigation of the symbiotic phenomenon. Of those, Z Andromedae is a so-called classical symbiotic star with a hot companion that shows a characteristic pattern of brightenings (outbursts). AG Draconis is a bright system like Z Andromedae and shows similar activity, but has an unusually hot yellow donor star. CH Cygni and EG Andromedae have, on the contrary, relatively dim white dwarfs. The former shows irregular outbursts, the origin of which is not easy to explain, the latter is one of the quiet symbiotic stars with no outburst yet recorded. Each of those four stars was observed for at least ten years with the 1.5-m telescope at Tartu Observatory. Several outbursts of Z Andromedae and AG Draconis were witnessed, as well as substantial changes in the CH Cygni spectra. The perhaps most surprising result was the discovery of collimated jets in Z Andromedae spectra on two instances, an event never observed in this star before. In CH Cygni, evidence for the existence of an accretion disk in 1998 was discovered. EG Andromedae stayed quiet and the only changes in its spectra could be ascribed to orbital motion. We found that not all the outbursts of Z Andromedae and AG Draconis are accompanied by similar changes in the spectra: during some brightenings the stars become hotter, during some, cooler. The existence of the disk in CH Cygni in 1998 affirms that the formation of such a structure is possible in symbiotic stars. Moreover, as the ejection of jets is associated to an accretion disk, the jets in Z Andromedae can also be

  7. A Remarkable Sample of New Symbiotic Stars Towards the Galactic Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, B.; Mikolajewska, J.; Udalski, A.

    2014-12-01

    Symbiotic stars are the longest orbital period interacting binaries, where nova-like outbursts are generated by the accretion of a high mass loss rate red giant wind onto a white dwarf companion. Long-term photometric monitoring surveys such as OGLE and MACHO are ideal platforms to identify nova-like events in symbiotic stars. However, there are only a handful of known systems within the small footprint of these surveys. We introduce a systematic Hα emission line object survey for new symbiotic stars covering 35 deg2 towards the Galactic Bulge that combines deep 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy with OGLE and MACHO photometry. This powerful combination has uncovered nearly two dozen new symbiotic stars, more than a dozen probable symbiotic stars, and several other unusual Hα emission line stars. While we don't find any nova-like activity, the lightcurves do exhibit semi-regular and Mira pulsations, orbital variations and slower changes due to dust. Here we introduce a few of the new symbiotics, including H1-45, only the fourth known carbon symbiotic Mira. This remarkable discovery may be the first luminous carbon star belonging to the Galactic Bulge, according to its period-luminosity relation distance of 6.2±1.4 kpc, potentially shedding new light on the puzzling lack of luminous carbon stars in the Bulge. We also present two old novae captured in the nebular phase, complementing other surveys to better characterize the old nova population.

  8. The Symbiotic Biofilm of Sinorhizobium fredii SMH12, Necessary for Successful Colonization and Symbiosis of Glycine max cv Osumi, Is Regulated by Quorum Sensing Systems and Inducing Flavonoids via NodD1

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Montaño, Francisco; Jiménez-Guerrero, Irene; Del Cerro, Pablo; Baena-Ropero, Irene; López-Baena, Francisco Javier; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Bellogín, Ramón; Lloret, Javier; Espuny, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial surface components, especially exopolysaccharides, in combination with bacterial Quorum Sensing signals are crucial for the formation of biofilms in most species studied so far. Biofilm formation allows soil bacteria to colonize their surrounding habitat and survive common environmental stresses such as desiccation and nutrient limitation. This mode of life is often essential for survival in bacteria of the genera Mesorhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, and Rhizobium. The role of biofilm formation in symbiosis has been investigated in detail for Sinorhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. However, for S. fredii this process has not been studied. In this work we have demonstrated that biofilm formation is crucial for an optimal root colonization and symbiosis between S. fredii SMH12 and Glycine max cv Osumi. In this bacterium, nod-gene inducing flavonoids and the NodD1 protein are required for the transition of the biofilm structure from monolayer to microcolony. Quorum Sensing systems are also required for the full development of both types of biofilms. In fact, both the nodD1 mutant and the lactonase strain (the lactonase enzyme prevents AHL accumulation) are defective in soybean root colonization. The impairment of the lactonase strain in its colonization ability leads to a decrease in the symbiotic parameters. Interestingly, NodD1 together with flavonoids activates certain quorum sensing systems implicit in the development of the symbiotic biofilm. Thus, S. fredii SMH12 by means of a unique key molecule, the flavonoid, efficiently forms biofilm, colonizes the legume roots and activates the synthesis of Nod factors, required for successfully symbiosis. PMID:25166872

  9. Toward the functional analysis of uncultivable, symbiotic microorganisms in the termite gut.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Yuichi

    2011-04-01

    Termites thrive on dead plant matters with the aid of microorganisms resident in their gut. The gut microbiota comprises protists (single-celled eukaryotes), bacteria, and archaea, most of which are unique to the termite gut ecosystem. Although this symbiosis has long been intriguing researchers of both basic and applied sciences, its detailed mechanism remains unclear due to the enormous complexity and the unculturability of the microbiota. In the effort to overcome the difficulty, recent advances in omics, such as metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics have gradually unveiled the black box of this symbiotic system. Genomics targeting a single species of the unculturable microbial members has also provided a great progress in the understanding of the symbiotic interrelationships among the gut microorganisms. In this review, the symbiotic system organized by wood-feeding termites and their gut microorganisms is outlined, focusing on the recent achievement in omics studies of this multilayered symbiotic system.

  10. IUE observations of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.

    1982-01-01

    The main photometric and spectroscopic characteristics in the ultraviolet and visual range of the most extensively studied symbiotic stars are reviewed. The main data obtained with IUE concern: (1) the determination of the shape of the UV continuum, which, in some cases, proves without doubt the presence of a hot companion; and the determination of the interstellar extinction by means of the lambda 2200 feature; (2) the measurement of emission lines, which enables us to derive the electron temperature and density of the circumstellar envelope, and, taken together with those lines observed in the visual, give more complete information on which spectroscopic mechanisms operate in the envelope; (3) the observation of absorption lines in the UV, which are present in just a few cases.

  11. Circumstellar Dust in Symbiotic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the near-IR photometry, ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code. A compact circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel shows the presence of an equatorially enhanced dust density during minimum obscuration. Obscuration events are explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust. The mass loss rates are significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras but in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.

  12. Release of SR Proteins from CLK1 by SRPK1: A Symbiotic Kinase System for Phosphorylation Control of Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Aubol, Brandon E; Wu, Guowei; Keshwani, Malik M; Movassat, Maliheh; Fattet, Laurent; Hertel, Klemens J; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Adams, Joseph A

    2016-07-21

    Phosphorylation has been generally thought to activate the SR family of splicing factors for efficient splice-site recognition, but this idea is incompatible with an early observation that overexpression of an SR protein kinase, such as the CDC2-like kinase 1 (CLK1), weakens splice-site selection. Here, we report that CLK1 binds SR proteins but lacks the mechanism to release phosphorylated SR proteins, thus functionally inactivating the splicing factors. Interestingly, CLK1 overcomes this dilemma through a symbiotic relationship with the serine-arginine protein kinase 1 (SRPK1). We show that SRPK1 interacts with an RS-like domain in the N terminus of CLK1 to facilitate the release of phosphorylated SR proteins, which then promotes efficient splice-site recognition and subsequent spliceosome assembly. These findings reveal an unprecedented signaling mechanism by which two protein kinases fulfill separate catalytic features that are normally encoded in single kinases to institute phosphorylation control of pre-mRNA splicing in the nucleus. PMID:27397683

  13. ZZ Canis Minoris as a symbiotic star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    The H-aplha and Na I D-line regions of the M6 giant star ZZ Canis Minoris (ZZ CMi) were observed with the Kitt Peak coude feed telescope and a CCD detector. It is shown that ZZ CMi has similar spectroscopic and photoproperties to the symbiotic star EG And. The data are used to argue for the classification of ZZ CMi as a symbiotic star despite its current listing in the General Catalog of Variable Stars (GCVS) as a semi-regular variable. The infrared magnitudes of ZZ CMi and the known symbiotic stars are compared in a table.

  14. TIDALLY ENHANCED STELLAR WIND: A WAY TO MAKE THE SYMBIOTIC CHANNEL TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA VIABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Han, Z.

    2011-07-10

    In the symbiotic (or WD+RG) channel of the single-degenerate scenario for type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the explosions occur a relatively long time after star formation. The birthrate from this channel would be too low to account for all observed SNe Ia were it not for some mechanism to enhance the rate of accretion on to the white dwarf. A tidally enhanced stellar wind, of the type which has been postulated to explain many phenomena related to giant star evolution in binary systems, can do this. Compared to mass stripping, this model extends the space of SNe Ia progenitors to longer orbital periods and hence increases the birthrate to about 0.0069 yr{sup -1} for the symbiotic channel. Two symbiotic stars, T CrB and RS Oph, considered to be the most likely progenitors of SNe Ia through the symbiotic channel, are well inside the period-companion mass space predicted by our models.

  15. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF SYMBIOTIC STARS. IX. D-TYPE SYMBIOTIC NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.; Fekel, Francis C.; Wood, Peter E-mail: joyce@noao.edu E-mail: wood@mso.anu.edu.au

    2013-06-10

    Time-series spectra of the near-infrared 1.6 {mu}m region have been obtained for five of the six known D-type symbiotic novae. The spectra map the pulsation kinematics of the Mira component in the Mira-white dwarf binary system and provide the center-of-mass velocity for the Mira. No orbital motion is detected in agreement with previous estimates of orbital periods {approx}>100 yr and semimajor axes {approx}50 AU. The 1-5 {mu}m spectra of the Miras show line weakening during dust obscuration events. This results from scattering and continuum emission by 1000 K dust. In the heavily obscured HM Sge system the 4.6 {mu}m CO spectrum formed in 1000 K gas is seen in emission against an optically thick dust continuum. Spectral features that are typically produced in either the cool molecular region or the expanding circumstellar region of late-type stars cannot be detected in the D-symbiotic novae. This is in accord with the colliding wind model for interaction between the white dwarf and Mira. Arguments are presented that the 1000 K gas and dust are not Mira circumstellar material but are in the wind interaction region of the colliding winds. CO is the first molecule detected in this region. We suggest that dust condensing in the intershock region is the origin of the dust obscuration. This model explains variations in the obscuration. Toward the highly obscured Mira in HM Sge the dust zone is estimated to be {approx}0.1 AU thick. The intershock wind interaction zone appears thinnest in the most active systems. Drawing on multiple arguments masses are estimated for the system components. The Miras in most D-symbiotic novae have descended from intermediate mass progenitors. The large amount of mass lost from the Mira combined with the massive white dwarf companion suggests that these systems are supernova candidates. However, timescales and the number of objects make these rare events.

  16. The Bright Symbiotic Mira EF Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, Bruce; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Monroe, TalaWanda

    2016-02-01

    An incidental spectrum of the poorly studied long-period variable EF Aquilae shows [O III] emission indicative of a symbiotic star. Strong GALEX detections in the UV reinforce this classification, providing overt evidence for the presence of the hot subluminous companion. Recent compilations of the photometric behavior strongly suggest that the cool component is a Mira variable. Thus EF Aql appears to be a member of the rare symbiotic Mira subgroup.

  17. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  18. Chemical Abundance Analysis of the Symbiotic Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Cezary; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of symbiotic stars - the long period, interacting binary systems - composed of red giant donor and a hot, compact companion is important for our understanding of binary stellar evolution in systems where mass loss or transfer take place involving RGB/AGB stars. The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants can track the mass exchange history and can determine their parent stellar population. However, the number of these objects with fairly well determined photospheric composition is insufficient for statistical considerations. Here we present the detailed chemical abundance analysis obtained for the first time for 14 M-type symbiotic giants. The analysis is based on the high resolution (R ˜ 50000), high S/N ˜ 100, near-IR spectra (at H- and K-band regions) obtained with Phoenix/Gemini South spectrometer. Spectrum synthesis employing standard LTE analysis and atmosphere models was used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis reveals mostly slightly sub-solar or near-solar metallicities. We obtained significantly subsolar metallicities for RW Hya, RT Ser, and Hen 3-1213 and slightly super-solar metallicity in V455 Sco. The very low ^{12}C/^{13}C isotopic ratios, ˜6-11, and significant enrichment in nitrogen ^{14}N isotope in almost all giants in our sample indicate that they have experienced the first dredge-up.

  19. The Frankia alni symbiotic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, Nicole; Queiroux, Clothilde; Fournier, Pascale; Pujic, Petar; Normand, Philippe; Vallenet, David; Médigue, Claudine; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kakoi, Kentaro; Kucho, Ken-ichi

    2010-05-01

    The actinobacteria Frankia spp. are able to induce the formation of nodules on the roots of a large spectrum of actinorhizal plants, where they convert dinitrogen to ammonia in exchange for plant photosynthates. In the present study, transcriptional analyses were performed on nitrogen-replete free-living Frankia alni cells and on Alnus glutinosa nodule bacteria, using whole-genome microarrays. Distribution of nodule-induced genes on the genome was found to be mostly over regions with high synteny between three Frankia spp. genomes, while nodule-repressed genes, which were mostly hypothetical and not conserved, were spread around the genome. Genes known to be related to nitrogen fixation were highly induced, nif (nitrogenase), hup2 (hydrogenase uptake), suf (sulfur-iron cluster), and shc (hopanoids synthesis). The expression of genes involved in ammonium assimilation and transport was strongly modified, suggesting that bacteria ammonium assimilation was limited. Genes involved in particular in transcriptional regulation, signaling processes, protein drug export, protein secretion, lipopolysaccharide, and peptidoglycan biosynthesis that may play a role in symbiosis were also identified. We also showed that this Frankia symbiotic transcriptome was highly similar among phylogenetically distant plant families Betulaceae and Myricaceae. Finally, comparison with rhizobia transcriptome suggested that F. alni is metabolically more active in symbiosis than rhizobia. PMID:20367468

  20. [A psychotic symbiotic child. Clinical and psychopathological study].

    PubMed

    Ledoux, M H

    1993-01-01

    Through the case study of a psychotic girl, we have tried to outline the psychotic mechanisms involved in this mental functioning. Anxieties of an autistic type have been found, as well as anxieties of a more psychotic type (i.e. symbiotic and schizophrenic). Characteristics of this psychotic functioning were: omnipotence, primitive identification mechanisms, fragmenting separation anxiety, search for sameness and for a low of identical repetition, difficulties in accessing to symbolism. Difficulties in defusion from the symbiotic object and the potential role played by this object in the difficulties are noteworthy. But it is not possible to conceptualize them in terms of direct causal relationship, because the object has also a counterphobic function and compensates for the void of subject as well as for the dissolution of the self. Also present is a schizoparanoïd aspect, with a temptation to cuddle inside the object. The sudden breaking through of informations or requirements from reality provokes surprise, panic reactions and retirement from the objectal world. Otherness triggers psychic pain and vacillation of symbiotic bounds. Thus the avoidance of, and retirement from, reality and the recourse to delusional thinking, especially when attempts to controlling with a rigid system are failing and deceiving. Threats of intrusion and loss of control are experienced as a threat of fragmentation and dissolution of the psyche. Far less threatening to the subject's internal balance is the policy of rigidly maintaining sameness and cuddling inside the object. PMID:7689733

  1. Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefanie; Wedin, Mats; Fernandez-Brime, Samantha; Cronholm, Bodil; Westberg, Martin; Weber, Bettina; Grube, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Alphaproteobacteria with a concomitant increase in Betaproteobacteria. Armatimonadia, Spartobacteria and Acidobacteria also decreased during the infection of Cladonia by Diploschistes. The lichens differed in photobiont specificity. C. symphycarpa was associated with the same algal species at all sites, but D. muscorum had a flexible strategy with different photobiont combinations at each site. This symbiotic invasion system suggests that partners can be reorganized in BSC and selected for maintaining potential roles rather than depending on particular species.

  2. New system improves diver communications

    SciTech Connect

    Baggoft, M.

    1982-08-01

    Utilizing a microprocessor-based speech unscrambler, and acoustic through-water transmission, a communication system introduced in the North Sea allows a diver to talk directly with the surface and other divers free of vulnerable, inhibiting cable links. Advantages include full mobility for divers. Key to the system is a single silicon chip microprocessor housed in a 300 by 60-mm tube for belt mounting.

  3. Response properties of self-improving systems.

    PubMed

    Krakovsky, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    We observe that a sustained positivity (or negativity) of a system's second-order response will result in a directional change of the system's characteristics under the corresponding random exposure. We identify these changes with improvement (or decline) in the state of a system and introduce the concept of self-improving systems as systems which characteristics can sustainably improve under a random exposure. The resulting framework is of a general phenomenological nature and can be applied to complex systems across different areas of knowledge. PMID:27059562

  4. First detection and characterization of symbiotic stars in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikołajewska, Joanna; Caldwell, Nelson; Shara, Michael M.

    2014-10-01

    Symbiotic binaries are putative progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. The census of Galactic symbiotic binaries is so incomplete that we cannot reliably estimate the total population of these stars, and use it to check whether that number is consistent with the observed Type Ia supernova rate in spiral galaxies. We have thus begun a survey of the nearest counterpart of our own Galaxy, namely M31, where a relatively complete census of symbiotic stars is achievable. We report the first detections and spectrographic characterizations of 35 symbiotic binaries in M31, and compare these stars with the symbiotic population in the Milky Way. These newly detected M31 symbiotic binaries are remarkably similar to Galactic symbiotics, though we are clearly only sampling (in this feasibility study) the most luminous symbiotics in M31. We have also found, in M31, the symbiotic star (M31SyS J004233.17+412720.7) with the highest ionization level known amongst all symbiotics. An optical outburst of the M31 symbiotic star M31SyS J004322.50+413940.9 was probably a nova-like outburst, the first symbiotic outburst detected outside the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds.

  5. Searching for New Yellow Symbiotic Stars: Positive Identification of StHα63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baella, N. O.; Pereira, C. B.; Miranda, L. F.; Alvarez-Candal, A.

    2016-04-01

    Yellow symbiotic stars are useful targets for probing whether mass transfer has happened in their binary systems. However, the number of known yellow symbiotic stars is very scarce. We report spectroscopic observations of five candidate yellow symbiotic stars that were selected by their positions in the 2MASS (J - H) versus (H - Ks) diagram and which were included in some emission-line catalogs. Among the five candidates, only StHα63 is identified as a new yellow symbiotic star because of its spectrum and its position in the [TiO]1-[TiO]2 diagram, which indicates a K4-K6 spectral type. In addition, the derived electron density (˜108.4 cm-3) and several emission-line intensity ratios provide further support for that classification. The other four candidates are rejected as symbiotic stars because three of them actually do not show emission lines and the fourth one only Balmer emission lines. We also found that the WISE W3-W4 index clearly separates normal K-giants from yellow symbiotic stars and therefore can be used as an additional tool for selecting candidate yellow symbiotic stars. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano-Alemán, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Heidelberg) and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), and at the 4.1 m telescope at Cerro Pachón Observatory, Chile.

  6. SU Lyncis, a hard X-ray bright M giant: clues point to a large hidden population of symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, K.; Luna, G. J. M.; Cusumano, G.; Segreto, A.; Munari, U.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Lucy, A. B.; Nelson, T.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-09-01

    Symbiotic star surveys have traditionally relied almost exclusively on low resolution optical spectroscopy. However, we can obtain a more reliable estimate of their total Galactic population by using all available signatures of the symbiotic phenomenon. Here we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source, 4PBC J0642.9+5528, in the Swift hard X-ray all-sky survey, and identify it with a poorly studied red giant, SU Lyn, using pointed Swift observations and ground-based optical spectroscopy. The X-ray spectrum, the optical to UV spectrum, and the rapid UV variability of SU Lyn are all consistent with our interpretation that it is a symbiotic star containing an accreting white dwarf. The symbiotic nature of SU Lyn went unnoticed until now, because it does not exhibit emission lines strong enough to be obvious in low resolution spectra. We argue that symbiotic stars without shell-burning have weak emission lines, and that the current lists of symbiotic stars are biased in favour of shell-burning systems. We conclude that the true population of symbiotic stars has been underestimated, potentially by a large factor.

  7. Overview of the observations of symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viotti, Roberto

    1993-01-01

    The term Symbiotic stars commonly denotes variable stars whose optical spectra simultaneously present a cool absorption spectrum (typically TiO absorption bands) and emission lines of high ionization energy. This term is now used for the category of variable stars with composite spectrum. The main spectral features of these objects are: (1) the presence of the red continuum typical of a cool star, (2) the rich emission line spectrum, and (3) the UV excess, frequently with the Balmer continuum in emission. In addition to the peculiar spectrum, the very irregular photometric and spectroscopic variability is the major feature of the symbiotic stars. Moreover, the light curve is basic to identify the different phases of activity in a symbiotic star. The physical mechanisms that cause the symbiotic phenomenon and its variety are the focus of this paper. An astronomical phenomenon characterized by a composite stellar spectrum with two apparently conflicting features, and large variability has been observed. Our research set out to find the origin of this behavior and, in particular, to identify and measure the physical mechanism(s) responsible for the observed phenomena.

  8. An improved system for hydroturbine index testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.J.; Hansen, D.B.; March, P.A

    1995-12-31

    An improved system has been developed that reduces the time and labor involved for index testing of hydroturbines. Multitasking operating systems for computers enable applications to be tightly integrated through dynamic data exchange and object linking and embedding. The index testing system utilizes these features to automate and integrate the processes of data acquisition, data analysis, and reporting.

  9. Symbiotic Activity of Pea (Pisum sativum) after Application of Nod Factors under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Siczek, Anna; Lipiec, Jerzy; Wielbo, Jerzy; Kidaj, Dominika; Szarlip, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Growth and symbiotic activity of legumes are mediated by Nod factors (LCO, lipo-chitooligosaccharides). To assess the effects of application of Nod factors on symbiotic activity and yield of pea, a two-year field experiment was conducted on a Haplic Luvisol developed from loess. Nod factors were isolated from Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain GR09. Pea seeds were treated with the Nod factors (10−11 M) or water (control) before planting. Symbiotic activity was evaluated by measurements of nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction assay), nodule number and mass, and top growth by shoot mass, leaf area, and seed and protein yield. Nod factors generally improved pea yield and nitrogenase activity in the relatively dry growing season 2012, but not in the wet growing season in 2013 due to different weather conditions. PMID:24786094

  10. Knockdown of actin and caspase gene expression by RNA interference in the symbiotic anemone Aiptasia pallida.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Simon R; Phillips, Wendy S; Green, Douglas R; Weis, Virginia M

    2007-06-01

    Since the discovery of the ancient eukaryotic process of RNA-mediated gene silencing, the reverse-genetics technique RNA interference (RNAi) has increasingly been used to examine gene function in vertebrate and invertebrate systems. In this study, we report on the use of RNAi, adapted from studies on animal model systems, to manipulate gene expression in a symbiotic marine cnidarian. We describe gene knockdown of actin and of acasp--a cysteine protease, or caspase--in the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida. Knockdown was assessed qualitatively with in situ hybridizations for both genes. Quantitative PCR and caspase activity assays were used as a quantitative measure of knockdown for acasp. PMID:17565114

  11. Spectroscopic observations of V443 Herculis - A symbiotic binary with a low mass white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrzycka, Danuta; Kenyon, Scott J.; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and existing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary V443 Herculis. This binary system consists of a normal M5 giant and a hot compact star. These two objects have comparable luminosities: about 1500 solar for the M5 giant and about 1000 solar for the compact star. We identify three nebular regions in this binary: a small, highly ionized volume surrounding the hot component, a modestly ionized shell close to the red giant photosphere, and a less dense region of intermediate ionization encompassing both binary components. The system parameters for V443 Her suggest the hot component currently declines from a symbiotic nova eruption.

  12. Plant-associated symbiotic Burkholderia species lack hallmark strategies required in mammalian pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Angus, Annette A; Agapakis, Christina M; Fong, Stephanie; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Estrada-de los Santos, Paulina; Yang, Paul; Song, Nannie; Kano, Stephanie; Caballero-Mellado, Jésus; de Faria, Sergio M; Dakora, Felix D; Weinstock, George; Hirsch, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia is a diverse and dynamic genus, containing pathogenic species as well as species that form complex interactions with plants. Pathogenic strains, such as B. pseudomallei and B. mallei, can cause serious disease in mammals, while other Burkholderia strains are opportunistic pathogens, infecting humans or animals with a compromised immune system. Although some of the opportunistic Burkholderia pathogens are known to promote plant growth and even fix nitrogen, the risk of infection to infants, the elderly, and people who are immunocompromised has not only resulted in a restriction on their use, but has also limited the application of non-pathogenic, symbiotic species, several of which nodulate legume roots or have positive effects on plant growth. However, recent phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that Burkholderia species separate into distinct lineages, suggesting the possibility for safe use of certain symbiotic species in agricultural contexts. A number of environmental strains that promote plant growth or degrade xenobiotics are also included in the symbiotic lineage. Many of these species have the potential to enhance agriculture in areas where fertilizers are not readily available and may serve in the future as inocula for crops growing in soils impacted by climate change. Here we address the pathogenic potential of several of the symbiotic Burkholderia strains using bioinformatics and functional tests. A series of infection experiments using Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells, as well as genomic characterization of pathogenic loci, show that the risk of opportunistic infection by symbiotic strains such as B. tuberum is extremely low.

  13. Symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth O. Waagen

    2012-09-01

    The symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst, according to observations reported to the AAVSO and confirmed by spectroscopy by Ulisse Munari et al. Prompted by an observation and comment from John Bortle (Stormville, NY) (16 June 2012, visual magnitude 12.2) about a possible outburst, Steven O'Connor (St. George's, Bermuda) obtained an observation (10 August 2012, 11.44V) that confirmed V4018 Sgr was bright. His subsequent BVRI observations in September and visual observations by Bortle and Andrew Pearce (Nedlands, Western Australia) show the system brightening and at V magnitude 11.07 as of 2012 Sep. 17.091 UT. Ulisse Munari (INAF Astr. Obs. Padua, Italy) and colleagues Paolo Valisa and Sergio Dallaporta (ANS Collaboration), after being informed by the AAVSO of the bright state of V4018 Sgr, carried out spectroscopy. Munari writes: "A low resolution, absolutely fluxed 4000-8650 Ang spectrum of V4018 Sgr was obtained on Sept 13.90 UT with the 0.6m telescope ! of the Schiaparelli Observatory in Varese (Italy). It shows the spectrum of the M giant overwhelmed by a blue continuum up to 6000 Ang, and all high ionization emission lines typical of quiescence are gone, leaving only hydrogen Balmer and weak HeI lines in emission. The spectrum looks like a template one for a symbiotic star in outburst. CCD photometry was obtained on Sept 13.79 UT and provides V=11.027 ± 0.002, B-V=+0.621 ± 0.003. The B-V color is appreciably bluer and the V magnitude much brighter than typical in quiescence (on average V=13.3, B-V=+1.09; Henden and Munari 2008, Baltic Astronomy 17, 293), and support the idea V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst." According to Munari, the last bright outburst of V4018 Sgr was underway in June 1990. Observations in the AAVSO International Database from Albert Jones (Nelson, New Zealand) beginning in May 1992 show the variable at visual magnitude 11.0, with fluctuations between 10.5 and 11.9 through October 1995. Numerous ! other observers

  14. Mid-IR imaging of symbiotics Mira AB and R Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter

    2006-08-01

    Symbiotic stars, in which material from a red-giant donor accretes onto or interacts with a compact companion, provide astrophysics with fascinating (relatively) nearby laboratories displaying phenomena such as astrophysical jets, shocks, accretion disks and colliding winds. Here we request a modest allotment of telescope time to image the two brightest southern-hemisphere symbiotic stars in the mid-infrared. We will exploit the recently commissioned aperture masking facility in the TReCS camera, which has now demonstrated the highest fidelity images ever recovered in the mid-infrared at spatial scales approaching the diffraction limit. This combination of resolving power and imaging dynamic range will be crucial in the study of symbiotic systems, opening a window on the key physics within the deeply dust-enshrouded interaction between the giant and dwarf.

  15. Improving Ohio's Education Management Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Legislative Office of Education Oversight, Columbus.

    Due to legislative mandate, the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) was required to develop a system (the Education Management Information System) that would increase the amount of information available to state-level policy makers and the public. Some recommendations for improving the function of EMIS are offered in this report. The text provides…

  16. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  17. Improved Interactive Medical-Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Twombly, Ian A.; Senger, Steven

    2003-01-01

    An improved computational-simulation system for interactive medical imaging has been invented. The system displays high-resolution, three-dimensional-appearing images of anatomical objects based on data acquired by such techniques as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). The system enables users to manipulate the data to obtain a variety of views for example, to display cross sections in specified planes or to rotate images about specified axes. Relative to prior such systems, this system offers enhanced capabilities for synthesizing images of surgical cuts and for collaboration by users at multiple, remote computing sites.

  18. Generating the Simple Decision Tree with Symbiotic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Noriko; Shimura, Masamichi

    In representing classification rules by decision trees, simplicity of tree structure is as important as predictive accuracy especially in consideration of the comprehensibility to a human, the memory capacity and the time required to classify. Trees tend to be complex when they get high accuracy. This paper proposes a novel method for generating accurate and simple decision trees based on symbiotic evolution. It is distinctive of symbiotic evolution that two different populations are evolved in parallel through genetic algorithms. In our method one's individuals are partial trees of height 1, and the other's individuals are whole trees represented by the combinations of the former individuals. Generally, overfitting to training examples prevents getting high predictive accuracy. In order to circumvent this difficulty, individuals are evaluated with not only the accuracy in training examples but also the correct answer biased rate indicating the dispersion of the correct answers in the terminal nodes. Based on our method we developed a system called SESAT for generating decision trees. Our experimental results show that SESAT compares favorably with other systems on several datasets in the UCI repository. SESAT has the ability to generate more simple trees than C5.0 without sacrificing predictive accuracy.

  19. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

    PubMed

    Field, Katie J; Pressel, Silvia; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Rimington, William R; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2015-08-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought. PMID:26111583

  20. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

    PubMed

    Field, Katie J; Pressel, Silvia; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Rimington, William R; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2015-08-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought.

  1. Isolation of symbiotic dinoflagellates by centrifugal elutriation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.E.; Quinn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation, a method combining centripetal liquid flow with centrifugal force, has been used to isolate symbiotic dinoflagellates from a cnidarian host. The elutriated cells were shown to be viable by photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and low release of photosynthetic products into the incubation medium. The level of contamination by clinging debris was low and by host solids was negligible.

  2. Improved All-Terrain Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    Redesigned suspension system for all-terrain vehicle exhibits enhanced ability to negotiate sand and rocks. Improved six-wheel suspension system includes only two links on each side. Bogie tends to pull rear wheels with it as it climbs. Designed for rover vehicle for exploration of Mars, also has potential application in off-road vehicles, military scout vehicles, robotic emergency vehicles, and toys. Predecessors of suspension system described in "Articulated Suspension Without Springs" (NPO-17354), "Four-Wheel Vehicle Suspension System" (NPO-17407), and "High-Clearance Six-Wheel Suspension" (NPO-17821).

  3. Extensive Differences in Gene Expression Between Symbiotic and Aposymbiotic Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Erik M.; Mouchka, Morgan E.; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Gallo, Natalya D.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Pringle, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs provide habitats for a disproportionate number of marine species relative to the small area of the oceans that they occupy. The mutualism between the cnidarian animal hosts and their intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts provides the nutritional foundation for coral growth and formation of reef structures, because algal photosynthesis can provide >90% of the total energy of the host. Disruption of this symbiosis (“coral bleaching”) is occurring on a large scale due primarily to anthropogenic factors and poses a major threat to the future of coral reefs. Despite the importance of this symbiosis, the cellular mechanisms involved in its establishment, maintenance, and breakdown remain largely unknown. We report our continued development of genomic tools to study these mechanisms in Aiptasia, a small sea anemone with great promise as a model system for studies of cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis. Specifically, we have generated de novo assemblies of the transcriptomes of both a clonal line of symbiotic anemones and their endogenous dinoflagellate symbionts. We then compared transcript abundances in animals with and without dinoflagellates. This analysis identified >900 differentially expressed genes and allowed us to generate testable hypotheses about the cellular functions affected by symbiosis establishment. The differentially regulated transcripts include >60 encoding proteins that may play roles in transporting various nutrients between the symbiotic partners; many more encoding proteins functioning in several metabolic pathways, providing clues regarding how the transported nutrients may be used by the partners; and several encoding proteins that may be involved in host recognition and tolerance of the dinoflagellate. PMID:24368779

  4. Extensive differences in gene expression between symbiotic and aposymbiotic cnidarians.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Erik M; Mouchka, Morgan E; Burriesci, Matthew S; Gallo, Natalya D; Schwarz, Jodi A; Pringle, John R

    2014-02-01

    Coral reefs provide habitats for a disproportionate number of marine species relative to the small area of the oceans that they occupy. The mutualism between the cnidarian animal hosts and their intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts provides the nutritional foundation for coral growth and formation of reef structures, because algal photosynthesis can provide >90% of the total energy of the host. Disruption of this symbiosis ("coral bleaching") is occurring on a large scale due primarily to anthropogenic factors and poses a major threat to the future of coral reefs. Despite the importance of this symbiosis, the cellular mechanisms involved in its establishment, maintenance, and breakdown remain largely unknown. We report our continued development of genomic tools to study these mechanisms in Aiptasia, a small sea anemone with great promise as a model system for studies of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis. Specifically, we have generated de novo assemblies of the transcriptomes of both a clonal line of symbiotic anemones and their endogenous dinoflagellate symbionts. We then compared transcript abundances in animals with and without dinoflagellates. This analysis identified >900 differentially expressed genes and allowed us to generate testable hypotheses about the cellular functions affected by symbiosis establishment. The differentially regulated transcripts include >60 encoding proteins that may play roles in transporting various nutrients between the symbiotic partners; many more encoding proteins functioning in several metabolic pathways, providing clues regarding how the transported nutrients may be used by the partners; and several encoding proteins that may be involved in host recognition and tolerance of the dinoflagellate. PMID:24368779

  5. Symbiotic crabs maintain coral health by clearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Hannah L.; Holbrook, Sally J.; Schmitt, Russell J.; Brooks, Andrew J.

    2006-11-01

    Stony corals are the foundation of coral reef ecosystems and form associations with other reef species. Many of these associations may be ecologically important and play a role in maintaining the health and diversity of reef systems, rendering it critical to understand the influence of symbiotic organisms in mediating responses to perturbation. This study demonstrates the importance of an association with trapeziid crabs in reducing adverse effects of sediments deposited on corals. In a field experiment, mortality rates of two species of branching corals were significantly lowered by the presence of crabs. All outplanted corals with crabs survived whereas 45-80% of corals without crabs died within a month. For surviving corals that lacked crabs, growth was slower and tissue bleaching and sediment load were higher. Laboratory experiments revealed that corals with crabs shed substantially more of the sediments deposited on coral surfaces, but also that crabs were most effective at removing grain sizes that were most damaging to coral tissues. The mechanism underlying this symbiotic relationship has not been recognized previously, and its role in maintaining coral health is likely to become even more critical as reefs worldwide experience increasing sedimentation.

  6. Improved perceptual-motor performance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. F., Jr.; Reilly, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Battery of tests determines the primary dimensions of perceptual-motor performance. Eighteen basic measures range from simple tests to sophisticated electronic devices. Improved system has one unit for the subject containing test display and response elements, and one for the experimenter where test setups, programming, and scoring are accomplished.

  7. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1993-04-09

    The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems - an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSPI) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium-based system where polyacrylamide and xanthan are crosslinked by CR(III) and an organic crosslinked system. Development of the KUSPI system and evaluation and identification of a suitable organic crosslinked system will be done. The laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: development and selection of gelled polymer systems, physical and chemical characterization of gel systems; and mathematical modeling of gel systems.

  8. Differential production of active oxygen species in photo-symbiotic and non-symbiotic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Maruyama, T

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the generation of active oxygen species in the bivalves, Crassostrea gigas, Fulvia mutica and Tridacna crocea in order to understand the defensive mechanisms in giant clams that allow a stable association with symbiotic zooxanthellae. C. gigas produced active oxygens, superoxide anion and nitric oxide upon stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate. F. mutica generated a little amount of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and contained significant phenoloxidase activity which catalyzes formation of quinones. T. crocea did not generate any apparent active oxygen species or quinones. The importance of lacking rapid cytotoxic responses consisting of active oxygen species to foreign organisms in the symbiotic clam is discussed.

  9. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  10. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-08-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  11. Improved Photon-Emission-Microscope System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Duc

    2006-01-01

    An improved photon-emission-microscope (PEM) instrumentation system has been developed for use in diagnosing failure conditions in semiconductor devices, including complex integrated circuits. This system is designed primarily to image areas that emit photons, at wavelengths from 400 to 1,100 nm, associated with device failures caused by leakage of electric current through SiO2 and other dielectric materials used in multilayer semiconductor structures. In addition, the system is sensitive enough to image areas that emit photons during normal operation.

  12. Lignocellulose-degrading enzymes from termites and their symbiotic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinfeng; Tokuda, Gaku

    2013-11-01

    Lignocellulose-the dry matter of plants, or "plant biomass"-digestion is of increasing interest in organismal metabolism research, specifically the conversion of biomass into biofuels. Termites efficiently decompose lignocelluloses, and studies on lignocellulolytic systems may elucidate mechanisms of efficient lignocellulose degradation in termites as well as offer novel enzyme sources, findings which have significant potential industrial applications. Recent progress in metagenomic and metatranscriptomic research has illuminated the diversity of lignocellulolytic enzymes within the termite gut. Here, we review state-of-the-art research on lignocellulose-degrading systems in termites, specifically cellulases, xylanases, and lignin modification enzymes produced by termites and their symbiotic microbiota. We also discuss recent investigations into heterologous overexpression of lignocellulolytic enzymes from termites and their symbionts.

  13. Profile disparity of Raman-scattered O VI in symbiotic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Won

    2016-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are wide binary systems consisting of a hot compact star (usually a white dwarf) and a mass losing giant. Symbiotic activities are believed to occur through gravitational capture of a fraction of the slow stellar wind from the giant. Raman scattered features of O VI resonance doublet 1032 and 1038 appearing at around 6825 Å and 7082 Å are a unique spectroscopic diagnostic tool to probe the mass transfer process in symbiotic stars. The Raman O VI features often exhibit multiple peak structures and in many cases the blue peak of 7082 features is relatively more suppressed than that of 6825 features. We propose that the disparity of the two profiles is attributed to the local variation of optical depths of O VI, implying that the accretion flow is convergent in the red emission region and divergent in the blue emission region. It is argued in this presentation that Raman scattering by atomic hydrogen is a natural mirror to provide an edge-on view of the accretion disk and a lateral view of the bipolar outflow in symbiotic stars. We discuss the spectropolarimetric implications of this interpretation.

  14. Improved Airborne System for Sensing Wildfires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeown, Donald; Richardson, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Wildfire Airborne Sensing Program (WASP) is engaged in a continuing effort to develop an improved airborne instrumentation system for sensing wildfires. The system could also be used for other aerial-imaging applications, including mapping and military surveillance. Unlike prior airborne fire-detection instrumentation systems, the WASP system would not be based on custom-made multispectral line scanners and associated custom- made complex optomechanical servomechanisms, sensors, readout circuitry, and packaging. Instead, the WASP system would be based on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment that would include (1) three or four electronic cameras (one for each of three or four wavelength bands) instead of a multispectral line scanner; (2) all associated drive and readout electronics; (3) a camera-pointing gimbal; (4) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver for measuring the position, velocity, and orientation of the aircraft; and (5) a data-acquisition subsystem. It would be necessary to custom-develop an integrated sensor optical-bench assembly, a sensor-management subsystem, and software. The use of mostly COTS equipment is intended to reduce development time and cost, relative to those of prior systems.

  15. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  16. On the nature of the symbiotic star BF Cygni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikolajewska, J.; Mikolajewski, M.; Kenyon, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy of the symbiotic binary BF Cyg obtained during 1979-1988 is discussed. This system consists of a low-mass M5 giant filling about 50 percent of its tidal volume and a hot, luminous compact object similar to the central star of a planetary nebula. The binary is embedded in an asymmetric nebula which includes a small, high-density region and an extended region of lower density. The larger nebula is formed by a slow wind ejected by the cool component and ionized by the hot star, while the more compact nebula is material expelled by the hot component in the form of a bipolar wind. The analysis indicates that disk accretion is essential to maintain the nuclear burning shell of the hot star.

  17. Aviation system capacity improvements through technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Don

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  18. The Clinical Support Systems Program: supporting system-wide improvement.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Jenni A; Long, Paul W; Barraclough, Bruce H

    2004-05-17

    The Clinical Support Systems Program (CSSP) provided a mechanism for change from the existing entrenched structure and culture of patient care to one based on patient-centred, evidence-based care. The spectrum of change and improvement achieved by the CSSP was extensive, with support from government and active and enthusiastic involvement of clinical champions, practising clinicians, consumers and managers. The CSSP experience confirmed that responsibility for quality clinical care cannot be borne solely by clinicians, and highlighted key areas where improvement in the support clinicians receive is needed. Many barriers to improvement in our complex healthcare system can be removed by recognising the need for accurate data recording and data systems, teamwork, and high-level organisational buy-in, with collaboration between teams and organisations trying to improve the quality of patient care. System-wide improvement has been stimulated and facilitated by the CSSP experience, with mutual flow-on benefits for the activities of the Australian Council for Safety and Quality in Health Care and the National Institute of Clinical Studies. PMID:15139847

  19. SYMBIOTIC STAR BLOWS BUBBLES INTO SPACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass. Images taken with Earth-based telescopes have shown the larger, hourglass-shaped nebula. But this picture, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, reveals a small, bright nebula embedded in the center of the larger one (close-up of nebula in inset). Astronomers have dubbed the entire nebula the 'Southern Crab Nebula' (He2-104), because, from ground-based telescopes, it looks like the body and legs of a crab. The nebula is several light-years long. The possible creators of these shapes cannot be seen at all in this Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image. It's a pair of aging stars buried in the glow of the tiny, central nebula. One of them is a red giant, a bloated star that is exhausting its nuclear fuel and is shedding its outer layers in a powerful stellar wind. Its companion is a hot, white dwarf, a stellar zombie of a burned-out star. This odd duo of a red giant and a white dwarf is called a symbiotic system. The red giant is also a Mira Variable, a pulsating red giant, that is far away from its partner. It could take as much as 100 years for the two to orbit around each other. Astronomers speculate that the interaction between these two stars may have sparked episodic outbursts of material, creating the gaseous bubbles that form the nebula. They interact by playing a celestial game of 'catch': as the red giant throws off its bulk in a powerful stellar wind, the white dwarf catches some of it. As a result, an accretion disk of material forms around the white dwarf and spirals onto its hot surface. Gas continues to build up on the surface until it sparks an eruption, blowing material into space. This explosive event may have happened twice in the 'Southern Crab.' Astronomers speculate that the hourglass-shaped nebulae represent two separate outbursts that occurred several thousand years apart

  20. SLAC modulator system improvements and reliability results

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.R.

    1998-06-01

    In 1995, an improvement project was completed on the 244 klystron modulators in the linear accelerator. The modulator system has been previously described. This article offers project details and their resulting effect on modulator and component reliability. Prior to the project, the authors had collected four operating cycles (1991 through 1995) of MTTF data. In this discussion, the '91 data will be excluded since the modulators operated at 60 Hz. The five periods following the '91 run were reviewed due to the common repetition rate at 120 Hz.

  1. Improved orbiter waste collection system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Design concepts for improved fecal waste collection both on the space shuttle orbiter and as a precursor for the space station are discussed. Inflight usage problems associated with the existing orbiter waste collection subsystem are considered. A basis was sought for the selection of an optimum waste collection system concept which may ultimately result in the development of an orbiter flight test article for concept verification and subsequent production of new flight hardware. Two concepts were selected for orbiter and are shown in detail. Additionally, one concept selected for application to the space station is presented.

  2. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  3. Purine biosynthesis-deficient Burkholderia mutants are incapable of symbiotic accommodation in the stinkbug.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Jang, Ho Am; Won, Yeo Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Han, Sang Heum; Kim, Chan-Hee; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-03-01

    The Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiotic system represents a promising experimental model to study the molecular mechanisms involved in insect-bacterium symbiosis due to the availability of genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont. Using transposon mutagenesis screening, we found a symbiosis-deficient mutant that was able to colonize the host insect but failed to induce normal development of host's symbiotic organ. The disrupted gene was identified as purL involved in purine biosynthesis. In vitro growth impairment of the purL mutant and its growth dependency on adenine and adenosine confirmed the functional disruption of the purine synthesis gene. The purL mutant also showed defects in biofilm formation, and this defect was not rescued by supplementation of purine derivatives. When inoculated to host insects, the purL mutant was initially able to colonize the symbiotic organ but failed to attain a normal infection density. The low level of infection density of the purL mutant attenuated the development of the host's symbiotic organ at early instar stages and reduced the host's fitness throughout the nymphal stages. Another symbiont mutant-deficient in a purine biosynthesis gene, purM, showed phenotypes similar to those of the purL mutant both in vitro and in vivo, confirming that the purL phenotypes are due to disrupted purine biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the purine biosynthesis genes of the Burkholderia symbiont are critical for the successful accommodation of symbiont within the host, thereby facilitating the development of the host's symbiotic organ and enhancing the host's fitness values.

  4. Exploring the symbiotic pangenome of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    SciTech Connect

    Galardini, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Brilli, Matteo; Pini, Francesco; Fioravanti, Antonella; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Woyke, Tanja; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ivanova, N; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Teshima, Hazuki; Mocali, Stefano; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sinorhizobium meliloti is a model system for the studies of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. An extensive polymorphism at the genetic and phenotypic level is present in natural populations of this species, especially in relation with symbiotic promotion of plant growth. AK83 and BL225C are two nodule-isolated strains with diverse symbiotic phenotypes; BL225C is more efficient in promoting growth of the Medicago sativa plants than strain AK83. In order to investigate the genetic determinants of the phenotypic diversification of S. meliloti strains AK83 and BL225C, we sequenced the complete genomes for these two strains. Results: With sizes of 7.14 Mbp and 6.97 Mbp, respectively, the genomes of AK83 and BL225C are larger than the laboratory strain Rm1021. The core genome of Rm1021, AK83, BL225C strains included 5124 orthologous groups, while the accessory genome was composed by 2700 orthologous groups. While Rm1021 and BL225C have only three replicons (Chromosome, pSymA and pSymB), AK83 has also two plasmids, 260 and 70 Kbp long. We found 65 interesting orthologous groups of genes that were present only in the accessory genome, consequently responsible for phenotypic diversity and putatively involved in plant-bacterium interaction. Notably, the symbiosis inefficient AK83 lacked several genes required for microaerophilic growth inside nodules, while several genes for accessory functions related to competition, plant invasion and bacteroid tropism were identified only in AK83 and BL225C strains. Presence and extent of polymorphism in regulons of transcription factors involved in symbiotic interaction were also analyzed. Our results indicate that regulons are flexible, with a large number of accessory genes, suggesting that regulons polymorphism could also be a key determinant in the variability of symbiotic performances among the analyzed strains.

  5. Rhizobium meliloti Genes Encoding Catabolism of Trigonelline Are Induced under Symbiotic Conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, C; Camut, S; Malpica, CA; Truchet, G; Rosenberg, C

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti trc genes controlling the catabolism of trigonelline, a plant secondary metabolite often abundant in legumes, are closely linked to nif-nod genes on the symbiotic megaplasmid pSym [Boivin, C., Malpica, C., Rosenberg, C., Denarie, J., Goldman, A., Fleury, V., Maille, M., Message, B., and Tepfer, D. (1989). In Molecular Signals in the Microbe-Plant Symbiotic and Pathogenic Systems. (Berlin: Springer-Verlag), pp. 401-407]. To investigate the role of trigonelline catabolism in the Rhizobium-legume interaction, we studied the regulation of trc gene expression in free-living and in endosymbiotic bacteria using Escherichia coli lacZ as a reporter gene. Experiments performed with free-living bacteria indicated that trc genes were organized in at least four transcription units and that the substrate trigonelline was a specific inducer for three of them. Noninducing trigonelline-related compounds such as betaines appeared to antagonize the inducing effect of trigonelline. None of the general or symbiotic regulatory genes ntrA, dctB/D, or nodD seemed to be involved in trigonelline catabolism. trc fusions exhibiting a low basal and a high induced [beta]-galactosidase activity when present on pSym were used to monitor trc gene expression in alfalfa tissue under symbiotic conditions. Results showed that trc genes are induced during all the symbiotic steps, i.e., in the rhizosphere, infection threads, and bacteroids of alfalfa, suggesting that trigonelline is a nutrient source throughout the Rhizobium-legume association. PMID:12354952

  6. Improving patient safety by instructional systems design

    PubMed Central

    Battles, J B

    2006-01-01

    Education and training are important elements in patient safety, both as a potential contributing factor to risks and hazards of healthcare associated injury or harm and as an intervention to be used in eliminating or preventing such harm. All too often we have relied on training as the only interventions for patient safety without examining other alternatives or realizing that, in some cases, the training systems themselves are part of the problem. One way to ensure safety by design is to apply established design principles to education and training. Instructional systems design (ISD) is a systematic method of development of education and training programs for improved learner performance. The ISD process involves five integrated steps: analysis, development, design, implementation, and evaluation (ADDIE). The application of ISD using the ADDIE approach can eliminate or prevent education and training from being a contributing factor of health associated injury or harm, and can also be effective in preventing injury or harm. PMID:17142604

  7. ISO observations of symbiotic stars. I. HM Sge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, H.; Eyres, S. P. S.; Salama, A.; Evans, A.

    2001-10-01

    We present ISO SWS and LWS observations of the symbiotic star HM Sge. The infrared emission longward of ~ 5 mu m is dominated by a silicate dust shell. There is a number of high ionization emission lines superimposed on the dust continuum. The ISO continuum spectra can be fitted with a single, optically thick silicate dust shell but such a model does not fit other known properties of this system, such as the observed J H K colours, the optical visibility of the red giant and the occurrence of a dust obscuration event. We favour a two component model in which in addition to a partial Mira dust shell, a second dust component is associated with the hot source. This second shell is located at the interface between the Mira dust shell and the dust free region carved out by the hot component. This picture corresponds closely to that deduced independently from radio observations. The two dust components are very different. The dust envelope associated with the Mira is very extended and optically thin, whereas the second dust component is geometrically rather thin but dust rich. The model not only fits the ISO data reasonably well, but is also compatible with other IR properties of HM Sge. The thin dust shell contributes strongly to the dust emission over most of the ISO range. It may be the combination of the two shells that makes a symbiotic a D type. The general agreement of the present models with ISO observations indicate that radiation (rather than collisions) as the main dust heating mechanism is sufficient.

  8. A systems approach to understanding and improving health systems.

    PubMed

    Erazo, Álvaro

    2015-09-01

    Health systems face the challenge of helping to improve health conditions. They occupy a priority place in middle- and lower-income countries, since the absence or fragility of health systems adversely impacts expected health outcomes. Thus, due to the direct relationship between programs and systems, the absence or weakness of either will result in a consequent deficiency in public health and the very execution of the programs. In the same vein, weakened health systems are one of the main bottlenecks to attaining the Millennium Development Goals. Systems thinking is one of the "four revolutions in progress" that are helping to transform health and health care systems. Within that framework, this article identifies conceptual and operational elements of systems applicable to health systems that contribute to overcoming the obstacles and inertia that hinder health activities and outcomes. It discusses relevant concepts characteristic of systems thinking, such as structural variables and dynamic complexity, the relationship between programs and health systems, and the monitoring and evaluation function, together with the role of innovation and systems integration as high-priority elements. This will aid in the development of designs that also stress the context of the components that guide management, identifying processes and outcomes in a health management continuum. PMID:26758004

  9. Phylogeny of Symbiotic Genes and the Symbiotic Properties of Rhizobia Specific to Astragalus glycyphyllos L.

    PubMed Central

    Gnat, Sebastian; Małek, Wanda; Oleńska, Ewa; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Łotocka, Barbara; Wójcik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeny of symbiotic genes of Astragalus glycyphyllos L. (liquorice milkvetch) nodule isolates was studied by comparative sequence analysis of nodA, nodC, nodH and nifH loci. In all these genes phylograms, liquorice milkvetch rhizobia (closely related to bacteria of three species, i.e. Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium septentrionale and Mesorhizobium ciceri) formed one clearly separate cluster suggesting the horizontal transfer of symbiotic genes from a single ancestor to the bacteria being studied. The high sequence similarity of the symbiotic genes of A. glycyphyllos rhizobia (99–100% in the case of nodAC and nifH genes, and 98–99% in the case of nodH one) points to the relatively recent (in evolutionary scale) lateral transfer of these genes. In the nodACH and nifH phylograms, A. glycyphyllos nodule isolates were grouped together with the genus Mesorhizobium species in one monophyletic clade, close to M. ciceri, Mesorhizobium opportunistum and Mesorhizobium australicum symbiovar biserrulae bacteria, which correlates with the close relationship of these rhizobia host plants. Plant tests revealed the narrow host range of A. glycyphyllos rhizobia. They formed effective symbiotic interactions with their native host (A. glycyphyllos) and Amorpha fruticosa but not with 11 other fabacean species. The nodules induced on A. glycyphyllos roots were indeterminate with apical, persistent meristem, an age gradient of nodule tissues and cortical vascular bundles. To reflect the symbiosis-adaptive phenotype of rhizobia, specific for A. glycyphyllos, we propose for these bacteria the new symbiovar “glycyphyllae”, based on nodA and nodC genes sequences. PMID:26496493

  10. Phylogeny of Symbiotic Genes and the Symbiotic Properties of Rhizobia Specific to Astragalus glycyphyllos L.

    PubMed

    Gnat, Sebastian; Małek, Wanda; Oleńska, Ewa; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Kalita, Michał; Łotocka, Barbara; Wójcik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeny of symbiotic genes of Astragalus glycyphyllos L. (liquorice milkvetch) nodule isolates was studied by comparative sequence analysis of nodA, nodC, nodH and nifH loci. In all these genes phylograms, liquorice milkvetch rhizobia (closely related to bacteria of three species, i.e. Mesorhizobium amorphae, Mesorhizobium septentrionale and Mesorhizobium ciceri) formed one clearly separate cluster suggesting the horizontal transfer of symbiotic genes from a single ancestor to the bacteria being studied. The high sequence similarity of the symbiotic genes of A. glycyphyllos rhizobia (99-100% in the case of nodAC and nifH genes, and 98-99% in the case of nodH one) points to the relatively recent (in evolutionary scale) lateral transfer of these genes. In the nodACH and nifH phylograms, A. glycyphyllos nodule isolates were grouped together with the genus Mesorhizobium species in one monophyletic clade, close to M. ciceri, Mesorhizobium opportunistum and Mesorhizobium australicum symbiovar biserrulae bacteria, which correlates with the close relationship of these rhizobia host plants. Plant tests revealed the narrow host range of A. glycyphyllos rhizobia. They formed effective symbiotic interactions with their native host (A. glycyphyllos) and Amorpha fruticosa but not with 11 other fabacean species. The nodules induced on A. glycyphyllos roots were indeterminate with apical, persistent meristem, an age gradient of nodule tissues and cortical vascular bundles. To reflect the symbiosis-adaptive phenotype of rhizobia, specific for A. glycyphyllos, we propose for these bacteria the new symbiovar "glycyphyllae", based on nodA and nodC genes sequences.

  11. Symbiotic empirical ethics: a practical methodology.

    PubMed

    Frith, Lucy

    2012-05-01

    Like any discipline, bioethics is a developing field of academic inquiry; and recent trends in scholarship have been towards more engagement with empirical research. This 'empirical turn' has provoked extensive debate over how such 'descriptive' research carried out in the social sciences contributes to the distinctively normative aspect of bioethics. This paper will address this issue by developing a practical research methodology for the inclusion of data from social science studies into ethical deliberation. This methodology will be based on a naturalistic conception of ethical theory that sees practice as informing theory just as theory informs practice - the two are symbiotically related. From this engagement with practice, the ways that such theories need to be extended and developed can be determined. This is a practical methodology for integrating theory and practice that can be used in empirical studies, one that uses ethical theory both to explore the data and to draw normative conclusions.

  12. Symbiote transmission and maintenance of extra-genomic associations.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotes can be transmitted from parents to offspring or horizontally from unrelated hosts or the environment. A key question is whether symbiote transmission is similar enough to Mendelian gene transmission to generate and maintain coevolutionary associations between host and symbiote genes. Recent papers come to opposite conclusions, with some suggesting that any horizontal transmission eliminates genetic association. These studies are hard to compare owing to arbitrary differences in modeling approach, parameter values, and assumptions about selection. I show that associations between host and symbiote genes (extra-genomic associations) can be described by the same dynamic model as conventional linkage disequilibria between genes in the same genome. Thus, covariance between host and symbiote genomes depends on population history, geographic structure, selection, and co-transmission rate, just as covariance between genes within a genome. The conclusion that horizontal transmission rapidly erodes extra-genomic associations is equivalent to the conclusion that recombination rapidly erodes associations between genes within a genome. The conclusion is correct in the absence of population structure or selection. However, population structure can maintain spatial associations between host and symbiote traits, and non-additive selection (interspecific epistasis) can generate covariances between host and symbiote genotypes. These results can also be applied to cultural or other non-genetic traits. This work contributes to a growing consensus that genomic, symbiotic, and gene-culture evolution can be analyzed under a common theoretical framework. In terms of coevolutionary potential, symbiotes can be viewed as lying on a continuum between the intimacy of genes and the indifference of casually co-occurring species.

  13. Symbiote transmission and maintenance of extra-genomic associations

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotes can be transmitted from parents to offspring or horizontally from unrelated hosts or the environment. A key question is whether symbiote transmission is similar enough to Mendelian gene transmission to generate and maintain coevolutionary associations between host and symbiote genes. Recent papers come to opposite conclusions, with some suggesting that any horizontal transmission eliminates genetic association. These studies are hard to compare owing to arbitrary differences in modeling approach, parameter values, and assumptions about selection. I show that associations between host and symbiote genes (extra-genomic associations) can be described by the same dynamic model as conventional linkage disequilibria between genes in the same genome. Thus, covariance between host and symbiote genomes depends on population history, geographic structure, selection, and co-transmission rate, just as covariance between genes within a genome. The conclusion that horizontal transmission rapidly erodes extra-genomic associations is equivalent to the conclusion that recombination rapidly erodes associations between genes within a genome. The conclusion is correct in the absence of population structure or selection. However, population structure can maintain spatial associations between host and symbiote traits, and non-additive selection (interspecific epistasis) can generate covariances between host and symbiote genotypes. These results can also be applied to cultural or other non-genetic traits. This work contributes to a growing consensus that genomic, symbiotic, and gene-culture evolution can be analyzed under a common theoretical framework. In terms of coevolutionary potential, symbiotes can be viewed as lying on a continuum between the intimacy of genes and the indifference of casually co-occurring species. PMID:24605109

  14. Improving Quality of Voice Conversion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhid, M.; Tinati, M. A.

    New improvement scheme for voice conversion are proposed in this paper. We take Human factor cepstral coefficients (HFCC), a modification of MFCC that uses the known relationship between center frequency and critical bandwidth from human psychoacoustics to decouple filter bandwidth from filter spacing, as the basic feature. We propose U/V (Unvoiced/Voiced) decision rule such that two sets of codebooks are used to capture the difference between unvoiced and voiced segments of the source speaker. Moreover, we apply three schemes to refine the synthesized voice, including pitch refinement, energy equalization, and frame concatenation. The acceptable performance of the voice conversion system can be verified through ABX listening test and MOS grad.

  15. Progesterone improves porcine in vitro fertilisation system.

    PubMed

    Malo, Clara; Gil, Lydia; Cano, Rafael; Martinez, Felisa; Gonzalez, Noelia

    2014-03-01

    In an effort to improve the quality of in vitro produced porcine embryos, the effect of progestagens - progesterone analogues - on the in vitro developmental competence of porcine oocytes was studied. A total of 1421 in vitro matured oocytes, from 4 replicates, were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Progestagens were added to late maturation and embryo cultures (10 IU/ml). Fertilisation success (pre-maturation, penetration, monospermy and efficiency) and nuclear maturation were evaluated. There were no differences among prematuration rates between groups (P = 0.221). Penetration rates were higher (P < 0.001) in the presence of progestagens (75.0%) as compared to the control (51.7%). However, no differences were observed in monospermy percentages (P = 0.246). The results indicated that supplementation with progestagens increased the efficiency of the in vitro fertilisation system (P < 0.001). An additional beneficial effect was observed in nuclear maturation with progestagens (P = 0.035). In summary, progestagen supplementation is an important factor to improve the in vitro fertilisation procedure.

  16. Three Fundamental Periods in an 87 Year Light Curve of the Symbiotic Star MWC 560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2015-08-01

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  17. THREE FUNDAMENTAL PERIODS IN AN 87 YEAR LIGHT CURVE OF THE SYMBIOTIC STAR MWC 560

    SciTech Connect

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana

    2015-08-15

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  18. AG Pegasi - now a classical symbiotic star in outburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T. V.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Zamanov, R. K.

    2016-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy study of the recent AG Pegasi (AG Peg) outburst observed during the second half of 2015 is presented. Considerable variations of the intensity and the shape of the spectral features as well as the changes of the hot component parameters, caused by the outburst, are discussed and certain similarities between the outburst of AG Peg and the outburst of a classical symbiotic stars are shown. It seems that after the end of the symbiotic nova phase, AG Peg became a member of the classical symbiotic stars group.

  19. AG Pegasi - now a classical symbiotic star in outburst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, T. V.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Zamanov, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    Optical spectroscopy study of the recent AG Peg outburst observed during the second half of 2015 is presented. Considerable variations of the intensity and the shape of the spectral features as well as the changes of the hot component parameters, caused by the outburst, are discussed and certain similarities between the outburst of AG Peg and the outburst of a classical symbiotic stars are shown. It seems that after the end of the symbiotic nova phase, AG Peg became a member of the classical symbiotic stars group.

  20. Discovery of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in corals.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Michael P; Mazel, Charles H; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Falkowski, Paul G

    2004-08-13

    Colonies of the Caribbean coral Montastraea cavernosa exhibit a solar-stimulated orange-red fluorescence that is spectrally similar to a variety of fluorescent proteins expressed by corals. The source of this fluorescence is phycoerythrin in unicellular, nonheterocystis, symbiotic cyanobacteria within the host cells of the coral. The cyanobacteria coexist with the symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) of the coral and express the nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase. The presence of this prokaryotic symbiont in a nitrogen-limited zooxanthellate coral suggests that nitrogen fixation may be an important source of this limiting element for the symbiotic association.

  1. Computer symbiosis: Emergence of symbiotic behavior through evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ikegami, Takashi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    1989-01-01

    Symbiosis is altruistic cooperation between distinct species. It is one of the most effective evolutionary processes, but its dynamics are not well understood as yet. A simple model of symbiosis is introduced, where we consider interactions between hosts and parasites and also mutations of hosts and parasites. It is found that a symbiotic state emerges for a suitable range of mutation rates. The symbiotic state is not static, but dynamically oscillates. Harmful parasites violating symbiosis appear periodically, but are rapidly extinguished by hosts and other parasites, and the symbiotic state is recovered. The emergence of ''Tit for Tat'' strategy to maintain symbiosis is discussed. 4 figs.

  2. The Role of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Sustainable Production of Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bandana; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    With the ever-increasing population of the world (expected to reach 9.6 billion by 2050), and altered life style, comes an increased demand for food, fuel and fiber. However, scarcity of land, water and energy accompanied by climate change means that to produce enough to meet the demands is getting increasingly challenging. Today we must use every avenue from science and technology available to address these challenges. The natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, whereby plants such as legumes fix atmospheric nitrogen gas to ammonia, usable by plants can have a substantial impact as it is found in nature, has low environmental and economic costs and is broadly established. Here we look at the importance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the production of biofuel feedstocks; how this process can address major challenges, how improving nitrogen fixation is essential, and what we can do about it. PMID:24786096

  3. Addendum to ``Colored-noise-induced discontinuous transitions in symbiotic ecosystems''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauga, Ako; Mankin, Romi

    2005-06-01

    A symbiotic ecosystem with Gompertz self-regulation and with adaptive competition between populations is studied by means of a N -species Lotka-Volterra stochastic model. The influence of fluctuating environment on the carrying capacity of a population is modeled as a dichotomous noise. The study is a follow up of previous investigations of symbiotic ecosystems subjected to the generalized Verhulst self-regulation [Phys. Rev. E 69, 061106 (2004); 65, 051108 (2002)]. In the framework of mean-field approximation the behavior of the solutions of the self-consistency equation for a stationary system is examined analytically in the full phase space of system parameters. Depending on the mutual interplay of symbiosis and competition of species, variation of noise parameters (amplitude, correlation time) can induce doubly unidirectional discontinuous transitions as well as single unidirectional discontinuous transitions of the mean population size.

  4. Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Steven A; Proebstel, Elliot P.

    2007-11-01

    Due to ever-increasing quantities of information traversing networks, network administrators are developing greater reliance upon statistically sampled packet information as the source for their intrusion detection systems (IDS). Our research is aimed at understanding IDS performance when statistical packet sampling is used. Using the Snort IDS and a variety of data sets, we compared IDS results when an entire data set is used to the results when a statistically sampled subset of the data set is used. Generally speaking, IDS performance with statistically sampled information was shown to drop considerably even under fairly high sampling rates (such as 1:5). Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems4AcknowledgementsThe authors wish to extend our gratitude to Matt Bishop and Chen-Nee Chuah of UC Davis for their guidance and support on this work. Our thanks are also extended to Jianning Mai of UC Davis and Tao Ye of Sprint Advanced Technology Labs for their generous assistance.We would also like to acknowledge our dataset sources, CRAWDAD and CAIDA, without which this work would not have been possible. Support for OC48 data collection is provided by DARPA, NSF, DHS, Cisco and CAIDA members.

  5. Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-23

    This sourcebook is designed to provide steam system users with a reference that describes the basic steam system components, outlines opportunities for energy and performance improvements, and discusses the benefits of a systems approach in identifying and implementing these improvement opportunities. The sourcebook is divided into three main sections: steam system basics, performance improvement opportunities, and where to find help.

  6. Improving robustness of speech recognition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Vikramjit

    2010-11-01

    speech databases: X-ray microbeam and Aurora-2 were annotated, where the former was used to train a TV-estimator and the latter was used to train a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) based ASR architecture. The DBN architecture used two sets of observation: (a) acoustic features in the form of mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) and (b) TVs (estimated from the acoustic speech signal). In this setup the articulatory gestures were modeled as hidden random variables, hence eliminating the necessity for explicit gesture recognition. Word recognition results using the DBN architecture indicate that articulatory representations not only can help to account for coarticulatory variations but can also significantly improve the noise robustness of ASR system.

  7. Outburst Activity Driven by Evolved Pulsating Star in the Symbiotic Binary AG Dra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gális, R.; Hric, L.; Leedjärv, L.

    2015-12-01

    The symbiotic system AG Dra regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of the series of individual outbursts. The period analysis of new and historical photometric data, as well as radial velocities, confirmed the presence of the two periods. The longer one around ≈ 550 d is related to the orbital motion and the shorter one ≈355 d could be due to pulsation of the cool component of AG Dra.

  8. SINFAC - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL FLUIDS ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to the April 1983 revision of SINDA, a general thermal analyzer program. The purpose of the additional routines is to allow for the modeling of active heat transfer loops. The modeler can simulate the steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different heat transfer loop components including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs and many types of valves and fittings. In addition, the program contains a property analysis routine that can be used to compute the thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. SINFAC can simulate the response to transient boundary conditions. SINFAC was first developed as a method for computing the steady-state performance of two phase systems. It was then modified using CNFRWD, SINDA's explicit time-integration scheme, to accommodate transient thermal models. However, SINFAC cannot simulate pressure drops due to time-dependent fluid acceleration, transient boil-out, or transient fill-up, except in the accumulator. SINFAC also requires the user to be familiar with SINDA. The solution procedure used by SINFAC is similar to that which an engineer would use to solve a system manually. The solution to a system requires the determination of all of the outlet conditions of each component such as the flow rate, pressure, and enthalpy. To obtain these values, the user first estimates the inlet conditions to the first component of the system, then computes the outlet conditions from the data supplied by the manufacturer of the first component. The user then estimates the temperature at the outlet of the third component and computes the corresponding flow resistance of the second component. With the flow resistance of the second component, the user computes the conditions down stream, namely the inlet conditions of the third. The computations follow for the rest of the system, back to the first component

  9. Towards the minimal nitrogen-fixing symbiotic genome.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Juan

    2016-09-01

    diCenzo and coworkers have reverse engineered a rhizobium into a non-nitrogen fixer, creating a genomic platform for gain-of-function genetics studies, which should aid to identify the minimal nitrogen fixing symbiotic genome.

  10. Towards the minimal nitrogen-fixing symbiotic genome.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Juan

    2016-09-01

    diCenzo and coworkers have reverse engineered a rhizobium into a non-nitrogen fixer, creating a genomic platform for gain-of-function genetics studies, which should aid to identify the minimal nitrogen fixing symbiotic genome. PMID:27188818

  11. LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Implementation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson Jr., WI; Vogelmann, AM

    2015-09-01

    This document illustrates the design of the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) workflow to provide a routine, high-resolution modeling capability to augment the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s high-density observations. LASSO will create a powerful new capability for furthering ARM’s mission to advance understanding of cloud, radiation, aerosol, and land-surface processes. The combined observational and modeling elements will enable a new level of scientific inquiry by connecting processes and context to observations and providing needed statistics for details that cannot be measured. The result will be improved process understanding that facilitates concomitant improvements in climate model parameterizations. The initial LASSO implementation will be for ARM’s Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma and will focus on shallow convection, which is poorly simulated by climate models due in part to clouds’ typically small spatial scale compared to model grid spacing, and because the convection involves complicated interactions of microphysical and boundary layer processes.

  12. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  13. Design and mathematical modelling of a synthetic symbiotic ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kambam, P K R; Henson, M A; Sun, L

    2008-01-01

    Artificial microbial ecosystems have been increasingly used to understand principles of ecology. These systems offer unique capabilities to mimic a variety of ecological interactions that otherwise would be difficult to study experimentally in a reasonable period of time. However, the elucidation of the genetic bases for these interactions remains a daunting challenge. To address this issue, we have designed and analysed a synthetic symbiotic ecosystem in which the genetic nature of the microbial interactions is defined explicitly. A mathematical model of the gene regulatory network in each species and their interaction through quorum sensing mediated intercellular signalling was derived to investigate the effect of system components on cooperative behaviour. Dynamic simulation and bifurcation analysis showed that the designed system admits a stable coexistence steady state for sufficiently large initial cell concentrations of the two species. The steady-state fraction of each species could be altered by varying model parameters associated with gene transcription and signalling molecule synthesis rates. The design also admitted a stable steady state corresponding to extinction of the two species for low initial cell concentrations and stable periodic solutions over certain domains of parameter space. The mathematical analysis was shown to provide insights into natural microbial ecosystems and to allow identification of molecular targets for engineering system behaviour.

  14. Application of an improved intracardiac fibreoptic system.

    PubMed Central

    Krovetz, L J; Brenner, J I; Polanyi, M; Ostrowski, D

    1978-01-01

    An improved fibreoptic in vivo haemoreflection system has been used in over 200 patients. Continuous recording of oxygen saturation while moving the catheter permits measurement of simultaneous pressure and oxygen saturation at almost an unlimited number of sites through the right heart. The oxygen saturation can be continuously monitored and the response is sufficiently fast to permit investigation of changes in oxygen saturation during portions of the cardiac cycle. Dye dilution curves have been recorded from over 200 patients. The only blood withdrawn for the dye dilution curve was the 3 ml needed for checking the calibration of the instrument. We have found that the calibration is extremely stable. In some instances where it has been deemed impractical to obtain blood for calibration, the calibration factor for each catheter may be used. In any case, the calibration check is performed at the end of the study and does not present problems of sterility. The calibration factor may yield a correction factor which then applies uniformly to all the cardiac output values obtained during the study. Images PMID:708525

  15. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-11-27

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic-eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential.

  16. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-01

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  17. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  18. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  19. Intracellular pH of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbin, E. M.; Davy, S. K.

    2013-09-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) is likely to play a key role in maintaining the functional success of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis, yet until now the pHi of the symbiotic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has never been quantified. Flow cytometry was used in conjunction with the ratiometric fluorescent dye BCECF to monitor changes in pHi over a daily light/dark cycle. The pHi of Symbiodinium type B1 freshly isolated from the model sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella was 7.25 ± 0.01 (mean ± SE) in the light and 7.10 ± 0.02 in the dark. A comparable effect of irradiance was seen across a variety of cultured Symbiodinium genotypes (types A1, B1, E1, E2, F1, and F5) which varied between pHi 7.21-7.39 in the light and 7.06-7.14 in the dark. Of note, there was a significant genotypic difference in pHi, irrespective of irradiance.

  20. Symbiotic two-species contact process.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Martins; Dos Santos, Renato Vieira; Dickman, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    We study a contact process (CP) with two species that interact in a symbiotic manner. In our model, each site of a lattice may be vacant or host individuals of species A and/or B; multiple occupancy by the same species is prohibited. Symbiosis is represented by a reduced death rate μ<1 for individuals at sites with both species present. Otherwise, the dynamics is that of the basic CP, with creation (at vacant neighbor sites) at rate λ and death of (isolated) individuals at a rate of unity. Mean-field theory and Monte Carlo simulation show that the critical creation rate λ(c)(μ) is a decreasing function of μ, even though a single-species population must go extinct for λ<λ(c) (1), the critical point of the basic CP. Extensive simulations yield results for critical behavior that are compatible with the directed percolation (DP) universality class, but with unusually strong corrections to scaling. A field-theoretic argument supports the conclusion of DP critical behavior. We obtain similar results for a CP with creation at second-neighbor sites and enhanced survival at first neighbors in the form of an annihilation rate that decreases with the number of occupied first neighbors. PMID:23005382

  1. Symbiotic two-species contact process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Martins; Dos Santos, Renato Vieira; Dickman, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    We study a contact process (CP) with two species that interact in a symbiotic manner. In our model, each site of a lattice may be vacant or host individuals of species A and/or B; multiple occupancy by the same species is prohibited. Symbiosis is represented by a reduced death rate μ<1 for individuals at sites with both species present. Otherwise, the dynamics is that of the basic CP, with creation (at vacant neighbor sites) at rate λ and death of (isolated) individuals at a rate of unity. Mean-field theory and Monte Carlo simulation show that the critical creation rate λc(μ) is a decreasing function of μ, even though a single-species population must go extinct for λ<λc(1), the critical point of the basic CP. Extensive simulations yield results for critical behavior that are compatible with the directed percolation (DP) universality class, but with unusually strong corrections to scaling. A field-theoretic argument supports the conclusion of DP critical behavior. We obtain similar results for a CP with creation at second-neighbor sites and enhanced survival at first neighbors in the form of an annihilation rate that decreases with the number of occupied first neighbors.

  2. Defining Requirements for Improved Photovoltaic System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1998-12-21

    Reliable systems are an essential ingredient of any technology progressing toward commercial maturity and large-scale deployment. This paper defines reliability as meeting system fictional requirements, and then develops a framework to understand and quantify photovoltaic system reliability based on initial and ongoing costs and system value. The core elements necessary to achieve reliable PV systems are reviewed. These include appropriate system design, satisfactory component reliability, and proper installation and servicing. Reliability status, key issues, and present needs in system reliability are summarized for four application sectors.

  3. IUE observations and interpretation of the symbiotic star RW Hya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The IUE observations of the high excitation symbiotic star RW Hya (gM2 + pec) are discussed. Analysis of the intense UV continuum observed between 1100 A to 2000 A suggests this star is a binary system in which the secondary is identified as a hot subdwarf with T sub eff being approximately 100,000 K. A distance to the system of 1000 pc is deduced. The UV spectrum consists of mainly semiforbidden and allowed transition lines of which the CIV (1548 A, 1550 A) emission lines are particularly strong, and UV continuum at both shorter and longer wavelengths. Strong forbidden lines seem to be absent suggesting the presence of a nebula of high densities. Tidal interaction between the red giant primary and the hot subdwarf is suggested as a likely means to form the observed nebula. RW Hya is suggested as a possible source of soft X-ray emission from material accreting onto the surface of the hot subdwarf. Detection of such emission with HEAO-B would give information if this accretion is taking place via Roche lobe overlow or via capture from a stellar wind emitted by the primary. A general discussion of elemental and ionic abundances in the nebula is also presented.

  4. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and the Challenges to Its Extension to Nonlegumes

    PubMed Central

    Mus, Florence; Crook, Matthew B.; Garcia, Kevin; Garcia Costas, Amaya; Geddes, Barney A.; Kouri, Evangelia D.; Paramasivan, Ponraj; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Poole, Philip S.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to fixed or available forms of nitrogen limits the productivity of crop plants and thus food production. Nitrogenous fertilizer production currently represents a significant expense for the efficient growth of various crops in the developed world. There are significant potential gains to be had from reducing dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers in agriculture in the developed world and in developing countries, and there is significant interest in research on biological nitrogen fixation and prospects for increasing its importance in an agricultural setting. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, a form that can be used by plants. However, the process is restricted to bacteria and archaea and does not occur in eukaryotes. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is part of a mutualistic relationship in which plants provide a niche and fixed carbon to bacteria in exchange for fixed nitrogen. This process is restricted mainly to legumes in agricultural systems, and there is considerable interest in exploring whether similar symbioses can be developed in nonlegumes, which produce the bulk of human food. We are at a juncture at which the fundamental understanding of biological nitrogen fixation has matured to a level that we can think about engineering symbiotic relationships using synthetic biology approaches. This minireview highlights the fundamental advances in our understanding of biological nitrogen fixation in the context of a blueprint for expanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation to a greater diversity of crop plants through synthetic biology. PMID:27084023

  5. Composition of symbiotic bacteria predicts survival in Panamanian golden frogs infected with a lethal fungus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthew H; Walke, Jenifer B; Cikanek, Shawna; Savage, Anna E; Mattheus, Nichole; Santiago, Celina N; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Harris, Reid N; Belden, Lisa K; Gratwicke, Brian

    2015-04-22

    Symbiotic microbes can dramatically impact host health and fitness, and recent research in a diversity of systems suggests that different symbiont community structures may result in distinct outcomes for the host. In amphibians, some symbiotic skin bacteria produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a cutaneous fungal pathogen that has caused many amphibian population declines and extinctions. Treatment with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) prevents Bd infection in some amphibian species and creates optimism for conservation of species that are highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by Bd. In a laboratory experiment, we used Bd-inhibitory bacteria from Bd-tolerant Panamanian amphibians in a probiotic development trial with Panamanian golden frogs, Atelopus zeteki, a species currently surviving only in captive assurance colonies. Approximately 30% of infected golden frogs survived Bd exposure by either clearing infection or maintaining low Bd loads, but this was not associated with probiotic treatment. Survival was instead related to initial composition of the skin bacterial community and metabolites present on the skin. These results suggest a strong link between the structure of these symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian host health in the face of Bd exposure and also suggest a new approach for developing amphibian probiotics.

  6. Composition of symbiotic bacteria predicts survival in Panamanian golden frogs infected with a lethal fungus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthew H; Walke, Jenifer B; Cikanek, Shawna; Savage, Anna E; Mattheus, Nichole; Santiago, Celina N; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Harris, Reid N; Belden, Lisa K; Gratwicke, Brian

    2015-04-22

    Symbiotic microbes can dramatically impact host health and fitness, and recent research in a diversity of systems suggests that different symbiont community structures may result in distinct outcomes for the host. In amphibians, some symbiotic skin bacteria produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a cutaneous fungal pathogen that has caused many amphibian population declines and extinctions. Treatment with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) prevents Bd infection in some amphibian species and creates optimism for conservation of species that are highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by Bd. In a laboratory experiment, we used Bd-inhibitory bacteria from Bd-tolerant Panamanian amphibians in a probiotic development trial with Panamanian golden frogs, Atelopus zeteki, a species currently surviving only in captive assurance colonies. Approximately 30% of infected golden frogs survived Bd exposure by either clearing infection or maintaining low Bd loads, but this was not associated with probiotic treatment. Survival was instead related to initial composition of the skin bacterial community and metabolites present on the skin. These results suggest a strong link between the structure of these symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian host health in the face of Bd exposure and also suggest a new approach for developing amphibian probiotics. PMID:25788591

  7. Composition of symbiotic bacteria predicts survival in Panamanian golden frogs infected with a lethal fungus

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthew H.; Walke, Jenifer B.; Cikanek, Shawna; Savage, Anna E.; Mattheus, Nichole; Santiago, Celina N.; Minbiole, Kevin P. C.; Harris, Reid N.; Belden, Lisa K.; Gratwicke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic microbes can dramatically impact host health and fitness, and recent research in a diversity of systems suggests that different symbiont community structures may result in distinct outcomes for the host. In amphibians, some symbiotic skin bacteria produce metabolites that inhibit the growth of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a cutaneous fungal pathogen that has caused many amphibian population declines and extinctions. Treatment with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) prevents Bd infection in some amphibian species and creates optimism for conservation of species that are highly susceptible to chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by Bd. In a laboratory experiment, we used Bd-inhibitory bacteria from Bd-tolerant Panamanian amphibians in a probiotic development trial with Panamanian golden frogs, Atelopus zeteki, a species currently surviving only in captive assurance colonies. Approximately 30% of infected golden frogs survived Bd exposure by either clearing infection or maintaining low Bd loads, but this was not associated with probiotic treatment. Survival was instead related to initial composition of the skin bacterial community and metabolites present on the skin. These results suggest a strong link between the structure of these symbiotic microbial communities and amphibian host health in the face of Bd exposure and also suggest a new approach for developing amphibian probiotics. PMID:25788591

  8. Active phases and flickering of a symbiotic recurrent nova T CrB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iłkiewicz, Krystian; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Stoyanov, Kiril; Manousakis, Antonios; Miszalski, Brent

    2016-11-01

    T CrB is a symbiotic recurrent nova known to exhibit active phases, characterized by apparent increases in the hot component temperature and the appearance of flickering, i.e. changes in the observed flux on the time-scale of minutes. Historical UV observations have ruled out orbital variability as an explanation for flickering and instead suggest flickering is caused by variable mass transfer. We have analysed optical and X-ray observations to investigate the nature of the flickering as well as the active phases in T CrB. The spectroscopic and photometric observations confirm that the active phases follow two periods of ˜1000d and ˜5000d. Flickering in the X-rays is detected and follows an amplitude-flux relationship similar to that observed in the optical. The flickering is most prominent at harder X-ray energies, suggesting that it originates in the boundary layer between the accretion disc and the white dwarf. The X-ray radiation from the boundary layer is then reprocessed by a thick accretion disc or a nebula into UV radiation. A more detailed understanding of flickering would benefit from long-term simultaneous X-ray and optical monitoring of the phenomena in symbiotic recurrent novae and related systems such as Z And type symbiotic stars.

  9. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and the Challenges to Its Extension to Nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Mus, Florence; Crook, Matthew B; Garcia, Kevin; Garcia Costas, Amaya; Geddes, Barney A; Kouri, Evangelia D; Paramasivan, Ponraj; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Poole, Philip S; Udvardi, Michael K; Voigt, Christopher A; Ané, Jean-Michel; Peters, John W

    2016-07-01

    Access to fixed or available forms of nitrogen limits the productivity of crop plants and thus food production. Nitrogenous fertilizer production currently represents a significant expense for the efficient growth of various crops in the developed world. There are significant potential gains to be had from reducing dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers in agriculture in the developed world and in developing countries, and there is significant interest in research on biological nitrogen fixation and prospects for increasing its importance in an agricultural setting. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, a form that can be used by plants. However, the process is restricted to bacteria and archaea and does not occur in eukaryotes. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is part of a mutualistic relationship in which plants provide a niche and fixed carbon to bacteria in exchange for fixed nitrogen. This process is restricted mainly to legumes in agricultural systems, and there is considerable interest in exploring whether similar symbioses can be developed in nonlegumes, which produce the bulk of human food. We are at a juncture at which the fundamental understanding of biological nitrogen fixation has matured to a level that we can think about engineering symbiotic relationships using synthetic biology approaches. This minireview highlights the fundamental advances in our understanding of biological nitrogen fixation in the context of a blueprint for expanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation to a greater diversity of crop plants through synthetic biology. PMID:27084023

  10. Genomic characterization of symbiotic mycoplasmas from the stomach of deep-sea isopod bathynomus sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Jiao-Mei; Wang, Shao-Lu; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Danchin, Antoine; He, Li-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Deep-sea isopod scavengers such as Bathynomus sp. are able to live in nutrient-poor environments, which is likely attributable to the presence of symbiotic microbes in their stomach. In this study we recovered two draft genomes of mycoplasmas, Bg1 and Bg2, from the metagenomes of the stomach contents and stomach sac of a Bathynomus sp. sample from the South China Sea (depth of 898 m). Phylogenetic trees revealed a considerable genetic distance to other mycoplasma species for Bg1 and Bg2. Compared with terrestrial symbiotic mycoplasmas, the Bg1 and Bg2 genomes were enriched with genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and sodium-driven symporters responsible for the uptake of sugars, amino acids and other carbohydrates. The genome of mycoplasma Bg1 contained sialic acid lyase and transporter genes, potentially enabling the bacteria to attach to the stomach sac and obtain organic carbons from various cell walls. Both of the mycoplasma genomes contained multiple copies of genes related to proteolysis and oligosaccharide degradation, which may help the host survive in low-nutrient conditions. The discovery of the different types of mycoplasma bacteria in the stomach of this deep-sea isopod affords insights into symbiotic model of deep-sea animals and genomic plasticity of mycoplasma bacteria. PMID:27312602

  11. Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation and the Challenges to Its Extension to Nonlegumes.

    PubMed

    Mus, Florence; Crook, Matthew B; Garcia, Kevin; Garcia Costas, Amaya; Geddes, Barney A; Kouri, Evangelia D; Paramasivan, Ponraj; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Poole, Philip S; Udvardi, Michael K; Voigt, Christopher A; Ané, Jean-Michel; Peters, John W

    2016-07-01

    Access to fixed or available forms of nitrogen limits the productivity of crop plants and thus food production. Nitrogenous fertilizer production currently represents a significant expense for the efficient growth of various crops in the developed world. There are significant potential gains to be had from reducing dependence on nitrogenous fertilizers in agriculture in the developed world and in developing countries, and there is significant interest in research on biological nitrogen fixation and prospects for increasing its importance in an agricultural setting. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric N2 to NH3, a form that can be used by plants. However, the process is restricted to bacteria and archaea and does not occur in eukaryotes. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is part of a mutualistic relationship in which plants provide a niche and fixed carbon to bacteria in exchange for fixed nitrogen. This process is restricted mainly to legumes in agricultural systems, and there is considerable interest in exploring whether similar symbioses can be developed in nonlegumes, which produce the bulk of human food. We are at a juncture at which the fundamental understanding of biological nitrogen fixation has matured to a level that we can think about engineering symbiotic relationships using synthetic biology approaches. This minireview highlights the fundamental advances in our understanding of biological nitrogen fixation in the context of a blueprint for expanding symbiotic nitrogen fixation to a greater diversity of crop plants through synthetic biology.

  12. A role for the mevalonate pathway in early plant symbiotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Chabaud, Mireille; Genre, Andrea; Balloon, Allison J.; Maeda, Junko; Forshey, Kari; den Os, Désirée; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Coon, Joshua J.; Barker, David G.; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi produce signals that are perceived by host legume receptors at the plasma membrane and trigger sustained oscillations of the nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spiking), which in turn leads to gene expression and downstream symbiotic responses. The activation of Ca2+ spiking requires the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like kinase Does not Make Infections 2 (DMI2) as well as the nuclear cation channel DMI1. A key enzyme regulating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Reductase 1 (HMGR1), interacts with DMI2 and is required for the legume–rhizobium symbiosis. Here, we show that HMGR1 is required to initiate Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in Medicago truncatula roots in response to rhizobial and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal signals. Furthermore, MVA, the direct product of HMGR1 activity, is sufficient to induce nuclear-associated Ca2+ spiking and symbiotic gene expression in both wild-type plants and dmi2 mutants, but interestingly not in dmi1 mutants. Finally, MVA induced Ca2+ spiking in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells expressing DMI1. This demonstrates that the nuclear cation channel DMI1 is sufficient to support MVA-induced Ca2+ spiking in this heterologous system. PMID:26199419

  13. Genomic characterization of symbiotic mycoplasmas from the stomach of deep-sea isopod bathynomus sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Jiao-Mei; Wang, Shao-Lu; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Zhang, Ai-Qun; Danchin, Antoine; He, Li-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Deep-sea isopod scavengers such as Bathynomus sp. are able to live in nutrient-poor environments, which is likely attributable to the presence of symbiotic microbes in their stomach. In this study we recovered two draft genomes of mycoplasmas, Bg1 and Bg2, from the metagenomes of the stomach contents and stomach sac of a Bathynomus sp. sample from the South China Sea (depth of 898 m). Phylogenetic trees revealed a considerable genetic distance to other mycoplasma species for Bg1 and Bg2. Compared with terrestrial symbiotic mycoplasmas, the Bg1 and Bg2 genomes were enriched with genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and sodium-driven symporters responsible for the uptake of sugars, amino acids and other carbohydrates. The genome of mycoplasma Bg1 contained sialic acid lyase and transporter genes, potentially enabling the bacteria to attach to the stomach sac and obtain organic carbons from various cell walls. Both of the mycoplasma genomes contained multiple copies of genes related to proteolysis and oligosaccharide degradation, which may help the host survive in low-nutrient conditions. The discovery of the different types of mycoplasma bacteria in the stomach of this deep-sea isopod affords insights into symbiotic model of deep-sea animals and genomic plasticity of mycoplasma bacteria.

  14. Improving File System Performance by Striping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Terance L.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This document discusses the performance and advantages of striped file systems on the SGI AD workstations. Performance of several striped file system configurations are compared and guidelines for optimal striping are recommended.

  15. Improved traveling wave tubes. [for ECM systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, E.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques, pioneered by NASA, which will allow substantial improvements in traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier efficiency, are described. It is shown that using design techniques developed at the Lewis Research Center, it is possible to approximately double the efficiency of the critical amplifier TWT. Attention is given to a quick method of computing the expected improvement to an ECM TWT. The benefits of such improvements such as less input power, a smaller and lighter power supply, and easier cooling are surveyed, and it noted that it is now possible to build efficient TWT's which rather than operating at saturation, can be very linear amplifiers. Finally, a new approach to power supplies is also covered.

  16. The role of the symbiotic fungus in the digestive metabolism of two species of fungus-growing ants.

    PubMed

    D'Ettorre, P; Mora, P; Dibangou, V; Rouland, C; Errard, C

    2002-02-01

    Leaf-cutting ants live in an obligatory symbiosis with a fungus which they grow on fresh leaves harvested by workers. This study attempts to clarify the respective role of ants and fungus in the degradation of plant material, in order to highlight the evolutionary basis of this mutualistic association. The symbiotic system of two ant species, Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus and Acromyrmex crassispinus, was investigated. To identify the digestive carbohydrases, a total of 19 specific and synthetic plant material substrates were tested on workers from different castes (major and minor), larvae and fungus. Extracts of A. subterraneus and A. crassispinus workers showed high enzymatic activity particularly on starch, maltose, sucrose and alpha-1,4 glucoside. Larvae degraded starch, sucrose, maltose but also laminarin, and all the detected activities were higher than those found for workers. The symbiotic fungus of A. subterraneus was mostly active on laminarin, xylan and cellulose, while the symbiotic fungus of A. crassispinus was mostly active on laminarin, starch, maltose and sucrose. The enzymatic activities of ants and fungus belonging to the same symbiotic system tended not to overlap, suggesting that the association is highly evolved and of an ancient origin.

  17. Comprehensive EST analysis of the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis

    PubMed Central

    Sabourault, Cécile; Ganot, Philippe; Deleury, Emeline; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Background Coral reef ecosystems are renowned for their diversity and beauty. Their immense ecological success is due to a symbiotic association between cnidarian hosts and unicellular dinoflagellate algae, known as zooxanthellae. These algae are photosynthetic and the cnidarian-zooxanthellae association is based on nutritional exchanges. Maintenance of such an intimate cellular partnership involves many crosstalks between the partners. To better characterize symbiotic relationships between a cnidarian host and its dinoflagellate symbionts, we conducted a large-scale EST study on a symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis, in which the two tissue layers (epiderm and gastroderm) can be easily separated. Results A single cDNA library was constructed from symbiotic tissue of sea anemones A. viridis in various environmental conditions (both normal and stressed). We generated 39,939 high quality ESTs, which were assembled into 14,504 unique sequences (UniSeqs). Sequences were analysed and sorted according to their putative origin (animal, algal or bacterial). We identified many new repeated elements in the 3'UTR of most animal genes, suggesting that these elements potentially have a biological role, especially with respect to gene expression regulation. We identified genes of animal origin that have no homolog in the non-symbiotic starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis genome, but in other symbiotic cnidarians, and may therefore be involved in the symbiosis relationship in A. viridis. Comparison of protein domain occurrence in A. viridis with that in N. vectensis demonstrated an increase in abundance of some molecular functions, such as protein binding or antioxidant activity, suggesting that these functions are essential for the symbiotic state and may be specific adaptations. Conclusion This large dataset of sequences provides a valuable resource for future studies on symbiotic interactions in Cnidaria. The comparison with the closest available genome, the sea

  18. Milwaukee Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP).

    PubMed

    Gradus, M Stephen; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Murphy, Amy; Becker, Julie N; Baker, Bevan K

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP) of the Association of Public Health Laboratories aims to improve state public health laboratory (PHL) system performance through continuous quality improvement. We successfully applied this state assessment tool to a local PHL (LPHL) system by tailoring it to reflect local system needs and created an LPHL system definition explaining how a local system differs from, yet complements, a state system. On November 18, 2010, 75 stakeholders from 40 agencies assessed the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, PHL system, capturing themes, strengths and weaknesses of the system, and scores for each of the 10 Essential Public Health Services. A Laboratory Advisory Committee analyzed assessment results to identify a strategic focus of research and workforce development and define an action plan, which is now being carried out. Milwaukee's L-SIP process is effectively improving LPHL system research and workforce development while raising community awareness of the system.

  19. Milwaukee Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Murphy, Amy; Becker, Julie N.; Baker, Bevan K.

    2013-01-01

    The Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP) of the Association of Public Health Laboratories aims to improve state public health laboratory (PHL) system performance through continuous quality improvement. We successfully applied this state assessment tool to a local PHL (LPHL) system by tailoring it to reflect local system needs and created an LPHL system definition explaining how a local system differs from, yet complements, a state system. On November 18, 2010, 75 stakeholders from 40 agencies assessed the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, PHL system, capturing themes, strengths and weaknesses of the system, and scores for each of the 10 Essential Public Health Services. A Laboratory Advisory Committee analyzed assessment results to identify a strategic focus of research and workforce development and define an action plan, which is now being carried out. Milwaukee's L-SIP process is effectively improving LPHL system research and workforce development while raising community awareness of the system. PMID:23997302

  20. Improving the explanation capabilities of advisory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Bruce; Souther, Art

    1993-01-01

    A major limitation of current advisory systems (e.g., intelligent tutoring systems and expert systems) is their restricted ability to give explanations. The goal of our research is to develop and evaluate a flexible explanation facility, one that can dynamically generate responses to questions not anticipated by the system's designers and that can tailor these responses to individual users. To achieve this flexibility, we are developing a large knowledge base, a viewpoint construction facility, and a modeling facility. In the long term we plan to build and evaluate advisory systems with flexible explanation facilities for scientists in numerous domains. In the short term, we are focusing on a single complex domain in biological science, and we are working toward two important milestones: (1) building and evaluating an advisory system with a flexible explanation facility for freshman-level students studying biology; and (2) developing general methods and tools for building similar explanation facilities in other domains.

  1. Improving the explanation capabilities of advisory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Bruce; Souther, Art

    1994-01-01

    A major limitation of current advisory systems (e.g., intelligent tutoring systems and expert systems) is their restricted ability to give explanations. The goal of our research is to develop and evaluate a flexible explanation facility, one that can dynamically generate responses to questions not anticipated by the system's designers and that can tailor these responses to individual users. To achieve this flexibility, we are developing a large knowledge base, a viewpoint construction facility, and a modeling facility. In the long term we plan to build and evaluate advisory systems with flexible explanation facilities for scientists in numerous domains. In the short term, we are focusing on a single complex domain in biological science, and we are working toward two important milestones: (1) building and evaluating an advisory system with a flexible explanation facility for freshman-level students studying biology, and (2) developing general methods and tools for building similar explanation facilities in other domains.

  2. Improving homogeneity by dynamic speed limit systems.

    PubMed

    van Nes, Nicole; Brandenburg, Stefan; Twisk, Divera

    2010-05-01

    Homogeneity of driving speeds is an important variable in determining road safety; more homogeneous driving speeds increase road safety. This study investigates the effect of introducing dynamic speed limit systems on homogeneity of driving speeds. A total of 46 subjects twice drove a route along 12 road sections in a driving simulator. The speed limit system (static-dynamic), the sophistication of the dynamic speed limit system (basic roadside, advanced roadside, and advanced in-car) and the situational condition (dangerous-non-dangerous) were varied. The homogeneity of driving speed, the rated credibility of the posted speed limit and the acceptance of the different dynamic speed limit systems were assessed. The results show that the homogeneity of individual speeds, defined as the variation in driving speed for an individual subject along a particular road section, was higher with the dynamic speed limit system than with the static speed limit system. The more sophisticated dynamic speed limit system tested within this study led to higher homogeneity than the less sophisticated systems. The acceptance of the dynamic speed limit systems used in this study was positive, they were perceived as quite useful and rather satisfactory.

  3. On the nature of the symbiotic binary AX Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikolajewska, Joanna; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1992-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary AX Persei are presented. This system contains a red giant that fills its tidal lobe and transfers material into an accretion disk surrounding a low-mass main-sequence star. The stellar masses - 1 solar mass for the red giant and about 0.4 solar mass for the companion - suggest AX Per is poised to enter a common envelope phase of evolution. The disk luminosity increases from L(disk) about 100 solar luminosity in quiescence to L(disk) about 5700 solar luminosity in outburst for a distance of d = 2.5 kpc. Except for visual maximum, high ionization permitted emission lines - such as He II - imply an EUV luminosity comparable to the disk luminosity. High-energy photons emitted by a hot boundary layer between the disk and central star ionize a surrounding nebula to produce this permitted line emission. High ionization forbidden lines form in an extended, shock-excited region well out of the binary's orbital plane and may be associated with mass loss from the disk.

  4. Improving Student Achievement Using Expert Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ronny; Smith, Bob; Leech, Don

    2004-01-01

    Both educators and the public are demanding improvements in student achievement and school performance. However, students meeting the highest college admission standards are increasingly selecting fields of study other than teaching. How can we increase teacher competence when many of our brightest teacher prospects are going into other fields?…

  5. Aligning Performance: Improving People, Systems, and Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, Danny

    Performance is the actual work that is done to assure that an organization achieves its mission, and aligning that performance assures that the path to the mission is harmonious. Alignment exists when all people involved understand the dimensions of the work and want to achieve and improve alignment. This book presents the "Language of Work" model…

  6. Feedback Improvement in Automatic Program Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupas, Bronius

    2010-01-01

    Automatic program evaluation is a way to assess source program files. These techniques are used in learning management environments, programming exams and contest systems. However, use of automated program evaluation encounters problems: some evaluations are not clear for the students and the system messages do not show reasons for lost points.…

  7. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  8. Changing and Improving Educational Systems and Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, A. Ross

    Research into the process of educational change has centered largely around the diffusion concept--the spread or permeation of an innovation from system to system or from school to school throughout a particular state or number of states. It is as if many teachers and administrators have understood the purpose of educational change to be the…

  9. Reliability improvement of distribution systems using SSVR.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mehdi; Shayanfar, Heidar Ali; Fotuhi-Firuzabad, Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability assessment algorithm for distribution systems using a Static Series Voltage Regulator (SSVR). Furthermore, this algorithm considers the effects of Distributed Generation (DG) units, alternative sources, system reconfiguration, load shedding and load adding on distribution system reliability indices. In this algorithm, load points are classified into 8 types and separated restoration times are considered for each class. Comparative studies are conducted to investigate the impacts of DG and alternative source unavailability on the distribution system reliability. For reliability assessment, the customer-oriented reliability indices such as SAIFI, SAIDI, CAIDI ASUI and also load- and energy-oriented indices such as ENS and AENS are evaluated. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is examined on the two standard distribution systems consisting of 33 and 69 nodes. The best location of the SSVR in distribution systems is determined based on different reliability indices, separately. Results show that the proposed algorithm is efficient for large-scale radial distribution systems and can accommodate the effects of fault isolation and load restoration. PMID:19006802

  10. Designing Bioretention Systems to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention systems effectively remove many stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate removal performance is highly variable. Bioretention media is typically coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which...

  11. Arthropod symbiotes of Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia:Diatomyidae).

    PubMed

    Bochkov, A V; Abramov, A V; Durden, L A; Apanaskevich, D A; Stekolnikov, A A; Stanyukovich, M K; Gnophanxay, S; Tikhonov, A N

    2011-04-01

    Arthropod symbiotes of the Laotian rock-rat, Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia:Diatomyidae), from Laos are examined. This host is a member of Diatomyidae previously thought to have gone extinct >10 million yr ago. Permanent symbiotes are represented by 2 species, a new species of sucking louse, Polyplax sp., near rhizomydis (Phthiraptera:Polyplacidae), and a new species of fur mite, Afrolistrophorus sp., near maculatus (Acariformes:Listrophoridae). The temporary parasites are represented by 18 species, i.e., 1 mesostigmatan species, i.e., a new species of Androlaelaps near casalis (Parasitiformes:Laelapidae); immature stages of 2 tick species, Ixodes granulatus and Haemaphysalis sp. (Parasitiformes:Ixodidae); and a rich fauna of chiggers (Acariformes:Trombiculidae) comprising 8 genera and 15 species. It is hypothesized that this host completely lost its initial fauna of ectosymbiotes and that ancestors of the recorded symbiotes switched to this host from rodents of the superfamily Muroidea.

  12. Symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. with an echinoderm

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.; De Ridder, C.

    1998-09-01

    Thiothrix-like bacteria have been reported as symbionts in invertebrates from sulfide-rich habitats. Isolation of these symbiotic Thiothrix-like bacteria has failed, and the organisms have not been previously identified with certainty. The genus Thiothrix was created for ensheathed filamentous bacteria that oxidize sulfide and deposit sulfur granules internally, attach to substrates, produce gliding gonidia, and form rosettes. Immunoassay procedures were used to investigate the symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. in the intestinal cecum of the spatangoid species Echinocardium cordatum. Thiothrix spp. were identified in nodule samples from E. cordatum digestive tubes based on microscopic examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and indirect immunofluorescence. Thiothrix spp. protein made up as much as 84% of the total protein content of the nodules. This is the first identification of Thiothrix spp. internally symbiotic with marine invertebrates.

  13. Morphological and genetic diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria from cycads.

    PubMed

    Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Sundaramoorthy, Mariappan; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Akbarsha, Mohamed Abdulkadar; Gunasekaran, Muthukumaran

    2010-06-01

    The morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria associated with cycads was examined using PCR amplification techniques and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from different cycad species. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously reported to form symbioses with Cycadaceae family, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the repetitive sequences. Based on fingerprint patterns and phenograms, it was revealed that cyanobacterial symbionts exhibit important genetic diversity among host plants, both within and between cycad populations. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of the symbiotic cyanobacterial isolates fell into well-separated clades. PMID:20473963

  14. Morphological and genetic diversity of symbiotic cyanobacteria from cycads.

    PubMed

    Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Muralitharan, Gangatharan; Sundaramoorthy, Mariappan; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Akbarsha, Mohamed Abdulkadar; Gunasekaran, Muthukumaran

    2010-06-01

    The morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria associated with cycads was examined using PCR amplification techniques and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Eighteen symbiotic cyanobacteria were isolated from different cycad species. One of the symbiotic isolates was a species of Calothrix, a genus not previously reported to form symbioses with Cycadaceae family, and the remainder were Nostoc spp. Axenic cyanobacterial strains were compared by DNA amplification using PCR with either short arbitrary primers or primers specific for the repetitive sequences. Based on fingerprint patterns and phenograms, it was revealed that cyanobacterial symbionts exhibit important genetic diversity among host plants, both within and between cycad populations. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that most of the symbiotic cyanobacterial isolates fell into well-separated clades.

  15. [The symbiotic microflora associated with the tegument of proteocephalidean cestodes and the intestines of their fish hosts].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Zh V; Plotnikov, A O

    2006-01-01

    The indigenous symbiotic microflora associated with the tegument of proteocephalidean cestodes and the intestines of their fish hosts has been investigated in morphological and ecological aspects. The indigenous microflora associated with the cestode tegument consists of the nannobacteria population, which was present obligatorily on the surface of tegument, and the "deep microflora". The deep microflora associates with some few species of parasites only. Each individual host-parasite micro-biocenosis includes specific indigenous symbiotic microorganisms, with the differing microfloras of host intestine and parasite. Physiology, biochemistry and/or diet of hosts apparently influence on the symbiotic microflora's structure of parasites. The least bacteria abundance and diversity of their morphotypes were observed in the parasites from baby fishes. The diversity and abundance of bacteria were increased with the fish host ageing and the formation of the definitive structure of its intestine. It is an evidence of the gradual invading of the intestinal parasites (cestodes) tegument by bacterial cells. The invading is realized on the base of the microflora that was present in the food of fish host. The symbiotic microflora has specific morphological features, can regulate the homeostasis of the cestodes and fish hosts and also can maintain equilibrium of alimentary and immune interrelations in the host-parasite system. PMID:17042276

  16. Systems and methods for improved telepresence

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Matthew O.; Willis, W. David; Kinoshita, Robert A.

    2005-10-25

    The present invention provides a modular, flexible system for deploying multiple video perception technologies. The telepresence system of the present invention is capable of allowing an operator to control multiple mono and stereo video inputs in a hands-free manner. The raw data generated by the input devices is processed into a common zone structure that corresponds to the commands of the user, and the commands represented by the zone structure are transmitted to the appropriate device. This modularized approach permits input devices to be easily interfaced with various telepresence devices. Additionally, new input devices and telepresence devices are easily added to the system and are frequently interchangeable. The present invention also provides a modular configuration component that allows an operator to define a plurality of views each of which defines the telepresence devices to be controlled by a particular input device. The present invention provides a modular flexible system for providing telepresence for a wide range of applications. The modularization of the software components combined with the generalized zone concept allows the systems and methods of the present invention to be easily expanded to encompass new devices and new uses.

  17. Performance improvement in the perioperative system.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kathleen V; Krupka, Dan C

    2012-12-01

    Hospital finance leaders should work with their organizations' perioperative leaders to implement a three-step process for identifying projects with the greatest potential for improving quality while reducing costs and increasing revenue. In essence, this process involves mapping the strategy, developing a list of potential projects, and culling projects that cannot reasonably be accomplished with available resources. The extent to which staff resources are available for such projects can best be measured using a simple spreadsheet designed for tracking special assignments of each staff member.

  18. Symbiotic stars and other Hα emission-line stars towards the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, Brent; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binaries with the longest orbital periods, and their multicomponent structure makes them rich astrophysical laboratories. The accretion of a high-mass-loss-rate red giant wind on to a white dwarf (WD) makes them promising Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) progenitors. Systematic surveys for new Galactic symbiotic stars are critical to identify new promising SN Ia progenitors (e.g. RS Oph) and to better estimate the total population size to compare against SN Ia rates. Central to the latter objective is building a complete census of symbiotic stars towards the Galactic bulge. Here we report on the results of a systematic survey of Hα emission-line stars covering 35 deg2. It is distinguished by the combination of deep optical spectroscopy and long-term light curves that improve the certainty of our classifications. A total of 20 bona fide symbiotic stars are found (13 S-types, 6 D-types and 1 D'-type), 35 per cent of which show the symbiotic specific Raman-scattered O VI emission bands, as well as 15 possible symbiotic stars that require further study (six S-types and nine D-types). Light curves show a diverse range of variability including stellar pulsations (semi-regular and Mira), orbital variations and slow changes due to dust. Orbital periods are determined for five S-types and Mira pulsation periods for three D-types. The most significant D-type found is H1-45 and its carbon Mira with a pulsation period of 408.6 d, corresponding to an estimated period-luminosity relation distance of ˜6.2 ± 1.4 kpc and MK = -8.06 ± 0.12 mag. If H1-45 belongs to the Galactic bulge, then it would be the first bona fide luminous carbon star to be identified in the Galactic bulge population. The lack of luminous carbon stars in the bulge is a longstanding unsolved problem. A possible explanation for H1-45 may be that the carbon enhancement was accreted from the progenitor of the WD companion. A wide variety of unusual emission-line stars were also

  19. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    PubMed Central

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  20. Improved OTEC System for a Submarine Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Yi; Jones, Jack; Valdez, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    An ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), now undergoing development, is a less-massive, more-efficient means of exploiting the same basic principle as that of the proposed system described in "Alternative OTEC Scheme for a Submarine Robot" (NPO-43500), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 50. The proposed system as described previously would be based on the thawing-expansion/freezing-contraction behavior of a wax or perhaps another suitable phase-change material (PCM). The power generated by the system would be used to recharge the batteries in a battery- powered unmanned underwater vehicle [UUV (essentially, a small exploratory submarine robot)] of a type that has been deployed in large numbers in research pertaining to global warming. A UUV of this type travels between the ocean surface and depths, measuring temperature and salinity. At one phase of its operational cycle, the previously proposed system would utilize the surface ocean temperature (which lies between 15 and 30 C over most of the Earth) to melt a PCM that has a melting/freezing temperature of about 10 C. At the opposite phase of its operational cycle, the system would utilize the lower ocean temperature at depth (e.g., between 4 and 7 C at a depth of 300 m) to freeze the PCM. The melting or freezing would cause the PCM to expand or contract, respectively, by about 9 volume percent. The PCM would be contained in tubes that would be capable of expanding and contracting with the PCM. The PCM-containing tubes would be immersed in a hydraulic fluid. The expansion and contraction would drive a flow of the hydraulic fluid against a piston that, in turn, would push a rack-and-pinion gear system to spin a generator to charge a battery.

  1. Corporate Electronic Publishing Systems. Curriculum Improvement Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Dwight; Crowley, Ed

    This guide is intended for use in teaching a postsecondary-level course in corporate electronic publishing systems. The following topics are covered: cultural influence of graphic communication (early events in communication, early attempts at printing); typefaces and styles of type (type style characteristics and their use); tools and methods of…

  2. Supporting Continuous Improvement in California's Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Plank, David N.

    2015-01-01

    California's new accountability system originated in the radical decentralization of power and authority from Sacramento to local schools and their communities brought about by the Legislature's adoption of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) in 2013. Under California's previous accountability policies and the federal "No Child Left…

  3. Improved thermal isolation for superconducting magnet systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, E. R.

    1974-01-01

    Closed-cycle refrigerating system for superconductive magnet and maser is operated in vacuum environment. Each wire leading from external power source passes through cooling station which blocks heat conduction. In connection with these stations, switch with small incandescent light bulb, which generates heat, is used to stop superconduction.

  4. Operating Systems. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Charlene

    This course curriculum is intended for community college instructors and administrators to use in implementing an operating systems course. A student's course syllabus provides this information: credit hours, catalog description, prerequisites, required texts, instructional process, objectives, student evaluation, and class schedule. A student…

  5. Philadelphia's Teacher Appraisal System Needs Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Camika; Tossman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the community about teacher appraisal methods in the School District of Philadelphia, outline the difficulties of the current system, and suggest approaches that would strengthen the teacher appraisal process. The authors gathered their information over three months in mid-2009 from multiple sources:…

  6. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, F.C.; Mei, V.C.; Murphy, R.W.

    1998-12-08

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger. 2 figs.

  7. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.; Murphy, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  8. Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2003-11-01

    NREL will produce this sourcebook for DOE's Industrial Technologies Office as part of a series of documents on industrial energy equipment. The sourcebook is a reference for industrial compressed air system users, outlining opportunities to improve system efficiency.

  9. Improving Fan System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-01

    This is one of a series of sourcebooks on motor-driven equipment produced by the Industrial Technologies Program. It provides a reference for industrial fan systems users, outlining opportunities to improve fan system performance.

  10. State Public Health Laboratory System Quality Improvement Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vagnone, Paula Snippes

    2013-01-01

    The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) and the APHL Laboratory Systems and Standards Committee manage the Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP). One component of L-SIP is an assessment that allows the members and stakeholders of a laboratory system to have an open and honest discussion about the laboratory system's strengths and weaknesses. From these facilitated discussions, gaps and opportunities for improvement are identified. In some cases, ideas for how to best address these gaps emerge, and workgroups are formed. Depending on resources, both monetary and personnel, laboratory staff will then prioritize the next component of L-SIP: which quality improvement activities to undertake. This article describes a sample of quality improvement activities initiated by several public health laboratories after they conducted L-SIP assessments. These projects can result in more robust linkages between system entities, which can translate into improvements in the way the system addresses the needs of stakeholders. PMID:23997301

  11. Fly ash system technology improves opacity

    SciTech Connect

    2007-06-15

    Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

  12. Imaging system design for improved information capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L.; Huck, F. O.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information for communication channels is used to assess the performance of line-scan and sensor-array imaging systems and to optimize the design trade-offs involving sensitivity, spatial response, and sampling intervals. Formulations and computational evaluations account for spatial responses typical of line-scan and sensor-array mechanisms, lens diffraction and transmittance shading, defocus blur, and square and hexagonal sampling lattices.

  13. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on Behavior Modification Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Silverman, Lloyd H.

    1978-01-01

    Obese women were treated in behavior modification programs for overeating. Behavior programs were accompanied by subliminal stimulation and by symbiotic and control messages. The symbiotic condition gave evidence of enhancing weight loss. This finding supports the proposition that subliminal stimulation of symbiotic fantasies can enhance the…

  14. National quality improvement policies and strategies in European healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, E; Walshe, K

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This survey provides an overview of the development of policies and strategies for quality improvement in European healthcare systems, by mapping quality improvement policies and strategies, progress in their implementation, and early indications of their impact. Study design: A survey of quality improvement policies and strategies in healthcare systems of the European Union was conducted in 2005 for the first phase of the Methods of Assessing Response to Quality Improvement Strategies (MARQuIS) project. Participants: The survey, completed by 68 key experts in quality improvement from 24 European Union member states, represents their views and accounts of quality improvement policies and strategies in their healthcare systems. Principal findings: There are substantial international and intra-national variations in the development of healthcare quality improvement. Legal requirements for quality improvement strategies are an important driver of progress, along with the activities of national governments and professional associations and societies. Patient and service user organisations appear to have less influence on quality improvement. Wide variation in voluntary and mandatory coverage of quality improvement policies and strategies across sectors can potentially lead to varying levels of progress in implementation. Many healthcare organisations lack basic infrastructure for quality improvement. Conclusions: Some convergence can be observed in policies on quality improvement in healthcare. Nevertheless, the growth of patient mobility across borders, along with the implications of free market provisions for the organisation and funding of healthcare systems in European Union member states, require policies for cooperation and learning transfer. PMID:19188457

  15. IPHAS and the symbiotic stars . II. New discoveries and a sample of the most common mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Valentini, M.; Munari, U.; Drew, J. E.; Rodríguez-Flores, E. R.; Viironen, K.; Greimel, R.; Santander-García, M.; Sabin, L.; Mampaso, A.; Parker, Q.; DePew, K.; Sale, S. E.; Unruh, Y. C.; Vink, J. S.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Barlow, M. J.; Lennon, D. J.; Groot, P. J.; Giammanco, C.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Walton, N. A.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Knowledge of the total population of symbiotic stars in the Galaxy is important for understanding basic aspects of stellar evolution in interacting binaries and the relevance of this class of objects in the formation of supernovae of type Ia. Aims: In a previous paper, we presented the selection criteria needed to search for symbiotic stars in IPHAS, the INT Hα survey of the Northern Galactic plane. IPHAS gives us the opportunity to make a systematic, complete search for symbiotic stars in a magnitude-limited volume. Methods: Follow-up spectroscopy at different telescopes worldwide of a sample of sixty two symbiotic star candidates is presented. Results: Seven out of nineteen S-type candidates observed spectroscopically are confirmed to be genuine symbiotic stars. The spectral type of their red giant components, as well as reddening and distance, were computed by modelling the spectra. Only one new D-type symbiotic system, out of forty-three candidates observed, was found. This was as expected (see discussion in our paper on the selection criteria). The object shows evidence for a high density outflow expanding at a speed ≥65 km s-1. Most of the other candidates are lightly reddened classical T Tauri stars and more highly reddened young stellar objects that may be either more massive young stars of HAeBe type or classical Be stars. In addition, a few notable objects have been found, such as three new Wolf-Rayet stars and two relatively high-luminosity evolved massive stars. We also found a helium-rich source, possibly a dense ejecta hiding a WR star, which is surrounded by a large ionized nebula. Conclusions: These spectroscopic data allow us to refine the selection criteria for symbiotic stars in the IPHAS survey and, more generally, to better understand the behaviour of different Hα emitters in the IPHAS and 2MASS colour-colour diagrams. Based on observations obtained at; the 2.6 m Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA; the 2.5 m INT and 4.2 m

  16. Improvements in patient treatment planning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Atkinson, C.A.; Babcock, R.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) software system is used to develop treatment planning information. In typical use BNCT-Rtpe consists of three main components: (1) Semi-automated geometric modeling of objects (brain, target, eyes, sinus) derived from MRI, CT, and other medical imaging modalities, (2) Dose computations for these geometric models with rtt-MC, the INEL Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, and (3) Dose contouring overlaid on medical images as well as generation of other dose displays. We continue to develop a planning system based on three-dimensional image-based reconstructions using Bspline surfaces. Even though this software is in an experimental state, it has been applied for large animal research and for an isolated case of treatment for a human glioma. Radiation transport is based on Monte Carlo, however there will be implementations of faster methods (e.g. diffusion theory) in the future. The important thing for treatment planning is the output which must convey, to the radiologist, the deposition of dose to healthy and target tissue. Many edits are available such that one can obtain contours registered to medical image, dose/volume histograms and most information required for treatment planning and response assessment. Recent work has been to make the process more automatic and easier to use. The interface, now implemented for contouring and reconstruction, utilizes the Xwindowing system and the MOTIF graphical users interface for effective interaction with the planner. Much work still remains before the tool can be applied in a routine clinical setting.

  17. Ignition system improvements for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, G.A.

    1989-07-11

    This patent describes an ignition system for a spark ignition internal combustion engine. The system consists of: a pulse transformer having a primary winding and a secondary winding connected to a spark plug; driver means for supplying a voltage signal to the pulse transformer primary winding thereby including a high voltage signal and the secondary winding applied to the spark plug; controller means for providing control signals to the driver means, thereby causing the driver means to generate a voltage applied to the secondary winding, and discharge detection means for sensing the occurrence of electrical discharge across the spark plug and applying a discharge signal to the controller means for controlling the operation of the controller means; wherein the ignition system detects the existence of auto-ignition characterized by pressure and temperature fluctuations within the engine combustion chamber occurring after piston top dead center which departs from normal combustion, and further comprising timing means for sensing the position of the piston and for providing a timing signal, and wherein the controller means applies a hover voltage of a predetermined maximum level across the spark plug during a period of the cylinder cycle operating cycle after piston top dead center, the hover voltage applied at a level at which discharge across the spark plug occurs in the event that the combustion chamber is experiencing auto-ignition but does not occur if the conditions within the cylinder are of normal combustion, wherein the discharge detection means thereby provides an indication of the existence of auto-ignition.

  18. Magnetic Bearing Controller Improvements for High Speed Flywheel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control system for a high-speed flywheel system is described. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system, using eddy current sensors for position feedback to the bearing controller. Magnetic bearing controller features designed to improve flywheel operation and testing are described. Operational improvements include feed forward control to compensate for rotor imbalance, moving notch filtering to compensate for synchronous and harmonic rotational noise, and fixed notching to prevent rotor bending mode excitation. Testing improvements include adding safe gain, bearing current hold, bearing current zero, and excitation input features. Performance and testing improvements provided by these features are measured and discussed.

  19. Improving School Leadership. Volume 2: Case Studies on System Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, David, Ed.; Nusche, Deborah, Ed.; Pont, Beatriz, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This book explores what specialists are saying about system leadership for school improvement. Case studies examine innovative approaches to sharing leadership across schools in Belgium (Flanders), Finland and the United Kingdom (England) and leadership development programmes for system improvement in Australia and Austria. As these are emerging…

  20. Design Patterns Application in the ERP Systems Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovičić, Bojan; Vlajić, Siniša

    Design patterns application have long been present in software engineering. The same is true for ERP systems in business software. Is it possible that ERP systems do not have a good maintenance score? We have found out that there is room for maintenance improvement and that it is possible to improve ERP systems using design patterns. We have conducted comparative analysis of ease of maintenance of the ERP systems. The results show that the average score for our questions is 64%, with most answers for ERP systems like SAP, Oracle EBS, Dynamics AX. We found that 59% of ERP system developer users are not familiar with design patterns. Based on this research, we have chosen Dynamics AX as the ERP system for examination of design patterns improvement possibilities. We used software metrics to measure improvement possibility. We found that we could increase the Conditional Complexity score 17-fold by introducing design patterns.

  1. The Effect of Symbiotic Supplementation on Liver Enzymes, C-reactive Protein and Ultrasound Findings in Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, Atefe; Askari, Gholamreza; Esmailzade, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Mohammadi, Vida

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regarding to the growing prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), concentrating on various strategies to its prevention and management seems necessary. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of symbiotic on C-reactive protein (CRP), liver enzymes, and ultrasound findings in patients with NAFLD. Methods: Eighty NAFLD patients were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Participants received symbiotic in form of a 500 mg capsule (containing seven species of probiotic bacteria and fructooligosaccharides) or a placebo capsule daily for 8 weeks. Ultrasound grading, CRP, and liver enzymes were evaluated at the baseline and the end of the study. Results: In the symbiotic group, ultrasound grade decreased significantly compared to baseline (P < 0.005) but symbiotic supplementation was not associated with changes in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels. In the placebo group, there was no significant change in steatosis grade whereas ALT and AST levels were significantly increased (P = 0.002, P = 0.02, respectively). CRP values remained static in either group. Conclusions: Symbiotic supplementation improved steatosis in NAFLD patients and might be useful in the management of NAFLD or protective against its progression. PMID:27076897

  2. Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D.; Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C.

    1995-02-28

    The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

  3. Concurrent hypercube system with improved message passing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John C. (Inventor); Tuazon, Jesus O. (Inventor); Lieberman, Don (Inventor); Pniel, Moshe (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A network of microprocessors, or nodes, are interconnected in an n-dimensional cube having bidirectional communication links along the edges of the n-dimensional cube. Each node's processor network includes an I/O subprocessor dedicated to controlling communication of message packets along a bidirectional communication link with each end thereof terminating at an I/O controlled transceiver. Transmit data lines are directly connected from a local FIFO through each node's communication link transceiver. Status and control signals from the neighboring nodes are delivered over supervisory lines to inform the local node that the neighbor node's FIFO is empty and the bidirectional link between the two nodes is idle for data communication. A clocking line between neighbors, clocks a message into an empty FIFO at a neighbor's node and vica versa. Either neighbor may acquire control over the bidirectional communication link at any time, and thus each node has circuitry for checking whether or not the communication link is busy or idle, and whether or not the receive FIFO is empty. Likewise, each node can empty its own FIFO and in turn deliver a status signal to a neighboring node indicating that the local FIFO is empty. The system includes features of automatic message rerouting, block message transfer and automatic parity checking and generation.

  4. The prototype symbiotic star AX Per is in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Dallaporta, S.; Righetti, G. L.; Castellani, F.; Cherini, G.

    2014-08-01

    The prototype symbiotic star AX Per is in outburst. This is the third such event in the current series of outbursts, the previous two peaking at V=10.41 on 2009 May 26 and at V=10.03 on 2012 Aug 28, according to ANS Collaboration intensive monitoring.

  5. Discovery in IC10 of the farthest known symbiotic star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Denise R.; Magrini, Laura; Munari, Ulisse; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Costa, Roberto D. D.

    2008-11-01

    We report the discovery of the first known symbiotic star in IC10, a starburst galaxy belonging to the Local Group, at a distance of ~750 kpc. The symbiotic star was identified during a survey of emission-line objects. It shines at V = 24.62 +/- 0.04,V - RC = 2.77 +/- 0.05 and RC - IC = 2.39 +/- 0.02, and suffers from EB- V = 0.85 +/- 0.05 reddening. The spectrum of the cool component well matches that of solar neighbourhood M8III giants. The observed emission lines belong to Balmer series, [SII], [NII] and [OIII]. They suggest a low electronic density, negligible optical depth effects and 35000 < Teff < 90000 K for the ionizing source. The spectrum of the new symbiotic star in IC10 is an almost perfect copy of that of Hen 2-147, a well-known Galactic symbiotic star and Mira. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership. We also retrieved UBVRI images of the `Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars', Massey et al. (2007). E-mail: denise@ov.ufrj.br

  6. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation is the result of a complex bacterial infection process, which depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial nodulation outer proteins (Nops)...

  7. Compressed Air System Improvements at an Automotive Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-01

    In 1998, the Ford Motor Company implemented a compressed air system improvement project at its Woodhaven Stamping plant in Woodhaven, Michigan. As a result of the system approach that it took towards improving the plant's compressed air system, the plant was able to take an 800-hp air compressor offline, shut down several high pressure satellite compressors, and operate the remaining compressors more efficiently.

  8. The Symbiotic Relationship between Scientific Workflow and Provenance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the symbiotic nature of scientific workflows and provenance. We will also discuss the current trends and real world challenges facing these two distinct research areas. Although motivated differently, the needs of the international science communities are the glue that binds this relationship together. Understanding and articulating the science drivers to these communities is paramount as these technologies evolve and mature. Originally conceived for managing business processes, workflows are now becoming invaluable assets in both computational and experimental sciences. These reconfigurable, automated systems provide essential technology to perform complex analyses by coupling together geographically distributed disparate data sources and applications. As a result, workflows are capable of higher throughput in a shorter amount of time than performing the steps manually. Today many different workflow products exist; these could include Kepler and Taverna or similar products like MeDICI, developed at PNNL, that are standardized on the Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). Provenance, originating from the French term Provenir “to come from”, is used to describe the curation process of artwork as art is passed from owner to owner. The concept of provenance was adopted by digital libraries as a means to track the lineage of documents while standards such as the DublinCore began to emerge. In recent years the systems science community has increasingly expressed the need to expand the concept of provenance to formally articulate the history of scientific data. Communities such as the International Provenance and Annotation Workshop (IPAW) have formalized a provenance data model. The Open Provenance Model, and the W3C is hosting a provenance incubator group featuring the Proof Markup Language. Although both workflows and provenance have risen from different communities and operate independently, their mutual

  9. Lean management systems: creating a culture of continuous quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Clark, David M; Silvester, Kate; Knowles, Simon

    2013-08-01

    This is the first in a series of articles describing the application of Lean management systems to Laboratory Medicine. Lean is the term used to describe a principle-based continuous quality improvement (CQI) management system based on the Toyota production system (TPS) that has been evolving for over 70 years. Its origins go back much further and are heavily influenced by the work of W Edwards Deming and the scientific method that forms the basis of most quality management systems. Lean has two fundamental elements--a systematic approach to process improvement by removing waste in order to maximise value for the end-user of the service and a commitment to respect, challenge and develop the people who work within the service to create a culture of continuous improvement. Lean principles have been applied to a growing number of Healthcare systems throughout the world to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of services for patients and a number of laboratories from all the pathology disciplines have used Lean to shorten turnaround times, improve quality (reduce errors) and improve productivity. Increasingly, models used to plan and implement large scale change in healthcare systems, including the National Health Service (NHS) change model, have evidence-based improvement methodologies (such as Lean CQI) as a core component. Consequently, a working knowledge of improvement methodology will be a core skill for Pathologists involved in leadership and management.

  10. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  11. Asparagine: an amide of particular distinction in the regulation of symbiotic nitrogen fixation of legumes.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-09-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is tightly regulated by a range of fine processes at the nodule level, over which the host plant has overall control through the whole life of the plant. The operation of this control at the nodule level is not yet fully understood, but greater knowledge will ultimately lead to a better improvement of N2 fixation through the use of crop legumes and genetic engineering of crop plants for higher performance. It has been suggested that, nodule responses to the nutritional complexity of the rhizosphere environment involve a great deal of coordination of sensing and signal transduction. This regulation can be achieved through several mechanisms, including changes in carbon metabolism, oxygen supply and/or overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recently, the cycling of amino acids observed between the plant and bacteroid fractions suggests a new and important regulatory mechanism involved in nodule responses. Most of the recent transcriptional findings are consistent with the earlier biochemical and physiological reports. Current research revealed unique advances for nodule metabolism, especially on the regulation of asparagine synthetase gene expression and the control of asparagine (ASN) to N2 fixing activity. A large amount of ASN is found accumulating in the root nodules of the symbiotic plants under restricted environments, such as drought, salinity and nutrient deficiency. Exceptionally, ASN phloem feeding has resulted in an increased concentration of the ASN amide in nodules followed by a remarkable decrease in nodule activity. In this review, recent progress concerning the possible role of ASN in whole-plant-based down-regulation of symbiotic N2 fixation will be reviewed.

  12. Hospitals recognize need to install or improve cost accounting systems.

    PubMed

    Gilman, T A

    1985-11-01

    Cost accounting and implementation of a cost accounting system are becoming increasing important issues for hospitals. Therefore, to gauge current practices and future plans, HFMA in conjunction with Deloitte Haskins & Sells conducted a survey of top financial officers in approximately 3,100 hospitals. The results show 54 percent of hospitals have installed some kind of cost accounting system that captures costs at the procedure or DRG level; the existing systems seem to be relatively unsophisticated; hospitals recognize the need to improve their systems; and the improved systems will incorporate some use of standard costs.

  13. Can Quality Improvement System Improve Childcare Site Performance in School Readiness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Watson, Grace

    2013-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of the Quality Improvement System (QIS) developed and implemented by Children's Services Council of Palm Beach County (Florida) as a voluntary initiative to improve the quality of childcare and education. They adopted a growth model approach to investigate whether childcare sites that participated in…

  14. Systems Thinking: A Skill to Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Bill; Peltier, Gary; Perreault, George

    2004-01-01

    This article examines how schools can avoid barriers to systems thinking in relation to improving student achievement. It then illustrates common errors associated with non-systems thinking and recommends solutions. Educators who understand that schools are complex interdependent social systems can move their organizations forward. Unfortunately,…

  15. Achieving Continuous Improvement: Theories that Support a System Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armel, Donald

    Focusing on improvement is different than focusing on quality, quantity, customer satisfaction, and productivity. This paper discusses Open System Theory, and suggests ways to change large systems. Changing a system (meaning the way all the parts are connected) requires a considerable amount of data gathering and analysis. Choosing the proper…

  16. Validation of a National Teacher Assessment and Improvement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taut, Sandy; Santelices, Maria Veronica; Stecher, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The task of validating a teacher assessment and improvement system is similar whether the system operates in the United States or in another country. Chile has a national teacher evaluation system (NTES) that is standards based, uses multiple instruments, and is intended to serve both formative and summative purposes. For the past 6 years the…

  17. Ohio Aluminum Industries: Compressed air system improvement project saves energy and improves product quality

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2003-11-01

    In 2001, Ohio Aluminum Industries implemented the first phase of a compressed air system improvement project at its Cleveland, Ohio, plant. By completing this phase, the plant stabilized the system's pressure and improved its performance. Furthermore, it yielded annual energy savings of 716,000 kilowatt-hours and $73,200. The total cost for the project's first phase was $83,500, making the simple payback slightly more than 1 year.

  18. Soybean nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in response to soil compaction and mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume crops such as soybean plays a key role in supplying nitrogen for agricultural systems. In symbiotic associations with Bradyrhizobium japonicum soybean can fix up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1. This reduces the need for expensive and often environmentally harmful because of leaching nitrogen fertilization. However both soybean nodulation and nitrogen fixation are sensitive to soil conditions. One of the critical soil constraints is soil compaction. Increasing use of heavy equipment and intensive cropping in modern agriculture leads to excessive soil compaction. Compaction often is found as a result of field operations that have to be performed in a very short period of time and when soils are wet and more susceptible to compaction. This results in unfavourable water content, temperature, aeration, pore size distribution, strength for plant growth and microbial activity. The surface mulching can alleviate the adverse effect of the environmental factors on soil by decreasing fluctuation of soil temperature, increasing moisture by controlling evaporation from the soil surface, decreasing bulk density, preventing soil crusting. The effect of mulch on soil conditions largely depends on soil compaction and weather conditions during growing season. The positive effect of the straw mulch on soil moisture has been seen under seasons with insufficient rainfalls. However thicker layers of mulch can act as diffusion barrier, especially when the mulch is wet. Additionally, low soil temperature prevalent during early spring under mulch can impede development of nodule, nodule size and delay onset of nodulation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the straw mulch on nodulation and nitrogen fixation of soybean in variously compacted soil. The experimental field was 192 m2and was divided into three parts composed of 6 micro-plots with area 7 m2. Three degrees of soil compaction obtained in each field part through tractor passes were

  19. Improved control system power unit for large parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.; Grubbs, T. M.

    1968-01-01

    Improved control system power unit drives the control surfaces of very large controllable parachutes. The design features subassemblies for determining control surface position and cable loading, and protection of the load sensor against the possibility of damage during manipulation.

  20. Improved molecular sorbent trap for high-vacuum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knechtel, E. D.; Pitts, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Closed cycle refrigeration loop in which trays holding molecular sorbent are made to serve as cooling baffles improves the performance of high vacuum systems. High performance is obtained with almost no decrease in pumping speed.

  1. Improving State Accountability Systems for Postsecondary Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert G.

    This paper makes recommendations for developing the next generation of state accountability systems for postsecondary vocational education (PVE). It focuses on the need to improve the core indicators for PVE; reduce the burden and improve the value of Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Amendments of 1998 (Perkins III)…

  2. Asan Medical Information System for Healthcare Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Woo Sung; Min, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Ja; Lee, Yong Su; Lee, Young Ha; Nam, Sang Woo; Eo, Gi Seung; Seo, Sook Gyoung; Nam, Mi Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This purpose of this paper is to introduce the status of the Asan Medical Center (AMC) medical information system with respect to healthcare quality improvement. Methods Asan Medical Information System (AMIS) is projected to become a completely electronic and digital information hospital. AMIS has played a role in improving the health care quality based on the following measures: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, privacy, and security. Results AMIS consisted of several distinctive systems: order communication system, electronic medical record, picture archiving communication system, clinical research information system, data warehouse, enterprise resource planning, IT service management system, and disaster recovery system. The most distinctive features of AMIS were the high alert-medication recognition & management system, the integrated and severity stratified alert system, the integrated patient monitoring system, the perioperative diabetic care monitoring and support system, and the clinical indicator management system. Conclusions AMIS provides IT services for AMC, 7 affiliated hospitals and over 5,000 partners clinics, and was developed to improve healthcare services. The current challenge of AMIS is standard and interoperability. A global health IT strategy is needed to get through the current challenges and to provide new services as needed. PMID:21818439

  3. Occurrence of Diatom-Cyanobacterial symbiotic relationship in the coastal surface waters of Northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    khomayis, hisham; Sommer, Ulrich; Al-Aidaroos, Ali; Kürten, Benjamin; Devassy, Reny

    2013-04-01

    The phenomenon of Diatom-Cyanobacterial symbiotic association is widely noticed from different marine ecosystems around the world especially in the tropical and subtropical regions. The fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the oligotrophic ocean is an important source of new nitrogen to surface waters, stimulating phytoplankton productivity and fueling the biological pump. The most common cyanobacterium that carry out the so called nitrogen fixation in marine system is Trichodesmium. The other major representative of this diazotrophic group is the heterocystous endosymbiotic cyanobacterium known as Richelia intracellularis which always seen in symbiotic relationship with other phytoplankton and is well-known for its capability to fix the atmospheric nitrogen in oligotrophic waters. Planktonic diatom- cyanobaterial symbioses play a significant role in the ecology and biogeochemistry of the surface oceans. Studies suggest that these particular diazotroph communities contribute annually 4.79 × 1012 gm of nitrogen to the water which comes almost one quarter of the total nitrogen input to the sea. The endosymbiont Richelia normally occupies the periplasmic space between the plasmalemma and the cell wall of the host and it provides a source of nutrient availability to the host where it is associated. They are expected to release the fixed nitrogen as either ammonium or dissolved organic nitrogen, which is then available to the particular host which lives in nutrient-starved condition. It is mainly known to be associated with the centric diatoms like Rhizosolenia, Hemialus, and Guinardia. The present observation of the Rhizosolenia-Richelia and Hemialus-Richelia symbiotic relation from the coastal waters of northern red sea implies much attention to the ecology of the particular area. While considering the oligotrophic nature of the region, the particular association helps the phytoplankton to avoid the limited growth due to the scarcity of nitrogen to a great extent. The

  4. Raman Scattered He II 4332 and Photoionization Model in the Symbiotic Star V1016 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Heo, J.-E.; Lee, B.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are wide binary systems of a white dwarf and a mass losing giant. They exhibit unique Raman scattered features as a result of inelastic scattering of far UV line photons by atomic hydrogen. Co-existence of a far UV He II emission region and a thick H I region in symbiotic stars is necessary for the formation of Raman-scattered features blueward of hydrogen Balmer emission lines. Being a single electron atom, He II has the same atomic structure as the hydrogen atom and hence emits far UV emission lines that are slightly blueward of hydrogen Lyman lines. These far UV He II emission lines can be Raman scattered to appear blueward of hydrogen Balmer lines. In particular, the symbiotic star V1016 Cyg is found to exhibit Raman scattered He II 4332 feature in the BOES high resolution spectrum. Our profile fitting of Raman scattered He II 4332 is consistent with the mass loss geometry proposed by Jung & Lee (2004). We use the photoionization code ‘ CLOUDY' to estimate the far UV He II emission lines and make comparisons with the observed Raman scattered He II 4332 blueward of Hγ in the high resolution echelle V1016 Cyg. The emission nebula is assumed to be of uniform density of 108 cm-3 that is illuminated by a black body characterized by its temperature and total luminosity. With our comparisons we conclude that the Raman scattered He II features are consistent with the existence of a photoionized nebula by a hot black body source with temperature 7-8× 104 K with a luminosity 1038erg s-1.

  5. Two-dimensional symbiotic solitons and vortices in binary condensates with attractive cross-species interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xuekai; Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Meier, Torsten; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) two-component spinor system with cubic attraction between the components and intra-species self-repulsion, which may be realized in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as in a quasi-equilibrium condensate of microcavity polaritons. Including a 2D spatially periodic potential, which is necessary for the stabilization of the system against the critical collapse, we use detailed numerical calculations and an analytical variational approximation (VA) to predict the existence and stability of several types of 2D symbiotic solitons in the spinor system. Stability ranges are found for symmetric and asymmetric symbiotic fundamental solitons and vortices, including hidden-vorticity (HV) modes, with opposite vorticities in the two components. The VA produces exceptionally accurate predictions for the fundamental solitons and vortices. The fundamental solitons, both symmetric and asymmetric ones, are completely stable, in either case when they exist as gap solitons or regular ones. The symmetric and asymmetric vortices are stable if the inter-component attraction is stronger than the intra-species repulsion, while the HV modes have their stability region in the opposite case.

  6. Two-dimensional symbiotic solitons and vortices in binary condensates with attractive cross-species interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuekai; Driben, Rodislav; Malomed, Boris A.; Meier, Torsten; Schumacher, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) two-component spinor system with cubic attraction between the components and intra-species self-repulsion, which may be realized in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as in a quasi-equilibrium condensate of microcavity polaritons. Including a 2D spatially periodic potential, which is necessary for the stabilization of the system against the critical collapse, we use detailed numerical calculations and an analytical variational approximation (VA) to predict the existence and stability of several types of 2D symbiotic solitons in the spinor system. Stability ranges are found for symmetric and asymmetric symbiotic fundamental solitons and vortices, including hidden-vorticity (HV) modes, with opposite vorticities in the two components. The VA produces exceptionally accurate predictions for the fundamental solitons and vortices. The fundamental solitons, both symmetric and asymmetric ones, are completely stable, in either case when they exist as gap solitons or regular ones. The symmetric and asymmetric vortices are stable if the inter-component attraction is stronger than the intra-species repulsion, while the HV modes have their stability region in the opposite case. PMID:27703235

  7. Improving Cardiac Surgical Care: A Work Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Eggman, Ashley A.; ElBardissi, Andrew W.; Henrickson, Sarah E.; Sundt, Thoralf M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, significant improvements in cardiac surgical care have been achieved. Nevertheless, surgical errors that significantly impact patient safety continue to occur. In order to further improve surgical outcomes, patient safety programs must focus on rectifying work system factors in the operating room (OR) that negatively impact the delivery of reliable surgical care. The goal of this paper is to provide an integrative review of specific work system factors in the OR that may directly impact surgical care processes, as well as the subsequent recommendations that have been put forth to improve surgical outcomes and patient safety. The important role that surgeons can play in facilitating work system changes in the OR is also discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of the challenges involved in assessing the impact that interventions have on improving surgical care. Opportunities for future research are also highlighted throughout the paper. PMID:20202623

  8. Termite digestomes as a potential source of symbiotic microbiota for lignocelluloses degradation: a review.

    PubMed

    Wong, L J; H'ng, P S; Wong, S Y; Lee, S H; Lum, W C; Chai, E W; Wong, W Z; Chin, K L

    2014-08-01

    Termites thrive in great abundance in terrestrial ecosystems and the symbiotic gut microbiota play important roles in digestion of lignocelluloses and nitrogen metabolism. Termites are excellent models of biocatalysts as they inhabit dense microbes in their guts that produce digestive enzymes to decompose lignocelluloses and convert it to end products such as sugars, hydrogen, and acetate. Different of digestive system between lower and higher termites which lower termites dependent on their dual decomposing system, consisting of termite's own cellulases and gut's protists. Higher termites decompose cellulose using their own enzymes, because of the absence of symbiotic protists. Termite gut prokaryotes efficiently support lignocelluloses degradation. In this review, a brief overview of recent experimental works, development and commercialization is discussed. Significant progress has been made to isolate cellulolytic strains from termites and optimise the digestion efficiency of cellulose. Future perspective should emphasize the isolation of cellulolytic strains from termites, genetically modifying or immobilization of the microbes which produce the desired enzyme and thus benefits on the microbiology and biotechnology.

  9. Spectrophotometric observations of symbiotic stars and related objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, W. P.; Feibelman, W. A.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Stencel, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Calibrated optical spectrophotometric observations of 16 symbiotic and symbiotic-like objects are presented. The objects observed include Z And, T CrB, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, AG Dra, YY Her, RS Oph, XX Oph, AG Peg, AX Per, CL Sco, HM Sge, AS 289, and M1-2. Integrated emission-line intensities are tabulated for comparison with ultraviolet and infrared data, as well as with previous optical studies. The reddening to each of the objects is derived by assuming that Balmer lines are emitted in their case B recombination ratios. However, the values so derived are often systematically higher than reddening estimates from the ultraviolet 2200 A feature. Comparisons with the available data from other wavelength ranges are noted.

  10. Leguminous plants: inventors of root nodules to accommodate symbiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Takuya; Yoro, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Legumes and a few other plant species can establish a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, which enables them to survive in a nitrogen-deficient environment. During the course of nodulation, infection with rhizobia induces the dedifferentiation of host cells to form primordia of a symbiotic organ, the nodule, which prepares plants to accommodate rhizobia in host cells. While these nodulation processes are known to be genetically controlled by both plants and rhizobia, recent advances in studies on two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, have provided great insight into the underlying plant-side molecular mechanism. In this chapter, we review such knowledge, with particular emphasis on two key processes of nodulation, nodule development and rhizobial invasion.

  11. Ultraviolet observations of the symbiotic star AS 296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Moreno, A.; Moreno, H.; Feibelman, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    AS 296 is a well-known S-type symbiotic star which underwent an optical outburst during 1988. In this paper, UV data based on IUE observations obtained both during the quiescent and outburst stages are presented and discussed, correlating them to observations made in the optical region. It is concluded that the object is a symbiotic nova, in which the outburst is due to a thermonuclear runaway produced in the hydrogen-burning shell of a white dwarf with M of about 0.5 solar masses, accreting from the late-type giant at a rate M(acc) of about 9.7 x 10 exp -9 solar mass/year. It is not possible to determine from the observations if the hydrogen flash is degenerate or nondegenerate.

  12. Are Job Banks Improving The Labor Market Information System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Joseph C.; Huber, George P.

    1974-01-01

    Local job banks, computer aided man-job matching systems, are the spearhead of the multiphased Federal program to improve the functioning of the labor market information system. As evaluated here, the program may eventually achieve this objective but the evidence concerning the first phase is not encouraging. (DS)

  13. Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement Seminar Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-01

    This report contains information presented at the Fourteenth Service Water System Reliability Improvement (SWSRI) Seminar held June 24-25, 2002, in San Diego, California. The bi-annual seminar--sponsored by EPRI--provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experiences regarding the monitoring, repair, and replacement of service water system components.

  14. A Documentation System for Teacher Improvement or Termination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Kelly; Horton, Janet L.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of a school district's teacher evaluation system is to improve teachers' performance so they can become successful and contribute to the objectives of the district. If the evaluation does not produce this positive result, the teacher must be replaced, either by resignation or termination. The district's evaluation system thus…

  15. Sequence evidence for the symbiotic origins of chloroplasts and mitochondria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, D. G.; Hunt, L. T.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1983-01-01

    The origin of mitochondria and chloroplasts is investigated on the basis of prokaryotic and early-eukaryotic evolutionary trees derived from protein and nucleic-acid sequences by the method of Dayhoff (1979). Trees for bacterial ferrodoxins, 5S ribosomal RNA, c-type cytochromes, the lipid-binding subunit of ATPase, and dihydrofolate reductase are presented and discussed. Good agreement among the trees is found, and it is argued that the mitochondria and chloroplasts evolved by multiple symbiotic events.

  16. Interpretation of the Line Spectrum of Classical Symbiotic Stars in the Scenario for their Prototype Z And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, N. A.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Tomova, M. T.; Kil'Pio, E. Yu.

    2011-07-01

    Results of the study of the symbiotic binary Z And during its recent active phase 2000-2010 when it experienced a series of six optical outbursts are presented. High-resolution spectra obtained during the first and fourth outburst, which was the strongest one, have been analyzed. These data are compared with results of theoretical computations. The comparison provides information about the behavior of the system during the entire active phase rather than during an individual outburst. In particular it was found fundamental difference between the first outburst which opened the active phase and the recurrent outbursts--namely, the presence of bipolar collimated optical outflow during some of the recurrent outbursts. A scenario that can explain all the spectroscopic phenomena observed during this active phase as well as previous active phases of Z And is proposed. The possibility to use this scenario for explanation of the line spectrum of other classical symbiotic stars during their active phases is motivated.

  17. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model. PMID:26406045

  18. A rhizobium leguminosarum mutant defective in symbiotic iron acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, K.D.; Chen, Jing-Wen; John, T.R. ); Johnston, A.W.B. )

    1990-02-01

    Iron acquisition by symbiotic Rhizobium spp. is essential for nitrogen fixation in the legume root nodule symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum 116, an ineffective mutant strain with a defect in iron acquisition, was isolated after nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis of the effective strain 1062. The pop-1 mutation in strain 116 imparted to it a complex phenotype, characteristic of iron deficiency. Several iron(III)-solubilizing agents, such as citrate, hydroxyquinoline, and dihydroxybenzoate, stimulated growth of 116 on low-iron solid medium; anthranilic acid, the R. leguminosarum siderophore, inhibited low-iron growth of 116. The initial rate of {sup 55}Fe uptake by suspensions of iron-starved 116 cells was 10-fold less than that of iron-starved wild-type cells. Electron microscopic observations revealed no morphological abnormalities in the small, white nodules induced by 116. Nodule cortical cells were filled with vesicles containing apparently normal bacteroids. No premature degeneration of bacteroids or of plant cell organelles was evident. The authors mapped pop-1 by R plasmid-mediated conjugation and recombination to the ade-27-rib-2 region of the R. leguminosarum chromosome. No segregation of pop-1 and the symbiotic defect was observed among the recombinants from these crosses. Cosmid pKN1, a pLAFR1 derivative containing a 24-kilobase-pair fragment of R. leguminosarum DNA, conferred on 116 the ability to grow on dipyridyl medium and to fix nitrogen symbiotically.

  19. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Freeman, D. Carl; McArthur, E.D.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at five times the rate observed in nonsymbiotic plants. Endophytes also influenced sexual reproduction of mature big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) plants. Two spatially distinct big sagebrush subspecies and their hybrids were symbiotic with unique fungal endophytes, despite being separated by only 380 m distance and 60 m elevation. A double reciprocal transplant experiment of parental and hybrid plants, and soils across the hybrid zone showed that fungal endophytes interact with the soils and different plant genotypes to confer enhanced plant reproduction in soil native to the endophyte and reduced reproduction in soil alien to the endophyte. Moreover, the most prevalent endophyte of the hybrid zone reduced the fitness of both parental subspecies. Because these endophytes are passed to the next generation of plants on seed coats, this interaction provides a selective advantage, habitat specificity, and the means of restricting gene flow, thereby making the hybrid zone stable, narrow and potentially leading to speciation. ?? 2009 Landes Bioscience.

  20. Cellulolytic activity and structure of symbiotic bacteria in locust guts.

    PubMed

    Su, L-J; Liu, H; Li, Y; Zhang, H-F; Chen, M; Gao, X-H; Wang, F-Q; Song, A-D

    2014-01-01

    Locusts are able to digest the cellulose of Gramineae plants, resulting in their being considered as major crop pests. To illustrate the mechanism involved in cellulose digestion, the cellulolytic activity and zymography in the gut contents of 16 locust species were determined using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as substrate. The diversity of gut symbiotic bacteria was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that high CMC activity was present in Acrididae gut fluid (mean 356.4 U/g proteins). Of the 5 locust species, Oxya chinensis had the highest diversity of intestinal symbiotic bacteria, characterized by the DGGE profile containing more than 20 bands of 16S rRNA. Klebsiella pneumoniae, in the gut of Locusta migratoria manilensis, was identified as the most abundant symbiotic bacterium by DNA sequencing, with a relative abundance of 19.74%. In comparison, Methylobacterium sp was the most dominant species in the Atractomorpha sinensis gut, with a relative abundance of 29.04%. The results indicated that the cellulolytic enzymes and gut microbial communities probably reflected their phylogenetic relationship with different locust species and associated feeding strategies. PMID:25299108

  1. Cellulolytic activity and structure of symbiotic bacteria in locust guts.

    PubMed

    Su, L-J; Liu, H; Li, Y; Zhang, H-F; Chen, M; Gao, X-H; Wang, F-Q; Song, A-D

    2014-01-01

    Locusts are able to digest the cellulose of Gramineae plants, resulting in their being considered as major crop pests. To illustrate the mechanism involved in cellulose digestion, the cellulolytic activity and zymography in the gut contents of 16 locust species were determined using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as substrate. The diversity of gut symbiotic bacteria was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that high CMC activity was present in Acrididae gut fluid (mean 356.4 U/g proteins). Of the 5 locust species, Oxya chinensis had the highest diversity of intestinal symbiotic bacteria, characterized by the DGGE profile containing more than 20 bands of 16S rRNA. Klebsiella pneumoniae, in the gut of Locusta migratoria manilensis, was identified as the most abundant symbiotic bacterium by DNA sequencing, with a relative abundance of 19.74%. In comparison, Methylobacterium sp was the most dominant species in the Atractomorpha sinensis gut, with a relative abundance of 29.04%. The results indicated that the cellulolytic enzymes and gut microbial communities probably reflected their phylogenetic relationship with different locust species and associated feeding strategies.

  2. Phase diagram of the symbiotic two-species contact process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo Martins; Dickman, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    We study the two-species symbiotic contact process, recently proposed by de Oliveira, Santos, and Dickman [Phys. Rev. E 86, 011121 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011121]. In this model, each site of a lattice may be vacant or host single individuals of species A and/or B. Individuals at sites with both species present interact in a symbiotic manner, having a reduced death rate μ <1. Otherwise, the dynamics follows the rules of the basic contact process, with individuals reproducing to vacant neighbor sites at rate λ and dying at a rate of unity. We determine the full phase diagram in the λ-μ plane in one and two dimensions by means of exact numerical quasistationary distributions, cluster approximations, and Monte Carlo simulations. We also study the effects of asymmetric creation rates and diffusion of individuals. In two dimensions, for sufficiently strong symbiosis (i.e., small μ), the absorbing-state phase transition becomes discontinuous for diffusion rates D within a certain range. We report preliminary results on the critical surface and tricritical line in the λ-μ-D space. Our results raise the possibility that strongly symbiotic associations of mobile species may be vulnerable to sudden extinction under increasingly adverse conditions.

  3. [Wawared Peru: reducing health inequities and improving maternal health by improving information systems in health].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lu, José E; Iguiñiz Romero, Ruth; Bayer, Angela M; García, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, there are no high quality data to support decision-making and governance due to inadequate information collection and transmission processes. Our project WawaRed-Peru: "Reducing health inequities and improving maternal health by improving health information systems" aims to improve maternal health processes and indicators through the implementation of interoperability standards for maternal health information systems in order for decision makers to have timely, high quality information. Through this project, we hope to support the development of better health policies and to also contribute to reducing problems of health equity among Peruvian women and potentially women in other developing countries. The aim of this article is to present the current state of information systems for maternal health in Peru. PMID:26338401

  4. Improving patient access and streamlining processes through enterprise intelligence systems.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates how enterprise intelligence systems can be used to improve operational efficiency in hospitals. Enterprise intelligence systems mine raw data from disparate systems and transform the data into actionable information, which when used appropriately, support streamlined processes, optimize resources, and positively affect staff efficiency and the quality of patient care. Case studies on the implementation of McKesson Performance Visibility and Capacity Planner enterprise intelligence solutions at the Southlake Regional Health Centre and Lions Gate and Richmond Hospitals are provided.

  5. Design of launch systems using continuous improvement process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify a systematic process for improving ground operations for future launch systems. This approach is based on the Total Quality Management (TQM) continuous improvement process. While the continuous improvement process is normally identified with making incremental changes to an existing system, it can be used on new systems if they use past experience as a knowledge base. In the case of the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), the Space Shuttle operations provide many lessons. The TQM methodology used for this paper will be borrowed from the United States Air Force 'Quality Air Force' Program. There is a general overview of the continuous improvement process, with concentration on the formulation phase. During this phase critical analyses are conducted to determine the strategy and goals for the remaining development process. These analyses include analyzing the mission from the customers point of view, developing an operations concept for the future, assessing current capabilities and determining the gap to be closed between current capabilities and future needs and requirements. A brief analyses of the RLV, relative to the Space Shuttle, will be used to illustrate the concept. Using the continuous improvement design concept has many advantages. These include a customer oriented process which will develop a more marketable product and a better integration of operations and systems during the design phase. But, the use of TQM techniques will require changes, including more discipline in the design process and more emphasis on data gathering for operational systems. The benefits will far outweigh the additional effort.

  6. A System That Works: Highlights of Effective Intervention Strategies in a Quality Improvement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinisterra, Diana; Baker, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes one approach to quality improvement efforts: the Quality Improvement System (QIS) implemented by Prime Time Palm Beach County (Prime Time) in Palm Beach County, Florida. Prime Time's QIS is recognized as one promising systemic effort to improve quality in the afterschool field (Yohalem, Granger, & Pittman, 2009). As a…

  7. Weyerhaeuser: Compressed Air System Improvement Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Sawmill

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    In 2000, Weyerhaeuser Company, a U.S. Department of Energy Allied Partner in the Industrial Technologies Program, increased the efficiency of the compressed air system at its sawmill facility in Coburg, Oregon. This improved the system's performance and will save about 1.3 million kWh annually. Total project costs were $55,000; because annual energy cost savings were also $55,000, the simple payback period was only 1 year. Subsequent improvements at six other company plants and mills are yielding 6.8 million kWh in energy savings and reducing annual energy costs by $250,000.

  8. Environmental and genotypic effects on the respiration associated with symbiotic nitrogen fixation in peas.

    PubMed

    Mahon, J D

    1979-05-01

    Estimated values for the respiration associated with symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Pisum sativum L. were independent of irradiance, temperature, plant age, and CO(2) concentration, despite large variation in the total rates of C(2)H(2) reduction and root + nodule respiration. Similar values were also found in Phaseolus vulgaris L., Vicia faba L. and Glycine max (L.) Merr. Among all combinations of four Pisum cultivars with four Rhizobium leguminosarum inoculants only the plant genotype significantly affected the fixation-linked respiration, although both plant and bacterial types significantly influenced the total rate of C(2)H(2) reduction. On the basis of measured rates of H(2) evolution and C(2)H(2) reduction, or total nitrogen gain in the same system, the least respiration per unit of ammonia produced symbiotically was estimated as 4.8 to 6.9 moles CO(2) (mole NH(3))(-1) in Laxton's Progress and the greatest as 9.3 to 13.3 moles CO(2) (mole NH(3))(-1) in an Indian cultivar, as compared to a theoretical minimum respiration requirement of 4.7 moles CO(2) (mole NH(3))(-1) in peas.

  9. Environmental and Genotypic Effects on the Respiration Associated with Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation in Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, John D.

    1979-01-01

    Estimated values for the respiration associated with symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Pisum sativum L. were independent of irradiance, temperature, plant age, and CO2 concentration, despite large variation in the total rates of C2H2 reduction and root + nodule respiration. Similar values were also found in Phaseolus vulgaris L., Vicia faba L. and Glycine max (L.) Merr. Among all combinations of four Pisum cultivars with four Rhizobium leguminosarum inoculants only the plant genotype significantly affected the fixation-linked respiration, although both plant and bacterial types significantly influenced the total rate of C2H2 reduction. On the basis of measured rates of H2 evolution and C2H2 reduction, or total nitrogen gain in the same system, the least respiration per unit of ammonia produced symbiotically was estimated as 4.8 to 6.9 moles CO2 (mole NH3)−1 in Laxton's Progress and the greatest as 9.3 to 13.3 moles CO2 (mole NH3)−1 in an Indian cultivar, as compared to a theoretical minimum respiration requirement of 4.7 moles CO2 (mole NH3)−1 in peas. PMID:16660833

  10. Phylogenetic and cophylogenetic relationships of entomopathogenic nematodes (Heterorhabditis: Rhabditida) and their symbiotic bacteria (Photorhabdus: Enterobacteriaceae).

    PubMed

    Maneesakorn, Patchareewan; An, Ruisheng; Daneshvar, Hannah; Taylor, Kara; Bai, Xiaodong; Adams, Byron J; Grewal, Parwinder S; Chandrapatya, Angsumarn

    2011-05-01

    Mutualistic association between entomopathogenic Photorhabdus bacteria and Heterorhabditis nematodes represents one of the emerging model systems in symbiosis studies, yet little is known about this partnership from a coevolutionary perspective. Herein, we investigated phylogenetic and cophylogenetic relationships of Heterorhabditis and Photorhabdus strains using molecular markers Internal Transcribed Spacer and gyrase B gene sequences, respectively. The phylogenies presented consistent, well supported, monophyletic groups in the parsimonious and likelihood analyses for both the nematode and bacterial strains and supported the placement of currently recognized taxa, from which a potentially new Heterorhabditis species represented by a Thailand strain MP68 was identified. While the nematode strains with distant geographic distributions showed no detectable phylogenetic divergence within H. bacteriophora or H. georgiana monophyletic groups, their respective symbiotic bacteria speciated into two Photorhabdus species: P. luminescens and P. temperata, indicating the occurrence of duplication. Although such evolutionary process reduces the phylogenetic congruence between Heterorhabditis nematodes and Photorhabdus bacteria, global cophylogenetic tests using ParaFit detected a highly significant correlation between the two phylogenies (ParaFitGlobal = 0.001). Further, the associations between H. zealandica, H. indica and H. megidis strains and their symbiotic bacteria exhibited significant contribution to the overall cophylogenetic structure. Overall, this study reveals evidence of coevolution between Photorhabdus bacteria and Heterorhabditis nematodes and provides a framework for further examination of the evolution of these associations. PMID:21335093

  11. Simulations of the Symbiotic Recurrent Nova V407 CYG. I. Accretion and Shock Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Taam, Ronald E.

    2015-06-01

    The shock interaction and evolution of nova ejecta with wind from a red giant (RG) star in a symbiotic binary system are investigated via three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We specifically model the 2010 March outburst of the symbiotic recurrent nova V407 Cygni from its quiescent phase to its eruption phase. The circumstellar density enhancement due to wind-white-dwarf interaction is studied in detail. It is found that the density-enhancement efficiency depends on the ratio of the orbital speed to the RG wind speed. Unlike another recurrent nova, RS Ophiuchi, we do not observe a strong disk-like density enhancement, but instead observe an aspherical density distribution with ˜20% higher density in the equatorial plane than at the poles. To model the 2010 outburst, we consider several physical parameters, including the RG mass-loss rate, nova eruption energy, and ejecta mass. A detailed study of the shock interaction and evolution reveals that the interaction of shocks with the RG wind generates strong Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In addition, the presence of the companion and circumstellar density enhancement greatly alter the shock evolution during the nova phase. Depending on the model, the ejecta speed after sweeping out most of the circumstellar medium decreases to ˜100-300 km s-1, which is consistent with the observed extended redward emission in [N ii] lines in 2011 April.

  12. Specific Hopanoid Classes Differentially Affect Free-Living and Symbiotic States of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Gargi; Busset, Nicolas; Molinaro, Antonio; Gargani, Daniel; Chaintreuil, Clemence; Silipo, Alba

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A better understanding of how bacteria resist stresses encountered during the progression of plant-microbe symbioses will advance our ability to stimulate plant growth. Here, we show that the symbiotic system comprising the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens and the legume Aeschynomene afraspera requires hopanoid production for optimal fitness. While methylated (2Me) hopanoids contribute to growth under plant-cell-like microaerobic and acidic conditions in the free-living state, they are dispensable during symbiosis. In contrast, synthesis of extended (C35) hopanoids is required for growth microaerobically and under various stress conditions (high temperature, low pH, high osmolarity, bile salts, oxidative stress, and antimicrobial peptides) in the free-living state and also during symbiosis. These defects might be due to a less rigid membrane resulting from the absence of free or lipidA-bound C35 hopanoids or the accumulation of the C30 hopanoid diploptene. Our results also show that C35 hopanoids are necessary for symbiosis only with the host Aeschynomene afraspera but not with soybean. This difference is likely related to the presence of cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptides in Aeschynomene nodules that induce drastic modification in bacterial morphology and physiology. The study of hopanoid mutants in plant symbionts thus provides an opportunity to gain insight into host-microbe interactions during later stages of symbiotic progression, as well as the microenvironmental conditions for which hopanoids provide a fitness advantage. PMID:26489859

  13. INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SAFETY CULTURE IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD JA JR

    2009-01-16

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified safety culture as one of their top Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) related priorities. A team was formed to address this issue. The team identified a consensus set of safety culture principles, along with implementation practices that could be used by DOE, NNSA, and their contractors. Documented improvement tools were identified and communicated to contractors participating in a year long pilot project. After a year, lessons learned will be collected and a path forward determined. The goal of this effort was to achieve improved safety and mission performance through ISMS continuous improvement. The focus of ISMS improvement was safety culture improvement building on operating experience from similar industries such as the domestic and international commercial nuclear and chemical industry.

  14. Improving the current system for supplying organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horton, R L; Horton, P J

    1993-01-01

    The United States currently relies on a voluntary, altruistic system for supplying organs for transplantation. It is now generally recognized that this system, as currently operated, produces a seriously inadequate supply of organs. A number of scholars have argued that some type of (generally unspecified) market system is necessary. Two articles appearing in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law have proposed relatively specific market systems for increasing the supply of organs. In this paper we argue that market systems are at best premature. In particular, there is little to suggest that any type of market system for organs will be permitted in the United States in the foreseeable future. We present data that strongly suggest that the current voluntary, altruistic system has not been developed to its full potential and offer a number of specific suggestions for improving the system.

  15. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  16. Shuttle waste management system design improvements and flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. Eugene; Goodman, Jerry R.; Murray, Robert W.; Mcintosh, Mathew E.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Shuttle waste management system has undergone a variety of design changes to improve performance and man-machine interface. These design improvements have resulted in more reliable operation and hygienic usage. Design enhancements include individual urinals, increased urine collection airflows, increased solids storage capacity, easier access to personal hygiene items, and additional wet trash stowage. The development and flight evaluation of these improvements are described herein. The Space Shuttle Orbiter has proved to be an invaluable test bed for development and in-flight evaluation of life support and habitability concepts which involve transport or separation of solids, liquids, and gases in a zero-g environment.

  17. Improved circular polarizer for far-infrared lightpipe systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Kaplan, S. G.; Quijada, M.; Sengupta, K.; Drew, H. D.

    1995-12-01

    We present an improved design for far-infrared (FIR) circular polarizers used in a lightpipe transmission system for magneto-optical experiments. A peak efficiency of nearly 100% is achieved for FIR laser radiation by reducing the multiple reflections within the polarizer system, as well as scattering from the walls of the lightpipe. Broadband low-resolution measurements are less susceptible to errors due to multiple reflections, but incorporation of these improvements is still found to reduce systematic errors due to the reflection from the sample. Also, we have measured the low temperature index of refraction of quartz and find significant disagreement with published values for frequencies below 100 cm-1.

  18. BTS Fact Sheet: Improving the efficiency of your duct system

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    1999-12-28

    The duct system, used in air heating and air cooling your home, is a collection of tubes that distributes the heated or cooled air to the various rooms. The duct system can have an important effect on health of the occupants through the distribution of indoor air pollution. Changes and repairs to a duct system should always be performed by a qualified professional. This brochure is meant to help you understand the problems that can affect the duct system and how you can save money, improve comfort, and protect against potential health hazards.

  19. Improvement of Abnormality Detection System for Bathers Using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Hiroki; Tajima, Takuya; Abe, Takehiko; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko

    This paper proposes a new method for improving an existing abnormality detection system for person who soaks in a bathtub. As the number of aged people increases year by year in Japan, bathing accident of the aged is growing at a rapid rate, especially in-bathtub drowning accident. Therefore, prompt detection of bather's abnormality such as dizziness and fainting is important to prevent in-bathtub drowning. In order to detect bather's abnormality promptly, an abnormality detection system using seven ultrasonic sensors has been proposed. The system uses the following two methods: posture detection and behavior detection, to detect bather's different state from normal before an accident occurs, and improves a delay of detection considered to be a serious problem heretofore. There was however plenty of room for improvement. In order to improve detection rate of the system, we propose a new detection method in this paper. The method uses two ultrasonic sensors to beam bather's head and neck, and detects the head height and swing speed of the head. Experimental results are superior to the accuracy of the existing system, which enables us to detect bather's abnormality more accurately.

  20. Large-subunit ribosomal RNA systematics of symbiotic dinoflagellates: morphology does not recapitulate phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, T P

    1998-12-01

    Biochemical, histological, physiological, and genetic evidence indicates that dinoflagellates symbiotic with marine invertebrates are a heterogeneous complex of taxa, representing at least five genera in three orders. Despite a wealth of data regarding morphological, biochemical, and behavioral differences among symbiotic dinoflagellates, knowledge concerning patterns of diversification is limited. I analyzed approximately 900 bp of the 5' end of the large-subunit ribosomal RNA gene from 14 dinoflagellate isolates: six cultured Symbiodinium specimens, two cultured symbiotic Gymnodinium, two algal samples isolated from reef-building corals, an algal sample obtained from cultures of the jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, and three free-living Gymnodinium isolates. Results show that morphological similarities among the examined symbiotic taxa do not necessarily correspond with molecular phylogeny. The included Symbiodinium taxa represent a paraphyletic assemblage while Gymnodinium is reconstructed as a polyphyletic assemblage. Analysis indicates that all the included symbiotic dinoflagellates descended from a common, symbiotic ancestor (though within the dinoflagellates, symbiosis is a polyphyletic trait). Additionally, two free-living dinoflagellates emerge within the symbiotic clade, suggesting that the symbiotic lifestyle has been lost at least once in this group. It has been hypothesized that rates of evolution within mutualistic endosymbioses should be reduced relative to free-living taxa. However, results indicate that rates of molecular, morphological, biochemical and behavioral change are similar among branches leading to symbiotic and free-living dinoflagellates. PMID:10051396

  1. Improving the use of health data for health system strengthening

    PubMed Central

    Nutley, Tara; Reynolds, Heidi W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Good quality and timely data from health information systems are the foundation of all health systems. However, too often data sit in reports, on shelves or in databases and are not sufficiently utilised in policy and program development, improvement, strategic planning and advocacy. Without specific interventions aimed at improving the use of data produced by information systems, health systems will never fully be able to meet the needs of the populations they serve. Objective To employ a logic model to describe a pathway of how specific activities and interventions can strengthen the use of health data in decision making to ultimately strengthen the health system. Design A logic model was developed to provide a practical strategy for developing, monitoring and evaluating interventions to strengthen the use of data in decision making. The model draws on the collective strengths and similarities of previous work and adds to those previous works by making specific recommendations about interventions and activities that are most proximate to affect the use of data in decision making. The model provides an organizing framework for how interventions and activities work to strengthen the systematic demand, synthesis, review, and use of data. Results The logic model and guidance are presented to facilitate its widespread use and to enable improved data-informed decision making in program review and planning, advocacy, policy development. Real world examples from the literature support the feasible application of the activities outlined in the model. Conclusions The logic model provides specific and comprehensive guidance to improve data demand and use. It can be used to design, monitor and evaluate interventions, and to improve demand for, and use of, data in decision making. As more interventions are implemented to improve use of health data, those efforts need to be evaluated. PMID:23406921

  2. Improving Childhood Obesity Treatment Using New Technologies: The ETIOBE System

    PubMed Central

    Baños, Rosa. M; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragoza, Irene; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an “obesogenic environment” are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control in patients, to obtain weight loss maintenance and to prevent relapse by establishing healthy lifestyle habits. ETIOBE is composed of three different applications, the Clinician Support System (CSS), the Home Support System (HSS) and the Mobile Support System (MSS). The use of new Information and Communication (ICT) technologies can help clinicians to improve the effectiveness of weight loss treatments, especially in the case of children, and to achieve designated treatment goals. PMID:21559232

  3. Improving Childhood Obesity Treatment Using New Technologies: The ETIOBE System.

    PubMed

    Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragoza, Irene; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an "obesogenic environment" are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control in patients, to obtain weight loss maintenance and to prevent relapse by establishing healthy lifestyle habits. ETIOBE is composed of three different applications, the Clinician Support System (CSS), the Home Support System (HSS) and the Mobile Support System (MSS). The use of new Information and Communication (ICT) technologies can help clinicians to improve the effectiveness of weight loss treatments, especially in the case of children, and to achieve designated treatment goals.

  4. Improving Childhood Obesity Treatment Using New Technologies: The ETIOBE System.

    PubMed

    Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausias; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena; Oliver, Elia; Zaragoza, Irene; Alcaniz, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing public health problem in western culture. Sedentary lifestyles and an "obesogenic environment" are the main influences on children leading to an increase in obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe an e-health platform for the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity called ETIOBE. This e-health platform is an e-therapy system for the treatment of obesity, aimed at improving treatment adherence and promoting the mechanisms of self-control in patients, to obtain weight loss maintenance and to prevent relapse by establishing healthy lifestyle habits. ETIOBE is composed of three different applications, the Clinician Support System (CSS), the Home Support System (HSS) and the Mobile Support System (MSS). The use of new Information and Communication (ICT) technologies can help clinicians to improve the effectiveness of weight loss treatments, especially in the case of children, and to achieve designated treatment goals. PMID:21559232

  5. Why Economic Analysis of Health System Improvement Interventions Matters

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Edward Ivor; Marquez, Lani

    2016-01-01

    There is little evidence to direct health systems toward providing efficient interventions to address medical errors, defined as an unintended act of omission or commission or one not executed as intended that may or may not cause harm to the patient but does not achieve its intended outcome. We believe that lack of guidance on what is the most efficient way to reduce medical errors and improve the quality of health-care limits the scale-up of health system improvement interventions. Challenges to economic evaluation of these interventions include defining and implementing improvement interventions in different settings with high fidelity, capturing all of the positive and negative effects of the intervention, using process measures of effectiveness rather than health outcomes, and determining the full cost of the intervention and all economic consequences of its effects. However, health system improvement interventions should be treated similarly to individual medical interventions and undergo rigorous economic evaluation to provide actionable evidence to guide policy-makers in decisions of resource allocation for improvement activities among other competing demands for health-care resources. PMID:27781204

  6. Symbiotic intelligence: Self-organizing knowledge on distributed networks, driven by human interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, N.; Joslyn, C.; Rocha, L.; Smith, S.; Kantor, M.; Rasmussen, S. |

    1998-07-01

    This work addresses how human societies, and other diverse and distributed systems, solve collective challenges that are not approachable from the level of the individual, and how the Internet will change the way societies and organizations view problem solving. The authors apply the ideas developed in self-organizing systems to understand self-organization in informational systems. The simplest explanation as to why animals (for example, ants, wolves, and humans) are organized into societies is that these societies enhance the survival of the individuals which make up the populations. Individuals contribute to, as well as adapt to, these societies because they make life easier in one way or another, even though they may not always understand the process, either individually or collectively. Despite the lack of understanding of the how of the process, society during its existence as a species has changed significantly, from separate, small hunting tribes to a highly technological, globally integrated society. The authors combine this understanding of societal dynamics with self-organization on the Internet (the Net). The unique capability of the Net is that it combines, in a common medium, the entire human-technological system in both breadth and depth: breadth in the integration of heterogeneous systems of machines, information and people; and depth in the detailed capturing of the entire complexity of human use and creation of information. When the full diversity of societal dynamics is combined with the accuracy of communication on the Net, a phase transition is argued to occur in problem solving capability. Through conceptual examples, an experiment of collective decision making on the Net and a simulation showing the effect of noise and loss on collective decision making, the authors argue that the resulting symbiotic structure of humans and the Net will evolve as an alternative problem solving approach for groups, organizations and society. Self

  7. Quality Rating and Improvement Systems and Children's Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing enriched learning environments is important to stimulating children's development in early childhood. Early child-care policymakers in many states in the US have adopted Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) as a way to verify quality of child care and to support children's school readiness. Objective: The purpose of…

  8. A Peer Assessment System to Improve Student Team Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Robert; Goodman, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Groups are frequently used in courses, but there is substantial evidence that insufficient attention is paid to creating conditions for successful teamwork. One key condition is high-quality, individual, and team-level feedback. An online peer assessment system and team improvement process was developed for this test case based on three design…

  9. Sustaining Improvement: The Teacher's Role in Helping School Systems Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayson, William W.

    One of the few efforts that arose in the 1980s that has much to teach the American educational system is Reading Recovery. Its contribution depends wholly upon what teachers do to make it work and what they do as professional educators to improve schooling for all America's children. Reading Recovery faces a variety of threats: it is educating…

  10. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  11. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  12. Operation Breakthrough for Continuous Self-Systems Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Given, Barbara K.

    1994-01-01

    Operation Breakthrough, in which graduate student interns teach life skills to adolescents with learning disabilities, provided an impetus for identifying a profile of learning and work habits necessary for production of an agile workforce. Agile learning for self-systems improvement calls for self-empowered learning, collaborative learning,…

  13. Healthcare Analytics: Creating a Prioritized Improvement System with Performance Benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Kolker, Evelyne

    2014-03-01

    The importance of healthcare improvement is difficult to overstate. This article describes our collaborative work with experts at Seattle Children's to create a prioritized improvement system using performance benchmarking. We applied analytics and modeling approaches to compare and assess performance metrics derived from U.S. News and World Report benchmarking data. We then compared a wide range of departmental performance metrics, including patient outcomes, structural and process metrics, survival rates, clinical practices, and subspecialist quality. By applying empirically simulated transformations and imputation methods, we built a predictive model that achieves departments' average rank correlation of 0.98 and average score correlation of 0.99. The results are then translated into prioritized departmental and enterprise-wide improvements, following a data to knowledge to outcomes paradigm. These approaches, which translate data into sustainable outcomes, are essential to solving a wide array of healthcare issues, improving patient care, and reducing costs.

  14. Healthcare Analytics: Creating a Prioritized Improvement System with Performance Benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Kolker, Evelyne

    2014-03-01

    The importance of healthcare improvement is difficult to overstate. This article describes our collaborative work with experts at Seattle Children's to create a prioritized improvement system using performance benchmarking. We applied analytics and modeling approaches to compare and assess performance metrics derived from U.S. News and World Report benchmarking data. We then compared a wide range of departmental performance metrics, including patient outcomes, structural and process metrics, survival rates, clinical practices, and subspecialist quality. By applying empirically simulated transformations and imputation methods, we built a predictive model that achieves departments' average rank correlation of 0.98 and average score correlation of 0.99. The results are then translated into prioritized departmental and enterprise-wide improvements, following a data to knowledge to outcomes paradigm. These approaches, which translate data into sustainable outcomes, are essential to solving a wide array of healthcare issues, improving patient care, and reducing costs. PMID:27447311

  15. An Improved Stereotactic System For CT Aided Neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Glenn, William V., Jr.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Howland, Robert S.

    1982-11-01

    Several computed tomography (CT) aided stereotactic systems have been introduced during the last five years for precise placement of neurosurgical instruments. Using digital CT image data that is transformed to a patient-frame coordinate system surgery can be simulated, planned and executed with sub-millimeter precision. This paper introduces a second generation stereotactic system that improves on speed, image resolution, accuracy and patient comfort of past and current systems. The system described here is designed for surgical procedures conducted entirely in the CT suite. Geometric resolution of this system is presented, test procedures are described and phantom results are discussed. An application to percutaneous knee surgery is briefly mentioned. At this writing patient data is not yet available.

  16. Improved Real-Time Monitoring Using Multiple Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Angelino, Robert; Quan, Alan G.; Veregge, John; Childs, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Monitor/Analyzer of Real-Time Voyager Engineering Link (MARVEL) computer program implements combination of techniques of both conventional automation and artificial intelligence to improve monitoring of complicated engineering system. Designed to support ground-based operations of Voyager spacecraft, also adapted to other systems. Enables more-accurate monitoring and analysis of telemetry, enhances productivity of monitoring personnel, reduces required number of such personnel by performing routine monitoring tasks, and helps ensure consistency in face of turnover of personnel. Programmed in C language and includes commercial expert-system software shell also written in C.

  17. Electric motor systems in developing countries: Opportunities for efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.; Monahan, P.; Lewis, P.; Greenberg, S.; Nadel, S.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents an overview of the current status and efficiency improvement potential of industrial motor systems in developing countries. Better management of electric motor systems is of particular relevance in developing countries, where improved efficiency can lead to increased productivity and slower growth in electricity demand. Motor systems currently consume some 65--80% of the industrial electricity in developing countries. Drawing on studies from Thailand, India, Brazil, China, Pakistan, and Costa Rica, we describe potential efficiency gains in various parts of the motor system, from the electricity delivery system through the motor to the point where useful work is performed. We report evidence of a significant electricity conservation potential. Most of the efficiency improvement methods we examine are very cost-effective from a societal viewpoint, but are generally not implemented due to various barriers that deter their adoption. Drawing on experiences in North America, we discuss a range of policies to overcome these barriers, including education, training, minimum efficiency standards, motor efficiency testing protocols, technical assistance programs, and financial incentives.

  18. An improved authentication scheme for telecare medicine information systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jianghong; Hu, Xuexian; Liu, Wenfen

    2012-12-01

    The telecare medicine information system enables or supports health-care delivery services. In order to safeguard patients' privacy, such as telephone number, medical record number, health information, etc., a secure authentication scheme will thus be in demand. Recently, Wu et al. proposed a smart card based password authentication scheme for the telecare medicine information system. Later, He et al. pointed out that Wu et al.'s scheme could not resist impersonation attacks and insider attacks, and then presented a new scheme. In this paper, we show that both of them fail to achieve two-factor authentication as smart card based password authentication schemes should achieve. We also propose an improved authentication scheme for the telecare medicine information system, and demonstrate that the improved one satisfies the security requirements of two-factor authentication and is also efficient. PMID:22374237

  19. Improved solution for system identification equations by Epsilon-Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, Irving U.

    1990-01-01

    Matrix eigenvalue theory is used to examine the source of ill-conditioning in linear algebraic equations. This approach highlights the crucial role played by the zero and near-zero eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of poorly conditioned systems. Insight gained from this approach is used to significantly improve a recently developed solution procedure called Epsilon-Decomposition (E-D). E-D is an efficient alternative to Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) for ill-conditioned systems arising in parameter estimation and system identification studies. The efficiency of the improved E-D over SVD resides in the need to only obtain the zero and near-zero eigenvalues of the coefficient matrix as opposed to all of its eigenvalues and vectors (as required by SVD). Thus, the efficiency of E-D is significant for large matrices with small rank deficiency.

  20. Development of an improved positron emission particle tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellema, C. S.; Vlek, J.; Mudde, R. F.; de Goeij, J. J. M.; van den Bleek, C. M.

    1998-02-01

    An improved Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) system has been developed for the non-intrusive investigation of solids flow in a gas-solids Interconnected Fluidised Bed (IFB) reactor. This system tracks continuously the 3D location of a single positron emitting particle. This particle has the same size and density as the solids and can be made as small as 500 μm. The system performance was improved through the use of graded absorbers which enable to filter valuable information from the Compton spectrum. A radiotracer particle moving at 1 m s -1 can be located with a 3D resolution better than 15 mm in a continuous trajectory. For a velocity of 0.1 m s -1 the 3D resolution is better than 5 mm. The obtained results are presented through ensemble-averaged solids' velocity patterns.

  1. Dual involvement of a Medicago truncatula NAC transcription factor in root abiotic stress response and symbiotic nodule senescence.

    PubMed

    de Zélicourt, Axel; Diet, Anouck; Marion, Jessica; Laffont, Carole; Ariel, Federico; Moison, Michaël; Zahaf, Ons; Crespi, Martin; Gruber, Véronique; Frugier, Florian

    2012-04-01

    Legume crops related to the model plant Medicago truncatula can adapt their root architecture to environmental conditions, both by branching and by establishing a symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Soil salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant yield and root growth. Previous transcriptomic analyses identified several transcription factors linked to the M. truncatula response to salt stress in roots, including NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC)-encoding genes. Over-expression of one of these transcription factors, MtNAC969, induced formation of a shorter and less-branched root system, whereas RNAi-mediated MtNAC969 inactivation promoted lateral root formation. The altered root system of over-expressing plants was able to maintain its growth under high salinity, and roots in which MtNAC969 was down-regulated showed improved growth under salt stress. Accordingly, expression of salt stress markers was decreased or induced in MtNAC969 over-expressing or RNAi roots, respectively, suggesting a repressive function for this transcription factor in the salt-stress response. Expression of MtNAC969 in central symbiotic nodule tissues was induced by nitrate treatment, and antagonistically affected by salt in roots and nodules, similarly to senescence markers. MtNAC969 RNAi nodules accumulated amyloplasts in the nitrogen-fixing zone, and were prematurely senescent. Therefore, the MtNAC969 transcription factor, which is differentially affected by environmental cues in root and nodules, participates in several pathways controlling adaptation of the M. truncatula root system to the environment.

  2. Drought enhances symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and competitive ability of a temperate forest tree.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2014-04-01

    General circulation models project more intense and frequent droughts over the next century, but many questions remain about how terrestrial ecosystems will respond. Of particular importance, is to understand how drought will alter the species composition of regenerating temperate forests wherein symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants play a critical role. In experimental mesocosms we manipulated soil moisture to study the effect of drought on the physiology, growth and competitive interactions of four co-occurring North American tree species, one of which (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a symbiotic N2-fixer. We hypothesized that drought would reduce growth by decreasing stomatal conductance, hydraulic conductance and increasing the water use efficiency of species with larger diameter xylem vessel elements (Quercus rubra, R. pseudoacacia) relative to those with smaller elements (Acer rubrum and Liriodendron tulipifera). We further hypothesized that N2 fixation by R. pseudoacacia would decline with drought, reducing its competitive ability. Under drought, growth declined across all species; but, growth and physiological responses did not correspond to species' hydraulic architecture. Drought triggered an 80% increase in nodule biomass and N accrual for R. pseudoacacia, improving its growth relative to other species. These results suggest that drought intensified soil N deficiency and that R. pseudoacacia's ability to fix N2 facilitated competition with non-fixing species when both water and N were limiting. Under scenarios of moderate drought, N2 fixation may alleviate the N constraints resulting from low soil moisture and improve competitive ability of N2-fixing species, and as a result, supply more new N to the ecosystem. PMID:24337710

  3. Drought enhances symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and competitive ability of a temperate forest tree.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2014-04-01

    General circulation models project more intense and frequent droughts over the next century, but many questions remain about how terrestrial ecosystems will respond. Of particular importance, is to understand how drought will alter the species composition of regenerating temperate forests wherein symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants play a critical role. In experimental mesocosms we manipulated soil moisture to study the effect of drought on the physiology, growth and competitive interactions of four co-occurring North American tree species, one of which (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a symbiotic N2-fixer. We hypothesized that drought would reduce growth by decreasing stomatal conductance, hydraulic conductance and increasing the water use efficiency of species with larger diameter xylem vessel elements (Quercus rubra, R. pseudoacacia) relative to those with smaller elements (Acer rubrum and Liriodendron tulipifera). We further hypothesized that N2 fixation by R. pseudoacacia would decline with drought, reducing its competitive ability. Under drought, growth declined across all species; but, growth and physiological responses did not correspond to species' hydraulic architecture. Drought triggered an 80% increase in nodule biomass and N accrual for R. pseudoacacia, improving its growth relative to other species. These results suggest that drought intensified soil N deficiency and that R. pseudoacacia's ability to fix N2 facilitated competition with non-fixing species when both water and N were limiting. Under scenarios of moderate drought, N2 fixation may alleviate the N constraints resulting from low soil moisture and improve competitive ability of N2-fixing species, and as a result, supply more new N to the ecosystem.

  4. Transcriptome analyses to investigate symbiotic relationships between marine protists

    PubMed Central

    Balzano, Sergio; Corre, Erwan; Decelle, Johan; Sierra, Roberto; Wincker, Patrick; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Pawlowski, Jan; Not, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Rhizaria are an important component of oceanic plankton communities worldwide. A number of species harbor eukaryotic microalgal symbionts, which are horizontally acquired in the environment at each generation. Although these photosymbioses are determinant for Rhizaria ability to thrive in oceanic ecosystems, the mechanisms for symbiotic interactions are unclear. Using high-throughput sequencing technology (i.e., 454), we generated large Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) datasets from four uncultured Rhizaria, an acantharian (Amphilonche elongata), two polycystines (Collozoum sp. and Spongosphaera streptacantha), and one phaeodarian (Aulacantha scolymantha). We assessed the main genetic features of the host/symbionts consortium (i.e., the holobiont) transcriptomes and found rRNA sequences affiliated to a wide range of bacteria and protists in all samples, suggesting that diverse microbial communities are associated with the holobionts. A particular focus was then carried out to search for genes potentially involved in symbiotic processes such as the presence of c-type lectins-coding genes, which are proteins that play a role in cell recognition among eukaryotes. Unigenes coding putative c-type lectin domains (CTLD) were found in the species bearing photosynthetic symbionts (A. elongata, Collozoum sp., and S. streptacantha) but not in the non-symbiotic one (A. scolymantha). More particularly, phylogenetic analyses group CTLDs from A. elongata and Collozoum sp. on a distinct branch from S. streptacantha CTLDs, which contained carbohydrate-binding motifs typically observed in other marine photosymbiosis. Our data suggest that similarly to other well-known marine photosymbiosis involving metazoans, the interactions of glycans with c-type lectins is likely involved in modulation of the host/symbiont specific recognition in Radiolaria. PMID:25852650

  5. Transcriptome analyses to investigate symbiotic relationships between marine protists.

    PubMed

    Balzano, Sergio; Corre, Erwan; Decelle, Johan; Sierra, Roberto; Wincker, Patrick; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Pawlowski, Jan; Not, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Rhizaria are an important component of oceanic plankton communities worldwide. A number of species harbor eukaryotic microalgal symbionts, which are horizontally acquired in the environment at each generation. Although these photosymbioses are determinant for Rhizaria ability to thrive in oceanic ecosystems, the mechanisms for symbiotic interactions are unclear. Using high-throughput sequencing technology (i.e., 454), we generated large Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) datasets from four uncultured Rhizaria, an acantharian (Amphilonche elongata), two polycystines (Collozoum sp. and Spongosphaera streptacantha), and one phaeodarian (Aulacantha scolymantha). We assessed the main genetic features of the host/symbionts consortium (i.e., the holobiont) transcriptomes and found rRNA sequences affiliated to a wide range of bacteria and protists in all samples, suggesting that diverse microbial communities are associated with the holobionts. A particular focus was then carried out to search for genes potentially involved in symbiotic processes such as the presence of c-type lectins-coding genes, which are proteins that play a role in cell recognition among eukaryotes. Unigenes coding putative c-type lectin domains (CTLD) were found in the species bearing photosynthetic symbionts (A. elongata, Collozoum sp., and S. streptacantha) but not in the non-symbiotic one (A. scolymantha). More particularly, phylogenetic analyses group CTLDs from A. elongata and Collozoum sp. on a distinct branch from S. streptacantha CTLDs, which contained carbohydrate-binding motifs typically observed in other marine photosymbiosis. Our data suggest that similarly to other well-known marine photosymbiosis involving metazoans, the interactions of glycans with c-type lectins is likely involved in modulation of the host/symbiont specific recognition in Radiolaria.

  6. Symbiotic physiology promotes homeostasis in Daisyworld.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Richard A; Lenton, Timothy M; Watson, Andrew J

    2011-04-01

    colonises and to an extent makes habitable an otherwise lifeless environment, but is later displaced by free-living genotypes that have higher local fitness once conditions improve. The final result is arguably analogous to lichen colonisation of the Neoproterozoic land surface, followed by the Phanerozoic rise of vascular plants. Caution is necessary in extrapolating from the Daisyworld parable to real ecology/geochemistry, but sufficiently conserved variables may be water potential, macronutrient stoichiometry and (to a lesser extent) the temperature window for metabolic activity. PMID:21236264

  7. Establishing a portfolio of quality-improvement projects in pediatric surgery through advanced improvement leadership systems.

    PubMed

    Gerrein, Betsy T; Williams, Christina E; Von Allmen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Formal quality-improvement (QI) projects require that participants are educated in QI methods to provide them with the capability to carry out successful, meaningful work. However, orchestrating a portfolio of projects that addresses the strategic mission of the institution requires an extension of basic QI training to provide the division or business unit with the capacity to successfully develop and manage the portfolio. Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems is a program to help units create a meaningful portfolio. This program, used by the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, helped establish a portfolio of targeted QI projects designed to achieve outstanding outcomes at competitive costs in multiple clinical areas aligned with the institution's strategic goals (improve disease-based outcomes, patient safety, flow, and patient and family experience). These objectives are addressed in an institutional strategic plan built around 5 core areas: Safety, Productivity, Care Coordination and Outcomes, Patient and Family Experience, and Value. By combining the portfolio of QI projects with improvements in the divisional infrastructure, effective improvement efforts were realized throughout the division. In the 9 months following the program, divisional capability resulted in a 16.5% increase (5.7% to 22.2%) of formally trained staff working on 10 QI teams. Concurrently, a leadership team, designed to coordinate projects, remove barriers, and provide technical support, provided the capacity to pursue this ongoing effort. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems program increased the Division's efficiency and effectiveness in pursing the QI mission that is integral at our hospital. PMID:24361020

  8. Establishing a portfolio of quality-improvement projects in pediatric surgery through advanced improvement leadership systems.

    PubMed

    Gerrein, Betsy T; Williams, Christina E; Von Allmen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Formal quality-improvement (QI) projects require that participants are educated in QI methods to provide them with the capability to carry out successful, meaningful work. However, orchestrating a portfolio of projects that addresses the strategic mission of the institution requires an extension of basic QI training to provide the division or business unit with the capacity to successfully develop and manage the portfolio. Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems is a program to help units create a meaningful portfolio. This program, used by the Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, helped establish a portfolio of targeted QI projects designed to achieve outstanding outcomes at competitive costs in multiple clinical areas aligned with the institution's strategic goals (improve disease-based outcomes, patient safety, flow, and patient and family experience). These objectives are addressed in an institutional strategic plan built around 5 core areas: Safety, Productivity, Care Coordination and Outcomes, Patient and Family Experience, and Value. By combining the portfolio of QI projects with improvements in the divisional infrastructure, effective improvement efforts were realized throughout the division. In the 9 months following the program, divisional capability resulted in a 16.5% increase (5.7% to 22.2%) of formally trained staff working on 10 QI teams. Concurrently, a leadership team, designed to coordinate projects, remove barriers, and provide technical support, provided the capacity to pursue this ongoing effort. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems program increased the Division's efficiency and effectiveness in pursing the QI mission that is integral at our hospital.

  9. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  10. Light and the bioenergetics of a symbiotic coral

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.; Dubinsky, Z.; Muscatine, L.; Porter, J.W.

    1984-12-01

    Colonies of coral Stylophora pistillata growing at high light can obtain all the reduced carbon needed for animal respiration from photosynthesis by symbiotic zooxanthellae. In contrast, colonies in shaded reef areas must acquired 60% of their reduced carbon heterotrophically. More than 90% of the carbon fixed by zooxanthellae is translocated to the animal host in both light regimes, but very little is assimilated, apparently because the translocated products are deficient in nitrogen. Thus, the coral's overall growth efficiency is similar to that of aquatic herbivores that forage actively. 29 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  11. Head-aimed vision system improves tele-operated mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Kent

    2004-12-01

    A head-aimed vision system greatly improves the situational awareness and decision speed for tele-operations of mobile robots. With head-aimed vision, the tele-operator wears a head-mounted display and a small three axis head-position measuring device. Wherever the operator looks, the remote sensing system "looks". When the system is properly designed, the operator's occipital lobes are "fooled" into believing that the operator is actually on the remote robot. The result is at least a doubling of: situational awareness, threat identification speed, and target tracking ability. Proper system design must take into account: precisely matching fields of view; optical gain; and latency below 100 milliseconds. When properly designed, a head-aimed system does not cause nausea, even with prolonged use.

  12. Effect of cadmium on symbiotic soybean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, A.C.; Wollum, A.G. II

    1981-04-01

    The potential for environmental contamination by cadmium (Cd) has increased significantly in recent years. Since Cd may be hazardous to living systems, a study was conducted to investigate: (1) the existence of Rhizobium japonicum strains tolerant to Cd, (2) the Cd effect on the symbiosis between host soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) and R. japonicum strains with different Cd tolerances, and (3) interactions and distribution of Cd and other elements in the host when biomass is decreased by Cd. The existence of R. japonicum strains tolerant to Cd was assessed by comparing growth curves of 10 different strains growing in a basal medium with gluconate, yeast extract, L-arabinose, and Cd (0, 3.5, 7, 14, and 28 ..mu..g/ml). Strain 3Ilb110 (110) exhibited a tolerance to Cd after an initial lag in growth, while strain 3Ilb123 (123) was susceptible. Strains 110 and 123 were used to inoculate plants growing in nutrient solution with Perlite as a support medium to evaluate the plant-rhizobial interactions in the presence of 0, 2.2, 6.7, 10.1, and 20.2 ..mu..g Cd/ml, respectively. Plants were harvested and tops, roots, and nodules were analyzed 23 days after starting Cd application. Cadmium decreased dry matter production of tops, roots, and nodules. Plants inoculated with strain 123 accumulated significantly more dry matter in nodules than those with strain 110. However, in the presence of 0 and 2.2 ..mu..g Cd/ml, plants innoculated with strain 110 accumulated significantly more N than plants innoculated with strain 123. Nutrient imbalances were observed in the presence of Cd. It is suggested that the interactions of Cd with some nutrients may contribute to Cd toxicity in soybean plants. In this study the most pronounced Cd effect was on Fe and Mn nutrition, rather than Zn as had been previously reported.

  13. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on College Student Self-Disclosure in Group Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linehan, Edward; O'Toole, James

    1982-01-01

    Studied subliminal symbiotic stimulation as a treatment aid in conjunction with counselor self-disclosures in group counseling. Results showed that subliminal exposure to MOMMY AND I ARE ONE stimulus would lead to more client self-disclosures in group counseling. Suggests impact of symbiotic stimulus can be affected by counselor behavior. (RC)

  14. Gene Expression in Gut Symbiotic Organ of Stinkbug Affected by Extracellular Bacterial Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations. PMID:23691247

  15. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    PubMed

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  16. Improved Thermal-Insulation Systems for Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D.

    2003-01-01

    Improved thermal-insulation materials and structures and the techniques for manufacturing them are undergoing development for use in low-temperature applications. Examples of low-temperature equipment for which these thermal insulation systems could provide improved energy efficiency include storage tanks for cryogens, superconducting electric-power-transmission equipment, containers for transport of food and other perishable commodities, and cold boxes for low-temperature industrial processes. These systems could also be used to insulate piping used to transfer cryogens and other fluids, such as liquefied natural gas, refrigerants, chilled water, crude oil, or low-pressure steam. The present thermal-insulation systems are layer composites based partly on the older class of thermal-insulation systems denoted generally as multilayer insulation (MLI). A typical MLI structure includes an evacuated jacket, within which many layers of radiation shields are stacked or wrapped close together. Low-thermal-conductivity spacers are typically placed between the reflection layers to keep them from touching. MLI can work very well when a high vacuum level (less than 10(exp-4) torr) is maintained and utmost care is taken during installation, but its thermal performance deteriorates sharply as the pressure in the evacuated space rises into the soft vacuum range [pressures greater than 0.1 torr (greater than 13 Pa)]. In addition, the thermal performance of MLI is extremely sensitive to mechanical compression and edge effects and can easily decrease from one to two orders of magnitude from its ideal value even when the MLI is kept under high vacuum condition. The present thermal-insulation systems are designed to perform well under soft vacuum level, in particular the range of 1 to 10 torr. They are also designed with larger interlayer spacings to reduce vulnerability to compression (and consequent heat leak) caused by installation and use. The superiority of these systems is the

  17. Titan I propulsion system modeling and possible performance improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Oreste

    This thesis features the Titan I propulsion systems and offers data-supported suggestions for improvements to increase performance. The original propulsion systems were modeled both graphically in CAD and via equations. Due to the limited availability of published information, it was necessary to create a more detailed, secondary set of models. Various engineering equations---pertinent to rocket engine design---were implemented in order to generate the desired extra detail. This study describes how these new models were then imported into the ESI CFD Suite. Various parameters are applied to these imported models as inputs that include, for example, bi-propellant combinations, pressure, temperatures, and mass flow rates. The results were then processed with ESI VIEW, which is visualization software. The output files were analyzed for forces in the nozzle, and various results were generated, including sea level thrust and ISP. Experimental data are provided to compare the original engine configuration models to the derivative suggested improvement models.

  18. An improved AVC strategy applied in distributed wind power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. N.; Liu, Q. H.; Song, S. Y.; Mao, W.

    2016-08-01

    Traditional AVC strategy is mainly used in wind farm and only concerns about grid connection point, which is not suitable for distributed wind power system. Therefore, this paper comes up with an improved AVC strategy applied in distributed wind power system. The strategy takes all nodes of distribution network into consideration and chooses the node having the most serious voltage deviation as control point to calculate the reactive power reference. In addition, distribution principles can be divided into two conditions: when wind generators access to network on single node, the reactive power reference is distributed according to reactive power capacity; when wind generators access to network on multi-node, the reference is distributed according to sensitivity. Simulation results show the correctness and reliability of the strategy. Compared with traditional control strategy, the strategy described in this paper can make full use of generators reactive power output ability according to the distribution network voltage condition and improve the distribution network voltage level effectively.

  19. Benefits of an improved wheat crop information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinne, I. L.

    1976-01-01

    The ECON work and the results of the independent reviews are summarized. Attempts are made to put this information into layman's terms and to present the benefits that can realistically be expected from a LANDSAT-type remote sensing system. Further the mechanisms by which these benefits can be expected to accrue are presented. The benefits are given including the nature of expected information improvements, how and why they can lead to benefits to society, and the estimated magnitude of the expected benefits. A brief description is presented of the ECON models, how they work, their results, and a summary of the pertinent aspects of each review. The ECON analyses show that substantial benefits will accrue from implementation of an improved wheat crop information system based on remote sensing.

  20. Clustering-based urbanisation to improve enterprise information systems agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imache, Rabah; Izza, Said; Ahmed-Nacer, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Enterprises are daily facing pressures to demonstrate their ability to adapt quickly to the unpredictable changes of their dynamic in terms of technology, social, legislative, competitiveness and globalisation. Thus, to ensure its place in this hard context, enterprise must always be agile and must ensure its sustainability by a continuous improvement of its information system (IS). Therefore, the agility of enterprise information systems (EISs) can be considered today as a primary objective of any enterprise. One way of achieving this objective is by the urbanisation of the EIS in the context of continuous improvement to make it a real asset servicing enterprise strategy. This paper investigates the benefits of EISs urbanisation based on clustering techniques as a driver for agility production and/or improvement to help managers and IT management departments to improve continuously the performance of the enterprise and make appropriate decisions in the scope of the enterprise objectives and strategy. This approach is applied to the urbanisation of a tour operator EIS.

  1. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  2. Operational tips for improving intrusion detection system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.

    1996-09-01

    The installation of a new intrusion detection system (IDS) is, of course, expected to improve site security. However, depending upon the way the system is used, it can, over time, actually degrade security. Proper use, control, and maintenance of the IDS is critical if site security is to be maintained. This paper discusses several operational issues that should be addressed in order to use an IDS effectively. Several anecdotes from the author`s experience are given to illustrate proper and improper use of an IDS. Improper operational use of an IDS can render it ineffective. Applying these tips can help keep the IDS operating at peak performance.

  3. Operational tips for improving intrusion detection system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    The installation of a new intrusion detection system (IDS) is, of course, expected to improve site security. However, depending upon the way the system is used, it can, over time, actually degrade security. Proper use, control, and maintenance of the IDS is critical if site security is to be maintained. This paper discusses several operational issues that should be addressed in order to use an IDS effectively. Several anecdotes from the author`s experience are given to illustrate proper and improper use of an IDS. Improper operational use of an IDS can render it ineffective. Applying these tips can help keep the IDS operating at peak performance.

  4. An Improved B+ Tree for Flash File Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havasi, Ferenc

    Nowadays mobile devices such as mobile phones, mp3 players and PDAs are becoming evermore common. Most of them use flash chips as storage. To store data efficiently on flash, it is necessary to adapt ordinary file systems because they are designed for use on hard disks. Most of the file systems use some kind of search tree to store index information, which is very important from a performance aspect. Here we improved the B+ search tree algorithm so as to make flash devices more efficient. Our implementation of this solution saves 98%-99% of the flash operations, and is now the part of the Linux kernel.

  5. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  6. SLR system improvement for GIOVE-A satellite observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, You; Fan, Cunbo; Han, Xingwei; Yang, Dingjiang; Chen, Nianjiang; Xue, Feng; Geng, Lin

    2008-03-01

    Galileo system consists of 27 satellites distributed in three uniformly separated planes. At the end of 2005, one satellite, Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element-A (GIOVE-A), was launched as planned into an MEO with an altitude of 23,260 kilometers. Carrying a payload of rubidium clocks, signal-generation units, and a phase-array antenna of individual L-band elements. GIOVE-A started broadcasting on January 28, 2006, securing the frequencies allocated by the ITU for Galileo. Performance of the on-board atomic clocks, antenna infrastructure, and signal properties is evaluated through precise orbit determination, supported by Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), an independent high-precision range measurement technique for orbit determination based on a global network of stations that measure the round-trip flight-time of ultra short laser pulses to satellites equipped with laser retro reflector arrays (LRAs). SLR provides instantaneous range measurements of millimeter-level precision which can be compiled to provide accurate orbits and to measure the on-board clock error. Given the importance of SLR data for the characterization of the GIOVE-A clocks, the Changchun SLR station in northeast China was selected among the Chinese stations contributing to the ILRS because it had demonstrated strong MEO satellite tracking; collocation with an existing International GPS Service station; and good weather conditions. This paper introduces the SLR system improvement for tracking GIOVE-A satellite in Changchun station. During the more than two months improvement, the new servo and encoder systems were installed, primary mirror, second mirror and some other mirrors have been cleaned and recoated, and the laser system was adjusted in order to improve the laser efficiency and output energy. The paper gives out the improvement results, and the GIOVE-A satellite observation results.

  7. Health care systems redesign project to improve dysphagia screening.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Virginia S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa M; Plue, Laurie; Russell, Scott; Allen, George; Williams, Linda S; Chumbler, Neale R; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve dysphagia-screening processes in a tertiary Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The dysphagia-screening tool was redesigned on the basis of frontline clinician feedback, clinical guidelines, user satisfaction, and multidisciplinary expertise. The revised tool triggered a speech-language consult for positive screens and demonstrated higher scores in user satisfaction and task efficiency. Systems redesign processes were effective for redesigning the tool and implementing practice changes with clinicians involved in dysphagia screening. PMID:25463001

  8. Electronic Equipment Proposal to Improve the Photovoltaic Systems Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Mena, J. E.; Juárez Morán, L. A.; Díaz Reyes, J.

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports a new technique proposal to improve the photovoltaic systems. It was made to design and implement an electronic system that will detect, capture, and transfer the maximum power of the photovoltaic (PV) panel to optimize the supplied power of a solar panel. The electronic system works on base technical proposal of electrical sweeping of electric characteristics using capacitive impedance. The maximum power is transformed and the solar panel energy is sent to an automotive battery. This electronic system reduces the energy lost originated when the solar radiation level decreases or the PV panel temperature is increased. This electronic system tracks, captures, and stores the PV module's maximum power into a capacitor. After, a higher voltage level step-up circuit was designed to increase the voltage of the PV module's maximum power and then its current can be sent to a battery. The experimental results show that the developed electronic system has 95% efficiency. The measurement was made to 50 W, the electronic system works rightly with solar radiation rate from 100 to 1,000 W m - 2 and the PV panel temperature rate changed from 1 to 75°C. The main advantage of this electronic system compared with conventional methods is the elimination of microprocessors, computers, and sophisticated numerical approximations, and it does not need any small electrical signals to track the maximum power. The proposed method is simple, fast, and it is also cheaper.

  9. Soil management systems to improve water availability for plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, A.; Rosner, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to climate change it is expected that the air temperature will increase and the amount as well as the variability of rainfall will change drastically within this century. Higher temperatures and fewer rainy days with more extreme events will increase the risk of surface runoff and erosion. This will lead to reduced soil water storage and therefore to a lower water use efficiency of plants. Soil and land management systems need to be applied and adapted to improve the amount of water stored in the soil and to ensure crop productivity functions of soils under changing climatic conditions. In a 14-yr. long field experiment, the effects of three soil management systems have been studied at three sites in Austria with respect to surface runoff, soil erosion, losses of nutrients and pesticides. Eight years after beginning of the project soil samples have been taken from different depth throughout the root zone to investigate the effects on soil properties. The results show that soil management systems with reduced tillage intensity are able to improve infiltration and soil water storage. More soil water enables plant development during longer dry periods and decreases amounts of irrigation. Overall, the higher water retention in the landscape improves the regional water balance and reduces environmental problems like soil erosion and nutrient and pesticide losses

  10. Characterization of a carbohydrate transporter from symbiotic glomeromycotan fungi.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, Arthur; Martin, Holger; Cohen, David; Fitz, Michael; Wipf, Daniel

    2006-12-14

    The symbiotic relationships between mycorrhizal fungi and plants have an enormous impact on terrestrial ecosystems. Most common are the arbuscular mycorrhizas, formed by fungi belonging to the phylum Glomeromycota. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi facilitate the uptake of soil nutrients by plants and in exchange obtain carbohydrates, thus representing a large sink for atmospheric plant-fixed CO(2). However, how carbohydrates are transported through the symbiotic interface is still unknown. Here we report the characterization of the first known glomeromycotan monosaccharide transporter, GpMST1, by exploiting the unique symbiosis of a glomeromycotan fungus (Geosiphon pyriformis) with cyanobacteria. The GpMST1 gene has a very low GC content and contains six introns with unusual boundaries. GpMST1 possesses twelve predicted transmembrane domains and functions as a proton co-transporter with highest affinity for glucose, then mannose, galactose and fructose. It belongs to an as yet uncharacterized phylogenetic monosaccharide transporter clade. This initial characterization of a new transporter family involved in fungal symbiosis will lead to a better understanding of carbon flows in terrestrial environments.

  11. Photophysiology and daily primary production of a temperate symbiotic gorgonian.

    PubMed

    Ferrier-Pagès, C; Reynaud, S; Béraud, E; Rottier, C; Menu, D; Duong, G; Gévaert, F

    2015-01-01

    Gorgonians are one of the most important benthic components of tropical and temperate areas, and play a fundamental role as ecosystem engineers. Although global warming and pollution increasingly threaten them, the acquisition of nutrients, which is a key process in fitness and stress resistance, has been poorly investigated in such species. This study has thus used an advanced in situ incubation chamber for the first time with gorgonians, to assess the daily acquisition of nutrients and the photophysiology of the Mediterranean symbiotic species, Eunicella singularis. The xanthophyll cycle was assessed in parallel. This work has revealed that E. singularis presents a different functioning than the Mediterranean symbiotic corals. This gorgonian indeed relies on both autotrophy and heterotrophy in summer to optimize its energetic budget, while corals mainly shift to autotrophy for their respiratory needs and tissue growth. In addition, although E. singularis lives in the same depths/locations, and harbours the same symbiont genotype than the corals, the photosynthetic performances of their respective symbionts are significantly different. Indeed, E. singularis acquired 2-3 times less autotrophic carbon from its symbionts than corals, but maintained a positive carbon budget by reducing respiration rates, and by presenting maximal photosynthetic rates throughout the day, suggesting a very efficient light utilization. Almost no photoinhibition was observed under very high light levels, because of the induction of a xanthophyll photoprotection process. These results help understanding why gorgonians often dominate many benthic ecosystems.

  12. Photophysiology and daily primary production of a temperate symbiotic gorgonian.

    PubMed

    Ferrier-Pagès, C; Reynaud, S; Béraud, E; Rottier, C; Menu, D; Duong, G; Gévaert, F

    2015-01-01

    Gorgonians are one of the most important benthic components of tropical and temperate areas, and play a fundamental role as ecosystem engineers. Although global warming and pollution increasingly threaten them, the acquisition of nutrients, which is a key process in fitness and stress resistance, has been poorly investigated in such species. This study has thus used an advanced in situ incubation chamber for the first time with gorgonians, to assess the daily acquisition of nutrients and the photophysiology of the Mediterranean symbiotic species, Eunicella singularis. The xanthophyll cycle was assessed in parallel. This work has revealed that E. singularis presents a different functioning than the Mediterranean symbiotic corals. This gorgonian indeed relies on both autotrophy and heterotrophy in summer to optimize its energetic budget, while corals mainly shift to autotrophy for their respiratory needs and tissue growth. In addition, although E. singularis lives in the same depths/locations, and harbours the same symbiont genotype than the corals, the photosynthetic performances of their respective symbionts are significantly different. Indeed, E. singularis acquired 2-3 times less autotrophic carbon from its symbionts than corals, but maintained a positive carbon budget by reducing respiration rates, and by presenting maximal photosynthetic rates throughout the day, suggesting a very efficient light utilization. Almost no photoinhibition was observed under very high light levels, because of the induction of a xanthophyll photoprotection process. These results help understanding why gorgonians often dominate many benthic ecosystems. PMID:25255987

  13. A statistical anomaly indicates symbiotic origins of eukaryotic membranes.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Suneyna; Mittal, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    Compositional analyses of nucleic acids and proteins have shed light on possible origins of living cells. In this work, rigorous compositional analyses of ∼5000 plasma membrane lipid constituents of 273 species in the three life domains (archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryotes) revealed a remarkable statistical paradox, indicating symbiotic origins of eukaryotic cells involving eubacteria. For lipids common to plasma membranes of the three domains, the number of carbon atoms in eubacteria was found to be similar to that in eukaryotes. However, mutually exclusive subsets of same data show exactly the opposite-the number of carbon atoms in lipids of eukaryotes was higher than in eubacteria. This statistical paradox, called Simpson's paradox, was absent for lipids in archaea and for lipids not common to plasma membranes of the three domains. This indicates the presence of interaction(s) and/or association(s) in lipids forming plasma membranes of eubacteria and eukaryotes but not for those in archaea. Further inspection of membrane lipid structures affecting physicochemical properties of plasma membranes provides the first evidence (to our knowledge) on the symbiotic origins of eukaryotic cells based on the "third front" (i.e., lipids) in addition to the growing compositional data from nucleic acids and proteins.

  14. UV-protectant metabolites from lichens and their symbiotic partners.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh-Hung; Chollet-Krugler, Marylène; Gouault, Nicolas; Tomasi, Sophie

    2013-12-01

    Lichens are structurally complex symbiotic organisms that are exposed to a wide variety of external conditions (extreme temperatures, desiccation, UV radiation, etc.). These poikilohydric organisms have developed various mechanisms of photoprotection, such as light scattering, radiation screening, thermal dissipation, activation of antioxidant defense and macromolecules and membrane repair. These unique organisms produce a vast array of compounds, with more than 1000 secondary metabolites known. An important protective mechanism of lichens is the production of UV screening compounds, such as phenolic compounds (depsidones, depsides, diphenyl ethers), anthraquinones, xanthones or shikimic acid derivatives (calycin, mycosporines, scytonemin). Due to the harmful effects of the UVA wavelengths of sunlight, the search for new sunscreens remains important. We herein propose a review that focuses on the UV protectants from lichens and their symbiotic partners (lichenized fungi, green alga, cyanobacteria). In fact, lichens produce unique and/or efficient UV filters such as depsidones (lobaric acid, pannarin, etc.), depsides (atranorin, gyrophoric acid, etc.), diphenyl ethers (epiphorellic acids, buellin), bisxanthones (secalonic acids, etc.), mycosporines and MAAs, scytonemin along with classical pigments (melanin, carotenoids). We propose to classify these compounds with regard to their chemical structures and review the physicochemical properties that act as UV filters. While the most abundant lichen polyfunctionalized aromatic compounds, belonging to orsellinic derivatives, are UVB screens, these organisms produce strong UVA filters, e.g., calycin (pulvinic acid derivatives), bisxanthones (secalonic acids), scytonemin or mycosporines and MAAs with the latter ones exhibiting attractive properties as photoprotectants.

  15. Ecology of planktonic foraminifera and their symbiotic algae

    SciTech Connect

    Gastrich, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of symbiotic algae occurred abundantly and persistently in the cytoplasm of several species of planktonic Foraminifera over a ten year period in different tropical and subtropical areas of the North Atlantic Ocean. These planktonic Foraminifera host species consistently harbored either dinoflagellates or a newly described minute coccoid algal type. There appeared to be a specific host-symbiont relationship in these species regardless of year, season or geographic locality. The larger ovoid dinoflagellates (Pyrrhophycophyta) occur in the spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, G. conglobatus and Orbulina universa. The smaller alga, from 1.5 to 3.5 um in diameter, occurs in one spinose species Globigerinella aequilateralis and also in the non-spinose species Globigerinita glutinata, Globoquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globorotalia cristata, Globorotalia inflata, Candeina nitida, in various juvenile specimens and at all seasons except the winter months in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalial hirsuta. Controlled laboratory studies indicated a significant C incorporation into the host cytoplasm and inorganic calcium carbonate test of Globigerinoides ruber. During incubation for up to two hours, the /sup 14/C uptake into the cytoplasm and test in the light was significantly greater than uptake in the dark by living specimens or by dead foraminifers. There appears to be light-enhanced uptake of /sup 14/C into the test with dinoflagellate photosynthesis contributing to host calcification. In culture, symbiotic algae were observed to survive for the duration of the lifespan of their hosts.

  16. Unraveling the nitrogen isotopic signature of symbiotic corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, Q.; Swart, P. K.; Altabet, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Coral reefs thrive in shallow, tropical, low nutrient waters. Nutrient inputs to a reef environment are often interpreted by measuring the nitrogen isotopic composition of reef organisms. The δ15N signature of scleractinian corals has been historically measured to assess the presence of anthropogenic influences such as sewage and fertilizer runoff. The majority of reef building corals form a symbiotic partnership with the dinoflagellate algae, Symbiodinium microadriaticum. The δ15N signature of symbiotic corals is complex as it is not only dependent on nitrogen acquisition by the coral, but also by the algal symbionts that reside within the gastrodermal tissue layer. The relationship between the δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and the δ15N of coral tissue has not been established. The aim of this study is to identify considerations necessary when interpreting nitrogen sources based on δ15N of coral tissue. Incubations were carried out in order to measure isotopic fractionation associated with nitrate and ammonium incorporation by the Pacific branching coral, Pocillopora damicornis. We investigated the dependence of nitrogen isotope fractionation on species of DIN (nitrate or ammonium), concentration of DIN (range: 1-50 μM N), genetic diversity of algal symbionts (clade C or clade D) and light levels.

  17. UV-protectant metabolites from lichens and their symbiotic partners.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh-Hung; Chollet-Krugler, Marylène; Gouault, Nicolas; Tomasi, Sophie

    2013-12-01

    Lichens are structurally complex symbiotic organisms that are exposed to a wide variety of external conditions (extreme temperatures, desiccation, UV radiation, etc.). These poikilohydric organisms have developed various mechanisms of photoprotection, such as light scattering, radiation screening, thermal dissipation, activation of antioxidant defense and macromolecules and membrane repair. These unique organisms produce a vast array of compounds, with more than 1000 secondary metabolites known. An important protective mechanism of lichens is the production of UV screening compounds, such as phenolic compounds (depsidones, depsides, diphenyl ethers), anthraquinones, xanthones or shikimic acid derivatives (calycin, mycosporines, scytonemin). Due to the harmful effects of the UVA wavelengths of sunlight, the search for new sunscreens remains important. We herein propose a review that focuses on the UV protectants from lichens and their symbiotic partners (lichenized fungi, green alga, cyanobacteria). In fact, lichens produce unique and/or efficient UV filters such as depsidones (lobaric acid, pannarin, etc.), depsides (atranorin, gyrophoric acid, etc.), diphenyl ethers (epiphorellic acids, buellin), bisxanthones (secalonic acids, etc.), mycosporines and MAAs, scytonemin along with classical pigments (melanin, carotenoids). We propose to classify these compounds with regard to their chemical structures and review the physicochemical properties that act as UV filters. While the most abundant lichen polyfunctionalized aromatic compounds, belonging to orsellinic derivatives, are UVB screens, these organisms produce strong UVA filters, e.g., calycin (pulvinic acid derivatives), bisxanthones (secalonic acids), scytonemin or mycosporines and MAAs with the latter ones exhibiting attractive properties as photoprotectants. PMID:24170172

  18. A slowly evolving host moves first in symbiotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damore, James; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Symbiotic relationships, both parasitic and mutualistic, are ubiquitous in nature. Understanding how these symbioses evolve, from bacteria and their phages to humans and our gut microflora, is crucial in understanding how life operates. Often, symbioses consist of a slowly evolving host species with each host only interacting with its own sub-population of symbionts. The Red Queen hypothesis describes coevolutionary relationships as constant arms races with each species rushing to evolve an advantage over the other, suggesting that faster evolution is favored. Here, we use a simple game theoretic model of host- symbiont coevolution that includes population structure to show that if the symbionts evolve much faster than the host, the equilibrium distribution is the same as it would be if it were a sequential game where the host moves first against its symbionts. For the slowly evolving host, this will prove to be advantageous in mutualisms and a handicap in antagonisms. The model allows for symbiont adaptation to its host, a result that is robust to changes in the parameters and generalizes to continuous and multiplayer games. Our findings provide insight into a wide range of symbiotic phenomena and help to unify the field of coevolutionary theory.

  19. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Cornwell, William K; Sprent, Janet I; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E Toby

    2014-06-10

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis' evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of 'stable fixers' (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships.

  20. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.; Cornwell, William K.; Sprent, Janet I.; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E. Toby

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis’ evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of ‘stable fixers’ (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships. PMID:24912610

  1. PTF 11kx: a type Ia supernova with a symbiotic nova progenitor.

    PubMed

    Dilday, B; Howell, D A; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Nugent, P E; Sullivan, M; Ben-Ami, S; Bildsten, L; Bolte, M; Endl, M; Filippenko, A V; Gnat, O; Horesh, A; Hsiao, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kirkman, D; Maguire, K; Marcy, G W; Moore, K; Pan, Y; Parrent, J T; Podsiadlowski, P; Quimby, R M; Sternberg, A; Suzuki, N; Tytler, D R; Xu, D; Bloom, J S; Gal-Yam, A; Hook, I M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Polishook, D; Poznanski, D

    2012-08-24

    There is a consensus that type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a binary companion. However, direct observation of SN Ia progenitors is lacking, and the precise nature of the binary companion remains uncertain. A temporal series of high-resolution optical spectra of the SN Ia PTF 11kx reveals a complex circumstellar environment that provides an unprecedentedly detailed view of the progenitor system. Multiple shells of circumstellar material are detected, and the SN ejecta are seen to interact with circumstellar material starting 59 days after the explosion. These features are best described by a symbiotic nova progenitor, similar to RS Ophiuchi. PMID:22923575

  2. PTF 11kx: a type Ia supernova with a symbiotic nova progenitor.

    PubMed

    Dilday, B; Howell, D A; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Nugent, P E; Sullivan, M; Ben-Ami, S; Bildsten, L; Bolte, M; Endl, M; Filippenko, A V; Gnat, O; Horesh, A; Hsiao, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kirkman, D; Maguire, K; Marcy, G W; Moore, K; Pan, Y; Parrent, J T; Podsiadlowski, P; Quimby, R M; Sternberg, A; Suzuki, N; Tytler, D R; Xu, D; Bloom, J S; Gal-Yam, A; Hook, I M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Polishook, D; Poznanski, D

    2012-08-24

    There is a consensus that type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a binary companion. However, direct observation of SN Ia progenitors is lacking, and the precise nature of the binary companion remains uncertain. A temporal series of high-resolution optical spectra of the SN Ia PTF 11kx reveals a complex circumstellar environment that provides an unprecedentedly detailed view of the progenitor system. Multiple shells of circumstellar material are detected, and the SN ejecta are seen to interact with circumstellar material starting 59 days after the explosion. These features are best described by a symbiotic nova progenitor, similar to RS Ophiuchi.

  3. Symbiotic Performance of Diverse Frankia Strains on Salt-Stressed Casuarina glauca and Casuarina equisetifolia Plants.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Mariama; Gray, Krystelle; Diagne, Nathalie; Oshone, Rediet; Fardoux, Joel; Gherbi, Hassen; Hocher, Valérie; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Laplaze, Laurent; Tisa, Louis S; Sy, Mame O; Champion, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen-fixing associations between Casuarina trees and the actinobacteria Frankia are widely used in agroforestry in particular for salinized land reclamation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of salinity on the establishment of the actinorhizal symbiosis between C. glauca and two contrasting Frankia strains (salt sensitive; CcI3 vs. salt tolerant; CeD) and the role of these isolates in the salt tolerance of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia plants. We show that the number of root nodules decreased with increasing salinity levels in both plants inoculated with CcI3 and CeD. Nodule formation did not occur in seedlings inoculated with CcI3 and CeD, at NaCl concentrations above 100 and 200 mM, respectively. Salinity also affected the early deformation of plant root hairs and reduced their number and size. In addition, expression of symbiotic marker Cg12 gene, which codes for a subtilase, was reduced at 50 mM NaCl. These data suggest that the reduction of nodulation in C. glauca under salt stress is in part due to inhibition of early mechanisms of infection. We also show that prior inoculation of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia with Frankia strains CcI3 and CeD significantly improved plant height, dry biomass, chlorophyll and proline contents at all levels of salinity tested, depending on the Casuarina-Frankia association. There was no correlation between in vitro salt tolerance of Frankia strains and efficiency in planta under salt-stressed conditions. Our results strongly indicate that increased N nutrition, photosynthesis potential and proline accumulation are important factors responsible for salt tolerance of nodulated C. glauca and C. equisetifolia. PMID:27630656

  4. Symbiotic Performance of Diverse Frankia Strains on Salt-Stressed Casuarina glauca and Casuarina equisetifolia Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Mariama; Gray, Krystelle; Diagne, Nathalie; Oshone, Rediet; Fardoux, Joel; Gherbi, Hassen; Hocher, Valérie; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Laplaze, Laurent; Tisa, Louis S.; Sy, Mame O.; Champion, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen-fixing associations between Casuarina trees and the actinobacteria Frankia are widely used in agroforestry in particular for salinized land reclamation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of salinity on the establishment of the actinorhizal symbiosis between C. glauca and two contrasting Frankia strains (salt sensitive; CcI3 vs. salt tolerant; CeD) and the role of these isolates in the salt tolerance of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia plants. We show that the number of root nodules decreased with increasing salinity levels in both plants inoculated with CcI3 and CeD. Nodule formation did not occur in seedlings inoculated with CcI3 and CeD, at NaCl concentrations above 100 and 200 mM, respectively. Salinity also affected the early deformation of plant root hairs and reduced their number and size. In addition, expression of symbiotic marker Cg12 gene, which codes for a subtilase, was reduced at 50 mM NaCl. These data suggest that the reduction of nodulation in C. glauca under salt stress is in part due to inhibition of early mechanisms of infection. We also show that prior inoculation of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia with Frankia strains CcI3 and CeD significantly improved plant height, dry biomass, chlorophyll and proline contents at all levels of salinity tested, depending on the Casuarina-Frankia association. There was no correlation between in vitro salt tolerance of Frankia strains and efficiency in planta under salt-stressed conditions. Our results strongly indicate that increased N nutrition, photosynthesis potential and proline accumulation are important factors responsible for salt tolerance of nodulated C. glauca and C. equisetifolia.

  5. Symbiotic Performance of Diverse Frankia Strains on Salt-Stressed Casuarina glauca and Casuarina equisetifolia Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Mariama; Gray, Krystelle; Diagne, Nathalie; Oshone, Rediet; Fardoux, Joel; Gherbi, Hassen; Hocher, Valérie; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Laplaze, Laurent; Tisa, Louis S.; Sy, Mame O.; Champion, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen-fixing associations between Casuarina trees and the actinobacteria Frankia are widely used in agroforestry in particular for salinized land reclamation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of salinity on the establishment of the actinorhizal symbiosis between C. glauca and two contrasting Frankia strains (salt sensitive; CcI3 vs. salt tolerant; CeD) and the role of these isolates in the salt tolerance of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia plants. We show that the number of root nodules decreased with increasing salinity levels in both plants inoculated with CcI3 and CeD. Nodule formation did not occur in seedlings inoculated with CcI3 and CeD, at NaCl concentrations above 100 and 200 mM, respectively. Salinity also affected the early deformation of plant root hairs and reduced their number and size. In addition, expression of symbiotic marker Cg12 gene, which codes for a subtilase, was reduced at 50 mM NaCl. These data suggest that the reduction of nodulation in C. glauca under salt stress is in part due to inhibition of early mechanisms of infection. We also show that prior inoculation of C. glauca and C. equisetifolia with Frankia strains CcI3 and CeD significantly improved plant height, dry biomass, chlorophyll and proline contents at all levels of salinity tested, depending on the Casuarina-Frankia association. There was no correlation between in vitro salt tolerance of Frankia strains and efficiency in planta under salt-stressed conditions. Our results strongly indicate that increased N nutrition, photosynthesis potential and proline accumulation are important factors responsible for salt tolerance of nodulated C. glauca and C. equisetifolia. PMID:27630656

  6. Cryptanalysis and improvement of an improved two factor authentication protocol for telecare medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Shehzad Ashraf; Naqvi, Husnain; Shon, Taeshik; Sher, Muhammad; Farash, Mohammad Sabzinejad

    2015-06-01

    Telecare medical information systems (TMIS) provides rapid and convenient health care services remotely. Efficient authentication is a prerequisite to guarantee the security and privacy of patients in TMIS. Authentication is used to verify the legality of the patients and TMIS server during remote access. Very recently Islam et al. (J. Med. Syst. 38(10):135, 2014) proposed a two factor authentication protocol for TMIS using elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) to improve Xu et al.'s (J. Med. Syst. 38(1):9994, 2014) protocol. They claimed their improved protocol to be efficient and provides all security requirements. However our analysis reveals that Islam et al.'s protocol suffers from user impersonation and server impersonation attacks. Furthermore we proposed an enhanced protocol. The proposed protocol while delivering all the virtues of Islam et al.'s protocol resists all known attacks. PMID:25912427

  7. Dual centrifuge system with flocculation improves barite recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Neidhardt, D.

    1993-03-15

    A mud-treatment system using two centrifuges and chemical flocculation to recover barite can return almost clean brine to the mud system and maintain low-gravity solids below 8.5%. The system requires no dilution to combat ultrafine particles and provides substantial cost savings on mud products, personnel, and disposal. Many conventional waste water treatment systems are useful but limited-pit volumes are reduced but not eliminated. Waste water treatment systems can help solve water supply and waste water problems for drillers. To achieve pitless, closed-loop drilling, the new method uses two centrifuges, each with dual hydraulic controls for bowl speed and scroll speed, and chemical flocculents for treatment of weighted and unweighted mud systems. This setup allows stringent control of low-gravity solids, barite recovery, and drilling waste disposal volumes. On many drilling operations, mud costs can typically be the third largest drilling cost. Thus, application of this type of barite-recovery system can provide significant cost savings and operational improvements, even if mud disposal is not a major concern.

  8. Fisher Pierce products for improving distribution system reliability

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The challenges facing the electric power utility today in the 1990s has changed significantly from those of even 10 years ago. The proliferation of automation and the personnel computer have heightened the requirements and demands put on the electric distribution system. Today`s customers, fighting to compete in a world market, demand quality, uninterrupted power service. Privatization and the concept of unregulated competition require utilities to streamline to minimize system support costs and optimize power delivery efficiency. Fisher Pierce, serving the electric utility industry for over 50 years, offers a line of products to assist utilities in meeting these challenges. The Fisher Pierce Family of products provide tools for the electric utility to exceed customer service demands. A full line of fault indicating devices are offered to expedite system power restoration both locally and in conjunction with SCADA systems. Fisher Pierce is the largest supplier of roadway lighting controls, manufacturing on a 6 million dollar automated line assuring the highest quality in the world. The distribution system capacitor control line offers intelligent local or radio linked switching control to maintain system voltage and Var levels for quality and cost efficient power delivery under varying customer loads. Additional products, designed to authenticate revenue metering calibration and verify on sight metering service wiring, help optimize the profitability of the utility assuring continuous system service improvements for their customers.

  9. Advanced Technologies to Improve Closure of Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    As NASA looks beyond the International Space Station toward long-duration, deep space missions away from Earth, the current practice of supplying consumables and spares will not be practical nor affordable. New approaches are sought for life support and habitation systems that will reduce dependency on Earth and increase mission sustainability. To reduce launch mass, further closure of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) beyond the current capability of the ISS will be required. Areas of particular interest include achieving higher degrees of recycling within Atmosphere Revitalization, Water Recovery and Waste Management Systems. NASA is currently investigating advanced carbon dioxide reduction processes that surpass the level of oxygen recovery available from the Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the ISS. Candidate technologies will potentially improve the recovery of oxygen from about 50% (for the CRA) to as much as 100% for technologies who's end product is solid carbon. Improving the efficiency of water recycling and recovery can be achieved by the addition of advanced technologies to recover water from brines and solid wastes. Bioregenerative technologies may be utilized for water reclaimation and also for the production of food. Use of higher plants will simultaneously benefit atmosphere revitalization and water recovery through photosynthesis and transpiration. The level at which bioregenerative technologies are utilized will depend on their comparative requirements for spacecraft resources including mass, power, volume, heat rejection, crew time and reliability. Planetary protection requirements will need to be considered for missions to other solar system bodies.

  10. Symbiotic Nuclear—Coal Systems for Production of Liquid Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taczanowski, S.

    The notion of safety is not confined to the technological or non-proliferation aspects. It covers also the elements of energy policy: irrational reactions of societies, emotions, egoistic interests of more or less powerful pressure of economical and external political factors. One should be conscious that the country's privilege of being equipped by the Nature with rich resources of oil or gas is not solely economical, but even more a political one. Simultaneously, the gradual depletion of world hydrocarbons that draws behind irrevocable price increase has to be expected within the time scale of exploitation of power plants (now amounted to ~60 years). Therefore consequences of energy policy last much longer than the perspectives the political or economical decision makers are planning and acting within and the public is expecting successes and finally evaluating them. The world oil and gas resources are geopolitically very non-uniformly distributed, in contrast to coal and uranium. Since the level of energy self-sufficiency of the EU is highest for coal, the old idea of synfuels production from coal is recalled. Yet, in view of limits to the CO2 emissions in the EU another method has to be used here than the conventional coal liquefaction just applied in China. Simultaneously, an interesting evolution of energy prices was be observed, namely an increase in that of motor fuels in contrast to that of electricity remaining well stable. This fact suggests that the use of electricity (mainly the off-peak load), generated without emissions of CO2 for production of liquid fuels can prove reasonable. Thus, the essence of the presented idea of coal-nuclear symbiosis lies in the supply of energy in the form of H2, necessary for this process, from a nuclear reactor. Particularly, in the present option H2 is obtained by electrolytic water splitting supplying also O2 as a precious by-product in well mature and commercially available already since decades, Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The direct coal hydrogenation (Bergius method) has been proposed as the optimum process for liquid fuels production, as distinct by the best hydrogen economy, thus reducing the consumption of need nuclear energy. The present concept allows for simultaneous achievement of a number of aims: production of motor fuels without CO2 emissions (thus without carbon tax) based upon domestic energy carriers — coals, supply of the electricity produced in the nuclear power plant to the national grid to cover the peak demand. Such concept broadens the palette of liquid fuels supply, thus heightens energy safety of the country or e.g. whole of the EU. In an emergency case (for instance — disturbances of gas deliveries) the supply of produced H2 directly to the gas grid is also not excluded too. The performed preliminary cost evaluation indicates that the coal—nuclear symbiont can be well economic. Finally, the most radical option of coal-nuclear alliance is mentioned — the production of liquid fuels in the Fischer—Tropsch process from CO2 as a raw material sequestered from a coal power plant. The latter would use the oxy-combustion technique profiting on the O2 obtained earlier together with H2 what would facilitate the sequestration of CO2 at the plant. Unfortunately, this variant requires for reduction of CO2 to C much more hydrogen, achievable effectively in High Temperature Reactors commercially still unavailable. But on the basis of coal alone great resources — natural, technological and human of the coal sector can be best utilized too. Summarizing: the coal-nuclear synergy is the optimum far-sighted concept of safe development of the EU energy and fuels sector.

  11. An improved optical identity authentication system with significant output images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Liu, Ming-tang; Yao, Shu-xia; Xin, Yan-hui

    2012-06-01

    An improved method for optical identity authentication system with significant output images is proposed. In this method, a predefined image is digitally encoded into two phase-masks relating to a fixed phase-mask, and this fixed phase-mask acts as a lock to the system. When the two phase-masks, serving as the key, are presented to the system, the predefined image is generated at the output. In addition to simple verification, our method is capable of identifying the type of input phase-mask, and the duties of identity verification and recognition are separated and, respectively, assigned to the amplitude and phase of the output image. Numerical simulation results show that our proposed method is feasible and the output image with better image quality can be obtained.

  12. Improvement of forecasting system with optimal interpolation focusing on korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, J.; Koo, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A system for forecasting future air quality can play an important role as part of an air quality management system working in concert with more traditional emissions-based approaches. However, there are still a lot of uncertainties in modeling atmospheric. Data assimilation makes use of observation in order to reduce the uncertainties. This paper presents experiments of PM10(particulate matter <10㎛ in diameter) data assimilation with the optimal interpolation method. In order to improve the performance of chemical transport models (CTM) models in predicting pollutant concentrations for PM10, data assimilation techniques can be used. Model (CMAQ : Community Multiscale Air Quality Model) to simulate and assimilate PM10 concentration over Korea peninsula. The observations are provided by AAQMS (Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Stations in Korea).Data assimilation techniques combine measurements of the pollutant concentrations with model results to obtain better estimates of the true concentration levels(unknown). The method is then applied in operational-forecast conditions. It is found that the assimilation of PM10 observations significantly improves the one-day forecast of PM10, whereas the improvement is non significant for the tow-day forecast. We focus on the horizontal and temporal impacts of the data assimilation. The strategy followed in this paper with the optimal interpolation could be useful for operational forecasts.

  13. Improving the efficiency of solar photovoltaic power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aribisala, Henry A.

    As the local and national clamor for foreign energy independent United States continues to grow unabated; renewable energy has been receiving increased focus and it's widely believed that it's not only the answer to ever increasing demand for energy in this country, but also the environmentally friendly means of meeting such demand. During the spring of 2010, I was involved with a 5KW solar power system design project; the project involved designing and building solar panels and associated accessories like the solar array mounts and Solar Inverter system. One of the key issues we ran into during the initial stage of the project was how to select efficient solar cells for panel building at a reasonable cost. While we were able to purchase good solar cells within our allocated budget, the issue of design for efficiency was not fully understood , not just in the contest of solar cells performance , but also in the overall system efficiency of the whole solar power system, hence the door was opened for this thesis. My thesis explored and expanded beyond the scope of the aforementioned project to research different avenues for improving the efficiency of solar photo-voltaic power system from the solar cell level to the solar array mounting, array tracking and DC-AC inversion system techniques.

  14. Improvements and Extensions for Joint Polar Satellite System Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.; Feeley, J. H.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS replaced the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the old POES system managed by the NOAA. JPSS satellites will carry sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for the JPSS is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3), data processing and product delivery. CGS's data processing capability processes the data from the JPSS satellites to provide environmental data products (including Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, known as the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, was launched on 28 October 2011. CGS is currently processing and delivering SDRs and EDRs for S-NPP and will continue through the lifetime of the JPSS program. The EDRs for S-NPP are currently undergoing an extensive Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) campaign. Changes identified by the Cal/Val campaign are coming available for implementation into the operational system in support of both S-NPP and JPSS-1 (scheduled for launch in 2017). Some of these changes will be available in time to update the S-NPP algorithm baseline, while others will become operational just prior to JPSS-1 launch. In addition, new capabilities, such as higher spectral and spatial resolution, will be exercised on JPSS-1. This paper will describe changes to current algorithms and products as a result of the Cal/Val campaign and related initiatives for improved capabilities. Improvements include Cross Track Infrared Sounder high spectral

  15. Thirty Years of Improving the NCEP Global Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G. H.; Manikin, G.; Yang, F.

    2014-12-01

    Current eight day forecasts by the NCEP Global Forecast System are as accurate as five day forecasts 30 years ago. This revolution in weather forecasting reflects increases in computer power, improvements in the assimilation of observations, especially satellite data, improvements in model physics, improvements in observations and international cooperation and competition. One important component has been and is the diagnosis, evaluation and reduction of systematic errors. The effect of proposed improvements in the GFS on systematic errors is one component of the thorough testing of such improvements by the Global Climate and Weather Modeling Branch. Examples of reductions in systematic errors in zonal mean temperatures and winds and other fields will be presented. One challenge in evaluating systematic errors is uncertainty in what reality is. Model initial states can be regarded as the best overall depiction of the atmosphere, but can be misleading in areas of few observations or for fields not well observed such as humidity or precipitation over the oceans. Verification of model physics is particularly difficult. The Environmental Modeling Center emphasizes the evaluation of systematic biases against observations. Recently EMC has placed greater emphasis on synoptic evaluation and on precipitation, 2-meter temperatures and dew points and 10 meter winds. A weekly EMC map discussion reviews the performance of many models over the United States and has helped diagnose and alleviate significant systematic errors in the GFS, including a near surface summertime evening cold wet bias over the eastern US and a multi-week period when the GFS persistently developed bogus tropical storms off Central America. The GFS exhibits a wet bias for light rain and a dry bias for moderate to heavy rain over the continental United States. Significant changes to the GFS are scheduled to be implemented in the fall of 2014. These include higher resolution, improved physics and

  16. When systems fail: improving care through technology can create risk.

    PubMed

    Bagalio, Sharon A

    2007-01-01

    Emerging medical technology is transforming the care of the modern-day patient. Hospital performance and patient safety is improving, lowering professional liability and medical malpractice costs. This advanced technology affects not only diagnosis and treatment but also hospital productivity and revenue. However, it also exposes hospitals and medical personnel to a number of unforeseeable risks. This article examines ongoing efforts to improve patient safety through the use of technology, automation and complex systems operations. It discusses the importance of skilled negotiation when vying for technology contracts and the value of maintaining a reliable data center to support it. Technology risk exposure is now a reality. A hospital needs to know how to protect itself from cyber liability, business interruption, and data loss and theft by ensuring that there is adequate coverage. PMID:20200890

  17. Improved low NOx firing systems for pulverized coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.; Laux, S.; Grusha, J.; Rosin, T.; Hausman, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    More stringent emission limits or the addition of post combustion NOx control create the need for improvements of NOx emissions from pulverized coal boilers. Many boilers retrofitted with Low NOx technology during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the CAAA fail or marginally meet their requirements. Technical solutions range from addition of overfire air and state-of-the-art low NOx burners to low cost additions of combustion enhancements. Regardless of the combustion NOx control method used, stoichiometries local to the burners must be maintained at the designed values at all times to provide high NOx performance at low efficiency loss due to unburned fuel. This paper describes Foster Wheeler's approach to NOx emission improvements for existing low NOx firing systems. The technology to measure air and coal flow individually for each burner and to control the parameters for optimum combustion are presented and discussed. Field experience shows the installation and advantages of the technology.

  18. Improved Modeling in a Matlab-Based Navigation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschmann, Julie; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack; Harman, Rick; Larimore, Wallace E.

    1999-01-01

    An innovative approach to autonomous navigation is available for low earth orbit satellites. The system is developed in Matlab and utilizes an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to estimate the attitude and trajectory based on spacecraft magnetometer and gyro data. Preliminary tests of the system with real spacecraft data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Satellite (RXTE) indicate the existence of unmodeled errors in the magnetometer data. Incorporating into the EKF a statistical model that describes the colored component of the effective measurement of the magnetic field vector could improve the accuracy of the trajectory and attitude estimates and also improve the convergence time. This model is identified as a first order Markov process. With the addition of the model, the EKF attempts to identify the non-white components of the noise allowing for more accurate estimation of the original state vector, i.e. the orbital elements and the attitude. Working in Matlab allows for easy incorporation of new models into the EKF and the resulting navigation system is generic and can easily be applied to future missions resulting in an alternative in onboard or ground-based navigation.

  19. CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.

    2010-07-19

    The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during

  20. Journal entries facilitating preprofessional scientific literacy and mutualistic symbiotic relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Vliet, Valerie J.

    This study explored journal writing as an alternative assessment to promote the development of pre-professional scientific literacy and mutualistic symbiotic relationships between teaching and learning, instruction and assessment, and students and teachers. The larger context of this study is an action reaction project of the attempted transformation of a traditional first year undergraduate pre-professional biology class to sociocultural constructivist principles. The participants were commuter and residential, full and part-time students ranging in age from 18 to 27 and 18/21 were female. The backgrounds of the students varied considerably, ranging from low to upper middle income, including students of Black and Asian heritage. The setting was a medium-sized Midwestern university. The instructor has twenty years of experience teaching Biology at the college level. The data were analyzed using the constant comparative method and the development of grounded theory. The journal entries were analyzed as to their function and form in relationship to the development of multiple aspects of pre-professional scientific literacy. The perceptions of the students as to the significance of the use of journal entries were also determined through the analysis of their use of journal entries in their portfolios and statements in surveys and portfolios. The analysis revealed that journal entries promoted multiple aspects of pre-professional scientific literacy in both students and the instructor and facilitated the development of mutualistic symbiotic relationships between teaching and learning, instruction and assessment, and students and teachers. The function analysis revealed that the journal entries fulfilled the functions intended for the development of multiple aspects of pre-professional scientific literacy. The complexity of journal writing emerged from the form analysis, which revealed the multiple form elements inherent in journal entries. Students perceived journal

  1. Applying Quality Improvement into Systems-based Learning to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Moreo, Kathleen; Sapir, Tamar; Greene, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S., where the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has reached epidemic proportions, many patients with this disease are treated by primary care physicians in community-based systems, including accountable care organisations (ACOs). To address gaps in the quality of diabetes care, national quality measures have been established, including patient-centered measures adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for its Shared Savings Program for ACOs. From a patient-centered perspective, high-quality diabetes care depends on effective communication between clinicians and patients, along with patient education and counseling about medications and lifestyle. We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) program for 30 primary care physicians treating patients with type 2 diabetes in three structurally similar but geographically diverse ACOs. Retrospective chart audits were conducted before (n = 300) and after (n = 300) each physician participated in accredited continuing medical education (CME) courses that focused on QI strategies. Randomly selected charts were audited to measurably assess essential interventions for improved outcomes in type 2 diabetes including the physicians' documentation of patient counseling and assessment of side effects, and patients' medication adherence status and changes in hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and body mass index (BMI). Paced educational interventions included a private performance improvement Internet live course conducted for each physician, small-group Internet live courses involving peer discussion, and a set of enduring materials, which were also multi-accredited for all clinicians in the physician's practice. Continual improvement cycles were guided by analysis of the baseline chart audits, quantitative survey data, and qualitative feedback offered by participants. To extend the benefit of the education, the enduring materials were offered to the interprofessional team of clinicians throughout the U.S. who did

  2. Improving the efficiency of high purity water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bukay, M.; Youngberg, D.

    1994-05-01

    High purity water (HPW) production involves the consumption of substantial amounts of energy, precious potable water, harsh/hazardous chemicals, and other environmental/impact materials. The discharge of some of the waste products from HPW systems is also a concern. The purpose of this paper is to discuss techniques to improve the efficiency of HPW production and thereby reduce any negative effects on the environment. It provides specific examples of how end-users and equipment suppliers are increasing the efficiency of their pretreatment, reverse osmosis, ion-exchange, and sanitization technology while frequently citing capital and operating cost reductions.

  3. Improving reliability in the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) control system

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, N.; Spencer, N.; Tinsman, J.

    1989-10-01

    During the past year, considerable emphasis has been placed on improving the overall reliability of the SLC control system. The Errorlog Facility has proven a useful tool to diagnose hardware and software problems. By analyzing the various error messages and their correlations, one can usually determine the software component or hardware module causing faults. Daily summaries help to identify problems so that they can be remedied before they become catastrophic; thereby bringing about a considerable increase in performance. We discuss the various tools we use and our operational experience with them. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Improved direct and indirect systems of columns for ternary distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Fidkowski, Z.T.

    1998-04-01

    Separation of a ternary mixture into almost pure components is discussed. Systems of distillation columns, with higher thermodynamic efficiency, are developed from a direct sequence (or indirect sequence) of distillation columns by allowing for two interconnecting streams of the same composition and different enthalpy. This increases the reversibility of distillation in the second column, which results in replacing a portion of the high-temperature boiling duty with a lower-temperature heat in the direct split case. For the indirect split case, the improvement allows a portion of the low-temperature condensing duty to be replaced with a higher-temperature condensation.

  5. Integrated Self-Management System for Improved Treatment of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Kristen T.; CULJAT, Martin O.; MIERZWA, Andrzej P.; SINGH, Rahul S.; FONG, Benson; VANLANDINGHAM, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    A mobile, affordable product that provides clinicians and patients with comprehensive asthma assessment is needed to improve asthma control. Our solution is an integrated system consisting of a portable, inexpensive, easy-to-use spirometer and a mobile application that communicates wirelessly with the spirometer. Results demonstrated that the wireless asthma management solution meets recommended American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) standards. The device is expected to empower patients to accurately self-assess their asthma for better self-management at home, work, or leisure. PMID:27046589

  6. Novel delivery systems for improving the clinical use of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kovalainen, Miia; Mönkäre, Juha; Riikonen, Joakim; Pesonen, Ullamari; Vlasova, Maria; Salonen, Jarno; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Järvinen, Kristiina; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2015-07-01

    Peptides have long been recognized as a promising group of therapeutic substances to treat various diseases. Delivery systems for peptides have been under development since the discovery of insulin for the treatment of diabetes. The challenge of using peptides as drugs arises from their poor bioavailability resulting from the low permeability of biological membranes and their instability. Currently, subcutaneous injection is clinically the most common administration route for peptides. This route is cost-effective and suitable for self-administration, and the development of appropriate dosing equipment has made performing the repeated injections relatively easy; however, only few clinical subcutaneous peptide delivery systems provide sustained peptide release. As a result, frequent injections are needed, which may cause discomfort and additional risks resulting from a poor administration technique. Controlled peptide delivery systems, able to provide required therapeutic plasma concentrations over an extended period, are needed to increase peptide safety and patient compliancy. In this review, we summarize the current peptidergic drugs, future developments, and parenteral peptide delivery systems. Special emphasis is given to porous silicon, a novel material in peptide delivery. Biodegradable and biocompatible porous silicon possesses some unique properties, such as the ability to carry exceptional high peptide payloads and to modify peptide release extensively. We have successfully developed porous silicon as a carrier material for improved parenteral peptide delivery. Nanotechnology, with its different delivery systems, will enable better use of peptides in several therapeutic applications in the near future. PMID:26023145

  7. Changes of cellular superficial configuration of symbiotic algae during cultivation from two anemones found in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Wang, Guangce

    2008-02-01

    Symbiotic algae from two anemones, Radianthus macrodactylus and Stichodactyla mertensii, found in the South China Sea, were cultivated in ASP-8A medium in this study. Changes of superficial configuration of symbiotic algae during the cultivation were studied by means of a microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A number of small cavities appeared on the surfaces of symbiotic algae after they were cultivated for 10 h. The cavities enlarged and the cell contents were lost with extended cultivation. Our data suggested that the presence of cavities on symbiotic algae surfaces may be one of the main reasons for failure to culture symbiotic algae in an artificial medium.

  8. Evolutionary signals of symbiotic persistence in the legume–rhizobia mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Gijsbert D. A.; Cornwell, William K.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Kiers, E. Toby

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the origins and evolutionary trajectories of symbiotic partnerships remains a major challenge. Why are some symbioses lost over evolutionary time whereas others become crucial for survival? Here, we use a quantitative trait reconstruction method to characterize different evolutionary stages in the ancient symbiosis between legumes (Fabaceae) and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, asking how labile is symbiosis across different host clades. We find that more than half of the 1,195 extant nodulating legumes analyzed have a high likelihood (>95%) of being in a state of high symbiotic persistence, meaning that they show a continued capacity to form the symbiosis over evolutionary time, even though the partnership has remained facultative and is not obligate. To explore patterns associated with the likelihood of loss and retention of the N2-fixing symbiosis, we tested for correlations between symbiotic persistence and legume distribution, climate, soil and trait data. We found a strong latitudinal effect and demonstrated that low mean annual temperatures are associated with high symbiotic persistence in legumes. Although no significant correlations between soil variables and symbiotic persistence were found, nitrogen and phosphorus leaf contents were positively correlated with legumes in a state of high symbiotic persistence. This pattern suggests that highly demanding nutrient lifestyles are associated with more stable partnerships, potentially because they “lock” the hosts into symbiotic dependency. Quantitative reconstruction methods are emerging as a powerful comparative tool to study broad patterns of symbiont loss and retention across diverse partnerships. PMID:26041807

  9. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  10. Symbiotic factors in Burkholderia essential for establishing an association with the bean bug, Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria are common in insects and intimately affect the various aspects of insect host biology. In a number of insect symbiosis models, it has been possible to elucidate the effects of the symbiont on host biology, whereas there is a limited understanding of the impact of the association on the bacterial symbiont, mainly due to the difficulty of cultivating insect symbionts in vitro. Furthermore, the molecular features that determine the establishment and persistence of the symbionts in their host (i.e., symbiotic factors) have remained elusive. However, the recently established model, the bean bug Riptortus pedestris, provides a good opportunity to study bacterial symbiotic factors at a molecular level through their cultivable symbionts. Bean bugs acquire genus Burkholderia cells from the environment and harbor them as gut symbionts in the specialized posterior midgut. The genome of the Burkholderia symbiont was sequenced, and the genomic information was used to generate genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont strains. Using mutant symbionts, we identified several novel symbiotic factors necessary for establishing a successful association with the host gut. In this review, these symbiotic factors are classified into three categories based on the colonization dynamics of the mutant symbiont strains: initiation, accommodation, and persistence factors. In addition, the molecular characteristics of the symbiotic factors are described. These newly identified symbiotic factors and on-going studies of the Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiosis are expected to contribute to the understanding of the molecular cross-talk between insects and bacterial symbionts that are of ecological and evolutionary importance.

  11. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem. PMID:27305777

  12. Identification of new Galactic symbiotic stars with SALT - I. Initial discoveries and other emission line objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, Brent; Mikołajewska, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    We introduce the first results from an ongoing, systematic survey for new symbiotic stars selected from the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα Survey. The survey aims to identify and characterize the fainter population of symbiotic stars under-represented in extant catalogues. The accreting white dwarfs (WDs) in symbiotic stars, fuelled by their red giant donors with high mass-loss rate winds, make them promising candidates for Type Ia supernovae. Several candidates were observed spectroscopically with the Southern African Large Telescope. A total of 12 bona fide and 3 possible symbiotic stars were identified. The most remarkable example is a rare carbon-rich symbiotic star that displays coronal [Fe X] λ6375 emission, suggesting it may be a supersoft X-ray source with a massive WD. Several other emission line objects with near-infrared colours similar to symbiotic stars are listed in an appendix, including six B[e] stars, four planetary nebulae (PNe), two possible Be stars, one [WC9] Wolf-Rayet (WR) central star of a PN and one WC9 WR star. These initial discoveries will help shape and refine the candidate selection criteria that we expect will uncover several more symbiotic stars as the survey progresses.

  13. How Can Health System Efficiency Be Improved in Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Sara; Veillard, Jeremy; Wang, Li; Grignon, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Improving value for money in the health system is an often-stated policy goal. This study is the first to systematically measure the efficiency of health regions in Canada in producing health gains with their available resources, and to identify the factors that are associated with increased efficiency. Based on the objective elicited from decision-makers that the health system should ensure access to care for Canadians when they need it, we measured the efficiency with which regions reduce causes of death that are amenable to healthcare interventions using a linear programming approach (data envelopment analysis). Variations in efficiency were explained in part by public health factors, such as the prevalence of obesity and smoking in the population; in part by characteristics of the population, such as their average income; and in part by managerial factors, such as hospital readmissions. PMID:26571467

  14. Drug delivery systems improve pharmaceutical profile and facilitate medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Albert I; Santella, Thomas M; Finestone, Albert J; Levy, Richard A

    2005-01-01

    Innovations in dosage forms and dose delivery systems across a wide range of medications offer substantial clinical advantages, including reduced dosing frequency and improved patient adherence; minimized fluctuation of drug concentrations and maintenance of blood levels within a desired range; localized drug delivery; and the potential for reduced adverse effects and increased safety. The advent of new large-molecule drugs for previously untreatable or only partially treatable diseases is stimulating the development of suitable delivery systems for these agents. Although advanced formulations may be more expensive than conventional dosage forms, they often have a more favorable pharmacologic profile and can be cost-effective. Inclusion of these dosage forms on drug formulary lists may help patients remain on therapy and reduce the economic and social burden of care.

  15. How Can Health System Efficiency Be Improved in Canada?

    PubMed

    Allin, Sara; Veillard, Jeremy; Wang, Li; Grignon, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Improving value for money in the health system is an often-stated policy goal. This study is the first to systematically measure the efficiency of health regions in Canada in producing health gains with their available resources, and to identify the factors that are associated with increased efficiency. Based on the objective elicited from decision-makers that the health system should ensure access to care for Canadians when they need it, we measured the efficiency with which regions reduce causes of death that are amenable to healthcare interventions using a linear programming approach (data envelopment analysis). Variations in efficiency were explained in part by public health factors, such as the prevalence of obesity and smoking in the population; in part by characteristics of the population, such as their average income; and in part by managerial factors, such as hospital readmissions. PMID:26571467

  16. Counselling skills to improve Nursing Relational System within the NICU.

    PubMed

    Pannacciulli, C

    2012-05-01

    The relationships amongst healthcare providers, as well as between these and the patients/families they care for, are currently experiencing profound changes in Italian hospitals, and--more generally--in the whole Italian health system, thus reproducing similar changes concomitantly occurring in most Western countries. A growing body of evidence suggests that nurses play a central role in the proper development of a healthy and transparent communication between caregivers and patients/families in all neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This article discusses the current knowledge in this area, and provides further evidence supporting the introduction in all NICUs of specific educational and training tools for nurses in order to promote the use of counselling skills. The implementation of specific counselling skills can improve the Nursing Relational System within the NICU, ultimately helping in better addressing the parental relational needs in the NICU.

  17. Information systems as a tool to improve legal metrology activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Filho, B. A.; Soratto, A. N. R.; Gonçalves, R. F.

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the importance of information systems applied to legal metrology as a tool to improve the control of measuring instruments used in trade. The information system implanted in Brazil has also helped to understand and appraise the control of the measurements due to the behavior of the errors and deviations of instruments used in trade, allowing the allocation of resources wisely, leading to a more effective planning and control on the legal metrology field. A study case analyzing the fuel sector is carried out in order to show the conformity of fuel dispersers according to maximum permissible errors. The statistics of measurement errors of 167,310 fuel dispensers of gasoline, ethanol and diesel used in the field were analyzed demonstrating the accordance of the fuel market in Brazil to the legal requirements.

  18. A new quality assessment and improvement system for print media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mohan; Konya, Iuliu; Nandzik, Jan; Flores-Herr, Nicolas; Eickeler, Stefan; Ndjiki-Nya, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Print media collections of considerable size are held by cultural heritage organizations and will soon be subject to digitization activities. However, technical content quality management in digitization workflows strongly relies on human monitoring. This heavy human intervention is cost intensive and time consuming, which makes automization mandatory. In this article, a new automatic quality assessment and improvement system is proposed. The digitized source image and color reference target are extracted from the raw digitized images by an automatic segmentation process. The target is evaluated by a reference-based algorithm. No-reference quality metrics are applied to the source image. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed system. We show that it features a good performance in the extraction as well as in the quality assessment step compared to the state-of-the-art. The impact of efficient and dedicated quality assessors on the optimization step is extensively documented.

  19. How Can Health System Efficiency Be Improved in Canada?

    PubMed

    Allin, Sara; Veillard, Jeremy; Wang, Li; Grignon, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Improving value for money in the health system is an often-stated policy goal. This study is the first to systematically measure the efficiency of health regions in Canada in producing health gains with their available resources, and to identify the factors that are associated with increased efficiency. Based on the objective elicited from decision-makers that the health system should ensure access to care for Canadians when they need it, we measured the efficiency with which regions reduce causes of death that are amenable to healthcare interventions using a linear programming approach (data envelopment analysis). Variations in efficiency were explained in part by public health factors, such as the prevalence of obesity and smoking in the population; in part by characteristics of the population, such as their average income; and in part by managerial factors, such as hospital readmissions.

  20. A systems approach to improving timeliness of immunisation.

    PubMed

    Bailie, Ross S; Si, Damin; Dowden, Michelle C; Selvey, Christine E; Kennedy, Catherine; Cox, Rhonda; O'Donoghue, Lynette; Liddle, Helen; Connors, Christine M; Thompson, Sandra; Burke, Hugh; Brown, Alex

    2009-06-01

    Timeliness of immunisation is important in achieving a protective effect at the individual and population levels. Recent international research has highlighted the importance of organisational features of the health system in timely immunisation. This paper reports on an analysis of the availability of records of timely delivery of childhood immunisations in Indigenous primary care services and organisational features of vaccination programs in different jurisdictions in Australia. The findings demonstrate wide variation in recorded timely delivery of immunisations between health centres within and between jurisdictions. Significant deficiencies in the approach to delivery and recording of immunisations appear to be principally related to fragmented systems of delivery, recording and communication between child health and primary care services. Understanding these deficiencies presents opportunities for improving timely immunisation.

  1. New software system to improve AGU membership management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Chris

    2012-06-01

    Almost 2 years ago, AGU began investigating how it could more efficiently manage member and customer records as well as support processes that currently run on multiple systems. I am pleased to announce that on 25 June, as the result of intense efforts, AGU will migrate to a new database software system that will house the majority of AGU operations. AGU staff will have more tools at their disposal to assist members, and members will have more intuitive and user-friendly options when using the online interface to update their profiles or make purchases. I am particularly excited about this major improvement to our infrastructure because it better positions AGU to achieve goals in its strategic plan.

  2. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Cooke, William

    2016-01-01

    Current optical observations of meteors are commonly limited by systematic uncertainties in photometric calibration at the level of approximately 0.5 mag or higher. Future improvements to meteor ablation models, luminous efficiency models, or emission spectra will hinge on new camera systems and techniques that significantly reduce calibration uncertainties and can reliably perform absolute photometric measurements of meteors. In this talk we discuss the algorithms and tests that NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has developed to better calibrate photometric measurements for the existing All-Sky and Wide-Field video camera networks as well as for a newly deployed four-camera system for measuring meteor colors in Johnson-Cousins BV RI filters. In particular we will emphasize how the MEO has been able to address two long-standing concerns with the traditional procedure, discussed in more detail below.

  3. A symbiotic gas exchange between bioreactors enhances microalgal biomass and lipid productivities: taking advantage of complementary nutritional modes.

    PubMed

    Santos, C A; Ferreira, M E; da Silva, T Lopes; Gouveia, L; Novais, J M; Reis, A

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the association of two bioreactors: one photoautotrophic and the other heterotrophic, connected by the gas phase and allowing an exchange of O(2) and CO(2) gases between them, benefiting from a symbiotic effect. The association of two bioreactors was proposed with the aim of improving the microalgae oil productivity for biodiesel production. The outlet gas flow from the autotrophic (O(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the heterotrophic bioreactor. In parallel, the outlet gas flow from another heterotrophic (CO(2) enriched) bioreactor was used as the inlet gas flow for the autotrophic bioreactor. Aside from using the air supplied from the auto- and hetero-trophic bioreactors as controls, one mixotrophic bioreactor was also studied and used as a model, for its claimed advantage of CO(2) and organic carbon being simultaneously assimilated. The microalga Chlorella protothecoides was chosen as a model due to its ability to grow under different nutritional modes (auto, hetero, and mixotrophic), and its ability to attain a high biomass productivity and lipid content, suitable for biodiesel production. The comparison between heterotrophic, autotrophic, and mixotrophic Chlorella protothecoides growth for lipid production revealed that heterotrophic growth achieved the highest biomass productivity and lipid content (>22%), and furthermore showed that these lipids had the most suitable fatty acid profile in order to produce high quality biodiesel. Both associations showed a higher biomass productivity (10-20%), when comparing the two separately operated bioreactors (controls) which occurred on the fourth day. A more remarkable result would have been seen if in actuality the two bioreactors had been inter-connected in a closed loop. The biomass productivity gain would have been 30% and the lipid productivity gain would have been 100%, as seen by comparing the productivities of the symbiotic assemblage with the sum of the two

  4. The symbiotic star TX CVn has entered an active state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Castellani, F.; Valisa, P.; Dallaporta, S.; Cherini, G.; Vagnozzi, A.; Righetti, G. L.; Belligoli, R.

    2014-01-01

    After the last active phase that begun in 2003, the symbiotic star TX CVn has now entered a new active phase. In 2003, TX CVn rose to B=10.5 and there it remained until the end of 2007 (Skopal 2007, AN 328, 909), when we started monitoring the variable with various ANS Collaboration telescopes in BVRI bands. Our observations show that the star has spent the following 6 years on a steady decline at a rate of 0.084 mag per year in the B band, that took it from B=10.55 on December 2007 to B=11.02 on September 2013, when the star begun a rapid brightening, reaching B=10.65 by early December 2013.

  5. Early Autoregulation of Symbiotic Root Nodulation in Soybeans

    PubMed Central

    Takats, Stephen T.

    1990-01-01

    Autoregulation of symbiotic root nodulation in soybean seedlings (Glycine max L. Merrill cv Pride 216) was studied following double inoculation of primary roots with Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110. When the second inoculation was given 10 or 17 hours after the first, the nodulation in the first-inoculated region of the root was suppressed. The effect was eliminated if B. japonicum 110 containing Tn5 insertions in the `common' nod ABC genes was used for the second inoculation, indicating the requirement for changes in the root mediated by these bacterial genes. When the root cortex in the suppressed basal region was examined 3 days after inoculation, cell division centers were present in numbers not significantly different from the numbers in control roots given a sham second inoculation; their size distribution, however, showed a failure of enlargement compared with controls. PMID:16667864

  6. Symbiotic microorganisms: untapped resources for insect pest control.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Angela E

    2007-08-01

    Symbiotic microorganisms offer one route to meet the anticipated heightened demand for novel insect pest management strategies created by growing human populations and global climate change. Two approaches have particular potential: the disruption of microbial symbionts required by insect pests, and manipulation of microorganisms with major impacts on insect traits contributing to their pest status (e.g. capacity to vector diseases, natural enemy resistance). Specific research priorities addressed in this article include identification of molecular targets against which highly specific antagonists can be designed or discovered, and management strategies to manipulate the incidence and properties of facultative microorganisms that influence insect pest traits. Collaboration with practitioners in pest management will ensure that the research agenda is married to agricultural and public health needs.

  7. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  8. [Mechanisms of the Effects of Probiotics on Symbiotic Digestion].

    PubMed

    Usakova, N A; Nekrasov, R V; Pravdin, I V; Sverchkova, N V; Kolomiyets, E I; Pavlov, D S

    2015-01-01

    The published data and our own data on the mechanisms of the influence of microbial probiotics, prebiotics, and their combinations on the processes of symbiotic digestion have been considered and generalized. It is shown that the effects on an organism are associated with the enhanced metabolic activity of intestinal bacteria: stimulation of bacterial fermentation of carbohydrates and formation of short-chained fatty acids, an increase in the blotting capacity of the intestines due to elongation of villi and deepening of crypts, and a decrease in secretion of toxic proteolytic products (ammonia, phenols, thiols, indoles, etc.). It has been shown that a combination of probiotics and prebiotic enhances the biological efficiency of a complex preparation, which contributes to activation of carbohydrate, protein, and mineral metabolism.

  9. Improving the representation of hydrologic processes in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Martyn P.; Fan, Ying; Lawrence, David M.; Adam, Jennifer C.; Bolster, Diogo; Gochis, David J.; Hooper, Richard P.; Kumar, Mukesh; Leung, L. Ruby; Mackay, D. Scott; Maxwell, Reed M.; Shen, Chaopeng; Swenson, Sean C.; Zeng, Xubin

    2015-08-21

    Many of the scientific and societal challenges in understanding and preparing for global environmental change rest upon our ability to understand and predict the water cycle change at large river basin, continent, and global scales. However, current large-scale models, such as the land components of Earth System Models (ESMs), do not yet represent the terrestrial water cycle in a fully integrated manner or resolve the finer-scale processes that can dominate large-scale water budgets. This paper reviews the current representation of hydrologic processes in ESMs and identifies the key opportunities for improvement. This review suggests that (1) the development of ESMs has not kept pace with modeling advances in hydrology, both through neglecting key processes (e.g., groundwater) and neglecting key aspects of spatial variability and hydrologic connectivity; and (2) many modeling advances in hydrology can readily be incorporated into ESMs and substantially improve predictions of the water cycle. Accelerating modeling advances in ESMs requires comprehensive hydrologic benchmarking activities, in order to systematically evaluate competing modeling alternatives, understand model weaknesses, and prioritize model development needs. This demands stronger collaboration, both through greater engagement of hydrologists in ESM development and through more detailed evaluation of ESM processes in research watersheds. Advances in the representation of hydrologic process in ESMs can substantially improve energy, carbon and nutrient cycle prediction capabilities through the fundamental role the water cycle plays in regulating these cycles.

  10. Training the approximate number system improves math proficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonkoo; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2013-10-01

    Humans and nonhuman animals share an approximate number system (ANS) that permits estimation and rough calculation of quantities without symbols. Recent studies show a correlation between the acuity of the ANS and performance in symbolic math throughout development and into adulthood, which suggests that the ANS may serve as a cognitive foundation for the uniquely human capacity for symbolic math. Such a proposition leads to the untested prediction that training aimed at improving ANS performance will transfer to improvement in symbolic-math ability. In the two experiments reported here, we showed that ANS training on approximate addition and subtraction of arrays of dots selectively improved symbolic addition and subtraction. This finding strongly supports the hypothesis that complex math skills are fundamentally linked to rudimentary preverbal quantitative abilities and provides the first direct evidence that the ANS and symbolic math may be causally related. It also raises the possibility that interventions aimed at the ANS could benefit children and adults who struggle with math.

  11. The Genetics of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation: Comparative Genomics of 14 Rhizobia Strains by Resolution of Protein Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Black, Michael; Moolhuijzen, Paula; Chapman, Brett; Barrero, Roberto; Howieson, John; Hungria, Mariangela; Bellgard, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The symbiotic relationship between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria is critical for agriculture, as it may have profound impacts on lowering costs for farmers, on land sustainability, on soil quality, and on mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the importance of the symbioses to the global nitrogen cycling balance, very few rhizobial genomes have been sequenced so far, although there are some ongoing efforts in sequencing elite strains. In this study, the genomes of fourteen selected strains of the order Rhizobiales, all previously fully sequenced and annotated, were compared to assess differences between the strains and to investigate the feasibility of defining a core ‘symbiome’—the essential genes required by all rhizobia for nodulation and nitrogen fixation. Comparison of these whole genomes has revealed valuable information, such as several events of lateral gene transfer, particularly in the symbiotic plasmids and genomic islands that have contributed to a better understanding of the evolution of contrasting symbioses. Unique genes were also identified, as well as omissions of symbiotic genes that were expected to be found. Protein comparisons have also allowed the identification of a variety of similarities and differences in several groups of genes, including those involved in nodulation, nitrogen fixation, production of exopolysaccharides, Type I to Type VI secretion systems, among others, and identifying some key genes that could be related to host specificity and/or a better saprophytic ability. However, while several significant differences in the type and number of proteins were observed, the evidence presented suggests no simple core symbiome exists. A more abstract systems biology concept of nitrogen fixing symbiosis may be required. The results have also highlighted that comparative genomics represents a valuable tool for capturing specificities and generalities of each genome. PMID:24704847

  12. Morula-like cells in photo-symbiotic clams harboring zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Nishijima, M; Maruyama, T

    1998-06-01

    Symbiosis is observed between zooxanthellae, symbiotic dinoflagellates, and giant clams and related clams which belong to the families Tridacnidae and Cardiidae. We have previously shown that a photo-symbiotic clam Tridacna crocea has three types of hemocytes, the eosinophilic granular hemocyte with phagocytic activity, the agranular cell with electron lucent granules, and the morula-like cell with large (ca. 2 mum in diameter) colorless granules. The function of the morula-like cell is not clear, but it has not been reported in any other bivalves except photo-symbiotic clams T. crocea and Tridacna maxima. In order to clarify whether it is specific to photo-symbiotic clams or not, we studied hemocytes in the photo-symbiotic clams Tridacna derasa (Tridacnidae), Hippopus hippopus (Tridacnidae) and Corculum cardissa (Cardiidae), and a closely related non-symbiotic clam Fulvia mutica (Cardiidae). The eosinophilic granular hemocytes and the agranular cells were found in all of the clams examined. However, the morula-like cells which were packed with many large electron dense granules (ca. 2 mum in diameter), were observed only in the photo-symbiotic clams. In F. mutica, a closely related non-symbiotic clam, this type of hemocyte was not found. Instead a hemocyte with vacuoles and a few large granules containing peroxidase activity was observed. The large granules of F. mutica varied in size from ca. 1-9 mum in diameter. Present data suggests that the presence of morula-like cells is restricted to photo-symbiotic clams and that the hemocytes associated with the morula-like cells may have some functional relationship to symbiosis with zooxanthellae.

  13. Scavenger deterrent factor (SDF) from symbiotic bacteria of entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gulcu, Baris; Hazir, Selcuk; Kaya, Harry K

    2012-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are symbiotically associated with bacteria in the genera Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus, respectively. The symbiotic bacteria produce a chemical compound(s) that deterred ants from feeding on nematode-killed insects (i.e., cadavers) and has been previously referred to as an Ant Deterrent Factor (ADF). We studied the response of different arthropod scavenger species which included the ant Lepisiota frauenfeldi, cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, wasps Vespa orientalis and Paravespula sp., and calliphorid fly Chrysomya albiceps, to ADF. These scavengers (ants, crickets, and wasps) were exposed to cadavers with and without the nematode/bacterium complex or to Photorhabdus luminescens cultures of different ages on different substrates. The ant, cricket, and wasp species did not feed on nematode-killed insects containing the nematode/bacterium complex that were 2 days old and older but fed on 1-day-old nematode-killed and freeze -killed insects. Crickets consumed 2- to 7-day-old axenic nematode-killed insects, 1-, 4-, and 5-day-old insects killed by the bacterium, Serratia marcescens, and freeze-killed, putrid insects that were up to 10 days old. The crickets only partially consumed 2- and 3-day-old insects killed by S. marcescens which differed significantly from the 1-, 4-, and 5-day-old killed insects by this bacterium. Ants fed only on 5% sucrose solution (control) and 1- to 3- day old cultures of P. luminescens containing 5% sucrose but not on older cultures of P. luminescens. Wasps did not feed on meat treated with P. luminescens supernatant, whereas they fed on meat treated with Escherichia coli supernatant and control meat. Calliphorid flies did not oviposit on meat treated with P. luminescens supernatant but did oviposit on untreated meat. Based on the response of these scavengers, the chemical compound(s) responsible for this deterrent activity should be called "scavenger deterrent factor

  14. Scavenger deterrent factor (SDF) from symbiotic bacteria of entomopathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gulcu, Baris; Hazir, Selcuk; Kaya, Harry K

    2012-07-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) in the genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are symbiotically associated with bacteria in the genera Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus, respectively. The symbiotic bacteria produce a chemical compound(s) that deterred ants from feeding on nematode-killed insects (i.e., cadavers) and has been previously referred to as an Ant Deterrent Factor (ADF). We studied the response of different arthropod scavenger species which included the ant Lepisiota frauenfeldi, cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, wasps Vespa orientalis and Paravespula sp., and calliphorid fly Chrysomya albiceps, to ADF. These scavengers (ants, crickets, and wasps) were exposed to cadavers with and without the nematode/bacterium complex or to Photorhabdus luminescens cultures of different ages on different substrates. The ant, cricket, and wasp species did not feed on nematode-killed insects containing the nematode/bacterium complex that were 2 days old and older but fed on 1-day-old nematode-killed and freeze -killed insects. Crickets consumed 2- to 7-day-old axenic nematode-killed insects, 1-, 4-, and 5-day-old insects killed by the bacterium, Serratia marcescens, and freeze-killed, putrid insects that were up to 10 days old. The crickets only partially consumed 2- and 3-day-old insects killed by S. marcescens which differed significantly from the 1-, 4-, and 5-day-old killed insects by this bacterium. Ants fed only on 5% sucrose solution (control) and 1- to 3- day old cultures of P. luminescens containing 5% sucrose but not on older cultures of P. luminescens. Wasps did not feed on meat treated with P. luminescens supernatant, whereas they fed on meat treated with Escherichia coli supernatant and control meat. Calliphorid flies did not oviposit on meat treated with P. luminescens supernatant but did oviposit on untreated meat. Based on the response of these scavengers, the chemical compound(s) responsible for this deterrent activity should be called "scavenger deterrent factor

  15. New-old hemoglobin-like proteins of symbiotic dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Rosic, Nedeljka N; Leggat, William; Kaniewska, Paulina; Dove, Sophie; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates are unicellular photosynthetic algae that live in mutualistic symbioses with many marine organisms. Within the transcriptome of coral endosymbionts Symbiodinium sp. (type C3), we discovered the sequences of two novel and highly polymorphic hemoglobin-like genes and proposed their 3D protein structures. At the protein level, four isoforms shared between 87 and 97% sequence identity for Hb-1 and 78–99% for Hb-2, whereas between Hb-1 and Hb-2 proteins, only 15–21% sequence homology has been preserved. Phylogenetic analyses of the dinoflagellate encoding Hb sequences have revealed a separate evolutionary origin of the discovered globin genes and indicated the possibility of horizontal gene transfer. Transcriptional regulation of the Hb-like genes was studied in the reef-building coral Acropora aspera exposed to elevated temperatures (6–7°C above average sea temperature) over a 24-h period and a 72-h period, as well as to nutrient stress. Exposure to elevated temperatures resulted in an increased Hb-1 gene expression of 31% after 72 h only, whereas transcript abundance of the Hb-2 gene was enhanced by up to 59% by both 1-day and 3-day thermal stress conditions. Nutrient stress also increased gene expression of Hb-2 gene by 70%. Our findings describe the differential expression patterns of two novel Hb genes from symbiotic dinoflagellates and their polymorphic nature. Furthermore, the inducible nature of Hb-2 gene by both thermal and nutrient stressors indicates a prospective role of this form of hemoglobin in the initial coral–algal responses to changes in environmental conditions. This novel hemoglobin has potential use as a stress biomarker. PMID:23610627

  16. Evolution of symbiotic organs and endosymbionts in lygaeid stinkbugs

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Yu; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Koga, Ryuichi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Kamagata, Yoichi; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema

    2012-01-01

    We investigated seed bugs of the genus Nysius (Insecta: Hemiptera: Lygaeidae) for their symbiotic bacteria. From all the samples representing 4 species, 18 populations and 281 individuals, specific bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were consistently identified, which formed a distinct clade in the Gammaproteobacteria. In situ hybridization showed that the bacterium was endocellularly localized in a pair of large bacteriomes that were amorphous in shape, deep red in color, and in association with gonads. In the ovary of adult females, the endosymbiont was also localized in the ‘infection zone' in the middle of each germarium and in the ‘symbiont ball' at the anterior pole of each oocyte, indicating vertical transmission of the endosymbiont through the ovarial passage. Phylogenetic analyses based on bacterial 16S rRNA, groEL and gyrB genes consistently supported a coherent monophyly of the Nysius endosymbionts. The possibility of a sister relationship to ‘Candidatus Kleidoceria schneideri', the bacteriome-associated endosymbiont of a lygaeid bug Kleidocerys resedae, was statistically rejected, indicating independent evolutionary origins of the endosymbionts in the Lygaeidae. The endosymbiont genes consistently exhibited AT-biased nucleotide compositions and accelerated rates of molecular evolution, and the endosymbiont genome was only 0.6 Mb in size. The endosymbiont phylogeny was congruent with the host insect phylogeny, suggesting strict vertical transmission and host–symbiont co-speciation over evolutionary time. Based on these results, we discuss the evolution of bacteriomes and endosymbionts in the Heteroptera, most members of which are associated with gut symbiotic bacteria. The designation ‘Candidatus Schneideria nysicola' is proposed for the endosymbiont clade. PMID:21814289

  17. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins in the life of seeds.

    PubMed

    Matilla, Angel J; Rodríguez-Gacio, María del Carmen

    2013-03-01

    Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs), ancestors of symbiotic-Hbs, are hexacoordinated dimeric proteins, for which the crystal structure is well described. According to the extent of hexacoordination, nsHbs are classified as belonging to class-1 (nsHbs1) or class-2 (nsHbs2). The nsHbs1 show weak hexacoordination, moderate rates of O(2)-binding, very small rates of O(2) dissociation, and a remarkably high affinity for O(2), all suggesting a function involving O(2) scavenging. In contrast, the nsHbs2 exhibit strong hexacoordination, low rates of O(2)-binding and moderately low O(2) dissociation and affinity, suggesting a sensing role for sustained low (μM) levels of O(2). The existence of spatial and specific expression of nsHbs1 suggests that nsHbs play tissue-specific rather than housekeeping functions. The permeation of O(2) into seeds is usually prevented during the desiccation phase and early imbibition, generating an internal hypoxic environment that leads to ATP limitation. During evolution, the seed has acquired mechanisms to prevent or reduce this hypoxic stress. The nsHbs1/NO cycle appear to be involved in modulating the redox state in the seed and in maintaining an active metabolism. Under O(2) deficit, NADH and NO are synthesized in the seed and nsHbs1 scavenges O(2), which is used to transform NO into NO(3)(-) with concomitant formation of Fe(3+)-nsHbs1. Expression of nsHbs1 is not detectable in dry viable seeds. However, in the seeds cross-talk occurs between nsHbs1 and NO during germination. This review considers the current status of our knowledge of seed nsHbs and considers key issues of further work to better understand their role in seed physiology. PMID:23286879

  18. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  19. Improving process and system for EUV coat-develop track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Stokes, Harold; Thouroude, Yan; Miyagi, Tadashi; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2015-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is well known to be a strong candidate for next generation, single exposure sub-30nm half-pitch lithography.[1] Furthermore, a high-NA EUV exposure tool released two years ago gave a strong impression for finer pattern results. On one hand, it seems that the coat develop track process remains very similar and in many aspects returns to KrF or ArF dry process fundamentals, but in practice the 26-32nm pitch patterning coat-develop track process also has challenges with EUV resist. As access to EUV lithography exposures has become more readily available over the last five (5) years, several challenges and accomplishments in the track process have been reported, such as the improvement of ultra-thin film coating, CD uniformity, defectivity, line width roughness (LWR) and so on.[2-6] The coat-develop track process has evolved along with novel materials and metrology capability improvements. Line width roughness (LWR) and defect control are demonstrated utilizing the SOKUDO DUO coat-develop track system with an ASML NXE:3100 in the IMEC (Leuven, Belgium) clean room environment. Additionally, we will show the latest lithographic results obtained by novel processing approaches in an EUV coat-develop track system.

  20. Improved spatial calibration for the CXRS system on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, X. H.; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, J.; Jiang, D.; Feng, S. Y.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cheng, Y.; Lyu, B.; Shi, Y. J.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system has been developed to measure profiles of ion temperature and rotation since 2014 on EAST. Several techniques have been developed to improve the spatial calibration of the CXRS diagnostic. The sightline location was obtained by measuring the coordinates of three points on each sightline using an articulated flexible coordinate measuring arm when the vessel was accessible. After vacuum pumping, the effect of pressure change in the vacuum vessel was evaluated by observing the movement of the light spot from back-illuminated sightlines on the first wall using the newly developed articulated inspection arm. In addition, the rotation of the periscope after vacuum pumping was derived by using the Doppler shift of neutral beam emission spectra without magnetic field. Combining these techniques, improved spatial calibration was implemented to provide a complete and accurate description of the EAST CXRS system. Due to the effects of the change of air pressure, a ˜0.4° periscope rotation, yielding a ˜20 mm movement of the major radius of observation positions to the lower field side, was derived. Results of Zeeman splitting of neutral beam emission spectra with magnetic field also showed good agreement with the calibration results.

  1. Improved power transfer to wearable systems through stretchable magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Bedair, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    The use of wireless power transfer is common in stretchable electronics since physical wiring can be easily destroyed as the system is stretched. This work presents the first demonstration of improved inductive power coupling to a stretchable system through the addition of a thin layer of ferroelastomeric material. A ferroelastomer, an elastomeric polymer loaded with magnetic particulates, has a permeability greater than one while retaining the ability to survive significant mechanical strains. A recently developed ferroelastomer composite based on sendust platelets within a soft silicone elastomer was incorporated into liquid metal stretchable inductors based on the liquid metal galinstan in fluidic channels. For a single-turn inductor, the maximum power transfer efficiency rises from 71 % with no backplane, to 81 % for a rigid ferrite backplane on the transmitter side alone, to 86 % with a ferroelastomer backplane on the receiver side as well. The coupling between a commercial wireless power transmitter coil with ferrite backplane to a five-turn liquid metal inductor was also investigated, finding an improvement in power transfer efficiency from 81 % with only a rigid backplane to 90 % with the addition of the ferroelastomer backplane. Both the single and multi-turn inductors were demonstrated surviving up to 50 % uniaxial applied strain.

  2. Improvement of the AeroClipper system for cyclones monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André; Philippe, Duvel Jean

    2016-07-01

    The AeroClipper developed by the French space agency (Centre National d'Études Spatiales, CNES) is a quasi-lagrangian device drifting with surface wind at about 20-30m above the ocean surface. It is a new and original device for real-time and continuous observation of air-sea surface parameters in open ocean remote regions. This device enables the sampling of the variability of surface parameters in particular under convective systems toward which it is attracted. The AeroClipper is therefore an ideal instrument to monitor Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in which they are likely to converge and provide original observations to evaluate and improve our current understanding and diagnostics of TCs as well as their representation in numerical models. In 2008, the AeroClipper demonstrates its capability to be captured by an Ocean Indian cyclone, as two models have converged, without damages, in the eye of Dora cyclone during the 2008 VASCO campaign. This paper will present the improvements of this balloon system for the international project 'the Year of Maritime Continent'.

  3. Multisphere neutron spectrometric system with thermoluminescence dosemeters: sensitive improvement.

    PubMed

    Gregori, B; Papadópulos, S; Cruzate, J; Kunst, J J

    2002-01-01

    In this work, a neutron spectrometric system based on a set of moderating spheres with thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) is presented. The system at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) Dosimetry Laboratory consists of 12 solid spheres made of high-density polyethylene (p = 0.95 g x cm(-3)), with diameters ranging from 2" to 12" and TLD sensitive to thermal and gamma radiation, namely TLD-600 and TLD-700, located at the centre of the spheres. The neutron response matrix for this Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was calculated using the MCNP-IVB code and the library ENDF/B-VI in the energy range between thermal neutrons and 100 MeV. The neutron spectrum was obtained using the LOUH182 unfolding code. The improvement in sensitivity of the system is based on the election of a different heating cycle of the TLD that allows an increase in sensitivity by a factor of 2.6 compared with the standard laboratory treatment. The system response for the calibration with an Am-Be source is presented.

  4. The effect of acidity on the distribution and symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia in Lithuanian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapinskas, E. B.

    2007-04-01

    The distribution and symbiotic efficiency of nodule bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum_bv. trifolii F., Sinorhizobium meliloti D., Rhizobium galegae L., and Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae F. in Lithuanian soils as dependent on the soil acidity were studied in the long-term field, pot, and laboratory experiments. The critical and optimal pH values controlling the distribution of rhizobia and the symbiotic nitrogen fixation were determined for every bacterial species. The relationship was found between the soil pH and the nitrogen-fixing capacity of rhizobia. A positive effect of liming of acid soils in combination with inoculation of legumes on the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation was demonstrated.

  5. Ingress observations of the 1980 eclipse of the symbiotic star CI Cyngni

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Boyarchuk, A. A.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major results from the IUE may prove to be the knowledge gained by studies of the ultraviolet spectra of symbiotic stars. Symbiotics combine spectral features of a cool M giant like photosphere with strong high excitation emission lines of nebular origin, superposed. The UV spectra are dominated by intense permitted and semiforbidden emission lines and weak continua indicative of hot compact objects and accretion disks. Two symbiotics, AR Pav and CI Cyg are thought to be eclipsing binaries and IUE observations during the 1980 eclipse of CI Cygni are discussed.

  6. Validation of a decision support system for improving irrigation system performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To address water shortage and improve water delivery operations, decision support systems have been developed and utilized throughout the United States and the world. One critical aspect that is often neglected during the development and implementation of decision support systems is validation, whi...

  7. Comparability of the Social Skills Improvement System to the Social Skills Rating System: A Norwegian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamst-Klaussen, Thor; Rasmussen, Lene-Mari P.; Svartdal, Frode; Strømgren, Børge

    2016-01-01

    The Social Skills Improvement System-Rating Scales (SSIS-RS) is a multi-informant instrument assessing social skills and problem behavior in children and adolescents. It is a revised version of the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS). A Norwegian translation of the SSRS has been validated, but this has not yet been done for the Norwegian…

  8. Improved mixing and sampling systems for vitrification melter feeds

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the methods used and results obtained during the progress of the study of waste slurry mixing and sampling systems during fiscal year 1977 (FY97) at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The objective of this work is to determine optimal mixing configurations and operating conditions as well as improved sampling technology for defense waste processing facility (DWPF) waste melter feeds at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Most of the research on this project was performed experimentally by using a tank mixing configuration with different rotating impellers. The slurry simulants for the experiments were prepared in-house based on the properties of the DOE sites` typical waste slurries. A sampling system was designed to withdraw slurry from the mixing tank. To obtain insight into the waste mixing process, the slurry flow in the mixing tank was also simulated numerically by applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The major parameters investigated in both the experimental and numerical studies included power consumption of mixer, mixing time to reach slurry uniformity, slurry type, solids concentration, impeller type, impeller size, impeller rotating speed, sampling tube size, and sampling velocities. Application of the results to the DWPF melter feed preparation process will enhance and modify the technical base for designing slurry transportation equipment and pipeline systems. These results will also serve as an important reference for improving waste slurry mixing performance and melter operating conditions. These factors will contribute to an increase in the capability of the vitrification process and the quality of the waste glass.

  9. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AVAILABILITY AND IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, Roy I; Peplov, Vladimir V; Wezensky, Mark W; Norris, Kevin Paul; Barnett, William E; Hicks, Jim; Weaver, Joey T; Moss, John; Rust, Kenneth R; Mize, Jeffery J; Anderson, David E

    2011-01-01

    SNS electrical systems have been operational for 4 years. System availability statistics and improvements are presented for AC electrical systems, DC and pulsed power supplies and klystron modulators.

  10. Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Denholm; Tracey Holloway

    2005-12-01

    Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO{sub 2} and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions 'accounting' might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Improved Emergency Egress Lighting System for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Leslie L.; Barr, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Emergency lights provide illumination in corridors, stairwells, ramps, escalators, aisles, and exit passageways during power failures. Safety and visibility are critical during a power outage. If emergency lights fail to operate properly, the building occupants can become disoriented. Four documents in a collection discuss different topics relating to a proposed improved emergency egress lighting system (EELS) for the International Space Station (ISS). While the present EELS is designed around rows of green-light-emitting diodes, the proposed system contains strips of electroluminescent tape using different colors for each egress path. The proposed EELS can be powered by the same battery currently used by the present EELS, but would require an inverter because electroluminescent devices require AC. Electroluminescent devices also require significantly less current and, depending on the color, would emit 3 to 8 times the light of the present EELS. In addition, they could operate for up to 75 hours (versus .20 minutes for the present system). The first document contains a one-page summary of the proposal and an evaluation of technical merit. The second document summarizes the motivation for, and the design of, the proposed EELS. The third document addresses relevant aspects of the measurement of spectral sensitivity and the psychophysics of perception of light. The fourth document presents additional background information and technical specifications for the electroluminescent tapes.

  12. Improved accounting of emissions from utility energy storage system operation.

    PubMed

    Denholm, Paul; Holloway, Tracey

    2005-12-01

    Several proposed utility-scale energy storage systems in the U.S. will use the spare output capacity of existing electric power systems to create the equivalent of new load-following plants that can rapidly respond to fluctuations in electricity demand and increase the flexibility of baseload generators. New energy storage systems using additional generation from existing plants can directly compete with new traditional sources of load-following and peaking electricity, yet this application of energy storage is not required to meet many of the Clean Air Act standards required of new electricity generators (e.g., coal- or gas-fired power plants). This study evaluates the total emissions that will likely result from the operation of a new energy storage facility when coupled with an average existing U.S. coal-fired power plant and estimates that the emission rates of SO2 and NOx will be considerably higher than the rate of a new plant meeting Clean Air Act standards, even accounting for the efficiency benefits of energy storage. This study suggests that improved emissions "accounting" might be necessary to provide accurate environmental comparisons between energy storage and more traditional sources of electricity generation.

  13. Why and how a functional information system improves computerized operations

    SciTech Connect

    Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    At the beginning of the eighties, designing a computerized control room was similar to exploring a terra incognita. Some major projects were carried out (N4 project, Kashiwasaki for example) in order to provide initial experience feedback. Today design guidelines and standards exist to help designers and now all projects (for new control rooms or for renovating existing ones) are designed to use computerized operations. Experience feedback on existing projects clearly shows that the computerization of operations significantly improves the overall quality and efficiency of operations. Nevertheless, the computerization of operations introduces new specific problems, the most important being the 'key hole effect' and the lack of global vision. These problems can be directly attributed to the media currently used (the screens) where space is scarce, and to the philosophy used when designing the information system (fundamentally, based on a reproduction of existing piping diagrams with little or no summary information). Yesterday, the challenge was to computerize the control room, today, it is to computerize operations and reduce or eliminate these existing problems. One promising method is to design the HSI using a functional methodology. This paper describes the operators' operational needs and how and why a functional information system can help address those needs. Finally, the paper presents a few proposals on how to design a functional information system. (authors)

  14. Improvements of the One-to-Many Eigenvoice Conversion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Yamato; Toda, Tomoki; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro

    We have developed a one-to-many eigenvoice conversion (EVC) system that allows us to convert a single source speaker's voice into an arbitrary target speaker's voice using an eigenvoice Gaussian mixture model (EV-GMM). This system is capable of effectively building a conversion model for an arbitrary target speaker by adapting the EV-GMM using only a small amount of speech data uttered by the target speaker in a text-independent manner. However, the conversion performance is still insufficient for the following reasons: 1) the excitation signal is not precisely modeled; 2) the oversmoothing of the converted spectrum causes muffled sounds in converted speech; and 3) the conversion model is affected by redundant acoustic variations among a lot of pre-stored target speakers used for building the EV-GMM. In order to address these problems, we apply the following promising techniques to one-to-many EVC: 1) mixed excitation; 2) a conversion algorithm considering global variance; and 3) adaptive training of the EV-GMM. The experimental results demonstrate that the conversion performance of one-to-many EVC is significantly improved by integrating all of these techniques into the one-to-many EVC system.

  15. Improvement of different vaccine delivery systems for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cancer vaccines are the promising tools in the hands of the clinical oncologist. Many tumor-associated antigens are excellent targets for immune therapy and vaccine design. Optimally designed cancer vaccines should combine the best tumor antigens with the most effective immunotherapy agents and/or delivery strategies to achieve positive clinical results. Various vaccine delivery systems such as different routes of immunization and physical/chemical delivery methods have been used in cancer therapy with the goal to induce immunity against tumor-associated antigens. Two basic delivery approaches including physical delivery to achieve higher levels of antigen production and formulation with microparticles to target antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have demonstrated to be effective in animal models. New developments in vaccine delivery systems will improve the efficiency of clinical trials in the near future. Among them, nanoparticles (NPs) such as dendrimers, polymeric NPs, metallic NPs, magnetic NPs and quantum dots have emerged as effective vaccine adjuvants for infectious diseases and cancer therapy. Furthermore, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been known as attractive carrier having applications in drug delivery, gene transfer and DNA vaccination. This review will focus on the utilization of different vaccine delivery systems for prevention or treatment of cancer. We will discuss their clinical applications and the future prospects for cancer vaccine development. PMID:21211062

  16. A Novel Hydro-information System for Improving National Weather Service River Forecast System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Z.; Wang, S.; Liang, X.; Adams, T. E.; Teng, W. L.; Liang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    A novel hydro-information system has been developed to improve the forecast accuracy of the NOAA National Weather Service River Forecast System (NWSRFS). An MKF-based (Multiscale Kalman Filter) spatial data assimilation framework, together with the NOAH land surface model, is employed in our system to assimilate satellite surface soil moisture data to yield improved evapotranspiration. The latter are then integrated into the distributed version of the NWSRFS to improve its forecasting skills, especially for droughts, but also for disaster management in general. Our system supports an automated flow into the NWSRFS of daily satellite surface soil moisture data, derived from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), and the forcing information of the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). All data are custom processed, archived, and supported by the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information and Services Center (GES DISC). An optional data fusing component is available in our system, which fuses NEXRAD Stage III precipitation data with the NLDAS precipitation data, using the MKF-based framework, to provide improved precipitation inputs. Our system employs a plug-in, structured framework and has a user-friendly, graphical interface, which can display, in real-time, the spatial distributions of assimilated state variables and other model-simulated information, as well as their behaviors in time series. The interface can also display watershed maps, as a result of the integration of the QGIS library into our system. Extendibility and flexibility of our system are achieved through the plug-in design and by an extensive use of XML-based configuration files. Furthermore, our system can be extended to support multiple land surface models and multiple data assimilation schemes, which would further increase its capabilities. Testing of the integration of the current system into the NWSRFS is

  17. Raytheon: Compressed Air System Upgrade Saves Energy and Improves Performance

    SciTech Connect

    2005-04-01

    In 2003, Raytheon Company upgraded the efficiency of the compressed air system at its Integrated Air Defense Center in Andover, Massachusetts, to save energy and reduce costs. Worn compressors and dryers were replaced, a more sophisticated control strategy was installed, and an aggressive leak detection and repair effort was carried out. The total cost of these improvements was $342,000; however, National Grid, a utility service provider, contributed a $174,000 incentive payment. Total annual energy and maintenance cost savings are estimated at $141,500, and energy savings are nearly 1.6 million kWh. This case study was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies Program.

  18. Improvements in linked-spar motion-compensated lifting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. A.; Cuthbertson, R. A.

    1984-10-01

    An improved system for operating a lifting cable over the side of a ship at sea in which a spar buoy having an adjustable lifting capacity is coupled to the shop by a rigid linkage which is free to pivot on an axis attached to the ship deck, and operates to decouple the motion of the ship from lifting cable. The spar buoy is attached to a gimbal sheave assembly having a disengageable connector and tension line for drawing the connector into engagement with a mating socket at the outward end of a linkage boom. A narrow upper section of the spar buoy is provided with a plurality of vertical tubes and valves which by flooding or evacuation operate to vary the effective water plane area of the buoy for continual fine tuning and optimally adjusting of its natural heave mode characteristic frequency.

  19. Improved fibroblast functionalities by microporous pattern fabricated by microelectromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongbo; Zhao, Lingzhou; Chen, Bangdao; Bai, Shizhu; Zhao, Yimin

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblasts, which play an important role in biological seal formation and maintenance, determine the long-term success of percutaneous implants. In this study, well-defined microporous structures with micropore diameters of 10-60 µm were fabricated by microelectromechanical systems and their influence on the fibroblast functionalities was observed. The results show that the microporous structures with micropore diameters of 10-60 µm did not influence the initial adherent fibroblast number; however, those with diameters of 40 and 50 µm improved the spread, actin stress fiber organization, proliferation and fibronectin secretion of the fibroblasts. The microporous structures with micropore diameters of 40-50 µm may be promising for application in the percutaneous part of an implant.

  20. Material Gradients in Oxygen System Components Improve Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen system components fabricated by Laser Engineered Net Shaping (TradeMark) (LENS(TradeMark)) could result in improved safety and performance. LENS(TradeMark) is a near-net shape manufacturing process fusing powdered materials injected into a laser beam. Parts can be fabricated with a variety of elemental metals, alloys, and nonmetallic materials without the use of a mold. The LENS(TradeMark) process allows the injected materials to be varied throughout a single workpiece. Hence, surfaces exposed to oxygen could be constructed of an oxygen-compatible material while the remainder of the part could be one chosen for strength or reduced weight. Unlike conventional coating applications, a compositional gradient would exist between the two materials, so no abrupt material boundary exists. Without an interface between dissimilar materials, there is less tendency for chipping or cracking associated with thermal-expansion mismatches.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus: strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuriko; Aoki, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with a high prevalence in females of childbearing age. Thus, reproduction in SLE patients is a major concern for clinicians. In the past, SLE patients were advised to defer pregnancy because of poor pregnancy outcomes and fear of SLE flares during pregnancy. Investigations to date show that maternal and fetal risks are higher in females with SLE than in the general population. However, with appropriate management of the disease, sufferers may have a relatively uncomplicated pregnancy course. Factors such as appropriate preconception counseling and medication adjustment, strict disease control prior to pregnancy, intensive surveillance during and after pregnancy by both the obstetrician and rheumatologist, and appropriate interventions when necessary play a key role. This review describes the strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in SLE patients at different time points in the reproduction cycle (preconception, during pregnancy, and postpartum period) and also details the neonatal concerns. PMID:27468250

  2. Integrating superconducting qubit systems for improved quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Stefan; Sheldon, Sarah; Magesan, Easwar; Bishop, Lev S.; Steffen, Matthias; Chow, Jerry M.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2015-03-01

    Recent progress in the field of superconducting circuits has led to qubit coherence times exceeding by far typical single and two-qubit gate times. In this regime, in which relaxation (T1) and dephasing (T2) times are above 40 and 50 microseconds, respectively, quantum gates are not limited by intrinsic noise sources. We enter this regime by optimizing the design of coplanar transmon qubits to reduce the influence of surface loss. Furthermore, we have eliminated spurious microwave resonances which we can detect by monitoring the qubit coherence while sweeping the frequency of an external microwave drive applied to the system. To improve T2 times, we minimize dephasing caused by thermal photons in coupled resonator modes by increasing the attenuation of the readout drive lines. To maintain the ability to drive fast gates with strong microwave signals while preserving coherence, we employ weakly capacitively coupled control lines providing independent control of the qubits and allowing for improved two-qubit entangling gate operations. We acknowledge support from ARO under Contract W911NF-14-1-0124.

  3. Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with A Modern Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Anthony J.; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    We are in the middle of a cooperative astronomy education project to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). We have completed an overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, and have made it available for hundreds of students at both schools, and once per week to the public. We have written an assessment test which was distributed to the students at the beginning and end of the Fall 2006 semester, which will be used as a baseline to determine whether the laboratory activities, which are currently under development, improve student learning in the Fall 2007 semester next year. The studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories will be designed to challenge student misconceptions. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we will cycle students through concurrent activities. This is enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We demonstrate the productivity of our newly refurbished telescope, show the baseline results of our assessment, and present samples of activities under development. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

  4. Improved illumination system of laparoscopes using an aspherical lens array

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rengmao; Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The current fiber-based illumination systems of laparoscopes are unable to uniformly illuminate a large enough area in abdomen due to the limited numerical aperture (NA) of the fiber bundle. Most energy is concentrated in a small region at the center of the illumination area. This limitation becomes problematic in laparoscopes which require capturing a wide field of view. In this paper, we propose an aspherical lens array which is used to direct the outgoing rays from the fiber bundle of laparoscope to produce a more uniformly illuminated, substantially larger field coverage than standalone fiber source. An intensity feedback method is developed to design the aspherical lens unit for extended non-Lambertian sources, which is the key to the design of this lens array. By this method, the lens unit is obtained after only one iteration, and the lens array is constructed by Boolean operation. Then, the ray-tracing technique is used to verify the design. Further, the lens array is fabricated and experimental tests are performed. The results clearly show that the well-illuminated area is increased to about 0.107m2 from 0.02m2 (about 5x larger than a standard fiber illumination source). More details of the internal organs can be clearly observed under this improved illumination condition, which also reflects the significant improvement in the optical performance of the laparoscope. PMID:27375940

  5. The NASA aircraft noise prediction program improved propeller analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. Cathy

    1991-01-01

    The improvements and the modifications of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) and the Propeller Analysis System (PAS) are described. Comparisons of the predictions and the test data are included in the case studies for the flat plate model in the Boundary Layer Module, for the effects of applying compressibility corrections to the lift and pressure coefficients, for the use of different weight factors in the Propeller Performance Module, for the use of the improved retarded time equation solution, and for the effect of the number grids in the Transonic Propeller Noise Module. The DNW tunnel test data of a propeller at different angles of attack and the Dowty Rotol data are compared with ANOPP predictions. The effect of the number of grids on the Transonic Propeller Noise Module predictions and the comparison of ANOPP TPN and DFP-ATP codes are studied. In addition to the above impact studies, the transonic propeller noise predictions for the SR-7, the UDF front rotor, and the support of the enroute noise test program are included.

  6. Magnesium peroxide breaker system improves filter cake removal

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.W. Jr.; Kayga, P.D.

    1995-10-01

    Treating drilling, completion and workover fluids with 0.5 to 1 lb/bbl of magnesium peroxide will, with proper completion procedures, substantially improve filter cake removal. Magnesium peroxide is very stable in an alkaline environment and remains inactive when added to polymer-based drilling, completion or workover fluids. Since the magnesium peroxide material is a powdered solid, it becomes an integral part of the deposited filter cake. The peroxide can be activated with a mild acid soak that produces hydrogen peroxide and decomposes into oxygen and hydroxyl radicals (OH) when catalyzed by a transition metal. These highly reactive (OH) species attack positions on the polymers that are resistant to acid alone. Significant improvements in filter cake removal can be realized by using the magnesium peroxide as a breaker, in alkaline water-based systems, especially in wells with a bottomhole temperature of 150 F or less in the following operations: Drilling into pay zone; Underreaming; Lost circulation pills; and Fluid loss pills for gravel prepacks.

  7. Improved illumination system of laparoscopes using an aspherical lens array.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rengmao; Qin, Yi; Hua, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The current fiber-based illumination systems of laparoscopes are unable to uniformly illuminate a large enough area in abdomen due to the limited numerical aperture (NA) of the fiber bundle. Most energy is concentrated in a small region at the center of the illumination area. This limitation becomes problematic in laparoscopes which require capturing a wide field of view. In this paper, we propose an aspherical lens array which is used to direct the outgoing rays from the fiber bundle of laparoscope to produce a more uniformly illuminated, substantially larger field coverage than standalone fiber source. An intensity feedback method is developed to design the aspherical lens unit for extended non-Lambertian sources, which is the key to the design of this lens array. By this method, the lens unit is obtained after only one iteration, and the lens array is constructed by Boolean operation. Then, the ray-tracing technique is used to verify the design. Further, the lens array is fabricated and experimental tests are performed. The results clearly show that the well-illuminated area is increased to about 0.107m(2) from 0.02m(2) (about 5x larger than a standard fiber illumination source). More details of the internal organs can be clearly observed under this improved illumination condition, which also reflects the significant improvement in the optical performance of the laparoscope. PMID:27375940

  8. Analysis of the Peroxidase Activity of Rice (Oryza Sativa) Recombinant Hemoglobin 1: Implications for the In Vivo Function of Hexacoordinate Non-Symbiotic Hemoglobins in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, it has been proposed that hexacoordinate (class 1) non-symbiotic Hbs (nsHb-1) function in vivo as peroxidases. However, little is known about the peroxidase activity of nsHb-1. We evaluated the peroxidase activity of rice recombinant Hb1 (a nsHb-1) by using the guaiacol/H2O2 system at pH ...

  9. The Symbiotic Relationship of Science and Technology in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, A. Emerson

    1999-01-01

    There are many examples in which science and technology complement each other. This is especially evident in biotechnology and genetic engineering. This symbiotic relationship is foundational to the technological culture of contemporary society. (SK)

  10. Construction of an artificial symbiotic community using a Chlorella–symbiont association as a model

    PubMed Central

    Imase, Masato; Watanabe, Keiji; Aoyagi, Hideki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana IAM C-212 produces a polysaccharide gel, termed a sheath, under photoautotrophic conditions. The C. sorokiniana sheath is a suitable habitat for several symbiotic microorganisms because it ensures close proximity between the C. sorokiniana and symbionts. In this study, we established a method for increasing the volume of the sheath produced by C. sorokiniana, and proposed a method for constructing artificial communities of Chlorella and symbiotic microorganisms. The C. sorokiniana sheath was increased by addition of calcium chloride solution. The sheath resulted in coflocculation of C. sorokiniana and the associated symbiotic bacteria, thus strengthening the bacterial–Chlorella symbiotic association. An application of this technique was demonstrated by constructing a complex of C. sorokiniana and a propionate-degrading bacterium (PDS1). Although propionate inhibited the growth of axenic C. sorokiniana, the C. sorokiniana–PDS1 complex showed good growth in a medium containing a high concentration of propionate. PMID:18269632

  11. Improving a regional outreach program in a large health system using geographic information systems.

    PubMed

    Gabbert, John P; Trine, Robert M; Bintz, Marilu

    2012-06-01

    As government-insured populations grow, commercially insured populations decrease, and declining insurance reimbursements pressure cost and revenue. Health systems must strive to improve quality while lowering costs. Large medical centers with rural sites must understand their geography and how distances impede access to services, thereby affecting patient health. Without relevant data, which can be provided through the use of geographic information systems (GIS) technology, improvement is often delayed. Gundersen Lutheran Health System, a large multi-specialty system with urban and rural sites in 3 states, is developing an evaluative outreach GIS to facilitate understanding of, and response to, rural health needs. Investing in GIS technology furthers the health system's ability to deliver superior, affordable care.

  12. Metatranscriptomic Study of Common and Host-Specific Patterns of Gene Expression between Pines and Their Symbiotic Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in the Genus Suillus

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Chen, Yuan; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2016-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) represent one of the major guilds of symbiotic fungi associated with roots of forest trees, where they function to improve plant nutrition and fitness in exchange for plant carbon. Many groups of EMF exhibit preference or specificity for different plant host genera; a good example is the genus Suillus, which grows in association with the conifer family Pinaceae. We investigated genetics of EMF host-specificity by cross-inoculating basidiospores of five species of Suillus onto ten species of Pinus, and screened them for their ability to form ectomycorrhizae. Several Suillus spp. including S. granulatus, S. spraguei, and S. americanus readily formed ectomycorrhizae (compatible reaction) with white pine hosts (subgenus Strobus), but were incompatible with other pine hosts (subgenus Pinus). Metatranscriptomic analysis of inoculated roots reveals that plant and fungus each express unique gene sets during incompatible vs. compatible pairings. The Suillus-Pinus metatranscriptomes utilize highly conserved gene regulatory pathways, including fungal G-protein signaling, secretory pathways, leucine-rich repeat and pathogen resistance proteins that are similar to those associated with host-pathogen interactions in other plant-fungal systems. Metatranscriptomic study of the combined Suillus-Pinus transcriptome has provided new insight into mechanisms of adaptation and coevolution of forest trees with their microbial community, and revealed that genetic regulation of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis utilizes universal gene regulatory pathways used by other types of fungal-plant interactions including pathogenic fungal-host interactions. PMID:27736883

  13. COOLING FAN AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Dupree

    2005-07-31

    Upcoming emissions regulations (Tiers 3, 4a and 4b) are imposing significantly higher heat loads on the cooling system than lesser regulated machines. This work was a suite of tasks aimed at reducing the parasitic losses of the cooling system, or improving the design process through six distinct tasks: 1. Develop an axial fan that will provide more airflow, with less input power and less noise. The initial plan was to use Genetic Algorithms to do an automated fan design, incorporating forward sweep for low noise. First and second generation concepts could not meet either performance or sound goals. An experienced turbomachinery designer, using a specialized CFD analysis program has taken over the design and has been able to demonstrate a 5% flow improvement (vs 10% goal) and 10% efficiency improvement (vs 10% goal) using blade twist only. 2. Fan shroud developments, using an 'aeroshroud' concept developed at Michigan State University. Performance testing at Michigan State University showed the design is capable of meeting the goal of a 10% increase in flow, but over a very narrow operating range of fan performance. The goal of 10% increase in fan efficiency was not met. Fan noise was reduced from 0 to 2dB, vs. a goal of 5dB at constant airflow. The narrow range of fan operating conditions affected by the aeroshroud makes this concept unattractive for further development at this time 3. Improved axial fan system modeling is needed to accommodate the numbers of cooling systems to be redesigned to meet lower emissions requirements. A CFD fan system modeling guide has been completed and transferred to design engineers. Current, uncontrolled modeling practices produce flow estimates in some cases within 5% of measured values, and in some cases within 25% of measured values. The techniques in the modeling guide reduced variability to the goal of + 5% for the case under study. 4. Demonstrate the performance and design versatility of a high performance fan. A 'swept blade

  14. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-02-10

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications.

  15. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications. PMID:26860260

  16. Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M; Gronberg, J; Jernigan, J G; Johnson, S; Kammeraad, J; Lange, D; Meyer, A; Nelson, K; Pohl, B; Wright, D; Wurtz, R

    2004-10-07

    This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored.

  17. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications. PMID:26860260

  18. LWR and defectivity improvement on EUV track system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Stokes, Harold; Thouroude, Yan; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is well known to be a strong candidate for next generation, single exposure sub-30nm halfpitch lithography.[1] Furthermore, high-NA EUV exposure tool(s) released two years ago gave a strong impression by finer pattern results. On the other hand, it seems that the coat-develop track process remains very similar and in many aspects returns to KrF or ArF dry process fundamentals, but in practice a 26-32nm pitch patterning coat develop track process also has challenges with EUV resists. As access to EUV lithography exposures has become more readily available over the last five (5) years, several challenges and accomplishments in the track process have been reported, such as the improvement of ultra-thin film coating, CD uniformity, defectivity, line width roughness (LWR), and so on.[2-8] The coat-develop track process has evolved along with novel materials and metrology capability. Line width roughness (LWR) control and defect reduction are demonstrated utilizing the SOKUDO DUO coat-develop track system with ASML NXE:3100 and NXE:3300 exposures in the IMEC (Leuven, Belgium) cleanroom environment. Additionally, we will show the latest lithographic results obtained by novel processing approaches in the EUV coat develop track system.

  19. Automatic graphene transfer system for improved material quality and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscá, Alberto; Pedrós, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Palacios, Tomás; Calle, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    In most applications based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, the transfer from the growth to the target substrate is a critical step for the final device performance. Manual procedures are time consuming and depend on handling skills, whereas existing automatic roll-to-roll methods work well for flexible substrates but tend to induce mechanical damage in rigid ones. A new system that automatically transfers CVD graphene to an arbitrary target substrate has been developed. The process is based on the all-fluidic manipulation of the graphene to avoid mechanical damage, strain and contamination, and on the combination of capillary action and electrostatic repulsion between the graphene and its container to ensure a centered sample on top of the target substrate. The improved carrier mobility and yield of the automatically transferred graphene, as compared to that manually transferred, is demonstrated by the optical and electrical characterization of field-effect transistors fabricated on both materials. In particular, 70% higher mobility values, with a 30% decrease in the unintentional doping and a 10% strain reduction are achieved. The system has been developed for lab-scale transfer and proved to be scalable for industrial applications.

  20. Swift observations of the 2015 outburst of AG Peg - from slow nova to classical symbiotic outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, Gavin; Sokoloski, J. L.; Luna, G. J. M.; Nuñez, N. E.

    2016-10-01

    Symbiotic stars often contain white dwarfs with quasi-steady shell burning on their surfaces. However, in most symbiotics, the origin of this burning is unclear. In symbiotic slow novae, however, it is linked to a past thermonuclear runaway. In 2015 June, the symbiotic slow nova AG Peg was seen in only its second optical outburst since 1850. This recent outburst was of much shorter duration and lower amplitude than the earlier eruption, and it contained multiple peaks - like outbursts in classical symbiotic stars such as Z And. We report Swift X-ray and UV observations of AG Peg made between 2015 June and 2016 January. The X-ray flux was markedly variable on a time-scale of days, particularly during four days near optical maximum, when the X-rays became bright and soft. This strong X-ray variability continued for another month, after which the X-rays hardened as the optical flux declined. The UV flux was high throughout the outburst, consistent with quasi-steady shell burning on the white dwarf. Given that accretion discs around white dwarfs with shell burning do not generally produce detectable X-rays (due to Compton-cooling of the boundary layer), the X-rays probably originated via shocks in the ejecta. As the X-ray photoelectric absorption did not vary significantly, the X-ray variability may directly link to the properties of the shocked material. AG Peg's transition from a slow symbiotic nova (which drove the 1850 outburst) to a classical symbiotic star suggests that shell burning in at least some symbiotic stars is residual burning from prior novae.

  1. Optical Manipulation of Symbiotic Chlorella in Paramecium Bursaria Using a Fiber Axicon Microlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, K.; Hirota, S.; Nakayama, H.; Kunugihara, D.; Mihara, Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, chemically etched axicon fiber was proposed for laser trapping of symbiotic chlorella from paramecium bursaria. We fabricated axicon micro lenses on a single-mode bare optical fiber by selective chemical etching technique. The laser beam from fiber axicon microlens was strongly focused and optical forces were sufficient to move a symbiotic chlorella. From experimental results, it was found that our proposed fiber axicon microlens was a promising tool for cell trapping without physical contact.

  2. Improved Refractories for Slagging Gasifiers in IGCC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2003-04-24

    The gasification of coal and other carbon-containing fuels provides the opportunity to produce energy more efficiently, and with significantly less environmental impact, than more-conventional combustion-based processes. In addition, the synthesis gas that is the product of the gasification process offers the option of ''polygeneration,'' i.e., the production of alternative products instead of power should it be economically favorable to do so. Because of these advantages, gasification is viewed as one of the key processes in the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 power system. However, issues with both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation will have to be resolved before gasification will be widely adopted by the power industry. Central to both enhanced reliability and economics is the development of materials with longer service lives in gasifier systems that can provide extended periods of continuous, trouble-free gasifier operation. The focus of the Advanced Refractories for Gasification project at the Albany Research Center is to develop improved refractory materials capable of withstanding the harsh, high-temperature environment created by the gasification reaction, and includes both the refractory lining that protects and insulates the slagging gasifier, as well as the thermocouple assemblies that are utilized to monitor gasifier operating temperatures. Current generation refractory liners in slagging gasifiers are typically replaced every four to 18 months, at costs ranging up to $2,000,000, depending upon the size of the gasification vessel. Compounding materials and installation costs are the lost-opportunity costs for the time that the gasifier is off-line for the refractory exchange. Current generation thermocouple devices rarely survive the gasifier start-up process, leaving the operator with no real means of temperature measurement during routine operation. Reliable, efficient, and economical gasifier operation that includes the

  3. Improving collaboration by standardization efforts in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Dräger, Andreas; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative genome-scale reconstruction endeavors of metabolic networks would not be possible without a common, standardized formal representation of these systems. The ability to precisely define biological building blocks together with their dynamic behavior has even been considered a prerequisite for upcoming synthetic biology approaches. Driven by the requirements of such ambitious research goals, standardization itself has become an active field of research on nearly all levels of granularity in biology. In addition to the originally envisaged exchange of computational models and tool interoperability, new standards have been suggested for an unambiguous graphical display of biological phenomena, to annotate, archive, as well as to rank models, and to describe execution and the outcomes of simulation experiments. The spectrum now even covers the interaction of entire neurons in the brain, three-dimensional motions, and the description of pharmacometric studies. Thereby, the mathematical description of systems and approaches for their (repeated) simulation are clearly separated from each other and also from their graphical representation. Minimum information definitions constitute guidelines and common operation protocols in order to ensure reproducibility of findings and a unified knowledge representation. Central database infrastructures have been established that provide the scientific community with persistent links from model annotations to online resources. A rich variety of open-source software tools thrives for all data formats, often supporting a multitude of programing languages. Regular meetings and workshops of developers and users lead to continuous improvement and ongoing development of these standardization efforts. This article gives a brief overview about the current state of the growing number of operation protocols, mark-up languages, graphical descriptions, and fundamental software support with relevance to systems biology. PMID:25538939

  4. Improving Collaboration by Standardization Efforts in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Dräger, Andreas; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative genome-scale reconstruction endeavors of metabolic networks would not be possible without a common, standardized formal representation of these systems. The ability to precisely define biological building blocks together with their dynamic behavior has even been considered a prerequisite for upcoming synthetic biology approaches. Driven by the requirements of such ambitious research goals, standardization itself has become an active field of research on nearly all levels of granularity in biology. In addition to the originally envisaged exchange of computational models and tool interoperability, new standards have been suggested for an unambiguous graphical display of biological phenomena, to annotate, archive, as well as to rank models, and to describe execution and the outcomes of simulation experiments. The spectrum now even covers the interaction of entire neurons in the brain, three-dimensional motions, and the description of pharmacometric studies. Thereby, the mathematical description of systems and approaches for their (repeated) simulation are clearly separated from each other and also from their graphical representation. Minimum information definitions constitute guidelines and common operation protocols in order to ensure reproducibility of findings and a unified knowledge representation. Central database infrastructures have been established that provide the scientific community with persistent links from model annotations to online resources. A rich variety of open-source software tools thrives for all data formats, often supporting a multitude of programing languages. Regular meetings and workshops of developers and users lead to continuous improvement and ongoing development of these standardization efforts. This article gives a brief overview about the current state of the growing number of operation protocols, mark-up languages, graphical descriptions, and fundamental software support with relevance to systems biology. PMID:25538939

  5. Symbiotic bacteria contribute to increasing the population size of a freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Tsukada, Koji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    The filter-feeding crustacean Daphnia is a key organism in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we report the effect of symbiotic bacteria on ecologically important life history traits, such as population dynamics and longevity, in Daphnia magna. By disinfection of the daphniid embryos with glutaraldehyde, aposymbiotic daphniids were prepared and cultured under bacteria-free conditions. Removal of bacteria from the daphniids was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The population of aposymbiotic daphniids was reduced 10-folds compared with that of the control daphniids. Importantly, re-infection with symbiotic bacteria caused daphniids to regain bacteria and increase their fecundity to the level of the control daphniids, suggesting that symbiotic bacteria regulate Daphnia fecundity. To identify the species of symbiotic bacteria, 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in daphniids were sequenced. This revealed that 50% of sequences belonged to the Limnohabitans sp. of the Betaproteobacteria class and that the diversity of bacterial taxa was relatively low. These results suggested that symbiotic bacteria have a beneficial effect on D. magna, and that aposymbiotic Daphnia are useful tools in understanding the role of symbiotic bacteria in the environmental responses and evolution of their hosts.

  6. Which role for nitric oxide in symbiotic N2-fixing nodules: toxic by-product or useful signaling/metabolic intermediate?

    PubMed Central

    Boscari, Alexandre; Meilhoc, Eliane; Castella, Claude; Bruand, Claude; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between legumes and rhizobia leads to the establishment of a symbiotic relationship characterized by the formation of new organs called nodules, in which bacteria have the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2) via the nitrogenase activity. Significant nitric oxide (NO) production was evidenced in the N2-fixing nodules suggesting that it may impact the symbiotic process. Indeed, NO was shown to be a potent inhibitor of nitrogenase activity and symbiotic N2 fixation. It has also been shown that NO production is increased in hypoxic nodules and this production was supposed to be linked – via a nitrate/NO respiration process – with improved capacity of the nodules to maintain their energy status under hypoxic conditions. Other data suggest that NO might be a developmental signal involved in the induction of nodule senescence. Hence, the questions were raised of the toxic effects versus signaling/metabolic functions of NO, and of the regulation of NO levels compatible with nitrogenase activity. The present review analyses the different roles of NO in functioning nodules, and discusses the role of plant and bacterial (flavo)hemoglobins in the control of NO level in nodules. PMID:24130563

  7. Deciphering The Hot Components in Symbiotic Variables: A Brave New Frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sion, Edward

    We propose to investigate the physical properties of the hot components of symbiotic variable stars. They are binary star systems consisting of a red giant and a white dwarf (WD) orbiting each other close enough to interact. Material from the outflowing stellar wind of the red giant accretes onto the white dwarf, and an accretion disk may or may not form. Much of the outflowing red giant wind material forms a large nebula around the binary that is partially ionized by radiation from the accreting WD and from thermonuclear burning at its surface. The exact nature of the hot component, the efficiency of such wind-fed accretion, the rate of accretion onto the WD, whether accretion disks are even present, and why the hot components are so much hotter than their cataclysmic variable cousins, all remain poorly know. All previous attempts to determine WD temperatures, luminosities and accretion rates relied upon the modified Zanstra method and crude black body fitting. To deepen our understanding of the hot components, we propose to apply synthetic spectra for high gravity stars and accretion disks generated from state-of-the-art computer codes to the far ultraviolet archival spectra of 40 symbiotic stars, obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) and Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) spacecrafts. Since the WD is the most common end-product of stellar evolution ( > 95% of all the stars in the Galaxy evolve into white dwarfs), and the accretion disk whether from wind- fed accretion or Roche lobe overflow, is the most common universal structure resulting from mass transfer with angular momentum, and since both can be directly viewed in CVs in the ultraviolet (UV), an understanding of the consequences of accretion in these systems is the first step in a global understanding of accretion in other systems throughout the universe. These include protostellar objects, X-ray binaries (containing neutron star and black hole accretors), active galactic

  8. The effects of symbiotic therapy on anthropometric measures, body composition and blood pressure in patient with metabolic syndrome: a triple blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Rabiei, Samira; Shakerhosseini, Rahebeh; Saadat, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Increase in prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes which are of the main risk factors of metabolic syndrome, is not only the result of changes in genetic, diet or physical activity, but also an imbalance of micro flora may play an important role. Therefore, alteration of micro flora using pre/probiotic is considered as a new strategy for treatment of metabolic disorders. Methods: The current study is a triple blind randomized controlled trial. 46 patients from both sexes, who fulfilled inclusion criteria, randomly categorized into intervention or placebo group. The intervention and placebo groups consumed 2 probiotic capsules or 2 placebo capsules during 3 months, respectively. Both groups received a weight loss diet, according to their adjusted ideal body weight. Anthropometric, body composition, blood pressure and nutritional measurements were done in the beginning, at 6th week, and at the end of the study. T-test and paired-t test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 40 patients completed the study. BMI, WC, HC, fat mass, lean mass and blood pressure were reduced in all participants (p< 0.05). Systolic blood pressure in symbiotic group was less than placebo group, significantly (p< 0.05). The trend of weight loss in symbiotic group continued at least for 12 weeks while it was stopped at week 6 in placebo group. Conclusion: Symbiotic supplement with the weight loss diet had synergistic effects on improvement in systolic blood pressure and anthropometric measurements. Based on our findings, symbiotic can postpone plateau phase of weight loss and it may prevent resistance to further weight loss. PMID:26478871

  9. Improving land vehicle situational awareness using a distributed aperture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean; Bias, Jason; Wells, Ashley; Riddle, Larry; van der Wal, Gooitzen; Piacentino, Mike; Mandelbaum, Robert

    2005-05-01

    U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has performed early work to develop a Distributed Aperture System (DAS). The DAS aims at improving the situational awareness of armored fighting vehicle crews under closed-hatch conditions. The concept is based on a plurality of sensors configured to create a day and night dome of surveillance coupled with heads up displays slaved to the operator's head to give a "glass turret" feel. State-of-the-art image processing is used to produce multiple seamless hemispherical views simultaneously available to the vehicle commander, crew members and dismounting infantry. On-the-move automatic cueing of multiple moving/pop-up low silhouette threats is also done with the possibility to save/revisit/share past events. As a first step in this development program, a contract was awarded to United Defense to further develop the Eagle VisionTM system. The second-generation prototype features two camera heads, each comprising four high-resolution (2048x1536) color sensors, and each covering a field of view of 270°hx150°v. High-bandwidth digital links interface the camera heads with a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based custom processor developed by Sarnoff Corporation. The processor computes the hemispherical stitch and warp functions required for real-time, low latency, immersive viewing (360°hx120°v, 30° down) and generates up to six simultaneous extended graphics array (XGA) video outputs for independent display either on a helmet-mounted display (with associated head tracking device) or a flat panel display (and joystick). The prototype is currently in its last stage of development and will be integrated on a vehicle for user evaluation and testing. Near-term improvements include the replacement of the color camera heads with a pixel-level fused combination of

  10. He 2-104: A link between symbiotic stars and planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Julie H.; Kaler, James B.; Shaw, Richard A.; Schwarz, Hugo E.; Aspin, Colin

    1989-01-01

    Ultraviolet, optical and infrared observations of He 2-104 are presented, and estimates for some of the physical properties of the nebular shell are made. It is argued that He 2-104 is in transition between the D-type symbiotic star and bipolar planetary nebula phases and, as such, represents a link between subclasses of these two types of objects. The model includes a binary system with a Mira variable and a hot, evolved star. Previous mass loss has resulted in the formation of a disk of gas and dust around the whole system, while the hot star has an accretion disk which produces the observed highly ionized emission line spectrum. Emission lines from cooler, lower density gas is also observed to come from the nebula. In addition, matter is flowing out of the system in a direction perpendicular to the disk with a high velocity and is impacting upon the previously-ejected red giant wind and/or the ambient interstellar medium.

  11. Improved refractories for slagging gasifiers in IGCC power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.; Chinn, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Most gasifiers are operated for refining, chemical production, and power generation. They are also considered a possible future source of H2 for future power systems under consideration. A gasifier fulfills these roles by acting as a containment vessel to react carbon-containing raw materials with oxygen and water using fluidized-bed, moving-bed, or entrained-flow systems to produce CO and H2, along with other gaseous by-products including CO2, CH4, SOx, HS, and/or NOx. The gasification process provides the opportunity to produce energy more efficiently and with less environmental impact than more conventional combustion processes. Because of these advantages, gasification is viewed as one of the key processes in the U.S. Department of Energy?s vision of an advanced power system for the 21st Century. However, issues with both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation will have to be resolved before gasification will be widely adopted by the power industry. Central to both enhanced reliability and economics is the development of materials with longer service lives in gasifier systems that can provide extended periods of continuous, trouble-free gasifier operation. The focus of the Advanced Refractories for Gasification project at the Albany Research Center (ARC) is to develop improved refractory liner materials capable of withstanding the harsh, high-temperature environment created by the gasification reaction. Current generation refractory liners in slagging gasifiers are typically replaced every 3 to 18 months at costs ranging up to $1,000,000 or more, depending upon the size of the gasification vessel. Compounding materials and installation costs are the lost-opportunity costs for the time that the gasifier is off-line for refractory repair/exchange. The goal of this project is to develop new refractory materials or to extend the service life of refractory liner materials currently used to at least 3 years. Post-mortem analyses of refractory brick

  12. Building High-Performing and Improving Education Systems. Systems and Structures: Powers, Duties and Funding. Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Liz

    2013-01-01

    This Review looks at the way high-performing and improving education systems share out power and responsibility. Resources--in the form of funding, capital investment or payment of salaries and other ongoing costs--are some of the main levers used to make policy happen, but are not a substitute for well thought-through and appropriate policy…

  13. Cristispira from oyster styles: complex morphology of large symbiotic spirochetes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Nault, L.; Sieburth, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Crystalline styles (digestive organs) of bivalve mollusks provide the habitat for highly motile bacteria. Styles from freshly-collected oysters, Crassostrea virginica, were studied by electron microscopy; Cristispira spirochetes were abundant in these organs. Detailed study reveals these spirochetes to be among the most complex prokaryotic cells known. More than 600 periplasmic flagella and an adhering outer lipoprotein membrane (e.g., a 270 degrees sillon) form the ultrastructural basis for the "crista," first described by light microscopy. Unique rosette structures corresponding to the "chambers" or "ovoid inclusions" of light microscopy were detected at the periphery of all protoplasmic cylinders. Polar organelles and linearly aligned flagellar insertions are conspicuous. In size and complexity, Cristispira more resembles Pillotina, Diplocalyx, Clevelandina and Hollandina (large spirochetes symbiotic in termites) than it does Treponema. Cristispira pectinis (Gross, 1910), the type species; Spirillum ostrea (Noguchi, 1921); and another, less frequent bacterial symbiont are the predominant inhabitants of the dense style matrix. The ultrastructure of the spirillum and an electron micrograph of the third bacterium are shown.

  14. Symbiotic Stars in X-Rays. III. Suzaku Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, N. E.; Nelson, T.; Mukai, K.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Luna, G. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the X-ray emission as observed by Suzaku from five symbiotic stars that we selected for deep Suzaku observations after their initial detection with ROSAT, ASCA, and Swift. We find that the X-ray spectra of all five sources can be adequately fit with absorbed optically thin thermal plasma models, with either single- or multi-temperature plasmas. These models are compatible with the X-ray emission originating in the boundary layer between an accretion disk and a white dwarf. The high plasma temperatures of kT > 3 keV for all five targets were greater than expected for colliding winds. Based on these high temperatures as well as previous measurements of UV variability and UV luminosity and the large amplitude of X-ray flickering in 4 Dra, we conclude that all five sources are accretion-powered through predominantly optically thick boundary layers. Our X-ray data allow us to observe a small optically thin portion of the emission from these boundary layers. Given the time between previous observations and these observations, we find that the intrinsic X-ray flux and the intervening absorbing column can vary by factors of three or more on a timescale of years. However, the location of the absorber and the relationship between changes in accretion rate and absorption are still elusive.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of symbiotic dinoflagellates from planktonic foraminifera and radiolaria.

    PubMed

    Gast, R J; Caron, D A

    1996-11-01

    Recent analyses of the small subunit ribosomal DNA (srDNA) from dinoflagellate symbionts of cnidaria have confirmed historical descriptions of a diverse but well-defined clade, Symbiodinium, as well as several other independent symbiont lineages (Rowan 1991; Rowan and Powers 1992; Sadler et al. 1992; McNally et al 1994). Dinoflagellates also occur as intracellular symbionts in a number of pelagic protistan taxa, but the srDNA of these symbionts has not been examined. We analyzed the srDNA sequences of the symbiotic dinoflagellates from four planktonic foraminiferal species and six radiolarian species. The symbionts from these sarcodines formed two distinct lineages within the dinoflagellates. Within each lineage, symbionts obtained from different host species showed few, if any, srDNA sequence differences. The planktonic foraminiferal symbionts were most closely related to Gymnodinium simplex and the Symbiodinium clade, whereas the radiolarian symbionts were most closely related to the dinoflagellate symbiont from the oceanic chondrophore, Velella velella. Therefore, although the dinoflagellate symbionts of foraminifera appear to be a sister taxon of the symbionts from benthic foraminifera and invertebrates, the symbionts of radiolaria are distinct and arose from an independent lineage of dinoflagellate symbionts that shares common ancestry with the symbiont of at least one pelagic metazoan. The lack of srDNA variability within the sarcodine symbiont lineages suggests that coevolution of host and symbiont has not occurred. PMID:8896371

  16. The symbiotic intestinal ciliates and the evolution of their hosts.

    PubMed

    Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; van der Staay, Georg W M; Michalowski, Tadeusz; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Pristas, Peter; Javorský, Peter; Kišidayová, Svetlana; Varadyova, Zora; McEwan, Neil R; Newbold, C Jamie; van Alen, Theo; de Graaf, Rob; Schmid, Markus; Huynen, Martijn A; Hackstein, Johannes H P

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of sophisticated differentiations of the gastro-intestinal tract enabled herbivorous mammals to digest dietary cellulose and hemicellulose with the aid of a complex anaerobic microbiota. Distinctive symbiotic ciliates, which are unique to this habitat, are the largest representatives of this microbial community. Analyses of a total of 484 different 18S rRNA genes show that extremely complex, but related ciliate communities can occur in the rumen of cattle, sheep, goats and red deer (301 sequences). The communities in the hindgut of equids (Equus caballus, Equus quagga), and elephants (Elephas maximus, Loxodonta africanus; 162 sequences), which are clearly distinct from the ruminant ciliate biota, exhibit a much higher diversity than anticipated on the basis of their morphology. All these ciliates from the gastro-intestinal tract constitute a monophyletic group, which consists of two major taxa, i.e. Vestibuliferida and Entodiniomorphida. The ciliates from the evolutionarily older hindgut fermenters exhibit a clustering that is specific for higher taxa of their hosts, as extant species of horse and zebra on the one hand, and Africa and Indian elephant on the other hand, share related ciliates. The evolutionary younger ruminants altogether share the various entodiniomorphs and the vestibuliferids from ruminants. PMID:24703617

  17. The anomalous C 4 intensity ratio in symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Fahey, R. P.

    1988-01-01

    The C IV lambda lambda 1548.2,1550.8 resonance doublet in a symbiotic stars was shown to exhibit anomalous line intensity ratios in which I (lambda 1548.2)/I(lambda 1550.8) less than 1, or less than the optically-thick limit of unity. The R Aquarii-central HII region and RX Puppis exhibit this phenomena. The I(lambda 1548.2)/I(lambda 1550.8) ratio in RX Puppis is found to vary inversely with the total C IV line intensity, and with the FES-visual light, as the object declined over a 5 yr period following a brightening in UV and optical emission which peaked in 1982. This doublet intensity behavior could be explained by a wind which has a narrow velocity range of 600 approx. less than sup v wind approx. less than 1000 km/sec, or by the pumping of the Fe II (mul. 45.01) transition a sup 4 F sub 9/2 - y sup 4 H(o) sub 11/2 by C IV lambda 1548.2, which effectively scatters C IV photons into the Fe II spectrum in these objects.

  18. Peer review for biomedical publications: we can improve the system.

    PubMed

    Stahel, Philip F; Moore, Ernest E

    2014-09-26

    The lack of formal training programs for peer reviewers places the scientific quality of biomedical publications at risk, as the introduction of 'hidden' bias may not be easily recognized by the reader. The exponential increase in the number of manuscripts submitted for publication worldwide, estimated in the millions annually, overburdens the capability of available qualified referees. Indeed, the workload imposed on individual reviewers appears to be reaching a 'breaking point' that may no longer be sustainable. Some journals have made efforts to improve peer review via structured guidelines, courses for referees, and employing biostatisticians to ensure appropriate study design and analyses. Further strategies designed to incentivize and reward peer review work include journals providing continuing medical education (CME) credits to individual referees by defined criteria for timely and high-quality evaluations. Alternative options to supplement the current peer review process consist of 'post-publication peer review,' 'decoupled peer review,' 'collaborative peer review,' and 'portable peer review'. This article outlines the shortcomings and flaws in the current peer review system and discusses new innovative options on the horizon.

  19. Improved thermal storage material for portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The availability of thermal storage materials that have heat absorption capabilities substantially greater than water-ice in the same temperature range would permit significant improvements in performance of projected portable thermal storage cooling systems. A method for providing increased heat absorption by the combined use of the heat of solution of certain salts and the heat of fusion of water-ice was investigated. This work has indicated that a 30 percent solution of potassium bifluoride (KHF2) in water can absorb approximately 52 percent more heat than an equal weight of water-ice, and approximately 79 percent more heat than an equal volume of water-ice. The thermal storage material can be regenerated easily by freezing, however, a lower temperature must be used, 261 K as compared to 273 K for water-ice. This work was conducted by the United Aircraft Research Laboratories as part of a program at Hamilton Standard Division of United Aircraft Corporation under contract to NASA Ames Research Center.

  20. An improved ionospheric model for the Wide Area Augmentation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, D.; Altshuler, E.

    2004-02-01

    We provide an enhanced model of the errors induced by deviations of ionospheric delays from those estimated by the planar model used by the GPS-based Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS). To a first approximation the nominal ionospheric spatial decorrelation of vertical equivalent signal delays, σdecorrnom, is roughly constant over the whole of the WAAS service volume. However, significant gains may be achieved by including a more detailed description of σdecorrnom as a function of various metrics such as geomagnetic latitude, time of day, as well as the quality of the planar fit as characterized by the radius, relative centroid of the fit, and the density of delay data. We take the first step in the development of this more sophisticated model by determining which of these parameters is best suited for use as a metric for determining σdecorrnom. This allows us to construct a first-order model of the ionospheric decorrelation which depends on the local density of ionospheric pierce points. Our preliminary study indicates that this first-order model will result in a better than 20% reduction in the values of broadcast grid ionospheric vertical errors (GIVEs) within the coterminous United States. We also observe a better than 50% reduction in trips of the ionospheric irregularity detector in the Alaska region, which will lead to significant improvements to continuity, although this comes at the cost of a roughly 20% increase in the median GIVE in the Alaska region.