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Sample records for improved chemical analysis

  1. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis - especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca(2+) and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca(2+) content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca(2+) content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat

  2. Improved Devices for Collecting Sweat for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2011-01-01

    Improved devices have been proposed for collecting sweat for biochemical analysis especially for determination of the concentration of Ca2+ ions in sweat as a measure of loss of Ca from bones. Unlike commercially available sweat-collection patches used previously in monitoring osteoporosis and in qualitative screening for some drugs, the proposed devices would not allow evaporation of the volatile chemical components (mostly water) of sweat. Moreover, the proposed devices would be designed to enable determination of the volumes of collected sweat. From these volumes and the quantities of Ca2+ and/or other analytes as determined by other means summarized below, one could determine the concentrations of the analytes in sweat. A device according to the proposal would be flexible and would be worn like a commercial sweat-collection patch. It would be made of molded polydimethylsiloxane (silicone rubber) or other suitable material having properties that, for the purpose of analyzing sweat, are similar to those of glass. The die for molding the silicone rubber would be fabricated by a combination of lithography and electroplating. The die would reproducibly form, in the silicone rubber, a precisely defined number of capillary channels per unit area, each channel having a precisely defined volume. Optionally, electrodes for measuring the Ca2+ content of the sweat could be incorporated into the device. The volume of sweat collected in the capillary channels of the device would be determined from (1) the amount of light or radio waves of a given wavelength absorbed by the device and (2) the known geometry of the array of capillary channels. Then, in one of two options, centrifugation would be performed to move the sweat from the capillary tubes to the region containing the electrodes, which would be used to measure the Ca2+ content by a standard technique. In the other option, centrifugation would be performed to remove the sweat from the device to make the sweat available

  3. Gaining improved chemical composition by exploitation of Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio in XRF analysis.

    PubMed

    Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Rackwitz, Vanessa

    2014-07-15

    The high specificity of the coherent (Rayleigh), as well as incoherent (Compton) X-ray scattering to the mean atomic number of a specimen to be analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), is exploited to gain more information on the chemical composition. Concretely, the evaluation of the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio from XRF spectra and its relation to the average atomic number of reference materials via a calibration curve can reveal valuable information on the elemental composition complementary to that obtained from the reference-free XRF analysis. Particularly for matrices of lower mean atomic numbers, the sensitivity of the approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished between specimens of mean atomic numbers differing from each other by 0.1. Hence, the content of light elements which are "invisible" for XRF, particularly hydrogen, or of heavier impurities/additives in light materials can be calculated "by difference" from the scattering calibration curve. The excellent agreement between such an experimental, empirical calibration curve and a synthetically generated one, on the basis of a reliable physical model for the X-ray scattering, is also demonstrated. Thus, the feasibility of the approach for given experimental conditions and particular analytical questions can be tested prior to experiments with reference materials. For the present work a microfocus X-ray source attached on an SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) system was used so that the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio could be acquired with EDX spectral data for improved analysis of the elemental composition.

  4. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  5. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T < 230 K the particles initiate deposition ice nucleation well below the homogeneous freezing limit. Particles collected throughout one day for similar meteorological conditions show very similar

  6. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  7. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; et al

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  8. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  9. Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.; Thornton, C. P.

    1996-01-01

    Work has included significant research in several areas aimed at further clarification of the aging and chemical failure mechanism of thermoplastics (PVDF or Tefzel) for pipes. Among the areas investigated were the crystallinity changes associated with both the Coflon and Tefzel after various simulated environmental exposures using X-Ray diffraction analysis. We have found that significant changes in polymer crystallinity levels occur as a function of the exposures. These crystallinity changes may have important consequences on the fracture, fatigue, tensile, and chemical resistance of the materials. We have also noted changes in the molecular weight distribution of the Coflon material using a dual detector Gel Permeation Analysis. Again these changes may result in variation in the mechanical and chemical properties in the material. We conducted numerous analytical studies with methods including X-Ray Diffraction, Gel Permeation Chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. We investigated a number of aged samples of both Tefzel and Coflon that were forwarded from MERL. Pressurized tests were performed in a modified Fluid G, which we will call G2. In this case the ethylene diamine concentration was increased to 3 percent in methanol. Coflon pipe sections and powdered Coflon were exposed in pressure cells at 1700 psi at three separate test temperatures, 70 C, 110 C, and 130 C. The primary purpose of the pressure tests in Fluid G2 was to further elucidate the aging mechanism of PVDF degradation.

  10. Film processing investigation. [improved chemical mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The present operational chemical mixing system for the Photographic Technology Division is evaluated, and the limitations are defined in terms of meeting the present and programmed chemical supply and delivery requirements. A major redesign of the entire chemical mixing, storage, analysis, and supply system is recommended. Other requirements for immediate and future implementations are presented.

  11. Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Work during the past three years has included significant research in several areas aimed at further clarification of the aging and chemical failure mechanism of thermoplastics (PVDF or Tefzel) for pipes. Among the areas investigated were the crystallinity changes associated with both the Coflon and Tefzel after various simulated environmental exposures using X-Ray diffraction analysis. We have found that significant changes in polymer crystallinity levels occur as a function of the exposures. These crystallinity changes may have important consequences on the fracture, fatigue, tensile, and chemical resistance of the materials. We have also noted changes in the molecular weight distribution and the increased crosslinking of the Coflon material using Gel Permeation Chromatographic Analysis. Again these changes may result in variations in the mechanical and chemical properties in the material. We conducted numerous analytical studies with methods including X-ray Diffraction, Gel Permeation Chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. We investigated a plethora of aged samples of both Tefzel and Coflon that were forwarded from MERL. Pressurized tests were performed on powdered PVDF in a modified Fluid A, which we will call A-2. In this case the ethylene diamine concentration was increased to 3 percent in methanol. Coflon pipe sections and powdered Coflon were exposed in pressure cells at 1700 psi at three separate test temperatures.

  12. Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal decomposition activation energies have been determined using two methods of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), with good correlation being obtained between the two techniques. Initial heating curves indicated a two-component system for Coflon (i.e. polymer plus placticizer) but a single component system for Tefzel. Two widely differing activation energies were for Coflon supported this view, 15 kcl/mol being associated with plasticizer, and 40 kcal/mol with polymer degradation. With Tefzel, values were 40-45 kcal/mol, the former perhaps being associated with a low molecular weight fraction. Appropriate acceleration factors have been determined. Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) has shown considerable dimensional change during temperature cycles. For unaged pipe sections heating to 100 C and then holding the temperature resulted in a stable thickness increase of 2%, whereas the Coflon thickness decreased continuously, reaching -4% in 2.7 weeks. Previously strained tensile bars of Tefzel expanded on cooling during TMA. SEM performed on H2S-aged Coflon samples showed significant changes in both physical and chemical nature. The first may have resulted from explosive decompression after part of the aging process. Chemically extensive dehydrofluorination was indicated, and sulfur was present as a result of the aging. These observations indicate that chemical attack of PVDF can occur in some circumstances.

  13. Technical note: An improved estimate of uncertainty for source contribution from effective variance Chemical Mass Balance (EV-CMB) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guo-Liang; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Feng, Yin-Chang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Liu, Gui-Rong; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    2015-01-01

    The CMB (Chemical Mass Balance) 8.2 model released by the USEPA is a commonly used receptor model that can determine estimated source contributions and their uncertainties (called default uncertainty). In this study, we propose an improved CMB uncertainty for the modeled contributions (called EV-LS uncertainty) by adding the difference between the modeled and measured values for ambient species concentrations to the default CMB uncertainty, based on the effective variance least squares (EV-LS) solution. This correction reconciles the uncertainty estimates for EV and OLS regression. To verify the formula for the EV-LS CMB uncertainty, the same ambient datasets were analyzed using the equation we developed for EV-LS CMB uncertainty and a standard statistical package, SPSS 16.0. The same results were obtained by both ways indicate that the equation for EV-LS CMB uncertainty proposed here is acceptable. In addition, four ambient datasets were studies by CMB 8.2 and the source contributions as well as the associated uncertainties were obtained accordingly.

  14. Laser Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zare, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews applications of laser methods to analytical problems, selecting examples from multiphoton ionization and fluorescence analysis. Indicates that laser methodologies promise to improve dramatically the detection of trace substances embedded in "real" matrices, giving the analyst a most powerful means for determining the composition of…

  15. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  16. Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    During the past six months we have conducted significant research in several domains in order to clarify and understanding the aging and chemical failure mechanism of thermoplastics (PVDF or Tefzel) for pipes. We organized numerous analytical studies with methods including Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, and Stress Relaxation experiments. In addition we have reanalyzed previous thermogravimetric data concerning the rate of deplasticization of Coflon pipe. We investigated a number of aged samples of both Tefzel and Coflon that were forwarded from MERL. We conducted stress relaxation experiments of Coflon pipe at several temperatures and determined an activation energy. We also examined the dynamic mechanical response PVDF during deplasticization and during methanol plasticization. We performed numerous DSC analyses to research the changing crystalline morphology. We have noted significant changes in crystallinity upon aging for both PVDF and Tefzel. Little variation in elemental composition was noted for many of the aged Coflon and Tefzel samples tested.

  17. Chemical Sensing in Process Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfeld, T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) rationale for chemical sensors in process analysis; (2) existing types of process chemical sensors; (3) sensor limitations, considering lessons of chemometrics; (4) trends in process control sensors; and (5) future prospects. (JN)

  18. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  20. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds.

  1. Improved sensitivity by use of gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for the analysis of drug related substances.

    PubMed

    Van Gansbeke, Wim; Polet, Michael; Hooghe, Fiona; Devos, Christophe; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-09-15

    In 2013, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) drastically lowered the minimum required performance levels (MRPLs) of most doping substances, demanding a substantial increase in sensitivity of the existing methods. For a number of compounds, conventional electron impact ionization gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS/MS) is often no longer sufficient to reach these MRPLs and new strategies are required. In this study, the capabilities of positive ion chemical ionization (PICI) GC-MS/MS are investigated for a wide range of drug related compounds of various classes by injection of silylated reference standards. Ammonia as PICI reagent gas had superior characteristics for GC-MS/MS purposes than methane. Compared to GC-EI-MS/MS, PICI (with ammonia as reagent gas) provided more selective ion transitions and consequently, increased sensitivity by an average factor of 50. The maximum increase (by factor of 500-1000) was observed in the analysis of stimulants, namely chlorprenaline, furfenorex and phentermine. In total, improved sensitivity was obtained for 113 out of 120 compounds. A new GC-PICI-MS/MS method has been developed and evaluated for the detection of a wide variety of exogenous doping substances and the quantification of endogenous steroids in urine in compliance with the required MRPLs established by WADA in 2013. The method consists of a hydrolysis and extraction step, followed by derivatization and subsequent 1μL pulsed splitless injection on GC-PICI-MS/MS (16min run). The increased sensitivity allows the set up of a balanced screening method that meets the requirements for both quantitative and qualitative compounds: sufficient capacity and resolution in combination with high sensitivity and short analysis time. This resulted in calibration curves with a wide linear range (e.g., 48-9600ng/mL for androsterone and etiochanolone; all r(2)>0.99) without compromising the requirements for the qualitative compounds. PMID:26296082

  2. Droplet microfluidics in (bio)chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Basova, Evgenia Yu; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Droplet microfluidics may soon change the paradigm of performing chemical analyses and related instrumentation. It can improve not only the analysis scale, possibility for sensitivity improvement, and reduced consumption of chemical and biological reagents, but also the speed of performing a variety of unit operations. At present, microfluidic platforms can reproducibly generate monodisperse droplet populations at kHz or higher rates with droplet sizes suitable for high-throughput experiments, single-cell detection or even single molecule analysis. In addition to being used as microreactors with volume in the micro- to femtoliter range, droplet based systems have also been used to directly synthesize particles and encapsulate biological entities for biomedicine and biotechnology applications. This minireview summarizes various droplet microfluidics operations and applications for (bio)chemical assays described in the literature during the past few years.

  3. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  4. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, K.K.; Wielandt, D.; Schiller, M.; Bizzarro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr3+, CrCl2+ and CrCl2+) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ~1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr3+, intermediates in CrCl2+ and the lightest in CrCl2+/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ~25% Cr (in the form of Cr3+) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected 53Cr/52Cr (μ53 Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and 54Cr/52Cr (μ54Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr3+ by >5 days exposure to HNO3 —H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >~98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a chromatographic elution strategy that

  5. Probabilistic Exposure Analysis for Chemical Risk Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Kenneth T.; Cullen, Alison C.; Frey, H. Christopher; Price, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the science of probabilistic exposure assessment (PEA) as applied to chemical risk characterization. Current probabilistic risk analysis methods applied to PEA are reviewed. PEA within the context of risk-based decision making is discussed, including probabilistic treatment of related uncertainty, interindividual heterogeneity, and other sources of variability. Key examples of recent experience gained in assessing human exposures to chemicals in the environment, and other applications to chemical risk characterization and assessment, are presented. It is concluded that, although improvements continue to be made, existing methods suffice for effective application of PEA to support quantitative analyses of the risk of chemically induced toxicity that play an increasing role in key decision-making objectives involving health protection, triage, civil justice, and criminal justice. Different types of information required to apply PEA to these different decision contexts are identified, and specific PEA methods are highlighted that are best suited to exposure assessment in these separate contexts. PMID:19223660

  6. Chemical Analysis of Single Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borland, Laura M.; Kottegoda, Sumith; Phillips, K. Scott; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-07-01

    Chemical analysis of single cells requires methods for quickly and quantitatively detecting a diverse array of analytes from extremely small volumes (femtoliters to nanoliters) with very high sensitivity and selectivity. Microelectrophoretic separations, using both traditional capillary electrophoresis and emerging microfluidic methods, are well suited for handling the unique size of single cells and limited numbers of intracellular molecules. Numerous analytes, ranging from small molecules such as amino acids and neurotransmitters to large proteins and subcellular organelles, have been quantified in single cells using microelectrophoretic separation techniques. Microseparation techniques, coupled to varying detection schemes including absorbance and fluorescence detection, electrochemical detection, and mass spectrometry, have allowed researchers to examine a number of processes inside single cells. This review also touches on a promising direction in single cell cytometry: the development of microfluidics for integrated cellular manipulation, chemical processing, and separation of cellular contents.

  7. Improved Access to Supercomputers Boosts Chemical Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stu

    1989-01-01

    Supercomputing is described in terms of computing power and abilities. The increase in availability of supercomputers for use in chemical calculations and modeling are reported. Efforts of the National Science Foundation and Cray Research are highlighted. (CW)

  8. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  9. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  10. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  11. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  12. Resist roughness improvement by a chemical shrink process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahara, Tatsuro; Sekito, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuriko

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we will discuss the improvement of resist pattern roughness on NTD (Negative Tone Development) resist by chemical shrink process. Chemical shrink process is one of the most practical approaches to achieve small feature size CH (Contact Hole) or trench with ArF immersion lithography. We found that this shrink material has not only general benefits of shrink process like DOF (Depth of Focus) margin improvement, but also demonstrates a pattern smoothing effect through observation of the surface of shrink layer using SPM (Scanning Probe Microscope). Additionally, an improvement of LWR (Line Width Roughness) over 16% and an improvement of LCDU (Local Critical Dimension Uniformity) around 60% were observed.

  13. Evaluation of In Vitro Biotransformation Using HepaRG Cells to Improve High-Throughput Chemical Hazard Prediction: A Toxicogenomics Analysis (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program has generated a wealth of data in >600 in vitro assayson a library of 1060 environmentally relevant chemicals and failed pharmaceuticals to facilitate hazard identification. An inherent criticism of many in vitro-based strategies is the inability of a...

  14. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  15. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted simultaneously with native fluorescence spectroscopy to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  16. Improving Molecular Level Chemical Speciation of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worton, D. R.; Decker, M.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    A substantial fraction of fine mode aerosols are organic with the majority formed in the atmosphere through oxidation of gas phase compounds emitted from a variety of natural and man-made sources. As a result, organic aerosols are comprised of thousands of individual organic species whose complexity increases exponentially with carbon number and degree of atmospheric oxidation. Chemical characterization of individual compounds present in this complex mixture provides information on sources and transformation processes that are critical for apportioning organic carbon from an often convoluted mixture of sources and to constrain oxidation mechanisms needed for atmospheric models. These compounds also affect the physical and optical properties of the aerosol but the vast majority remain unidentified and missing from published mass spectral libraries because of difficulties in separating and identifying them. We have developed improved methodologies for chemical identification in order to better understand complex environmental mixtures. Our approach has been to combine two-dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) and both traditional electron ionization (EI) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization. GC×GC provides improved separation of individual compounds over traditional one dimensional GC and minimizes co-elution of peaks resulting in mass spectra that are virtually free of interferences. VUV ionization is a ';soft' ionization technique that reduces fragmentation and enhances the abundance of the parent or molecular ion, which when combined with high resolution mass spectrometry can provide molecular formulas for chromatographic peaks. We demonstrate our methodology by applying it to identify more than 500 individual compounds in aerosol filter samples collected at Blodgett Forest, a rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Using the EI NIST mass spectral library and molecular formulas determined

  17. Nature and Analysis of Chemical Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, Mark S.; Fogleman, Wavell W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the nature and analysis of chemical species in water, covering publications of 1976-77. This review is concerned with inorganics, and it covers: (1) electrochemical analysis; (2) spectroscopy; (3) neutron activation, radiochemical analysis, and isotope dilution. A list of 262 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Improving the electrical properties of graphene layers by chemical doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq Khan, Muhammad; Zahir Iqbal, Muhammad; Waqas Iqbal, Muhammad; Eom, Jonghwa

    2014-10-01

    Although the electronic properties of graphene layers can be modulated by various doping techniques, most of doping methods cost degradation of structural uniqueness or electrical mobility. It is matter of huge concern to develop a technique to improve the electrical properties of graphene while sustaining its superior properties. Here, we report the modification of electrical properties of single- bi- and trilayer graphene by chemical reaction with potassium nitrate (KNO3) solution. Raman spectroscopy and electrical transport measurements showed the n-doping effect of graphene by KNO3. The effect was most dominant in single layer graphene, and the mobility of single layer graphene was improved by the factor of more than 3. The chemical doping by using KNO3 provides a facile approach to improve the electrical properties of graphene layers sustaining their unique characteristics.

  19. Improved EOR by use of chemicals in combination

    SciTech Connect

    Baviere, M.; Labrid, J.; Glenat, P.; Plazanet, V.

    1995-08-01

    Present crude oil prices are too low for the economic implementation of chemical EOR processes based on surfactants and polymers. However, considering recent progress made in use of surfactants, polymers, and alkalis in a synergistic way, it appears that significant improvements can be made in the efficiency/cost ratio of the process, which could make it attractive within a more favorable oil-price context. To illustrate this, the method used in developing the process is applied to a field case characterized by some properties not really suitable for chemical processes (i.e., a high clay content that magnifies ion exchange and related permeability effects, a pore-diameter distribution that prevents complete tertiary oil recovery, and an acid number that is not high enough to give substantial oil production when alkalis alone are used). Nevertheless, relatively reasonable performances have been obtained by combining the different chemicals.

  20. Chemical Analysis Of Beryllium Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, J; Cook, R

    2005-11-17

    There is a need to understand the level of high-Z impurities in Beryllium shells prepared by sputter coating. The Ignition Point Design Requirements state the following: ''Except for allowed ingredients, as listed in the ablator composition entries, the ablator material in all layers shall contain sufficiently low impurity levels that the sum over all impurities of atom fraction*Z{sup 2} shall be less than or equal to 0.2''. This is a tight specification that requires careful materials analysis. Early in the first quarter of FY06, we undertook a study of Be shell impurities via ICP-MS{sup 2} and determined that the impurity levels in the sputtered shells are very close to the specification.

  1. Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis Methods and Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray D.

    2012-01-01

    This invention relates to non-contact spectroscopic methods and apparatus for performing chemical analysis and the ideal wavelengths and sources needed for this analysis. It employs deep ultraviolet (200- to 300-nm spectral range) electron-beam-pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor lightemitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers. Three achieved goals for this innovation are to reduce the size (under 20 L), reduce the weight [under 100 lb (.45 kg)], and reduce the power consumption (under 100 W). This method can be used in microscope or macroscope to provide measurement of Raman and/or native fluorescence emission spectra either by point-by-point measurement, or by global imaging of emissions within specific ultraviolet spectral bands. In other embodiments, the method can be used in analytical instruments such as capillary electrophoresis, capillary electro-chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, and related instruments for detection and identification of unknown analytes using a combination of native fluorescence and/or Raman spectroscopic methods. This design provides an electron-beampumped semiconductor radiation-producing method, or source, that can emit at a wavelength (or wavelengths) below 300 nm, e.g. in the deep ultraviolet between about 200 and 300 nm, and more preferably less than 260 nm. In some variations, the method is to produce incoherent radiation, while in other implementations it produces laser radiation. In some variations, this object is achieved by using an AlGaN emission medium, while in other implementations a diamond emission medium may be used. This instrument irradiates a sample with deep UV radiation, and then uses an improved filter for separating wavelengths to be detected. This provides a multi-stage analysis of the sample. To avoid the difficulties related to producing deep UV semiconductor sources, a pumping approach has been developed that uses

  2. Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor); Bhartia, Rohit (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic chemical analysis methods and apparatus are disclosed which employ deep ultraviolet (e.g. in the 200 nm to 300 nm spectral range) electron beam pumped wide bandgap semiconductor lasers, incoherent wide bandgap semiconductor light emitting devices, and hollow cathode metal ion lasers to perform non-contact, non-invasive detection of unknown chemical analytes. These deep ultraviolet sources enable dramatic size, weight and power consumption reductions of chemical analysis instruments. Chemical analysis instruments employed in some embodiments include capillary and gel plane electrophoresis, capillary electrochromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, flow cells for liquids and aerosols, and surface detection instruments. In some embodiments, Raman spectroscopic detection methods and apparatus use ultra-narrow-band angle tuning filters, acousto-optic tuning filters, and temperature tuned filters to enable ultra-miniature analyzers for chemical identification. In some embodiments Raman analysis is conducted along with photoluminescence spectroscopy (i.e. fluorescence and/or phosphorescence spectroscopy) to provide high levels of sensitivity and specificity in the same instrument.

  3. In-Situ Planetary Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, S. P.; Buehler, M. G.; Grannan, S. M.; Hecht, M. H.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2000-01-01

    Both, the search for evidence of life on Mars and the assessment of the Martian environment in respect to its compatibility with human explorers, will require the ability to measure and understand the aqueous chemistry of the Martian regolith. Direct in-situ chemical analysis is the only method by which chemical biosignatures can be reliably recognized and the toxicity of the regolith accurately assessed. Qualitative and quantitative determination of the aqueous ionic constituents and their concentrations is critical in developing kinetic and thermodynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the potential of the past or present Martian geochemical environment to have either generated or still sustain life. In-situ chemical characterization could provide evidence as to whether the chemical composition of the regolith or evaporates in suspected ancient water bodies have been biologically influenced.

  4. Chemical analysis of some standard carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galle, O.K.

    1969-01-01

    Twenty limestone, dolomite and limestone-dolomite blends were analyzed. The samples, which are available from the G. Fredrick Smith Chemical Company of Columbus, Ohio, were issued with an analysis certificate listing values for SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO and MgO. Additional analyses are reported and results compared with certificate values. ?? 1969.

  5. 40 CFR 761.253 - Chemical analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chemical analysis. 761.253 Section 761.253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.253...

  6. 40 CFR 761.253 - Chemical analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chemical analysis. 761.253 Section 761.253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.253...

  7. 40 CFR 761.253 - Chemical analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chemical analysis. 761.253 Section 761.253 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... Sample Sites, Collecting Surface Samples, and Analyzing Standard PCB Wipe Samples § 761.253...

  8. KCF-S: KEGG Chemical Function and Substructure for improved interpretability and prediction in chemical bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to develop hypothesis on unknown metabolic pathways, biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups or substructures. In computational chemistry or cheminformatics, molecules are typically represented by chemical descriptors, i.e., vectors that summarize information on its various properties. However, it is difficult to interpret these chemical descriptors since they are not directly linked to the terminology of functional groups or substructures that the biochemists use. Methods In this study, we used KEGG Chemical Function (KCF) format to computationally describe biochemical substructures in seven attributes that resemble biochemists' way of dealing with substructures. Results We established KCF-S (KCF-and-Substructures) format as an additional structural information of KCF. Applying KCF-S revealed the specific appearance of substructures from various datasets of molecules that describes the characteristics of the respective datasets. Structure-based clustering of molecules using KCF-S resulted the clusters in which molecular weights and structures were less diverse than those obtained by conventional chemical fingerprints. We further applied KCF-S to find the pairs of molecules that are possibly converted to each other in enzymatic reactions, and KCF-S clearly improved predictive performance than that presented previously. Conclusions KCF-S defines biochemical substructures with keeping interpretability, suggesting the potential to apply more studies on chemical bioinformatics. KCF and KCF-S can be automatically converted from Molfile format, enabling to deal with molecules from any data sources. PMID:24564846

  9. Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, Bruno

    2007-03-01

    This thesis is entitled “Chemical Analysis of the Fornax Dwarf Galaxy”, and it’s main goal is to determine what are the chemical elements present in the stars of this galaxy in order to try and understand it’s evolution. Galaxies are not “static” objects, they move, form stars and can interact with other galaxies. Studying the stars composing a galaxy can in principle, inform us about its past. Some stars can be as old as the galaxy itself, some can be much younger and we can use this information to study how the stellar spectra have varied with time over the entire history of star formation in this galaxy. Dwarf galaxies are in principle the most simple and straightforward type of galaxy and their study can be used to test numerous theories of the formation and evolution of stars and galaxies in a range of environments. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are small, roughly spherical galaxies that are typically found in the vicinity of larger galaxies, such as the Milky Way. They typically do not have any ongoing star formation, nor do they appear to have any gas associated to them. The abundance ratios of different elements in individual stars with a range of ages provide a detailed insight into the various chemical enrichment processes (e.g., supernovae, stellar winds) which in turn improves our understanding of the global processes of formation and evolution of a galaxy as a whole. An important aspect of this thesis is the pipeline developed to analyse a large number of stellar spectra (~100) in a consistent and statistically robust manner, using tools that are typically used on spectra with twice the resolution and larger wavelength coverage. This required bringing together several complex tasks, including accurate stellar atmospheric models, atomic data for the absorption lines, codes of line formation, EW measurements and signal extraction methods, all of which need to be properly included and treated in order to obtain accurate results. The pipeline

  10. Microfabricated Gas Phase Chemical Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Wong, C. Channy

    1999-08-02

    A portable, autonomous, hand-held chemical laboratory ({mu}ChemLab{trademark}) is being developed for trace detection (ppb) of chemical warfare (CW) agents and explosives in real-world environments containing high concentrations of interfering compounds. Microfabrication is utilized to provide miniature, low-power components that are characterized by rapid, sensitive and selective response. Sensitivity and selectivity are enhanced using two parallel analysis channels, each containing the sequential connection of a front-end sample collector/concentrator, a gas chromatographic (GC) separator, and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector. Component design and fabrication and system performance are described.

  11. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis: Sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Exposure conditions in atomic oxygen (ESCA) was performed on an SSL-100/206 Small Spot Spectrometer. All data were taken with the use of a low voltage electron flood gun and a charge neutralization screen to minimize charging effects on the data. The X-ray spot size and electron flood gun voltage used are recorded on the individual spectra as are the instrumental resolutions. Two types of spectra were obtained for each specimen: (1) general surveys, and (2) high resolution spectra. The two types of data reduction performed are: (1) semiquantitative compositional analysis, and (2) peak fitting. The materials analyzed are: (1) kapton 4, 5, and 6, (2) HDPE 19, 20, and 21, and (3) PVDF 4, 5, and 6.

  12. Surface chemical composition analysis of heat-treated bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fan-dan; Yu, Yang-lun; Zhang, Ya-mei; Yu, Wen-ji; Gao, Jian-min

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on the chemical composition of bamboo slivers was studied. The chemical properties of the samples were examined by chemical analysis. Results showed a decrease in the contents of holocellulose and α-cellulose, as well as an increase in the contents of lignin and extractives. Changes in the chemical structure of bamboo components were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that hemicellulose contents decrease, whereas lignin contents increase after heat treatment. Ester formation linked to lignin decreased the hygroscopicity of the bamboo samples and consequently improved their dimensional stability and durability. XPS spectroscopy results showed that hemicelluloses and celluloses are relatively more sensitive to the heating process than lignin. As a consequence, hemicellulose and cellulose contents decreased, whereas lignin contents increased during heat treatment. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the future utilization of heat-treated bamboo.

  13. Unifying Approach to Analytical Chemistry and Chemical Analysis: Problem-Oriented Role of Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardue, Harry L.; Woo, Jannie

    1984-01-01

    Proposes an approach to teaching analytical chemistry and chemical analysis in which a problem to be resolved is the focus of a course. Indicates that this problem-oriented approach is intended to complement detailed discussions of fundamental and applied aspects of chemical determinations and not replace such discussions. (JN)

  14. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  15. Updated Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    2005-01-01

    An updated version of the General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis (LSENS) computer code has become available. A prior version of LSENS was described in "Program Helps to Determine Chemical-Reaction Mechanisms" (LEW-15758), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 19, No. 5 (May 1995), page 66. To recapitulate: LSENS solves complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical-kinetics problems (e.g., combustion of fuels) that are represented by sets of many coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations. LSENS has been designed for flexibility, convenience, and computational efficiency. The present version of LSENS incorporates mathematical models for (1) a static system; (2) steady, one-dimensional inviscid flow; (3) reaction behind an incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; (4) a perfectly stirred reactor; and (5) a perfectly stirred reactor followed by a plug-flow reactor. In addition, LSENS can compute equilibrium properties for the following assigned states: enthalpy and pressure, temperature and pressure, internal energy and volume, and temperature and volume. For static and one-dimensional-flow problems, including those behind an incident shock wave and following a perfectly stirred reactor calculation, LSENS can compute sensitivity coefficients of dependent variables and their derivatives, with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate-coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  16. Simple optical computing device for chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O.; Zhang, Lixia; Eastwood, DeLyle; Li, Hongli; Gemperline, Paul J.; Myrick, Michael L.

    2001-05-01

    Multivariate Optical Computing (MOC) devices have the potential of greatly simplifying as well as reducing the cost of applying the mathematics of multivariate regression to problems of chemical analysis in the real world. These devices utilize special optical interference coatings known as multivariate optical elements (MOEs) that are encoded with pre-determined spectroscopic patterns to selectively quantify a chemical species of interest in the presence of other interfering species. A T-format prototype of the first optical computing device is presented utilizing a multilayer MOE consisting of alternating layers of two metal oxide films (Nb2O5 and SiO2) on a BK-7 glass substrate. The device was tested by using it to quantify copper uroporphyrin in a quaternary mixture consisting of uroporphyrin (freebase), tin uroporphyrin, nickel uroporphyrin, and copper uroporphyrin. A standard error of prediction (SEP) of 0.86(mu) M was obtained for copper uroporphyrin.

  17. Improvement of Rocket Engine Plume Analysis Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    A nozzle plume flow field code was developed. The RAMP code which was chosen as the basic code is of modular construction and has the following capabilities: two phase with two phase transonic solution; a two phase, reacting gas (chemical equilibrium reaction kinetics), supersonic inviscid nozzle/plume solution; and is operational for inviscid solutions at both high and low altitudes. The following capabilities were added to the code: a direct interface with JANNAF SPF code; shock capturing finite difference numerical operator; two phase, equilibrium/frozen, boundary layer analysis; a variable oxidizer to fuel ratio transonic solution; an improved two phase transonic solution; and a two phase real gas semiempirical nozzle boundary layer expansion.

  18. Chemical pretreatment of combined sewer overflows for improved UV disinfection.

    PubMed

    Gibson, J; Farnood, R; Seto, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to better understand chemical pre-treatment of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) for subsequent ultraviolet (UV) disinfection. Approximately 200 jar tests were completed. Alum (Al2(S04)3·12H2O) resulted in a higher UV light transmission (UVT), and equivalent total suspended solids (TSS) removal, than ferric chloride (FeCl3). An alum dose of 20 mg/L increased the UVT of the raw CSO from 30 to 60% after settling. The addition of 100 mg/L of alum maximized UVT reaching approximately 85%. Flocculation did not increase UVT. However, it did improve the removal of TSS. Cationic polymers worked quickly compared with metal coagulants, but only reached a UVT of 60%. A high positive charge density on the polymer improved the removal of turbidity when compared with low charge, but did not affect UVT. If the goal is to maximise UVT, a very high alum dose may be preferred. If the goal is to minimize coagulant dose with moderate UV performance, cationic polymer at approximately 3 mg/L is recommended. PMID:26819393

  19. Improved Prediction of CYP-Mediated Metabolism with Chemical Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Zaretzki, Jed; Boehm, Kevin M; Swamidass, S Joshua

    2015-05-26

    Molecule and atom fingerprints, similar to path-based Daylight fingerprints, can substantially improve the accuracy of P450 site-of-metabolism prediction models. Only two chemical fingerprints have been used in metabolism prediction, so little is known about the importance of fingerprint parameters on site of metabolism predictions. It is possible that different fingerprints might yield more accurate models. Here, we study if tuning fingerprints to specific site of metabolism data sets can lead to improved models. We measure the impact of 484 specific chemical fingerprints on the accuracy of P450 site-of-metabolism prediction models on nine P450 isoform site of metabolism data sets. Using a range of search depths, we study path, circular, and subgraph fingerprints. Two different labelings, also, are considered, both standard SMILES labels and also a labeling that marks ring bonds differently than nonring bonds, enabling ortho, para, and meta positioning of substituents to be more clearly encoded. Optimal fingerprint models chosen by cross-validation performance on the full training data are, on average, 3.8% (Top-2; percent of molecules with a site of metabolism in the top two predictions) and 1.4% (AUC; area under the ROC curve) more accurate than base fingerprint models. These gains represent, respectively, a 25.6% and 16.7% reduction in error. A more rigorous assessment selects fingerprints within each cross-validation fold, sometimes selecting different fingerprints for different folds, but yielding a more reliable estimate of generalization error. In this assessment, averaging the scores from the top few fingerprints yields performances improvements of, on average, 3.0% (Top-2) and 0.7% (AUC). These gains are statistically significant and represent, respectively, a 20.1% and 8.8% reduction in error. Between different isoforms, not many consistencies were observed among the top performing fingerprints, with different fingerprints working best for different

  20. Chemical approaches to the improved performance of nanoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Noel N.

    Although randomly oriented CNT networks and polycrystalline graphene are easy to make and robust towards mechanical deformation, both materials suffer from resistive: at the intertube junctions in CNT networks and at grain boundaries in polycrystalline graphene sheets. In a process we have named "nanosoldering," a conductive material is deposited at the resistive junctions by operating the device in an atmosphere of a chemical precursor. The resistive heating that occurs at the "bad" junctions induces a thermal CVD process. The conductive material that is deposited at these junctions improves the overlap between the two nanotubes and decreases the junction resistance. Two precursors were utilized for this method: CpPd(allyl) to deposit Pd(0) and Hf(BH4)4 to deposit HfB2. In the SEM images post treatment, deposition is observed on many intertube junctions as well as along the lengths of some tubes; the latter can be eliminated by selecting the appropriate experimental conditions. For treatment with the Pd precursor, the ION/IOFF ratio improved by a factor of 6 on average. On the other hand, no improvement was observed for samples treated with the HfB2 precursor due to the large mismatch in work functions between CNTs and HfB2, which creates a Schottky barrier. A solution process was developed to improve the scalability of the nanosoldering process by eliminating the necessity of using a vacuum system and volatile chemical precursors. To do so, a nanosoldering precursor is spin-coated onto the solid substrate. The nanosoldering process is conducted in a commercial available probe station either in air or under vacuum, after which the excess material and byproduct are removed by a solvent rinse. Using this method, we show a comparable degree of device performance improvement using a nonvolatile Pd precursor, Pd2(dba)3. We also obtained improved device performance with a new carbon-based precursor, 1,3,5-tris(2-bromophenyl)benzene. Finally, preliminary experiments were

  1. VALIDATION GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following guidelines for laboratories engaged in the forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism. This document provides a baseline framework and guidance for...

  2. TOF-SIMS analysis of polystyrene/polybutadiene blend using chemical derivatization and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Teiichiro; Iwase, Eijiro; Kanamori, Yukiko

    2008-12-01

    Chemical imaging with high spatial resolution is one of the features of TOF-SIMS. However, degradation of the sample due to primary ion bombardment becomes problematic when the analysis area is small. Although polystyrene (PS) and polybutadiene (PB) separately show relatively distinct spectra, observation of their phase separation in PS/PB blends is difficult when the analysis area is small because degradation of both polymers and especially PS leads to disappearance of their characteristic peaks, resulting in low chemical image contrast. We therefore investigated the application of various forms of multivariate analysis (MVA) to the TOF-SIMS image data to improve the chemical image contrast. PCA, MCR, and the other forms of MVA provided improvement in contrast, but the images were still obscure and observation of phase separation remained difficult. Chemical derivatization using osmium tetroxide was also investigated, and found to give clear images of phase separation in the PS/PB blend. In quantitative determinations with MVA and chemical derivatization, PLS demonstrated the best predictive capability and chemical derivatization resulted in large deviations from both the bulk chemical composition and the determinations with MVA, particularly in regions of low PB content.

  3. Failure Analysis for Improved Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sood, Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Outline: Section 1 - What is reliability and root cause? Section 2 - Overview of failure mechanisms. Section 3 - Failure analysis techniques (1. Non destructive analysis techniques, 2. Destructive Analysis, 3. Materials Characterization). Section 4 - Summary and Closure

  4. Evidence-Based Approaches to Improving Chemical Equilibrium Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Jodi L.; Leinhardt, Gaea; Greeno, James; Koedinger, Kenneth; Klahr, David; Karabinos, Michael; Yaron, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Two suggestions for instruction in chemical equilibrium are presented, along with the evidence that supports these suggestions. The first is to use diagrams to connect chemical reactions to the effects of reactions on concentrations. The second is the use of the majority and minority species (M&M) strategy to analyze chemical equilibrium…

  5. Evaluation of mixed surfactants for improved chemical flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; French, T.R.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1993-02-01

    Phase behavior studies were conducted using combinations of a primary surfactant component and several ethoxylated surfactants. The objective of the study is to evaluate combinations of surfactants, anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic mixtures, that would yield favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The dependence of the solution behavior on the additive surfactant structure, surfactant type, oil, surfactant proportion, salinity, HLB, and temperature was observed. The results showed that the ethoxylated surfactants can improve the solution behavior of the overall system. The increase in optimum salinity range of these solutions corresponded to an increase in the degree of ethoxylation of additive surfactant, up to a certain limit. The nonionic surfactant additives yielded much higher salinities compared to the results from the ethoxylated anionics tested. The proportion of surfactant component in solution was critical in achieving a balance between the solubilization capacity and the enhancement in the system`s salinity tolerance. Some combinations of these types of surfactants showed improved solution behavior with favorable solubilization capacity. The phase inversion temperature (PIT) method has been shown to be a relatively fast method for screening candidate surfactant systems. Comparisons were made using both the conventional salinity scan and the PIT method on selected chemical systems. The results showed good agreement between the salinity regions determined using both methods. A difference in the dependence of optimal salinity on HLB was observed for the different nonionics tested. The linear alkyl alcohol ethoxylates exhibited a behavior distinct from the dialkyl phenols at similar HLB levels with and without the primary sulfonate component in the solution. Other experiments performed at NIPER have shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding has good potential for the recovery of oil from Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR No. 3).

  6. Evaluation of mixed surfactants for improved chemical flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; French, T.R.; Lorenz, P.B.

    1993-02-01

    Phase behavior studies were conducted using combinations of a primary surfactant component and several ethoxylated surfactants. The objective of the study is to evaluate combinations of surfactants, anionic-nonionic and anionic-anionic mixtures, that would yield favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The dependence of the solution behavior on the additive surfactant structure, surfactant type, oil, surfactant proportion, salinity, HLB, and temperature was observed. The results showed that the ethoxylated surfactants can improve the solution behavior of the overall system. The increase in optimum salinity range of these solutions corresponded to an increase in the degree of ethoxylation of additive surfactant, up to a certain limit. The nonionic surfactant additives yielded much higher salinities compared to the results from the ethoxylated anionics tested. The proportion of surfactant component in solution was critical in achieving a balance between the solubilization capacity and the enhancement in the system's salinity tolerance. Some combinations of these types of surfactants showed improved solution behavior with favorable solubilization capacity. The phase inversion temperature (PIT) method has been shown to be a relatively fast method for screening candidate surfactant systems. Comparisons were made using both the conventional salinity scan and the PIT method on selected chemical systems. The results showed good agreement between the salinity regions determined using both methods. A difference in the dependence of optimal salinity on HLB was observed for the different nonionics tested. The linear alkyl alcohol ethoxylates exhibited a behavior distinct from the dialkyl phenols at similar HLB levels with and without the primary sulfonate component in the solution. Other experiments performed at NIPER have shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding has good potential for the recovery of oil from Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR No. 3).

  7. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  8. SALI chemical analysis of provided samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Christopher H.

    1993-01-01

    SRI has completed the chemical analysis of all the samples supplied by NASA. The final batch of four samples consisted of: one inch diameter MgF2 mirror, control 1200-ID-FL3; one inch diameter neat resin, PMR-15, AO171-IV-55, half exposed and half unexposed; one inch diameter chromic acid anodized, EOIM-3 120-47 aluminum disc; and AO-exposed and unexposed samples of fullerene extract material in powdered form, pressed into In foil for analysis. Chemical analyses of the surfaces were performed by the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) method. The analyses emphasize surface contamination or general organic composition. SALI uses nonselective photoionization of sputtered or desorbed atoms and molecules above but close (approximately one mm) to the surface, followed by time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. In these studies, we used laser-induced desorption by 5-ns pulse-width 355-nm light (10-100 mJ/sq cm) and single-photon ionization (SPI) by coherent 118-nm radiation (at approximately 5 x 10(exp 5) W/sq cm). SPI was chosen primarily for its ability to obtain molecular information, whereas multiphoton ionization (not used in the present studies) is intended primarily for elemental and small molecule information. In addition to these four samples, the Au mirror (EOIM-3 200-11, sample four) was depth profiled again. Argon ion sputtering was used together with photoionization with intense 355-nm radiation (35-ps pulsewidths). Depth profiles are similar to those reported earlier, showing reproducibility. No chromium was found in the sample above noise level; its presence could at most be at the trace level. Somewhat more Ni appears to be present in the Au layer in the unexposed side, indicating thermal diffusion without chemical enhancement. The result of the presence of oxygen is apparently to tie-up/draw out the Ni as an oxide at the surface. The exposed region has a brownish tint appearance to the naked eye.

  9. Transient analysis of a chemical synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, D S

    1993-01-01

    The statistical dynamics of an impulse induced quanta turnover is studied by means of a nonstationary stochastic model--double barrier synapse--resulting from a previously developed mathematical theory of chemical synaptic transmission. An essential aspect of nonstationarities of the model is that the interpool quanta transfers follow binomial distribution at impulse arrival time, while in the absence of stimulation they obey Yule-Furry statistics. Under a variety of conditions, corresponding to those in actual experiments, the transient behaviour of the model is simulated and analysed in detail. As a result, the quantitative description of immediate and delayed components of synaptic action is introduced. If simulations of quantal fluctuations are performed numerically, then for the treatment of dynamic regularities, besides numerical procedures, an analytical method of envelopes is developed. It is supported by the theorems which reduce behaviour of the double-barrier synapse to the super-position of simpler solutions for single-barrier systems. With short-term facilitation quantitative analysis and simulations, the synaptic resonance phenomenon is theoretically predicted: different resonant frequencies are found at different levels of facilitation. The importance of this phenomenon treated as a clue to the information processing capabilities of a chemical synapse is discussed. PMID:8097407

  10. Energy analysis of thermal, chemical, and metallurgical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Szargut, J.; Morris, D.R.; Steward, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book consists of the following chapters: The exergy concept and exergy losses; Calculation of exergy; Physical and chemical exergy of typical substances; Exergy analysis of typical thermal and chemical processes; Cumulative exergy consumption and cumulative degree of perfection; Reduction of external exergy losses; Exergy analysis of major thermal and chemical processes; Thermoeconomic applications of exergy; and Ecological applications of exergy.

  11. Assuring the Safety of Chemicals through Improved Exposure Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals are currently in commercial use and hundreds more are introduced each year. Of these, only a small fraction has been assessed adequately for potential risks. Existing chemical testing and exposure measurement protocols are expensive and time consuming. Fu...

  12. Collection and chemical analysis of lichens for biomonitoring. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.L.; Ford, J.; Schwartzman, D.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter discusses the interrelated aspects of biomonitoring using chemical analysis of lichens. Many unique aspects of study objectives, study design (including design tasks, considerations, and sampling schemes), sample collection, sample preparation, and sample analysis that are required for a successful biomonitoring program using chemical analysis are emphasized. The advantages and disadvantages of common analytical methods suitable for chemical analysis of lichens are briefly discussed. Aspects of a quality assurance program and final contract reports are highlighted. In addition, some examples of studies using chemical analysis of lichens are discussed.

  13. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  14. Novel Self-Thickening Chemicals for Improved Conformance Control

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick J. Shuler, Ph.D.

    2011-07-18

    The objective of this project is to identify single chemical agents that exhibit a desirable rheological property whereby if such a chemical is dissolved in salt water it increases the solution viscosity significantly with time. We term that behavior as 'self-thickening' and have nicknamed this as 'T85 technology'. As detailed in the original project proposal, such single chemical products can be applied to advantage as agents for selectively slowing or blocking high flow water channels in subsurface oil reservoirs. The net effect is a decrease in water and an increase in oil flow and production. The initial testing has focused on five different synthetic co-polymers that have two or more chemical groups. These chemicals were dissolved at a concentration of 2500 ppm into different salt solutions (sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride) that encompass a range of dissolved salt concentrations. For the sodium chloride and potassium chloride solutions the salt concentration ranged from 1-5 wt%. The calcium chloride dihydrate sample concentrations ranged from 0.1-1 wt%. One set of samples being aged at 25 C and a second set at 50 C. Viscosity measurements versus aging time show two of these agents may exhibit apparent self-thickening behavior under certain salinity and temperature conditions. Generally the effect is greater in lower salinity NaCl brines and at 25 C. Preliminary flow experiments confirm that the aged fluids exhibit increased effective viscosity while flowing through a porous medium (sand pack). These flow tests include the case of the chemical fluid being aged on the bench before injection into a sand pack, and also a second series of sand packs where fresh chemical fluid is injected and allowed to age in-situ. Thus, the results of the static ageing tests together with the flow tests are a technical validation of the T85 concept.

  15. 78 FR 48029 - Improving Chemical Facility Safety and Security

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Request for Information designed to identify issues related to modernization of the PSM Standard and... key information in a useable format, including by thoroughly reviewing categories of chemicals for which information is provided to first responders and the manner in which it is made available, so as...

  16. Development of Improved Chemicals and Plastics from Oilseeds

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Patricia A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2006-11-09

    The overall objective of this program was to develop technology that can be applied to the production of various chemicals and plastics from seed oils. This research and development program included activities in all four key barrier areas identified in the US DOE Technology Roadmap for Plant/Crop-Based Renewable Resources, namely Plant Science, Production, Processing, and Utilization. Participants in the project included The Dow Chemical Company, Castor Oil, Inc., and the USDA Western Regional Research Center (WRRC). The objective of this production task was to evaluate and develop metathesis catalyst technology as a means of utilizing seed oils as feedstocks for the chemical industry. Specifically, ethenolysis of fatty acid methyl esters, FAME’s, leads to functionalized derivatives. These serve as valuable starting points for materials which cascade into a variety of applications, many of which have a current market presence. The relatively recent discovery and commercial availability of a family of metathesis catalysts which are tolerant of polar functional groups and the acquisition and implementation of high throughput synthesis and screening infrastructure led to a prime opportunity to investigate this project area.

  17. [Rationality of commercial specification of rhubarb based on chemical analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiabo; Zhang, Xueru; Xiao, Xiaohe; Chu, Xiaohui; Zhou, Canping; Jin, Cheng; Yan, Dan

    2010-02-01

    The differences of 34 rhubarb samples collected on the market and at producing area were investigated by chemical analysis on the contents of anthraquinones and chromatographic fingerprints, in order to assess the rationality of the commercial specification of rhubarb. The results indicated that the commercial specification of rhubarb was not correlated to the contents of anthraquinones as well as the price. The chromatographic fingerprints of rhubarb samples from different producing area were dissimilar, while the commercial specifications were difficult to be separated. Generally, the rhubarb samples produced in famous-region contained more anthraquinones. This demonstrated rationality on the traditional records of the famous-region of rhubarb from a chemical view. In this study, it was firstly reported that rhubarb could be categorized into two types, chrysophanol-type and rhein-type, based on the proportion of the two constituents in the total anthraquinones after acid hydrohysis. It was found that the rhubarb samples of rhein-type were mostly produced in famous-regions, such as Qinghai, Xizang, West Sichuan and Gansu. The literatures reported that rhein was superior to chrysophanol at many pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetic properties. Hence, we primarily considered that rhein-type rhubarb might be high-quality. These results were helpful to improve the commercial specification of rhubarb from a view of chemical information.

  18. FMC Chemicals: Burner Management System Upgrade Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-01

    FMC Chemicals Corporation increased the efficiency of two large coal-fired boilers at its soda ash mine in Green River, Wyoming, by upgrading the burner management system. The project yields annual energy savings of 250,000 MMBtu.

  19. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter surveys the analytical techniques used to determine the concentrations of aerosol mass and its chemical components. The techniques surveyed include mass, major ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), organic carbon, elemental carbon, and trace elements. As reported in...

  20. Chemical Engineering Data Analysis Made Easy with DataFit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The outline for half of a one-credit-hour course in analysis of chemical engineering data is presented, along with a range of typical problems encountered later on in the chemical engineering curriculum that can be used to reinforce the data analysis skills learned in the course. This mini course allows students to be exposed to a variety of ChE…

  1. Forecasting for energy and chemical decision analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalet, E.G.

    1984-08-01

    This paper focuses on uncertainty and bias in forecasts used for major energy and chemical investment decisions. Probability methods for characterizing uncertainty in the forecast are reviewed. Sources of forecasting bias are classified based on the results of relevant psychology research. Examples are drawn from the energy and chemical industry to illustrate the value of explicit characterization of uncertainty and reduction of bias in forecasts.

  2. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals. PMID:14762640

  3. Study of improved methods for predicting chemical equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Terry G.; Vaughan, John D.

    The research involves developing general computational methods for predicting the thermodynamic properties of condensed state chemically reactive systems. The overall effort has encompassed both computer studies, and parallel laboratory experimental work to support the evolving computational models. To date, the soundness of molecular mechanics/force-field techniques were demonstrated for accurate prediction of the thermodynamic properties of chemically reactive systems. Extensive work was done with three molecular mechanics models, Boyd's MOLBD3, Allinger's MMP2 and the Warshel/Lifson/Karplus QCFF/PI program. Not one of these programs at present has general full thermodynamic output capability. Modification of the QCFF/PI is well on its way to full thermodynamic capability. Supporting laboratory studies have involved careful bomb calorimetry for H(sub f) information, X-ray structure determination for accurate molecular geometry data, and kinetics/equilibrium determinations for various prototypical Diels-Alder reactions. Vapor pressure studies for candidate Diels-Alder compounds are also underway. The bomb calorimetric and greater initial effort on vapor pressure studies have replaced the original solvent effect and hindered rotation NMR studies planned, on the basis of most critical data needs for correct computational model development.

  4. Conducting a SWOT Analysis for Program Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a teacher education program, or any program, can be the driving force for implementing change. A SWOT analysis is used to assist faculty in initiating meaningful change in a program and to use the data for program improvement. This tool is useful in any undergraduate or degree…

  5. Improved cellular response of chemically crosslinked collagen incorporated hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl) alcohol nanofibers scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Farah Hanani; Jahir Hussain, Fathima Shahitha; Abdull Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari; Mohd Yusoff, Mashitah

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research is to develop biocompatible nanofibrous mats using hydroxyethyl cellulose with improved cellular adhesion profiles and stability and use these fibrous mats as potential scaffold for skin tissue engineering. Glutaraldehyde was used to treat the scaffolds water insoluble as well as improve their biostability for possible use in biomedical applications. Electrospinning of hydroxyethyl cellulose (5 wt%) with poly(vinyl alcohol) (15 wt%) incorporated with and without collagen was blended at (1:1:1) and (1:1) ratios, respectively, and was evaluated for optimal criteria as tissue engineering scaffolds. The nanofibrous mats were crosslinked and characterized by scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the mean diameters of blend nanofibers were gradually increased after chemically crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was carried out to understand chemical interactions in the presence of aldehyde groups. Thermal characterization results showed that the stability of hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol) and hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen nanofibers was increased with glutaraldehyde treatment. Studies on cell-scaffolds interaction were carried out by culturing human fibroblast (hFOB) cells on the nanofibers by assessing the growth, proliferation, and morphologies of cells. The scanning electron microscope results show that better cell proliferation and attachment appeared on hydroxyethyl cellulose/poly(vinyl alcohol)/collagen substrates after 7 days of culturing, thus, promoting the potential of electrospun scaffolds as a promising candidate for tissue engineering applications.

  6. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Baseline and Improved Crystalline Silicotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    2002-01-23

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been evaluating technologies for removing radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from the supernate solutions stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) sorbent (IONSIV IE-911{reg_sign}, UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL), which is very effective at removing cesium from high-salt solutions, was one of three technologies that were tested. Because of the extremely high inventory of {sup 137}Cs expected for the large columns of CST that would be used for treating the SRS supernate, any loss of flow or cooling to the columns could result in high temperatures from radiolytic heating. Also, even under normal operating conditions, the CST would be exposed to the supernates for up to a year before being removed. Small-scale batch and column tests conducted last year using samples of production batches of CST showed potential problems with CST clumping and loss of cesium capacity after extended contact with the simulant solutions. Similar tests-using samples of a baseline and improved granular CST and the CST powder used to make both granular samples-were performed this year to compare the performance of the improved CST. The column tests, which used recirculating supernate simulant, showed that the baseline CST generated more precipitates of sodium aluminosilicate than the improved CST. The precipitates were particularly evident in the tubing that carried the simulant solution to and from the column, but the baseline CST also showed higher concentrations of aluminum on the CST than were observed for the improved CST. Recirculating the simulant through just a section of the tubing (no contact with CST) also produced small amounts of precipitate, similar to the amounts seen for the improved CST column. The sodium aluminosilicate formed bridges between the CST granules, causing clumps of CST to form in the column. Clumps were visible in the baseline CST column after 1 month of operation and in the improved CST column

  7. Chemical and Genetic Wrappers for Improved Phage and RNA Display

    PubMed Central

    Lamboy, Jorge A.; Tam, Phillip Y.; Lee, Lucie S.; Jackson, Pilgrim J.; Avrantinis, Sara K.; Lee, Hye Jin; Corn, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    An Achilles heel inherent to all molecular display formats, background binding between target and display system introduces false positives into screens and selections. For example, the negatively charged surfaces of phage, mRNA, and ribosome display systems bind with unacceptably high non-specificity to positively charged target molecules, which represent an estimated 35% of proteins in the human proteome. We report the first systematic attempt to understand why a broad class of molecular display selections fail, and then solve the underlying problem for both phage and RNA display. First, a genetic strategy introduced a short charge neutralizing peptide into the solvent-exposed, negatively charged phage coat. The modified phage (KO7+) reduced or eliminated non-specific binding to the problematic high pI proteins. In the second, chemical approach, oligolysine wrappers for phage and total RNA blocked non-specific interactions. For phage display applications, the peptides Lysn (where n = 16 to 24) emerged as optimal for wrapping the phage. Lys8, however, provided effective wrappers for RNA binding in assays against the RNA binding protein HIV-1 Vif. The oligolysine peptides blocked non-specific binding to allow successful selections, screens, and assays with five previously unworkable protein targets. PMID:18973165

  8. Exploring new chemical functionalities to improve aromatase inhibition of steroids.

    PubMed

    Varela, Carla L; Amaral, Cristina; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Costa, Saul C; Carvalho, Rui A; Costa, Giosuè; Alcaro, Stefano; Teixeira, Natércia A A; Tavares-da-Silva, Elisiário J; Roleira, Fernanda M F

    2016-06-15

    In this work, new potent steroidal aromatase inhibitors both in microsomes and in breast cancer cells have been found. The synthesis of the 3,4-(ethylenedioxy)androsta-3,5-dien-17-one (12), a new steroid containing a heterocycle dioxene fused in the A-ring, led to the discovery of a new reaction for which a mechanism is proposed. New structure-activity relationships were established. Some 5β-steroids, such as compound 4β,5β-epoxyandrostan-17-one (9), showed aromatase inhibitory activity, because they adopt a similar A-ring conformation as those of androstenedione, the natural substrate of aromatase. Moreover, new chemical features to increase planarity were disclosed, specifically the 3α,4α-cyclopropane ring, as in 3α,4α-methylen-5α-androstan-17-one (5) (IC50=0.11μM), and the Δ(9-11) double bond in the C-ring, as in androsta-4,9(11)-diene-3,17-dione (13) (IC50=0.25μM). In addition, induced-fit docking (IFD) simulations and site of metabolism (SoM) predictions helped to explain the recognition of new potent steroidal aromatase inhibitors within the enzyme. These insights can be valuable tools for the understanding of the molecular recognition process by the aromatase and for the future design of new steroidal inhibitors. PMID:27160054

  9. Theory, Image Simulation, and Data Analysis of Chemical Release Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.

    1994-01-01

    The final phase of Grant NAG6-1 involved analysis of physics of chemical releases in the upper atmosphere and analysis of data obtained on previous NASA sponsored chemical release rocket experiments. Several lines of investigation of past chemical release experiments and computer simulations have been proceeding in parallel. This report summarizes the work performed and the resulting publications. The following topics are addressed: analysis of the 1987 Greenland rocket experiments; calculation of emission rates for barium, strontium, and calcium; the CRIT 1 and 2 experiments (Collisional Ionization Cross Section experiments); image calibration using background stars; rapid ray motions in ionospheric plasma clouds; and the NOONCUSP rocket experiments.

  10. Environmental analysis of the chemical release module. [space shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Dubin, M.

    1980-01-01

    The environmental analysis of the Chemical Release Module (a free flying spacecraft deployed from the space shuttle to perform chemical release experiments) is reviewed. Considerations of possible effects of the injectants on human health, ionosphere, weather, ground based optical astronomical observations, and satellite operations are included. It is concluded that no deleterious environmental effects of widespread or long lasting nature are anticipated from chemical releases in the upper atmosphere of the type indicated for the program.

  11. Quantifying chemical reactions by using mixing analysis.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Anna; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Carrera, Jesús; Tubau, Isabel; Pujades, Estanislao

    2015-01-01

    This work is motivated by a sound understanding of the chemical processes that affect the organic pollutants in an urban aquifer. We propose an approach to quantify such processes using mixing calculations. The methodology consists of the following steps: (1) identification of the recharge sources (end-members) and selection of the species (conservative and non-conservative) to be used, (2) identification of the chemical processes and (3) evaluation of mixing ratios including the chemical processes. This methodology has been applied in the Besòs River Delta (NE Barcelona, Spain), where the River Besòs is the main aquifer recharge source. A total number of 51 groundwater samples were collected from July 2007 to May 2010 during four field campaigns. Three river end-members were necessary to explain the temporal variability of the River Besòs: one river end-member is from the wet periods (W1) and two are from dry periods (D1 and D2). This methodology has proved to be useful not only to compute the mixing ratios but also to quantify processes such as calcite and magnesite dissolution, aerobic respiration and denitrification undergone at each observation point.

  12. IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF CHEMICAL PROCESSES THROUGH THE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts are currently underway at the USEPA to develop information technology applications to improve the environmental performance of the chemical process industry. These efforts include the use of genetic algorithms to optimize different process options for minimal environmenta...

  13. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  14. Chemical properties and methods of analysis of refractory compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samsonov, G. V. (Editor); Frantsevich, I. N. (Editor); Yeremenko, V. N. (Editor); Nazarchuk, T. N. (Editor); Popova, O. I. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Reactions involving refractory metals and the alloys based on them are discussed. Chemical, electrochemical, photometric, spectrophotometric, and X-ray analysis are among the methods described for analyzing the results of the reactions and for determining the chemical properties of these materials.

  15. Improved fiber-optic chemical sensor for penicillin

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, B.G.; Walt, D.R.

    1995-12-15

    An optical penicillin biosensor is described, based on the enzyme penicillinase. The sensor is fabricated by selective photodeposition of analyte-sensitive polymer matrices on optical imaging fibers. The penicillin-sensitive matrices are fabricated by immobilizing the enzyme as micrometer-sized particles in a polymer hydrogel with a covalently bound pH indicator. An array of penicillin-sensitive and pH-sensitive matrices are fabricated on the same fiber. This array allows for the simultaneous, independent measurement of pH and penicillin. Independent measurement of the two analytes allows penicillin to be quantitated in the presence of a concurrent pH change. An analysis was conducted of enzyme kinetic parameters in order to model the penicillin response of the sensor at all pH values. This analysis accounts for the varying activity of the immobilized penicillinase at different pH values. The sensor detects penicillin in the range 0.25-10.0 mM in the pH range 6.2-7.5. The sensor was used to quantify penicillin concentration produced during a Penicillium chrysogenum fermentation. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Improving transient analysis technology for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Chargin, Mladen

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic analyses are demanding of computer simulation capabilities. The modeling complexities of semi-monocoque construction, irregular geometry, high-performance materials, and high-accuracy analysis are present. At issue are the safety of the passengers and the integrity of the structure for a wide variety of flight-operating and emergency conditions. The technology which supports engineering of aircraft structures using computer simulation is examined. Available computer support is briefly described and improvement of accuracy and efficiency are recommended. Improved accuracy of simulation will lead to a more economical structure. Improved efficiency will result in lowering development time and expense.

  17. Chemical glycosylation of cytochrome c improves physical and chemical protein stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is an apoptosis-initiating protein when released into the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and therefore a possible cancer drug candidate. Although proteins have been increasingly important as pharmaceutical agents, their chemical and physical instability during production, storage, and delivery remains a problem. Chemical glycosylation has been devised as a method to increase protein stability and thus enhance their long-lasting bioavailability. Results Three different molecular weight glycans (lactose and two dextrans with 1 kD and 10 kD) were chemically coupled to surface exposed Cyt c lysine (Lys) residues using succinimidyl chemistry via amide bonds. Five neo-glycoconjugates were synthesized, Lac4-Cyt-c, Lac9-Cyt-c, Dex5(10kD)-Cyt-c, Dex8(10kD)-Cyt-c, and Dex3(1kD)-Cyt-c. Subsequently, we investigated glycoconjugate structure, activity, and stability. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra demonstrated that Cyt c glycosylation did not cause significant changes to the secondary structure, while high glycosylation levels caused some minor tertiary structure perturbations. Functionality of the Cyt c glycoconjugates was determined by performing cell-free caspase 3 and caspase 9 induction assays and by measuring the peroxidase-like pseudo enzyme activity. The glycoconjugates showed ≥94% residual enzyme activity and 86 ± 3 to 95 ± 1% relative caspase 3 activation compared to non-modified Cyt c. Caspase 9 activation by the glycoconjugates was with 92 ± 7% to 96 ± 4% within the error the same as the caspase 3 activation. There were no major changes in Cyt c activity upon glycosylation. Incubation of Dex3(1 kD)-Cyt c with mercaptoethanol caused significant loss in the tertiary structure and a drop in caspase 3 and 9 activation to only 24 ± 8% and 26 ± 6%, respectively. This demonstrates that tertiary structure intactness of Cyt c was essential for apoptosis induction. Furthermore, glycosylation protected Cyt c from

  18. Numerical simulation of Jet-A combustion approximated by improved propane chemical kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, Shuh-Jing; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1991-01-01

    Through the effort devoted to the chemical kinetics for propane air combustion, three mechanisms are developed. The full mechanism consists of 131 reactions. This mechanism is used as a guide for the evaluation of other mechanisms, but because of the long expected cpu time, it is not to be incorporated into the computer code KIVA-II for actual simulation. Through the sensitivity analysis, a reduced mechanism of 45 reactions is produced. But the calculated results from the 45 reaction mechanism are always low in temperature. Some efforts are devoted to correct this situation and details are included in this report. A simplified mechanism of reactions is successfully improved and computed results are compared with experimental data. Contour plots of physical parameters and species concentrations and results for emission indices of CO and NOx are presented.

  19. Chemical considerations in severe accident analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Kress, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study presented the first systematic attempt to include fission product physicochemical effects in the determination of expected consequences of hypothetical nuclear reactor power plant accidents. At the time, however, the data base was sparse, and the treatment of fission product behavior was not entirely consistent or accurate. Considerable research has since been performed to identify and understand chemical phenomena that can occur in the course of a nuclear reactor accident, and how these phenomena affect fission product behavior. In this report, the current status of our understanding of the chemistry of fission products in severe core damage accidents is summarized and contrasted with that of the Reactor Safety Study.

  20. Tribology analysis of chemical-mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnels, Scott R.; Eyman, L. Michael

    1994-06-01

    To better understand the variation of material removal rate on a wafer during chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP), knowledge of the stress distribution on the wafer surface is required. The difference in wafer-surface stress distributions could be considerable depending on whether or not the wafer hydroplanes during polishing. This study analyzes the fluid film between the wafer and pad and demonstrates that hydroplaning is possible for standard CMP processes. The importance of wafer curvature, slurry viscosity, and rotation speed on the thickness of the fluid film is also demonstrated.

  1. Quantitative Chemical Analysis of Single Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heien, Michael L.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    Exocytosis, the fusion of intracellular vesicles with the membrane and subsequent release of vesicular contents, is important in intercellular communication. The release event is a rapid process (milliseconds), hence detection of released chemicals requires a detection scheme that is both sensitive and has rapid temporal dynamics. Electrochemistry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes allows time-resolved exocytosis of electroactive catecholamines to be observed at very low levels. When coupled with constant-potential amperometry, the number of molecules released and the kinetics of quantal release can be determined. The rapid response time (milliseconds) of microelectrodes makes them well suited for monitoring the dynamic process of exocytosis.

  2. Chemical Diversity, Origin, and Analysis of Phycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Andersen, Aaron John Christian; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Per Juel; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-03-25

    Microalgae, particularly those from the lineage Dinoflagellata, are very well-known for their ability to produce phycotoxins that may accumulate in the marine food chain and eventually cause poisoning in humans. This includes toxins accumulating in shellfish, such as saxitoxin, okadaic acid, yessotoxins, azaspiracids, brevetoxins, and pinnatoxins. Other toxins, such as ciguatoxins and maitotoxins, accumulate in fish, where, as is the case for the latter compounds, they can be metabolized to even more toxic metabolites. On the other hand, much less is known about the chemical nature of compounds that are toxic to fish, the so-called ichthyotoxins. Despite numerous reports of algal blooms causing massive fish kills worldwide, only a few types of compounds, such as the karlotoxins, have been proven to be true ichthyotoxins. This review will highlight marine microalgae as the source of some of the most complex natural compounds known to mankind, with chemical structures that show no resemblance to what has been characterized from plants, fungi, or bacteria. In addition, it will summarize algal species known to be related to fish-killing blooms, but from which ichthyotoxins are yet to be characterized. PMID:26901085

  3. SYSTEMS CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF PETROLEUM POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of an established mathematical treatment useful for the characterization and identification of petroleum pollutants is described. Using discriminant analysis of relevant infrared spectrophotometric data, 99% of numerous known and unknown oil samples have been corr...

  4. Improved Chemical Structure-Activity Modeling Through Data Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Extending the original training data with simulated unobserved data points has proven powerful to increase both the generalization ability of predictive models and their robustness against changes in the structure of data (e.g., systematic drifts in the response variable) in diverse areas such as the analysis of spectroscopic data or the detection of conserved domains in protein sequences. In this contribution, we explore the effect of data augmentation in the predictive power of QSAR models, quantified by the RMSE values on the test set. We collected 8 diverse data sets from the literature and ChEMBL version 19 reporting compound activity as pIC50 values. The original training data were replicated (i.e., augmented) N times (N ∈ 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), and these replications were perturbed with Gaussian noise (μ = 0, σ = σnoise) on either (i) the pIC50 values, (ii) the compound descriptors, (iii) both the compound descriptors and the pIC50 values, or (iv) none of them. The effect of data augmentation was evaluated across three different algorithms (RF, GBM, and SVM radial) and two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints and physicochemical-property-based descriptors). The influence of all factor levels was analyzed with a balanced fixed-effect full-factorial experiment. Overall, data augmentation constantly led to increased predictive power on the test set by 10-15%. Injecting noise on (i) compound descriptors or on (ii) both compound descriptors and pIC50 values led to the highest drop of RMSEtest values (from 0.67-0.72 to 0.60-0.63 pIC50 units). The maximum increase in predictive power provided by data augmentation is reached when the training data is replicated one time. Therefore, extending the original training data with one perturbed repetition thereof represents a reasonable trade-off between the increased performance of the models and the computational cost of data augmentation, namely increase of (i) model complexity due to the need for optimizing

  5. Electron Spectroscopy: Applications for Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heercules, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The development of XPS as an effective method for surface analysis during the period 1964-1977 is presented. The study shows that unlike other surface methods, XPS data can be obtained for both conductors and insulators and a variety of samples can be handled effectively, which is one of the major reasons for the popularity of the technique.

  6. Methods for Chemical Analysis of Fresh Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golterman, H. L.

    This manual, one of a series prepared for the guidance of research workers conducting studies as part of the International Biological Programme, contains recommended methods for the analysis of fresh water. The techniques are grouped in the following major sections: Sample Taking and Storage; Conductivity, pH, Oxidation-Reduction Potential,…

  7. 40 CFR 761.253 - Chemical analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Determining a PCB Concentration for Purposes of Abandonment or Disposal of Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting... analysis. (a) Extract PCBs from the standard wipe sample collection medium and clean-up the extracted PCBs... SW-846, or a method validated under subpart Q of this part, to analyze these extracts for PCBs....

  8. 40 CFR 761.253 - Chemical analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Determining a PCB Concentration for Purposes of Abandonment or Disposal of Natural Gas Pipeline: Selecting... analysis. (a) Extract PCBs from the standard wipe sample collection medium and clean-up the extracted PCBs... SW-846, or a method validated under subpart Q of this part, to analyze these extracts for PCBs....

  9. Development of an Improved Simulator for Chemical and Microbial EOR Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Gary A.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Delshad, Mojdeh

    2000-09-11

    The objective of this research was to extend the capability of an existing simulator (UTCHEM) to improved oil recovery methods that use surfactants, polymers, gels, alkaline chemicals, microorganisms and foam as well as various combinations of these in both conventional and naturally fractured oil reservoirs. Task 1 is the addition of a dual-porosity model for chemical improved of recovery processes in naturally fractured oil reservoirs. Task 2 is the addition of a foam model. Task 3 addresses several numerical and coding enhancements that will greatly improve the versatility and performance of UTCHEM. Task 4 is the enhancements of physical property models.

  10. Pretest uncertainty analysis for chemical rocket engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric pretest uncertainty analysis has been performed for a chemical rocket engine test at a unique 1000:1 area ratio altitude test facility. Results from the parametric study provide the error limits required in order to maintain a maximum uncertainty of 1 percent on specific impulse. Equations used in the uncertainty analysis are presented.

  11. Improving chemical mapping algorithm and visualization in full-field hard x-ray spectroscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Cheng; Xu, Wei; Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Wang, Jun; Yu, Dantong

    2013-12-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) imaging, an advanced absorption spectroscopy technique, at the Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) Beamline X8C of NSLS enables high-resolution chemical mapping (a.k.a. chemical composition identification or chemical spectra fitting). Two-Dimensional (2D) chemical mapping has been successfully applied to study many functional materials to decide the percentages of chemical components at each pixel position of the material images. In chemical mapping, the attenuation coefficient spectrum of the material (sample) can be fitted with the weighted sum of standard spectra of individual chemical compositions, where the weights are the percentages to be calculated. In this paper, we first implemented and compared two fitting approaches: (i) a brute force enumeration method, and (ii) a constrained least square minimization algorithm proposed by us. Next, as 2D spectra fitting can be conducted pixel by pixel, so theoretically, both methods can be implemented in parallel. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of parallel computing in the chemical mapping problem and investigate how much efficiency improvement can be achieved, we used the second approach as an example and implemented a parallel version for a multi-core computer cluster. Finally we used a novel way to visualize the calculated chemical compositions, by which domain scientists could grasp the percentage difference easily without looking into the real data.

  12. Improvements to enforcement of multilateral environmental agreements to control international shipments of chemicals and wastes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Somboon, Vira; Wun'gaeo, Surichai; Middleton, Carl; Tingsabadh, Charit; Limjirakan, Sangchan

    2016-06-01

    Illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals has caused severe damage on human health and the environment, and brought big challenges to countries to meet their commitments to related multilateral environmental agreements. Synergy-building, like organising law enforcement operations, is critical to address illegal trade in waste and chemicals, and further improve the effectiveness of environmental enforcement. This article discusses how and why law enforcement operations can help countries to implement chemical and waste-related multilateral environmental agreements in a more efficient and effective way. The research explores key barriers and factors for organising law enforcement operations, and recommends methods to improve law enforcement operations to address illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals. PMID:27118737

  13. Stratospheric Sampling and In Situ Atmospheric Chemical Element Analysis During Meteor Showers: A Resource Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Resources studies for asteroidal mining evaluation have depended historically on remote sensing analysis for chemical elements. During the November 1998 Leonids meteor shower, a stratospheric balloon and various low-density capture media were used to sample fragments from Comet Tempel-Tuttle debris during a peak Earth crossing. The analysis not only demonstrates how potential sampling strategies may improve the projections for metals or rare elements in astromining, but also benchmarks materials during low temperature (-60 F), high dessication environments as seen during atmospheric exposure. The results indicate high aluminum, magnesium and iron content for various sampled particles recovered, but generalization to the sporadic meteors expected from asteroidal sources will require future improvements in larger sampling volumes before a broad-use strategy for chemical analysis can be described. A repeat of the experimental procedure is planned for the November 1999 Leonids' shower, and various improvements for atmospheric sampling will be discussed.

  14. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process

    DOEpatents

    Hawthorne, Steven B.; Miller, David J.; Yang, Yu; Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

  15. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.; Yang, Y.; Lagadec, A.J.M.

    1999-12-14

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100 to 374 C while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

  16. Chemical characterization and analysis of TNT composts

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, P.G.; Leggett, D.C.; Jenkins, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    The US Army has considerable interest in restoring land previously contaminated with the explosive, TNT. One method of remediation that is economically attractive is composting. Previous work on TNT/soil composts indicates that TNT was initially converted to solvent-extractable reduction products. These compounds were subsequently bound in a non-solvent-extractable form. There was no evidence that mineralization occurred. Similar observations have been made with respect to TNT amended soils, activated sludge and tissues of plants grown hydroponically in TNT solutions. Last year the authors reported on a method that used acid hydrolysis after solvent extraction to release covalently-bound amino and diamino TNT-reduction products from a compost time-series. This year the authors have added a base hydrolysis step preceding the acid hydrolysis. About 25% of the original TNT can now be accounted for as covalently-bound reduction products in a 15-day compost. Furthermore, recovery experiments have revealed that the method is not yet very efficient with regard to recovery of spiked aminos and diaminos. Work is continuing on improving the method and/or developing a rigorous recovery correction factor so that a mass balance for TNT can be obtained.

  17. Assessing and improving cross-border chemical incident preparedness and response across Europe.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Evans, James; Hall, Lisbeth; Czerczak, Slawomir; Manley, Kevin; Dobney, Alec; Hoffer, Sally; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-01

    Good practices in emergency preparedness and response for chemical incidents include practices specific to the different functions of exposure assessment (e.g., within the monitoring function, the use of mobile monitoring equipment; within the modelling function, the use of rapid dispersion models with integrated mapping software) and generic practices to engage incident response stakeholders to maximise exposure assessment capabilities (e.g., sharing protocols and pre-prepared information and multi-agency training and exercising). Such practices can optimise cross-border collaboration. A wide range of practices have been implemented across MSs during chemical incident response, particularly during incidents that have cross-border and trans-boundary impacts. This paper proposes a self-assessment methodology to enable MSs, or organisations within MSs, to examine exposure assessment capabilities and communication pathways between exposure assessors and public health risk assessors. Where gaps exist, this methodology provides links to good practices that could improve response, communication and collaboration across local, regional and national borders. A fragmented approach to emergency preparedness for chemical incidents is a major obstacle to improving cross-border exposure assessment. There is no one existing body or structure responsible for all aspects of chemical incident preparedness and response in the European Union. Due to the range of different organisations and networks involved in chemical incident response, emergency preparedness needs to be drawn together. A number of recommendations are proposed, including the use of networks of experts which link public health risk assessors with experts in exposure assessment, in order to coordinate and improve chemical incident emergency preparedness. The EU's recent Decision on serious cross-border threats to health aims to facilitate MSs' compliance with the International Health Regulations, which require

  18. An improved probit method for assessment of domino effect to chemical process equipment caused by overpressure.

    PubMed

    Mingguang, Zhang; Juncheng, Jiang

    2008-10-30

    Overpressure is one important cause of domino effect in accidents of chemical process equipments. Damage probability and relative threshold value are two necessary parameters in QRA of this phenomenon. Some simple models had been proposed based on scarce data or oversimplified assumption. Hence, more data about damage to chemical process equipments were gathered and analyzed, a quantitative relationship between damage probability and damage degrees of equipment was built, and reliable probit models were developed associated to specific category of chemical process equipments. Finally, the improvements of present models were evidenced through comparison with other models in literatures, taking into account such parameters: consistency between models and data, depth of quantitativeness in QRA.

  19. Black tea: chemical analysis and stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiming; Lo, Chih-Yu; Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lai, Ching-Shu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Tea is the most popular flavored and functional drink worldwide. The nutritional value of tea is mostly from the tea polyphenols that are reported to possess a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-oxidant properties, reduction of various cancers, inhibition of inflammation, and protective effects against diabetes, hyperlipidemia and obesity. Tea polyphenols include catechins and gallic acid in green and white teas, and theaflavins and thearubigins as well as other catechin polymers in black and oolong teas. Accurate analysis of black tea polyphenols plays a significant role in the identification of black tea contents, quality control of commercial tea beverages and extracts, differentiation of various contents of theaflavins and catechins and correlations of black tea identity and quality with biological activity, and most importantly, the establishment of the relationship between quantitative tea polyphenol content and its efficacy in animal or human studies. Global research in tea polyphenols has generated much in vitro and in vivo data rationally correlating tea polyphenols with their preventive and therapeutic properties in human diseases such as cancer, and metabolic and cardiovascular diseases etc. Based on these scientific findings, numerous tea products have been developed including flavored tea drinks, tea-based functional drinks, tea extracts and concentrates, and dietary supplements and food ingredients, demonstrating the broad applications of tea and its extracts, particularly in the field of functional food.

  20. Improving the analysis of slug tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines several techniques that have the potential to improve the quality of slug test analysis. These techniques are applicable in the range from low hydraulic conductivities with overdamped responses to high hydraulic conductivities with nonlinear oscillatory responses. Four techniques for improving slug test analysis will be discussed: use of an extended capability nonlinear model, sensitivity analysis, correction for acceleration and velocity effects, and use of multiple slug tests. The four-parameter nonlinear slug test model used in this work is shown to allow accurate analysis of slug tests with widely differing character. The parameter ?? represents a correction to the water column length caused primarily by radius variations in the wellbore and is most useful in matching the oscillation frequency and amplitude. The water column velocity at slug initiation (V0) is an additional model parameter, which would ideally be zero but may not be due to the initiation mechanism. The remaining two model parameters are A (parameter for nonlinear effects) and K (hydraulic conductivity). Sensitivity analysis shows that in general ?? and V0 have the lowest sensitivity and K usually has the highest. However, for very high K values the sensitivity to A may surpass the sensitivity to K. Oscillatory slug tests involve higher accelerations and velocities of the water column; thus, the pressure transducer responses are affected by these factors and the model response must be corrected to allow maximum accuracy for the analysis. The performance of multiple slug tests will allow some statistical measure of the experimental accuracy and of the reliability of the resulting aquifer parameters. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Appendix C. Collection of Samples for Chemical Agent Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, C; Thompson, C; Doerr, T; Scripsick, R

    2005-09-23

    This chapter describes procedures for the collection and analysis of samples of various matrices for the purpose of determining the presence of chemical agents in a civilian setting. This appendix is intended to provide the reader with sufficient information to make informed decisions about the sampling and analysis process and to suggest analytical strategies that might be implemented by the scientists performing sampling and analysis. This appendix is not intended to be used as a standard operating procedure to provide detailed instructions as to how trained scientists should handle samples. Chemical agents can be classified by their physical and chemical properties. Table 1 lists the chemical agents considered by this report. In selecting sampling and analysis methods, we have considered procedures proposed by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and peer-reviewed scientific literature. EPA analytical methods are good resources describing issues of quality assurance with respect to chain-of-custody, sample handling, and quality control requirements.

  2. An integrated decision model for the application of airborne sensors for improved response to accidental and terrorist chemical vapor releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitan, Loginn

    This research created a new model which provides an integrated approach to planning the effective selection and employment of airborne sensor systems in response to accidental or intentional chemical vapor releases. The approach taken was to use systems engineering and decision analysis methods to construct a model architecture which produced a modular structure for integrating both new and existing components into a logical procedure to assess the application of airborne sensor systems to address chemical vapor hazards. The resulting integrated process model includes an internal aggregation model which allowed differentiation among alternative airborne sensor systems. Both models were developed and validated by experts and demonstrated using appropriate hazardous chemical release scenarios. The resultant prototype integrated process model or system fills a current gap in capability allowing improved planning, training and exercise for HAZMAT teams and first responders when considering the selection and employment of airborne sensor systems. Through the research process, insights into the current response structure and how current airborne capability may be most effectively used were generated. Furthermore, the resultant prototype system is tailorable for local, state, and federal application, and can potentially be modified to help evaluate investments in new airborne sensor technology and systems. Better planning, training and preparedness exercising holds the prospect for the effective application of airborne assets for improved response to large scale chemical release incidents. Improved response will result in fewer casualties and lives lost, reduced economic impact, and increased protection of critical infrastructure when faced with accidental and intentional terrorist release of hazardous industrial chemicals. With the prospect of more airborne sensor systems becoming available, this prototype system integrates existing and new tools into an effective

  3. Improving Intelligence Analysis With Decision Science.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Mandeep K; Mandel, David R; Mellers, Barbara A; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-11-01

    Intelligence analysis plays a vital role in policy decision making. Key functions of intelligence analysis include accurately forecasting significant events, appropriately characterizing the uncertainties inherent in such forecasts, and effectively communicating those probabilistic forecasts to stakeholders. We review decision research on probabilistic forecasting and uncertainty communication, drawing attention to findings that could be used to reform intelligence processes and contribute to more effective intelligence oversight. We recommend that the intelligence community (IC) regularly and quantitatively monitor its forecasting accuracy to better understand how well it is achieving its functions. We also recommend that the IC use decision science to improve these functions (namely, forecasting and communication of intelligence estimates made under conditions of uncertainty). In the case of forecasting, decision research offers suggestions for improvement that involve interventions on data (e.g., transforming forecasts to debias them) and behavior (e.g., via selection, training, and effective team structuring). In the case of uncertainty communication, the literature suggests that current intelligence procedures, which emphasize the use of verbal probabilities, are ineffective. The IC should, therefore, leverage research that points to ways in which verbal probability use may be improved as well as exploring the use of numerical probabilities wherever feasible.

  4. A review of chemical gradient systems for cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Somaweera, Himali; Ibraguimov, Akif; Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-02-11

    Microfluidic spatial and temporal gradient generators have played an important role in many biological assays such as in the analysis of wound healing, inflammation, and cancer metastasis. Chemical gradient systems can also be applied to other fields such as drug design, chemical synthesis, chemotaxis, etc. Microfluidic systems are particularly amenable to gradient formation, as the length scales used in chips enable fluid processes that cannot be conducted in bulk scale. In this review we discuss new microfluidic devices for gradient generation and applications of those systems in cell analysis.

  5. Evaluating Geographically Weighted Regression Models for Environmental Chemical Risk Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Wheeler, David C; Gennings, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In the evaluation of cancer risk related to environmental chemical exposures, the effect of many correlated chemicals on disease is often of interest. The relationship between correlated environmental chemicals and health effects is not always constant across a study area, as exposure levels may change spatially due to various environmental factors. Geographically weighted regression (GWR) has been proposed to model spatially varying effects. However, concerns about collinearity effects, including regression coefficient sign reversal (ie, reversal paradox), may limit the applicability of GWR for environmental chemical risk analysis. A penalized version of GWR, the geographically weighted lasso, has been proposed to remediate the collinearity effects in GWR models. Our focus in this study was on assessing through a simulation study the ability of GWR and GWL to correctly identify spatially varying chemical effects for a mixture of correlated chemicals within a study area. Our results showed that GWR suffered from the reversal paradox, while GWL overpenalized the effects for the chemical most strongly related to the outcome. PMID:25983546

  6. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 5F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-03-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. The conclusions from this work are: (1) With the exception of iron, the dissolution of sludge components from Tank 5F agreed with results from the actual waste demonstration performed in 2007. The fraction of iron removed from Tank 5F by chemical cleaning was significantly less than the fraction removed in the SRNL demonstrations. The likely cause of this difference is the high pH following the first oxalic acid strike. (2) Most of the sludge mass remaining in the tank is iron and nickel. (3) The remaining sludge contains approximately 26 kg of barium, 37 kg of chromium, and 37 kg of mercury. (4) Most of the radioactivity remaining in the residual material is beta emitters and {sup 90}Sr. (5) The chemical cleaning removed more than {approx} 90% of the uranium isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. (6) The chemical cleaning removed {approx} 70% of the neptunium, {approx} 83% of the {sup 90}Sr, and {approx} 21% of the {sup 60}Co. (7) The chemical cleaning removed less than 10% of the plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. (8) The chemical cleaning removed more than 90% of the aluminium, calcium, and sodium from the tank. (9) The cleaning operations removed 61% of lithium, 88% of non-radioactive strontium, and 65% of zirconium. The {sup 90}Sr and non-radioactive strontium were measured

  7. Micropyrolyzer for chemical analysis of liquid and solid samples

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis D.; Morgan, Catherine H.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2006-07-18

    A micropyrolyzer has applications to pyrolysis, heated chemistry, and thermal desorption from liquid or solid samples. The micropyrolyzer can be fabricated from semiconductor materials and metals using standard integrated circuit technologies. The micropyrolyzer enables very small volume samples of less than 3 microliters and high sample heating rates of greater than 20.degree. C. per millisecond. A portable analyzer for the field analysis of liquid and solid samples can be realized when the micropyrolyzer is combined with a chemical preconcentrator, chemical separator, and chemical detector. Such a portable analyzer can be used in a variety of government and industrial applications, such as non-proliferation monitoring, chemical and biological warfare detection, industrial process control, water and air quality monitoring, and industrial hygiene.

  8. Surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates pretreated by alkali hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Song, Xueping; Jiang, Yan; Rong, Xianjian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Shuangfei; Nie, Shuangxi

    2016-09-01

    The surface characterization and chemical analysis of bamboo substrates by alkali hydrogen peroxide pretreatment (AHPP) were investigated in this study. The results tended to manifest that AHPP prior to enzymatic and chemical treatment was potential for improving accessibility and reactivity of bamboo substrates. The inorganic components, organic solvent extractives and acid-soluble lignin were effectively removed by AHPP. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the surface of bamboo chips had less lignin but more carbohydrate after pre-treatment. Fiber surfaces became etched and collapsed, and more pores and debris on the substrate surface were observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Brenauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) results showed that both of pore volume and surface area were increased after AHPP. Although XRD analysis showed that AHPP led to relatively higher crystallinity, pre-extraction could overall enhance the accessibility of enzymes and chemicals into the bamboo structure. PMID:27311789

  9. Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) study of atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, J. G.; Seals, R. D.; Wightman, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of analyses by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) on several Nuclepore filters which were exposed during air pollution studies are presented along with correlative measurements by Neutron Activation Analysis and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Samples were exposed during air pollution studies at Norfolk, Virginia and the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It was demonstrated that with the ESCA technique it was possible to identify the chemical (bonding) state of elements contained in the atmospheric particulate matter collected on Nuclepore filters. Sulfur, nitrogen, mercury, chlorine, alkali, and alkaline earth metal species were identified in the Norfolk samples. ESCA binding energy data for aluminum indicated that three chemically different types of aluminum are present in the launch and background samples from NASA-KSC.

  10. Improved ADM1 model for anaerobic digestion process considering physico-chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Piccard, Sarah; Zhou, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The "Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1" (ADM1) was modified in the study by improving the bio-chemical framework and integrating a more detailed physico-chemical framework. Inorganic carbon and nitrogen balance terms were introduced to resolve the discrepancies in the original bio-chemical framework between the carbon and nitrogen contents in the degraders and substrates. More inorganic components and solids precipitation processes were included in the physico-chemical framework of ADM1. The modified ADM1 was validated with the experimental data and used to investigate the effects of calcium ions, magnesium ions, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen on anaerobic digestion in batch reactor. It was found that the entire anaerobic digestion process might exist an optimal initial concentration of inorganic nitrogen for methane gas production in the presence of calcium ions, magnesium ions and inorganic phosphorus. PMID:26253912

  11. Improved ADM1 model for anaerobic digestion process considering physico-chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Piccard, Sarah; Zhou, Wen

    2015-11-01

    The "Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1" (ADM1) was modified in the study by improving the bio-chemical framework and integrating a more detailed physico-chemical framework. Inorganic carbon and nitrogen balance terms were introduced to resolve the discrepancies in the original bio-chemical framework between the carbon and nitrogen contents in the degraders and substrates. More inorganic components and solids precipitation processes were included in the physico-chemical framework of ADM1. The modified ADM1 was validated with the experimental data and used to investigate the effects of calcium ions, magnesium ions, inorganic phosphorus and inorganic nitrogen on anaerobic digestion in batch reactor. It was found that the entire anaerobic digestion process might exist an optimal initial concentration of inorganic nitrogen for methane gas production in the presence of calcium ions, magnesium ions and inorganic phosphorus.

  12. A chemically reactive spinning dope for significant improvements in wet spun carbon nanotube fibres.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Jose M; Neri, Wilfrid; Maugey, Maryse; Poulin, Philippe; Ansón-Casaos, Alejandro; Martínez, M Teresa

    2013-05-11

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be spun in a polyvinyl alcohol stream to produce nanocomposite fibres. We use a facile ester linking between both elements to create improved fibres which exhibit outstanding enhancements in the absence of post-processing stages, providing a promising alternative based on a chemical method. PMID:23471091

  13. The Use of the Software MATLAB To Improve Chemical Engineering Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damatto, T.; Maegava, L. M.; Filho, R. Maciel

    In all the Brazilian Universities involved with the project "Prodenge-Reenge", the main objective is to improve teaching and learning procedures for the engineering disciplines. The Chemical Engineering College of Campinas State University focused its effort on the use of engineering softwares. The work developed by this project has allowed all…

  14. Rethinking the history of artists' pigments through chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Berrie, Barbara H

    2012-01-01

    Following a brief overview of the history of analysis of artists' pigments, I discuss the illustrative example of lead-tin yellow. Recent advances in our knowledge of artists' use of red lakes, glassy pigments, and metallic pigments in works of cultural heritage, particularly European paintings, as determined from chemical analyses are described. PMID:22708904

  15. Rethinking the History of Artists' Pigments Through Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrie, Barbara H.

    2012-07-01

    Following a brief overview of the history of analysis of artists' pigments, I discuss the illustrative example of lead-tin yellow. Recent advances in our knowledge of artists' use of red lakes, glassy pigments, and metallic pigments in works of cultural heritage, particularly European paintings, as determined from chemical analyses are described.

  16. Methods of chemical analysis used to characterize battery materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K. J.; Streets, W. E.

    1980-05-01

    Procedures are given for the chemical analysis of a variety of materials of interest in battery development and research. These materials include LiCl-KCl eutectic, Li-Al alloys, lithium sulfide, lithium aluminum chloride, calcium sulfide, titanium sulfide, and various sulfides of iron, nickel, copper, and cobalt. 8 tables.

  17. Methods of chemical analysis used to characterize battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. J.; Streets, W. E.

    1980-05-01

    Procedures are given for the chemical analysis of a variety of materials of interest in battery development and research. These materials include LiCl-KCl eutectic, Li-Al alloys, lithium sulfide, lithium aluminum chloride, calcium sulfide, titanium sulfide and various sulfides of iron, nickel, copper, and cobalt.

  18. Global analysis of large-scale chemical and biological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Root, David E; Kelley, Brian P

    2005-01-01

    Research in the life sciences is increasingly dominated by high-throughput data collection methods that benefit from a global approach to data analysis. Recent innovations that facilitate such comprehensive analyses are highlighted. Several developments enable the study of the relationships between newly derived experimental information, such as biological activity in chemical screens or gene expression studies, and prior information, such as physical descriptors for small molecules or functional annotation for genes. The way in which global analyses can be applied to both chemical screens and transcription profiling experiments using a set of common machine learning tools is discussed. PMID:12058610

  19. Component pattern analysis of chemicals using multispectral THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yuki

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a novel basic technology for terahertz (THz) imaging, which allows detection and identification of chemicals by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the chemicals were obtained from terahertz multispectral transillumination images, using absorption spectra previously measured with a widely tunable THz-wave parametric oscillator. Further we have applied this technique to the detection and identification of illicit drugs concealed in envelopes. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  20. Near-field Optical Imagigng and Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, La Rosa

    1998-03-01

    Identification of molecular structures in complex mixtures represents a major challenge in chemical research today. Microfabricated devices or lab-on-a-chip that perform chemical analysis allows dynamic sampling of picoliter microenvironments and separation. The long-term goals of nanochemistry down to the femtoliter scale involve refinement of the detection limit to single-molecule. Our approach consists in designing a very sensitive near-field optical microscope (NSOM-SIAM) to explore the mesoscopic properties of organic compounds. The validity, sensitivity and unique spatial resolution of this system will be discussed for multiple analyte chemosensing.

  1. Improved detection and false alarm rejection for chemical vapors using passive hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, William J.; Miyashiro, Rex; Gittins, Christopher M.; Konno, Daisei; Chang, Shing; Farr, Matt; Perkins, Brad

    2013-05-01

    Two AIRIS sensors were tested at Dugway Proving Grounds against chemical agent vapor simulants. The primary objectives of the test were to: 1) assess performance of algorithm improvements designed to reduce false alarm rates with a special emphasis on solar effects, and 3) evaluate performance in target detection at 5 km. The tests included 66 total releases comprising alternating 120 kg glacial acetic acid (GAA) and 60 kg triethyl phosphate (TEP) events. The AIRIS sensors had common algorithms, detection thresholds, and sensor parameters. The sensors used the target set defined for the Joint Service Lightweight Chemical Agent Detector (JSLSCAD) with TEP substituted for GA and GAA substituted for VX. They were exercised at two sites located at either 3 km or 5 km from the release point. Data from the tests will be presented showing that: 1) excellent detection capability was obtained at both ranges with significantly shorter alarm times at 5 km, 2) inter-sensor comparison revealed very comparable performance, 3) false alarm rates < 1 incident per 10 hours running time over 143 hours of sensor operations were achieved, 4) algorithm improvements eliminated both solar and cloud false alarms. The algorithms enabling the improved false alarm rejection will be discussed. The sensor technology has recently been extended to address the problem of detection of liquid and solid chemical agents and toxic industrial chemical on surfaces. The phenomenology and applicability of passive infrared hyperspectral imaging to this problem will be discussed and demonstrated.

  2. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  3. An Inverse Analysis Approach to the Characterization of Chemical Transport in Paints

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Matthew P.; Stevenson, Shawn M.; Pearl, Thomas P.; Mantooth, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX. PMID:25226346

  4. An inverse analysis approach to the characterization of chemical transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Stevenson, Shawn M; Pearl, Thomas P; Mantooth, Brent A

    2014-08-29

    The ability to directly characterize chemical transport and interactions that occur within a material (i.e., subsurface dynamics) is a vital component in understanding contaminant mass transport and the ability to decontaminate materials. If a material is contaminated, over time, the transport of highly toxic chemicals (such as chemical warfare agent species) out of the material can result in vapor exposure or transfer to the skin, which can result in percutaneous exposure to personnel who interact with the material. Due to the high toxicity of chemical warfare agents, the release of trace chemical quantities is of significant concern. Mapping subsurface concentration distribution and transport characteristics of absorbed agents enables exposure hazards to be assessed in untested conditions. Furthermore, these tools can be used to characterize subsurface reaction dynamics to ultimately design improved decontaminants or decontamination procedures. To achieve this goal, an inverse analysis mass transport modeling approach was developed that utilizes time-resolved mass spectroscopy measurements of vapor emission from contaminated paint coatings as the input parameter for calculation of subsurface concentration profiles. Details are provided on sample preparation, including contaminant and material handling, the application of mass spectrometry for the measurement of emitted contaminant vapor, and the implementation of inverse analysis using a physics-based diffusion model to determine transport properties of live chemical warfare agents including distilled mustard (HD) and the nerve agent VX.

  5. Improving ruminal degradability and energetic values of bamboo shoot shell using chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liping; Ren, Liping; Zhou, Zhenming; Meng, Qingxiang; Huo, Yunlong; Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated effects of different treatments on nutritive value of bamboo shoot shell (BSS). Five treatments were sun-drying (control), ammoniation (5%/dry matter (DM) urea), Ca(OH)2 (4%/DM calcium hydroxide), NaOH (4%/DM sodium hydroxide), and AHP (4%/DM sodium hydroxide plus 1%/DM hydrogen peroxide). The results showed that chemical composition of BSS was greatly changed by chemicals (P < 0.01) except acid-detergent lignin. All chemical treatments significantly reduced neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content except AHP (P < 0.01), and obviously increased acid detergent fiber (ADF) content (P < 0.01) except ammoniation. The predicted organic matter digestibility, metabolizable energy and net energy for lactation of BSS were greatly increased by chemical treatments (P < 0.01), the highest for ammoniation, followed by Ca(OH)2 , NaOH and AHP. Ammoniation had higher (P = 0.03) ammonia-N concentration than the other four treatments. There were significant differences among all treatments on total volatile fatty acids (P = 0.03), propionate (P = 0.01), butyrate concentration (P < 0.01) and C2 /C3 ratio (P = 0.02). Chemical treatments greatly improved effective degradability (ED) of DM (P < 0.01) and ED of NDF (P = 0.06) and ADF (P = 0.07) numerically. Ammoniation got a higher ED of crude protein than control. In conclusion, all chemical treatments greatly improved nutritive value of BSS with highest value obtained from ammoniation, followed by strong alkalization, alkaline hydrogen peroxide and modest alkalization. PMID:26953064

  6. Improving ruminal degradability and energetic values of bamboo shoot shell using chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liping; Ren, Liping; Zhou, Zhenming; Meng, Qingxiang; Huo, Yunlong; Wang, Fei

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated effects of different treatments on nutritive value of bamboo shoot shell (BSS). Five treatments were sun-drying (control), ammoniation (5%/dry matter (DM) urea), Ca(OH)2 (4%/DM calcium hydroxide), NaOH (4%/DM sodium hydroxide), and AHP (4%/DM sodium hydroxide plus 1%/DM hydrogen peroxide). The results showed that chemical composition of BSS was greatly changed by chemicals (P < 0.01) except acid-detergent lignin. All chemical treatments significantly reduced neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content except AHP (P < 0.01), and obviously increased acid detergent fiber (ADF) content (P < 0.01) except ammoniation. The predicted organic matter digestibility, metabolizable energy and net energy for lactation of BSS were greatly increased by chemical treatments (P < 0.01), the highest for ammoniation, followed by Ca(OH)2 , NaOH and AHP. Ammoniation had higher (P = 0.03) ammonia-N concentration than the other four treatments. There were significant differences among all treatments on total volatile fatty acids (P = 0.03), propionate (P = 0.01), butyrate concentration (P < 0.01) and C2 /C3 ratio (P = 0.02). Chemical treatments greatly improved effective degradability (ED) of DM (P < 0.01) and ED of NDF (P = 0.06) and ADF (P = 0.07) numerically. Ammoniation got a higher ED of crude protein than control. In conclusion, all chemical treatments greatly improved nutritive value of BSS with highest value obtained from ammoniation, followed by strong alkalization, alkaline hydrogen peroxide and modest alkalization.

  7. Chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics: an optical near-field study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zebo; Wang, Weiliang; Ma, Teng; Deng, Zexiang; Ke, Yanlin; Zhan, Runze; Zou, Qionghui; Ren, Wencai; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Huanjun; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-10-01

    One of the most fascinating and important merits of graphene plasmonics is their tunability over a wide range. While chemical doping has proven to be a facile and effective way to create graphene plasmons, most of the previous studies focused on the macroscopic behaviors of the plasmons in chemically-doped graphene and little was known about their nanoscale responses and related mechanisms. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first experimental near-field optical study on chemically-doped graphene with improved surface plasmon characteristics. By using a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM), we managed to show that the graphene plasmons can be tuned and improved using a facile chemical doping method. Specifically, the plasmon interference patterns near the edge of the monolayer graphene were substantially enhanced via nitric acid (HNO3) exposure. The plasmon-related characteristics can be deduced by analyzing such plasmonic fringes, which exhibited a longer plasmon wavelength and reduced plasmon damping rate. In addition, the local carrier density and therefore the Fermi energy level (EF) of graphene can be obtained from the plasmonic nano-imaging, which indicated that the enhanced plasmon oscillation originated from the injection of free holes into graphene by HNO3. These findings were further corroborated by theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT). We believe that our findings provide a clear nanoscale picture on improving graphene plasmonics by chemical doping, which will be helpful for optimizing graphene plasmonics and for elucidating the mechanisms of two-dimensional light confinement by atomically thick materials.

  8. Exploring Chemical Analysis, 1st Edition (by Daniel C. Harris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.

    1998-01-01

    W. H. Freeman: New York, 1997. ISBN: 0716730421. $80.00. Daniel Harris's book Quantitative Chemical Analysis is one of the 1000-pound gorillas for introductory analytical chemistry, both because of its dominance in the field and its size and information content. Students find the writing informal, interesting, and clear. Faculty like the completeness of the book and its sound treatment of the subject matter. It contains everything that an introductory analytical course could possibly want. Daniel Harris's recent book, Exploring Chemical Analysis, is a tamed version of the 1000-pound gorilla for nonchemistry majors. Students will find the same informality, interest, and clarity as in the earlier text but they will also find the book a comfortable companion. Faculty will find an abbreviated but excellent treatment of the subject matter. It contains most of the things that an introductory nonmajors analytical course should want.

  9. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis in environmental research

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetzle, D.; Lewtas, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of short-term bioassay tests in conjunction with analytical measurements, constitute a powerful tool for identifying important environmental contaminants. The authors have coined the terminology bioassay directed chemical analysis to best describe this marriage of analytical chemistry and biology. The objective of this methodology is to identify key compounds in various types of air-pollutant samples. Once that task is completed, studies on metabolism, sources, environmental exposure and atmospheric chemistry can be undertaken. The principles and methodologies for bioassay directed chemical analysis are presented and illustrated in this paper. Most of this work has been directed toward the characterization of ambient air and diesel particulates, which are used as examples in this report to illustrate the analytical logic used for identifying the bio-active components of complex mixtures.

  10. Chemically glycosylation improves the stability of an amperometric horseradish peroxidase biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cancel, Griselle; Suazo-Dávila, Damaris; Medina-Guzmán, Johnsue; Rosado-González, María; Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M.; Griebenow, Kai

    2014-01-01

    We constructed a biosensor by electrodeposition of gold nano-particles (AuNPs) on glassy carbon (GC) and subsequent formation of a 4-mercaptobenzoic acid self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was then covalently immobilized onto the SAM. Two forms of HRP were employed: non-modified and chemically glycosylated with lactose. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that chemical glycosylation did neither change the tertiary structure of HRP nor the heme environment. The highest sensitivity of the biosensor to hydroquinone was obtained for the biosensor with HRP-lactose 1 (414 nA μM−1 ) compared to 378 nA μM−1 for the one employing non-modified HRP. The chemically glycosylated form of the enzyme catalyzed the reduction of hydroquinone more rapidly than the native form of the enzyme. The sensor employing lactose-modified HRP also had a lower limit of detection (74 μM) than the HRP biosensor (83 μM). However, most importantly, chemically glycosylation improved the long-term stability of the biosensor, which retained 60% of its activity over a four-month storage period compared to only 10% for HRP. These results highlight improvements by an innovative stabilization method when compared to previously reported enzyme-based biosensors. PMID:25479876

  11. Device for high spatial resolution chemical analysis of a sample and method of high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-06

    A system and method for analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The system can include at least one pin; a sampling device configured to contact a liquid with a specimen on the at least one pin to form a testing solution; and a stepper mechanism configured to move the at least one pin and the sampling device relative to one another. The system can also include an analytical instrument for determining a chemical composition of the specimen from the testing solution. In particular, the systems and methods described herein enable chemical analysis of specimens, such as tissue, to be evaluated in a manner that the spatial-resolution is limited by the size of the pins used to obtain tissue samples, not the size of the sampling device used to solubilize the samples coupled to the pins.

  12. PCS Nitrogen: Combustion Fan System Optimization Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program case study describes how, in 2003, PCS Nitrogen, Inc., improved the efficiency of the combustion fan on a boiler at the company's chemical fertilizer plant in Augusta, Georgia. The project saved $420,000 and 76,400 million British thermal units (MBtu) per year. In addition, maintenance needs declined, because there is now less stress on the fan motor and bearings and less boiler feed water usage. This project was so successful that the company has implemented more efficiency improvements that should result in energy cost savings of nearly $1 million per year.

  13. An Improved Chemical Resistance and Mechanical Durability of Hydrophobic FDTS Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrin, B.; Zhang, T.; Grimes, M. T.; Chong, K.; Wanebo, M.; Chinn, J.; Nowak, R.

    2006-04-01

    Chemical and mechanical stability of FDTS (perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane) hydrophobic coatings was improved by using an oxide adhesion layer followed by an in-situ vapour deposition of the FDTS self-aligned monolayer. The use of silicon oxide base layer improves stability of the FDTS film and degradation of its hydrophobic properties resulting from a continuous immersion in water and other liquids. We ascribe the improved stability of the FDTS films grown on oxide to high density and uniformity of the surface hydroxyl groups required for FDTS attachment and the resulting high quality of the FDTS monolayer. This approach shows film property improvement over traditional substrates such as silicon and aluminium but may also be particularly useful in biochemistry and micro fluidics when films are deposited on substrates with lower density of the surface hydroxyl groups.

  14. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  15. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P

    2003-02-17

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  16. Electrochemical approaches for chemical and biological analysis on Mars.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P

    2003-02-17

    Obtaining in situ chemical data from planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa can present significant challenges. The one analytical technique that has many of the requisite characteristics to meet such a challenge is electroanalysis. Described here are three electroanalytical devices designed for in situ geochemical and biological analysis on Mars. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) was built and flight qualified for the now cancelled NASA Mars 2001 Lander. Part of MECA consisted of four "cells" containing arrays of electrochemical based sensors for measuring the ionic species in soil samples. A next-generation MECA, the Robotic Chemical Analysis Laboratory (RCAL), uses a carousel-type system to allow for greater customization of analytical procedures. A second instrument, proposed as part of the 2007 CryoScout mission, consists of a flow-through inorganic chemical analyzer (MICA). CryoScout is a torpedo-like device designed for subsurface investigation of the stratigraphic climate record embedded in Mars' north polar cap. As the CryoScout melts its way through the ice cap, MICA will collect and analyze the meltwater for a variety of inorganics and chemical parameters. By analyzing the chemistry locked in the layers of dust, salt, and ice, geologists will be able to determine the recent history of climate, water, and atmosphere on Mars and link it to the past. Finally, electroanalysis shows its abilities in the detection of possible microorganism on Mars or elsewhere in the solar system. To identify an unknown microorganism, one that may not even use Earth-type biochemistry, requires a detection scheme which makes minimal assumptions and looks for the most general features. Recent work has demonstrated that the use of an array of electrochemical sensors which monitors the changes in a solution via electrical conductivity, pH, and ion selective electrodes, can be used to detect minute chemical perturbations caused by the growth of bacteria and

  17. Analysis of the stochastic excitability in the flow chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirtseva, Irina

    2015-11-30

    A dynamic model of the thermochemical process in the flow reactor is considered. We study an influence of the random disturbances on the stationary regime of this model. A phenomenon of noise-induced excitability is demonstrated. For the analysis of this phenomenon, a constructive technique based on the stochastic sensitivity functions and confidence domains is applied. It is shown how elaborated technique can be used for the probabilistic analysis of the generation of mixed-mode stochastic oscillations in the flow chemical reactor.

  18. Application of Surface Chemical Analysis Tools for Characterization of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Baer, DR; Gaspar, DJ; Nachimuthu, P; Techane, SD; Castner, DG

    2010-01-01

    The important role that surface chemical analysis methods can and should play in the characterization of nanoparticles is described. The types of information that can be obtained from analysis of nanoparticles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS); low energy ion scattering (LEIS); and scanning probe microscopy (SPM), including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), are briefly summarized. Examples describing the characterization of engineered nanoparticles are provided. Specific analysis considerations and issues associated with using surface analysis methods for the characterization of nanoparticles are discussed and summarized, along with the impact that shape instability, environmentally induced changes, deliberate and accidental coating, etc., have on nanoparticle properties. PMID:20052578

  19. Chemical analysis of Panax quinquefolius (North American ginseng): A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Brinckmann, Josef A; Jiang, Xue; Huang, Linfang

    2015-12-24

    Panax quinquefolius (PQ) is one of the best-selling natural health products due to its proposed beneficial anti-aging, anti-cancer, anti-stress, anti-fatigue, and anxiolytic effects. In recent years, the quality of PQ has received considerable attention. Sensitive and accurate methods for qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical constituents are necessary for the comprehensive quality control to ensure the safety and efficacy of PQ. This article reviews recent progress in the chemical analysis of PQ and its preparations. Numerous analytical techniques, including spectroscopy, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), high-speed centrifugal partition chromatography (HSCPC), high-performance counter-current chromatography (HPCCC), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and immunoassay, are described. Among these techniques, HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is the most promising method for quality control. The challenges encountered in the chemical analysis of PQ are also briefly discussed, and the remaining questions regarding the quality control of PQ that require further investigation are highlighted.

  20. Proximate analysis, backwards stepwise regression between gross calorific value, ultimate and chemical analysis of wood.

    PubMed

    Telmo, C; Lousada, J; Moreira, N

    2010-06-01

    The gross calorific value (GCV), proximate, ultimate and chemical analysis of debark wood in Portugal were studied, for future utilization in wood pellets industry and the results compared with CEN/TS 14961. The relationship between GCV, ultimate and chemical analysis were determined by multiple regression stepwise backward. The treatment between hardwoods-softwoods did not result in significant statistical differences for proximate, ultimate and chemical analysis. Significant statistical differences were found in carbon for National (hardwoods-softwoods) and (National-tropical) hardwoods in volatile matter, fixed carbon, carbon and oxygen and also for chemical analysis in National (hardwoods-softwoods) for F and (National-tropical) hardwoods for Br. GCV was highly positively related to C (0.79 * * *) and negatively to O (-0.71 * * *). The final independent variables of the model were (C, O, S, Zn, Ni, Br) with R(2)=0.86; F=27.68 * * *. The hydrogen did not contribute statistically to the energy content.

  1. LSENS - GENERAL CHEMICAL KINETICS AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    LSENS has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase, chemical kinetics problems. The motivation for the development of this program is the continuing interest in developing detailed chemical reaction mechanisms for complex reactions such as the combustion of fuels and pollutant formation and destruction. A reaction mechanism is the set of all elementary chemical reactions that are required to describe the process of interest. Mathematical descriptions of chemical kinetics problems constitute sets of coupled, nonlinear, first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The number of ODEs can be very large because of the numerous chemical species involved in the reaction mechanism. Further complicating the situation are the many simultaneous reactions needed to describe the chemical kinetics of practical fuels. For example, the mechanism describing the oxidation of the simplest hydrocarbon fuel, methane, involves over 25 species participating in nearly 100 elementary reaction steps. Validating a chemical reaction mechanism requires repetitive solutions of the governing ODEs for a variety of reaction conditions. Analytical solutions to the systems of ODEs describing chemistry are not possible, except for the simplest cases, which are of little or no practical value. Consequently, there is a need for fast and reliable numerical solution techniques for chemical kinetics problems. In addition to solving the ODEs describing chemical kinetics, it is often necessary to know what effects variations in either initial condition values or chemical reaction mechanism parameters have on the solution. Such a need arises in the development of reaction mechanisms from experimental data. The rate coefficients are often not known with great precision and in general, the experimental data are not sufficiently detailed to accurately estimate the rate coefficient parameters. The development of a reaction mechanism is facilitated by a systematic sensitivity analysis

  2. Improvement of enalapril maleate chemical stability by high shear melting granulation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula Montandon; Cunha, Talita Amorim; Serpa, Raphael Caixeta; Taveira, Stephânia Fleury; Lima, Eliana Martins; Almeida Diniz, Danielle Guimarães; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro; Marreto, Ricardo Neves

    2014-09-18

    Abstract Enalapril maleate is a widely used drug, which is chemically unstable when mixed with excipients resulting in enalaprilat and diketopiperazine as the main degradation products. The preparation of enalapril sodium salt has been used to improve drug stability in solid dosage forms; however, product rejection is observed when the chemical reaction for obtaining the sodium salt is not completely finished before packaging. In this study, granules were prepared by melting granulation using stearic acid or glyceryl monostearate, with a view to developing more stable enalapril maleate solid dosage forms. The granules were prepared in a laboratory-scale high shear mixer and compressed in a rotary machine. Size distribution, flow properties, in vitro drug release and enalapril maleate chemical stability were evaluated and compared with data obtained from tablets prepared without hydrophobic binders. All formulations showed good physical properties and immediate drug release. The greatest improvement in the enalapril maleate stability was observed in formulations containing stearic acid. This study showed that hot melting granulation could be successfully used to prepare enalapril maleate granules which could substitute the in situ formation of enalapril sodium salt, since they provided better enalapril stability in solid dosage forms. PMID:25231642

  3. Improving dry carbon nanotube actuators by chemical modifications, material hybridization, and proper engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biso, Maurizio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide

    2013-04-01

    Low voltage, dry electrochemical actuators can be prepared by using a gel made of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquid.1 Their performance can be significantly improved by combining physical and chemical modifications with a proper engineering. We demonstrated that multi walled carbon nanotubes can be effectively used for actuators preparation;2 we achieved interesting performance improvements by chemically cross linking carbon nanotubes using both aromatic and aliphatic diamines;3 we introduced a novel hybrid material, made by in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole on carbon nanotubes, that further boosts actuation by taking advantage of the peculiar properties of both materials in terms of maximum strain and conductivity;4 we investigated the influence of actuator thickness showing that the generated strain at high frequency is strongly enhanced when thickness is reduced. To overcome limitations set by bimorphs, we designed a novel actuator in which a metal spring, embedded in the solid electrolyte of a bimorph device, is used as a non-actuating counter plate resulting in a three electrode device capable of both linear and bending motion. Finally, we propose a way to model actuators performance in terms of purely material-dependent parameters instead of geometry-dependent ones.5

  4. ISS Expeditions 16 & 17: Chemical Analysis Results for Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Schultz, John R.

    2009-01-01

    During the twelve month span of Expeditions 16 and 17 beginning October of 2007, the chemical quality of the potable water onboard the International Space Station (ISS) was verified safe for crew consumption through the return and chemical analysis of water samples by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory (WAFAL) at Johnson Space Center (JSC). Reclaimed cabin humidity condensate and Russian ground-supplied water were the principle sources of potable water and for the first time, European groundsupplied water was also available. Although water was transferred from Shuttle to ISS during Expeditions 16 and 17, no Shuttle potable water was consumed during this timeframe. A total of 12 potable water samples were collected using U.S. hardware during Expeditions 16 and 17 and returned on Shuttle flights 1E (STS122), 1JA (STS123), and 1J (STS124). The average sample volume was sufficient for complete chemical characterization to be performed. The results of JSC chemical analyses of these potable water samples are presented in this paper. The WAFAL also received potable water samples for analysis from the Russian side collected inflight with Russian hardware, as well as preflight samples of Rodnik potable water delivered to ISS on Russian Progress vehicles 28 to 30. Analytical results for these additional potable water samples are also reported and discussed herein. Although the potable water supplies available during Expeditions 16 and 17 were judged safe for crew consumption, a recent trending of elevated silver levels in the SVOZV water is a concern for longterm consumption and efforts are being made to lower these levels.

  5. New crosslinkers for electrospun chitosan fibre mats. I. Chemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Austero, Marjorie S.; Donius, Amalie E.; Wegst, Ulrike G. K.; Schauer, Caroline L.

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan (CS), the deacetylated form of chitin, the second most abundant, natural polysaccharide, is attractive for applications in the biomedical field because of its biocompatibility and resorption rates, which are higher than chitin. Crosslinking improves chemical and mechanical stability of CS. Here, we report the successful utilization of a new set of crosslinkers for electrospun CS. Genipin, hexamethylene-1,6-diaminocarboxysulphonate (HDACS) and epichlorohydrin (ECH) have not been previously explored for crosslinking of electrospun CS. In this first part of a two-part publication, we report the morphology, determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and chemical interactions, determined by Fourier transform infrared microscopy, respectively. FESEM revealed that CS could successfully be electrospun from trifluoroacetic acid with genipin, HDACS and ECH added to the solution. Diameters were 267 ± 199 nm, 644 ± 359 nm and 896 ± 435 nm for CS–genipin, CS–HDACS and CS–ECH, respectively. Short- (15 min) and long-term (72 h) dissolution tests (T600) were performed in acidic, neutral and basic pHs (3, 7 and 12). Post-spinning activation by heat and base to enhance crosslinking of CS–HDACS and CS–ECH decreased the fibre diameters and improved the stability. In the second part of this publication, we report the mechanical properties of the fibres. PMID:22628209

  6. Conformational Sampling by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations Improves NMR Chemical Shift Predictions.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2013-08-13

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations were performed for N-methyl acetamide as a small test system for amide groups in protein backbones, and NMR chemical shifts were calculated based on the generated ensemble. If conformational sampling and explicit solvent molecules are taken into account, excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental chemical shifts is obtained. These results represent a landmark improvement over calculations based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations especially for amide protons, which are predicted too high-field shifted based on the latter ensembles. We were able to show that the better results are caused by the solute-solvents interactions forming shorter hydrogen bonds as well as by the internal degrees of freedom of the solute. Inspired by these results, we propose our approach as a new tool for the validation of force fields due to its power of identifying the structural reasons for discrepancies between the experimental and calculated data. PMID:26584127

  7. Chemical modification approaches for improved performance of Na-ion battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byles, Bryan; Clites, Mallory; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina

    2015-08-01

    Na-ion batteries have received considerable attention in recent years but still face performance challenges such as limited cycle lifetime and low capacities at high current rates. In this work, we propose novel combinations of preand post-synthesis treatments to modify known Na-ion battery electrode materials to achieve enhanced electrochemical performance. We work with two model metal oxide materials to demonstrate the effectiveness of the different treatments. First, wet chemical preintercalation is combined with post-synthesis aging, hydrothermal treatment, and annealing of α-V2O5, resulting in enhanced capacity retention in a Na-ion battery system. The hydrothermal treatment resulted in an increased specific capacity of nearly 300 mAh/g. Second, post-synthesis acid leaching is performed on α- MnO2, also resulting in improved electrochemical capacity. The chemical, structural, and morphological changes brought about by the modifications are fully characterized.

  8. Chemical chaperone TUDCA prevents apoptosis and improves survival during polymicrobial sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Doerflinger, Marcel; Glab, Jason; Nedeva, Christina; Jose, Irvin; Lin, Ann; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Allison, Cody; Pellegrini, Marc; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis-induced lymphopenia is a major cause of morbidities in intensive care units and in populations with chronic conditions such as renal failure, diabetes, HIV and alcohol abuse. Currently, other than supportive care and antibiotics, there are no treatments for this condition. We developed an in vitro assay to understand the role of the ER-stress-mediated apoptosis process in lymphocyte death during polymicrobial sepsis, which was reproducible in in vivo mouse models. Modulating ER stress using chemical chaperones significantly reduced the induction of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim both in vitro and in mice. Furthermore, in a ‘two-hit’ pneumonia model in mice, we have been able to demonstrate that administration of the chemical chaperone TUDCA helped to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis by significantly reducing lymphocyte apoptosis and this correlated with four-fold improvement in survival. Our results demonstrate a novel therapeutic opportunity for treating sepsis-induced lymphopenia in humans. PMID:27694827

  9. Tooth matrix analysis for biomonitoring of organic chemical exposure: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro-odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps: (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers

  10. Tooth Matrix Analysis for Biomonitoring of Organic Chemical Exposure: Current Status, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Andra, Syam S.; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers to

  11. QUALITY ASSURANCE GUIDELINES FOR LABORATORIES PERFORMING FORENSIC ANALYSIS OF CHEMICAL TERRORISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Scientific Working Group on Forensic Analysis of Chemical Terrorism (SWGFACT) has developed the following quality assurance guidelines to provide laboratories engaged in forensic analysis of chemical evidence associated with terrorism a framework to implement a quality assura...

  12. Combined physical and chemical immobilization of glucose oxidase in alginate microspheres improves stability of encapsulation and activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiguang; Srivastava, Rohit; Brown, J Quincy; McShane, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Chemical sensors utilizing immobilized enzymes and proteins are important for monitoring chemical processes and biological systems. In this study, calcium-cross-linked alginate hydrogel microspheres were fabricated as enzyme carriers by an emulsification technique. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was encapsulated in alginate microspheres using three different methods: physical entrapment (emulsion), chemical conjugation (conjugation), and a combination of physical entrapment and chemical conjugation (emulsion-conjugation). Nano-organized coatings were applied on alginate/GOx microspheres using the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique in order to stabilize the hydrogel/enzyme system under biological environment. The encapsulation of GOx and formation of nanofilm coating on alginate microspheres were verified with FTIR spectral analysis, zeta-potential analysis, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. To compare both the immobilization properties of enzyme encapsulation techniques and the influence of nanofilms with uncoated microspheres, the relationship between enzyme loading, release, and effective GOx activity (enzyme activity per unit protein loading) were studied over a period of four weeks. The results produced four key findings: (1) the emulsion-conjugation technique improved the stability of GOx in alginate microspheres compared to the emulsion technique, reducing the GOx leaching from microsphere from 50% to 17%; (2) the polyelectrolyte nanofilm coatings increased the GOx stability over time, but also reduced the effective GOx activity; (3) the effective GOx activity for the emulsion-conjugation technique (about 3.5 x 10(-)(5) AU microg(-)(1) s(-)(1)) was higher than that for other methods, and did not change significantly over four weeks; and (4) the GOx concentration, when compared after one week for microspheres with three bilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) ({PAH/PSS}) coating, was highest for the emulsion

  13. Chemical phase analysis of seed mediated synthesized anisotropic silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Amardeep; Singh, Suman; Singla, M. L.; Goyal, Navdeep

    2015-08-01

    Noble-metal nanoparticles are of great interest because of its broad applications almost in every stream (i.e. biology, chemistry and engineering) due to their unique size/shape dependant properties. In this paper, chemical phase of seed mediated synthesized anisotropic silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) has been investigated via fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These nanaoparticles were synthesized by seed-growth method controlled by urea and dextrose results to highly stable 12-20 nm particle size revealed by zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  14. Chemical phase analysis of seed mediated synthesized anisotropic silver nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bharti, Amardeep Goyal, Navdeep; Singh, Suman; Singla, M. L.

    2015-08-28

    Noble-metal nanoparticles are of great interest because of its broad applications almost in every stream (i.e. biology, chemistry and engineering) due to their unique size/shape dependant properties. In this paper, chemical phase of seed mediated synthesized anisotropic silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) has been investigated via fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These nanaoparticles were synthesized by seed-growth method controlled by urea and dextrose results to highly stable 12-20 nm particle size revealed by zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  15. Crystal-Chemical Analysis of Soil at Rocknest, Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Achilles, C. N.; Rampe, E. B.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Sarrazin, P. C.; DesMarais, D. J.; Morookian, J. M.; Anderson, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity performed X-ray diffraction analysis on Martian soil [1] at Rocknest in Gale Crater. In particular, crystalline phases from scoop 5 were identified and analyzed with the Rietveld method [2]. Refined unit-cell parameters are reported in Table 1. Comparing these unit-cell parameters with those in the literature provides an estimate of the chemical composition of the crystalline phases. For instance, Fig. 1 shows the Mg-content of Fa-Fo olivine as a function of the b unit-cell parameter using literature data. Our refined b parameter is indicated by the black triangle.

  16. Interlaboratory comparison of chemical analysis of uranium mononitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, E. J.; Davis, W. F.; Halloran, J. T.; Graab, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical methods were established in which the critical variables were controlled, with the result that acceptable interlaboratory agreement was demonstrated for the chemical analysis of uranium mononitride. This was accomplished by using equipment readily available to laboratories performing metallurgical analyses. Agreement among three laboratories was shown to be very good for uranium and nitrogen. Interlaboratory precision of + or - 0.04 percent was achieved for both of these elements. Oxygen was determined to + or - 15 parts per million (ppm) at the 170-ppm level. The carbon determination gave an interlaboratory precision of + or - 46 ppm at the 320-ppm level.

  17. Structural cluster analysis of chemical reactions in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Grégoire A.; Pietrucci, Fabio

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a simple and general approach to the problem of clustering structures from atomic trajectories of chemical reactions in solution. By considering distance metrics which are invariant under permutation of identical atoms or molecules, we demonstrate that it is possible to automatically resolve as distinct structural clusters the configurations corresponding to reactants, products, and transition states, even in presence of atom-exchanges and of hundreds of solvent molecules. Our approach strongly simplifies the analysis of large trajectories and it opens the way to the construction of kinetic network models of activated processes in solution employing the available efficient schemes developed for proteins conformational ensembles.

  18. Chemical Analysis of NOx Removal Under Different Reduced Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, A.; Lemerini, M.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a chemical kinetic analysis of different species involved in nitrogen-oxygen mixed gas induced by stationary corona discharge at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This study takes into account twenty different chemical species participating in one hundred and seventy selected chemical reactions. The reaction rate coefficients are taken from the literature, and the density is analyzed by the continuity equation without the diffusion term. A large number of investigations considered the removal of NOx showing the effects of N, O and O3 radicals. The aim of the present simulation is to complete these studies by analysing various plasma species under different reduced electric fields in the range of 100-200 Td (1 Td=10-21 V·m2). In particular, we analyze the time evolution of depopulation (10-9-10-3 s) of NOx. We have found that the depopulation rate of NO and NO2 is substantially affected by the rise of reduced electric field as it grows from 100 Td to 200 Td. This allows us to ascertain the important role played by the reduced electric field.

  19. Fixation and chemical analysis of single fog and rain droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, M.; Akashi, S.; Ma, C.-J.; Tohno, S.

    Last decade, the importance of global environmental problems has been recognized worldwide. Acid rain is one of the most important global environmental problems as well as the global warming. The grasp of physical and chemical properties of fog and rain droplets is essential to make clear the physical and chemical processes of acid rain and also their effects on forests, materials and ecosystems. We examined the physical and chemical properties of single fog and raindrops by applying fixation technique. The sampling method and treatment procedure to fix the liquid droplets as a solid particle were investigated. Small liquid particles like fog droplet could be easily fixed within few minutes by exposure to cyanoacrylate vapor. The large liquid particles like raindrops were also fixed successively, but some of them were not perfect. Freezing method was applied to fix the large raindrops. Frozen liquid particles existed stably by exposure to cyanoacrylate vapor after freezing. The particle size measurement and the elemental analysis of the fixed particle were performed in individual base using microscope, and SEX-EDX, particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and micro-PIXE analyses, respectively. The concentration in raindrops was dependent upon the droplet size and the elapsed time from the beginning of rainfall.

  20. SINFAC - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL FLUIDS ANALYSIS CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Systems Improved Numerical Fluids Analysis Code, SINFAC, consists of additional routines added to the April 1983 revision of SINDA, a general thermal analyzer program. The purpose of the additional routines is to allow for the modeling of active heat transfer loops. The modeler can simulate the steady-state and pseudo-transient operations of 16 different heat transfer loop components including radiators, evaporators, condensers, mechanical pumps, reservoirs and many types of valves and fittings. In addition, the program contains a property analysis routine that can be used to compute the thermodynamic properties of 20 different refrigerants. SINFAC can simulate the response to transient boundary conditions. SINFAC was first developed as a method for computing the steady-state performance of two phase systems. It was then modified using CNFRWD, SINDA's explicit time-integration scheme, to accommodate transient thermal models. However, SINFAC cannot simulate pressure drops due to time-dependent fluid acceleration, transient boil-out, or transient fill-up, except in the accumulator. SINFAC also requires the user to be familiar with SINDA. The solution procedure used by SINFAC is similar to that which an engineer would use to solve a system manually. The solution to a system requires the determination of all of the outlet conditions of each component such as the flow rate, pressure, and enthalpy. To obtain these values, the user first estimates the inlet conditions to the first component of the system, then computes the outlet conditions from the data supplied by the manufacturer of the first component. The user then estimates the temperature at the outlet of the third component and computes the corresponding flow resistance of the second component. With the flow resistance of the second component, the user computes the conditions down stream, namely the inlet conditions of the third. The computations follow for the rest of the system, back to the first component

  1. Sampling and physico-chemical analysis of precipitation: a review.

    PubMed

    Krupa, Sagar V

    2002-01-01

    as Hg and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). Similarly, methods now exist for source-receptor studies, using for example, the characterization of reduced elemental states and/or the use of stable isotopes in precipitation as tracers. Future studies on the relationship between atmospheric deposition and environmental impacts must exploit these advances. This review provides a comprehensive and comparative treatment of the state of the art sampling methods of precipitation and its physico-chemical analysis.

  2. Improvement of uniformity in chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide by using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin-Won; Kim, Jun-Woo; Choi, Kyoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC) on carbon has been widely used as a general method to suppress dust generation on carbon surfaces. For a CH3SiCl3 (MTS) and hydrogen system, computational fluid dynamic simulations to predict the growth rate of the silicon carbide are performed. The results of the simulations are consistent with the experimental results where the deposition rate depends highly on the H/Si composition and the specimen's location. This simulation can provide guidance in optimizing the CVD process and improving the apparatus for CVD of SiC.

  3. Chemical analysis of human blood for assessment of environmental exposure to semivolatile organochlorine chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Bristol, D W; Crist, H L; Lewis, R G; MacLeod, K E; Sovocool, G W

    1982-01-01

    A chemical method for the quantitative analysis of organochlorine pesticide residues present in human blood was scaled-up to provide increased sensitivity and extended to include organochlorine industrial chemicals. Whole blood samples were extracted with hexane, concentrated, and analyzed without further cleanup by gas chromatography with electron capture detection. The methodology used was validated by conducting recovery studies at 1 and 10 ng/g (ppb) levels. Screening and confirmational analyses were performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry on samples collected from potentially exposed residents of the Love Canal area of Niagara Falls, New York and from volunteers in the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina for 25 specific semivolatile organochlorine contaminants including chlorobenzene and chlorotoluene congeners, hexachloro-1,3-butadiene, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls as Aroclor 1260. Dichlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, and beta-hexachlorocyclohexane residues fell in the range of 0.1 to 26 ppb in a high percentage of both the field and volunteer blood samples analyzed. Levels of other organochlorine compounds were either non-detectable or present in sub-ppb ranges. PMID:6819409

  4. THz-Raman: accessing molecular structure with Raman spectroscopy for enhanced chemical identification, analysis, and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyler, Randy A.; Carriere, James T. A.; Havermeyer, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Structural analysis via spectroscopic measurement of rotational and vibrational modes is of increasing interest for many applications, since these spectra can reveal unique and important structural and behavioral information about a wide range of materials. However these modes correspond to very low frequency (~5cm-1 - 200cm-1, or 150 GHz-6 THz) emissions, which have been traditionally difficult and/or expensive to access through conventional Raman and Terahertz spectroscopy techniques. We report on a new, inexpensive, and highly efficient approach to gathering ultra-low-frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra (referred to as "THz-Raman") on a broad range of materials, opening potential new applications and analytical tools for chemical and trace detection, identification, and forensics analysis. Results are presented on explosives, pharmaceuticals, and common elements that show strong THz-Raman spectra, leading to clear discrimination of polymorphs, and improved sensitivity and reliability for chemical identification.

  5. Improving Public Perception of Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, David H

    2016-05-01

    The potential impact of behavior analysis is limited by the public's dim awareness of the field. The mass media rarely cover behavior analysis, other than to echo inaccurate negative stereotypes about control and punishment. The media instead play up appealing but less-evidence-based approaches to problems, a key example being the touting of dubious diets over behavioral approaches to losing excess weight. These sorts of claims distort or skirt scientific evidence, undercutting the fidelity of behavior analysis to scientific rigor. Strategies for better connecting behavior analysis with the public might include reframing the field's techniques and principles in friendlier, more resonant form; pushing direct outcome comparisons between behavior analysis and its rivals in simple terms; and playing up the "warm and fuzzy" side of behavior analysis. PMID:27606184

  6. Microbiological and Chemical Analysis of Land Snails Commercialised in Sicily

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Antonello; Giangrosso, Giuseppe; Cammilleri, Gaetano; Macaluso, Andrea; Currò, Vittoria; Galuppo, Lucia; Vargetto, Daniela; Vicari, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    In this study 160 samples of snails belonging to the species Helix aspersa maxima and Helix aspersa muller were examined for chemical and microbiological analysis. Samples came from Greece and Poland. Results showed mean concentration of cadmium (0.35±0.036 mg/kg) and lead (0.05±0.013 mg/kg) much higher than the limit of detection. Mercury levels in both species were not detected. Microbiological analysis revealed the absence of Salmonella spp. and Clostridium spp. in both examined species. E. coli and K. oxytoca were observed in Helix aspersa maxima and Helix aspersa muller. Furthermore, one case of fungi positivity in samples of Helix aspersa muller was found. The reported investigations highlight the need to create and adopt a reference legislation to protect the health of consumers. PMID:27800385

  7. A modular approach for automated sample preparation and chemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Michael L.; Turner, Terry D.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Pacetti, Randolph

    1994-01-01

    Changes in international relations, especially within the past several years, have dramatically affected the programmatic thrusts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE now is addressing the environmental cleanup required as a result of 50 years of nuclear arms research and production. One major obstacle in the remediation of these areas is the chemical determination of potentially contaminated material using currently acceptable practices. Process bottlenecks and exposure to hazardous conditions pose problems for the DOE. One proposed solution is the application of modular automated chemistry using Standard Laboratory Modules (SLM) to perform Standard Analysis Methods (SAM). The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) Program has developed standards and prototype equipment that will accelerate the development of modular chemistry technology and is transferring this technology to private industry.

  8. Development of automated imaging and analysis for zebrafish chemical screens.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Andreas; Codore, Hiba; Day, Billy W.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Tsang, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of image-based high-content screening (HCS) methodology to identify small molecules that can modulate the FGF/RAS/MAPK pathway in zebrafish embryos. The zebrafish embryo is an ideal system for in vivo high-content chemical screens. The 1-day old embryo is approximately 1mm in diameter and can be easily arrayed into 96-well plates, a standard format for high throughput screening. During the first day of development, embryos are transparent with most of the major organs present, thus enabling visualization of tissue formation during embryogenesis. The complete automation of zebrafish chemical screens is still a challenge, however, particularly in the development of automated image acquisition and analysis. We previously generated a transgenic reporter line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of FGF activity and demonstrated their utility in chemical screens 1. To establish methodology for high throughput whole organism screens, we developed a system for automated imaging and analysis of zebrafish embryos at 24-48 hours post fertilization (hpf) in 96-well plates 2. In this video we highlight the procedures for arraying transgenic embryos into multiwell plates at 24hpf and the addition of a small molecule (BCI) that hyperactivates FGF signaling 3. The plates are incubated for 6 hours followed by the addition of tricaine to anesthetize larvae prior to automated imaging on a Molecular Devices ImageXpress Ultra laser scanning confocal HCS reader. Images are processed by Definiens Developer software using a Cognition Network Technology algorithm that we developed to detect and quantify expression of GFP in the heads of transgenic embryos. In this example we highlight the ability of the algorithm to measure dose-dependent effects of BCI on GFP reporter gene expression in treated embryos. PMID:20613708

  9. Improved solution methods for an inverse problem related to a population balance model in chemical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Andreas; Krebs, Jochen

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a population balance equation, originating from applications in chemical engineering, is considered and novel solution techniques for a related inverse problem are presented. This problem consists in the determination of the breakage rate and the daughter drop distribution of an evolving drop size distribution from time-dependent measurements under the assumption of self-similarity. We analyze two established solution methods for this ill-posed problem and improve the two procedures by adapting suitable data fitting and inversion algorithms to the specific situation. In addition, we introduce a novel technique that, compared to the former, does not require certain a priori information. The improved stability properties of the resulting algorithms are substantiated with numerical examples.

  10. Improved actuation strain of PDMS-based DEA materials chemically modified with softening agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Miriam; Blümke, Martin; Wegener, Michael; Krüger, Hartmut

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are smart materials that gained much in interest particularly in recent years. One active field of research is the improvement of their properties by modification of their structural framework. The object of this work is to improve the actuation properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based DEAs by covalent incorporation of mono-vinyl-terminated low-molecular PDMS chains into the PDMS network. These low-molecular units act as a kind of softener within the PDMS network. The loose chain ends interfere with the network formation and lower the network's density. PDMS films with up to 50wt% of low-molecular PDMS additives were manufactured and the chemical, mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical properties of these novel materials were investigated.

  11. Ecological food web analysis for chemical risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Damian V; Pastorok, Robert A

    2008-12-01

    Food web analysis can be a critical component of ecological risk assessment, yet it has received relatively little attention among risk assessors. Food web data are currently used in modeling bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals and, to a limited extent, in the determination of the ecological significance of risks. Achieving more realism in ecological risk assessments requires new analysis tools and models that incorporate accurate information on key receptors in a food web paradigm. Application of food web analysis in risk assessments demands consideration of: 1) different kinds of food webs; 2) definition of trophic guilds; 3) variation in food webs with habitat, space, and time; and 4) issues for basic sampling design and collection of dietary data. The different kinds of food webs include connectance webs, materials flow webs, and functional (or interaction) webs. These three kinds of webs play different roles throughout various phases of an ecological risk assessment, but risk assessors have failed to distinguish among web types. When modeling food webs, choices must be made regarding the level of complexity for the web, assignment of species to trophic guilds, selection of representative species for guilds, use of average diets, the characterization of variation among individuals or guild members within a web, and the spatial and temporal scales/dynamics of webs. Integrating exposure and effects data in ecological models for risk assessment of toxic chemicals relies on coupling food web analysis with bioaccumulation models (e.g., Gobas-type models for fish and their food webs), wildlife exposure models, dose-response models, and population dynamics models. PMID:18703218

  12. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology.

  13. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of brookite titanium dioxide nanorods by surface modification using chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Menendez-Flores, Victor M.; Murakami, Naoya; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2012-05-01

    Surface morphology of brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods was modified by chemical etching with aqueous hydrogen (H2O2)-ammonia (NH3) or sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solution. The brookite nanorods after chemical etching were characterized by TEM, SAED, FE-SEM, XRD and specific surface area measurements. Brookite nanorods after chemical etching with H2O2-NH3 solution exposed new crystal faces in the tips, and nanorods with sharper tips were observed. On the other hand, etching with H2SO4 at 200 °C induced morphological changes in the tip faces and broadened the angle between tip faces as a result of dissolution along the [0 0 1] direction, though brookite nanorods were only slightly etched after etching with H2SO4 at room temperature. Photocatalytic activity of brookite nanorods was tested by toluene decomposition in gas phase under ultraviolet irradiation. Brookite nanorods etched with H2O2-NH3 solution showed higher photocatalytic activity than that of brookite nanorods before etching. In the case of H2SO4 etching at 200 °C, brookite nanorods after etching exhibited lower photocatalytic activity. One reason for this may be that the formation of newly exposed crystal faces by H2O2-NH3 etching improved separation of redox sites due to their strong oxidation ability.

  14. An improved chemically inducible gene switch that functions in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane.

    PubMed

    Kinkema, Mark; Geijskes, R Jason; Shand, Kylie; Coleman, Heather D; De Lucca, Paulo C; Palupe, Anthony; Harrison, Mark D; Jepson, Ian; Dale, James L; Sainz, Manuel B

    2014-03-01

    Chemically inducible gene switches can provide precise control over gene expression, enabling more specific analyses of gene function and expanding the plant biotechnology toolkit beyond traditional constitutive expression systems. The alc gene expression system is one of the most promising chemically inducible gene switches in plants because of its potential in both fundamental research and commercial biotechnology applications. However, there are no published reports demonstrating that this versatile gene switch is functional in transgenic monocotyledonous plants, which include some of the most important agricultural crops. We found that the original alc gene switch was ineffective in the monocotyledonous plant sugar cane, and describe a modified alc system that is functional in this globally significant crop. A promoter consisting of tandem copies of the ethanol receptor inverted repeat binding site, in combination with a minimal promoter sequence, was sufficient to give enhanced sensitivity and significantly higher levels of ethanol inducible gene expression. A longer CaMV 35S minimal promoter than was used in the original alc gene switch also substantially improved ethanol inducibility. Treating the roots with ethanol effectively induced the modified alc system in sugar cane leaves and stem, while an aerial spray was relatively ineffective. The extension of this chemically inducible gene expression system to sugar cane opens the door to new opportunities for basic research and crop biotechnology. PMID:24142380

  15. An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer by fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin; Chang, Jiaxing; Shao, Youlin; Liu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle has been successful in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), but an improved design is required for future development. In this paper, the coating layers are reconsidered, and an improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer is proposed. Three methods of preparing the porous SiC layer, called high methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentration method, high Ar concentration method and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) method, are experimentally studied. It is indicated that porous SiC layer can be successfully prepared and the density of SiC layer can be adjusted by tuning the preparation parameters. Microstructure and characterization of the improved TRISO coated particle are given based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. It can be found that the improved TRISO coated particle with porous SiC layer can be mass produced successfully. The formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer are also discussed based on the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition principle.

  16. Eugenol improves physical and chemical stabilities of nanoemulsions loaded with β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongguang; Wu, Jine; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-03-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are potential vehicles of labile lipophilic compounds such as β-carotene, but much work is needed to improve physical and chemical stabilities. The objective of this work was to study impacts of eugenol on physical and chemical stabilities of β-carotene-loaded nanoemulsions prepared with whey protein and lecithin. The combination of whey protein and lecithin resulted in stable nanoemulsions with eugenol added at 10% mass of soybean oil. Nanoemulsions, especially with eugenol, drastically reduced the degradation of β-carotene during ambient storage, heating at 60 and 80°C, and UV radiation at 254, 302, and 365nm. The droplet diameter of the nanoemulsion without eugenol increased from 153.6 to 227.3nm after 30-day ambient storage, contrasting with no significant changes of nanoemulsions with eugenol. Heating or UV radiation up to 8h did not significantly change the droplet diameter. Therefore, eugenol can be used to improve the stability of nanoemulsion delivery systems. PMID:26471619

  17. Eugenol improves physical and chemical stabilities of nanoemulsions loaded with β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongguang; Wu, Jine; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-03-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are potential vehicles of labile lipophilic compounds such as β-carotene, but much work is needed to improve physical and chemical stabilities. The objective of this work was to study impacts of eugenol on physical and chemical stabilities of β-carotene-loaded nanoemulsions prepared with whey protein and lecithin. The combination of whey protein and lecithin resulted in stable nanoemulsions with eugenol added at 10% mass of soybean oil. Nanoemulsions, especially with eugenol, drastically reduced the degradation of β-carotene during ambient storage, heating at 60 and 80°C, and UV radiation at 254, 302, and 365nm. The droplet diameter of the nanoemulsion without eugenol increased from 153.6 to 227.3nm after 30-day ambient storage, contrasting with no significant changes of nanoemulsions with eugenol. Heating or UV radiation up to 8h did not significantly change the droplet diameter. Therefore, eugenol can be used to improve the stability of nanoemulsion delivery systems.

  18. Combined Micro-chemical and Micro-structural Analysis of New Minerals Representing Extreme Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Tschauner, O. D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent improvements in micro-chemical analysis in combination with novel tools for micrometer-scale structural analysis of minerals from synchrotron X-ray diffraction open a pathway towards studies of mineral paragenesis that were previously not or barely accessible. Often mineral assemblies that represent extreme conditions also pose extreme challenges to analysis: very small size scale, complex matrix, minor amounts of material. Examples of such extreme, but also quite relevant environments are: a) High pressure shock-metamorphic minerals in meteorites and terrestrial impact sites, b) inclusions in diamonds from the deep mantle, c) ultrarefractory phases in Ca-Al-inlcusions from the solar nebula, d) presolar condensates. We show how a combination of synchrotron-based structural and semi-quantitative chemical techniques, with electron-microscopy based high-resolution imaging and fully quantitative chemical analysis and qualitative structural identification establish a powerful tool for discovery and characterization of important and interesting new minerals on micron- to submicron size scale.

  19. Comprehensive Analysis Competence and Innovative Approaches for Sustainable Chemical Production.

    PubMed

    Appel, Joerg; Colombo, Corrado; Dätwyler, Urs; Chen, Yun; Kerimoglu, Nimet

    2016-01-01

    Humanity currently sees itself facing enormous economic, ecological, and social challenges. Sustainable products and production in specialty chemistry are an important strategic element to address these megatrends. In addition to that, digitalization and global connectivity will create new opportunities for the industry. One aspect is examined in this paper, which shows the development of comprehensive analysis of production networks for a more sustainable production in which the need for innovative solutions arises. Examples from data analysis, advanced process control and automated performance monitoring are shown. These efforts have significant impact on improved yields, reduced energy and water consumption, and better product performance in the application of the products.

  20. Comprehensive Analysis Competence and Innovative Approaches for Sustainable Chemical Production.

    PubMed

    Appel, Joerg; Colombo, Corrado; Dätwyler, Urs; Chen, Yun; Kerimoglu, Nimet

    2016-01-01

    Humanity currently sees itself facing enormous economic, ecological, and social challenges. Sustainable products and production in specialty chemistry are an important strategic element to address these megatrends. In addition to that, digitalization and global connectivity will create new opportunities for the industry. One aspect is examined in this paper, which shows the development of comprehensive analysis of production networks for a more sustainable production in which the need for innovative solutions arises. Examples from data analysis, advanced process control and automated performance monitoring are shown. These efforts have significant impact on improved yields, reduced energy and water consumption, and better product performance in the application of the products. PMID:27646543

  1. Crystal-Chemical Analysis Martian Minerals in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Achilles, C. N..; Rampe, E. B.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Farmer, J. D.; DesMarais, D. J.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Stolper, E. M.; Morookian, J. M.; Wilson, M. A.; Spanovich, N.; Anderson, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity performed X-ray diffraction analyses on scooped soil at Rocknest and on drilled rock fines at Yellowknife Bay (John Klein and Cumberland samples), The Kimberley (Windjana sample), and Pahrump (Confidence Hills sample) in Gale crater, Mars. Samples were analyzed with the Rietveld method to determine the unit-cell parameters and abundance of each observed crystalline phase. Unit-cell parameters were used to estimate compositions of the major crystalline phases using crystal-chemical techniques. These phases include olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene minerals. Comparison of the CheMin sample unit-cell parameters with those in the literature provides an estimate of the chemical compositions of the major crystalline phases. Preliminary unit-cell parameters, abundances and compositions of crystalline phases found in Rocknest and Yellowknife Bay samples were reported in. Further instrument calibration, development of 2D-to- 1D pattern conversion corrections, and refinement of corrected data allows presentation of improved compositions for the above samples.

  2. Chemical Abundance Analysis of the Symbiotic Red Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Cezary; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of symbiotic stars - the long period, interacting binary systems - composed of red giant donor and a hot, compact companion is important for our understanding of binary stellar evolution in systems where mass loss or transfer take place involving RGB/AGB stars. The elemental abundances of symbiotic giants can track the mass exchange history and can determine their parent stellar population. However, the number of these objects with fairly well determined photospheric composition is insufficient for statistical considerations. Here we present the detailed chemical abundance analysis obtained for the first time for 14 M-type symbiotic giants. The analysis is based on the high resolution (R ˜ 50000), high S/N ˜ 100, near-IR spectra (at H- and K-band regions) obtained with Phoenix/Gemini South spectrometer. Spectrum synthesis employing standard LTE analysis and atmosphere models was used to obtain photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Sc, Ti, Fe, and Ni). Our analysis reveals mostly slightly sub-solar or near-solar metallicities. We obtained significantly subsolar metallicities for RW Hya, RT Ser, and Hen 3-1213 and slightly super-solar metallicity in V455 Sco. The very low ^{12}C/^{13}C isotopic ratios, ˜6-11, and significant enrichment in nitrogen ^{14}N isotope in almost all giants in our sample indicate that they have experienced the first dredge-up.

  3. Summer 2012 Testing and Analysis of the Chemical Mixture Methodology -- Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, Clifford S.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Coggin, Rebekah L.; Ponder, Lashaundra A.; Booth, Alexander E.; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Horn, Sarah M.; Yao, Juan

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the key findings made by the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) project team during the first stage of their summer 2012 testing and analysis of the CMM. The study focused on answering the following questions: o What is the percentage of the chemicals in the CMM Rev 27 database associated with each Health Code Number (HCN)? How does this result influence the relative importance of acute HCNs and chronic HCNs in the CMM data set? o What is the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? Which Modes of Action and Target Organ Effects tend to be important in determining the HCN-based Hazard Index (HI) for a chemical mixture? o What are some of the potential issues associated with the current HCN-based approach? What are the opportunities for improving the performance and/or technical defensibility of the HCN-based approach? How would those improvements increase the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? o What is the Target Organ System Effect approach and how can it be used to improve upon the current HCN-based approach? How does the benefits users would derive from using the Target Organ System Approach compare to the benefits available from the current HCN-based approach?

  4. Physical and Chemical Analytical Analysis: A key component of Bioforensics

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2005-02-15

    The anthrax letters event of 2001 has raised our awareness of the potential importance of non-biological measurements on samples of biological agents used in a terrorism incident. Such measurements include a variety of mass spectral, spectroscopic, and other instrumental techniques that are part of the current armamentarium of the modern materials analysis or analytical chemistry laboratory. They can provide morphological, trace element, isotopic, and other molecular ''fingerprints'' of the agent that may be key pieces of evidence, supplementing that obtained from genetic analysis or other biological properties. The generation and interpretation of such data represents a new domain of forensic science, closely aligned with other areas of ''microbial forensics''. This paper describes some major elements of the R&D agenda that will define this sub-field in the immediate future and provide the foundations for a coherent national capability. Data from chemical and physical analysis of BW materials can be useful to an investigation of a bio-terror event in two ways. First, it can be used to compare evidence samples collected at different locations where such incidents have occurred (e.g. between the powders in the New York and Washington letters in the Amerithrax investigation) or between the attack samples and those seized during the investigation of sites where it is suspected the material was manufactured (if such samples exist). Matching of sample properties can help establish the relatedness of disparate incidents, and mis-matches might exclude certain scenarios, or signify a more complex etiology of the events under investigation. Chemical and morphological analysis for sample matching has a long history in forensics, and is likely to be acceptable in principle in court, assuming that match criteria are well defined and derived from known limits of precision of the measurement techniques in question. Thus, apart from certain operational issues (such as how to

  5. Enhancing the Benefit of the Chemical Mixture Methodology: A Report on Methodology Testing and Potential Approaches for Improving Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Glantz, Clifford S.; Booth, Alexander E.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive testing shows that the current version of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is meeting its intended mission to provide conservative estimates of the health effects from exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. However, the current version of the CMM could benefit from several enhancements that are designed to improve its application of Health Code Numbers (HCNs) and employ weighting factors to reduce over conservatism.

  6. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Anders S. E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  7. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anders S.; Elstner, Marcus; Cui, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets. PMID:26328834

  8. Improving subjective pattern recognition in chemical senses through reduction of nonlinear effects in evaluation of sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Amir H.; Rasouli, Firooz; Wrenn, Susan E.; Subbiah, M.

    2002-11-01

    Artificial neural network models are typically useful in pattern recognition and extraction of important features in large data sets. These models are implemented in a wide variety of contexts and with diverse type of input-output data. The underlying mathematics of supervised training of neural networks is ultimately tied to the ability to approximate the nonlinearities that are inherent in network"s generalization ability. The quality and availability of sufficient data points for training and validation play a key role in the generalization ability of the network. A potential domain of applications of neural networks is in analysis of subjective data, such as in consumer science, affective neuroscience and perception of chemical senses. In applications of ANN to subjective data, it is common to rely on knowledge of the science and context for data acquisition, for instance as a priori probabilities in the Bayesian framework. In this paper, we discuss the circumstances that create challenges for success of neural network models for subjective data analysis, such as sparseness of data and cost of acquisition of additional samples. In particular, in the case of affect and perception of chemical senses, we suggest that inherent ambiguity of subjective responses could be offset by a combination of human-machine expert. We propose a method of pre- and post-processing for blind analysis of data that that relies on heuristics from human performance in interpretation of data. In particular, we offer an information-theoretic smoothing (ITS) algorithm that optimizes that geometric visualization of multi-dimensional data and improves human interpretation of the input-output view of neural network implementations. The pre- and post-processing algorithms and ITS are unsupervised. Finally, we discuss the details of an example of blind data analysis from actual taste-smell subjective data, and demonstrate the usefulness of PCA in reduction of dimensionality, as well as ITS.

  9. Improving solubility and chemical stability of natural compounds for medicinal use by incorporation into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Maria; Isacchi, Benedetta; van Bloois, Louis; Torano, Javier Sastre; Ket, Aldo; Wu, Xiaojie; Broere, Femke; Metselaar, Josbert M; Rijcken, Cristianne J F; Storm, Gert; Bilia, Rita; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2011-09-20

    Natural bioactive compounds have been studied for a long time for their chemopreventive and therapeutic potential in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. However, their physicochemical properties generally result in poor chemical stability and lack of in vivo bioavailability. Very few human clinical trials have addressed absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of these compounds in relation to efficacy. This limits the use of these valuable natural compounds in the clinic. In this study, we examined caffeic acid (derivatives), carvacrol (derivatives), thymol, pterostilbene (derivatives), and N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. These are natural compounds with strong anti-inflammatory properties derived from plants and bacteria. However, these compounds have poor water solubility or are chemically unstable. To overcome these limitations we have prepared liposomal formulations. Our results show that lipophilic 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and stilbene derivatives can be loaded into liposomal lipid bilayer with efficiencies of 50-70%. Thereby, the liposomes solubilize these compounds, allowing intravenous administration without use of solvents. When compounds could not be loaded into the lipid bilayer (carvacrol and thymol) or are rapidly extracted from the liposomes in the presence of serum albumin (3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and pterostilbene derivatives), derivatization of the compound into a water-soluble prodrug was shown to improve loading efficiency and encapsulation stability. The phosphate forms of carvacrol and pterostilbene were loaded into the aqueous interior of the liposomes and encapsulation was unaffected by the presence of serum albumin. Chemical instability of resveratrol was improved by liposome-encapsulation, preventing inactivating cis-trans isomerization. For caffeic acid, liposomal encapsulation did not prevent oxidation into a variety of products. Still, by derivatization into a phenyl ester, the

  10. Development of Chemical Analysis Training Programs for Fisheries Technicians Utilizing an Interactive Microcomputer Videotape System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, James M.

    A project was conducted to develop a series of interactive microcomputer-controlled videotape training programs in chemical analysis of water quality for the fisheries technician program at Peninsula College (Washington). Improved color video equipment was obtained during the year for development of the training films. Interactive instruction and…

  11. Planning, Conducting, and Documenting Data Analysis for Program Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Abby; Taylor, Cornelia; Derrington, Taletha; Lucas, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 document was developed to help technical assistance (TA) providers and state staff define and limit the scope of data analysis for program improvement efforts, including the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP); develop a plan for data analysis; document alternative hypotheses and additional analyses as they are generated; and…

  12. Complete chemical analysis of aerosol particles in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mo; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.A.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Real-time mass spectrometry of individual aerosol particles using an ion trap mass spectrometer is described. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation ionization at the center of the ion trap. The produced ions are analyzed by the ion trap mass spectrometer. Ions of interest are selected and dissociated through collision with buffer gas atoms for further fragmentation analysis. Real-time chemical analyses of inorganic, organic, and bacterial aerosol articles have been demonstrated. It has been confirmed that the velocity and the size of the incoming particles highly correlate to each other. The performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are discussed.

  13. Optical instrumentation for on-line analysis of chemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, A. Jr.; Cremers, D.A.; Loree, T.R.; Quigley, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Optical diagnostics provide the capability for nonintrusive, on-line, real time analysis of chemical process streams. Several laser-based methods for monitoring fossil energy processes have been evaluated. Among the instrumentation techniques which appear quite promising are coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence (SDLIF). A CARS diagnostic was implemented on a coal gasifier and was successfully employed to measure species concentrations and temperatures within the process stream. The LIBS approach has been used to identify total trace impurities (e.g., Na, K, and S) within a gasifier. Recently, individual components in mixtures of aromatics hydrocarbons have been resolved via the synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence. 9 figures.

  14. Advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of chuanxiong.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixia; Tang, Yuping; Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    Chuanxiong Rhizoma (Chuan-Xiong, CX), the dried rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. (Umbelliferae), is one of the most popular plant medicines in the World. Modern research indicates that organic acids, phthalides, alkaloids, polysaccharides, ceramides and cerebrosides are main components responsible for the bioactivities and properties of CX. Because of its complex constituents, multidisciplinary techniques are needed to validate the analytical methods that support CX's use worldwide. In the past two decades, rapid development of technology has advanced many aspects of CX research. The aim of this review is to illustrate the recent advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of CX, and to highlight new applications and challenges. Emphasis is placed on recent trends and emerging techniques. PMID:22955453

  15. 3rd annual symposium of chemical and pharmaceutical structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Naidong; Zheng, Jenny; Lee, Mike

    2012-08-01

    The 3rd Annual Symposium on Chemical and Pharmaceutical Structure Analysis was once again held in Shanghai, where a rich history of 'East meets West' continued. This meeting is dedicated to bringing together scientists from pharmaceutical companies, academic institutes, CROs and instrument vendors to discuss current challenges and opportunities on the forefront of pharmaceutical research and development. The diversified symposia and roundtables are highly interactive events where scientists share their experiences and visions in a collegial setting. The symposium highlighted speakers and sessions that provided first-hand experiences as well as the latest guidance and industrial/regulatory thinking, which was reflected by the theme of this year's meeting 'From Bench to Decision Making - from Basics to Application.' In addition to the highly successful Young Scientist Excellence Award, new events were featured at this year's meeting, such as the Executive Roundtable and the inaugural Innovator Award.

  16. Computational analysis of RNA structures with chemical probing data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-06-01

    RNAs play various roles, not only as the genetic codes to synthesize proteins, but also as the direct participants of biological functions determined by their underlying high-order structures. Although many computational methods have been proposed for analyzing RNA structures, their accuracy and efficiency are limited, especially when applied to the large RNAs and the genome-wide data sets. Recently, advances in parallel sequencing and high-throughput chemical probing technologies have prompted the development of numerous new algorithms, which can incorporate the auxiliary structural information obtained from those experiments. Their potential has been revealed by the secondary structure prediction of ribosomal RNAs and the genome-wide ncRNA function annotation. In this review, the existing probing-directed computational methods for RNA secondary and tertiary structure analysis are discussed.

  17. Improving analytical methods for protein-protein interaction through implementation of chemically inducible dimerization.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Tonni Grube; Nintemann, Sebastian J; Marek, Magdalena; Halkier, Barbara A; Schulz, Alexander; Burow, Meike

    2016-01-01

    When investigating interactions between two proteins with complementary reporter tags in yeast two-hybrid or split GFP assays, it remains troublesome to discriminate true- from false-negative results and challenging to compare the level of interaction across experiments. This leads to decreased sensitivity and renders analysis of weak or transient interactions difficult to perform. In this work, we describe the development of reporters that can be chemically induced to dimerize independently of the investigated interactions and thus alleviate these issues. We incorporated our reporters into the widely used split ubiquitin-, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC)- and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)- based methods and investigated different protein-protein interactions in yeast and plants. We demonstrate the functionality of this concept by the analysis of weakly interacting proteins from specialized metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results illustrate that chemically induced dimerization can function as a built-in control for split-based systems that is easily implemented and allows for direct evaluation of functionality. PMID:27282591

  18. Improving analytical methods for protein-protein interaction through implementation of chemically inducible dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Tonni Grube; Nintemann, Sebastian J.; Marek, Magdalena; Halkier, Barbara A.; Schulz, Alexander; Burow, Meike

    2016-01-01

    When investigating interactions between two proteins with complementary reporter tags in yeast two-hybrid or split GFP assays, it remains troublesome to discriminate true- from false-negative results and challenging to compare the level of interaction across experiments. This leads to decreased sensitivity and renders analysis of weak or transient interactions difficult to perform. In this work, we describe the development of reporters that can be chemically induced to dimerize independently of the investigated interactions and thus alleviate these issues. We incorporated our reporters into the widely used split ubiquitin-, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC)- and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)- based methods and investigated different protein-protein interactions in yeast and plants. We demonstrate the functionality of this concept by the analysis of weakly interacting proteins from specialized metabolism in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results illustrate that chemically induced dimerization can function as a built-in control for split-based systems that is easily implemented and allows for direct evaluation of functionality. PMID:27282591

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod, K. S.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The 13C and 1H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of cinnamic acid using quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vinod, K S; Periandy, S; Govindarajan, M

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, FT-IR, FT-Raman, (13)C NMR and (1)H NMR spectra for cinnamic acid have been recorded for the vibrational and spectroscopic analysis. The observed fundamental frequencies (IR and Raman) were assigned according to their distinctiveness region. The computed frequencies and optimized parameters have been calculated by using HF and DFT (B3LYP) methods and the corresponding results are tabulated. On the basis of the comparison between computed and experimental results assignments of the fundamental vibrational modes are examined. A study on the electronic and optical properties; absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment and frontier molecular orbital energies, were performed by HF and DFT methods. The alternation of the vibration pattern of the pedestal molecule related to the substitutions was analyzed. The (13)C and (1)H NMR spectra have been recorded and the chemical shifts have been calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Mulliken charges, UV spectral analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis of have been calculated and reported. The molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was constructed.

  1. Chemically amplified photoresist characterization using interdigitated electrodes: an improved method for determining the Dill C parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Cody M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2004-05-01

    We have recently developed a technique that utilizes capacitance data from resist coated interdigitated electrodes to measure the kinetic rate constant of photoacid generation (commonly referred to as the Dill C parameter) for photoacid generators in chemically amplified resists. The work presented in this paper focuses on a recently improved version of the IDE Dill C measurement technique. The original version of the technique required coating several IDEs with resist films containing different loadings of photoacid generator and then using the capacitance data from these IDEs to calculate linear mixing relationships between IDE capacitance and the content of PAG or photoproducts within the resist film. The improved version of the technique reported here totally eliminates the need for this "calibration process" through the use of normalized capacitance data. Elimination of the need to measure linear mixing relationships independently for each PAG and polymer combination gives the improved technique many advantages over the prior version. These include improved curve fitting and accuracy of Dill C calculations; fewer raw materials, IDEs, and experimental time; and most importantly, the potential to measure the Dill C for a resist from a single IDE with no prior knowledge of the resist"s photoacid generator type or loading. A detailed derivation of the normalization scheme is presented in this paper, along with evidence of the dramatic improvement in model curve fit that can be achieved using this technique. In addition, Dill C parameters measured for five different photoacid generators with both the original and normalized version of the IDE technique are presented to demonstrate that both techniques measure the same Dill C parameter and hence are describing the same physical phenomena.

  2. Chemical analysis of Ginkgo biloba leaves and extracts.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Teris A

    2002-08-16

    The chemical analysis and quality control of Ginkgo leaves and extracts is reviewed. Important constituents present in the medicinally used leaves are the terpene trilactones, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, C, J and bilobalide, many flavonol glycosides, biflavones, proanthocyanidins, alkylphenols, simple phenolic acids, 6-hydroxykynurenic acid, 4-O-methylpyridoxine and polyprenols. In the commercially important Ginkgo extracts some of these compound classes are no longer present. Many publications deal with the analysis of the unique terpene trilactones. They can be extracted with aqueous acetone or aqueous methanol but also supercritical fluid extraction is possible. Still somewhat problematic is their sample clean-up. Various procedures, not all of them validated, employing partitioning or SPE have been proposed. Some further development in this area can be foreseen. Separation and detection can be routinely carried out by HPLC with RI, ELSD or MS, or with GC-FID after silylation. TLC is another possibility. No quantitative procedure for flavonol glycosides has been published so far due their difficult separation and commercial unavailability. Fingerprint analysis by gradient RP-HPLC is possible. After acidic hydrolysis to the aglycones quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin and separation by HPLC, quantitation is straightforward and yields by recalculation an estimation of the original total flavonol glycoside content. For biflavones, simple phenols, 6-hydroxykynurenic acid, 4-O-methylpyridoxine and polyprenols analytical procedures have been published but not all assays are yet ideal. Lately a there is a lot of interest in the analysis of the undesired alkylphenols and a few validated procedures have been published. The analysis of Ginkgo proanthocyanidins is still in its infancy and no reliable assays exist.

  3. Chemical analysis of Ginkgo biloba leaves and extracts.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Teris A

    2002-08-16

    The chemical analysis and quality control of Ginkgo leaves and extracts is reviewed. Important constituents present in the medicinally used leaves are the terpene trilactones, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, C, J and bilobalide, many flavonol glycosides, biflavones, proanthocyanidins, alkylphenols, simple phenolic acids, 6-hydroxykynurenic acid, 4-O-methylpyridoxine and polyprenols. In the commercially important Ginkgo extracts some of these compound classes are no longer present. Many publications deal with the analysis of the unique terpene trilactones. They can be extracted with aqueous acetone or aqueous methanol but also supercritical fluid extraction is possible. Still somewhat problematic is their sample clean-up. Various procedures, not all of them validated, employing partitioning or SPE have been proposed. Some further development in this area can be foreseen. Separation and detection can be routinely carried out by HPLC with RI, ELSD or MS, or with GC-FID after silylation. TLC is another possibility. No quantitative procedure for flavonol glycosides has been published so far due their difficult separation and commercial unavailability. Fingerprint analysis by gradient RP-HPLC is possible. After acidic hydrolysis to the aglycones quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin and separation by HPLC, quantitation is straightforward and yields by recalculation an estimation of the original total flavonol glycoside content. For biflavones, simple phenols, 6-hydroxykynurenic acid, 4-O-methylpyridoxine and polyprenols analytical procedures have been published but not all assays are yet ideal. Lately a there is a lot of interest in the analysis of the undesired alkylphenols and a few validated procedures have been published. The analysis of Ginkgo proanthocyanidins is still in its infancy and no reliable assays exist. PMID:12219929

  4. Comparison of Seven Chemical Pretreatments of Corn Straw for Improving Methane Yield by Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS −1 in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost. PMID:24695485

  5. Improving N(6)-methyladenosine site prediction with heuristic selection of nucleotide physical-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Sun, Jia-Wei; Liu, Zi; Ren, Ming-Wu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-09-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most common and abundant post-transcriptional RNA modifications found in viruses and most eukaryotes. m(6)A plays an essential role in many vital biological processes to regulate gene expression. Because of its widespread distribution across the genomes, the identification of m(6)A sites from RNA sequences is of significant importance for better understanding the regulatory mechanism of m(6)A. Although progress has been achieved in m(6)A site prediction, challenges remain. This article aims to further improve the performance of m(6)A site prediction by introducing a new heuristic nucleotide physical-chemical property selection (HPCS) algorithm. The proposed HPCS algorithm can effectively extract an optimized subset of nucleotide physical-chemical properties under the prescribed feature representation for encoding an RNA sequence into a feature vector. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed HPCS algorithm under different feature representations, including pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC), auto-covariance (AC), and cross-covariance (CC). Based on the proposed HPCS algorithm, we implemented an m(6)A site predictor, called M6A-HPCS, which is freely available at http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/M6A-HPCS. Experimental results over rigorous jackknife tests on benchmark datasets demonstrated that the proposed M6A-HPCS achieves higher success rates and outperforms existing state-of-the-art sequence-based m(6)A site predictors. PMID:27293216

  6. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired process

    DOEpatents

    Hawthorne, Steven B.; Miller, David J.; Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie; Hammond, Peter James; Clifford, Anthony Alan

    2002-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents, and degrading various compounds.

  7. Improvement of the immune efficacy of carbohydrate vaccines by chemical modification on the GM3 antigen.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiu-Jing; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Mingwei; Huo, Chang-Xin; Zhang, Ye; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2015-06-14

    Tumor cells often display aberrant levels and patterns of cell surface glycosylation, which provides a potential opportunity to develop carbohydrate-based anticancer vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. However, one of the most addressed challenges in this field is the low efficiency of the carbohydrate vaccination due to poor immunogenicity of carbohydrate antigens. In this article, a number of structure-modified GM3 antigen analogues were designed and chemically synthesized. The modified GM3 antigens were conjugated to protein carriers for vaccination. The vaccination results on mice show that the modification on the GM3 antigen could improve the efficiency of the vaccination, and in particular, two glycoconjugates (3-KLH and 8-KLH) elicited higher titers of anti-GM3 antibodies than the unmodified GM3-protein conjugate (2-KLH) did.

  8. Nanosoldering carbon nanotube junctions by local chemical vapor deposition for improved device performance.

    PubMed

    Do, Jae-Won; Estrada, David; Xie, Xu; Chang, Noel N; Mallek, Justin; Girolami, Gregory S; Rogers, John A; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    The performance of carbon nanotube network (CNN) devices is usually limited by the high resistance of individual nanotube junctions (NJs). We present a novel method to reduce this resistance through a nanoscale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. By passing current through the devices in the presence of a gaseous CVD precursor, localized nanoscale Joule heating induced at the NJs stimulates the selective and self-limiting deposition of metallic nanosolder. The effectiveness of this nanosoldering process depends on the work function of the deposited metal (here Pd or HfB2), and it can improve the on/off current ratio of a CNN device by nearly an order of magnitude. This nanosoldering technique could also be applied to other device types where nanoscale resistance components limit overall device performance. PMID:24215439

  9. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 6F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2010-02-02

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. In mechanical sludge removal, personnel add liquid (e.g., inhibited water or supernate salt solution) to the tank to form a slurry. They mix the liquid and sludge with pumps, and transfer the slurry to another tank for further processing. Mechanical sludge removal effectively removes the bulk of the sludge from a tank, but is not able to remove all of the sludge. In Tank 6F, SRR estimated a sludge heel of 5,984 gallons remained after mechanical sludge removal. To remove this sludge heel, SRR performed chemical cleaning. The chemical cleaning included two oxalic acid strikes, a spray wash, and a water wash. SRR conducted the first oxalic acid strike as follows. Personnel added 110,830 gallons of 8 wt % oxalic acid to Tank 6F and mixed the contents of Tank 6F with two submersible mixer pumps (SMPs) for approximately four days. Following the mixing, they transferred 115,903 gallons of Tank 6F material to Tank 7F. The SMPs were operating when the transfer started and were shut down approximately five hours after the transfer started. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. Mapping of the tank following the transfer indicated that 2,400 gallons of solids remained in the tank. SRR conducted the second oxalic acid strike as follows. Personnel added 28,881 gallons of 8 wt % oxalic acid to Tank 6F. Following the acid addition, they visually inspected the tank and transferred 32,247 gallons of Tank 6F material to Tank 7F. SRR collected a sample of the liquid from Tank 6F and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. Mapping of the tank following the transfer indicated that 3,248 gallons of solids remained in the tank. Following the oxalic acid strikes, SRR performed Spray Washing with oxalic acid to remove waste collected on internal structures, cooling coils, tank top internals, and tank

  10. Long-term chemical and biological improvement in an acid mine drainage-impacted watershed.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Bruce E; Kruse, Natalie A; Bowman, Jennifer R

    2014-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common result of coal and metal mining worldwide caused by weathering of metal sulfides exposed during mining. AMD typically results in low-pH, high-metal, high-conductivity water that does not support aquatic life. Chemical water quality improvement does not necessarily lead to rapid biological recovery. Little Raccoon Creek, a major tributary to Raccoon Creek in the Western Allegheny Plateau of Ohio, drains 401 km(2), has a legacy of AMD that stems from mining activities over more than a century. Since 1999, seven major passive treatments systems have been installed in the watershed to a total of over $6.5 million. This study analyzes the hourly water quality data collected at a United States Geological Survey gage station alongside trends in fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Both fish and macroinvertebrate communities have shown a statistically significant improvement in the lower reaches of Little Raccoon Creek since treatment began. Long-term chemical monitoring shows a significant increase in pH, but no significant change in conductivity. The conductivity data is well correlated with sulfate concentrations and discharge, while the pH is well correlated with net  alkalinity data, but not with discharge. Significant investment in passive treatment systems and land reclamation has decreased the percent occurrence of pH measurements below the target of 6.5 and has led to recovery of both fish and macroinvertebrate communities in the downstream reaches of Little Raccoon Creek. Long-term monitoring has proven to be a valuable tool to assess success of a high-cost remediation program. PMID:25063535

  11. Recent improvements in Thomson scattering data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tillack, M.S.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1980-04-01

    A new profile analysis package for use with the Thomson scattering data on ISX-B has recently been implemented. The primary feature of this package is a weighted least squares fitting of temperature and density data to generate a representative curve, as opposed to the previous hand-fitting technique. The changes will automate the manner in which data are transmitted and manipulated, without affecting the calculational techniques previously used. The computer programs have also been used to estimate the sensitivity of various plasma quantities to the accuracy of the Thomson scattering data.

  12. Chemical hazards analysis of resilient flooring for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lent, Tom; Silas, Julie; Vallette, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses resilient flooring, evaluating the potential health effects of vinyl flooring and the leading alternatives-synthetic rubber, polyolefin, and linoleum-currently used in the healthcare marketplace. The study inventories chemicals incorporated as components of each of the four material types or involved in their life cycle as feedstocks, intermediary chemicals, or emissions. It then characterizes those chemicals using a chemical hazard-based framework that addresses persistence and bioaccumulation, human toxicity, and human exposures. PMID:21165873

  13. Structural analysis of photosystem I polypeptides using chemical crosslinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armbrust, T. S.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes, obtained from leaves of 14 d soybean (Glycine max L. cv. Williams) plants, were treated with the chemical crosslinkers glutaraldehyde or 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) to investigate the structural organization of photosystem I. Polypeptides were resolved using lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and were identified by western blot analysis using a library of polyclonal antibodies specific for photosystem I subunits. An electrophoretic examination of crosslinked thylakoids revealed numerous crosslinked products, using either glutaraldehyde or EDC. However, only a few of these could be identified by western blot analysis using subunit-specific polyclonal antibodies. Several glutaraldehyde dependent crosslinked species were identified. A single band was identified minimally composed of PsaC and PsaD, documenting the close interaction between these two subunits. The most interesting aspect of these studies was a crosslinked species composed of the PsaB subunit observed following EDC treatment of thylakoids. This is either an internally crosslinked species, which will provide structural information concerning the topology of the complex PsaB protein, a linkage with a polypeptide for which we do not yet have an immunological probe, or a masking of epitopes by the EDC linkage at critical locations in the peptide which is linked to PsaB.

  14. Chemical analysis and potential health risks of hookah charcoal.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Yehya; Dalibalta, Sarah; Abu-Farha, Nedal

    2016-11-01

    Hookah (waterpipe) smoking is a very common practice that has spread globally. There is growing evidence on the hazardous consequences of smoking hookah, with studies indicating that its harmful effects are comparable to cigarette smoking if not worse. Charcoal is commonly used as a heating source for hookah smoke. Although charcoal briquettes are thought to be one of the major contributors to toxicity, their composition and impact on the smoke generated remains largely unidentified. This study aims to analyze the elemental composition of five different raw synthetic and natural charcoals by using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Elemental analysis showed that the raw charcoals contain heavy metals such as zinc, iron, cadmium, vanadium, aluminum, lead, chromium, manganese and cobalt at concentrations similar, if not higher than, cigarettes. In addition, thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the smoke produced from burning the charcoal samples. The smoke emitted from charcoal was found to be the source of numerous compounds which could be hazardous to health. A total of seven carcinogens, 39 central nervous system depressants and 31 respiratory irritants were identified.

  15. Chemical analysis and potential health risks of hookah charcoal.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Yehya; Dalibalta, Sarah; Abu-Farha, Nedal

    2016-11-01

    Hookah (waterpipe) smoking is a very common practice that has spread globally. There is growing evidence on the hazardous consequences of smoking hookah, with studies indicating that its harmful effects are comparable to cigarette smoking if not worse. Charcoal is commonly used as a heating source for hookah smoke. Although charcoal briquettes are thought to be one of the major contributors to toxicity, their composition and impact on the smoke generated remains largely unidentified. This study aims to analyze the elemental composition of five different raw synthetic and natural charcoals by using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Elemental analysis showed that the raw charcoals contain heavy metals such as zinc, iron, cadmium, vanadium, aluminum, lead, chromium, manganese and cobalt at concentrations similar, if not higher than, cigarettes. In addition, thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was used to analyze the chemical composition of the smoke produced from burning the charcoal samples. The smoke emitted from charcoal was found to be the source of numerous compounds which could be hazardous to health. A total of seven carcinogens, 39 central nervous system depressants and 31 respiratory irritants were identified. PMID:27343945

  16. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  17. Kinematic analysis of in situ measurement during chemical mechanical planarization process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongkai; Wang, Tongqing; Zhao, Qian; Meng, Yonggang; Lu, Xinchun

    2015-10-15

    Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) is the most widely used planarization technique in semiconductor manufacturing presently. With the aid of in situ measurement technology, CMP tools can achieve good performance and stable productivity. However, the in situ measurement has remained unexplored from a kinematic standpoint. The available related resources for the kinematic analysis are very limited due to the complexity and technical secret. In this paper, a comprehensive kinematic analysis of in situ measurement is provided, including the analysis model, the measurement trajectory, and the measurement time of each zone of wafer surface during the practical CMP process. In addition, a lot of numerical calculations are performed to study the influences of main parameters on the measurement trajectory and the measurement velocity variation of the probe during the measurement process. All the efforts are expected to improve the in situ measurement system and promote the advancement in CMP control system.

  18. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3–20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  19. Neural network based analysis for chemical sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-04-01

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective individual sensors. We use a prototype sensor array which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of the sensor data, the selectivity of the sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) the sensors are not highly selective.

  20. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-12

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  1. Advances in Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Julian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    Infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral window has evolved from a routine laboratory technique into a state-of-the-art spectroscopy and sensing tool by benefitting from recent progress in increasingly sophisticated spectra acquisition techniques and advanced materials for generating, guiding, and detecting mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. Today, MIR spectroscopy provides molecular information with trace to ultratrace sensitivity, fast data acquisition rates, and high spectral resolution catering to demanding applications in bioanalytics, for example, and to improved routine analysis. In addition to advances in miniaturized device technology without sacrificing analytical performance, selected innovative applications for MIR spectroscopy ranging from process analysis to biotechnology and medical diagnostics are highlighted in this review.

  2. Flow Injection Analysis and Liquid Chromatography for Multifunctional Chemical Analysis (MCA) Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ana V.; Loegel, Thomas N.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Danielson, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    The large class sizes of first-year chemistry labs makes it challenging to provide students with hands-on access to instrumentation because the number of students typically far exceeds the number of research-grade instruments available to collect data. Multifunctional chemical analysis (MCA) systems provide a viable alternative for large-scale…

  3. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-chemical stres...

  4. An improved photometric analysis of SX Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnel, Albert P.; Peters, Geraldine J.; Polidan, Ronald S.

    1988-01-01

    A new analysis of existing photometric data on SX Aurigae is presented which changes current conclusions in the literature concerning the star. It is concluded, based on fitting of the continuous spectrum to Kurucz model atmospheres and simplex optimization procedure utilized, that the system consists of two normal main-sequence stars of spectral types B2 and slightly earlier than B5. The components are very close to the inner Roche limiting surface. The secondary component is unevolved, and the primary component is extremely close to contact with its inner Roche lobe. The evidence indicates that mass flow from the primary to the secondary has not yet begun. Allowing the bolometric albedo of the secondary to be a free parameter produces a solution with an excellent fit to the B, V data. The derived value, A2 = 0.40, disagrees with the theoretical value for radiative atmospheres and agrees with the value for convective equilibrium.

  5. Chemical derivatization for forensic drug analysis by GC- and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Lin, D L; Wang, S M; Wu, C H; Chen, B G; Liu, R H

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing chemical derivatization (CD) to improve gas chromatographic (GC) and GC-mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of drugs has been abundantly studied and widely practiced, while in liquid chromatography (LC) and LC-MS, application of CD approaches is still at an early stage. Silylation, acylation, and alkylation are common CD reactions, long adopted by GC and GC-MS (including GC-MS/MS) methodologies, to improve analytes' stability and/or to optimize their extraction/separation and detection efficiencies. Highly polar and nonvolatile analytes are not amenable to GC-MS analysis without the CD step; however, CD can improve LC-MS analysis of highly polar analytes, especially those with low molecular weights. Many CD reagents developed for GC and GC-MS applications are also effective in LC-MS. Other CD reagents are developed for LC-MS to enhance analytes' performance under electrospray and atmospheric pressure ionization sources. Certain CD reagents are designed to facilitate analytes' fragmentation (upon collision-induced dissociation) in generating intense product ions for sensitive MS/MS detection. In this review, various CD reagents, reaction types, and application examples are presented and discussed, with emphases on GC-MS and LC-MS analysis of drugs of abuse.

  6. ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

    2014-06-05

    Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

  7. Improved chemically amplified photoresist characterization using interdigitated electrode sensors: photoacid diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Cody M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2004-05-01

    The ability of interdigitated electrodes to serve as novel chemically amplified resist characterization tools has recently been demonstrated through their ability to measure the Dill C kinetic rate constant for photoacid generation. The work presented in this paper attempts to further extend the capabilities of the interdigitated electrode (IDE) sensors by investigating their potential use as a measurement tool for photoacid diffusion coefficients. Impedance spectroscopy of chemically amplified photoresist coated interdigitated electrodes is used to calculate the bulk ionic conductivity of the resist film. The ionic conductivity is subsequently utilized in the Nernst-Einstein equation to calculate the diffusion coefficient of the photoacid, assuming that it is the major charge carrying species in the film. A detailed description of the measurement and data analysis processes required to calculate the diffusion coefficient of triphenylsulfonium triflate in poly(p-hydroxystyrene) is provided. In addition, the effect of varying the relative humidity of the measurement environment upon the impedance data collected has been examined. It has been observed that the presence of water within the resist film, typically as a result of absorption of water from the humid ambient environment, dramatically changes the conductivity of the resist coated IDE. This change is apparently the result of changes in the proton conduction mechanism within the resist as a function of film water content. A discussion of several possible causes of this phenomena and its impact on the interpretation of the electrical data and the calculation and meaning of an acid diffusion coefficient are presented.

  8. Chemical etching of stainless steel 301 for improving performance of electrochemical capacitors in aqueous electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeżowski, P.; Nowicki, M.; Grzeszkowiak, M.; Czajka, R.; Béguin, F.

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of the study was to increase the surface roughness of stainless steel 301 current collectors by etching, in order to improve the electrochemical performance of electrical double-layer capacitors (EDLC) in 1 mol L-1 lithium sulphate electrolyte. Etching was realized in 1:3:30 (HNO3:HCl:H2O) solution with times varying up to 10 min. For the considered 15 μm thick foil and a mass loss around 0.4 wt.%, pitting was uniform, with diameter of pits ranging from 100 to 300 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed an increase of average surface roughness (Ra) from 5 nm for the as-received stainless steel foil to 24 nm for the pitted material. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy realized on EDLCs with coated electrodes either on as-received or pitted foil in 1 mol L-1 Li2SO4 gave equivalent distributed resistance (EDR) of 8 Ω and 2 Ω, respectively, demonstrating a substantial improvement of collector/electrode interface after pitting. Correlatively, the EDLCs with pitted collector displayed a better charge propagation and low ohmic losses even at relatively high current of 20 A g-1. Hence, chemical pitting of stainless steel current collectors is an appropriate method for optimising the performance of EDLCs in neutral aqueous electrolyte.

  9. Mechanisms of Local Planarization Improvement Using Solo Pad in Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Akira; Yokoyama, Toshiyuki; Komiyama, Takashi; Kurokawa, Syuhei

    2013-12-01

    The mechanism of local planarization improvement using a solo pad in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) was investigated, and the pad surface temperature was found to be the key factor. The use of a solo pad results in better planarity than that of a stacked pad under the same process conditions. When Cu CMP evaluation was conducted at various platen temperatures, a good correlation of local planarity to pad surface temperature was confirmed regardless of the pad type. Planarity improved when the pad surface temperature was lowered, and the solo pad had a lower temperature than the stacked pad at the same platen temperature. It is considered that the solo pad has a higher heat conductance than the stacked pad, so that heat generated during polishing is transferred to the platen more easily through the solo pad than through the stacked pad. The reason for the better planarity with the lower pad surface temperature was explained by the change in pad elasticity by the temperature.

  10. Improvement in human health risk assessment utilizing site- and chemical-specific information: a case study.

    PubMed

    Del Pup, J; Kmiecik, J; Smith, S; Reitman, F

    1996-10-28

    This paper provides results of an effort to use site- and chemical-specific data and other factors to characterize and refine risk estimates to a community. The refined assessment illustrated the influence of additional key variables on the risk estimates. Influence of variables associated with meteorological data and decay was relatively low. Influence of exposure assumptions was somewhat higher, approaching an order of magnitude. Of the variables examined, the butadiene slope factor assumption had the greatest impact, contributing nearly three orders of magnitude to the risk estimates separating the Best and Worst Case scenarios. Monte Carlo analysis indicated a high level of uncertainty in the risk estimates. Risk estimates in this paper should be considered in comparison to the approximate 1 in 4 background fatal cancer risk in the US population. In all cases the risk would be zero if butadiene is not carcinogenic in humans at prevailing exposure levels.

  11. Enhancing the chemical mixture methodology in emergency preparedness and consequence assessment analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Glantz, Clifford S; Yao, Juan; He, Hua; Petrocchi, Achille J; Craig, Douglas K; Ciolek, John T; Booth, Alexander E

    2013-11-16

    Emergency preparedness personnel at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities use the chemical mixture methodology (CMM) to estimate the potential health impacts to workers and the public from the unintended airborne release of chemical mixtures. The CMM uses a Hazard Index (HI) for each chemical in a mixture to compare a chemical's concentration at a receptor location to an appropriate concentration limit for that chemical. This limit is typically based on Protection Action Criteria (PAC) values developed and published by the DOE. As a first cut, the CMM sums the HIs for all the chemicals in a mixture to conservatively estimate their combined health impact. A cumulative HI>1.0 represents a concentration exceeding the concentration limit and indicates the potential for adverse health effects. Next, Health Code Numbers (HCNs) are used to identify the target organ systems that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The sum of the HIs for the maximally impacted target organ system is used to provide a refined, though still conservative, estimate of the potential for adverse health effects from exposure to the chemical mixture. This paper explores approaches to enhance the effectiveness of the CMM by using HCN weighting factors. A series of 24 case studies have been defined to evaluate both the existing CMM and three new approaches for improving the CMM. The first approach uses a set of HCN weighting factors that are applied based on the priority ranking of the HCNs for each chemical. The second approach uses weighting factors based on the priority rankings of the HCNs established for a given type of concentration limit. The third approach uses weighting factors that are based on the exposure route used to derive PAC values and a priority ranking of the HCNs (the same ranking as used in the second approach). Initial testing indicates that applying weighting factors increases the effectiveness of the CMM in general, though care must be taken to

  12. Using Cryptography to Improve Conjunction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, B.; Welser, B.; Baiocchi, D.

    2012-09-01

    Coordination of operations between satellite operators is becoming increasingly important to prevent collisions. Unfortunately, this coordination is often handicapped by a lack of trust. Coordination and cooperation between satellite operators can take many forms, however, one specific area where cooperation between operators would yield significant benefits is in the computation of conjunction analyses. Passively collected orbital are of generally of too low fidelity to be of use in conjunction analyses. Each operator, however, maintains high fidelity data about their own satellites. These high fidelity data are significantly more valuable in calculating conjunction analyses than the lower-fidelity data. If operators were to share their high fidelity data overall space situational awareness could be improved. At present, many operators do not share data and as a consequence space situational awareness suffers. Restrictive data sharing policies are primarily motivated by privacy concerns on the part of the satellite operators, as each operator is reluctant or unwilling to share data that might compromise its political or commercial interests. In order to perform the necessary conjunction analyses while still maintaining the privacy of their own data, a few operators have entered data sharing agreements. These operators provide their private data to a trusted outside party, who then performs the conjunction analyses and reports the results to the operators. These types of agreements are not an ideal solution as they require a degree of trust between the parties, and the cost of employing the trusted party can be large. In this work, we present and analyze cryptographic tools that would allow satellite operators to securely calculate conjunction analyses without the help of a trusted outside party, while provably maintaining the privacy of their own orbital information. For example, recent advances in cryptographic protocols, specifically in the area of secure

  13. Discrimination Enhancement with Transient Feature Analysis of a Graphene Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Nallon, Eric C; Schnee, Vincent P; Bright, Collin J; Polcha, Michael P; Li, Qiliang

    2016-01-19

    A graphene chemical sensor is subjected to a set of structurally and chemically similar hydrocarbon compounds consisting of toluene, o-xylene, p-xylene, and mesitylene. The fractional change in resistance of the sensor upon exposure to these compounds exhibits a similar response magnitude among compounds, whereas large variation is observed within repetitions for each compound, causing a response overlap. Therefore, traditional features depending on maximum response change will cause confusion during further discrimination and classification analysis. More robust features that are less sensitive to concentration, sampling, and drift variability would provide higher quality information. In this work, we have explored the advantage of using transient-based exponential fitting coefficients to enhance the discrimination of similar compounds. The advantages of such feature analysis to discriminate each compound is evaluated using principle component analysis (PCA). In addition, machine learning-based classification algorithms were used to compare the prediction accuracies when using fitting coefficients as features. The additional features greatly enhanced the discrimination between compounds while performing PCA and also improved the prediction accuracy by 34% when using linear discrimination analysis. PMID:26674670

  14. Thermo-chemical modelling of a village cookstove for design improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkalaskar, Vijay H.; Sohoni, Milind; Bhandarkar, Upendra V.

    2014-05-01

    Cookstove operation comprises three basic processes, namely combustion of firewood, natural air draft due to the buoyancy induced by the temperature difference between the hearth and its surroundings, and heat transfer to the pot, stove body and surrounding atmosphere. Owing to the heterogenous and unsteady burning of solid fuel, there exist nonlinear and dynamic interrelationships among these process parameters. A steady-state analytical model of the cookstove operation is developed for its design improvement by splitting the hearth into three zones to study char combustion, volatile combustion and heat transfer to the pot bottom separately. It comprises a total of seven relations corresponding to a thorough analysis of the three basic processes. A novel method is proposed to model the combustion of wood to mimic the realities closely. Combustion space above the fuel bed is split into 1000 discrete parts to study the combustion of volatiles by considering a set of representative volatile gases. Model results are validated by comparing them with a set of water boiling tests carried on a traditional cookstove in the laboratory. It is found that the major thrust areas to improve the thermal performance are combustion of volatiles and the heat transfer to the pot. It is revealed that the existing design dimensions of the traditional cookstove are close to their optimal values. Addition of twisted-tape inserts in the hearth of the cookstove shows an improvement in the thermal performance due to increase in the heat transfer coefficient to the pot bottom and improved combustion of volatiles.

  15. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  16. Chemical systems for improved oil recovery: Phase behavior, oil recovery, and mobility control studies

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.; Gall, B.; Gao, H., Scott, L., Cook, I.

    1995-09-01

    Selected surfactant systems containing a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combination with an anionic surfactant system have been studied to evaluate phase behavior as well as oil recovery potential. These experiments were conducted to evaluate possible improved phase behavior and overall oil recovery potential of mixed surfactant systems over a broad range of conditions. Both polyacrylamide polymers and Xanthan biopolymers were evaluated. Studies were initiated to use a chemical flooding simulation program, UTCHEM, to simulate oil recovery for laboratory and field applications and evaluate its use to simulate oil saturation distributions obtained in CT-monitoring of oil recovery experiments. The phase behavior studies focused on evaluating the effect of anionic-nonionic surfactant proportion on overall phase behavior. Two distinct transition behaviors were observed, depending on the dominant surfactant in the overall system. The first type of transition corresponded to more conventional behavior attributed to nonionic-dominant surfactant systems. This behavior is manifested by an oil-water-surfactant system that inverts from a water-external (highly conducting) microemulsion to an oil-external (nonconducting) one, as a function of temperature. The latter type which inverts in an opposite manner can be attributed to the separation of the anionic-nonionic mixtures into water- and oil-soluble surfactants. Both types of transition behavior can still be used to identify relative proximity to optimal areas. Determining these transition ranges provided more insight on how the behavior of these surfactant mixtures was affected by altering component proportions. Efforts to optimize the chemical system for oil displacement experiments were also undertaken. Phase behavior studies with systems formulated with biopolymer in solution were conducted.

  17. Method of chemical analysis for oil shale wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.R.; Alden, L.; Bonomo, F.S.; Nichols, J.; Sexton, E.

    1984-06-01

    Several methods of chemical analysis are described for oil shale wastewaters and retort gases. These methods are designed to support the field testing of various pollution control systems. As such, emphasis has been placed on methods which are rapid and sufficiently rugged to perform well under field conditions. Ion chromatograph has been developed as a technique for the minor non-carbonate inorganic anions in retort water, including SO4, NO3, S2O3, SCN(-1), and total S. The method recommended for sulfide is a potiometric titration with Pb(II). The freezing point depression was used to determine the total solute content in retort waters, a test which can be considered analogous to the standard residue test. Three methods are described for the determination of total ammoniacal nitrogen in retort wastewaters: (1) a modified ion selective electrode technique, (2) an optical absorption technique, and (3) an ion chromatographic technique. Total sulfur in retort gas is determined by combusting the gas in a continuously flowing system, whereupon the resulting sulfur dioxide is determined by SO2 monitor. Individual sulfur species in retort gas including H2S, COS, SO2, and CH3CH2SH are determined by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Quality control, pH, conductivity, total inorganic carbon, and total organic carbon measurements are discussed briefly.

  18. Laser-induced destination of hazardous chemicals: A preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, P. F.; Wolf, K. A.

    1982-10-01

    Technical methods that might prove effective in destroying dangerous chemicals before they leave the plant environment and become subject to regulation are studied. Laser infrared multiphoton dissociation, for decomposing deleterious chemical gases is evaluated. The chlorinated ethylenes and the chlorinated ethanes are emphasized. A detailed method for decomposing chlorinated chemicals in the workplace using a relatively inexpensive CO2 laser is discussed. Results show that CO2 laser photodegradation of vinyl chloride, a chlorinated ethylene, is promising.

  19. Improving the Practical Education of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering Majors in Chinese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Feng-qing; Yu, Yi-feng; Ren, Shao-feng; Liu, Shao-jie; Rong, Xin-yu

    2014-01-01

    Practical education in chemical engineering has drawn increasing attention in recent years. This paper discusses two approaches to teaching and learning about experiments among upper-level chemical and pharmaceutical engineering majors in China. On the basis of years of experience in teaching chemical and pharmaceutical engineering, we propose the…

  20. Nonradiological chemical pathway analysis and identification of chemicals of concern for environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.L.; Cooper, A.T.; Castleton, K.J.

    1995-11-01

    Pacific Northwest`s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) is an ongoing effort tot design, review, and conducted monitoring on and off the Hanford site. Chemicals of concern that were selected are listed. Using modeled exposure pathways, the offsite cancer incidence and hazard quotient were calculated and a retrospective pathway analysis performed to estimate what onsite concentrations would be required in the soil for each chemical of concern and other detected chemicals that would be required to obtain an estimated offsite human-health risk of 1.0E-06 cancer incidence or 1.0 hazard quotient. This analysis indicates that current nonradiological chemical contamination occurring on the site does not pose a significant offsite human-health risk; the highest cancer incidence to the offsite maximally exposed individual was from arsenic (1.76E-10); the highest hazard quotient was chromium(VI) (1.48E-04). The most sensitive pathways of exposure were surfacewater and aquatic food consumption. Combined total offsite excess cancer incidence was 2.09E-10 and estimated hazard quotient was 2.40E-04. Of the 17 identified chemicals of concern, the SESP does not currently (routinely) monitor arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, bis(2- ethylhexyl)phthalate (BEHP), and chrysene. Only 3 of the chemicals of concern (arsenic, BEHP, chloroform) could actually occur in onsite soil at concern high enough to cause a 1.0E-06 excess cancer incidence or a 1.0 hazard index for a given offsite exposure pathway. During the retrospective analysis, 20 other chemicals were also evaluated; only vinyl chloride and thallium could reach targeted offsite risk values.

  1. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and

  2. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a 'volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss. PMID:27295099

  3. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a `volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss.

  4. Are the Hirshfeld and Mulliken population analysis schemes consistent with chemical intuition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Soumen; Roy, Ram Kinkar; Ayers, Paul W.

    In the present article, we report a comparative study between the Hirshfeld and Mulliken population analysis schemes (abbreviated as HPA and MPA, respectively). Trends of atomic charges derived from these two population analysis schemes are compared with those expected from other commonly used chemical concepts like electronegativity, inductive effects, and resonance effects. Although previous studies on intramolecular reactivity sequences demonstrated that HPA generates reliable and non-negative (and thus physically more realistic) condensed Fukui function (FF) values, the present study reveals problems with the HPA charge partitioning technique. Specifically, HPA fails to reproduce reliable intermolecular and intramolecular charge trends in several systems. Reasons for the success and failure of HPA are discussed and a method for improving the Hirshfeld charge partitioning is proposed.

  5. Advances in explosives analysis--part I: animal, chemical, ion, and mechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased substantially since the publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis (Moore and Goodpaster, Anal Bioanal Chem 395(2):245-246, 2009). Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. This part, Part I, reviews methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. Part II will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of alternate energy carriers, hydrogen and chemical heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Funk, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen and chemical heat pipes were proposed as methods of transporting energy from a primary energy source (nuclear, solar) to the user. In the chemical heat pipe system, primary energy is transformed into the energy of a reversible chemical reaction; the chemical species are then transmitted or stored until the energy is required. Analysis of thermochemical hydrogen schemes and chemical heat pipe systems on a second law efficiency or available work basis show that hydrogen is superior especially if the end use of the chemical heat pipe is electrical power.

  7. Chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto polyurethane surface for improving blood compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunli; Wang, Miao; Cai, Xianmei; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Li; Zhu, Haomiao; Shen, Jian; Yuan, Jiang

    2011-11-01

    To improve hydrophilicity and blood compatibility properties of polyurethane (PU) film, we chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto the surface of polyurethane film using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. The effects of grafting temperature, grafting time, monomer and initiator concentrations on the grafting yields were studied. The maximum grafting yield value was obtained 0.0275 g/cm2 for HEMA. Characterization of the films was carried out by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), water contact angle measurements. ATR-FTIR data showed that HEMA was successfully grafted onto the PU films surface. Water contact angle measurement demonstrated the grafted films possessed a relatively hydrophilic surface. The blood compatibility of the grafted films was preliminarily evaluated by a platelet-rich plasma adhesion test and hemolysis test. The results of platelet adhesion experiment showed that polyurethane grafted polymerization with monomer of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate had good blood compatibility featured by the low platelet adhesion. Hemolysis rate of the PU-g-PHEMA films was dramatically decreased than the ungrafted PU films. This kind of new biomaterials grafted with HEMA monomers might have a potential usage for biomedical applications.

  8. Diversity selection of compounds based on 'protein affinity fingerprints' improves sampling of bioactive chemical space.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha P; Koutsoukas, Alexios; Mohd Fauzi, Fazlin; Drakakis, Georgios; Maciejewski, Mateusz; Glen, Robert C; Bender, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Diversity selection is a frequently applied strategy for assembling high-throughput screening libraries, making the assumption that a diverse compound set increases chances of finding bioactive molecules. Based on previous work on experimental 'affinity fingerprints', in this study, a novel diversity selection method is benchmarked that utilizes predicted bioactivity profiles as descriptors. Compounds were selected based on their predicted activity against half of the targets (training set), and diversity was assessed based on coverage of the remaining (test set) targets. Simultaneously, fingerprint-based diversity selection was performed. An original version of the method exhibited on average 5% and an improved version on average 10% increase in target space coverage compared with the fingerprint-based methods. As a typical case, bioactivity-based selection of 231 compounds (2%) from a particular data set ('Cutoff-40') resulted in 47.0% and 50.1% coverage, while fingerprint-based selection only achieved 38.4% target coverage for the same subset size. In conclusion, the novel bioactivity-based selection method outperformed the fingerprint-based method in sampling bioactive chemical space on the data sets considered. The structures retrieved were structurally more acceptable to medicinal chemists while at the same time being more lipophilic, hence bioactivity-based diversity selection of compounds would best be combined with physicochemical property filters in practice.

  9. Improving source efficiency for aluminum nitride grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Laurent, Matthew A.; Yonkee, Benjanim; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic pre-reactions are known to play a role in the growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) via metal organic chemical vapor deposition, where they can deplete precursor molecules before reaching the substrate, leading to poor growth efficiency. Studies have shown that reducing the growth pressure and growth temperature results in improved growth efficiency of AlN; however, superior crystal quality and reduced impurity incorporation are generally best obtained when growing at high temperatures. This study shows that, with proper alkyl source dilution, parasitic pre-reactions can be suppressed while maintaining high growth temperatures. The results show an 18× increase in growth rate and efficiency of AlN films: from 0.04 μm h-1 to 0.73 μm h-1, and 26 μm mol-1 to 502 μm mol-1, respectively; under constant TMAl flow and a small change in total gas flow. This results in 6.8% of Al atoms from the injected TMAl being utilized for AlN layer growth for this reactor configuration. This is better than the standard GaN growth, where 6.0% of the Ga atoms injected from TMGa are utilized for GaN growth.

  10. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24% to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6-h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3°C.

  11. Targeting Hormone-Related Pathways to Improve Grain Yield in Rice: A Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Hiroaki; Reguera, Maria; Abdel-Tawab, Yasser M.; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Sink/source relationships, regulating the mobilization of stored carbohydrates from the vegetative tissues to the grains, are of key importance for grain filling and grain yield. We used different inhibitors of plant hormone action to assess their effects on grain yield and on the expression of hormone-associated genes. Among the tested chemicals, 2-indol-3-yl-4-oxo-4-phenylbutanoic acid (PEO-IAA; antagonist of auxin receptor), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis inhibitor), and 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB; ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor) improved grain yield in a concentration dependent manner. These effects were also dependent on the plant developmental stage. NDGA and AIB treatments induced an increase in photosynthesis in flag leaves concomitant to the increments of starch content in flag leaves and grains. NDGA inhibited the expression of ABA-responsive gene, but did not significantly decrease ABA content. Instead, NDGA significantly decreased jasmonic acid and jasmonic acid-isoleucine. Our results support the notion that the specific inhibition of jasmonic acid and ethylene biosynthesis resulted in grain yield increase in rice. PMID:26098557

  12. Defective carbon nanotube-silicon heterojunctions for photodetector and chemical sensor with improved responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jungwook; Kim, Jongbaeg

    2015-11-01

    The direct growth and integration of defect-modulated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on n-type silicon (Si) microstructures for high performance photodetectors and chemiresistive sensors is presented. By devising a Si microspring that is strained by the growth force of the CNTs, a vertical load from the restoring force of the microspring is perpendicularly applied against the growth direction of the CNTs. This vertical load induces the formation of defective structures in the CNTs while the CNT-Si heterojunctions are fabricated. Under the illumination of UV light, photogenerated carriers from both the CNTs and the Si can be separated at the CNT-Si heterojunctions and at the defects in the CNTs before recombination, which contributes to a high photoresponsivity of 262.3 mA W-1 and an external quantum efficiency of 91.4%. Moreover, the adsorption of chemical species can be promoted by increasing the defects in the CNTs, thereby improving the sensing responsiveness toward ethanol and NO2 vapors. Our simple and facile growth of defect-adjusted CNTs on conductive Si microstructures would be beneficial to the scalable, high throughput manufacturing of heterojunctioned devices with tunable properties and functionalities of the CNTs.

  13. Improving source efficiency for aluminum nitride grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foronda, Humberto M.; Laurent, Matthew A.; Yonkee, Benjanim; Keller, Stacia; DenBaars, Steven P.; Speck, James S.

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic pre-reactions are known to play a role in the growth of aluminum nitride (AlN) via metal organic chemical vapor deposition, where they can deplete precursor molecules before reaching the substrate, leading to poor growth efficiency. Studies have shown that reducing the growth pressure and growth temperature results in improved growth efficiency of AlN; however, superior crystal quality and reduced impurity incorporation are generally best obtained when growing at high temperatures. This study shows that, with proper alkyl source dilution, parasitic pre-reactions can be suppressed while maintaining high growth temperatures. The results show an 18× increase in growth rate and efficiency of AlN films: from 0.04 μm h‑1 to 0.73 μm h‑1, and 26 μm mol‑1 to 502 μm mol‑1, respectively; under constant TMAl flow and a small change in total gas flow. This results in 6.8% of Al atoms from the injected TMAl being utilized for AlN layer growth for this reactor configuration. This is better than the standard GaN growth, where 6.0% of the Ga atoms injected from TMGa are utilized for GaN growth.

  14. Development of improved space sampling strategies for ocean chemical properties: Total carbon dioxide and dissolved nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Goyet, C.; Peltzer, E.T.; Davis, D.; Brewer, P.G.

    1995-04-15

    Large-scale ocean observing programs such as the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) today, must face the problem of designing an adequate sampling strategy. For ocean chemical variables, the goals and observing technologies are quite different from ocean physical variables (temperature, salinity, pressure). The authors have recently acquired data on the ocean CO{sub 2} properties on WOCE cruises P16c and P17c that are sufficiently dense to test for sampling redundancy. They use linear and quadratic interpolation methods on the sampled field to investigate what is the minimum number of samples required to define the deep ocean total inorganic carbon (TCO{sub 2}) field within the limits of experimental accuracy ({+-}4 {mu}mol/kg). Within the limits of current measurements, these lines were oversampled in the deep ocean. Should the precision of the measurement be improved, then a denser sampling pattern may be desirable in the future. This approach rationalizes the efficient use of resources for field work and for estimating gridded TCO{sub 2} fields needed to constrain geochemical models. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Improving surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides by chemical modification with fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Matemu, Athanasia Oswald; Katayama, Shigeru; Kayahara, Hisataka; Murasawa, Hisashi; Nakamura, Soichiro

    2012-04-01

    Effect of acylation with saturated fatty acids on surface functional properties of tofu whey-derived peptides was investigated. Tofu whey (TW) and soy proteins (7S, 11S, and acid-precipitated soy protein [APP]) were hydrolyzed by Protease M 'Amano' G, and resulting peptide mixtures were acylated with esterified fatty acids of different chain length (6C to 18C) to form a covalent linkage between the carboxyl group of fatty acid and the free amino groups of peptide. Acylation significantly (P < 0.05) increased emulsifying properties of 7S, 11S, and APP peptides independent of fatty acid chain length. Acylation decreased water binding capacity although oil binding capacity of acylated tofu whey ultra filtered fraction (UFTW < 3 kDa), 7S- and 11S-peptides were improved compared to native peptides. 7S peptides acylated with long chain fatty acids had shown significant higher surface hydrophobicity as in contrast with acylated UFTW < 3 kDa and APP peptides. Fluorescence spectra studies revealed structural conformation of acylated soy peptides as compared to native peptides. This study shows that chemical modification with fatty acids can further affect functional properties of soy proteins.

  16. Chemical Polysialylation and In Vivo Tetramerization Improve Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase-Based Bioscavengers.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, S S; Smirnov, I V; Shamborant, O G; Bobik, T V; Ilyushin, D G; Murashev, A N; Dyachenko, I A; Palikov, V A; Knorre, V D; Belogurov, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Kuzina, E S; Genkin, D D; Masson, P; Gabibov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate toxins (OPs) are the most toxic low-molecular compounds. The extremely potent toxicity of OPs is determined by their specificity toward the nerve system. Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is a natural bioscavenger against a broad spectrum of OPs, which makes it a promising candidate for the development of DNA-encoded bioscavengers. The high values of the protective index observed for recombinant hBChE (rhBChE) make it appropriate for therapy against OP poisoning, especially in the case of highly toxic warfare nerve agents. Nevertheless, large-scale application of biopharmaceuticals based on hBChE is restricted due to its high cost and extremely rapid elimination from the bloodstream. In the present study, we examine two approaches for long-acting rhBChE production: I) chemical polysialylation and II) in-vivo tetramerization. We demonstrate that both approaches significantly improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rhBChE (more than 5 and 10 times, respectively), which makes it possible to use rhBChE conjugated with polysialic acids (rhBChE-CAO) and tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) in the treatment of OP poisonings. PMID:26798501

  17. Development of improved space sampling strategies for ocean chemical properties: Total carbon dioxide and dissolved nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyet, Catherine; Davis, Daniel; Peltzer, Edward T.; Brewer, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale ocean observing programs such as the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) today, must face the problem of designing an adequate sampling strategy. For ocean chemical variables, the goals and observing technologies are quite different from ocean physical variables (temperature, salinity, pressure). We have recently acquired data on the ocean CO2 properties on WOCE cruises P16c and P17c that are sufficiently dense to test for sampling redundancy. We use linear and quadratic interpolation methods on the sampled field to investigate what is the minimum number of samples required to define the deep ocean total inorganic carbon (TCO2) field within the limits of experimental accuracy (+/- 4 micromol/kg). Within the limits of current measurements, these lines were oversampled in the deep ocean. Should the precision of the measurement be improved, then a denser sampling pattern may be desirable in the future. This approach rationalizes the efficient use of resources for field work and for estimating gridded (TCO2) fields needed to constrain geochemical models.

  18. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical analysis of Isonicotinic acid methyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoba, D.; Periandy, S.; Govindarajan, M.; Gayathri, P.

    2015-02-01

    In this present study, an organic compound Isonicotinic acid methyl ester (INAME) was structurally characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, and NMR and UV spectroscopy. The optimized geometrical parameters and energies of all different and possible conformers of INAME are obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) by B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) method. There are three conformers (SI, SII-1, and SII-2) for this molecule (ground state). The most stable conformer of INAME is SI conformer. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of INAME in the ground state have been calculated by using HF and density functional method (B3LYP) 6-311++G (d,p) basis set. Detailed vibrational spectral analysis has been carried out and assignments of the observed fundamental bands have been proposed on the basis of peak positions and relative intensities. The computed vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental frequencies, which yield good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. A study on the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies were performed by time independent DFT approach. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. The electric dipole moment (μ) and first hyper polarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule were computed using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. The calculated results show that the INAME molecule may have microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non zero values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated by gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  19. XPS chemical analysis of tholins: the oxygen contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, N.; Jomard, F.; Vigneron, J.; Cernogora, G.

    2013-12-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, solid organic aerosols are initiated in the upper atmosphere by the photo-dissociation and photo-ionization of N2 and CH4. In order to simulate this complex chemistry several experimental setups have been built, among them plasma experiments. The aerosol analogues produced in such plasma discharges contain oxygen, as a few percents of the elemental composition, despite the absence of oxygen source in the reactive medium [1]. The present study aims at studying the origin of such systematic oxygen incorporation in tholins. A low pressure (0.9mbar) RF CCP discharge is used described in [2]. Gas mixtures of N2 and CH4 (from 1 to 10% of CH4) are injected continuously. The plasma discharge leads to the production of analogues of Titan's atmospheric aerosols: both as grains in the volume [1] and as thin films on the surface of the reactor [3]. SiO2 substrates of 1cm diameter and 1mm thickness are placed on the grounded electrode of the discharge. Organic films are deposited during 2 hours in order to have films thickness less than 1μm. After the two hours, samples are recovered at ambient air for ex-situ analysis. Two complementary analyses are performed to analyse the thin film chemical composition: XPS and SIMS, in order to probe both the surface and depth profile. References [1] Sciamma-O'brien E., Carrasco N., Szopa C., Buch A., Cernogora G. Icarus 209, 2 (2010) 704-714 [2] Alcouffe G., Cavarroc M., Cernogora G., Ouni F., Jolly A., Boufendi L., Szopa C. Plasma Sources Science and Technology 19, 1 (2010) 015008 (11pp) [3] Mahjoub A., Carrasco N., Dahoo P.-R., Gautier T., Szopa C., Cernogora G. Icarus 221, 2 (2012) 670-677.

  20. Human exploration of near earth asteroids: Mission analysis for chemical and electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Jonathan F. C.; Zimmer, Aline K.; Reijneveld, Johannes P. J.; Dunlop, Kathryn L.; Takahashi, Yu; Tardivel, Simon; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a mission analysis comparison of human missions to asteroids using two distinct architectures. The objective is to determine if either architecture can reduce launch mass with respect to the other, while not sacrificing other performance metrics such as mission duration. One architecture relies on chemical propulsion, the traditional workhorse of space exploration. The second combines chemical and electric propulsion into a hybrid architecture that attempts to utilize the strengths of each, namely the short flight times of chemical propulsion and the propellant efficiency of electric propulsion. The architectures are thoroughly detailed, and accessibility of the known asteroid population is determined for both. The most accessible asteroids are discussed in detail. Aspects such as mission abort scenarios and vehicle reusability are also discussed. Ultimately, it is determined that launch mass can be greatly reduced with the hybrid architecture, without a notable increase in mission duration. This demonstrates that significant performance improvements can be introduced to the next step of human space exploration with realistic electric propulsion system capabilities. This leads to immediate cost savings for human exploration and simultaneously opens a path of technology development that leads to technologies enabling access to even further destinations in the future.

  1. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-ch...

  2. Improving The Discipline of Cost Estimation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.; Pine, David J.; Wilson, Delano M.

    2000-01-01

    The need to improve the quality and accuracy of cost estimates of proposed new aerospace systems has been widely recognized. The industry has done the best job of maintaining related capability with improvements in estimation methods and giving appropriate priority to the hiring and training of qualified analysts. Some parts of Government, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in particular, continue to need major improvements in this area. Recently, NASA recognized that its cost estimation and analysis capabilities had eroded to the point that the ability to provide timely, reliable estimates was impacting the confidence in planning many program activities. As a result, this year the Agency established a lead role for cost estimation and analysis. The Independent Program Assessment Office located at the Langley Research Center was given this responsibility. This paper presents the plans for the newly established role. Described is how the Independent Program Assessment Office, working with all NASA Centers, NASA Headquarters, other Government agencies, and industry, is focused on creating cost estimation and analysis as a professional discipline that will be recognized equally with the technical disciplines needed to design new space and aeronautics activities. Investments in selected, new analysis tools, creating advanced training opportunities for analysts, and developing career paths for future analysts engaged in the discipline are all elements of the plan. Plans also include increasing the human resources available to conduct independent cost analysis of Agency programs during their formulation, to improve near-term capability to conduct economic cost-benefit assessments, to support NASA management's decision process, and to provide cost analysis results emphasizing "full-cost" and "full-life cycle" considerations. The Agency cost analysis improvement plan has been approved for implementation starting this calendar year. Adequate financial

  3. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  4. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques

    PubMed Central

    D’Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed. PMID:27231626

  5. Subcellular chemical and morphological analysis by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    D'Arco, Annalisa; Brancati, Nadia; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Indolfi, Maurizio; Frucci, Maria; Sirleto, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The visualization of heterogeneous morphology, segmentation and quantification of image features is a crucial point for nonlinear optics microscopy applications, spanning from imaging of living cells or tissues to biomedical diagnostic. In this paper, a methodology combining stimulated Raman scattering microscopy and image analysis technique is presented. The basic idea is to join the potential of vibrational contrast of stimulated Raman scattering and the strength of imaging analysis technique in order to delineate subcellular morphology with chemical specificity. Validation tests on label free imaging of polystyrene-beads and of adipocyte cells are reported and discussed.

  6. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Analysis of Low Temperature Non-Sooting Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a model of the diesel fuel injection process for application to analysis of low temperature non-sooting combustion. The model uses a simplified mixing correlation and detailed chemical kinetics, and analyzes a parcel of fuel as it moves along the fuel jet, from injection into evaporation and ignition. The model predicts chemical composition and soot precursors, and is applied at conditions that result in low temperature non-sooting combustion. Production of soot precursors is the first step toward production of soot, and modeling precursor production is expected to give insight into the overall evolution of soot inside the engine. The results of the analysis show that the model has been successful in describing many of the observed characteristics of low temperature combustion. The model predicts results that are qualitatively similar to those obtained for soot formation experiments at conditions in which the EGR rate is increased from zero to very high values as the fueling rate is kept constant. The model also describes the two paths to achieve non-sooting combustion. The first is smokeless rich combustion and the second is modulated kinetics (MK). The importance of the temperature after ignition and the equivalence ratio at the time of ignition is demonstrated, as these parameters can be used to collapse onto a single line all the results for soot precursors for multiple fueling rates. A parametric analysis indicates that precursor formation increases considerably as the gas temperature in the combustion chamber and the characteristic mixing time are increased. The model provides a chemical kinetic description of low temperature diesel combustion that improves the understanding of this clean and efficient regime of operation.

  7. Rohm and Haas: Furnace Replacement Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-02-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Rohm and Haas's Deer Park, Texas, chemical plant reduced natural gas usage and energy costs by replacing inefficient furnace equipment.

  8. SIMULATION MODELS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MULTIMEDIA ANALYSIS OF TOXIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia understanding of pollutant behavior in the environment is of particular concern for chemicals that are toxic and are subject to accumulation in the environmental media (air, soil, water, vegetation) where biota and human exposure is significant. Multimedia simulation ...

  9. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level.

  10. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level. PMID:23552653

  11. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer--A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/. PMID:26807911

  12. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer—A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J.; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/. PMID:26807911

  13. CERENA: ChEmical REaction Network Analyzer--A Toolbox for the Simulation and Analysis of Stochastic Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kazeroonian, Atefeh; Fröhlich, Fabian; Raue, Andreas; Theis, Fabian J; Hasenauer, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression, signal transduction and many other cellular processes are subject to stochastic fluctuations. The analysis of these stochastic chemical kinetics is important for understanding cell-to-cell variability and its functional implications, but it is also challenging. A multitude of exact and approximate descriptions of stochastic chemical kinetics have been developed, however, tools to automatically generate the descriptions and compare their accuracy and computational efficiency are missing. In this manuscript we introduced CERENA, a toolbox for the analysis of stochastic chemical kinetics using Approximations of the Chemical Master Equation solution statistics. CERENA implements stochastic simulation algorithms and the finite state projection for microscopic descriptions of processes, the system size expansion and moment equations for meso- and macroscopic descriptions, as well as the novel conditional moment equations for a hybrid description. This unique collection of descriptions in a single toolbox facilitates the selection of appropriate modeling approaches. Unlike other software packages, the implementation of CERENA is completely general and allows, e.g., for time-dependent propensities and non-mass action kinetics. By providing SBML import, symbolic model generation and simulation using MEX-files, CERENA is user-friendly and computationally efficient. The availability of forward and adjoint sensitivity analyses allows for further studies such as parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. The MATLAB code implementing CERENA is freely available from http://cerenadevelopers.github.io/CERENA/.

  14. EXPLOITING CHEMICAL ECOLOGY FOR LIVELIHOOD IMPROVEMENT OF SMALL HOLDER FARMERS IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Winter, E; Midega, C; Bruce, T; Hummel, H E; Langner, S S; Leithold, G; Khan, Z; Pickett, J

    2014-01-01

    "Push-Pull" is an inexpensive and eminently practical strategy designed for developing countries in order to exploit sound principles of chemical ecology for agricultural pest management. This strategy is specifically suitable for small holder farmers. Their experience can easily be integrated into existing farming practices in their immediate environment. "Push-pull" within one and a half decades became widely established and meanwhile is greatly beneficial to practitioners in East Africa, mainly Kenya. The classical push-pull approach used for applied plant-insect management was pioneered by Khan and Pickett (2000) and subsequent papers of Pickett (2003) and Khan et al. (2006, 2008). Relevant plant species explored so far were maize or sorghum intercropped with other East African plants (Desmodium spp. resp. Melinis minutiflora) possessing natural chemicals repellent resp. attractive for stem borer moths Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera), whereby Desmodium spp. was grown inside the maize rows while M. minutiflora surrounded it. Both simultaneous actions combined resulted in a significant decrease of stem borers in the area to be protected. A benefit to cost ratio of 2.5 was realized. Within a period of 15 years the number of subscribing farmers substantially increased from a few dozen to more than 80,000 in 2014. Two experiments along the paths of chemical ecology were undertaken between Sept 2012 and Feb 2013: One was designed to investigate if the legume D. intortum known to produce repellent volatiles against stem borer moths induces defence in Zea mays varieties. We looked at two open-pollinated farmers' varieties and two commercial hybrid varieties suspecting the farmers' varieties to be responsive rather than the hybrids. However, no defence induction was detected in this study so far. This could be explained by an insufficient production of defence inducing volatiles in leaves of D. intortum whereas flowers might produce a sufficient response. More detailed

  15. EXPLOITING CHEMICAL ECOLOGY FOR LIVELIHOOD IMPROVEMENT OF SMALL HOLDER FARMERS IN KENYA.

    PubMed

    Winter, E; Midega, C; Bruce, T; Hummel, H E; Langner, S S; Leithold, G; Khan, Z; Pickett, J

    2014-01-01

    "Push-Pull" is an inexpensive and eminently practical strategy designed for developing countries in order to exploit sound principles of chemical ecology for agricultural pest management. This strategy is specifically suitable for small holder farmers. Their experience can easily be integrated into existing farming practices in their immediate environment. "Push-pull" within one and a half decades became widely established and meanwhile is greatly beneficial to practitioners in East Africa, mainly Kenya. The classical push-pull approach used for applied plant-insect management was pioneered by Khan and Pickett (2000) and subsequent papers of Pickett (2003) and Khan et al. (2006, 2008). Relevant plant species explored so far were maize or sorghum intercropped with other East African plants (Desmodium spp. resp. Melinis minutiflora) possessing natural chemicals repellent resp. attractive for stem borer moths Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera), whereby Desmodium spp. was grown inside the maize rows while M. minutiflora surrounded it. Both simultaneous actions combined resulted in a significant decrease of stem borers in the area to be protected. A benefit to cost ratio of 2.5 was realized. Within a period of 15 years the number of subscribing farmers substantially increased from a few dozen to more than 80,000 in 2014. Two experiments along the paths of chemical ecology were undertaken between Sept 2012 and Feb 2013: One was designed to investigate if the legume D. intortum known to produce repellent volatiles against stem borer moths induces defence in Zea mays varieties. We looked at two open-pollinated farmers' varieties and two commercial hybrid varieties suspecting the farmers' varieties to be responsive rather than the hybrids. However, no defence induction was detected in this study so far. This could be explained by an insufficient production of defence inducing volatiles in leaves of D. intortum whereas flowers might produce a sufficient response. More detailed

  16. Chemically Derived Dense Alumina-Zirconia Composites for Improved Mechanical and Wear Erosion Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As a result of this funded project high purity Zirconia-Toughened Alumina (ZTA) ceramic powders with and without yttria were produced using metal alkoxide precursors. ZTA ceramic powders with varying volume percents of zirconia were prepared (7, 15, and 22%). Aluminum tri-sec butoxide, zirconium propoxide, and yttrium isopropoxide were the reagents used. Synthesis conditions were varied to control the hydrolysis and the aging conditions for the sol to gel transition. FTIR analysis and rheological characterization were used to follow the structural evolution during the sol to gel transition. The greater extent of hydrolysis and the build-up of structure measured from viscoelastic properties were consistent. Heat treatment was conducted to produce submicron grain fully crystalline ZTA ceramic powders. This improved materials should have enhanced properties such strength, toughness, and wear resistance for advanced structural applications, for example engine components in high technology aerospace applications.

  17. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under a China Meteorological Administration (CMA) chemical weather modeling system, GRAPES/CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System, CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment). Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are interactively fed online into a two-moment cloud scheme (WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme - WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred.

    The results show that aerosols that interact with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content, and cloud droplet number concentrations, while decreasing the mean diameters of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive microphysical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48 % enhancements of threat score for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The aerosols that interact with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  18. IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Donal F. Day

    2009-01-29

    The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State University’s Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate

  19. Human biomonitoring after chemical incidents and during short-term maintenance work as a tool for exposure analysis and assessment.

    PubMed

    Bader, M; Van Weyenbergh, T; Verwerft, E; Van Pul, J; Lang, S; Oberlinner, C

    2014-12-15

    Human biomonitoring (HBM) is frequently used for the analysis and assessment of exposure to chemicals under routine working conditions. In recent years, HBM has also been applied to monitor the exposure of the general population, and of emergency responders in the aftermath of chemical incidents. Two examples of targeted HBM programs in the chemical industry are described and discussed in this paper: (1) analysis and assessment of the exposure of firefighters and chemical workers after the spill of p-chloroaniline from a burning chemical barrel, and (2) biomonitoring of maintenance workers potentially exposed to benzene during regular turnarounds. The results of these investigations underline that human biomonitoring contributes substantially to comprehensive exposure analyses, human health risk assessments and communication. In addition, regular HBM surveillance and feedback can assist in the continuous improvement of workplace safety measures and exposure control. In conclusion, data on accidental or short-term exposure to hazardous chemicals are an important source of information for the further development of limit and assessment values, the validation of biomarkers and of targeted HBM programs for both routine monitoring and disaster management.

  20. Improving the Risk Assessment of Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic (PBT) Chemicals in Breast Milk: Workshop Summary Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a summary of discussions held at an EPA-sponsored workshop in Research Triangle Park, NC in October, 2012. Workshop participants discussed approaches to improve risk assessment of PBT chemicals in breast milk, data gaps, uncertainties, and suggested solutions...

  1. Improved Planetary Frequencies Based on Updated Kepler Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.

    2011-10-01

    Initial estimates of the intrinsic exoplanet frequencies were based on the first 132 days of Kepler observations and on the stellar properties listed in the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). Improved estimates of stellar temperatures, sizes, and metallicities are being obtained from spectroscopic observations of individual target stars and SME analysis. In turn, the new values of stellar properties contribute to more accurate estimates of candidate size and association with stellar characteristics. Continued analysis of the candidates has increased the certainty for separating false positives from true candidates. The accuracy of the intrinsic frequencies is being improved further by the recently added capability to the data analysis pipeline of being able to stitch together multiple quarters of data. This advance is boosting the discovery rate of small candidates. Based on updated candidate and stellar parameter values, we present improved and extended estimates of intrinsic frequencies and the associations of exoplanets with stellar parameters.

  2. Non-enzymatic browning in citrus juice: chemical markers, their detection and ways to improve product quality.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Bharate, Sandip B

    2014-10-01

    Citrus juices are widely consumed due to their nutritional benefits and variety of pharmacological properties. Non-enzymatic browning (NEB) is one of the most important chemical reactions responsible for quality and color changes during the heating or prolonged storage of citrus products. The present review covers various aspects of NEB in citrus juice viz. chemistry of NEB, identifiable markers of NEB, analytical methods to identify NEB markers and ways to improve the quality of citrus juice. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) is one of the promising marker formed during browning process with number of analytical methods reported for its analysis; therefore it can be used as an indicator for NEB process. Amongst analytical methods reported, RP-HPLC is more sensitive and accurate method, which can be used as analytical tool. NEB can be prevented by removal of amino acids/ proteins (via ion exchange treatment) or by targeting NEB reactions (e.g. blockage of furfural/ HMF by sulphiting agent). PMID:25328169

  3. Non-enzymatic browning in citrus juice: chemical markers, their detection and ways to improve product quality.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Bharate, Sandip B

    2014-10-01

    Citrus juices are widely consumed due to their nutritional benefits and variety of pharmacological properties. Non-enzymatic browning (NEB) is one of the most important chemical reactions responsible for quality and color changes during the heating or prolonged storage of citrus products. The present review covers various aspects of NEB in citrus juice viz. chemistry of NEB, identifiable markers of NEB, analytical methods to identify NEB markers and ways to improve the quality of citrus juice. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) is one of the promising marker formed during browning process with number of analytical methods reported for its analysis; therefore it can be used as an indicator for NEB process. Amongst analytical methods reported, RP-HPLC is more sensitive and accurate method, which can be used as analytical tool. NEB can be prevented by removal of amino acids/ proteins (via ion exchange treatment) or by targeting NEB reactions (e.g. blockage of furfural/ HMF by sulphiting agent).

  4. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  5. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information. PMID:26560682

  6. Evaluating Chemical Persistence in a Multimedia Environment: ACART Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.H.; McKone, T.E.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1999-02-01

    For the thousands of chemicals continuously released into the environment, it is desirable to make prospective assessments of those likely to be persistent. Persistent chemicals are difficult to remove if adverse health or ecological effects are later discovered. A tiered approach using a classification scheme and a multimedia model for determining persistence is presented. Using specific criteria for persistence, a classification tree is developed to classify a chemical as ''persistent'' or ''non-persistent'' based on the chemical properties. In this approach, the classification is derived from the results of a standardized unit world multimedia model. Thus, the classifications are more robust for multimedia pollutants than classifications using a single medium half-life. The method can be readily implemented and provides insight without requiring extensive and often unavailable data. This method can be used to classify chemicals when only a few properties are known and be used to direct further data collection. Case studies are presented to demonstrate the advantages of the approach.

  7. International Research Project on the Effects of Chemical Ageing of Polymers on Performance Properties: Chemical and Thermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Work during the past six months has included significant research in several areas aimed at further clarification of the aging and chemical failure mechanism of thermoplastics (PVDF or Tefzel) pipes. Among the areas investigated were the crystallinity changes associated with both the Coflon and Tefzel after various simulated environmental exposures using X-ray diffraction analysis. We have found that significant changes in polymer crystallinity levels occur as a function of the exposures. These crystallinity changes may have important consequences on the fracture, fatigue, tensile, and chemical resistance of the materials. We have also noted small changes in the molecular weight distribution. Again these changes may result in variations in the mechanical and chemical properties in the material. We conducted numerous analytical studies with methods including X-ray Diffraction, Gel Permeation Chromatography, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Ultra- Violet Scanning Analysis, GC/Mass Spectrometry, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermomechanical Analysis. In the ultra-violet analysis we noted the presence of an absorption band indicative of triene formation. We investigated a number of aged samples of both Tefzel and Coflon that were forwarded from MERL. We also cast films at SWT and subjected these films to a refluxing methanol 1% ethylene diamine solution. An updated literature search was conducted using Dialog and DROLLS to identify any new papers that may have been published in the open literature since the start of this project. The updated literature search and abstracts are contained in the Appendix section of this report.

  8. Analysis of forward and inverse problems in chemical dynamics and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabitz, H.

    1993-12-01

    The overall scope of this research concerns the development and application of forward and inverse analysis tools for problems in chemical dynamics and chemical kinetics. The chemical dynamics work is specifically associated with relating features in potential surfaces and resultant dynamical behavior. The analogous inverse research aims to provide stable algorithms for extracting potential surfaces from laboratory data. In the case of chemical kinetics, the focus is on the development of systematic means to reduce the complexity of chemical kinetic models. Recent progress in these directions is summarized below.

  9. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis and its implementation in deep tissue with a catheter setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhou-xian; Lin, Jian-die D.; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the relative concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. This study validated the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing liver conditions during the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also tested.

  10. Improving the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of camel meat burger patties using ginger extract and papain.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Naeem, Heba H S; Mohamed, Hussein M H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the current study was to include tenderizing agents in the formulation of camel meat burger patties to improve the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of the product. Camel meat burger patties were processed with addition of ginger extract (7%), papain (0.01%) and mixture of ginger extract (5%) and papain (0.005%) in addition to control. Addition of ginger, papain and their mixture resulted in significant (P<0.05) increase of the collagen solubility and sensory scores (juiciness, tenderness and overall acceptability) with significant (P<0.05) reduction of the shear force values. Ginger extract resulted in extensive fragmentation of myofibrils; however, papain extract caused noticeable destructive effect on connective tissue. Moreover, ginger and papain resulted in improvement of the lipid stability of treated burger patties during storage. Therefore, addition of ginger extract and papain powder during formulation of camel burger patties can improve their physico-chemical and sensory properties.

  11. Improving the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of camel meat burger patties using ginger extract and papain.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Naeem, Heba H S; Mohamed, Hussein M H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the current study was to include tenderizing agents in the formulation of camel meat burger patties to improve the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of the product. Camel meat burger patties were processed with addition of ginger extract (7%), papain (0.01%) and mixture of ginger extract (5%) and papain (0.005%) in addition to control. Addition of ginger, papain and their mixture resulted in significant (P<0.05) increase of the collagen solubility and sensory scores (juiciness, tenderness and overall acceptability) with significant (P<0.05) reduction of the shear force values. Ginger extract resulted in extensive fragmentation of myofibrils; however, papain extract caused noticeable destructive effect on connective tissue. Moreover, ginger and papain resulted in improvement of the lipid stability of treated burger patties during storage. Therefore, addition of ginger extract and papain powder during formulation of camel burger patties can improve their physico-chemical and sensory properties. PMID:27045253

  12. Genomic analysis of thermophilic Bacillus coagulans strains: efficient producers for platform bio-chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Microbial strains with high substrate efficiency and excellent environmental tolerance are urgently needed for the production of platform bio-chemicals. Bacillus coagulans has these merits; however, little genetic information is available about this species. Here, we determined the genome sequences of five B. coagulans strains, and used a comparative genomic approach to reconstruct the central carbon metabolism of this species to explain their fermentation features. A novel xylose isomerase in the xylose utilization pathway was identified in these strains. Based on a genome-wide positive selection scan, the selection pressure on amino acid metabolism may have played a significant role in the thermal adaptation. We also researched the immune systems of B. coagulans strains, which provide them with acquired resistance to phages and mobile genetic elements. Our genomic analysis provides comprehensive insights into the genetic characteristics of B. coagulans and paves the way for improving and extending the uses of this species. PMID:24473268

  13. Improving the assessment of endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) effects on puberty

    EPA Science Inventory

    During puberty, key developmental events occur that are critical for normal adult male and female reproductive maturation. Recent studies raised concern that exposure to environmental chemicals alter the normal progression through puberty and lead to impaired reproductive functio...

  14. Prospects for improved detection of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, Craig R.; Hart, Brad; Slezak, Thomas R.

    2012-07-31

    Acquisition and use of Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons continue to be a major focus of concern form the security apparatus of nation states because of their potential for mass casualties when used by a determined adversary.

  15. Rohm and Haas: Furnace Replacement Project Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2006-02-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Rohm and Haas’s Deer Park, Texas, chemical plant reduced natural gas usage and energy costs by replacing inefficient furnace equipment.

  16. Improved inhalation technology for setting safe exposure levels for workplace chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Bruce O.

    1993-01-01

    Threshold Limit Values recommended as allowable air concentrations of a chemical in the workplace are often based upon a no-observable-effect-level (NOEL) determined by experimental inhalation studies using rodents. A 'safe level' for human exposure must then be estimated by the use of generalized safety factors in attempts to extrapolate from experimental rodents to man. The recent development of chemical-specific physiologically-based toxicokinetics makes use of measured physiological, biochemical, and metabolic parameters to construct a validated model that is able to 'scale-up' rodent response data to predict the behavior of the chemical in man. This procedure is made possible by recent advances in personal computer software and the emergence of appropriate biological data, and provides an analytical tool for much more reliable risk evaluation and airborne chemical exposure level setting for humans.

  17. An Improved Experiment to Illustrate the Effect of Electronegativity on Chemical Shift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggess, Robert K.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a method for using nuclear magnetic resonance to observe the effect of electronegativity on the chemical shift of protons in similar compounds. Suggests the use of 1,3-dihalopropanes as samples. Includes sample questions. (MVL)

  18. Portfolio Assessment on Chemical Reactor Analysis and Process Design Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alha, Katariina

    2004-01-01

    Assessment determines what students regard as important: if a teacher wants to change students' learning, he/she should change the methods of assessment. This article describes the use of portfolio assessment on five courses dealing with chemical reactor and process design during the years 1999-2001. Although the use of portfolio was a new…

  19. ASTP chemical and microbiological analysis of potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Leslie, S. A.

    1976-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project procedures for potable water system servicing and the results of preflight and postflight chemical and microbiological analyses of the water are discussed. Tables show results of the analyses. The effectiveness of the water system is evaluated.

  20. An Analysis of the Algebraic Method for Balancing Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes the algebraic method for balancing chemical reactions. Introduces a third general condition that involves a balance between the total amount of oxidation and reduction. Requires the specification of oxidation states for all elements throughout the reaction. Describes the general conditions, the mathematical treatment, redox reactions, and…

  1. Koopmans' Analysis of Chemical Hardness with Spectral-Like Resolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three approximation levels of Koopmans' theorem are explored and applied: the first referring to the inner quantum behavior of the orbitalic energies that depart from the genuine ones in Fock space when the wave-functions' Hilbert-Banach basis set is specified to solve the many-electronic spectra of spin-orbitals' eigenstates; it is the most subtle issue regarding Koopmans' theorem as it brings many critics and refutation in the last decades, yet it is shown here as an irrefutable “observational” effect through computation, specific to any in silico spectra of an eigenproblem; the second level assumes the “frozen spin-orbitals” approximation during the extracting or adding of electrons to the frontier of the chemical system through the ionization and affinity processes, respectively; this approximation is nevertheless workable for great deal of chemical compounds, especially organic systems, and is justified for chemical reactivity and aromaticity hierarchies in an homologue series; the third and the most severe approximation regards the extension of the second one to superior orders of ionization and affinities, here studied at the level of chemical hardness compact-finite expressions up to spectral-like resolution for a paradigmatic set of aromatic carbohydrates. PMID:23970834

  2. Sampling of vehicle emissions for chemical analysis and biological testing.

    PubMed Central

    Schuetzle, D

    1983-01-01

    Representative dilution tube sampling techniques for particulate and gas phase vehicle emissions are described using Teflon filter media and XAD-2 resin. More than 90% of the total gas (C8-C18) and particulate direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity (TA 98) was found in the particulate phase. The gas and particulate phase material was fractionated by HPLC into nonpolar, moderately polar and highly polar chemical fractions. The moderately polar chemical fraction of the particulates contained more than 50% of the direct acting Ames assay mutagenicity for the total extract. The concentration of oxygenated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAH) and nitrated PAH (nitro-PAH) identified in the moderately polar particulate fractions are given. Nitro-PAH account for most of the direct-acting (TA 98) Ames assay mutagenicity in these moderately polar fractions. Reactions and kinetic expressions for chemical conversion of PAH are presented. Chemical conversion of PAH to nitro-PAH during dilution tube sampling of particulates on Teflon filters and gases on XAD-2 resin is a minor problem (representing 10-20%, on the average, of the 1-nitropyrene found in extracts) at short (46 min) sampling times, at low sampling temperatures (42 degrees C), and in diluted exhaust containing 3 ppm NO2. Particulate emissions collected from dilution tubes on filter media appear to be representative of what is emitted in the environment as based upon a comparison of highway and laboratory studies. PMID:6186484

  3. Improved method for in vitro assessment of dermal toxicity for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, James V; McDougal, James N

    2002-09-01

    Cell culture methods are being developed to assess the dermal toxicity (irritancy and corrosion) of chemicals. These in vitro methods are being validated to categorize chemicals as irritating or non-irritating to humans. Currently, these cell culture tests are useful to assist in the ranking of chemicals for irritancy, but they are not useful for quantitative risk assessment for two reasons. First, for volatile chemicals the amount of chemical in the media that the cells are exposed to may decrease with exposure time. Also, effective concentrations such as EC(50) and IC(50) are reported as the concentrations in the media not the skin tissue/cells. We have developed an in vitro approach for dermal toxicity testing of volatile chemicals that avoids these problems. Using sealed vials lacking a headspace, dermal equivalents (dermal fibroblasts in a collagen matrix) were exposed to culture medium containing a test chemical (m-xylene) and compared to a traditional open well culture system. We found that about 90% of the m-xylene was lost from the open well plates and the viability was 4-6 times greater than in the closed system. Partition coefficients were measured and used to estimate the m-xylene concentration in the fibroblasts. The EC(50) for m-xylene in the dermal equivalents was 833.13+/-35.33 microg m-xylene per gram of fibroblasts. This method will provide an effective approach to relate target cell chemical concentration to cellular responses. Based on this method, a biologically-based mathematical model could be used to determine an equivalent external dose for a specific toxic end point.

  4. Fluorescence, XPS, and TOF-SIMS surface chemical state image analysis of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Harbers, Gregory M; Grainger, David W; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G

    2007-08-01

    Performance improvements in DNA-modified surfaces required for microarray and biosensor applications rely on improved capabilities to accurately characterize the chemistry and structure of immobilized DNA molecules on micropatterned surfaces. Recent innovations in imaging X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) now permit more detailed studies of micropatterned surfaces. We have exploited the complementary information provided by imaging XPS and imaging TOF-SIMS to detail the chemical composition, spatial distribution, and hybridization efficiency of amine-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound to commercial polyacrylamide-based, amine-reactive microarray slides, immobilized in both macrospot and microarray diagnostic formats. Combinations of XPS imaging and small spot analysis were used to identify micropatterned DNA spots within printed DNA arrays on slide surfaces and quantify DNA elements within individual microarray spots for determination of probe immobilization and hybridization efficiencies. This represents the first report of imaging XPS of DNA immobilization and hybridization efficiencies for arrays fabricated on commercial microarray slides. Imaging TOF-SIMS provided distinct analytical data on the lateral distribution of DNA within single array microspots before and after target hybridization. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to TOF-SIMS imaging datasets demonstrated that the combination of these two techniques provides information not readily observable in TOF-SIMS images alone, particularly in identifying species associated with array spot nonuniformities (e.g., "halo" or "donut" effects often observed in fluorescence images). Chemically specific spot images were compared to conventional fluorescence scanned images in microarrays to provide new information on spot-to-spot DNA variations that affect current diagnostic reliability, assay variance, and sensitivity.

  5. Fluorescence, XPS, and TOF-SIMS surface chemical state image analysis of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Harbers, Gregory M; Grainger, David W; Gamble, Lara J; Castner, David G

    2007-08-01

    Performance improvements in DNA-modified surfaces required for microarray and biosensor applications rely on improved capabilities to accurately characterize the chemistry and structure of immobilized DNA molecules on micropatterned surfaces. Recent innovations in imaging X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) now permit more detailed studies of micropatterned surfaces. We have exploited the complementary information provided by imaging XPS and imaging TOF-SIMS to detail the chemical composition, spatial distribution, and hybridization efficiency of amine-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound to commercial polyacrylamide-based, amine-reactive microarray slides, immobilized in both macrospot and microarray diagnostic formats. Combinations of XPS imaging and small spot analysis were used to identify micropatterned DNA spots within printed DNA arrays on slide surfaces and quantify DNA elements within individual microarray spots for determination of probe immobilization and hybridization efficiencies. This represents the first report of imaging XPS of DNA immobilization and hybridization efficiencies for arrays fabricated on commercial microarray slides. Imaging TOF-SIMS provided distinct analytical data on the lateral distribution of DNA within single array microspots before and after target hybridization. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to TOF-SIMS imaging datasets demonstrated that the combination of these two techniques provides information not readily observable in TOF-SIMS images alone, particularly in identifying species associated with array spot nonuniformities (e.g., "halo" or "donut" effects often observed in fluorescence images). Chemically specific spot images were compared to conventional fluorescence scanned images in microarrays to provide new information on spot-to-spot DNA variations that affect current diagnostic reliability, assay variance, and sensitivity. PMID:17625851

  6. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with

  7. Development of Improved Vaccine Adjuvants Based on the Saponin Natural Product QS-21 through Chemical Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Tan, Derek S; Gin, David Y

    2016-09-20

    Vaccines based on molecular subunit antigens are increasingly being investigated due to their improved safety and more precise targeting compared to classical whole-pathogen vaccines. However, subunit vaccines are inherently less immunogenic; thus, coadministration of an adjuvant to increase the immunogenicity of the antigen is often necessary to elicit a potent immune response. QS-21, an immunostimulatory saponin natural product, has been used as an adjuvant in conjunction with various vaccines in numerous clinical trials, but suffers from several inherent liabilities, including scarcity, chemical instability, and dose-limiting toxicity. Moreover, little is known about its mechanism of action. Over a decade-long effort, beginning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and continuing at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), the group of Prof. David Y. Gin accomplished the total synthesis of QS-21 and developed a practical semisynthetic approach to novel variants that overcome the liabilities of the natural product. First, semisynthetic QS-21 variants were designed with stable amide linkages in the acyl chain domain that exhibited comparable in vivo adjuvant activity and lower toxicity than the natural product. Further modifications in the acyl chain domain and truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain led to identification of a trisaccharide variant with a simple carboxylic acid side chain that retained potent adjuvant activity, albeit with reemergence of toxicity. Conversely, an acyl chain analogue terminating in a free amine was inactive but enabled chemoselective functionalization with radiolabeled and fluorescent tags, yielding adjuvant-active saponin probes that, unlike inactive congeners, accumulated in the lymph nodes in vaccinated mice and internalized into dendritic cells. Subtle variations in length, stereochemistry, and conformational flexibility around the central glycosidic linkage provided QS-21 variants with adjuvant

  8. An Improved Qualitative Analysis Procedure for Aluminum Subgroup Cations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kistner, C. R.; Robinson, Patricia J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a procedure for the qualitative analysis of aluminum subgroup cations designed to avoid failure to obtain lead or barium chromate precipitates or failure to report aluminum hydroxide when present (due to staining). Provides a flow chart and step-by-step explanation for the new procedure, indicating significantly improved student results.…

  9. The Impact of Chemical Abrasion on Trace Element Analysis of Zircon by In Situ Micro-Analytical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanoski, A.; Coint, N.; Cottle, J. M.; Hetherington, C. J.; Barnes, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction of the chemical abrasion technique has significantly increased the precision and accuracy of ID-TIMS U-Pb dating of zircon. The chemical abrasion technique, coupled with thermal annealing, removes inclusions and metamict domains from zircon reducing the impact of Pb-loss leading to more concordant analyses.In this study, zircon from the Red Bluff Granitic Suite (TX) (ID-TIMS age 1120 ± 35 Ma) has been thermally annealed and chemically abraded prior to SHRIMP-RG and LA-MC-ICP-MS analysis.Chemically abraded zircon gives a date of 1109 ± 22 Ma with an average of 3% discordancy. This compares with dates of 1137 ± 48 Ma with an average of 39% discordancy for non-abraded zircon from the same sample. The dates overlap within uncertainty, but the age from chemically abraded zircon has a lower population uncertainty. Other petrographic and analytical observations of the chemically abraded zircon include brighter CL intensity, lower REE abundances, more consistent (smaller scatter) negative Eu/Eu* anomalies, less scatter in the chondrite-normalized LREE values, and a slightly less-steep chondrite normalized HREE slope. The data show that thermal annealing and chemical abrasion of zircon prior to analysis by in situ ion-beam or laser ablation techniques may result in better accuracy and greater concordance in U-Pb analysis of zircon. However, while improving the quality of some components of the trace element dataset (e.g. Eu anomalies) the process may prejudice the interpretation of zircon trace element data (e.g. HREECN slopes).

  10. High resolution Physio-chemical Tissue Analysis: Towards Non-invasive In Vivo Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuo-xian; Lin, Jian-die; Deng, Cheri X.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-01-01

    Conventional gold standard histopathologic diagnosis requires information of both high resolution structural and chemical changes in tissue. Providing optical information at ultrasonic resolution, photoacoustic (PA) technique could provide highly sensitive and highly accurate tissue characterization noninvasively in the authentic in vivo environment, offering a replacement for histopathology. A two-dimensional (2D) physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) combining micrometer to centimeter morphology and chemical composition simultaneously can be generated for each biological sample with PA measurements at multiple optical wavelengths. This spectrogram presents a unique 2D “physio-chemical signature” for any specific type of tissue. Comprehensive analysis of PCS, termed PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), can lead to very rich diagnostic information, including the contents of all relevant molecular and chemical components along with their corresponding histological microfeatures, comparable to those accessible by conventional histology. PAPCA could contribute to the diagnosis of many diseases involving diffusive patterns such as fatty liver. PMID:26842459

  11. High resolution Physio-chemical Tissue Analysis: Towards Non-invasive In Vivo Biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Lin, Jian-Die; Deng, Cheri X.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Tao, Chao; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Xueding

    2016-02-01

    Conventional gold standard histopathologic diagnosis requires information of both high resolution structural and chemical changes in tissue. Providing optical information at ultrasonic resolution, photoacoustic (PA) technique could provide highly sensitive and highly accurate tissue characterization noninvasively in the authentic in vivo environment, offering a replacement for histopathology. A two-dimensional (2D) physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) combining micrometer to centimeter morphology and chemical composition simultaneously can be generated for each biological sample with PA measurements at multiple optical wavelengths. This spectrogram presents a unique 2D “physio-chemical signature” for any specific type of tissue. Comprehensive analysis of PCS, termed PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), can lead to very rich diagnostic information, including the contents of all relevant molecular and chemical components along with their corresponding histological microfeatures, comparable to those accessible by conventional histology. PAPCA could contribute to the diagnosis of many diseases involving diffusive patterns such as fatty liver.

  12. Improving the Discipline of Cost Estimation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.; Pine, David J.; Wilson, Delano M.

    2000-01-01

    The need to improve the quality and accuracy of cost estimates of proposed new aerospace systems has been widely recognized. The industry has done the best job of maintaining related capability with improvements in estimation methods and giving appropriate priority to the hiring and training of qualified analysts. Some parts of Government, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in particular, continue to need major improvements in this area. Recently, NASA recognized that its cost estimation and analysis capabilities had eroded to the point that the ability to provide timely, reliable estimates was impacting the confidence in planning man), program activities. As a result, this year the Agency established a lead role for cost estimation and analysis. The Independent Program Assessment Office located at the Langley Research Center was given this responsibility.

  13. Improving food safety within the dairy chain: an application of conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Valeeva, N I; Meuwissen, M P M; Lansink, A G J M Oude; Huirne, R B M

    2005-04-01

    This study determined the relative importance of attributes of food safety improvement in the production chain of fluid pasteurized milk. The chain was divided into 4 blocks: "feed" (compound feed production and its transport), "farm" (dairy farm), "dairy processing" (transport and processing of raw milk, delivery of pasteurized milk), and "consumer" (retailer/catering establishment and pasteurized milk consumption). The concept of food safety improvement focused on 2 main groups of hazards: chemical (antibiotics and dioxin) and microbiological (Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, and Staphylococcus aureus). Adaptive conjoint analysis was used to investigate food safety experts' perceptions of the attributes' importance. Preference data from individual experts (n = 24) on 101 attributes along the chain were collected in a computer-interactive mode. Experts perceived the attributes from the "feed" and "farm" blocks as being more vital for controlling the chemical hazards; whereas the attributes from the "farm" and "dairy processing" were considered more vital for controlling the microbiological hazards. For the chemical hazards, "identification of treated cows" and "quality assurance system of compound feed manufacturers" were considered the most important attributes. For the microbiological hazards, these were "manure supply source" and "action in salmonellosis and M. paratuberculosis cases". The rather high importance of attributes relating to quality assurance and traceability systems of the chain participants indicates that participants look for food safety assurance from the preceding participants. This information has substantial decision-making implications for private businesses along the chain and for the government regarding the food safety improvement of fluid pasteurized milk.

  14. Improved reliability analysis method based on the failure assessment diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Zhong, Qunpeng

    2012-07-01

    With the uncertainties related to operating conditions, in-service non-destructive testing (NDT) measurements and material properties considered in the structural integrity assessment, probabilistic analysis based on the failure assessment diagram (FAD) approach has recently become an important concern. However, the point density revealing the probabilistic distribution characteristics of the assessment points is usually ignored. To obtain more detailed and direct knowledge from the reliability analysis, an improved probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) assessment method is proposed. By integrating 2D kernel density estimation (KDE) technology into the traditional probabilistic assessment, the probabilistic density of the randomly distributed assessment points is visualized in the assessment diagram. Moreover, a modified interval sensitivity analysis is implemented and compared with probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The improved reliability analysis method is applied to the assessment of a high pressure pipe containing an axial internal semi-elliptical surface crack. The results indicate that these two methods can give consistent sensitivities of input parameters, but the interval sensitivity analysis is computationally more efficient. Meanwhile, the point density distribution and its contour are plotted in the FAD, thereby better revealing the characteristics of PFM assessment. This study provides a powerful tool for the reliability analysis of critical structures.

  15. Chemical etching and EDAX analysis of beryllium-free nickel-chromium ceramo-metal alloy.

    PubMed

    Atta, O M; Mosleh, I E; Shehata, M T

    1995-10-01

    A chemical etching technique is described for producing etch patterns in beryllium-free nickel chromium ceramo-metal alloy. Disc-shaped samples were chemically etched, evaluated with SEM and analysed by the EDAX technique. Scanning electron micrographs revealed, profound retentive cavities. The EDAX analysis provided a comprehensive interpretation of the etch mechanism. The obtained results show that the developed chemical etching has the potential to produce a highly retentive etched surface with less problematic and less technique sensitive than electrolytic etching.

  16. Chemical analysis of charged Li/SO(sub)2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, S.; Lawson, D.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Barnes, J.; Bis, R.

    1987-01-01

    The initial focus of the program was to confirm that charging can indeed result in explosions and constitute a significant safety problem. Results of this initial effort clearly demonstrated that cells do indeed explode on charge and that charging does indeed constitute a real and severe safety problem. The results of the effort to identify the chemical reactions involved in and responsible for the observed behavior are described.

  17. Investigation and improvement of three-dimensional plasma crystal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, C.; Thoma, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, existing methods for plasma crystal analysis are investigated using artificial and simulated calibration data, which reproduce a multiphase system consisting of fcc, hcp, and bcc crystal data. Disturbances of the artificial data including Gaussian noise, stretching, and randomly missing particles are used to investigate the methods thoroughly. A popular method, called bond order parameter, has been repeatedly criticized as a structure analysis tool and will be improved with the help of a recent development. The method is called the bcc-sensitive Minkowski structure metric. It enhances robustness and consistency, while remaining compatible with previous bond-order-based results. Also, a promising method rooted in the molecular dynamics community is tested, yielding detailed insight of bond-order-specific drawbacks. With this investigation, the state of three-dimensional plasma crystal analysis will be significantly improved.

  18. Miniaturised wireless smart tag for optical chemical analysis applications.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Matthew D; Kassal, Petar; Tkalčec, Biserka; Murković Steinberg, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturised photometer has been developed as an ultra-portable and mobile analytical chemical instrument. The low-cost photometer presents a paradigm shift in mobile chemical sensor instrumentation because it is built around a contactless smart card format. The photometer tag is based on the radio-frequency identification (RFID) smart card system, which provides short-range wireless data and power transfer between the photometer and a proximal reader, and which allows the reader to also energise the photometer by near field electromagnetic induction. RFID is set to become a key enabling technology of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), hence devices such as the photometer described here will enable numerous mobile, wearable and vanguard chemical sensing applications in the emerging connected world. In the work presented here, we demonstrate the characterisation of a low-power RFID wireless sensor tag with an LED/photodiode-based photometric input. The performance of the wireless photometer has been tested through two different model analytical applications. The first is photometry in solution, where colour intensity as a function of dye concentration was measured. The second is an ion-selective optode system in which potassium ion concentrations were determined by using previously well characterised bulk optode membranes. The analytical performance of the wireless photometer smart tag is clearly demonstrated by these optical absorption-based analytical experiments, with excellent data agreement to a reference laboratory instrument.

  19. A thermodynamic analysis of alternative approaches to chemical looping combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Veerathu K; Daw, C Stuart; Pihl, Josh A

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we review and clarify some of the points made by previous authors regarding chemical looping combustion (CLC). While much of the recent interest in chemical looping combustion has been associated with carbon sequestration, our primary interest here is its potential to increase the thermodynamic efficiency of converting fuel chemical energy into useful work. We expand on several points about the details of CLC that we feel have not previously been sufficiently explored, and suggest alternative (and possibly more practical) approaches that exploit some of the same thermodynamic concepts. We illustrate our key points with {First} and {Second} Law analyses of ideal conceptual processes, which in addition to {CLC} also include isothermal, non-equilibrium, preheated combustion and combustion with thermochemical recuperation. Our results suggest that a significant portion of the potential efficiency benefit of CLC might be achieved without the need to handle and transport large quantities of solid oxygen storage material. Exploitation of this fact may lead to higher efficiency approaches for power generation from hydrocarbon fuels combustion.

  20. Miniaturised wireless smart tag for optical chemical analysis applications.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Matthew D; Kassal, Petar; Tkalčec, Biserka; Murković Steinberg, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturised photometer has been developed as an ultra-portable and mobile analytical chemical instrument. The low-cost photometer presents a paradigm shift in mobile chemical sensor instrumentation because it is built around a contactless smart card format. The photometer tag is based on the radio-frequency identification (RFID) smart card system, which provides short-range wireless data and power transfer between the photometer and a proximal reader, and which allows the reader to also energise the photometer by near field electromagnetic induction. RFID is set to become a key enabling technology of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), hence devices such as the photometer described here will enable numerous mobile, wearable and vanguard chemical sensing applications in the emerging connected world. In the work presented here, we demonstrate the characterisation of a low-power RFID wireless sensor tag with an LED/photodiode-based photometric input. The performance of the wireless photometer has been tested through two different model analytical applications. The first is photometry in solution, where colour intensity as a function of dye concentration was measured. The second is an ion-selective optode system in which potassium ion concentrations were determined by using previously well characterised bulk optode membranes. The analytical performance of the wireless photometer smart tag is clearly demonstrated by these optical absorption-based analytical experiments, with excellent data agreement to a reference laboratory instrument. PMID:24274311

  1. Tattoo inks: legislation, pigments, metals and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Prior, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Legal limits for chemical substances require that they are linked to clearly defined analytical methods. Present limits for certain chemicals in tattoo and permanent make-up inks do not mention analytical methods for the detection of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or forbidden colourants. There is, therefore, no established method for the determination of the quantities of these chemicals in tattoo and permanent make-up inks. Failing to provide an appropriate method may lead to unqualified and questionable results which often cause legal disputes that are ultimately resolved by a judge with regard to the method that should have been applied. Analytical methods are tuned to exactly what is to be found and what causes the health problems. They are extremely specific. Irrespective of which is the correct method for detecting metals in tattoo inks, the focus should be on the actual amounts of ink in the skin. CTL® has conducted experiments to determine these amounts and these experiments are crucial for toxicological evaluations and for setting legal limits. When setting legal limits, it is essential to also incorporate factors such as daily consumption, total uptake and frequency of use. A tattoo lasts for several decades; therefore, the limits that have been established for heavy metals used in drinking water or soap are not relevant. Drinking water is consumed on a daily basis and soap is used several times per week, while tattooing only occurs once. PMID:25833637

  2. Chemical Discrimination of Cortex Phellodendri amurensis and Cortex Phellodendri chinensis by Multivariate Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Aihua; Yan, Guangli; Han, Ying; Li, Yuan; Wu, Xiuhong; Meng, Xiangcai; Wang, Xijun

    2016-01-01

    Background: As herbal medicines have an important position in health care systems worldwide, their current assessment, and quality control are a major bottleneck. Cortex Phellodendri chinensis (CPC) and Cortex Phellodendri amurensis (CPA) are widely used in China, however, how to identify species of CPA and CPC has become urgent. Materials and Methods: In this study, multivariate analysis approach was performed to the investigation of chemical discrimination of CPA and CPC. Results: Principal component analysis showed that two herbs could be separated clearly. The chemical markers such as berberine, palmatine, phellodendrine, magnoflorine, obacunone, and obaculactone were identified through the orthogonal partial least squared discriminant analysis, and were identified tentatively by the accurate mass of quadruple-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 29 components can be used as the chemical markers for discrimination of CPA and CPC. Of them, phellodenrine is significantly higher in CPC than that of CPA, whereas obacunone and obaculactone are significantly higher in CPA than that of CPC. Conclusion: The present study proves that multivariate analysis approach based chemical analysis greatly contributes to the investigation of CPA and CPC, and showed that the identified chemical markers as a whole should be used to discriminate the two herbal medicines, and simultaneously the results also provided chemical information for their quality assessment. SUMMARY Multivariate analysis approach was performed to the investigate the herbal medicineThe chemical markers were identified through multivariate analysis approachA total of 29 components can be used as the chemical markers. UPLC-Q/TOF-MS-based multivariate analysis method for the herbal medicine samples Abbreviations used: CPC: Cortex Phellodendri chinensis, CPA: Cortex Phellodendri amurensis, PCA: Principal component analysis, OPLS-DA: Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, BPI: Base peaks ion

  3. Comparative study of mechanical, hydrothermal, chemical and enzymatic treatments of digested biofibers to improve biogas production.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Emiliano; Jensen, Anders Peter; Angelidaki, Irini

    2010-11-01

    Organic waste such as manure is an important resource for biogas production. The biodegradability of manures is however limited because of the recalcitrant nature of the biofibers it contains. To increase the biogas potential of the biofibers in digested manure, we investigated physical treatment (milling), chemical treatment (CaO), biological treatment (enzymatic and partial aerobic microbial conversion), steam treatment with catalyst (H(3)PO(4) or NaOH) and combination of biological and steam treatments (biofibers steam-treated with catalyst were treated with laccase enzyme). We obtained the highest methane yield increase through the chemical treatment that resulted in 66% higher methane production compared to untreated biofibers. The combination of steam treatment with NaOH and subsequent enzymatic treatment increased the methane yield by 34%. To choose the optimal treatment, the energy requirements relative to the energy gain as extra biogas production have to be taken into account, as well as the costs of chemicals or enzymes.

  4. Chemical analysis and antihyperglycemic activity of an original extract from burdock root (Arctium lappa).

    PubMed

    Tousch, Didier; Bidel, Luc P R; Cazals, Guillaume; Ferrare, Karine; Leroy, Jeremy; Faucanié, Marie; Chevassus, Hugues; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained a dried burdock root extract (DBRE) rich in caffeoylquinic acids derivatives. We performed the chemical characterization of DBRE and explored its antihyperglycemic potential in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Chemical analysis of DBRE using LC-MS and GC-MS revealed the presence of a great majority of dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives (75.4%) of which 1,5-di-O-caffeoyl-4-O-maloylquinic acid represents 44% of the extract. In the in vitro experiments, DBRE is able to increase glucose uptake in cultured L6 myocytes and to decrease glucagon-induced glucose output from rat isolated hepatocytes together with a reduction of hepatic glucose 6-phosphatase activity. DBRE did not increase insulin secretion in the INS-1 pancreatic β-cell line. In vivo, DBRE improves glucose tolerance both after intraperitoneal and oral subchronic administration. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DBRE constitutes an original set of caffeoylquinic acid derivatives displaying antihyperglycemic properties.

  5. Chemical analysis and antihyperglycemic activity of an original extract from burdock root (Arctium lappa).

    PubMed

    Tousch, Didier; Bidel, Luc P R; Cazals, Guillaume; Ferrare, Karine; Leroy, Jeremy; Faucanié, Marie; Chevassus, Hugues; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we obtained a dried burdock root extract (DBRE) rich in caffeoylquinic acids derivatives. We performed the chemical characterization of DBRE and explored its antihyperglycemic potential in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Chemical analysis of DBRE using LC-MS and GC-MS revealed the presence of a great majority of dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives (75.4%) of which 1,5-di-O-caffeoyl-4-O-maloylquinic acid represents 44% of the extract. In the in vitro experiments, DBRE is able to increase glucose uptake in cultured L6 myocytes and to decrease glucagon-induced glucose output from rat isolated hepatocytes together with a reduction of hepatic glucose 6-phosphatase activity. DBRE did not increase insulin secretion in the INS-1 pancreatic β-cell line. In vivo, DBRE improves glucose tolerance both after intraperitoneal and oral subchronic administration. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DBRE constitutes an original set of caffeoylquinic acid derivatives displaying antihyperglycemic properties. PMID:24933284

  6. Towards an improved understanding of processes controlling absorption efficiency and biomagnification of organic chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Arnot, Jon A; MacLeod, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Dietary exposure is considered the dominant pathway for fish exposed to persistent, hydrophobic chemicals in the environment. Here we present a dynamic, fugacity-based three-compartment bioaccumulation model that describes the fish body as one compartment and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) as two compartments. The model simulates uptake from the GIT by passive diffusion and micelle-mediated diffusion, and chemical degradation in the fish and the GIT compartments. We applied the model to a consistent measured dietary uptake and depuration dataset for rainbow trout (n=215) that is comprised of chlorinated benzenes, biphenyls, dioxins, diphenyl ethers, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Model performance relative to the measured data is statistically similar regardless of whether micelle-mediated diffusion is included; however, there are considerable uncertainties in modeling this process. When degradation in the GIT is assumed to be negligible, modeled chemical elimination rates are similar to measured rates; however, predicted concentrations of the PAHs are consistently higher than measurements by up to a factor of 20. Introducing a kinetic limit on chemical transport from the fish compartment to the GIT and increasing the rate constant for degradation of PAHs in tissues of the liver and/or GIT are required to achieve good agreement between the modelled and measured concentrations for PAHs. Our results indicate that the apparent low absorption efficiency of PAHs relative to the chemicals with similar hydrophobicity is attributable to biotransformation in the liver and/or the GIT. Our results provide process-level insights about controls on the extent of bioaccumulation of chemicals.

  7. Comprehensive Mass Analysis for Chemical Processes, a Case Study on L-Dopa Manufacture

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the “greenness” of chemical processes in route selection and process development, we propose a comprehensive mass analysis to inform the stakeholders from different fields. This is carried out by characterizing the mass intensity for each contributing chemical or wast...

  8. Analysis of solids remaining following chemical cleaning in tank 6F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Michael R.; Fondeur, Fernando F.; Missimer, David M.; Summer, Michael E.; Fink, Samuel D.

    2010-02-05

    Following chemical cleaning, a solid sample was collected and submitted to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. SRNL analyzed this sample by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the composition of the solids remaining in Tank 6F and to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process.

  9. Exploring the Potential for Using Inexpensive Natural Reagents Extracted from Plants to Teach Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap

    2012-01-01

    A number of scientific articles report on the use of natural extracts from plants as chemical reagents, where the main objective is to present the scientific applications of those natural plant extracts. The author suggests that natural reagents extracted from plants can be used as alternative low cost tools in teaching chemical analysis,…

  10. An investigation of chemically-induced improvement in saturation moisture characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St.clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    MY-720/DDS epoxy samples were treated with three selected chemical compounds to render the active H-sites inactive for moisture absorption. Treating the epoxy castings with acetyl chloride and dichlorodimethyl silane leads only to surface changes indicating that these molecules are too large to penetrate the epoxy castings. Boron trifluoride, on the other hand, does penetrate the epoxy chain as is indicated by the formation of green domains in the interior of the castings. However, the process of saturating the specimens with moisture appears to leach out the chemical additives--thereby nullifying their possible ameliorative effects.

  11. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P; Davidson, Warren J; Flemons, W Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment. PMID:27445545

  12. Using Operational Analysis to Improve Access to Pulmonary Function Testing.

    PubMed

    Ip, Ada; Asamoah-Barnieh, Raymond; Bischak, Diane P; Davidson, Warren J; Flemons, W Ward; Pendharkar, Sachin R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Timely pulmonary function testing is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary diseases. Perceptions of poor access at an academic pulmonary function laboratory prompted analysis of system demand and capacity to identify factors contributing to poor access. Methods. Surveys and interviews identified stakeholder perspectives on operational processes and access challenges. Retrospective data on testing demand and resource capacity was analyzed to understand utilization of testing resources. Results. Qualitative analysis demonstrated that stakeholder groups had discrepant views on access and capacity in the laboratory. Mean daily resource utilization was 0.64 (SD 0.15), with monthly average utilization consistently less than 0.75. Reserved testing slots for subspecialty clinics were poorly utilized, leaving many testing slots unfilled. When subspecialty demand exceeded number of reserved slots, there was sufficient capacity in the pulmonary function schedule to accommodate added demand. Findings were shared with stakeholders and influenced scheduling process improvements. Conclusion. This study highlights the importance of operational data to identify causes of poor access, guide system decision-making, and determine effects of improvement initiatives in a variety of healthcare settings. Importantly, simple operational analysis can help to improve efficiency of health systems with little or no added financial investment.

  13. Biosensors for the analysis of microbiological and chemical contaminants in food.

    PubMed

    McGrath, T F; Elliott, C T; Fodey, T L

    2012-04-01

    Increases in food production and the ever-present threat of food contamination from microbiological and chemical sources have led the food industry and regulators to pursue rapid, inexpensive methods of analysis to safeguard the health and safety of the consumer. Although sophisticated techniques such as chromatography and spectrometry provide more accurate and conclusive results, screening tests allow a much higher throughput of samples at a lower cost and with less operator training, so larger numbers of samples can be analysed. Biosensors combine a biological recognition element (enzyme, antibody, receptor) with a transducer to produce a measurable signal proportional to the extent of interaction between the recognition element and the analyte. The different uses of the biosensing instrumentation available today are extremely varied, with food analysis as an emerging and growing application. The advantages offered by biosensors over other screening methods such as radioimmunoassay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescence immunoassay and luminescence immunoassay, with respect to food analysis, include automation, improved reproducibility, speed of analysis and real-time analysis. This article will provide a brief footing in history before reviewing the latest developments in biosensor applications for analysis of food contaminants (January 2007 to December 2010), focusing on the detection of pathogens, toxins, pesticides and veterinary drug residues by biosensors, with emphasis on articles showing data in food matrices. The main areas of development common to these groups of contaminants include multiplexing, the ability to simultaneously analyse a sample for more than one contaminant and portability. Biosensors currently have an important role in food safety; further advances in the technology, reagents and sample handling will surely reinforce this position.

  14. Recommended default methodology for analysis of airborne exposures to mixtures of chemicals in emergencies.

    PubMed

    Craig, D K; Baskett, R L; Davis, J S; Dukes, L; Hansen, D J; Petrocchi, A J; Powell, T J; Sutherland, P J; Tuccinardi, T E

    1999-09-01

    Emergency planning and hazard assessment of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities require consideration of potential exposures to mixtures of chemicals released to the atmosphere. Exposure to chemical mixtures may lead to additive, synergistic, or antagonistic health effects. In the past, the consequences of exposures to each chemical have been analyzed separately. This approach may not adequately protect the health of persons exposed to mixtures. This article presents default recommendations for use in emergency management and safety analysis within the DOE complex where potential exists for releases of mixtures of chemicals. These recommendations were developed by the DOE Subcommittee on Consequence Assessment and Protective Actions (SCAPA). It is recommended that hazard indices (e.g., HIi = Ci/Limiti, where Ci is the concentration of chemical "i") be calculated for each chemical, and unless sufficient toxicological knowledge is available to indicate otherwise, that they be summed, that is, sigma i(n) = 1HIi = HI1 + HI2 + ... + HIn. A sum of 1.0 or less means the limits have not been exceeded. To facilitate application of these recommendations for analysis of exposures to specific mixtures, chemicals are classified according to their toxic consequences. This is done using health code numbers describing toxic effects by target organ for each chemical. This methodology has been applied to several potential releases of chemicals to compare the resulting hazard indices of a chemical mixture with those obtained when each chemical is treated independently. The methodology used and results obtained from analysis of one mixture are presented in this article. This article also demonstrates how health code numbers can be used to sum hazard indices only for those chemicals that have the same toxic consequence.

  15. Approximate chemical analysis of volcanic glasses using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Daniele; Hess, Kai‐Uwe; Neuville, Daniel R.; Borovkov, Nikita; Perugini, Diego; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical composition on the Raman spectra of a series of natural calcalkaline silicate glasses has been quantified by performing electron microprobe analyses and obtaining Raman spectra on glassy filaments (~450 µm) derived from a magma mingling experiment. The results provide a robust compositionally‐dependent database for the Raman spectra of natural silicate glasses along the calcalkaline series. An empirical model based on both the acquired Raman spectra and an ideal mixing equation between calcalkaline basaltic and rhyolitic end‐members is constructed enabling the estimation of the chemical composition and degree of polymerization of silicate glasses using Raman spectra. The model is relatively insensitive to acquisition conditions and has been validated using the MPI‐DING geochemical standard glasses1 as well as further samples. The methods and model developed here offer several advantages compared with other analytical and spectroscopic methods such as infrared spectroscopy, X‐ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron and ion microprobe analyses, inasmuch as Raman spectroscopy can be performed with a high spatial resolution (1 µm2) without the need for any sample preparation as a nondestructive technique. This study represents an advance in efforts to provide the first database of Raman spectra for natural silicate glasses and yields a new approach for the treatment of Raman spectra, which allows us to extract approximate information about the chemical composition of natural silicate glasses using Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate its application in handheld in situ terrestrial field studies of silicate glasses under extreme conditions (e.g. extraterrestrial and submarine environments). © 2015 The Authors Journal of Raman Spectroscopy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:27656038

  16. Approximate chemical analysis of volcanic glasses using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Daniele; Hess, Kai‐Uwe; Neuville, Daniel R.; Borovkov, Nikita; Perugini, Diego; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical composition on the Raman spectra of a series of natural calcalkaline silicate glasses has been quantified by performing electron microprobe analyses and obtaining Raman spectra on glassy filaments (~450 µm) derived from a magma mingling experiment. The results provide a robust compositionally‐dependent database for the Raman spectra of natural silicate glasses along the calcalkaline series. An empirical model based on both the acquired Raman spectra and an ideal mixing equation between calcalkaline basaltic and rhyolitic end‐members is constructed enabling the estimation of the chemical composition and degree of polymerization of silicate glasses using Raman spectra. The model is relatively insensitive to acquisition conditions and has been validated using the MPI‐DING geochemical standard glasses1 as well as further samples. The methods and model developed here offer several advantages compared with other analytical and spectroscopic methods such as infrared spectroscopy, X‐ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron and ion microprobe analyses, inasmuch as Raman spectroscopy can be performed with a high spatial resolution (1 µm2) without the need for any sample preparation as a nondestructive technique. This study represents an advance in efforts to provide the first database of Raman spectra for natural silicate glasses and yields a new approach for the treatment of Raman spectra, which allows us to extract approximate information about the chemical composition of natural silicate glasses using Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate its application in handheld in situ terrestrial field studies of silicate glasses under extreme conditions (e.g. extraterrestrial and submarine environments). © 2015 The Authors Journal of Raman Spectroscopy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  17. Efficient chemical-disease identification and relationship extraction using Wikipedia to improve recall.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Daniel M; O'Boyle, Noel M; Sayle, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the adverse effects of chemicals is important in biomedical research and healthcare. Text mining can allow timely and low-cost extraction of this knowledge from the biomedical literature. We extended our text mining solution, LeadMine, to identify diseases and chemical-induced disease relationships (CIDs). LeadMine is a dictionary/grammar-based entity recognizer and was used to recognize and normalize both chemicals and diseases to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) IDs. The disease lexicon was obtained from three sources: MeSH, the Disease Ontology and Wikipedia. The Wikipedia dictionary was derived from pages with a disease/symptom box, or those where the page title appeared in the lexicon. Composite entities (e.g. heart and lung disease) were detected and mapped to their composite MeSH IDs. For CIDs, we developed a simple pattern-based system to find relationships within the same sentence. Our system was evaluated in the BioCreative V Chemical-Disease Relation task and achieved very good results for both disease concept ID recognition (F1-score: 86.12%) and CIDs (F1-score: 52.20%) on the test set. As our system was over an order of magnitude faster than other solutions evaluated on the task, we were able to apply the same system to the entirety of MEDLINE allowing us to extract a collection of over 250 000 distinct CIDs. PMID:27060160

  18. Novel approaches to improving the chemical safety of the meat chain towards toxicants.

    PubMed

    Engel, E; Ratel, J; Bouhlel, J; Planche, C; Meurillon, M

    2015-11-01

    In addition to microbiological issues, meat chemical safety is a growing concern for the public authorities, chain stakeholders and consumers. Meat may be contaminated by various chemical toxicants originating from the environment, treatments of agricultural production or food processing. Generally found at trace levels in meat, these toxicants may harm human health during chronic exposure. This paper overviews the key issues to be considered to ensure better control of their occurrence in meat and assessment of the related health risk. We first describe potential contaminants of meat products. Strategies to move towards a more efficient and systematic control of meat chemical safety are then presented in a second part, with a focus on emerging approaches based on toxicogenomics. The third part presents mitigation strategies to limit the impact of process-induced toxicants in meat. Finally, the last part introduces methodological advances to refine chemical risk assessment related to the occurrence of toxicants in meat by quantifying the influence of digestion on the fraction of food contaminants that may be assimilated by the human body. PMID:26043665

  19. Improving Students' Chemical Literacy Levels on Thermochemical and Thermodynamics Concepts through a Context-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigdemoglu, Ceyhan; Geban, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delve into the effect of context-based approach (CBA) over traditional instruction (TI) on students' chemical literacy level related to thermochemical and thermodynamics concepts. Four eleventh-grade classes with 118 students in total taught by two teachers from a public high school in 2012 fall semester were enrolled…

  20. Efficient chemical-disease identification and relationship extraction using Wikipedia to improve recall.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Daniel M; O'Boyle, Noel M; Sayle, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the adverse effects of chemicals is important in biomedical research and healthcare. Text mining can allow timely and low-cost extraction of this knowledge from the biomedical literature. We extended our text mining solution, LeadMine, to identify diseases and chemical-induced disease relationships (CIDs). LeadMine is a dictionary/grammar-based entity recognizer and was used to recognize and normalize both chemicals and diseases to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) IDs. The disease lexicon was obtained from three sources: MeSH, the Disease Ontology and Wikipedia. The Wikipedia dictionary was derived from pages with a disease/symptom box, or those where the page title appeared in the lexicon. Composite entities (e.g. heart and lung disease) were detected and mapped to their composite MeSH IDs. For CIDs, we developed a simple pattern-based system to find relationships within the same sentence. Our system was evaluated in the BioCreative V Chemical-Disease Relation task and achieved very good results for both disease concept ID recognition (F1-score: 86.12%) and CIDs (F1-score: 52.20%) on the test set. As our system was over an order of magnitude faster than other solutions evaluated on the task, we were able to apply the same system to the entirety of MEDLINE allowing us to extract a collection of over 250 000 distinct CIDs.

  1. New class of thermosetting plastics has improved strength, thermal and chemical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, E. A.; Dubrow, B.; Lubowitz, H. R.

    1967-01-01

    New class of thermosetting plastics has high hydrocarbon content, high stiffness, thermal stability, humidity resistance, and workability in the precured state. It is designated cyclized polydiene urethane, and is applicable as matrices to prepare chemically stable ablative materials for rocket nose cones of nozzles.

  2. Novel approaches to improving the chemical safety of the meat chain towards toxicants.

    PubMed

    Engel, E; Ratel, J; Bouhlel, J; Planche, C; Meurillon, M

    2015-11-01

    In addition to microbiological issues, meat chemical safety is a growing concern for the public authorities, chain stakeholders and consumers. Meat may be contaminated by various chemical toxicants originating from the environment, treatments of agricultural production or food processing. Generally found at trace levels in meat, these toxicants may harm human health during chronic exposure. This paper overviews the key issues to be considered to ensure better control of their occurrence in meat and assessment of the related health risk. We first describe potential contaminants of meat products. Strategies to move towards a more efficient and systematic control of meat chemical safety are then presented in a second part, with a focus on emerging approaches based on toxicogenomics. The third part presents mitigation strategies to limit the impact of process-induced toxicants in meat. Finally, the last part introduces methodological advances to refine chemical risk assessment related to the occurrence of toxicants in meat by quantifying the influence of digestion on the fraction of food contaminants that may be assimilated by the human body.

  3. Apparatus and method for performing microfluidic manipulations for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    A microchip apparatus and method provide fluidic manipulations for a variety of applications, including sample injection for microchip liquid chromatography. The microchip is fabricated using standard photolitographic procedures and chemical wet etching, with the substrate and cover plate joined using direct bonding. Capillary electrophoresis is performed in channels formed in the substrate. Injections are made by electro-osmotically pumping sample through the injection channel that crosses the separation channel, followed by a switching of the potentials to force a plug into the separation channel.

  4. Apparatus and method for performing microfluidic manipulations for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael

    1999-01-01

    A microchip apparatus and method provide fluidic manipulations for a variety of applications, including sample injection for microchip liquid chromatography. The microchip is fabricated using standard photolithographic procedures and chemical wet etching, with the substrate and cover plate joined using direct bonding. Capillary electrophoresis is performed in channels formed in the substrate. Injections are made by electro-osmotically pumping sample through the injection channel that crosses the separation channel, followed by a switching of the potentials to force a plug into the separation channel.

  5. Apparatus and method for performing microfluidic manipulations for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-12-14

    A microchip apparatus and method provide fluidic manipulations for a variety of applications, including sample injection for microchip liquid chromatography. The microchip is fabricated using standard photolithographic procedures and chemical wet etching, with the substrate and cover plate joined using direct bonding. Capillary electrophoresis is performed in channels formed in the substrate. Injections are made by electro-osmotically pumping sample through the injection channel that crosses the separation channel, followed by a switching of the potentials to force a plug into the separation channel.

  6. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  7. Laser Applications to Chemical, Security, and Environmental Analysis: introduction to the feature issue

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizler, Andreas; Fried, Alan; Gord, James R

    2007-07-01

    This Applied Optics feature issue on Laser Applications to Chemical, Security,and Environmental Analysis (LACSEA) highlights papers presented at theLACSEA 2006 Tenth Topical Meeting sponsored by the Optical Society ofAmerica.

  8. Chemical analysis and sampling techniques for geothermal fluids and gases at the Fenton Hill Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.

    1987-06-01

    A general description of methods, techniques, and apparatus used for the sampling, chemical analysis, and data reporting of geothermal gases and fluids is given. Step-by-step descriptions of the procedures are included in the appendixes.

  9. Airborne photography of chemical releases and analysis of twilight sky brightness data, phases 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedinger, J. F.; Constantinides, E.

    1976-01-01

    The photography from aboard an aircraft of chemical releases is reported. The equipment installation on the aircraft is described, and photographs of the releases are included. An extensive analysis of twilight sky photographs is presented.

  10. Recent Development in Optical Chemical Sensors Coupling with Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Catalina Bosch; Rojas, Fuensanta Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Optical techniques for chemical analysis are well established and sensors based on these techniques are now attracting considerable attention because of their importance in applications such as environmental monitoring, biomedical sensing, and industrial process control. On the other hand, flow injection analysis (FIA) is advisable for the rapid analysis of microliter volume samples and can be interfaced directly to the chemical process. The FIA has become a widespread automatic analytical method for more reasons; mainly due to the simplicity and low cost of the setups, their versatility, and ease of assembling. In this paper, an overview of flow injection determinations by using optical chemical sensors is provided, and instrumentation, sensor design, and applications are discussed. This work summarizes the most relevant manuscripts from 1980 to date referred to analysis using optical chemical sensors in FIA.

  11. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) study of aluminum-containing atmospheric particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, J.G.; Seals, R.D.; Wightman, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been utilized for the analysis of aluminum-laden particulates. Collection and analysis of samples are described. Samples were collected during a rocket launch at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis reveals that at least three chemically different types of aluminum are present in the samples. (3 graphs, 5 photos, 35 references, 2 tables)

  12. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  13. Performance Objectives, Task Analysis, Learning Content, Content Limits, and Domain Referenced Tests for the Agricultural Chemicals Catalog. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, William; And Others

    This document contains Indiana agricultural chemicals curriculum materials based on the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (VTECS) Agricultural Chemicals Catalog. It is intended to improve preparation of high school and adult students for handling and using agricultural chemicals and for jobs as chemical salespersons or chemical…

  14. A Psychometric Analysis of the Chemical Concepts Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbera, Jack

    2013-01-01

    designed to assess the alternate conceptions of students in high school or first-semester college chemistry. The instrument was published in 2002 along with an analysis of its data from a test population. This study supports the initial analysis and expands on the psychometric…

  15. Towards an improved modeling of chemical weathering in the SoilGen soil evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2014-05-01

    As the need for soil information particularly in the fields of agriculture, land evaluation, hydrology, biogeochemistry and climate change keeps increasing, models for soil evolution are increasingly becoming valuable tools to provide such soil information. Although still limited, such models are progressively being developed. The SoilGen model is one of such models with capabilities to provide soil information such as soil texture, pH, base saturation, organic carbon, CEC, etc over multi-millennia time scale. SoilGen is a mechanistic water flow driven pedogenetic model describing soil forming processes such as carbon cycling, clay migration, decalcification, bioturbation, physical weathering and chemical weathering. The model has been calibrated and confronted with field measurements in a number of case studies, giving plausible results. Discrepancies between measured and simulated soil properties as concluded from case studies have been mainly attributed to (i) the simple chemical weathering system (ii) poor estimates of initial data inputs such as bulk density and element fluxes, and (iii) incorrect values of variables that describe boundary conditions such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. This study focuses on extending the chemical weathering system, such that it can deal with a more heterogeneous composition of primary minerals and includes more elements such as Fe and Si. We propose and discuss here an extended description of chemical weathering in the model that is based on more primary minerals, taking into account the role of the specific area of these minerals, and the effect of physical weathering on these specific areas over time. In the initial stage, the proposed chemical weathering mechanism is also implemented in PHREEQC (a widely applied geochemical code with capabilities to simulate equilibrium reactions involving water and minerals, surface complexes and ion exchangers, etc.) to facilitate comparison with the model results

  16. Process correlation analysis model for process improvement identification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Su-jin; Kim, Dae-Kyoo; Park, Sooyong

    2014-01-01

    Software process improvement aims at improving the development process of software systems. It is initiated by process assessment identifying strengths and weaknesses and based on the findings, improvement plans are developed. In general, a process reference model (e.g., CMMI) is used throughout the process of software process improvement as the base. CMMI defines a set of process areas involved in software development and what to be carried out in process areas in terms of goals and practices. Process areas and their elements (goals and practices) are often correlated due to the iterative nature of software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data.

  17. Process Correlation Analysis Model for Process Improvement Identification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sooyong

    2014-01-01

    Software process improvement aims at improving the development process of software systems. It is initiated by process assessment identifying strengths and weaknesses and based on the findings, improvement plans are developed. In general, a process reference model (e.g., CMMI) is used throughout the process of software process improvement as the base. CMMI defines a set of process areas involved in software development and what to be carried out in process areas in terms of goals and practices. Process areas and their elements (goals and practices) are often correlated due to the iterative nature of software development process. However, in the current practice, correlations of process elements are often overlooked in the development of an improvement plan, which diminishes the efficiency of the plan. This is mainly attributed to significant efforts and the lack of required expertise. In this paper, we present a process correlation analysis model that helps identify correlations of process elements from the results of process assessment. This model is defined based on CMMI and empirical data of improvement practices. We evaluate the model using industrial data. PMID:24977170

  18. Analysis of residual chemicals on filtering facepiece respirators after decontamination.

    PubMed

    Salter, W B; Kinney, K; Wallace, W H; Lumley, A E; Heimbuch, B K; Wander, J D

    2010-08-01

    The N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) is commonly used to protect individuals from infectious aerosols. Health care experts predict a shortage of N95 FFRs if a severe pandemic occurs, and an option that has been suggested for mitigating such an FFR shortage is to decontaminate and reuse the devices. Before the effectiveness of this strategy can be established, many parameters affecting respiratory protection must be measured: biocidal efficacy of the decontamination treatment, filtration performance, pressure drop, fit, and toxicity to the end user post treatment. This research effort measured the amount of residual chemicals created or deposited on six models of FFRs following treatment by each of 7 simple decontamination technologies. Measured amounts of decontaminants retained by the FFRs treated with chemical disinfectants were small enough that exposure to wearers will be below the permissible exposure limit (PEL). Toxic by-products were also evaluated, and two suspected toxins were detected after ethylene oxide treatment of FFR rubber straps. The results provide encouragement to efforts promoting the evolution of effective strategies for decontamination and reuse of FFRs. PMID:20526947

  19. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  20. An infant surgical table for laser photocoagulation: ergonomic improvement analysis.

    PubMed

    Ryland, K A; Nelson, C A; Hejkal, T W

    2010-02-01

    Current methods of treatment for retinopathy of prematurity, using laser photocoagulation, require surgeons to assume awkward standing positions, which can result in occupational injury. A new infant surgical table was designed for improving this surgical procedure. To quantify its benefits, an ergonomic comparison of the standard and modified procedures was carried out, using specialized checklists, Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaires, and analysis of videotaped procedures using an Ovako Working Posture Analysing System method. Analysis of the typical laser photocoagulation procedure revealed a high risk for cumulative trauma disorders. The majority of the risk factors were lowered considerably with use of the new table. Improvement was largely due to the new table allowing seated postures during surgery, relieving muscular stress on the back, shoulders and legs. This study demonstrates risk reduction through engineering design of new medical devices, and illustrates how combining different assessment approaches can help evaluate ergonomic impact of medical technologies.

  1. Improved biliary detection and diagnosis through intelligent machine analysis.

    PubMed

    Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports on work undertaken to improve automated detection of bile ducts in magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images, with the objective of conducting preliminary classification of the images for diagnosis. The proposed I-BDeDIMA (Improved Biliary Detection and Diagnosis through Intelligent Machine Analysis) scheme is a multi-stage framework consisting of successive phases of image normalization, denoising, structure identification, object labeling, feature selection and disease classification. A combination of multiresolution wavelet, dynamic intensity thresholding, segment-based region growing, region elimination, statistical analysis and neural networks, is used in this framework to achieve good structure detection and preliminary diagnosis. Tests conducted on over 200 clinical images with known diagnosis have shown promising results of over 90% accuracy. The scheme outperforms related work in the literature, making it a viable framework for computer-aided diagnosis of biliary diseases.

  2. How Root Cause Analysis Can Improve the Value Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wixson, J. R.

    2002-02-05

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is an important methodology that can be integrated with the VE Job Plan to generate superior results from the VE Methodology. The point at which RCA is most appropriate is after the function analysis and FAST Model have been built and functions for improvement have been chosen. These functions are then subjected to a simple, but, rigorous RCA to get to the root cause of their deficiencies, whether it is high cost/poor value, poor quality, or poor reliability. Once the most probable causes for these problems have been arrived at, better solutions for improvement can be developed in the creativity phase because the team better understands the problems associated with these functions.

  3. How Root Cause Analysis Can Improve the Value Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wixson, James Robert

    2002-05-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is an important methodology that can be integrated with the VE Job Plan to generate superior results from the VE Methodology. The point at which RCA is most appropriate is after the function analysis and FAST Model have been built and functions for improvement have been chosen. These functions are then subjected to a simple, but, rigorous RCA to get to the root cause of their deficiencies, whether it is high cost/poor value, poor quality, or poor reliability. Once the most probable causes for these problems have been arrived at, better solutions for improvement can be developed in the creativity phase because the team better understands the problems associated with these functions.

  4. Improved spectral analysis for the motional Stark effect diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Klabacha, J.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic pitch angle and the magnitude from reversed field pinch plasmas in the Madison symmetric torus (MST) have been routinely obtained from fully resolved motional Stark effect (MSE) spectrum analyses. Recently, the spectrum fit procedure has been improved by initializing and constraining the fit parameters based on the MSE model in the atomic data and analysis structure. A collisional-radiative model with level populations nlm-resolved up to n = 4 and a simple Born approximation for ion-impact cross sections is used for this analysis. Measurement uncertainty is quantified by making MSE measurements with multiple views of a single spatial location, ranging 5%-15% for typical MST operation conditions. A multi-view fit improves the goodness of fit of MSE spectral features and background.

  5. Improved Conjunction Analysis via Collaborative Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, T. S.; Vallado, D.; Chan, J.; Buckwalter, B.

    2009-03-01

    Satellite operators are becoming increasingly aware of the threat of on-orbit collisions—between satellites or with orbital debris. Successful conjunction monitoring and collision avoidance activities require accurate orbital information for as many space objects as possible. Current sources of orbital data are of low fidelity, as a result of how those data are generated, and are of limited value to conjunction analysis. However, satellite operators have much better data for their own satellites. When that data is shared among operators, overall space situational awareness can be significantly improved. This paper will demonstrate the potential improvements and discuss an operational implementation— SOCRATES-GEO—which uses operator data to improve conjunction monitoring.

  6. Laser applications to chemical analysis: an introduction by the feature editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Ramsey, J. Michael; Lucht, Robert P.

    1995-06-01

    This issue of Applied Optics features papers on the application of laser technology to chemical analysis. Many of the contributions, although not all, result from papers presented at the Fourth OSA Topical Meeting on Laser Applications to Chemical Analysis, which was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, March, 1994. This successful meeting, with nearly one hundred participants, continued the tradition of earlier LACA meetings to focus on the optical science of laser-based measurements of temperature and trace chemical assays in a wide variety of practical applications.

  7. Minimizing Errors in Numerical Analysis of Chemical Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusling, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates minimizing errors in computational methods commonly used in chemistry. Provides a series of examples illustrating the propagation of errors, finite difference methods, and nonlinear regression analysis. Includes illustrations to explain these concepts. (MVL)

  8. Glycolic acid chemical peeling improves inflammatory acne eruptions through its inhibitory and bactericidal effects on Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Takeda, Mikiko; Ashikaga, Sayaka; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Glycolic acid chemical peeling is effective for treating comedones, and some clinical data show that it also improves inflammatory eruptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of glycolic acid chemical peeling to improve inflammatory acne. To assess growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects of glycolic acid on Propionibacterium acnes in vitro, we used an agar diffusion method and a time-kill method. To reveal bactericidal effects in vivo, we established an agar-attached method which correlated well with the ordinary swab-wash method, and we used the agar-attached method to compare the numbers of propionibacteria on the cheek treated with glycolic acid chemical peeling. Our results show that 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5, 3.5 and 5.5) formed growth inhibitory circles in the agar diffusion method, but the diameters of those circles were smaller than with 1% nadifloxacin lotion or 1% clindamycin gel. In the time-kill method, 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5 and 3.5) or 1% nadifloxacin lotion reduced the number of P. acnes to less than 100 CFU/mL within 5 min. In contrast, in 30% glycolic acid (at pH 5.5) or in 1% clindamycin gel, P. acnes survived for more than 4 h. Chemical peeling with 35% glycolic acid (at pH 1.2) decreased the number of propionibacteria on the cheeks of patients compared with untreated controls (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrate that glycolic acid has moderate growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects on P. acnes, and that chemical peeling with glycolic acid works on inflammatory acne via those effects. PMID:21950544

  9. Glycolic acid chemical peeling improves inflammatory acne eruptions through its inhibitory and bactericidal effects on Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Yuko; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Takeda, Mikiko; Ashikaga, Sayaka; Kawashima, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Glycolic acid chemical peeling is effective for treating comedones, and some clinical data show that it also improves inflammatory eruptions. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism of glycolic acid chemical peeling to improve inflammatory acne. To assess growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects of glycolic acid on Propionibacterium acnes in vitro, we used an agar diffusion method and a time-kill method. To reveal bactericidal effects in vivo, we established an agar-attached method which correlated well with the ordinary swab-wash method, and we used the agar-attached method to compare the numbers of propionibacteria on the cheek treated with glycolic acid chemical peeling. Our results show that 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5, 3.5 and 5.5) formed growth inhibitory circles in the agar diffusion method, but the diameters of those circles were smaller than with 1% nadifloxacin lotion or 1% clindamycin gel. In the time-kill method, 30% glycolic acid (at pH 1.5 and 3.5) or 1% nadifloxacin lotion reduced the number of P. acnes to less than 100 CFU/mL within 5 min. In contrast, in 30% glycolic acid (at pH 5.5) or in 1% clindamycin gel, P. acnes survived for more than 4 h. Chemical peeling with 35% glycolic acid (at pH 1.2) decreased the number of propionibacteria on the cheeks of patients compared with untreated controls (P < 0.01). Our results demonstrate that glycolic acid has moderate growth inhibitory and bactericidal effects on P. acnes, and that chemical peeling with glycolic acid works on inflammatory acne via those effects.

  10. Proposed Methodological Improvement in the Elucidation of Chemical Reaction Mechanisms Based on Chemist-Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigarnik, Andrew V.; Valdés-Pérez, Raúl E.; White, Brian S.

    2000-02-01

    A recent book by Roald Hoffmann explains for a general audience the methods of chemistry. It includes a chapter on the experimental study of chemical reaction mechanisms, which accurately describes the methodological status quo. As an expository vehicle, the book cites a 1960s study of the photolysis of ethane notable for the simplicity of the chemistry and the crisp and surprising character of the experimental observations. We use Hoffmann's exposition and his colorful depiction of current methodological weaknesses to argue for a chemist-computer collaborative search for the simpler mechanistic hypotheses consistent with experiment. We have used this method elsewhere to make specialized chemical contributions that are uniquely enabled by the man-machine interaction. The methods can be useful in the classroom to teach the specific skills needed by mechanistic chemists.

  11. Instantaneous physico-chemical analysis of suspension-based nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanxu; Ugaz, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput manufacturing of nanomaterial-based products demands robust online characterization and quality control tools capable of continuously probing the in-suspension state. But existing analytical techniques are challenging to deploy in production settings because they are primarily geared toward small-batch ex-situ operation in research laboratory environments. Here we introduce an approach that overcomes these limitations by exploiting surface complexation interactions that emerge when a micron-scale chemical discontinuity is established between suspended nanoparticles and a molecular tracer. The resulting fluorescence signature is easily detectable and embeds surprisingly rich information about composition, quantity, size, and morphology of nanoparticles in suspension independent of their agglomeration state. We show how this method can be straightforwardly applied to enable continuous sizing of commercial ZnO nanoparticles, and to instantaneously quantify the anatase and rutile composition of multicomponent TiO2 nanoparticle mixtures pertinent to photocatalysis and solar energy conversion. PMID:25923196

  12. Engineering and Functional Analysis of Mitotic Kinases Through Chemical Genetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mathew J K; Jallepalli, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, multiple protein kinases transform the cytoskeleton and chromosomes into new and highly dynamic structures that mediate the faithful transmission of genetic information and cell division. However, the large number and strong conservation of mammalian kinases in general pose significant obstacles to interrogating them with small molecules, due to the difficulty in identifying and validating those which are truly selective. To overcome this problem, a steric complementation strategy has been developed, in which a bulky "gatekeeper" residue within the active site of the kinase of interest is replaced with a smaller amino acid, such as glycine or alanine. The enlarged catalytic pocket can then be targeted in an allele-specific manner with bulky purine analogs. This strategy provides a general framework for dissecting kinase function with high selectivity, rapid kinetics, and reversibility. In this chapter we discuss the principles and techniques needed to implement this chemical genetic approach in mammalian cells.

  13. Morphofunctional analysis of the prostate exposed to chemical manufacture factors.

    PubMed

    Lapii, G A; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Kiptilov, A V; Neimark, A I

    2014-07-01

    The structural characteristics of the prostate and the blood flow in the organ were studied in chemical plant workers suffering from chronic prostatitis. The prostate echostructure was characterized by vast zones of fibrosis and calcinosis, the hemodynamic ultrasonic parameters were low. Degenerative changes in the acinar structures and stromal fibrosis predominated in the biopsy specimens, these shifts were the most pronounced in the peripheral and transitory zones. Foci of common and small-acinar degeneration of the glands, abundant concrements, and significant collagenization with periglandular and perivascular sclerosis without or with slight inflammatory infiltration were detected. We hypothesize that long exposure to adverse factors of sulfuric acid manufacture contributed to the development of pathological changes in the prostate.

  14. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Mutant Tyrosine Kinase Chemical Rescue†

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Kathryn E.; Seeliger, Markus A.; Wang, Zhihong; Fomina, Dina; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Havranek, James J.; Baker, David; Kuriyan, John; Cole, Philip A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are critical cell signaling enzymes. These enzymes have a highly conserved Arg residue in their catalytic loop which is present two residues or four residues downstream from an absolutely conserved Asp catalytic base. Prior studies on protein tyrosine kinases Csk and Src revealed the potential for chemical rescue of catalytically-deficient mutant kinases (Arg to Ala mutations) by small diamino compounds, particularly imidazole, however the potency and efficiency of rescue was greater for Src. This current study further examines the structural and kinetic basis of rescue for mutant Src as compared to mutant Abl tyrosine kinase. An X-ray crystal structure of R388A Src revealed the surprising finding that a histidine residue of the N-terminus of a symmetry-related kinase inserts into the active site of the adjacent Src and mimics the hydrogen bonding pattern seen in wild-type protein tyrosine kinases. Abl R367A shows potent and efficient rescue more comparable to Src, even though its catalytic loop is more like that of Csk. Various enzyme redesigns of the active sites indicate that the degree and specificity of rescue is somewhat flexible, but the overall properties of the enzymes and rescue agents play an overarching role. The newly discovered rescue agent 2-aminoimidazole is about as efficient as imidazole in rescuing R/A Src and Abl. Rate vs. pH studies with these imidazole analogs suggest that the protonated imidazolium is the preferred form for chemical rescue, consistent with structural models. The efficient rescue seen with mutant Abl points to the potential of this approach to be used effectively to analyze Abl phosphorylation pathways in cells. PMID:19260709

  16. Biomimetic, Mild Chemical Synthesis of CdTe-GSH Quantum Dots with Improved Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Donoso, José M.; Monrás, Juan P.; Bravo, Denisse; Aguirre, Adam; Quest, Andrew F.; Osorio-Román, Igor O.; Aroca, Ricardo F.; Chasteen, Thomas G.; Vásquez, Claudio C.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple applications of nanotechnology, especially those involving highly fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) or quantum dots (QDs) have stimulated the research to develop simple, rapid and environmentally friendly protocols for synthesizing NPs exhibiting novel properties and increased biocompatibility. In this study, a simple protocol for the chemical synthesis of glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe QDs (CdTe-GSH) resembling conditions found in biological systems is described. Using only CdCl2, K2TeO3 and GSH, highly fluorescent QDs were obtained under pH, temperature, buffer and oxygen conditions that allow microorganisms growth. These CdTe-GSH NPs displayed similar size, chemical composition, absorbance and fluorescence spectra and quantum yields as QDs synthesized using more complicated and expensive methods. CdTe QDs were not freely incorporated into eukaryotic cells thus favoring their biocompatibility and potential applications in biomedicine. In addition, NPs entry was facilitated by lipofectamine, resulting in intracellular fluorescence and a slight increase in cell death by necrosis. Toxicity of the as prepared CdTe QDs was lower than that observed with QDs produced by other chemical methods, probably as consequence of decreased levels of Cd+2 and higher amounts of GSH. We present here the simplest, fast and economical method for CdTe QDs synthesis described to date. Also, this biomimetic protocol favors NPs biocompatibility and helps to establish the basis for the development of new, “greener” methods to synthesize cadmium-containing QDs. PMID:22292028

  17. Improved performance of the microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell using the stack structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Qin, Bangyu; Luo, Yong; Hou, Yanping

    2012-07-01

    The microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) is a device to desalinate seawater, and produce acid and alkali. The objective of this study was to enhance the desalination and chemical-production performance of the MEDCC using two types of stack structure. Experiments were conducted with different membrane spacings, numbers of desalination chambers and applied voltages. Results showed that the stack construction in the MEDCC enhanced the desalination and chemical-production rates. The maximal desalination rate of 0.58 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which was 43% higher than that in the MEDCC, was achieved in the four-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 1.5mm. The maximal acid- and alkali-production rates of 0.079 ± 0.006 and 0.13 ± 0.02 mmol/h, which were 46% and 8% higher than that in the MEDCC, respectively, were achieved in the two-desalination-chamber MEDCC with the BPM-AEM-CEM stack structure and the membrane spacing of 3mm.

  18. Efficient chemical-disease identification and relationship extraction using Wikipedia to improve recall

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Daniel M.; O’Boyle, Noel M.; Sayle, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the adverse effects of chemicals is important in biomedical research and healthcare. Text mining can allow timely and low-cost extraction of this knowledge from the biomedical literature. We extended our text mining solution, LeadMine, to identify diseases and chemical-induced disease relationships (CIDs). LeadMine is a dictionary/grammar-based entity recognizer and was used to recognize and normalize both chemicals and diseases to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) IDs. The disease lexicon was obtained from three sources: MeSH, the Disease Ontology and Wikipedia. The Wikipedia dictionary was derived from pages with a disease/symptom box, or those where the page title appeared in the lexicon. Composite entities (e.g. heart and lung disease) were detected and mapped to their composite MeSH IDs. For CIDs, we developed a simple pattern-based system to find relationships within the same sentence. Our system was evaluated in the BioCreative V Chemical–Disease Relation task and achieved very good results for both disease concept ID recognition (F1-score: 86.12%) and CIDs (F1-score: 52.20%) on the test set. As our system was over an order of magnitude faster than other solutions evaluated on the task, we were able to apply the same system to the entirety of MEDLINE allowing us to extract a collection of over 250 000 distinct CIDs. PMID:27060160

  19. Analysis of fracture surface of titanium-porcelain bonding by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kannari, Yoshiteru; Endo, Kazuhiko; Ida, Yusuke; Ochi, Morio; Ohno, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Three commercially available porcelains bonded to titanium were evaluated to determine the weakest zone of the titanium-porcelain bonding structures. Tensile bond tests were performed for these specimens (NO, DU, and VI) and for Ni-Cr alloy-porcelain bonding samples that served as controls. The maximum bond strengths between porcelain and titanium and the Ni-Cr alloy subjected to different metal surface treatments were compared. Sand blasting effectively increased bond strengths in titanium-porcelain bonding materials. No statistically significant differences in the maximum bond strengths were found between the NO sample and a control; however, sample NO exhibited greater maximum bond strength than DU and VI samples. The bond strengths increased with increasing area fractions of porcelain failure on fracture surfaces. The weakest zones were investigated based on the oxygen chemical states determined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include bridging oxygen (Si-O-Si), nonbridging oxygen (Si-O(-) M(+)), and titanium oxide (O(2-)) states. We concluded that the titanium oxide layer is the weakest zone of titanium-porcelain bonding structures.

  20. Identification and quantitative analysis of chemical compounds based on multiscale linear fitting of terahertz spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Lingbo; Wang, Yingxin; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy is considered as an attractive tool for the analysis of chemical composition. The traditional methods for identification and quantitative analysis of chemical compounds by THz spectroscopy are all based on full-spectrum data. However, intrinsic features of the THz spectrum only lie in absorption peaks due to existence of disturbances, such as unexpected components, scattering effects, and barrier materials. We propose a strategy that utilizes Lorentzian parameters of THz absorption peaks, extracted by a multiscale linear fitting method, for both identification of pure chemicals and quantitative analysis of mixtures. The multiscale linear fitting method can automatically remove background content and accurately determine Lorentzian parameters of the absorption peaks. The high recognition rate for 16 pure chemical compounds and the accurate predicted concentrations for theophylline-lactose mixtures demonstrate the practicability of our approach.

  1. Spiral analysis-improved clinical utility with center detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, Qiping; Kurtis, Mónica M; Floyd, Alicia G; Smith, Whitney A; Pullman, Seth L

    2008-06-30

    Spiral analysis is a computerized method that measures human motor performance from handwritten Archimedean spirals. It quantifies normal motor activity, and detects early disease as well as dysfunction in patients with movement disorders. The clinical utility of spiral analysis is based on kinematic and dynamic indices derived from the original spiral trace, which must be detected and transformed into mathematical expressions with great precision. Accurately determining the center of the spiral and reducing spurious low frequency noise caused by center selection error is important to the analysis. Handwritten spirals do not all start at the same point, even when marked on paper, and drawing artifacts are not easily filtered without distortion of the spiral data and corruption of the performance indices. In this report, we describe a method for detecting the optimal spiral center and reducing the unwanted drawing artifacts. To demonstrate overall improvement to spiral analysis, we study the impact of the optimal spiral center detection in different frequency domains separately and find that it notably improves the clinical spiral measurement accuracy in low frequency domains.

  2. Improving ozone forecasts over Europe by synergistic use of the LOTOS-EUROS chemical transport model and in-situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curier, R. L.; Timmermans, R.; Calabretta-Jongen, S.; Eskes, H.; Segers, A.; Swart, D.; Schaap, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we investigate the added value of assimilation of ozone in-situ measurements for both re-analysis and forecasting purposes. Various simulations were performed using the LOTOS-EUROS chemical transport model and an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) to assimilate measured ozone surface concentrations over Europe, for spring and summer of 2007. The results for the re-analysis of ozone show a significant improvement in the LOTOS-EUROS performance score when compared to measurements. The average correlation coefficient for the daily maximum ozone concentration improves from 0.72 to 0.83. Similarly, the average Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) for the daily maximum ozone concentration is reduced from 20.8 to 16.9 μg m-3. The free running model performs well in forecast mode and the agreement between in-situ and modeled ozone concentration is good. The average temporal correlation coefficient ranges from 0.62 for the first day forecast to 0.61 for the third day forecast. Based on these results, assimilated fields were used to initialize the forecast. As for the re-analysis a better comparison between model and observation was observed. The mean correlation coefficient increased by 0.07 and the averaged RMSE decreased by 0.65 μg m-3. However, the addition of an inheritance scheme to import additional information from the data assimilation to the forecast did not significantly improve the concentration fields.

  3. Greatly improved 3C-SiC p-n junction diodes grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Larkin, David J.; Starr, Jonathan E.; Powell, J. A.; Salupo, Carl S.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and initial electrical characterization of greatly improved 3C-SiC (beta-SiC) p-n junction diodes. These diodes, which were grown on commercially available 6H-SiC substrates by chemical vapor deposition, demonstrate rectification to -200 V at room temperature, representing a fourfold improvement in reported 3C-SiC diode blocking voltage. The reverse leakage currents and saturation current densities measured on these diodes also show significant improvement compared to previously reported 3C-SiC p-n junction diodes. When placed under sufficient forward bias, the diodes emit significantly bright green-yellow light. These results should lead to substantial advancements in 3C-SiC transistor performance.

  4. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  5. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N; Thorneloe, Kevin S; Bradshaw, Heather B; Matalon, Sadis; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2014-07-15

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  6. Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Zaharov, Viktor; Tetard, Laurene; Thundat, Thomas George; Passian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

  7. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations

  8. Synthesis and analysis in studies of chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponnamperuma, C.; Hobish, M. K.; Kobayashi, K.; Hua, L. L.; Senaratne, N.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of the various processes that may have given rise to life on the Earth have demonstrated the appropriateness of an approach that makes use of analysis and synthesis. Analysis of extraterrestrial samples in the form of meteorites has demonstrated the presence of several precursors of biomolecules, most notably a full suite of nucleic acid bases and nucleotides of biological significance. These species were determined after exhaustive extraction of the sample and subsequent analysis using HPLC, GC, MS, and GC-MS. Procedural blanks indicate that these molecules are likely not the result of contamination during the extraction and analysis process. Similar species were found as products of spark discharge experiments in atmospheres thought to mimic primitive Earth conditions. These results indicate that the basic chemistry underlying these syntheses is common, and that life may not be unique to the Earth. Studies underway in the laboratory make use of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a probe to assess associations between selected amino acids and any of several nucleotides comprising their genetic code and genetic anticode sequences. These studies demonstrate a clear selectivity by the anticode sequences, thus confirming the hydrophobicity studies performed by Lacey et al. These studies further support the contention that life is likely a natural result of the physics and chemistry of the universe.

  9. Rapid Screening of Complex Chemical Samples via Capillary Array Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Anex; D. W. Neyer

    1998-11-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that developed instrumentation and methods for capillary array analysis. During the course of this project, a new capillary array electrochromatography instrument was developed to perform eight simultaneous separations and provide complementary chromatographic information from each column on a single sample.

  10. RAPID ON-SITE METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The analysis of potentially hazardous air, water and soil samples collected and shipped to service laboratories off-site is time consuming and expensive. This Chapter addresses the practical alternative of performing the requisite analytical services on-site. The most significant...

  11. An improved method for thin layer chromatographic analysis of saponins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Bhat, Tej K

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of saponins by thin layer chromatography (TLC) is reported. The solvent system was n-butanol:water:acetic acid (84:14:7). Detection of saponins on the TLC plates after development and air-drying was done by immersion in a suspension of sheep erythrocytes, followed by washing off the excess blood on the plate surface. Saponins appeared as white spots against a pink background. The protocol provided specific detection of saponins in the saponins enriched extracts from Aesculusindica (Wall. ex Camb.) Hook.f., Lonicera japonica Thunb., Silene inflata Sm., Sapindusmukorossi Gaertn., Chlorophytum borivilianum Santapau & Fernandes, Asparagusadscendens Roxb., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Agave americana L., Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze. The protocol is convenient, inexpensive, does not require any corrosive chemicals and provides specific detection of saponins. PMID:26434348

  12. An improved method for thin layer chromatographic analysis of saponins.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om P; Kumar, Neeraj; Singh, Bikram; Bhat, Tej K

    2012-05-01

    Analysis of saponins by thin layer chromatography (TLC) is reported. The solvent system was n-butanol:water:acetic acid (84:14:7). Detection of saponins on the TLC plates after development and air-drying was done by immersion in a suspension of sheep erythrocytes, followed by washing off the excess blood on the plate surface. Saponins appeared as white spots against a pink background. The protocol provided specific detection of saponins in the saponins enriched extracts from Aesculusindica (Wall. ex Camb.) Hook.f., Lonicera japonica Thunb., Silene inflata Sm., Sapindusmukorossi Gaertn., Chlorophytum borivilianum Santapau & Fernandes, Asparagusadscendens Roxb., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Agave americana L., Camellia sinensis [L.] O. Kuntze. The protocol is convenient, inexpensive, does not require any corrosive chemicals and provides specific detection of saponins.

  13. Tuning the performance of a natural treatment process using metagenomics for improved trace organic chemical attenuation.

    PubMed

    Drewes, J E; Li, D; Regnery, J; Alidina, M; Wing, A; Hoppe-Jones, C

    2014-01-01

    By utilizing high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics, this study revealed how the microbial community characteristics including composition, diversity, as well as functional genes in managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems can be tuned to enhance removal of trace organic chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). Increasing the humic content of the primary substrate resulted in higher microbial diversity. Lower concentrations and a higher humic content of the primary substrate promoted the attenuation of biodegradable CECs in laboratory and field MAR systems. Metagenomic results indicated that the metabolic capabilities of xenobiotic biodegradation were significantly promoted for the microbiome under carbon-starving conditions.

  14. Analysis of physical and chemical parameters of bottled drinking water.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar; Walia, T P S; Lark, B S; Sumanjit

    2006-04-01

    Seventeen different brands of bottled drinking water, collected from different retail shops in Amritsar, were analyzed for different physical and chemical parameters to ascertain their compliability with the prescribed/recommended limits of the World Heath Organization (WHO) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). It was found that the majority of the brands tested were over-treated. Lower values of hardness, total dissolved solids (TDS) and conductance than the prescribed limits of WHO showed that water was deficient in essential minerals. Minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium and fluoride were present in some cases in such a low concentration that water seemed to be as good as distilled water. Samples showing fluoride lesser than 0.5 mg/l warranted additional sources of fluoride for the people consuming only bottled water for drinking purposes. Zero values for chlorine demand as shown by all the bottled water samples showed that water samples were safe from micro-organisms. In case of heavy metals, only lead had been found to be greater than the limit of 0.015 mg/l as prescribed by WHO and USEPA, in seven out of 17 samples. Lead even at such a low concentration can pose a great health hazard.

  15. A quasistationary analysis of a stochastic chemical reaction: Keizer's paradox.

    PubMed

    Vellela, Melissa; Qian, Hong

    2007-07-01

    For a system of biochemical reactions, it is known from the work of T.G. Kurtz [J. Appl. Prob. 8, 344 (1971)] that the chemical master equation model based on a stochastic formulation approaches the deterministic model based on the Law of Mass Action in the infinite system-size limit in finite time. The two models, however, often show distinctly different steady-state behavior. To further investigate this "paradox," a comparative study of the deterministic and stochastic models of a simple autocatalytic biochemical reaction, taken from a text by the late J. Keizer, is carried out. We compute the expected time to extinction, the true stochastic steady state, and a quasistationary probability distribution in the stochastic model. We show that the stochastic model predicts the deterministic behavior on a reasonable time scale, which can be consistently obtained from both models. The transition time to the extinction, however, grows exponentially with the system size. Mathematically, we identify that exchanging the limits of infinite system size and infinite time is problematic. The appropriate system size that can be considered sufficiently large, an important parameter in numerical computation, is also discussed.

  16. Chemical analysis of superconducting phase in K-doped picene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Takashi; Nishiyama, Saki; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Terao, Takahiro; Izumi, Masanari; Sakai, Yusuke; Zheng, Lu; Goto, Hidenori; Itoh, Yugo; Onji, Taiki; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C.; Sugino, Hisako; Gohda, Shin; Okamoto, Hideki; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Potassium-doped picene (K3.0picene) with a superconducting transition temperature (T C) as high as 14 K at ambient pressure has been prepared using an annealing technique. The shielding fraction of this sample was 5.4% at 0 GPa. The T C showed a positive pressure-dependence and reached 19 K at 1.13 GPa. The shielding fraction also reached 18.5%. To investigate the chemical composition and the state of the picene skeleton in the superconducting sample, we used energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, MALDI-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Both EDX and MALDI-TOF indicated no contamination with materials other than K-doped picene or K-doped picene fragments, and supported the preservation of the picene skeleton. However, it was also found that a magnetic K-doped picene sample consisted mainly of picene fragments or K-doped picene fragments. Thus, removal of the component contributing the magnetic quality to a superconducting sample should enhance the volume fraction.

  17. Chemical analysis of superconducting phase in K-doped picene.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Takashi; Nishiyama, Saki; Nguyen, Huyen L T; Terao, Takahiro; Izumi, Masanari; Sakai, Yusuke; Zheng, Lu; Goto, Hidenori; Itoh, Yugo; Onji, Taiki; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C; Sugino, Hisako; Gohda, Shin; Okamoto, Hideki; Kubozono, Yoshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Potassium-doped picene (K3.0picene) with a superconducting transition temperature (T C) as high as 14 K at ambient pressure has been prepared using an annealing technique. The shielding fraction of this sample was 5.4% at 0 GPa. The T C showed a positive pressure-dependence and reached 19 K at 1.13 GPa. The shielding fraction also reached 18.5%. To investigate the chemical composition and the state of the picene skeleton in the superconducting sample, we used energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, MALDI-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Both EDX and MALDI-TOF indicated no contamination with materials other than K-doped picene or K-doped picene fragments, and supported the preservation of the picene skeleton. However, it was also found that a magnetic K-doped picene sample consisted mainly of picene fragments or K-doped picene fragments. Thus, removal of the component contributing the magnetic quality to a superconducting sample should enhance the volume fraction. PMID:27604421

  18. Photoacoustic chemical sensing: layered systems and excitation source analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Logan S.; Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a versatile tool that is well suited for the ranged interrogation of layered samples. We have previously demonstrated standoff photoacoustic (PA) chemical detection of condensed phase samples at one meter distance using an interferometric sensing platform. Current research investigates layered solid samples constructed from a thin layer of energetic material deposited on a substrate. The PA signal from the system, as measured by the interferometer, changes based on the differing optical and mechanical properties of the substrate. This signal variance must be understood in order to develop a sensor capable of detecting trace quantities of hazardous materials independent of the surface. Optical absorption and modal excitation are the two biggest sources of PA signal generated in the sample/substrate system. Finally, the mode of operation of the excitation source is investigated. Most PA sensing paradigms use a quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in either pulsed or modulated CW mode. We will discuss photoacoustic signal generation with respect to these different operating modes.

  19. Chemical analysis applied to the radiation sterilization of solid ketoprofen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, S.; Maquille, A.; Tilquin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of radiation sterilization of ketoprofen from a chemical point of view. Although irradiated ketoprofen has already been studied in the literature [Katusin-Razem et al., Radiat. Phys. Chem. 73 111-116 (2005)], new results, on the basis of electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements and the use of hyphenated techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS), are obtained. The ESR spectra of irradiated ketoprofen consists of four unresolved resonance peaks and the mean G-value of ketoprofen is found to be 4 +/- 0.9 nmoles/J, which is very small. HPLC-UV analyses indicate that no significant loss of ketoprofen is detected after irradiation. LC-MS-MS analyses show that the structures of the non-volatile final products are similar to ketoprofen. Benzaldehyde is detected in the irradiated samples after dynamic-extraction GC-MS. The analyses show that ketoprofen is radioresistant and therefore might be radiosterilized.

  20. Virus and Bacterial Cell Chemical Analysis by NanoSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P; Holt, J

    2008-07-28

    In past work for the Department of Homeland Security, the LLNL NanoSIMS team has succeeded in extracting quantitative elemental composition at sub-micron resolution from bacterial spores using nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). The purpose of this task is to test our NanoSIMS capabilities on viruses and bacterial cells. This initial work has proven successful. We imaged Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and Bacillus anthracis Sterne cells using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and then analyzed those samples by NanoSIMS. We were able resolve individual viral particles ({approx}18 nm by 300 nm) in the SEM and extract correlated elemental composition in the NanoSIMS. The phosphorous/carbon ratio observed in TMV is comparable to that seen in bacterial spores (0.033), as was the chlorine/carbon ratio (0.11). TMV elemental composition is consistent from spot to spot, and TMV is readily distinguished from debris by NanoSIMS analysis. Bacterial cells were readily identified in the SEM and relocated in the NanoSIMS for elemental analysis. The Ba Sterne cells were observed to have a measurably lower phosphorous/carbon ratio (0.005), as compared to the spores produced in the same run (0.02). The chlorine/carbon ratio was approximately 2.5X larger in the cells (0.2) versus the spores (0.08), while the fluorine/carbon ratio was approximately 10X lower in the cells (0.008) than the spores (0.08). Silicon/carbon ratios for both cells and spores encompassed a comparable range. The initial data in this study suggest that high resolution analysis is useful because it allows the target agent to be analyzed separate from particulates and other debris. High resolution analysis would also be useful for trace sample analysis. The next step in this work is to determine the potential utility of elemental signatures in these kinds of samples. We recommend bulk analyses of media and agent samples to determine the range of media compositions in use, and to determine how

  1. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  2. Different Models Used to Interpret Chemical Changes: Analysis of a Curriculum and Its Impact on French Students' Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kermen, Isabelle; Meheut, Martine

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the new French curriculum on chemical changes describing the underlying models and highlighting their relations to the empirical level. The authors of the curriculum introduced a distinction between the chemical change of a chemical system and the chemical reactions that account for it. We specify the different roles of…

  3. Improved Methods for the Enrichment and Analysis of Glycated Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Schepmoes, Athena A; Brock, Jonathan W; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Purvine, Samuel O; Baynes, John; Smith, Richard D; Metz, Thomas O

    2008-12-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. Herein we report improved methods for the enrichment and analysis of glycated peptides using boronate affinity chromatography and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry, respectively. The enrichment of glycated peptides was improved by replacing an off-line desalting step with an on-line wash of column-bound glycated peptides using 50 mM ammonium acetate. The analysis of glycated peptides by MS/MS was improved by considering only higher charged (≥3) precursor-ions during data-dependent acquisition, which increased the number of glycated peptide identifications. Similarly, the use of supplemental collisional activation after electron transfer (ETcaD) resulted in more glycated peptide identifications when the MS survey scan was acquired with enhanced resolution. In general, acquiring ETD-MS/MS data at a normal MS survey scan rate, in conjunction with the rejection of both 1+ and 2+ precursor-ions, increased the number of identified glycated peptides relative to ETcaD or the enhanced MS survey scan rate. Finally, an evaluation of trypsin, Arg-C, and Lys-C showed that tryptic digestion of glycated proteins was comparable to digestion with Lys-C and that both were better than Arg-C in terms of the number glycated peptides identified by LC-MS/MS.

  4. Cytocompatibility assessment of chemical surface treatments for phosphate glass to improve adhesion between glass and polyester.

    PubMed

    S Hasan, M; Ahmed, I; Parsons, A J; Walker, G S; Scotchford, C A

    2013-11-01

    Fully resorbable phosphate glass fiber reinforced polymer composites have shown real potential for replacing some of the existing metallic bone fracture fixation devices. However, some of these composites have not provided suitable mechanical strength profiles over the required healing period for bone. Typically, it has been seen that these composites can lose up to 50% or more of their strength within the first week of degradation. Functionalizing the glass surface to promote polymer adhesion or to introduce hydrophobicity at the glass surface could potentially introduce control over the mechanical properties of the composite and their retention. In this study eight chemical agents namely, Glycerol 2-phosphate disodium salt; 3-phosphonopropionic acid; 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane; etidronic acid; hexamethylene diisocyanate; sorbitol/sodium ended PLA oligomers and amino phosphonic acid, were selected to functionalise the bulk phosphate glass surface. Selected chemical agents had one functional group (-OH or O C N) to react with the glass and another functionality (either -OH, NH2, or Na) to react with the polymer matrix and/or produce hydrophobicity at the fiber surface. Bulk phosphate glass surface-treated with the above agents were assessed for the cytotoxicity of degradation products cell-material interaction in short- and long-term direct cytocompatibility studies. Results obtained from these cytocompatibility studies (using human osteosarcoma (MG63) and primary human osteoblast cell lines) revealed no cytotoxicity from the degradation products and a response comparable to controls in terms of cell functions (attachment, viability, metabolic activity, proliferation, and differentiation) and morphology.

  5. Modified CTAB and TRIzol protocols improve RNA extraction from chemically complex Embryophyta1

    PubMed Central

    Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid E.; Chanderbali, Andre S.; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Here we present a series of protocols for RNA extraction across a diverse array of plants; we focus on woody, aromatic, aquatic, and other chemically complex taxa. Methods and Results: Ninety-one taxa were subjected to RNA extraction with three methods presented here: (1) TRIzol/TURBO DNA-free kits using the manufacturer’s protocol with the addition of sarkosyl; (2) a combination method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and TRIzol/sarkosyl/TURBO DNA-free; and (3) a combination of CTAB and QIAGEN RNeasy Plant Mini Kit. Bench-ready protocols are given. Conclusions: After an iterative process of working with chemically complex taxa, we conclude that the use of TRIzol supplemented with sarkosyl and the TURBO DNA-free kit is an effective, efficient, and robust method for obtaining RNA from 100 mg of leaf tissue of land plant species (Embryophyta) examined. Our protocols can be used to provide RNA of suitable stability, quantity, and quality for transcriptome sequencing. PMID:25995975

  6. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  7. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  8. Vacuum Enhanced X-Ray Florescent Scanner Allows On-The-Spot Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, the Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have developed a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions- a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in at a mere 4 pounds, the newly developed handheld vacuum X-ray fluorescent analyzer can identify and characterize a wide range of elements, and is capable of detecting chemical elements with low atomic numbers, such as sodium, aluminum and silicon. It is the only handheld product on the market with that capability. Aluminum alloy verification is of particular interest to NASA because vast amounts of high-strength aluminum alloys are used in the Space Shuttle propulsion system such as the External Tank, Main Engine, and Solid Rocket Boosters. This capability promises to be a boom to the aerospace community because of unique requirements, for instance, the need to analyze Space Shuttle propulsion systems on the launch pad. Those systems provide the awe-inspiring rocket power that propels the Space Shuttle from Earth into orbit in mere minutes. The scanner development also marks a major improvement in the quality assurance field, because screws, nuts, bolts, fasteners, and other items can now be evaluated upon receipt and rejected if found to be substandard. The same holds true for aluminum weld rods. The ability to validate the integrity of raw materials and partially finished products before adding value to them in the manufacturing process will be of benefit not only to businesses, but also to the consumer, who will have access to a higher value product at a cheaper price. Three vacuum X-ray scanners are already being used in the Space Shuttle Program. The External Tank

  9. Vacuum Enhanced X-Ray Florescent Scanner Allows On-The-Spot Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, the Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have developed a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions- a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in at a mere 4 pounds, the newly developed handheld vacuum X-ray fluorescent analyzer can identify and characterize a wide range of elements, and is capable of detecting chemical elements with low atomic numbers, such as sodium, aluminum and silicon. It is the only handheld product on the market with that capability. Aluminum alloy verification is of particular interest to NASA because vast amounts of high-strength aluminum alloys are used in the Space Shuttle propulsion system such as the External Tank, Main Engine, and Solid Rocket Boosters. This capability promises to be a boom to the aerospace community because of unique requirements, for instance, the need to analyze Space Shuttle propulsion systems on the launch pad. Those systems provide the awe-inspiring rocket power that propels the Space Shuttle from Earth into orbit in mere minutes. The scanner development also marks a major improvement in the quality assurance field, because screws, nuts, bolts, fasteners, and other items can now be evaluated upon receipt and rejected if found to be substandard. The same holds true for aluminum weld rods. The ability to validate the integrity of raw materials and partially finished products before adding value to them in the manufacturing process will be of benefit not only to businesses, but also to the consumer, who will have access to a higher value product at a cheaper price. Three vacuum X-ray scanners are already being used in the Space Shuttle Program. The External Tank

  10. Vacuum Enhanced X-Ray Florescent Scanner Allows On-The-Spot Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers have teamed with KeyMaster Technologies, Kennewick, Washington, to develop a portable vacuum analyzer that performs on-the-spot chemical analyses under field conditions, a task previously only possible in a chemical laboratory. The new capability is important not only to the aerospace industry, but holds potential for broad applications in any industry that depends on materials analysis, such as the automotive and pharmaceutical industries. Weighing in at a mere 4 pounds, the newly developed handheld vacuum X-ray fluorescent analyzer can identify and characterize a wide range of elements, and is capable of detecting chemical elements with low atomic numbers, such as sodium, aluminum and silicon. It is the only handheld product on the market with that capability. Aluminum alloy verification is of particular interest to NASA because vast amounts of high-strength aluminum alloys are used in the Space Shuttle propulsion system such as the External Tank, Main Engine, and Solid Rocket Boosters. This capability promises to be a boom to the aerospace community because of unique requirements, for instance, the need to analyze Space Shuttle propulsion systems on the launch pad. Those systems provide the awe-inspiring rocket power that propels the Space Shuttle from Earth into orbit in mere minutes. The scanner development also marks a major improvement in the quality assurance field, because screws, nuts, bolts, fasteners, and other items can now be evaluated upon receipt and rejected if found to be substandard. The same holds true for aluminum weld rods. The ability to validate the integrity of raw materials and partially finished products before adding value to them in the manufacturing process will be of benefit not only to businesses, but also to the consumer, who will have access to a higher value product at a cheaper price. Three vacuum X-ray scanners are already being used in the Space Shuttle Program. The External Tank Project

  11. Chemical analysis of outgassing contaminants on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Methods for analyzing and characterizing outgassing contaminants from such materials as RTV 501 potting compound and S 13 G paint are presented. Fractional distillation of a gross distillate from RTV 501 rubber was carried out and the distilled fractions examined as to their ultraviolet and infrared spectra by gas liquid chromatography. A sensitive technique for structural analysis and molecular identification was found to consist of a gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy system, which was determined to be economically unfeasible at present.

  12. Improved spectrum simulation for validating SEM-EDS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statham, P.; Penman, C.; Duncumb, P.

    2016-02-01

    X-ray microanalysis by SEM-EDS requires corrections for the many physical processes that affect emitted intensity for elements present in the material. These corrections will only be accurate provided a number of conditions are satisfied and it is essential that the correct elements are identified. As analysis is pushed to achieve results on smaller features and more challenging samples it becomes increasingly difficult to determine if all conditions are upheld and whether the analysis results are valid. If a theoretical simulated spectrum based on the measured analysis result is compared with the measured spectrum, any marked differences will indicate problems with the analysis and can prevent serious mistakes in interpretation. To achieve the necessary accuracy a previous theoretical model has been enhanced to incorporate new line intensity measurements, differential absorption and excitation of emission lines, including the effect of Coster-Kronig transitions and an improved treatment of bremsstrahlung for compounds. The efficiency characteristic has been measured for a large area SDD detector and data acquired from an extensive set of standard materials at both 5 kV and 20 kV. The parameterized model has been adjusted to fit measured characteristic intensities and both background shape and intensity at the same beam current. Examples are given to demonstrate how an overlay of an accurate theoretical simulation can expose some non-obvious mistakes and provide some expert guidance towards a valid analysis result. A new formula for calculating the effective mean atomic number for compounds has also been derived that is appropriate and should help improve accuracy in techniques that calculate the bremsstrahlung or use a bremsstrahlung measurement for calibration.

  13. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with experimental factor-compensated and T1-normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant RF irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with Creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (kws) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI. PMID:22649044

  14. Improved Aerodynamic Analysis for Hybrid Wing Body Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gern, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of ongoing efforts to develop, evaluate, and validate different tools for improved aerodynamic modeling and systems analysis of Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft configurations. Results are being presented for the evaluation of different aerodynamic tools including panel methods, enhanced panel methods with viscous drag prediction, and computational fluid dynamics. Emphasis is placed on proper prediction of aerodynamic loads for structural sizing as well as viscous drag prediction to develop drag polars for HWB conceptual design optimization. Data from transonic wind tunnel tests at the Arnold Engineering Development Center s 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel was used as a reference data set in order to evaluate the accuracy of the aerodynamic tools. Triangularized surface data and Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) models of an X-48B 2% scale wind tunnel model were used to generate input and model files for the different analysis tools. In support of ongoing HWB scaling studies within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, an improved finite element based structural analysis and weight estimation tool for HWB center bodies is currently under development. Aerodynamic results from these analyses are used to provide additional aerodynamic validation data.

  15. Modified paraffin wax for improvement of histological analysis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jin Ik; Lim, Kook-Jin; Choi, Jin-Young; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2010-08-01

    Paraffin wax is usually used as an embedding medium for histological analysis of natural tissue. However, it is not easy to obtain enough numbers of satisfactory sectioned slices because of the difference in mechanical properties between the paraffin and embedded tissue. We describe a modified paraffin wax that can improve the histological analysis efficiency of natural tissue, composed of paraffin and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) resin (0, 3, 5, and 10 wt %). Softening temperature of the paraffin/EVA media was similar to that of paraffin (50-60 degrees C). The paraffin/EVA media dissolved completely in xylene after 30 min at 50 degrees C. Physical properties such as the amount of load under the same compressive displacement, elastic recovery, and crystal intensity increased with increased EVA content. EVA medium (5 wt %) was regarded as an optimal composition, based on the sectioning efficiency measured by the numbers of unimpaired sectioned slices, amount of load under the same compressive displacement, and elastic recovery test. Based on the staining test of sectioned slices embedded in a 5 wt % EVA medium by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Masson trichrome (MT), and other staining tests, it was concluded that the modified paraffin wax can improve the histological analysis efficiency with various natural tissues.

  16. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  17. The electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis microscopy beamline data acquisition system at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, C.; Krempaska, R.; Morrison, G. R.

    1996-07-01

    The electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) microscopy data acquisition system enables the user to control the imaging and spectroscopy modes of operation of the beamline ESCA microscopy at ELETTRA. It allows the user to integrate all experiment, beamline and machine operations in one single environment. The system also provides simple data analysis for both spectra and images data to guide further data acquisition.

  18. Evaluation of Chemical Abstracts(4) - Analysis of Technical Reports Collection -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Nobumasa

    It has been long time since various data bases appeared. Amid so-called information flood data bases have played a role in improving performances of industrial activities or social life by providing appropriate information at right time from them. Particularly CA Search is indispensable and important to persons who are engaged in R & D in chemistry and the related fields. For the purpose of advancing on-line searching efficiency by clarifying the scope and coverage by document type the author analyzed the information covered in CA, which results were reported in the series of articles "Evaluation of CA". In this article the author analyzed the coverage of technical reports and compared the result with NTIS file.

  19. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  20. Chemical modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. for improved activity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, N S; Kishore, Vijay; Manonmani, H K

    2014-01-01

    L-Asparaginase (ASNase), an antileukemia enzyme, is facing problems with antigenicity in the blood. Modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. was tried to obtain improved stability and improved functionality. In our experiment, modification of the enzyme was tried with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin by crosslinking using glutaraldehyde, N-bromosuccinimide, and mono-methoxy polyethylene glycol. Modified enzymes were studied for activity, temperature stability, rate constants (kd), and protection to proteolytic digestion. Modification with ovalbumin resulted in improved enzyme activity that was 10-fold higher compared to native enzyme, while modification with bovine serum albumin through glutaraldehyde cross-linking resulted in high stability of L-asparaginase that was 8.5- and 7.62-fold more compared to native enzyme at 28°C and 37°C by the end of 24 hr. These effects were dependent on the quantity of conjugate formed. Modification also markedly prolonged L-asparaginase half-life and serum stability. N-Bromosuccinimide-modified ASNase presented greater stability with prolonged in vitro half-life of 144 hr to proteolytic digestion relative to unmodified enzyme (93 h). The present work could be seen as producing a modified L-asparaginase with improved activity and stability and can be a potential source for developing therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  1. Inorganic chemical analysis of environmental materials—A lecture series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    At the request of the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado, the authors prepared and presented a lecture series to the students of a graduate level advanced instrumental analysis class. The slides and text presented in this report are a compilation and condensation of this series of lectures. The purpose of this report is to present the slides and notes and to emphasize the thought processes that should be used by a scientist submitting samples for analyses in order to procure analytical data to answer a research question. First and foremost, the analytical data generated can be no better than the samples submitted. The questions to be answered must first be well defined and the appropriate samples collected from the population that will answer the question. The proper methods of analysis, including proper sample preparation and digestion techniques, must then be applied. Care must be taken to achieve the required limits of detection of the critical analytes to yield detectable analyte concentration (above "action" levels) for the majority of the study's samples and to address what portion of those analytes answer the research question-total or partial concentrations. To guarantee a robust analytical result that answers the research question(s), a well-defined quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) plan must be employed. This QA/QC plan must include the collection and analysis of field and laboratory blanks, sample duplicates, and matrix-matched standard reference materials (SRMs). The proper SRMs may include in-house materials and/or a selection of widely available commercial materials. A discussion of the preparation and applicability of in-house reference materials is also presented. Only when all these analytical issues are sufficiently addressed can the research questions be answered with known certainty.

  2. Prevention of optics and resist contamination in 300-mm lithography: improvements in chemical air filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinkead, Devon A.; Grayfer, Anatoly; Kishkovich, Oleg P.

    2001-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure deep UV lithography using fast chemically amplified photoresists will be the mainstay of semiconductor production into the foreseeable future. Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) in the form of bases and condensable organic and inorganic materials however, threaten both sensitive optics and modern resists thereby creating a host of yield limiting contamination issues. Past work by Kunz at MIT has described photo-induced organic contamination of lithographic optics as a significant concern in leading-edge lithography. Moreover, Kinkead and Ercken, and Kishkovich and Dean have published work on the impact of base contamination on CD uniformity in modern photoresists. Herein, the authors discuss solutions to control both optics and resist contamination in a single compact filter system for advanced lithography. The results of this work suggest that resist and optics contamination can be controlled as we enter the era of low K1 factor <150nm/300mm-device production.

  3. Chemical re-engineering of chlorotoxin improves bioconjugation properties for tumor imaging and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Stroud, Mark R; Hansen, Stacey J; Clark, Richard J; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J; Olson, James M

    2011-02-10

    Bioconjugates composed of chlorotoxin and near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) moieties are being advanced toward human clinical trials as intraoperative imaging agents that will enable surgeons to visualize small foci of cancer. In previous studies, the NIRF molecules were conjugated to chlorotoxin, which results in a mixture of mono-, di-, and trilabeled peptide. Here we report a new chemical entity that bound only a single NIRF molecule. The lysines at positions 15 and 23 were substituted with either alanine or arginine, which resulted in only monolabeled peptide that was functionally equivalent to native chlorotoxin/Cy5.5. We also analyzed the serum stability and serum half-life of cyclized chlorotoxin, which showed an 11 h serum half-life and resulted in a monolabeled product. Based on these data, we propose to advance a monolabeled chlorotoxin to human clinical trials.

  4. An improved flux-split algorithm applied to hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    An explicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing numerical algorithm is presented and applied to hypersonic flows assumed to be in thermochemical equilibrium. Real-gas chemistry is either loosely coupled to the gasdynamics by way of a Gibbs free energy minimization package or fully coupled using species mass conservation equations with finite-rate chemical reactions. A scheme is developed that maintains stability in the explicit, finite-rate formulation while allowing relatively high time steps. The codes use flux vector splitting to difference the inviscid fluxes and employ real-gas corrections to viscosity and thermal conductivity. Numerical results are compared against existing ballistic range and flight data. Flows about complex geometries are also computed.

  5. CHEMICAL RE-ENGINEERING OF CHLOROTOXIN IMPROVES BIOCONJUGATION PROPERTIES FOR TUMOR IMAGING AND TARGETED THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Akcan, Muharrem; Stroud, Mark R.; Hansen, Stacey J.; Clark, Richard J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.; Olson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Bioconjugates composed of chlorotoxin and near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) moieties are being advanced toward human clinical trials as intra-operative imaging agents that will enable surgeons to visualize small foci of cancer. In previous studies, the NIRF molecules were conjugated to chlorotoxin, which results in a mixture of mono-, di-, and tri-labeled peptide. Here we report a new chemical entity that bound only a single NIRF molecule. The lysines at positions 15 and 23 were substituted with either Ala or Arg, which resulted in only mono-labeled peptide that was functionally equivalent to native chlorotoxin:Cy5.5. We also analyzed the serum stability and serum half life of cyclized chlorotoxin, which showed an 11 hour serum half life and resulted in a mono-labeled product. Based on these data, we propose to advance a mono-labeled chlorotoxin to human clinical trials. PMID:21210710

  6. Mechanism of highly improved electrical properties in polypropylene by chemical modification of grafting maleic anhydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yao; Hu, Jun; Dang, Bin; He, Jinliang

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports excellent electrical properties in polypropylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PP-g-MAH) and a related mechanism of the enhanced electrical properties. The chemical structure of PP-g-MAH was analyzed and its effect on space charge accumulation, electrical breakdown strength and DC conductivity was studied. Compared with pure PP, the PP-g-MAH exhibits remarkably suppressed space charge accumulation, enhanced electrical breakdown strength and reduced conduction current. The mechanism enhancing the electrical properties was studied by measuring the trap level distribution. It can be explained that abundant deep traps are introduced in PP-g-MAH with the introduction of polar groups in MAH, which reduces the charge mobility and raises the charge injection barrier so as to suppress space charge accumulation. This investigation would contribute to propose a new material modification strategy for designing high-voltage direct current insulation material in addition to the inclusion of nanoparticles.

  7. Improved carrier mobility of chemical vapor deposition-graphene by counter-doping with hydrazine hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhang, Haoran; Sui, Yanping; Zhang, Yaqian; Ge, Xiaoming; Yu, Guanghui Xie, Xiaoming; Li, Xiaoliang; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Xinyu

    2015-03-02

    We developed a counter-doping method to tune the electronic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene by varying the concentration and time of graphene exposure to hydrazine hydrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O). The shift of G and 2D peaks of Raman spectroscopy is analyzed as a function of N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O concentration. The result revealed that N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O realized n-type doping on CVD grown graphene. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement proved the existence of nitrogen, which indicated the adsorption of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} on the surface of graphene. After counter-doping, carrier mobility, which was measured by Hall measurements, increased three fold.

  8. Improving the chemical shift dispersion of multidimensional NMR spectra of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Bermel, Wolfgang; Bruix, Marta; Felli, Isabella C; Kumar M V, Vasantha; Pierattelli, Roberta; Serrano, Soraya

    2013-03-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have recently attracted the attention of the scientific community challenging the well accepted structure-function paradigm. In the characterization of the dynamic features of proteins nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) is a strategic tool of investigation. However the peculiar properties of IDPs, with the lack of a unique 3D structure and their high flexibility, have a strong impact on NMR observables (low chemical shift dispersion, efficient solvent exchange broadening) and thus on the quality of NMR spectra. Key aspects to be considered in the design of new NMR experiments optimized for the study of IDPs are discussed. A new experiment, based on direct detection of (13)C(α), is proposed.

  9. Case study II: application of the divalent cation bridging theory to improve biofloc properties and industrial activated sludge system performance-using alternatives to sodium-based chemicals.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Matthew J; Sobeck, David C; Owens, Steven J; Szabo, Lynn M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the application of the divalent cation bridging theory (DCBT) as a tool in the chemical selection process at an activated sludge plant to improve settling, dewatering, and effluent quality. According to the DCBT, to achieve improvements, the goal of chemical selection should be to reduce the ratio of monovalent-to-divalent (M/D) cations. A study was conducted to determine the effect of using magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] as an alternative to sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at a full-scale industrial wastewater treatment plant. Floc properties and treatment plant performance were measured for approximately one year during two periods of NaOH addition and Mg(OH)2 addition. A cost analysis of plant operation during NaOH and Mg(OH)2 use was also performed. During NaOH addition, the M/D ratio was 48, while, during Mg(OH)2 addition, this ratio was reduced to an average of approximately 0.1. During the Mg(OH)2 addition period, the sludge volume index, effluent total suspended solids, and effluent chemical oxygen demand were reduced by approximately 63, 31, and 50%, respectively, compared to the NaOH addition period. The alum and polymer dose used for clarification was reduced by approximately 50 and 60%, respectively, during Mg(OH)2 addition. The dewatering properties of the activated sludge improved dewatering as measured by decreased capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), along with an increase in cake solids from the SRF test. This corresponded to a reduction in the volume of solids thickened by centrifuges at the treatment plant, which reduced the disposal costs of solids. Considering the costs for chemicals and solids disposal, the annual cost of using Mg(OH)2 was approximately 30,000 dollars to 115,000 dollars less than using NaOH, depending on the pricing of NaOH. The results of this study confirm that the DCBT is a useful tool for assessing chemical-addition strategies and their potential effect

  10. Software for analysis of chemical mixtures--composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Jonathon C.; Skach, Kenneth A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The composition, occurrence, distribution, and possible toxicity of chemical mixtures in the environment are research concerns of the U.S. Geological Survey and others. The presence of specific chemical mixtures may serve as indicators of natural phenomena or human-caused events. Chemical mixtures may also have ecological, industrial, geochemical, or toxicological effects. Chemical-mixture occurrences vary by analyte composition and concentration. Four related computer programs have been developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey for research of chemical-mixture compositions, occurrences, distributions, and possible toxicities. The compositions and occurrences are identified for the user-supplied data, and therefore the resultant counts are constrained by the user’s choices for the selection of chemicals, reporting limits for the analytical methods, spatial coverage, and time span for the data supplied. The distribution of chemical mixtures may be spatial, temporal, and (or) related to some other variable, such as chemical usage. Possible toxicities optionally are estimated from user-supplied benchmark data. The software for the analysis of chemical mixtures described in this report is designed to work with chemical-analysis data files retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System but can also be used with appropriately formatted data from other sources. Installation and usage of the mixture software are documented. This mixture software was designed to function with minimal changes on a variety of computer-operating systems. To obtain the software described herein and other U.S. Geological Survey software, visit http://water.usgs.gov/software/.

  11. Surge Nozzle NDE Specimen Mechanical Stress Improvement Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fredette, Lee F.

    2011-07-14

    The purpose of this project was to perform a finite element analysis of a pressurized water reactor pressurizer surge nozzle mock-up to predict both the weld residual stresses created in its construction and the final stress state after the application of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP). Strain gages were applied to the inner diameter of the mock-up to record strain changes during the MSIP. These strain readings were used in an attempt to calculate the final stress state of the mock-up as well.

  12. Improved method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, J.S.; Gjerde, D.T.; Schmuckler, G.

    An improved apparatus and method are described for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single element and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  13. An improved convergence analysis of smoothed aggregation algebraic multigrid

    SciTech Connect

    Brezina, Marian; Vaněk, Petr; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2011-03-02

    We present an improved analysis of the smoothed aggregation (SA) alge- braic multigrid method (AMG) extending the original proof in [SA] and its modification in [Va08]. The new result imposes fewer restrictions on the aggregates that makes it eas- ier to verify in practice. Also, we extend a result in [Van] that allows us to use aggressive coarsening at all levels due to the special properties of the polynomial smoother, that we use and analyze, and thus provide a multilevel convergence estimate with bounds independent of the coarsening ratio.

  14. Independent component analysis for improving the quality of interferometric products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saqellari Likoka, A.; Vafeiadi-Bila, E.; Karathanassi, V.

    2016-05-01

    The accuracy of InSAR DEMs is affected by the temporal decorrelation of SAR images which is due to atmosphere, land use/cover, soil moisture, and roughness changes. Elimination of the temporal decorrelation of the master and slave image improves the DEMs accuracy. In this study, the Independent Component Analysis was applied before interferometric process. It was observed that using three ICA entries, ICA independent sources can be interpreted as background and changed images. ICA when performed on the master and slave images using the same couple of additional images produces two background images which enable the production of high quality DEMs. However, limitations exist in the proposed approach.

  15. Hydrogen determination in chemically delithiated lithium ion battery cathodes by prompt gamma activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Emilio, II

    2007-12-01

    Lithium ion batteries, due to their relatively high energy density, are now widely used as the power source for portable electronics. Commercial lithium ion cells currently employ layered LiCoO2 as a cathode but only 50% of its theoretical capacity can be utilized. The factors that cause the limitation are not fully established in the literature. With this perspective, prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has been employed to determine the hydrogen content in various oxide cathodes that have undergone chemical extraction of lithium (delithiation). The PGAA data is complemented by data obtained from atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), redox titration, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass spectroscopy to better understand the capacity limitations and failure mechanisms of lithium ion battery cathodes. As part of this work, the PGAA facility has been redesigned and reconstructed. The neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds have been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Detection limits for elements have also been improved. Special attention was given to the experimental setup including potential sources of error and system calibration for the detection of hydrogen. Spectral interference with hydrogen arising from cobalt was identified and corrected for. Limits of detection as a function of cobalt mass present in a given sample are also discussed. The data indicates that while delithiated layered Li1- xCoO2, Li1-xNi 1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2, and Li1- xNi0.5Mn0.5O2 take significant amounts of hydrogen into the lattice during deep extraction, orthorhombic Li 1-xMnO2, spinel Li1- xMn2O4, and olivine Li1- xFePO4 do not. Layered LiCoO2, LiNi 0.5Mn0.5O2, and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co 1/3O2 have been further analyzed to assess their relative chemical instabilities while undergoing stepped chemical delithiation. Each system takes increasing amounts of protons at lower lithium contents. The differences are attributed to the relative chemical instabilities of the various cathodes

  16. An Efficient and Configurable Preprocessing Algorithm to Improve Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Ilaria; Cantoni, Elena; Cernigliaro, Alice; Signorile, Giovanna; Fantino, Gianluca; Tavella, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) is widely used to measure the stability of experimental time series. Specifically, AVAR is commonly used in space applications such as monitoring the clocks of the global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). In these applications, the experimental data present some peculiar aspects which are not generally encountered when the measurements are carried out in a laboratory. Space clocks' data can in fact present outliers, jumps, and missing values, which corrupt the clock characterization. Therefore, an efficient preprocessing is fundamental to ensure a proper data analysis and improve the stability estimation performed with the AVAR or other similar variances. In this work, we propose a preprocessing algorithm and its implementation in a robust software code (in MATLAB language) able to deal with time series of experimental data affected by nonstationarities and missing data; our method is properly detecting and removing anomalous behaviors, hence making the subsequent stability analysis more reliable. PMID:26540679

  17. Missile placement analysis based on improved SURF feature matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaida; Zhao, Wenjie; Li, Dejun; Gong, Xiran; Sheng, Qian

    2015-03-01

    The precious battle damage assessment by use of video images to analysis missile placement is a new study area. The article proposed an improved speeded up robust features algorithm named restricted speeded up robust features, which combined the combat application of TV-command-guided missiles and the characteristics of video image. Its restrictions mainly reflected in two aspects, one is to restrict extraction area of feature point; the second is to restrict the number of feature points. The process of missile placement analysis based on video image was designed and a video splicing process and random sample consensus purification were achieved. The RSURF algorithm is proved that has good realtime performance on the basis of guarantee the accuracy.

  18. An Efficient and Configurable Preprocessing Algorithm to Improve Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Ilaria; Cantoni, Elena; Cernigliaro, Alice; Signorile, Giovanna; Fantino, Gianluca; Tavella, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) is widely used to measure the stability of experimental time series. Specifically, AVAR is commonly used in space applications such as monitoring the clocks of the global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). In these applications, the experimental data present some peculiar aspects which are not generally encountered when the measurements are carried out in a laboratory. Space clocks' data can in fact present outliers, jumps, and missing values, which corrupt the clock characterization. Therefore, an efficient preprocessing is fundamental to ensure a proper data analysis and improve the stability estimation performed with the AVAR or other similar variances. In this work, we propose a preprocessing algorithm and its implementation in a robust software code (in MATLAB language) able to deal with time series of experimental data affected by nonstationarities and missing data; our method is properly detecting and removing anomalous behaviors, hence making the subsequent stability analysis more reliable.

  19. Integrated optical sensor platform for multiparameter bio-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lützow, Peter; Pergande, Daniel; Heidrich, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    There is growing demand for robust, reliable, low cost, and easy to use sensor systems that feature multiparameter analysis in many application areas ranging from safety and security to point of care and medical diagnostics. Here, we highlight the theory and show first experimental results on a novel approach targeting the realization of massively multiplexed sensor arrays. The presented sensor platform is based on arrays of frequency-modulated integrated optical microring resonators (MRR) fed by a single bus waveguide combined with lock-in detection to filter out in a reliable and simple manner their individual response to external stimuli. The working principle is exemplified on an array of four thermo-optically modulated MRR. It is shown that with this technique tracking of individual resonances is possible even in case of strong spectral overlap. PMID:21747482

  20. Integrated optical sensor platform for multiparameter bio-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lützow, Peter; Pergande, Daniel; Heidrich, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    There is growing demand for robust, reliable, low cost, and easy to use sensor systems that feature multiparameter analysis in many application areas ranging from safety and security to point of care and medical diagnostics. Here, we highlight the theory and show first experimental results on a novel approach targeting the realization of massively multiplexed sensor arrays. The presented sensor platform is based on arrays of frequency-modulated integrated optical microring resonators (MRR) fed by a single bus waveguide combined with lock-in detection to filter out in a reliable and simple manner their individual response to external stimuli. The working principle is exemplified on an array of four thermo-optically modulated MRR. It is shown that with this technique tracking of individual resonances is possible even in case of strong spectral overlap.

  1. The chemical identification and analysis of Aspergillus nidulans secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi have long been recognized to be a rich source of secondary metabolites with potential medicinal applications. The recent genomic sequencing of several Aspergillus species has revealed that many secondary metabolite gene clusters are apparently silent under standard laboratory conditions. Several successful approaches have been utilized to upregulate these genes and unearth the corresponding natural products. A straightforward, reliable method to purify and characterize new metabolites therefore should be useful. Details are provided herein on the cultivation of Aspergillus nidulans and the LC/MS analysis of the metabolic profile. Following is an explanation of silica gel chromatography, HPLC, and preparative TLC. Finally, the NMR characterization of previously unknown A. nidulans metabolites is detailed. PMID:23065610

  2. Chemical modification of proteins to improve the accuracy of their relative molecular mass determination by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dolnik, Vladislav; Gurske, William A

    2011-10-01

    We studied the electrophoretic behavior of basic proteins (cytochrome c and histone III) and developed a carbamylation method that normalizes their electrophoretic size separation and improves the accuracy of their relative molecular mass determined electrophoretically. In capillary zone electrophoresis with cationic hitchhiking, native cytochrome c does not sufficiently bind cationic surfactants due to electrostatic repulsion between the basic protein and cationic surfactant. Carbamylation suppresses the strong positive charge of the basic proteins and results in more accurate relative molecular masses.

  3. A composite of complex and chemical hydrides yields the first Al-based amidoborane with improved hydrogen storage properties.

    PubMed

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Jepsen, Lars H; Safin, Damir A; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Dyadkin, Vadim; Jensen, Torben R; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2015-10-01

    The first Al-based amidoborane Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] was obtained through a mechanochemical treatment of the NaAlH4 -4 AB (AB=NH3 BH3 ) composite releasing 4.5 wt % of pure hydrogen. The same amidoborane was also produced upon heating the composite at 70 °C. The crystal structure of Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ], elucidated from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and confirmed by DFT calculations, contains the previously unknown tetrahedral ion [Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ](-) , with every NH2 BH3 (-) ligand coordinated to aluminum through nitrogen atoms. Combination of complex and chemical hydrides in the same compound was possible due to both the lower stability of the AlH bonds compared to the BH ones in borohydride, and due to the strong Lewis acidity of Al(3+) . According to the thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry-mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) studies, Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] releases in two steps 9 wt % of pure hydrogen. As a result of this decomposition, which was also supported by volumetric studies, the formation of NaBH4 and amorphous product(s) of the surmised composition AlN4 B3 H(0-3.6) were observed. Furthermore, volumetric experiments have also shown that the final residue can reversibly absorb about 27 % of the released hydrogen at 250 °C and p(H2 )=150 bar. Hydrogen re-absorption does not regenerate neither Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] nor starting materials, NaAlH4 and AB, but rather occurs within amorphous product(s). Detailed studies of the latter one(s) can open an avenue for a new family of reversible hydrogen storage materials. Finally, the NaAlH4 -4 AB composite might become a starting point towards a new series of aluminum-based tetraamidoboranes with improved hydrogen storage properties such as hydrogen storage density, hydrogen purity, and reversibility. PMID:26306666

  4. A composite of complex and chemical hydrides yields the first Al-based amidoborane with improved hydrogen storage properties.

    PubMed

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Jepsen, Lars H; Safin, Damir A; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Dyadkin, Vadim; Jensen, Torben R; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2015-10-01

    The first Al-based amidoborane Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] was obtained through a mechanochemical treatment of the NaAlH4 -4 AB (AB=NH3 BH3 ) composite releasing 4.5 wt % of pure hydrogen. The same amidoborane was also produced upon heating the composite at 70 °C. The crystal structure of Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ], elucidated from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and confirmed by DFT calculations, contains the previously unknown tetrahedral ion [Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ](-) , with every NH2 BH3 (-) ligand coordinated to aluminum through nitrogen atoms. Combination of complex and chemical hydrides in the same compound was possible due to both the lower stability of the AlH bonds compared to the BH ones in borohydride, and due to the strong Lewis acidity of Al(3+) . According to the thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry-mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) studies, Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] releases in two steps 9 wt % of pure hydrogen. As a result of this decomposition, which was also supported by volumetric studies, the formation of NaBH4 and amorphous product(s) of the surmised composition AlN4 B3 H(0-3.6) were observed. Furthermore, volumetric experiments have also shown that the final residue can reversibly absorb about 27 % of the released hydrogen at 250 °C and p(H2 )=150 bar. Hydrogen re-absorption does not regenerate neither Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] nor starting materials, NaAlH4 and AB, but rather occurs within amorphous product(s). Detailed studies of the latter one(s) can open an avenue for a new family of reversible hydrogen storage materials. Finally, the NaAlH4 -4 AB composite might become a starting point towards a new series of aluminum-based tetraamidoboranes with improved hydrogen storage properties such as hydrogen storage density, hydrogen purity, and reversibility.

  5. Improvement of in vivo rat skin optical clearing with chemical penetration enhancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Xue; Duan, Shu; Chen, Zhongwei; Zhu, Dan

    2011-03-01

    Optical method plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and treatment, but suffers from limited penetration depth of light in turbid tissue. The optical clearing technique can improve the light delivery significantly through immersion of tissues into Optical Clearing Agents (OCAs). However, the barrier function of stratum corneum makes it difficult for optical clearing of skin by topical application of OCAs. Addition of penetration enhancers to OCAs can improve the skin clearing efficacy, but most investigations were performed on in vitro skin. Here, to evaluate the efficacy of this method on in vivo skin, direct observation and measurement of diffuse reflectance spectra were performed after topical application of different mixtures. One OCA, PEG-400, and three penetration enhancers (PEs), Thiazone, Azone and Propylene Glycol (PG), were used. The results indicated that the addition of penetration enhancers could improve the optical clearing efficacy of rat skin in vivo significantly, the dermal blood vessels could be observed directly with PEs. Among the three penetration enhancers, Thiazone induced the largest enhancement of clearing efficacy, and the enhancement induced by PG is the least. This study is very helpful for in vivo application of OCAs to enhance skin optical clearing non- invasively.

  6. The dilemma in prioritizing chemicals for environmental analysis: known versus unknown hazards.

    PubMed

    Anna, Sobek; Sofia, Bejgarn; Christina, Rudén; Magnus, Breitholtz

    2016-08-10

    A major challenge for society is to manage the risks posed by the many chemicals continuously emitted to the environment. All chemicals in production and use cannot be monitored and science-based strategies for prioritization are essential. In this study we review available data to investigate which substances are included in environmental monitoring programs and published research studies reporting analyses of chemicals in Baltic Sea fish between 2000 and 2012. Our aim is to contribute to the discussion of priority settings in environmental chemical monitoring and research, which is closely linked to chemical management. In total, 105 different substances or substance groups were analyzed in Baltic Sea fish. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were the most studied substances or substance groups. The majority, 87%, of all analyses comprised 20% of the substances or substance groups, whereas 46 substance groups (44%) were analyzed only once. Almost three quarters of all analyses regarded a POP-substance (persistent organic pollutant). These results demonstrate that the majority of analyses on environmental contaminants in Baltic Sea fish concern a small number of already regulated chemicals. Legacy pollutants such as POPs pose a high risk to the Baltic Sea due to their hazardous properties. Yet, there may be a risk that prioritizations for chemical analyses are biased based on the knowns of the past. Such biases may lead to society failing in identifying risks posed by yet unknown hazardous chemicals. Alternative and complementary ways to identify priority chemicals are needed. More transparent communication between risk assessments performed as part of the risk assessment process within REACH and monitoring programs, and information on chemicals contained in consumer articles, would offer ways to identify chemicals for environmental analysis.

  7. The dilemma in prioritizing chemicals for environmental analysis: known versus unknown hazards.

    PubMed

    Anna, Sobek; Sofia, Bejgarn; Christina, Rudén; Magnus, Breitholtz

    2016-08-10

    A major challenge for society is to manage the risks posed by the many chemicals continuously emitted to the environment. All chemicals in production and use cannot be monitored and science-based strategies for prioritization are essential. In this study we review available data to investigate which substances are included in environmental monitoring programs and published research studies reporting analyses of chemicals in Baltic Sea fish between 2000 and 2012. Our aim is to contribute to the discussion of priority settings in environmental chemical monitoring and research, which is closely linked to chemical management. In total, 105 different substances or substance groups were analyzed in Baltic Sea fish. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were the most studied substances or substance groups. The majority, 87%, of all analyses comprised 20% of the substances or substance groups, whereas 46 substance groups (44%) were analyzed only once. Almost three quarters of all analyses regarded a POP-substance (persistent organic pollutant). These results demonstrate that the majority of analyses on environmental contaminants in Baltic Sea fish concern a small number of already regulated chemicals. Legacy pollutants such as POPs pose a high risk to the Baltic Sea due to their hazardous properties. Yet, there may be a risk that prioritizations for chemical analyses are biased based on the knowns of the past. Such biases may lead to society failing in identifying risks posed by yet unknown hazardous chemicals. Alternative and complementary ways to identify priority chemicals are needed. More transparent communication between risk assessments performed as part of the risk assessment process within REACH and monitoring programs, and information on chemicals contained in consumer articles, would offer ways to identify chemicals for environmental analysis. PMID:27222376

  8. Bulked sample analysis in genetics, genomics and crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Zou, Cheng; Wang, Pingxi; Xu, Yunbi

    2016-10-01

    Biological assay has been based on analysis of all individuals collected from sample populations. Bulked sample analysis (BSA), which works with selected and pooled individuals, has been extensively used in gene mapping through bulked segregant analysis with biparental populations, mapping by sequencing with major gene mutants and pooled genomewide association study using extreme variants. Compared to conventional entire population analysis, BSA significantly reduces the scale and cost by simplifying the procedure. The bulks can be built by selection of extremes or representative samples from any populations and all types of segregants and variants that represent wide ranges of phenotypic variation for the target trait. Methods and procedures for sampling, bulking and multiplexing are described. The samples can be analysed using individual markers, microarrays and high-throughput sequencing at all levels of DNA, RNA and protein. The power of BSA is affected by population size, selection of extreme individuals, sequencing strategies, genetic architecture of the trait and marker density. BSA will facilitate plant breeding through development of diagnostic and constitutive markers, agronomic genomics, marker-assisted selection and selective phenotyping. Applications of BSA in genetics, genomics and crop improvement are discussed with their future perspectives.

  9. Environmental Chemical Analysis (by B. B. Kebbekus and S. Mitra)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Reviewed By Nathan W.

    1999-11-01

    This text helps to fill a void in the market, as there are relatively few undergraduate instrumental analysis texts designed specifically for the expanding population of environmental science students. R. N. Reeve's introductory, open-learning Environmental Analysis (Wiley, 1994) is one of the few, and it is aimed at a lower level and is less appropriate for traditional classroom study. Kebbekus and Mitra's book appears to be an update of I. Marr and M. Cresser's excellent 1983 text by the same name (and also published under the Chapman and Hall imprint). It assumes no background in instrumental methods of analysis but it does depend upon a good general chemistry background in kinetic and equilibrium calculations and the standard laboratory techniques found in a classical introduction to analytical chemistry. The slant taken by the authors is aimed more toward engineers, not only in the choice of topics, but also in how they are presented. For example, the statistical significance tests presented follow an engineering format rather than the standard used in analytical chemistry. This approach does not detract from the book's clarity. The writing style is concise and the book is generally well written. The earlier text, which has become somewhat of a classic, took the unusual step of teaching the instruments in the context of their environmental application. It was divided into sections on the "atmosphere", the "hydrosphere", the "lithosphere", and the "biosphere". This text takes a similar approach in the second half, with chapters on methods for air, water, and solid samples. Users who intend to use the book as a text instead of a reference will appreciate the addition of chapters in the first half of the book on spectroscopic, chromatographic, and mass spectrometric methods. The six chapters in these two parts of the book along with four chapters scattered throughout on environmental measurements, sampling, sample preparation, and quality assurance make a nice

  10. Requirements analysis for safety-critical systems: A chemical batch processing example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delemos, R.; Saeed, A.; Anderson, T.

    1994-01-01

    An essential basis for the development of software for safety-critical systems is to establish high-quality requirements specifications. In the paper the authors present a methodology for requirements analysis that consists of: a framework which facilitates the systematic analysis of the safety requirements, a graph which records the safety specifications and their relationships, and a set of procedures for the quality analysis of the safety specifications. To illustrate the approach a case study, based on chemical batch processing, is presented.

  11. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt , B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  12. Basic mechanisms of photosynthesis and applications to improved production and conversion of biomass to fuels and chemical products

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sayed, M.; Greenbaum, E.; Wasielewski, M.

    1996-09-01

    Natural photosynthesis, the result of 3.5 billion years of evolutionary experimentation, is the best proven, functional solar energy conversion technology. It is responsible for filling the vast majority of humanity`s energy, nutritional, and materials needs. Understanding the basic physical chemical principles underlying photosynthesis as a working model system is vital to further exploitation of this natural technology. These principles can be used to improve or modify natural photosynthesis so that it is more efficient or so that it can produce unusual products such as hydrogen, methane, methanol, ethanol, diesel fuel substitutes, biodegradable materials, or other high value chemical products. Principles garnered from the natural process can also be used to design artificial photosynthetic devices that employ analogs of natural antenna and reaction center function, self-assembly and repair concepts, photoinduced charge transfer processes, photoprotection, and dark reactions that facilitate catalytic action to convert light into, useful chemical or electrical energy. The present broad understanding of many structural and functional aspects of photosynthesis has resulted from rapid recent research progress. X-ray structures of several key photosynthetic reaction centers and antenna systems are available, and the overall principles controlling photoinduced energy and electron transfer are being established.

  13. Chemical analysis of copper/brass samples from Christian Island

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, R.G.V.; Farquhar, R.M.; Pavlish, L.A.; Finlayson, W.A.

    1994-12-31

    In 1639, French Jesuit missionaries established the fortified mission of Ste. Marie I at Midland, Ontario. Ten years later, following a series of Iroquoian war-party raids that were facilitated by Dutch and English trading interests, the mission was abandoned and destroyed. The missionaries and local Wendats (Hurons) debated new venues, finally settling on Christian Island in southwestern Georgian Bay as a temporary safe haven rather than their original first choice, the more distant and safer Manitoulin Island. In 1649, they began establishing the fortified mission of Ste. Marie 11. A Wendat settlement existed on the island, but unlike the fort whose walls are intact today, little evidence remains of the island`s single-year population of {approximately} 10000 Wendats, most of whom perished. There was extreme deprivation on the island during the winter of 1649-1650. People died of famine, disease, and ill-fated sorties to the mainland. In June of 1650, after a single year of occupation, the site of Ste. Marie 11 was abandoned when the missionaries were recalled to the relative safety of Quebec City. The remaining Wendats were either assimilated by other groups or killed by the Iroquois. An analysis was performed of the brass goods discarded in the area of the island fort and nearby villages.

  14. [Analysis of thickening polysaccharides by the improved diethyldithioacetal derivatization method].

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takumi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    The identification test for thickening polysaccharides containing neutral saccharides and uronic acids was investigated by GC analysis of constituent monosaccharides. The reported method, in which monosaccharides were converted to diethyldithioacetal derivatives with ethanethiol followed by trimethylsilylation, was improved in terms of operability and reproducibility of GC/MS analysis. The suitability of the improved diethyldithioacetal derivatization method was determined for seven thickening polysaccharides, i.e., carob bean gum, guar gum, karaya gum, gum arabic, gum ghatti, tragacanth gum and peach gum. The samples were acid-hydrolyzed to form monosaccharides. The hydrolysates were derivatized and analyzed with GC/FID. Each sugar derivative was detected as a single peak and was well separated from others on the chromatograms. The amounts of constituent monosaccharides in thickening polysaccharides were successfully estimated. Seven polysaccharides were distinguished from each other on the basis of constituent monosaccharides. Further examination of the time period of hydrolysis of polysaccharides using peach gum showed that the optimal times were not the same for all monosaccharides. A longer time was needed to hydrolyze glucuronic acid than neutral saccharides. The findings suggest that hydrolysis time may sometimes affect the analytical results on composition of constituent monosaccharides in polysaccharides.

  15. Figure content analysis for improved biomedical article retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Daekeun; Apostolova, Emilia; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical images are invaluable in medical education and establishing clinical diagnosis. Clinical decision support (CDS) can be improved by combining biomedical text with automatically annotated images extracted from relevant biomedical publications. In a previous study we reported 76.6% accuracy using supervised machine learning on the feasibility of automatically classifying images by combining figure captions and image content for usefulness in finding clinical evidence. Image content extraction is traditionally applied on entire images or on pre-determined image regions. Figure images articles vary greatly limiting benefit of whole image extraction beyond gross categorization for CDS due to the large variety. However, text annotations and pointers on them indicate regions of interest (ROI) that are then referenced in the caption or discussion in the article text. We have previously reported 72.02% accuracy in text and symbols localization but we failed to take advantage of the referenced image locality. In this work we combine article text analysis and figure image analysis for localizing pointer (arrows, symbols) to extract ROI pointed that can then be used to measure meaningful image content and associate it with the identified biomedical concepts for improved (text and image) content-based retrieval of biomedical articles. Biomedical concepts are identified using National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. Our methods report an average precision and recall of 92.3% and 75.3%, respectively on identifying pointing symbols in images from a randomly selected image subset made available through the ImageCLEF 2008 campaign.

  16. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Lee, James Y; York, Sean W; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2013-03-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC'fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars.

  17. An improved dual porosity model for chemical transport in macroporous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Chittaranjan; Ellsworth, Timothy R.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Boast, Charles W.

    1997-06-01

    The often observed processes involved in preferential water flow and chemical transport in porous media appear to be realistically described using a dual-continuum (dual-porosity) approach. In this approach, the porous medium is conceptualized as two coexistent continua, one representing the bulk matrix and the other the macropore region. Fluid and solute mass transfer between the two regions in the conceptual model occurs under pressure and concentration gradients. However, oscillatory behavior (overshoot problems in the macropore region) of the transport equation was observed for high values of the advective solute flux relative to the diffusive solute flux between the two regions. To circumvent this oscillatory behavior, the fluid coupling term in the transport equations was treated as an element-averaged, rather than a nodal property. The model was extended to two space dimensions for evaluating the impact of agricultural practices on solute leaching. A linear kinetic sorption module in the transport equations and a simple plant root extraction routine in the flow equations were also added. Although the simulation results show promise, additional work will be needed to determine realistic model parameter values.

  18. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Lee, James Y; York, Sean W; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2013-03-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC'fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. PMID:23431191

  19. Development of improved nanosilver-based antibacterial textiles via synthesis of versatile chemically modified cotton fabrics.

    PubMed

    Hebeish, A; El-Shafei, A; Sharaf, S; Zaghloul, S

    2014-11-26

    Cationization of cotton fabric form was effected by reacting the cellulose with 3-chloro-2 hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride in presence of sodium hydroxide as per the pad dry cure method. Thus obtained cationized cotton cellulose was reacted with a reactive copolymer, namely, reactive β-cyclodextrin grafted with polyacrylic acid (MCT-βCD-g-PAA).Bridging of another copolymer, namely, β-cyclodextrin grafted with polyacrylic acid (βCD-g-PAA) to the cationized fabric using epichlorohydrin crosslinker was also performed. Inclusion of Ag nanoparticles in these three cotton substrates via treatment of the latter with colloid of Ag nanoparticles or through in situ formation of the former was exercised. Characterization of cotton fabric before and after being chemically modified was carried out using FTIR, XRD and SEM. Bacterial examination of the cationized cotton containing either (MCT-βCD-g-PAA) or (βCD-g-PAA) incorporated with Ag nanoparticles showed these substrates function against G+ve and G-ve bacteria. Ability of (MCT-βCD-g-PAA) modified cotton to include hydrophobic molecules was examined.

  20. Improving the Resistance of a Eukaryotic β-Barrel Protein to Thermal and Chemical Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Beta-barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen bonding networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions exist, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the ‘mitochondrial porin family’ and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM. Using a physical interaction model TmSIP for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three β-strands unfavorable in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of one degree per minute, is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering. PMID:21835183

  1. Improving the resistance of a eukaryotic β-barrel protein to thermal and chemical perturbations.

    PubMed

    Gessmann, Dennis; Mager, Frauke; Naveed, Hammad; Arnold, Thomas; Weirich, Sara; Linke, Dirk; Liang, Jie; Nussberger, Stephan

    2011-10-14

    β-Barrel membrane proteins have regular structures with extensive hydrogen-bond networks between their transmembrane (TM) β-strands, which stabilize their protein fold. Nevertheless, weakly stable TM regions, which are important for the protein function and interaction with other proteins, exist. Here, we report on the apparent stability of human Tom40A, a member of the "mitochondrial porin family" and main constituent of the mitochondrial protein-conducting channel TOM (translocase of the outer membrane). Using a physical interaction model, TmSIP, for β-barrel membrane proteins, we have identified three unfavorable β-strands in the TM domain of the protein. Substitution of key residues inside these strands with hydrophobic amino acids results in a decreased sensitivity of the protein to chemical and/or thermal denaturation. The apparent melting temperature observed when denatured at a rate of 1 °C per minute is shifted from 73 to 84 °C. Moreover, the sensitivity of the protein to denaturant agents is significantly lowered. Further, we find a reduced tendency for the mutated protein to form dimers. We propose that the identified weakly stable β-strands 1, 2 and 9 of human Tom40A play an important role in quaternary protein-protein interactions within the mammalian TOM machinery. Our results show that the use of empirical energy functions to model the apparent stability of β-barrel membrane proteins may be a useful tool in the field of nanopore bioengineering.

  2. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Lee, James Y.; York, Sean W.; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC′fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. PMID:23431191

  3. Endocrine-disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Oneyeol; Kim, Hye Lim; Weon, Jong-Il; Seo, Young Rok

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are known to cause harmful effects to human through various exposure routes. These chemicals mainly appear to interfere with the endocrine or hormone systems. As importantly, numerous studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of endocrine disruptors can induce fatal disorders including obesity and cancer. Using diverse biological tools, the potential molecular mechanisms related with these diseases by exposure of endocrine disruptors. Recently, pathway analysis, a bioinformatics tool, is being widely used to predict the potential mechanism or biological network of certain chemicals. In this review, we initially summarize the major molecular mechanisms involved in the induction of the above mentioned diseases by endocrine disruptors. Additionally, we provide the potential markers and signaling mechanisms discovered via pathway analysis under exposure to representative endocrine disruptors, bisphenol, diethylhexylphthalate, and nonylphenol. The review emphasizes the importance of pathway analysis using bioinformatics to finding the specific mechanisms of toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. PMID:25853100

  4. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity.

  5. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity. PMID:25753999

  6. S3 and S4 abundances and improved chemical kinetic model for Venus lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    Mixing ratios of S3 and S4 are retrieved from the Venera 11 observations. The previous model for 0-47 km [4] is improved by (1) a test and inclusion of the S4 cycle [9], (2) reduction of the H2SO4 and CO fluxes from the middle atmosphere by a factor of 4, (3) removal of sulfur flux from the middle atmosphere, (4) a closed boundary for OCS at the surface instead of a free parameter for the OCS density, and (5) some minor updates. The model results are briefly discussed.

  7. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  8. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data.

  9. Pretreatment and integrated analysis of spectral data reveal seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Ito, Kengo; Sakata, Kenji; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Extracting useful information from high dimensionality and large data sets is a major challenge for data-driven approaches. The present study was aimed at developing novel integrated analytical strategies for comprehensively characterizing seaweed similarities based on chemical diversity. The chemical compositions of 107 seaweed and 2 seagrass samples were analyzed using multiple techniques, including Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), CHNS/O total elemental analysis, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IR-MS). The spectral data were preprocessed using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) and NMF combined with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) methods in order to separate individual component information from the overlapping and/or broad spectral peaks. Integrated analysis of the preprocessed chemical data demonstrated distinct discrimination of differential seaweed species. Further network analysis revealed a close correlation between the heavy metal elements and characteristic components of brown algae, such as cellulose, alginic acid, and sulfated mucopolysaccharides, providing a componential basis for its metal-sorbing potential. These results suggest that this integrated analytical strategy is useful for extracting and identifying the chemical characteristics of diverse seaweeds based on large chemical data sets, particularly complicated overlapping spectral data. PMID:25647718

  10. Nuclear and radiochemical techniques in chemical analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finston, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1981-06-01

    The areas studied during the period of the contract included determinations of cross sections for nuclear reactions, determination of neutron capture cross sections of radionuclides, application of special activation techniques, and x-ray counting, elucidation of synergic solvent extraction mechanisms and development of new solvent extraction techniques, and the development of a PIXE analytical facility. The thermal neutron capture cross section of /sup 22/Na was determined, and cross sections and energy levels were determined for /sup 20/Ne(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 17/O, /sup 20/Ne(n,P)/sup 20/F, and /sup 40/Ar(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 37/S. Inelastic scattering with 2 to 3 MeV neutrons followed by counting of the metastable states permits analysis of the following elements: In, Sr, Cd, Hg, and Pb. Bromine can be detected in the presence of a 500-fold excess of Na and/or K by thermal neutron activation and x-ray counting, and as little as 0.3 x 10/sup -9/ g of Hg can be detected by this technique. Mediun energy neutrons (10 to 160 MeV) have been used to determine Tl, Pb, and Bi by (n,Xn) and (n,PXn) reactions. The reaction /sup 19/F(P,..cap alpha..)/sup 76/O has been used to determine as little as 50 ..mu..mol of Freon -14. Mechanisms for synergic solvent extractions have been elucidated and a new technique of homogeneous liquid-liquid solvent extraction has been developed in which the neutral complex is rapidly extracted propylene carbonate by raising and lowering the temperature of the system. An external-beam PIXE system has been developed for trace element analyses of a variety of sample types. Various sample preparation techniques have been applied to a diverse range of samples including marine sediment, coral, coal, and blood.

  11. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN M62

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Dalessandro, E.

    2015-11-10

    We have collected UVES-FLAMES high-resolution spectra for a sample of 6 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and 13 red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) M62 (NGC 6266). Here we present the detailed abundance analysis of iron, titanium, and light elements (O, Na, Mg, and Al). For the majority (five out of six) of the AGB targets, we find that the abundances of both iron and titanium determined from neutral lines are significantly underestimated with respect to those obtained from ionized features, the latter being, instead, in agreement with those measured for the RGB targets. This is similar to recent findings in other clusters and may suggest the presence of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects. In the O–Na, Al–Mg, and Na–Al planes, the RGB stars show the typical correlations observed for GC stars. Instead, all the AGB targets are clumped in the regions where first-generation stars are expected to lie, similar to what was recently found for the AGB population of NGC 6752. While the sodium and aluminum abundances could be underestimated as a consequence of the NLTE bias affecting iron and titanium, the oxygen line used does not suffer from the same effects, and the lack of O-poor AGB stars therefore is a solid result. We can thus conclude that none of the investigated AGB stars belongs to the second stellar generation of M62. We also find an RGB star with extremely high sodium abundance ([Na/Fe] = +1.08 dex)

  12. LDEX-PLUS: Lunar Dust Experiment with Chemical Analysis Capability to search for Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Gruen, E.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphee and Dust Explorer Mission (LADEE) is scheduled for launch in early 2013. It will map the variability of the density and size distributions of dust in the lunar vicinity. LDEX is an impact ionization instrument, at an impact speed of > 1.6 km/s, it is capable of measuring the mass of grains with m > 10^(-11) g, and it can also identify a population of smaller grains with m > 10^(-14) kg with a density of n > 10^(-4) cm^(-3). This talk is to introduce the LDEX-PLUS instrument that extends the LDEX capabilities to also measure the chemical composition of the impacting particles with a mass resolution of M/ΔM > 30. We will summarize the science goals, measurement requirements, and the resource needs of this instrument. Traditional methods to analyze surfaces of airless planetary objects from an orbiter are IR and gamma ray spectroscopy, and neutron backscatter measurements. Here we present a complementary method to analyze dust particles as samples of planetary objects from which they were released. The Moon, Mercury, and all other airless planetary object are exposed to the ambient meteoroid bombardment that erodes their surface and generates secondary ejecta particles. Therefore, such objects are enshrouded in clouds of dust particles that have been lifted from their surfaces. In situ mass spectroscopic analysis of these dust particles impacting onto a detector of an orbiting spacecraft reveals their composition, and the origin of each analyzed grain can be determined with an accuracy at the surface that is approximately the altitude of the orbit. Since the detection rates can be on the order of thousands per day, a spatially resolved mapping of the surface composition can be achieved. Possible enhancements include the addition of a dust trajectory sensor to improve the spatial resolution on the surface to ~ 10 km from an altitude of 100 km, and a reflectron type instrument geometry to increase the

  13. Analysis of Pfizer compounds in EPA's ToxCast chemicals-assay space.

    PubMed

    Shah, Falgun; Greene, Nigel

    2014-01-21

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the ToxCast program in 2007 with the goal of evaluating high-throughput in vitro assays to prioritize chemicals that need toxicity testing. Their goal was to develop predictive bioactivity signatures for toxic compounds using a set of in vitro assays and/or in silico properties. In 2009, Pfizer joined the ToxCast initiative by contributing 52 compounds with preclinical and clinical data for profiling across the multiple assay platforms available. Here, we describe the initial analysis of the Pfizer subset of compounds within the ToxCast chemical (n = 1814) and in vitro assay (n = 486) space. An analysis of the hit rate of Pfizer compounds in the ToxCast assay panel allowed us to focus our mining of assays potentially most relevant to the attrition of our compounds. We compared the bioactivity profile of Pfizer compounds to other compounds in the ToxCast chemical space to gain insights into common toxicity pathways. Additionally, we explored the similarity in the chemical and biological spaces between drug-like compounds and environmental chemicals in ToxCast and compared the in vivo profiles of a subset of failed pharmaceuticals having high similarity in both spaces. We found differences in the chemical and biological spaces of pharmaceuticals compared to environmental chemicals, which may question the applicability of bioactivity signatures developed exclusively based on the latter to drug-like compounds if used without prior validation with the ToxCast Phase-II chemicals. Finally, our analysis has allowed us to identify novel interactions for our compounds in particular with multiple nuclear receptors that were previously not known. This insight may help us to identify potential liabilities with future novel compounds.

  14. Germanium-on-Silicon Strain Engineered Materials for Improved Device Performance Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, Jayesh Moorkoth

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a chemical vapor deposition process for growing epitaxial films of germanium on silicon (001) substrates with two-dimensional (2-D) morphology, and a low density of threading dislocations. Growth was carried out in a reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) system by a two-step growth technique. An accurate knowledge of elastic constants of thin films is important in understanding the effect of strain on material properties. Residual thermal strain was used to measure the Poisson ratio of Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates, by the sin2Psi method and highresolution x-ray diffraction. The Poisson ratio of the Ge films was measured to be 0.25, compared to the bulk value of 0.27. The result was found to be independent of film thickness and defect density, which confirmed that the strain is associated with the elastic response of the film. The study showed that the use of Poisson ratio instead of bulk compliance values yields a more accurate description of the state of in-plane strain present in the film. The experimentally measured in-plane strain in Ge films was found to be lower than the theoretical calculations based on the differential thermal expansion coefficients of Si and Ge. The mechanism of thermal misfit strain relaxation in epitaxial Ge films grown on Si(001) substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Lattice misfit strain associated with Ge/(001)Si mismatched epitaxy is relieved by a network of Lomer edge misfit dislocations during the first step of the growth technique. However, thermal misfit strain energy during growth is relieved by interdiffusion mechanism at the heterointerface. Two SiGe compositions containing 0.5 and 6.0 atomic percent Si were detected that relieve the thermal mismatch strain associated with the two steps of the growth process. This study discusses the importance of interdiffusion mechanism in relieving small misfit strains

  15. Redesigned and chemically-modified hammerhead ribozymes with improved activity and serum stability

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Philip; McCall, Maxine J; Stewart, Tom S; Lockett, Trevor J

    2004-01-01

    Background Hammerhead ribozymes are RNA-based molecules which bind and cleave other RNAs specifically. As such they have potential as laboratory reagents, diagnostics and therapeutics. Despite having been extensively studied for 15 years or so, their wide application is hampered by their instability in biological media, and by the poor translation of cleavage studies on short substrates to long RNA molecules. This work describes a systematic study aimed at addressing these two issues. Results A series of hammerhead ribozyme derivatives, varying in their hybridising arm length and size of helix II, were tested in vitro for cleavage of RNA derived from the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene of Plasmodium falciparum. Against a 550-nt transcript the most efficient (t1/2 = 26 seconds) was a miniribozyme with helix II reduced to a single G-C base pair and with twelve nucleotides in each hybridising arm. Miniribozymes of this general design were targeted to three further sites, and they demonstrated exceptional cleavage activity. A series of chemically modified derivatives was prepared and examined for cleavage activity and stability in human serum. One derivative showed a 103-fold increase in serum stability and a doubling in cleavage efficiency compared to the unmodified miniribozyme. A second was almost 104-fold more stable and only 7-fold less active than the unmodified parent. Conclusion Hammerhead ribozyme derivatives in which helix II is reduced to a single G-C base pair cleave long RNA substrates very efficiently in vitro. Using commonly available phosphoramidites and reagents, two patterns of nucleotide substitution in this derivative were identified which conferred both good cleavage activity against long RNA targets and good stability in human serum. PMID:15588292

  16. The Application of Chemical Derivatization in Forensic Drug Chemistry for Gas and High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Methods of Analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, J M

    1990-12-01

    The analyses of solid-dosage forensic drug samples can be enhanced by chemical derivatization followed by gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. Using these techniques permits improved detection and chromatography of some illicit drugs and their manufacturing by-products. This review focuses on the use of chemical derivatization in conjunction with gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography-electron capture detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection and high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection in the analysis of illicit drug samples. These drugs include the amphetamines, barbiturates, cannabis, fentanyls, opium, and hallucinogens. Discussion on sensitivity enhancement and determination of enantiomeric composition using gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography is included. An entire section is devoted to the chemical derivatization and chromatographic analyses of manufacturing by-products found in illicit amphetamine and methamphetamine, heroin, and cocaine samples. This review also includes a section that describes practical elements and experimental design associated with chemical derivatization-chromatographic analyses..

  17. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  18. Chemical analysis of exhaled human breath using a terahertz spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosnight, Alyssa M.; Moran, Benjamin L.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-09-01

    As many as 3500 chemicals are reported in exhaled human breath. Many of these chemicals are linked to certain health conditions and environmental exposures. This experiment demonstrated a method of breath analysis utilizing a high resolution spectroscopic technique for the detection of ethanol, methanol, and acetone in the exhaled breath of a person who consumed alcohol. This technique is applicable to a wide range of polar molecules. For select species, unambiguous detection in a part per trillion dilution range with a total sample size in a femtomol range is feasible. It compares favorably with other methods of breath analysis.

  19. Ultrafast electronic spectroscopy for chemical analysis near liquid water interfaces: concepts and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, O.; Lugovoy, E.; Siefermann, K.; Liu, Y.; Faubel, M.; Abel, B.

    2009-07-01

    Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) being conceptually a photoelectron spectroscopy is established as a chemically specific probe mostly for surface analysis. Liquid phase ESCA for volatile liquids has become possible through the development of the liquid microjet technique in vacuum enabling the measurement of liquid interface photoelectron emission at the high vapor pressure of volatile liquids. Recently we have been able to add the dimension of time to the liquid interface ESCA technique employing high-harmonics soft X-ray and UV/near IR femtosecond pulses in combination with liquid water micro beams in vacuum. The concepts as well as technical details are outlined and several characteristic applications are highlighted.

  20. Full-motion video analysis for improved gender classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flora, Jeffrey B.; Lochtefeld, Darrell F.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2014-06-01

    The ability of computer systems to perform gender classification using the dynamic motion of the human subject has important applications in medicine, human factors, and human-computer interface systems. Previous works in motion analysis have used data from sensors (including gyroscopes, accelerometers, and force plates), radar signatures, and video. However, full-motion video, motion capture, range data provides a higher resolution time and spatial dataset for the analysis of dynamic motion. Works using motion capture data have been limited by small datasets in a controlled environment. In this paper, we explore machine learning techniques to a new dataset that has a larger number of subjects. Additionally, these subjects move unrestricted through a capture volume, representing a more realistic, less controlled environment. We conclude that existing linear classification methods are insufficient for the gender classification for larger dataset captured in relatively uncontrolled environment. A method based on a nonlinear support vector machine classifier is proposed to obtain gender classification for the larger dataset. In experimental testing with a dataset consisting of 98 trials (49 subjects, 2 trials per subject), classification rates using leave-one-out cross-validation are improved from 73% using linear discriminant analysis to 88% using the nonlinear support vector machine classifier.