Science.gov

Sample records for improved damage control

  1. Ageing Fxr deficient mice develop increased energy expenditure, improved glucose control and liver damage resembling NASH.

    PubMed

    Bjursell, Mikael; Wedin, Marianne; Admyre, Therése; Hermansson, Majlis; Böttcher, Gerhard; Göransson, Melker; Lindén, Daniel; Bamberg, Krister; Oscarsson, Jan; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group H, member 4 (Nr1h4, FXR) is a bile acid activated nuclear receptor mainly expressed in the liver, intestine, kidney and adrenal glands. Upon activation, the primary function is to suppress cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the classic or neutral bile acid synthesis pathway. In the present study, a novel Fxr deficient mouse line was created and studied with respect to metabolism and liver function in ageing mice fed chow diet. The Fxr deficient mice were similar to wild type mice in terms of body weight, body composition, energy intake and expenditure as well as behaviours at a young age. However, from 15 weeks of age and onwards, the Fxr deficient mice had almost no body weight increase up to 39 weeks of age mainly because of lower body fat mass. The lower body weight gain was associated with increased energy expenditure that was not compensated by increased food intake. Fasting levels of glucose and insulin were lower and glucose tolerance was improved in old and lean Fxr deficient mice. However, the Fxr deficient mice displayed significantly increased liver weight, steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning degeneration and lobular inflammation together with elevated plasma levels of ALT, bilirubin and bile acids, findings compatible with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cholestasis. In conclusion, ageing Fxr deficient mice display late onset leanness associated with elevated energy expenditure and improved glucose control but develop severe NASH-like liver pathology.

  2. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  3. Damage mitigating control for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Richard A.

    2007-12-01

    In the last few decades the wind industry has made great strides in reducing the cost of energy of utility scale wind turbines. In an attempt to reduce infrastructure costs and improve efficiency, the trend has been to develop larger variations of existing designs. In the past, the wind turbine controller was used primarily for rotor speed control and prevention of catastrophic damage from extreme wind conditions or component failures. The recent trend of wind turbine growing in size has resulted in wind turbines becoming much more flexible, and now the emphasis of wind turbine controls research focuses on how to damp resonances and avoid dangerous excitations that may lead to structural failure. Control of the fatigue loads on the wind turbine structure addresses neglects the fatigue mechanism of the material. The conversion of loads into stresses and those stresses into fatigue damage is a highly nonlinear process and is based on the so-called "cycle-counting" methods. Since the cycle counting methodology is difficult to convert into the time or frequency domains, these components have been generally avoided in controls research. Without modeling the damage dynamics, the wind turbine controller cannot efficiently reduce the fatigue of the structural components. The result is that only small decreases of fatigue damage are realized by current load reduction strategies at the expense of excessive control actuation. This dissertation introduces the concept of Damage Mitigating Control (DMC) as it applies to utility scale Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs). The work presented extends earlier work in damage mitigating and life extending control in several ways and then applies then applies this control strategy to reduce the fatigue damage suffered by wind turbines during operation. By modeling fatigue damage dynamics within the wind turbine controller, the life of the turbine can be extended significantly without sacrificing performance.

  4. Damage control resuscitation: history, theory and technique

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.

    2014-01-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) represents the natural evolution of the initial concept of damage control surgery. It currently includes early blood product transfusion, immediate arrest and/or temporization of ongoing hemorrhage (i.e., temporary intravascular shunts and/or balloon tamponade) as well as restoration of blood volume and physiologic/hematologic stability. As a result, DCR addresses the early coagulopathy of trauma, avoids massive crystalloid resuscitation and leaves the peritoneal cavity open when a patient approaches physiologic exhaustion without improvement. This concept also applies to severe injuries within anatomical transition zones as well as extremities. This review will discuss each of these concepts in detail. PMID:24461267

  5. Demystifying damage control in musculoskeletal trauma.

    PubMed

    Bates, P; Parker, P; McFadyen, I; Pallister, I

    2016-05-01

    Trauma care has evolved rapidly over the past decade. The benefits of operative fracture management in major trauma patients are well recognised. Concerns over early total care arose when applied broadly. The burden of additional surgical trauma could constitute a second hit, fuelling the inflammatory response and precipitating a decline into acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Temporary external fixation aimed to deliver the benefits of fracture stabilisation without the risk of major surgery. This damage control orthopaedics approach was advocated for those in extremis and a poorly defined borderline group. An increasing understanding of the physiological response to major trauma means there is now a need to refine our treatment options. A number of large scale retrospective reviews indicate that early definitive fracture fixation is beneficial in the majority of major trauma patients. It is recommended that patients are selected appropriately on the basis of their response to resuscitation. The hope is that this approach (dubbed 'safe definitive fracture surgery' or 'early appropriate care') will herald an era when care is individualised for each patient and their circumstances. The novel Damage Control in Orthopaedic Trauma Surgery course at The Royal College of Surgeons of England aims to equip senior surgeons with the insights and mindset necessary to contribute to this key decision making process as well as also the technical skills to provide damage control interventions when needed, relying on the improved techniques of damage control resuscitation and advances in the understanding of early appropriate care. PMID:27023640

  6. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  7. Assessment and control of structural damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, G. D.; Stubbs, N.; Yao, J. T. P.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to summarize and review several investigations on the assessment and control of structural damage in civil engineering. Specifically, the definition of structural damage is discussed. A candidate method for the evaluation of damage is then reviewed and demonstrated. Various ways of implementing passive and active control of civil engineering structures are next summarized. Finally, the possibility of applying expert systems is discussed.

  8. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  9. Semi-active control of isolated and damaged structures using online damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Fereidoun; Mohajeri, Seyed Ahmad; Javanbakht, Majd

    2015-10-01

    The idea of using semi-active or active control devices within a base isolation system has been developed recently, since applying this system to building structures has some shortcomings such as the creation of large displacements at the base level and the system's lack of adaptability to different seismic excitations. In this study, an integrated structural health monitoring and semi-active control scheme is proposed to enhance the seismic behavior of damaged isolated structures. The nonlinear behavior of an isolated structure is limited to the isolator level and the superstructure is assumed to remain linear. Then, using an online damage detection algorithm based on identified system Markov parameters and a semi-active fuzzy controller, the damage in the base isolator is mitigated and the seismic response of the structure is reduced. In addition, a magnetorheological damper is utilized as a well-studied semi-active actuator in the control system. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is evaluated through the numerical study of a six-degrees-of-freedom model of base-isolated buildings excited by various near-fault and far-field earthquake records. The results of the simulation show that the integrated algorithm is substantially effective in improving the dynamic behavior of isolated structures and reducing the damage in the isolator.

  10. Control of electrostatic damage to electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, W.J. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Static is caused by the flow of materials and people within an environment. The static voltages generated by these movements can degrade or destroy many solid state devices currently being used in sophisticated electronic equipment. Discharge of static voltages through these sensitive devices during assembly operations can lead to a nonfunctional assembly fabricated from parts which previously were acceptable or to later failure of an assembly which was functional after fabrication. Sources of electrostatic charges, equipment and methods for minimizing the generation of electrostatic voltages during the production, assembly and packaging of solid state electronic equipment, and the sensitivity of solid state devices to electrostatic damage are discussed. It is concluded that static awareness is the key to an effective electrostatic damage (ESD) control program, and that production facilities must incorporate electrostatic protection facilities, materials, and processes so that workers can concentrate on producing a high-quality product without having to be overly concerned about ESD procedures. (LCL)

  11. Improved control system power unit for large parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A.; Grubbs, T. M.

    1968-01-01

    Improved control system power unit drives the control surfaces of very large controllable parachutes. The design features subassemblies for determining control surface position and cable loading, and protection of the load sensor against the possibility of damage during manipulation.

  12. Blast damage control during underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    Tracer blasting is commonly used in Canadian underground mines for overbreak control. It involves tracing a column of ANFO with a low strength detonating cord. In order to investigate the effectiveness of tracer blasting in perimeter control and to understand its mechanism, a field experimentation was conducted which involved drifting, benching and pipe tests. Initially, a comparison between tracer blasting and other explosive products was made on the basis of half cast factor and percentage overbreak. It was found that tracer blasting produced relatively much lower damage. The following observations were made during tracer blasting experiments: (a) reduction in ground vibrations; (b) partial deflagration and desensitization of ANFO; (c) reduction in the total available explosive energy; (d) continuous side initiation of ANFO column; (e) lateral VOD of ANFO was much less than the steady state VOD; (f) energy partitioning was more in favor of gas energy. It was observed that tracer blasting has the potential of being very cost effective and safer technique for overbreak control. A mechanism of tracer blasting has also been proposed in this paper.

  13. Control Reallocation Strategies for Damage Adaptation in Transport Class Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Krishnakumar, K.; Limes, Greg; Bryant, Don

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility, potential benefits and implementation issues associated with retrofitting a neural-adaptive flight control system (NFCS) to existing transport aircraft, including both cable/hydraulic and fly-by-wire configurations. NFCS uses a neural network based direct adaptive control approach for applying alternate sources of control authority in the presence of damage or failures in order to achieve desired flight control performance. Neural networks are used to provide consistent handling qualities across flight conditions, adapt to changes in aircraft dynamics and to make the controller easy to apply when implemented on different aircraft. Full-motion piloted simulation studies were performed on two different transport models: the Boeing 747-400 and the Boeing C-17. Subjects included NASA, Air Force and commercial airline pilots. Results demonstrate the potential for improving handing qualities and significantly increased survivability rates under various simulated failure conditions.

  14. Proceedings of the ninth SPE symposium on formation damage control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the ninth SPE symposium on formation damage control. Topics covered include: factors affecting gravel placement on long deviated intervals, use of CT scanning in the investigation of damage to unconsolidated cores, simulation of sandstone acidizing of a damaged perforation, completion fluids design criteria and current technology weaknesses.

  15. Improved Method for Laser Damage Testing Coated Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, M R; Folta, J A; Stolz, C J; Taylor, J R; Wolfe, J E; Griffin, A J; Thomas, M D

    2005-10-25

    The damage test procedure for qualifying a coating run of anti-reflection coated optics consists of scanning a pulsed 1064 nm laser over a 1 cm x 1 cm area on a test sample to illuminate approximately 2400 sites. Scans are repeated at 3 J/cm{sup 2} increments until the fluence specification for the optic is reached. In the past, initiation of 1 or more damage sites was classified as a failed coating run, requiring the production optics in the corresponding coating lot be reworked and recoated. Recent laser damage growth tests of 300 repetitive pulses performed on numerous damage sites revealed that all were stable up to 20 J/cm{sup 2}. Therefore the acceptance criteria has been modified to allow a moderate number of damage sites, as long as they are smaller than the allowed dig size and are stable (do not grow). Consequently many coating runs that previously would have been rejected are now accepted, resulting in higher yield, lower cost, and improved delivery schedule. The new test also provides assurance that initiated damage sites are stable during long term operation.

  16. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., George W.; Ashby, Carol I. H.; Brannon, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  17. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    PubMed

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA. PMID:27155660

  18. Quality control of chemically damaged RNA.

    PubMed

    Simms, Carrie L; Zaher, Hani S

    2016-10-01

    The "central dogma" of molecular biology describes how information contained in DNA is transformed into RNA and finally into proteins. In order for proteins to maintain their functionality in both the parent cell and subsequent generations, it is essential that the information encoded in DNA and RNA remains unaltered. DNA and RNA are constantly exposed to damaging agents, which can modify nucleic acids and change the information they encode. While much is known about how cells respond to damaged DNA, the importance of protecting RNA has only become appreciated over the past decade. Modification of the nucleobase through oxidation and alkylation has long been known to affect its base-pairing properties during DNA replication. Similarly, recent studies have begun to highlight some of the unwanted consequences of chemical damage on mRNA decoding during translation. Oxidation and alkylation of mRNA appear to have drastic effects on the speed and fidelity of protein synthesis. As some mRNAs can persist for days in certain tissues, it is not surprising that it has recently emerged that mRNA-surveillance and RNA-repair pathways have evolved to clear or correct damaged mRNA.

  19. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  20. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  1. Damage-mitigating control of space propulsion systems for high performance and extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Wu, Min-Kuang; Dai, Xiaowen; Carpino, Marc; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations are presented showing that a substantial improvement in service life of a reusable rocket engine can be achieved by an insignificant reduction in the system dynamic performance. The paper introduces the concept of damage mitigation and formulates a continuous-time model of fatigue damage dynamics. For control of complex mechanical systems, damage prediction and damage mitigation are carried out based on the available sensory and operational information such that the plant can be inexpensively maintained and safely and efficiently steered under diverse operating conditions. The results of simulation experiments are presented for transient operations of a reusable rocket engine.

  2. DAMAGE CONTROL TECHNIQUES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SEVERE LUNG TRAUMA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Alberto; Martinez, Juan; Rodriguez, Julio; Millan, Mauricio; Valderrama, Gustavo; Ordoñez, Carlos; Puyana, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Damage Control (DC) has improved survival from severe abdominal and extremities injuries. The data on the surgical strategies and outcomes in patients managed with DC for severe thoracic injuries is scarce. Methods Retrospective review of the patients treated with DC for thoracic/pulmonary complex trauma at two level I trauma centers from 2006 to 2010. Subjects 14 and older, were included. Demographics, trauma characteristics, surgical techniques, and resuscitation strategies were reviewed. Results A total of 840 trauma thoracotomies were performed. Damage control thoracotomy (DCT) was done in 31 (3.7%). Pulmonary trauma was found in 25 of them. The median age was 28 (IQR 20–34) years, Revised Trauma Score was 7.11, (IQR 5.44–7.55), and Injury Severity Score was 26 (IQR 25–41). Nineteen patients had gunshot-wounds, four stab-wounds and two blunt trauma. Pulmonary trauma was managed by pneumorrhaphy in three cases, tractotomy in 12, wedge resection in one and packing as primary treatment in 8. Clamping of the pulmonary hilum was used as a last resource in 7 cases. Five patients returned to the ICU with the pulmonary hilum occluded by a vascular clamp or an en masse ligature. These patients underwent a deferred resection within 16 to 90 hours after the initial DCT. Four of them survived. Bleeding from other intra-thoracic sources was found in 20 cases: major vessels in nine, heart in three, and thoracic wall in nine. DCT mortality in pulmonary trauma was 6/25, (24%) due to coagulopathy or persistent bleeding in five cases and to multiorgan failure in one. Conclusion This series describes our experience with DCT in severe lung trauma. We describe pulmonary hilum clamping and deferred lung resection as a viable surgical alternative for major pulmonary injuries, and the use of packing as a definitive method for hemorrhage control. PMID:25539202

  3. Seed dressings to control slug damage in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Simms, Louise C; Mullins, Christopher E; Wilson, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    Slugs are major pests of oilseed rape that are poorly controlled by conventional bait pellets. A series of laboratory experiments investigated the potential of seed-dressings to control slug damage in this crop. Four compounds: metaldehyde, methiocarb, cinnamamide and 3,5-dimethoxycinnamic acid (DMCA) were tested at a range of doses for phytotoxicity and ability to reduce damage by Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). Metaldehyde and methiocarb were not phytotoxic at any doses, whereas all doses of cinnamamide and DMCA were. All compounds reduced slug damage, but metaldehyde and methiocarb consistently performed better than cinnamamide and DMCA. Metaldehyde and methiocarb seed-dressings were compared with baited pellets containing the same active ingredients at recommended field doses. The seed-dressings protected plants from damage by D reticulatum and Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud) as well as, or better than, baited pellets. We therefore recommend that metaldehyde and methiocarb should be field-tested as seed dressings to control slugs in oilseed rape.

  4. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage. PMID:26180839

  5. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage. PMID:26180839

  6. MRAC Control with Prior Model Knowledge for Asymmetric Damaged Aircraft.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xieyu; Yang, Lingyu; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a novel state-tracking multivariable model reference adaptive control (MRAC) technique utilizing prior knowledge of plant models to recover control performance of an asymmetric structural damaged aircraft. A modification of linear model representation is given. With prior knowledge on structural damage, a polytope linear parameter varying (LPV) model is derived to cover all concerned damage conditions. An MRAC method is developed for the polytope model, of which the stability and asymptotic error convergence are theoretically proved. The proposed technique reduces the number of parameters to be adapted and thus decreases computational cost and requires less input information. The method is validated by simulations on NASA generic transport model (GTM) with damage.

  7. Assessing the damage control resuscitation: development, drivers and direction.

    PubMed

    Quinn, David; Frith, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) has become a more widely adopted acute management strategy over the past decade. A cornerstone of this strategy is the performance of an initial limited surgical intervention for the control of active bleeding and contamination. This technique is indicated where significant physiological compromise exists and immediate surgical intervention is required. This damage control surgery itself is completed judiciously to allow a period of resuscitative stabilisation before later definitive surgical solutions. This discussion describes the three further principles of DCR and then explores the rationale and drivers behind the development of this approach. PMID:26315261

  8. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control. PMID:26228573

  9. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control.

  10. Geologic controls of subdivision damage near Denver, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    This case study investigates the geologic controls on damaging ground deformations in a residential subdivision near Denver, Colo. Moderate to severe damage has occurred in certain areas where linear, parallel heave features with up to 0.3 in (1 ft) of differential displacement have formed across roads and under houses. Other areas have small, localized depressions that have formed in the roadsides with no discernable damage to nearby houses. Still other areas show no evidence of ground movements. The bedrock beneath the subdivision consists of steeply dipping Cretaceous strata of the Benton Shale, Niobrara Formation, and Pierre Shale. Quaternary soil deposits and fill, 0-16 m (0-53 ft) thick, overlie the bedrock. The most pronounced and damaging linear-heave features are coincident with steeply dipping, silty claystone with thin layers of very highly plastic bentonite. These heave features diminish as the depth to bedrock increases, and become small to negligible where the bedrock is overlain by 3 m (10 ft) or more of overburden soil deposits or fill. In contrast, areas having no visible damage and those having localized surface depressions are typically underlain by 1-12 m (3-39 ft) of alluvial-terrace deposits or fill. The depressions appear to have been caused by settlement over improperly filled water-and-sewer line trenches. The overall relationship between geology and ground deformations as seen in this subdivision may be useful for predicting, and thereby reducing, damage for future subdivision projects. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering ?? ASCE.

  11. [Influence of Detector Radiation Damage on CR Mammography Quality Control].

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsumi; Ishii, Mie; Terazono, Shiho; Arao, Keiko; Ishii, Rie; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Recently, radiation damage to the detector apparatus employed in computed radiography (CR) mammography has become problematic. The CR system and the imaging plate (IP) applied to quality control (QC) program were also used in clinical mammography in our hospital, and the IP to which radiation damage has occurred was used for approximately 5 years (approximately 13,000 exposures). We considered using previously acquired QC image data, which is stored in a server, to investigate the influence of radiation damage to an IP. The mammography unit employed in this study was a phase contrast mammography (PCM) Mermaid (KONICA MINOLTA) system. The QC image was made newly, and it was output in the film, and thereafter the optical density of the step-phantom image was measured. An input (digital value)-output (optical density) conversion curve was plotted using the obtained data. The digital values were then converted to optical density values using a reference optical density vs. digital value curve. When a high radiation dose was applied directly, radiation damage occurred at a position on the IP where no object was present. Daily QC for mammography is conducted using an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and acrylic disc, and an environmental background density measurement is performed as one of the management indexes. In this study, the radiation damage sustained by the acrylic disc was shown to differ from that of the background. Thus, it was revealed that QC results are influenced by radiation damage. PMID:27211088

  12. NDE of Damage in Aircraft Flight Control Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Dayal, Vinay

    2007-03-01

    Flight control surfaces on an aircraft, such as ailerons, flaps, spoilers and rudders, are typically adhesively bonded composite or aluminum honeycomb sandwich structures. These components can suffer from damage caused by hail stone, runway debris, or dropped tools during maintenance. On composites, low velocity impact damages can escape visual inspection, whereas on aluminum honeycomb sandwich, budding failure of the honeycomb core may or may not be accompanied by a disbond. This paper reports a study of the damage morphology in such structures and the NDE methods for detecting and characterizing them. Impact damages or overload failures in composite sandwiches with Nomex or fiberglass core tend to be a fracture or crinkle or the honeycomb cell wall located a distance below the facesheet-to-core bondline. The damage in aluminum honeycomb is usually a buckling failure, propagating from the top skin downward. The NDE methods used in this work for mapping out these damages were: air-coupled ultrasonic scan, and imaging by computer aided tap tester. Representative results obtained from the field will be shown.

  13. Laser damage resistance of optical coatings in the sub-ps regime: limitations and improvement of damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallais, L.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the topic of short-pulse laser damage in optical coatings in order to understand the intrinsic limitations depending on the application, and the possibility of laser damage resistance improvement. Firstly we describe the physical process of a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse interaction with an optical coating and how this interaction can lead to a damage of the film. Then we present the main facts about laser damage resistance of coatings that are relevant for applications and related to the previously described processes: the dependence of the Laser-Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT) of coating materials with bandgap, the decrease of LIDT with the pulse number, the wavelength and pulse duration dependence, etc... We also discuss on the question of the role of macroscopic defects on damage initiation in this regime and damage growth under multiple irradiation. Eventually different strategies to improve the laser damage resistance will be discussed: engineering of the electric field distribution in the stack, fabrication of mixture materials with enhanced LIDT, mitigation of defects.

  14. Prevention of fetal damage through dietary control of maternal hyperphenylalaninemia.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, M; Levy, H L; Erbe, R W

    1986-09-01

    Maternal phenylketonuria is a new entity in obstetrics. If unrecognized and for this or other reasons untreated, it produces a substantial risk for fetal damage. Our knowledge of the pathophysiology of the fetal complications in maternal PKU is very limited, but the degree of maternal hyperphenylalaninemia seems to be important. The management differs from the other high-risk pregnancies in the need for a special diet beginning before conception. An effective program of dietary therapy designed in collaboration with a PKU clinic will reduce the likelihood of fetal damage and improve pregnancy outcome.

  15. Controlled Damage in Thick Specimens by Multiphoton ExcitationV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, James A.; Terasaki, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Controlled damage by light energy has been a valuable tool in studies of cell function. Here, we show that the Ti:Sapphire laser in a multiphoton microscope can be used to cause localized damage within unlabeled cells or tissues at greater depths than previously possible. We show that the damage is due to a multiphoton process and made wounds as small as 1 μm in diameter 20 μm from the surface. A characteristic fluorescent scar allows monitoring of the damage and identifies the wound site in later observations. We were able to lesion a single axon within a bundle of nerves, locally interrupt organelle transport within one axon, cut dendrites in a zebrafish embryo, ablate a mitotic pole in a sea urchin egg, and wound the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope in starfish oocytes. The starfish nucleus collapsed ∼1 h after wounding, indicating that loss of compartmentation barrier makes the structure unstable; surprisingly, the oocyte still completed meiotic divisions when exposed to maturation hormone, indicating that the compartmentalization and translocation of cdk1 and its regulators is not required for this process. Multiphoton excitation provides a new means for producing controlled damage deep within tissues or living organisms. PMID:12802057

  16. Damage-Mitigating Control of Space Propulsion Systems for High Performance and Extended Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Wu, Min-Kuang

    1994-01-01

    A major goal in the control of complex mechanical system such as spacecraft rocket engine's advanced aircraft, and power plants is to achieve high performance with increased reliability, component durability, and maintainability. The current practice of decision and control systems synthesis focuses on improving performance and diagnostic capabilities under constraints that often do not adequately represent the materials degradation. In view of the high performance requirements of the system and availability of improved materials, the lack of appropriate knowledge about the properties of these materials will lead to either less than achievable performance due to overly conservative design, or over-straining of the structure leading to unexpected failures and drastic reduction of the service life. The key idea in this report is that a significant improvement in service life could be achieved by a small reduction in the system dynamic performance. The major task is to characterize the damage generation process, and then utilize this information in a mathematical form to synthesize a control law that would meet the system requirements and simultaneously satisfy the constraints that are imposed by the material and structural properties of the critical components. The concept of damage mitigation is introduced for control of mechanical systems to achieve high performance with a prolonged life span. A model of fatigue damage dynamics is formulated in the continuous-time setting, instead of a cycle-based representation, for direct application to control systems synthesis. An optimal control policy is then formulated via nonlinear programming under specified constraints of the damage rate and accumulated damage. The results of simulation experiments for the transient upthrust of a bipropellant rocket engine are presented to demonstrate efficacy of the damage-mitigating control concept.

  17. Seed dressings to control slug damage in oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Simms, Louise C; Mullins, Christopher E; Wilson, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    Slugs are major pests of oilseed rape that are poorly controlled by conventional bait pellets. A series of laboratory experiments investigated the potential of seed-dressings to control slug damage in this crop. Four compounds: metaldehyde, methiocarb, cinnamamide and 3,5-dimethoxycinnamic acid (DMCA) were tested at a range of doses for phytotoxicity and ability to reduce damage by Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). Metaldehyde and methiocarb were not phytotoxic at any doses, whereas all doses of cinnamamide and DMCA were. All compounds reduced slug damage, but metaldehyde and methiocarb consistently performed better than cinnamamide and DMCA. Metaldehyde and methiocarb seed-dressings were compared with baited pellets containing the same active ingredients at recommended field doses. The seed-dressings protected plants from damage by D reticulatum and Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud) as well as, or better than, baited pellets. We therefore recommend that metaldehyde and methiocarb should be field-tested as seed dressings to control slugs in oilseed rape. PMID:12146169

  18. Damage control resuscitation: permissive hypotension and massive transfusion protocols.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Naomi T; Burd, Randall S; Teach, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Evidence for changes in adult trauma management often precedes evidence for changes in pediatric trauma management. Many adult trauma centers have adopted damage-control resuscitation management strategies, which target the metabolic syndrome of acidosis, coagulopathy, and hypothermia often found in severe uncontrolled hemorrhage. Two key components of damage-control resuscitation are permissive hypotension, which is a fluid management strategy that targets a subnormal blood pressure, and hemostatic resuscitation, which is a transfusion strategy that targets coagulopathy with early blood product administration. Acceptance of damage-control resuscitation strategies is reflected in recent changes in the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support curriculum; the most recent edition has decreased its initial fluid recommendation to 1 L from 2 L, and it now recommends early administration of blood products without specifying any specific ratio. These recommendations are not advocating permissive hypotension or hemostatic resuscitation directly but represent an initial step toward limiting fluid resuscitation and using blood products to treat coagulopathy earlier. Evidence for permissive hypotension exists in animal studies and few adult clinical trials. There is no evidence to support permissive hypotension strategies in pediatrics. Evidence for hemostatic resuscitation in adult trauma management is more comprehensive, and there are limited data to support its use in pediatric trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Additional studies on the management of children with severe uncontrolled hemorrhage are needed.

  19. Frequency-Wavenumber Domain Filtering for Improved Damage Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzzene, M.

    2007-03-21

    This paper presents a technique for the analysis of full wavefield data in the wavenumber/frequency domain as an effective tool for damage detection, visualization and characterization. Full wavefield data contain a wealth of information regarding the space and time variation of propagating waves in damaged structural components. Such information can be used to evaluate the response spectrum in the frequency/wavenumber domain, which effectively separates incident waves from reflections caused by discontinuities encountered along the wave paths. This allows removing the injected wave from the overall response through simple filtering strategies, thus highlighting the presence of reflections associated to damage. The concept is first illustrated on analytical and numerically simulated data, and then tested on experimental results. In the experiments, full wavefield measurements are conveniently obtained using a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which allows the detection of displacements and/or velocities over a user-defined grid, and it is able to provide the required spatial and time information in a timely manner. Tests performed on a simple aluminum plate with artificially seeded slits simulating longitudinal cracks, and on a disbonded tongue and groove joint show the effectiveness of the technique and its potential for application to the inspection of a variety of structural components.

  20. Autoimmune control of lesion growth in CNS with minimal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathankumar, R.; Mohan, T. R. Krishna

    2013-07-01

    Lesions in central nervous system (CNS) and their growth leads to debilitating diseases like Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's etc. We developed a model earlier [1, 2] which shows how the lesion growth can be arrested through a beneficial auto-immune mechanism. We compared some of the dynamical patterns in the model with different facets of MS. The success of the approach depends on a set of control parameters and their phase space was shown to have a smooth manifold separating the uncontrolled lesion growth region from the controlled. Here we show that an optimal set of parameter values exist in the model which minimizes system damage while, at once, achieving control of lesion growth.

  1. Nutriomes and personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention, telomere integrity maintenance and cancer growth control.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage at the base sequence and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability, including telomere integrity and functionality and DNA repair. Using nutrient array systems with high-content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth, it is possible to define, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control. This knowledge can also be used to improve culture systems for cells used in therapeutics such as stem cells to ensure that they are not genetically aberrant when returned to the body. Furthermore, this information could be used to design dietary patterns that deliver the micronutrient combinations and concentrations required for preventing DNA damage by micronutrient deficiency or excess. Using this approach, new knowledge could be obtained to identify the dietary restrictions and/or supplementations required to control specific cancers, which is particularly important given that reliable validated advice is not yet available for those diagnosed with cancer.

  2. Nutriomes and personalised nutrition for DNA damage prevention, telomere integrity maintenance and cancer growth control.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage at the base sequence and chromosome level is a fundamental cause of developmental and degenerative diseases. Multiple micronutrients and their interactions with the inherited and/or acquired genome determine DNA damage and genomic instability rates. The challenge is to identify for each individual the combination of micronutrients and their doses (i.e. the nutriome) that optimises genome stability, including telomere integrity and functionality and DNA repair. Using nutrient array systems with high-content analysis diagnostics of DNA damage, cell death and cell growth, it is possible to define, on an individual basis, the optimal nutriome for DNA damage prevention and cancer growth control. This knowledge can also be used to improve culture systems for cells used in therapeutics such as stem cells to ensure that they are not genetically aberrant when returned to the body. Furthermore, this information could be used to design dietary patterns that deliver the micronutrient combinations and concentrations required for preventing DNA damage by micronutrient deficiency or excess. Using this approach, new knowledge could be obtained to identify the dietary restrictions and/or supplementations required to control specific cancers, which is particularly important given that reliable validated advice is not yet available for those diagnosed with cancer. PMID:24114494

  3. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  4. Crocin Improves Damage Induced by Nicotine on A Number of Reproductive Parameters in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Khazaei, Mozafar; Jalili, Cyrus; Keivan, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Background Crocin, a carotenoid isolated from Crocus sativus L. (saffron), is a pharmacologically active component of saffron. Nicotine consumption can decrease fertility in males through induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of crocin on reproductive parameter damages in male mice exposed to nicotine. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we divided 48 mice into 8 groups (n=6 per group): control (normal saline), nicotine (2.5 mg/kg), crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg)+nicotine (2.5 mg/kg). Mice received once daily intraperitoneal injections of crocin, nicotine and crocin+nicotine for 4 weeks. Sperm parameters (count, motility, and viability), testis weight, seminiferous tube diameters, testosterone, and serum nitric oxide levels were analyzed and compared. Results Nicotine administration significantly decreased testosterone level; sperm count, viability, and motility; testis weight and seminiferous tubule diameters compared to the control group (P<0.05). However, increasing the dose of crocin in the crocin and crocin+nicotine groups significantly boosted sperm motility and viability; seminiferous tubule diameters; testis weight; and testosterone levels in all groups compared to the nicotine group (P<0.05). Conclusion Crocin improves nicotine-induced adverse effects on reproductive parameters in male mice. PMID:27123203

  5. Improvements in Modeling Thruster Plume Erosion Damage to Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soares, Carlos; Olsen, Randy; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Mikatarian, Ron; Myers, Brandon; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft bipropellant thrusters impact spacecraft surfaces with high speed droplets of unburned and partially burned propellant. These impacts can produce erosion damage to optically sensitive hardware and systems (e.g., windows, camera lenses, solar cells and protective coatings). On the International Space Station (ISS), operational constraints are levied on the position and orientation of the solar arrays to mitigate erosion effects during thruster operations. In 2007, the ISS Program requested evaluation of erosion constraint relief to alleviate operational impacts due to an impaired Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ). Boeing Space Environments initiated an activity to identify and remove sources of conservatism in the plume induced erosion model to support an expanded range of acceptable solar array positions ? The original plume erosion model over-predicted plume erosion and was adjusted to better correlate with flight experiment results. This paper discusses findings from flight experiments and the methodology employed in modifying the original plume erosion model for better correlation of predictions with flight experiment data. The updated model has been successful employed in reducing conservatism and allowing for enhanced flexibility in ISS solar array operations.

  6. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  7. The Effect of Faster Engine Response on the Lateral Directional Control of a Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The integration of flight control and propulsion control has been a much discussed topic, especially for emergencies where the engines may be able to help stabilize and safely land a damaged aircraft. Previous research has shown that for the engines to be effective as flight control actuators, the response time to throttle commands must be improved. Other work has developed control modes that accept a higher risk of engine failure in exchange for improved engine response during an emergency. In this effort, a nonlinear engine model (the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k) has been integrated with a nonlinear airframe model (the Generic Transport Model) in order to evaluate the use of enhanced-response engines as alternative yaw rate control effectors. Tests of disturbance rejection and command tracking were used to determine the impact of the engines on the aircraft's dynamical behavior. Three engine control enhancements that improve the response time of the engine were implemented and tested in the integrated simulation. The enhancements were shown to increase the engine s effectiveness as a yaw rate control effector when used in an automatic feedback loop. The improvement is highly dependent upon flight condition; the airframe behavior is markedly improved at low altitude, low speed conditions, and relatively unchanged at high altitude, high speed.

  8. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which

  9. Improving 351-nm Damage Performance of Large-Aperture Fused Silica and DKDP Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Hackel, L; Wegner, P; Parham, T; Hrubesh, L; Penetrante, B; Whitman, P; Demos, S; Menapace, J; Runkel, M; Fluss, M; Feit, M; Key, M; Biesiada, T

    2002-01-07

    A program to identify and eliminate the causes of UV laser-induced damage and growth in fused silica and DKDP has developed methods to extend optics lifetimes for large-aperture, high-peak-power, UV lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Issues included polish-related surface damage initiation and growth on fused silica and DKDP, bulk inclusions in fused silica, pinpoint bulk damage in DKDP, and UV-induced surface degradation in fused silica and DKDP in a vacuum. Approaches included an understanding of the mechanism of the damage, incremental improvements to existing fabrication technology, and feasibility studies of non-traditional fabrication technologies. Status and success of these various approaches are reviewed. Improvements were made in reducing surface damage initiation and eliminating growth for fused silica by improved polishing and post-processing steps, and improved analytical techniques are providing insights into mechanisms of DKDP damage. The NIF final optics hardware has been designed to enable easy retrieval, surface-damage mitigation, and recycling of optics.

  10. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just

  11. Improving fatigue damage resistance of alumina through surface grading.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Liu, L; Bhowmick, S; Gerbig, Y B; Janal, M N; Thompson, V P; Zhang, Y

    2011-08-01

    Porcelain-veneered alumina crown restorations often fail from bulk fracture resulting from radial cracks that initiate at the cementation surface with repeated flexure of the stiffer crown layers on the soft dentin support. We hypothesized that bulk fracture may be substantially mitigated by grading the elastic modulus at the crown surfaces. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into dense alumina plates, resulting in a diminished modulus at the surface layers. The plates were then bonded to polycarbonate substrates and subjected to fatigue loading in water. Tests were terminated when fracture occurred at the cementation tensile surface or at the fatigue endurance limit (1 million cycles). Infiltrated specimens showed a significant increase in fatigue fracture loads over non-infiltrated controls. Our results indicate that controlled elastic gradients at the surface could be highly beneficial in the design of fracture-resistant alumina crowns.

  12. Improving Fatigue Damage Resistance of Alumina through Surface Grading

    PubMed Central

    Ren, L.; Liu, L.; Bhowmick, S.; Gerbig, Y.B.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Porcelain-veneered alumina crown restorations often fail from bulk fracture resulting from radial cracks that initiate at the cementation surface with repeated flexure of the stiffer crown layers on the soft dentin support. We hypothesized that bulk fracture may be substantially mitigated by grading the elastic modulus at the crown surfaces. In this study, we fabricated graded structures by infiltrating glass into dense alumina plates, resulting in a diminished modulus at the surface layers. The plates were then bonded to polycarbonate substrates and subjected to fatigue loading in water. Tests were terminated when fracture occurred at the cementation tensile surface or at the fatigue endurance limit (1 million cycles). Infiltrated specimens showed a significant increase in fatigue fracture loads over non-infiltrated controls. Our results indicate that controlled elastic gradients at the surface could be highly beneficial in the design of fracture-resistant alumina crowns. PMID:21555776

  13. Decreasing the damage in smart structures using integrated online DDA/ISMP and semi-active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, K.; Amini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Integrated structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration control has been considered recently by researchers. Up to now, all of the research in the field of integrated SHM and vibration control has been conducted using control devices and control algorithms to enhance system identification and damage detection. In this study, online SHM is used to improve the performance of structural vibration control, unlike previous research. Also, a proposed algorithm including integrated online SHM and a semi-active control strategy is used to reduce both damage and seismic response of the main structure due to strong seismic disturbance. In the proposed algorithm the nonlinear behavior of the building structure is simulated during the excitation. Then, using the measured data and the damage detection algorithm based on identified system Markov parameters (DDA/ISMP), a method proposed by the authors, damage corresponding to axial and bending stiffness of all structural elements is identified. In this study, a 20 t MR damper is employed as a control device to mitigate both damage and dynamic response of the building structure. Also, the interaction between SHM and a semi-active control strategy is assessed. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, a two bay two story steel braced frame structure is used. By defining the damage index and damage rate index, the input current of the MR damper is generated using a fuzzy logic controller. The obtained results show that the possibility of smart building creation is provided using the proposed algorithm. In comparison to the widely used strategy of only vibration control, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is more effective. Furthermore, in the proposed algorithm, the total consumed current intensity and generated control forces are considerably less than for the strategy of only vibration control.

  14. Curcumin improves liver damage in male mice exposed to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Salahshoor, Mohammadreza; Mohamadian, Sabah; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Roshankhah, Shiva; Jalili, Cyrus

    2016-04-01

    The color of turmeric ( jiāng huáng) is because of a substance called curcumin. It has different pharmacological effects, such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotine is a major pharmacologically active substance in cigarette smoke. It is mainly metabolized in the liver and causes devastating effects. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of curcumin against nicotine on the liver in mice. Forty-eight mice were equally divided into eight groups; control (normal saline), nicotine (2.5 mg/kg), curcumin (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) and curcumin plus nicotine-treated groups. Curcumin, nicotine, and curcumin plus nicotine (once a day) were intraperitoneally injected for 4 weeks. The liver weight and histology, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and serum nitric oxide levels have been studied. The results indicated that nicotine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes level, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared with the saline group (p < 0.05). However, curcumin and curcumin plus nicotine administration substantially increased liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes, and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared with the nicotine group (p < 0.05). Curcumin demonstrated its protective effect against nicotine-induced liver toxicity. PMID:27114942

  15. Curcumin improves liver damage in male mice exposed to nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Salahshoor, Mohammadreza; Mohamadian, Sabah; Kakabaraei, Seyran; Roshankhah, Shiva; Jalili, Cyrus

    2015-01-01

    The color of turmeric (薑黃 jiāng huáng) is because of a substance called curcumin. It has different pharmacological effects, such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotine is a major pharmacologically active substance in cigarette smoke. It is mainly metabolized in the liver and causes devastating effects. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of curcumin against nicotine on the liver in mice. Forty-eight mice were equally divided into eight groups; control (normal saline), nicotine (2.5 mg/kg), curcumin (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg) and curcumin plus nicotine-treated groups. Curcumin, nicotine, and curcumin plus nicotine (once a day) were intraperitoneally injected for 4 weeks. The liver weight and histology, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and serum nitric oxide levels have been studied. The results indicated that nicotine administration significantly decreased liver weight and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes level, and blood serum nitric oxide level compared with the saline group (p < 0.05). However, curcumin and curcumin plus nicotine administration substantially increased liver weight and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte, central hepatic vein, liver enzymes, and nitric oxide levels in all groups compared with the nicotine group (p < 0.05). Curcumin demonstrated its protective effect against nicotine-induced liver toxicity. PMID:27114942

  16. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  17. Highwall damage control using presplitting with low-density explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Stachura, V.J.; Cumerlato, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    The US Bureau of Mines is conducting research on blasting methods that reduce highwall overbreak and the associated rockfall hazards. This paper presents the results of tests using a low-density water gel to improve the quality of air-decked presplit blasts at a surface coal mine in New Mexico. The explosive`s specific gravity averaged 0.50 and was bulk loaded using a modified truck which injected the gassing agent. Reductions in overbreak and resulting rockfall were achieved in comparison to a highwall presplit with ANFO. The test sections used 15{degree} angled blast holes and resulted in 1,119 m of air deck presplit highwall using a low-density water gel which was then compared to 894 m of highwall shot with an ANFO air decked presplit design. The total quantity of explosives per hole ranged from 68 to 113 kg and the 27 cm holes were 19- to 33-m deep on 5.5 m centers. Periodic visual examination and photographic surveys of the highwall test areas were used to document the amount of rockfall. In addition, laser profiles of selected sections were conducted to further delineate the damage and highwall contour differences.

  18. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  19. Recommendations for assessing sea lamprey damages: toward optimizing the control program in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Bence, James R.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Ebener, Mark P.; Lupi, Frank; Rutter, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    The Great Lakes sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) control program currently allocates stream treatments to optimize the number of juvenile sea lampreys killed for a given level of control. Although the economic benefits derived from control appear to outweigh the dollars spent on control efforts, optimizing the number of sea lampreys killed will not necessarily optimize the economic benefits provided by the fish communities. These benefits include both non-consumptive and fishery values. We emphasize that the biological damages caused by each juvenile sea lamprey will vary, as will the economic value associated with each host that is killed. We consider issues related to assessing damages due to sea lampreys, taking into account effects on the fish community and fisheries, so as to improve the sea lamprey control program. We recommend a consolidation of information regarding the valuation of benefits, better understanding of variation in host-parasite interactions among the Great Lakes, and integration of the control program with other fisheries management objectives and activities. Adoption of these recommendations should promote lake trout rehabilitation in the Great Lakes, healthy fish communities and prudent use of limited fishery management resources.

  20. Damage control surgery: it's evolution over the last 20 years.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Brett H; Rotondo, Michael M F

    2012-01-01

    In less than twenty years, what began as a concept for the treatment of exsanguinating truncal trauma patients has become the primary treatment model for numerous emergent, life threatening surgical conditions incapable of tolerating traditional methods. Its core concepts are relative straightforward and simple in nature: first, proper identification of the patient who is in need of following this paradigm; second, truncation of the initial surgical procedure to the minimal necessary operation; third, aggressive, focused resuscitation in the intensive care unit; fourth, definitive care only once the patient is optimized to tolerate the procedure. These simple underlying principles can be molded to a variety of emergencies, from its original application in combined major vascular and visceral trauma to the septic abdomen and orthopedics. A host of new resuscitation strategies and technologies have been developed over the past two decades, from permissive hypotension and damage control resuscitation to advanced ventilators and hemostatic agents, which have allowed for a more focused resuscitation, allowing some of the morbidity of this model to be reduced. The combination of the simple, malleable paradigm along with better understanding of resuscitation has proven to be a potent blend. As such, what was once an almost lethal injury (combined vascular and visceral injury) has become a survivable one.

  1. A Piloted Evaluation of Damage Accommodating Flight Control Using a Remotely Piloted Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Cox, David E.; Murri, Daniel G.; Riddick, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    Toward the goal of reducing the fatal accident rate of large transport airplanes due to loss of control, the NASA Aviation Safety Program has conducted research into flight control technologies that can provide resilient control of airplanes under adverse flight conditions, including damage and failure. As part of the safety program s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project, the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system was designed to address the challenges associated with the safe and efficient subscale flight testing of research control laws under adverse flight conditions. This paper presents the results of a series of pilot evaluations of several flight control algorithms used during an offset-to-landing task conducted at altitude. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the ability of various flight control technologies to prevent loss of control as stability and control characteristics were degraded. During the course of 8 research flights, data were recorded while one task was repeatedly executed by a single evaluation pilot. Two generic failures, which degraded stability and control characteristics, were simulated inflight for each of the 9 different flight control laws that were tested. The flight control laws included three different adaptive control methodologies, several linear multivariable designs, a linear robust design, a linear stability augmentation system, and a direct open-loop control mode. Based on pilot Cooper-Harper Ratings obtained for this test, the adaptive flight control laws provided the greatest overall benefit for the stability and control degradation scenarios that were considered. Also, all controllers tested provided a significant improvement in handling qualities over the direct open-loop control mode.

  2. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    C there was less clinical bleeding than when blood was reconstituted with components or when platelets were stored at 22°C. Early reversal of shock is essential to prevent exacerbation of coagulopathy and progression of cell death cascades in patients with severe traumatic injuries. Red blood cell storage solutions have evolved to accommodate the needs of non-critically ill patients yet may not be optimal for patients in hemorrhagic shock. Continued focus on the recognition and treatment of shock is essential for continued improvement in outcomes for patients who require damage control resuscitation and RDCR.

  3. Tracking and Control of Gas Turbine Engine Component Damage/Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaw, Link C.; Wu, Dong N.; Bryg, David J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes damage mechanisms and the methods of controlling damages to extend the on-wing life of critical gas turbine engine components. Particularly, two types of damage mechanisms are discussed: creep/rupture and thermo-mechanical fatigue. To control these damages and extend the life of engine hot-section components, we have investigated two methodologies to be implemented as additional control logic for the on-board electronic control unit. This new logic, the life-extending control (LEC), interacts with the engine control and monitoring unit and modifies the fuel flow to reduce component damages in a flight mission. The LEC methodologies were demonstrated in a real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation. The results show that LEC is not only a new paradigm for engine control design, but also a promising technology for extending the service life of engine components, hence reducing the life cycle cost of the engine.

  4. The processes controlling damage zone propagation induced by wellbore fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Induced seismicity by wellbore fluid injection is an important tool for enhancing permeability in hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. We model nucleation and propagation of damage zones and seismicity patterns for two-dimensional plane strain configuration at a depth of 5 km using novel numerical software developed in the course of this study. Simulations include the coupling of poro-elastic deformation and groundwater flow with damage evolution (weakening and healing) and its effect on the elastic and hydrologic parameters. Results show that the process occurring during fluid injection can be divided into four stages. The duration of each stage depends on the hydrological and mechanical parameters. Initially, fluid flows into the rock with no seismic events (5 to 20 hr). At this stage, damage increases from 0 to 1 creating two sets of conjugate zones (four narrow damage zones). Thereafter, the occurrence of seismic events and faulting begins and accelerates for the next 20 to 70 hr. At the initial part of this stage, two of the damage zones create stress shadows on the other two damage zones that stop progressing. The velocity of the advancing damage is limited only by the rock parameters controlling damage evolution. At the third stage, which lasts for the following 20-30 hr, damage acceleration decreases because fluid transport becomes a limiting factor as the damage zones are too long to efficiently transfer the pressure from the well to the tip of the damage zones. Finally, the damage decelerates and even stops in some cases. The propagation of damage is controlled and limited by fluid transport from the injection well to the tip of the damage zones because fluid transport does not keep up with the dilatancy of the damage zones. The time and distance of propagation depend on the damage-permeability coupling and the remote shear stress. Higher remote shear stress causes shorter initial periods of no seismicity; strong damage-permeability coupling causes

  5. Flight Test of an Adaptive Controller and Simulated Failure/Damage on the NASA NF-15B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Maliska, Heather

    2006-01-01

    The method of flight-testing the Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Second Generation (Gen-2) project on the NASA NF-15B is herein described. The Gen-2 project objective includes flight-testing a dynamic inversion controller augmented by a direct adaptive neural network to demonstrate performance improvements in the presence of simulated failure/damage. The Gen-2 objectives as implemented on the NASA NF-15B created challenges for software design, structural loading limitations, and flight test operations. Simulated failure/damage is introduced by modifying control surface commands, therefore requiring structural loads measurements. Flight-testing began with the validation of a structural loads model. Flight-testing of the Gen-2 controller continued, using test maneuvers designed in a sequenced approach. Success would clear the new controller with respect to dynamic response, simulated failure/damage, and with adaptation on and off. A handling qualities evaluation was conducted on the capability of the Gen-2 controller to restore aircraft response in the presence of a simulated failure/damage. Control room monitoring of loads sensors, flight dynamics, and controller adaptation, in addition to postflight data comparison to the simulation, ensured a safe methodology of buildup testing. Flight-testing continued without major incident to accomplish the project objectives, successfully uncovering strengths and weaknesses of the Gen-2 control approach in flight.

  6. Risk control and prevention of spinal cord damage due to surgery of thoracoabdominal aneurysms: medicolegal aspects.

    PubMed

    de Mol, B; Hamerlijnck, R; Vermeulen, F E; de Geest, R

    1991-01-01

    Surgery of thoracoabdominal aneurysms is accompanied by many complications of which spinal cord damage is the most serious. Such a complication tends to be the subject of litigation and medicolegal assessment. This report presents a risk control concept focussed on the reduction of spinal cord damage after surgery for a thoracoabdominal aneurysm. This concept may provide a basis for a risk management program in major surgery. Apart from sparing the patient a serious complication, improvement of the quality of care and anticipation of a medicolegal assessment were considered valuable benefits of such an effort. It is described how the threat of litigation--also in Europe--may affect clinical practice. A definition of surgical failure is described related to the five elements of risk homeostasis: complexity, linkage, cascade, human factor and safety margins. Limitations of risk control in the surgery of thoracoabdominal aneurysms are described. Finally the role of perception of risks by patient and doctor as well as the importance of informed consent and adequate disclosure are described in respect of medical quality improvement and litigation.

  7. Optical power control filters: from laser dazzling to damage protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, Ariela; Golding, Karin; Nevo, Doron; Fisher, Tali; Lipman, Ofir; Oron, Moshe

    2012-02-01

    With the development of more powerful lasers for applications, optical limiters and blockers are required for providing human eye and optical sensors protection. In some scenarios, laser radiation may seriously interrupt the signal, from transient saturation and can lead to permanent damage. We present a variety of non-linear, solid-state dynamic filter solutions protecting from dazzling and damage in a passive way. Our filters either limit or block the transmission, only if the power exceeds a certain threshold as opposed to spectral filters that block a certain wavelength permanently. We propose a dynamic protection for cameras, sensors and the human eye from laser threats.

  8. Reaction ion etching process for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surface.

    PubMed

    Sun, Laixi; Liu, Hongjie; Huang, Jin; Ye, Xin; Xia, Handing; Li, Qingzhi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yang, Liming; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-11

    Laser induced damage of fused silica optics occurs primarily on optical surface or subsurface resulting from various defects produced during polishing/grinding process. Many new kinds of surface treatment processes are explored to remove or control the defects on fused silica surface. In this study, we report a new application of reaction ion etching (RIE)-based surface treatment process for manufacture of high quality fused silica optics. The influence of RIE processes on laser damage resistance as a function of etching depth and the evolution of typical defects which are associated with laser damage performance were investigated. The results show that the impurity element defects and subsurface damage on the samples surface were efficiently removed and prevented. Pure silica surface with relatively single-stable stoichiometry and low carbon atomic concentration was created during the etching. The laser damage resistance of the etched samples increased dramatically. The increase of roughness and ODC point defect with deeper etching are believed to be the main factors to limit further increase of the damage resistance of fused silica. The study is expected to contribute to the development of fused silica optics with high resistance to laser induced degradation in the future. PMID:26832251

  9. Is there a place for crystalloids and colloids in remote damage control resuscitation?

    PubMed

    Medby, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Crystalloids and colloids are used in prehospital fluid resuscitation to replace blood loss and preserve tissue perfusion until definite surgical control of bleeding can be achieved. However, large volumes of fluids will increase bleeding by elevating blood pressure, dislodging blood clots, and diluting coagulation factors and platelets. Hypotensive fluid resuscitation strategies are used to avoid worsening of uncontrolled bleeding. This is largely supported by animal studies. Most clinical evidence suggests that restricting fluid therapy is associated with improved outcome. Remote damage control resuscitation emphasizes the early use of blood products and restriction of other fluids to support coagulation and tissue oxygenation. Controversy regarding the optimal choice and composition of resuscitation fluids is ongoing. Compared with crystalloids, less colloid is needed for the same expansion of intravascular volume. On the other hand, colloids may cause coagulopathy not only related to dilution. The most important advantage of using colloids is logistical because less volume and weight are needed. In conclusion, prehospital fluid resuscitation is considered the standard of care, but there is little clinical evidence supporting the use of either crystalloids or colloids in remote damage control resuscitation. Alternative resuscitation fluids are needed.

  10. Through-and-through wire technique for endovascular damage control in traumatic proximal axillary artery transection.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, Fiona; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel Antonio; Petersen, Jan Philipp; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Kölbel, Tilo

    2015-02-01

    Repair of blunt shoulder trauma with transection of the subclavian or proximal axillary artery poses a surgical challenge, especially in instable patients. Endovascular treatment for initial damage control in arterial transection has evolved as a promising technique to improve outcome, but technical success can be limited in cases of complete transection as the lesion cannot be passed by a guidewire. This report describes an endovascular approach using a through-and-through brachial-femoral wire to control complete traumatic transection of the proximal axillary artery in a hemodynamically unstable patient. Endovascular therapy is used as a bridging method for open surgical repair three days later under optimized conditions with an interdisciplinary team. The brachial-femoral guidewire technique helps to overcome limitations in endovascular therapy in patients with blunt traumatic transection of thoracic outlet arteries.

  11. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Ribeiro, Ana M

    2015-08-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner.

  12. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Miguel P.; Ribeiro, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  13. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance of composite laminates at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Buffer strips greatly improve the damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates loaded in tension. Graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels were made and tested to determine their residual strength at ambient and elevated (177 C) temperature. Each panel was cut in the center to represent damage. Panels were radiographed and crack-opening displacements were recorded to indicate fracture, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after arrest. All panels had the same buffer strip spacing and width. The buffer strip material was 0 deg S-glass/PMR-15. The buffer strips were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of the 0 deg S-glass on either a one-for-one or a two-for-one basis. Half of the panels were heated to 177 + or - 3 C before and during the testing. Elevated temperature did not alter the fracture behavior of the buffer configuration.

  14. A protocol for a scoping and qualitative study to identify and evaluate indications for damage control surgery and damage control interventions in civilian trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Derek J; Zygun, David A; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Ball, Chad G; Faris, Peter D; Bobrovitz, Niklas; Robertson, Helen Lee; Stelfox, H Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Initial abbreviated surgery with planned reoperation (damage control surgery) is frequently used for major trauma patients to rapidly control haemorrhage while limiting surgical stress. Although damage control surgery may decrease mortality risk among the severely injured, it may also be associated with several complications when inappropriately applied. We seek to scope the literature on trauma damage control surgery, identify its proposed indications, map and clarify their definitions, and examine the content and evidence on which they are based. We also seek to generate a comprehensive list of unique indications to inform an appropriateness rating process. Methods and analysis We will search 11 electronic bibliographic databases, included article bibliographies and grey literature sources for citations involving civilian trauma patients that proposed one or more indications for damage control surgery or a damage control intervention. Indications will be classified into a predefined conceptual framework and categorised and described using qualitative content analysis. Constant comparative methodology will be used to create, modify and test codes describing principal findings or injuries (eg, bilobar liver injury) and associated decision variables (eg, coagulopathy) that comprise the reported indications. After a unique list of codes have been developed, we will use the organisational system recommended by the RAND/University of California, Los Angeles (RAND-UCLA) Appropriateness Rating Method to group principal findings or injuries into chapters (subdivided by associated decision variables) according to broader clinical findings encountered during surgical practice (eg, major liver injury). Ethics and dissemination This study will constitute the first step in a multistep research programme aimed at developing appropriate, evidence-informed indications for damage control in civilian trauma patients. With use of an integrated knowledge translation

  15. Controlling Nickel Sillicide Phase by Si Implantation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Guillard, M.; Turcotte-Tremblay, P; Gaudet, S; Coia, C; Roorda, S; Desjardins, P; Lavoie, C; Schiettekatte, F

    2009-01-01

    In the context of fabrication process of contacts in CMOS integrated circuits, we studied the effect of implantation-induced damage on the Ni silicide phase formation sequence. The device layers of Silicon-on-insulator samples were implanted with 30 or 60 keV Si ions at several fluences up to amorphization. Next, 10 or 30 nm Ni layers were deposited. The monitoring of annealing treatments was achieved with time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and pole figure XRD were also used to characterize some intermediate phase formations. We show the existence of an implantation threshold (1 ions/nm{sup 2}) from where the silicidation behaviour changes significantly, the formation temperature of the disilicide namely shifting abruptly from 800 to 450 C. It is also found that the monosilicide formation onset temperature for the thinner Ni deposits increases linearly by about 30 C with the amount of damage.

  16. Low-Temperature Growth of DKDP for Improving Laser-Induced Damage resistance at 350nm

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K; Runkel, M; Hawley-Fedder, R A; Carman, M L; Torres, R A; Whitman, P K

    2000-12-06

    A set of twenty-three 20-L crystallizer runs exploring the importance of several engineering variables found that growth temperature is the most important variable controlling damage resistance of DKDP over the conditions investigated. Boules grown between 45 C and room temperature have a 50% probability of 3{omega} bulk damage that is 1.5 to 2 times higher than boules grown between 65 and 45 C. This raises their damage resistance above the NIF tripler specification for 8 J/cm{sup 2} operation by a comfortable margin. Solution impurity levels do not correlate with damage resistance for iron less than 200 ppb and aluminum less than 2000 ppb. The possibility that low growth temperatures could increase damage resistance in NIF-scale boules was tested by growing a large boule in a 1000-L crystallizer with a supplemental growth solution tank. Four samples representing early and late pyramid and prism growth are very close to the specification as best it is understood at the present. Implications of low temperature growth for meeting absorbance, homogeneity, and other material specifications are discussed.

  17. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  18. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving. PMID:27485132

  19. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving.

  20. Paricalcitol may improve oxidative DNA damage on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Gulay; Basbugan, Yildiray; Ari, Elif; Erten, Remzi; Bektas, Havva; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Bayram, Irfan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of paricalcitol on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model in rats. Wistar albino rats (n = 32) were allocated into four equal groups of eight each, the control (Group C), paricalcitol (Group P), amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A), and paricalcitol-treated amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A + P) groups. Paricalcitol was given intra-peritoneally at a dose of 0.4 μg/kg/d for 5 consecutive days prior to induction of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Intra-peritoneal amikacin (1.2 g/kg) was used to induce nephrotoxicity at day 4. Renal function parameters, oxidative stress biomarkers, oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio), kidney histology, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoexpression were determined. Group A + P had lower mean fractional sodium excretion (p < 0.001) as well as higher creatinine clearance (p = 0.026) than the amikacin group (Group A). Renal tissue malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.035) and serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio (8-OHdG/dG ratio) (p < 0.001) were significantly lower; superoxide dismutase (p = 0.024) and glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.007) activities of renal tissue were significantly higher in group A + P than in group A. The mean scores of tubular necrosis (p = 0.024), proteinaceous casts (p = 0.038), medullary congestion (p = 0.035), and VEGF immunoexpression (p = 0.018) were also lower in group A + P when compared with group A. This study demonstrates the protective effect of paricalcitol in the prevention of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in an experimental model. Furthermore, it is the first study to demonstrate that paricalcitol improves oxidative DNA damage in an experimental acute kidney injury model.

  1. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  2. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  3. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  4. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  5. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  6. DNA damage control: regulation and functions of checkpoint kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Smits, Veronique A J; Gillespie, David A

    2015-10-01

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a master regulator of the DNA damage and replication checkpoints in vertebrate cells. When activated via phosphorylation by its upstream regulatory kinase, ATR, Chk1 prevents cells with damaged or incompletely replicated DNA from entering mitosis, and acts to stabilize stalled replication forks and suppress replication origin firing when DNA synthesis is inhibited. Chk1 blocks mitosis by maintaining high levels of inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1; however, the mechanisms that underlie replication fork stabilization and suppression of origin firing are less well defined. Although Chk1 function is evidently acutely regulated during these responses, how this occurs at the molecular level is incompletely understood. Recent evidence that Chk1 contains a 'kinase-associated 1' domain within its regulatory C-terminal region promises new insights. Additional modifications catalysed by other protein kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Akt, and RSK, can combine with ubiquitylation to regulate Chk1 subcellular localization and protein stability. Interestingly, it is clear that Chk1 has less well-defined functions in homologous recombination, chromatin modification, gene expression, spindle checkpoint proficiency, and cytokinesis. Here, we provide an overview of Chk1 regulation and functions, with an emphasis on unresolved questions that merit further research. PMID:26216057

  7. Behavioral interventions to improve infection control practices.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, E K; Larson, E L

    1998-06-01

    No single intervention has been successful in improving and sustaining such infection control practices as universal precautions and handwashing by health care professionals. This paper examines several behavioral theories (Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior, self-efficacy, and the Transtheoretic Model) and relates them to individual factors, also considering interpersonal and organizational factors. Further, this article includes recommendations of individual and organizational components to be addressed when planning a theoretically based intervention for improving infection control practices. A hypothetic framework to enhance handwashing practice is proposed. PMID:9638287

  8. Aqueous dispersions of oligomer-grafted carbon nanomaterials with controlled surface charge and minimal framework damage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Chen, Shu; Menzel, Robert; Goode, Angela D.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalised carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), with an undamaged carbon framework and controlled physiochemical properties, are desirable for a wide range of scientific studies and commercial applications. The use of a thermochemical grafting approach provides a versatile means to functionalise both multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles without altering their inherent structure. The functionalisation process was investigated by employing various types of grafting monomers; to improve water solubility, reagents were chosen that introduced ionic character either intrinsically or after further chemical reaction. The degree of grafting for both MWCNTs and CB ranged from 3 to 27 wt%, as established by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the structural framework of the MWNTs was unaffected by the thermochemical treatment. The effectiveness of the surface modification was demonstrated by significantly improved dispersibility and stability in water, and further quantified by zeta-potential analysis. The concentration of stable, individualised, grafted MWNTs in water ranged from 30 to 80 µg mL−1, whereas functionalised CB (CB) in water showed improved dispersibility up to ~460 µg mL−1 after centrifugation at 10, 000 g for 15 minutes. The successful preparation of structurally identical but differently functionalised nanoparticles panels, with high water compatibility and minimal framework damage, are useful for controlled experiments. For example, they can be used to explore the relationship between toxicological effects and specific physiochemical properties, such as surface charge and geometry. PMID:25254653

  9. Aqueous dispersions of oligomer-grafted carbon nanomaterials with controlled surface charge and minimal framework damage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sheng; Chen, Shu; Menzel, Robert; Goode, Angela D; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    Functionalised carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), with an undamaged carbon framework and controlled physiochemical properties, are desirable for a wide range of scientific studies and commercial applications. The use of a thermochemical grafting approach provides a versatile means to functionalise both multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles without altering their inherent structures. The functionalisation process was investigated by employing various types of grafting monomers; to improve water solubility, reagents were chosen that introduced an ionic character either intrinsically or after further chemical reactions. The degree of grafting for both MWCNTs and CB ranged from 3-27 wt%, as established by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the structural framework of the MWCNTs was unaffected by the thermochemical treatment. The effectiveness of the surface modification was demonstrated by significantly improved dispersibility and stability in water, and further quantified by zeta-potential analysis. The concentration of stable, individualised and grafted MWCNTs in water ranged from ∼30 to 80 μg mL(-1) after centrifugation at 10 000 g for 15 min, whereas functionalised CB in water showed improved dispersibility up to ∼460 μg mL(-1). The successful preparation of structurally identical but differently functionalised nanoparticle panels, with high water compatibility and minimal framework damage, is useful for controlled experiments. For example, they can be used to explore the relationship between toxicological effects and specific physiochemical properties, such as surface charge and geometry.

  10. Investigation of surface damage precursor evolutions and laser-induced damage threshold improvement mechanism during Ion beam etching of fused silica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Zhong, Yaoyu; Dai, Yifan; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Mingjin; Sui, Tingting

    2016-09-01

    Surface damage precursor evolution has great influence on laser-induced damage threshold improvement of fused silica surface during Ion beam etching. In this work, a series of ion sputtering experiment are carried out to obtain the evolutions of damage precursors (dot-form microstructures, Polishing-Induced Contamination, Hertz scratches, and roughness). Based on ion sputtering theory, surface damage precursor evolutions are analyzed. The results show that the dot-form microstructures will appear during ion beam etching. But as the ion beam etching depth goes up, the dot-form microstructures can be mitigated. And ion-beam etching can broaden and passivate the Hertz scratches without increasing roughness value. A super-smooth surface (0.238nm RMS) can be obtained finally. The relative content of Fe and Ce impurities both significantly reduce after ion beam etching. The laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica is improved by 34% after ion beam etching for 800nm. Research results can be a reference on using ion beam etching process technology to improve laser-induced damage threshold of fused silica optics. PMID:27607688

  11. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  12. Improving UV laser damage threshold of fused silica optics by wet chemical etching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Li, Yaguo; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao; Yang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Fused silica is widely used in high-power laser systems because of its good optical performance and mechanical properties. However, laser damage initiation and growth induced by 355 nm laser illumination in optical elements have become a bottleneck in the development of high energy laser system. In order to improve the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), the fused silica optics were treated by two types of HF-based etchants: 1.7%wt. HF acid and buffer oxide etchant (BOE: the mixture of 0.4%wt. HF and 12%wt. NH4F), respectively, for varied etching time. Damage testing shows that both the etchants increase the damage threshold at a certain depth of material removal, but further removal of material lowers the LIDT markedly. The etching rates of both etchants keep steady in our processing procedure, ~58 μg/min and ~85 μg/min, respectively. The micro-surface roughness (RMS and PV) increases as etching time extends. The hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) of the fused silica etched for diverse time, measured by nano-indenter, show no solid evidence that LIDT can be related to hardness or Young's modulus.

  13. Controlling large malpractice claims: the unexpected impact of damage caps.

    PubMed

    Gronfein, W P; Kinney, E D

    1991-01-01

    Indiana's comprehensive malpractice reforms, inaugurated in 1975, include a cap on damages, a mandated medical review before trial, and a state insurance fund to pay claims equal to or greater than $100,000. We have found that the amount of compensation going to claimants with such large malpractice claims in Indiana is, on average, substantially higher than in Michigan and Ohio. Indiana's mean claim severity between 1977 and 1988 was $404,832, while the means for Michigan and Ohio were $290,022 and $303,220, respectively, with the difference between these three means being highly significant. Although data on claim and claimant characteristics reveal considerable interstate variation, the results of regression analyses show that Indiana claim payment amounts are higher than Michigan or Ohio payments, independent of the effect of factors such as sex, age, severity of injury, allegations of negligence, and year of settlement.

  14. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment.

  15. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment. PMID:23815735

  16. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  17. Rheological Control of Interbedded Siliciclastic Strata on Damage Zone Evolution During Fault Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wightman, R. H.; Imber, J.; Healy, D.; Holdsworth, R. E.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Jones, R. R.

    2006-12-01

    Fault damage zones can have a major impact on fluid flow through sub-surface reservoirs. The typical resolution of seismic reflection data is such that faults with throws <15m are not imaged, and those with throws >15 m are imaged as discrete planes, revealing none of the smaller scale architecture of the fault damage zones. Previous field studies show that damage zone width scales with fault throw, which suggests that a relationship exists between fault growth and increasing damage zone width. However, this hypothesis remains largely untested and the factors controlling damage zone evolution are poorly understood. This study develops kinematic models to describe the evolution of damage zones during fault growth. The predictions of these models are tested against quantitative geometric attributes of natural fault damage zones preserved in siliciclastic sand/shale sequences from the Carboniferous Northumberland Basin, NE England. These data, obtained from faults with throws spanning 0.1-20 m, were measured from detailed (cm-resolution) digital outcrop models captured using terrestrial laser scanning techniques. Study locations include areas of active open-cast coal mining that provide good 3D exposure of faults during progressive coal extraction. The damage zones comprise complex arrays of structural elements including: fault splays and oversteps; drag folds; rotated fault-bound blocks; sub-parallel fracture sets and ductile shear zones; cataclasite lenses; and intensely deformed scaly gouge. We propose two complimentary kinematic models to explain the structural relationships observed within these damage zones. The first model predicts the development of cataclasite lenses from fault-bounded blocks in contractional oversteps with increasing fault throw. In this scenario, the damage zone width remains approximately constant, defined by the initial fault separation. The second model describes the space incompatibility that develops between discrete fault planes in

  18. Improve distillation-column control design

    SciTech Connect

    Fruehauf, P.S.; Mahoney, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    Steady-state process models have long been used to assist the engineer in designing control strategies for distillation columns. Yet, a large number of industrial columns still operate in manual or with ineffectual controls. So, better control design techniques using steady-state models certainly are needed. In this article, the authors introduced an improved method that already has proven itself on 33 industrial columns. This article deals exclusively with the design of single-point composition controls. The vast majority of columns have one-sided composition specifications. With such specifications, a single-point composition control scheme can keep both top and bottom product compositions at or below limits for a wide range of disturbances. The predominance of one-sided specifications means that the main incentive for dual-point control schemes is achieving energy savings. In most cases, though, the energy savings are small and do not justify the added difficulty of implementing and maintaining dual-point control. Additionally, dual-point schemes often have significantly longer recoveries from upsets due to interactions between the control loops. The design procedure can be best thought of as a general approach rather than a single detailed procedure that covers all cases. The produce must be adapted to each problem because there are many different types of distillation and almost every industrial problem has some unique requirement.

  19. Improving infection control in general practice.

    PubMed

    Farrow, S C; Zeuner, D; Hall, C

    1999-03-01

    Infection control measures in the health care setting should protect patients and staff from cross-infection. The prevention of harm is an essential part of good medical practice and failure might result in professional misconduct proceedings by the General Medical Council (GMC) and prosecution under the Health and Safety at Work legislation, as well as civil liability. For a health authority, overall responsibility for public health includes arrangements for the control of communicable diseases and infection in hospital and the community (NHS Management Executive, 1993), a function usually led by the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC). This paper describes one district's collaborative approach between public health and GPs to assess and improve local infection control standards.

  20. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations.

  1. Damage-mitigating control of a reusable rocket engine for high performance and extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Dai, Xiaowen

    1995-01-01

    The goal of damage mitigating control in reusable rocket engines is to achieve high performance with increased durability of mechanical structures such that functional lives of the critical components are increased. The major benefit is an increase in structural durability with no significant loss of performance. This report investigates the feasibility of damage mitigating control of reusable rocket engines. Phenomenological models of creep and thermo-mechanical fatigue damage have been formulated in the state-variable setting such that these models can be combined with the plant model of a reusable rocket engine, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), for synthesizing an optimal control policy. Specifically, a creep damage model of the main thrust chamber wall is analytically derived based on the theories of sandwich beam and viscoplasticity. This model characterizes progressive bulging-out and incremental thinning of the coolant channel ligament leading to its eventual failure by tensile rupture. The objective is to generate a closed form solution of the wall thin-out phenomenon in real time where the ligament geometry is continuously updated to account for the resulting deformation. The results are in agreement with those obtained from the finite element analyses and experimental observation for both Oxygen Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper and a copper-zerconium-silver alloy called NARloy-Z. Due to its computational efficiency, this damage model is suitable for on-line applications of life prediction and damage mitigating control, and also permits parametric studies for off-line synthesis of damage mitigating control systems. The results are presented to demonstrate the potential of life extension of reusable rocket engines via damage mitigating control. The control system has also been simulated on a testbed to observe how the damage at different critical points can be traded off without any significant loss of engine performance. The research work

  2. Anti-acrolein treatment improves behavioral outcome and alleviates myelin damage in EAE mouse

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Gary; Sun, Wenjing; Zheng, Lingxing; Brookes, Sarah; Tully, Melissa; Shi, Riyi

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor in the pathology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde byproduct of lipid peroxidation, is thought to perpetuate oxidative stress. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of acrolein in an animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune enchephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. We have demonstrated a significant elevation of acrolein protein adduct levels in EAE mouse spinal cord. Hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger, significantly improved behavioral outcomes and lessened myelin damage in spinal cord. We postulate that acrolein is an important pathological factor and likely a novel therapeutic target in MS. PMID:21081153

  3. Improvement of optical damage in specialty fiber at 266 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobisch, T.; Ohlmeyer, H.; Zimmermann, H.; Prein, S.; Kirchhof, J.; Unger, S.; Belz, M.; Klein, K.-F.

    2014-02-01

    Improved multimode UV-fibers with core diameters ranging from 70 to 600 μm diameter have been manufactured based on novel preform modifications and fiber processing techniques. Only E'-centers at 214 nm and NBOHC at 260 nm are generated in these fibers. A new generation of inexpensive laser-systems have entered the market and generated a multitude of new and attractive applications in the bio-life science, chemical and material processing field. However, for example pulsed 355 nm Nd:YAG lasers generate significant UV-damages in commercially available fibers. For lower wavelengths, no results on suitable multi-mode or low-mode fibers with high UV resistance at 266 nm wavelength (pulsed 4th harmonic Nd:YAG laser) have been published. In this report, double-clad fibers with 70 μm or 100 μm core diameter and a large claddingto- core ratio will be recommended. Laser-induced UV-damages will be compared between these new fiber type and traditional UV fibers with similar core sizes. Finally, experimental results will be cross compared against broadband cw deuterium lamp damage standards.

  4. Non-damaging, portable radiography: Applications in arms control verification

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.A.; Butterfield, K.B.; Apt, K.E.

    1992-08-01

    The state-of-the-technology necessary to perform portable radiography in support of arms control verification is evaluated. Specific requirements, such as accurate measurements of the location of features in a treaty-limited object and the detection of deeply imbedded features, are defined in three scenarios. Sources, detectors, portability, mensuration, and safety are discussed in relation to the scenarios. Examples are given of typical radiographic systems that would be capable of addressing the inspection problems associated with the three scenarios.

  5. Ubiquitin facilitates a quality-control pathway that removes damaged chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Joens, Matthew S.; Sinson, Andrew B.; Gilkerson, Jonathan; Salomé, Patrice A.; Weigel, Detlef; Fitzpatrick, James A.; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Energy production by chloroplasts and mitochondria causes constant oxidative damage. A functioning photosynthetic cell requires quality-control mechanisms to turn over and degrade chloroplasts damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we generated a conditionally lethal Arabidopsis mutant that accumulated excess protoporphyrin IX in the chloroplast and produced singlet oxygen. Damaged chloroplasts were subsequently ubiquitinated and selectively degraded. A genetic screen identified the plant U-box 4 (PUB4) E3 ubiquitin ligase as being necessary for this process. pub4-6 mutants had defects in stress adaptation and longevity. Thus, we have identified a signal that leads to the targeted removal of ROS-overproducing chloroplasts. PMID:26494759

  6. Ubiquitin facilitates a quality-control pathway that removes damaged chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Jesse D; Joens, Matthew S; Sinson, Andrew B; Gilkerson, Jonathan; Salomé, Patrice A; Weigel, Detlef; Fitzpatrick, James A; Chory, Joanne

    2015-10-23

    Energy production by chloroplasts and mitochondria causes constant oxidative damage. A functioning photosynthetic cell requires quality-control mechanisms to turn over and degrade chloroplasts damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we generated a conditionally lethal Arabidopsis mutant that accumulated excess protoporphyrin IX in the chloroplast and produced singlet oxygen. Damaged chloroplasts were subsequently ubiquitinated and selectively degraded. A genetic screen identified the plant U-box 4 (PUB4) E3 ubiquitin ligase as being necessary for this process. pub4-6 mutants had defects in stress adaptation and longevity. Thus, we have identified a signal that leads to the targeted removal of ROS-overproducing chloroplasts.

  7. Improve corrosion control in refining processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    New guidelines show how to control corrosion and environmental cracking of process equipment when processing feedstocks containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acids. To be cost competitive refiners must be able to process crudes of opportunity. These feedstocks when processed under high temperatures and pressures and alkaline conditions can cause brittle cracks and blisters in susceptible steel-fabricated equipment. Even with advances in steel metallurgy, wet H{sub 2}S cracking continues to be a problem. New research data shows that process conditions such as temperature, pH and flowrate are key factors in the corrosion process. Before selecting equipment material, operators must understand the corrosion mechanisms present within process conditions. Several case histories investigate the corrosion reactions found when refining naphthenic crudes and operating amine gas-sweetening systems. These examples show how to use process controls, inhibitors and/or metallurgy to control corrosion and environmental cracking, to improve material selection and to extend equipment service life.

  8. Damage control immunoregulation: is there a role for low-volume hypertonic saline resuscitation in patients managed with damage control surgery?

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Simms, Eric; Guidry, Chrissy; Duke, Marquinn; Beeson, Esther; McSwain, Norman E; Cotton, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HTS) is beneficial in the treatment of head-injured patients as a result of its potent cytoprotective effects on various cell lines. We hypothesize that low-volume resuscitation with 3 per cent HTS, when used after damage control surgery (DCS), improves outcomes compared with standard resuscitation with isotonic crystalloid solution (ICS). This is a 4-year retrospective review from two Level I trauma centers. Patients included had 10 units or more of packed red blood cells during initial DCS. On arrival to the trauma intensive care unit (TICU), patients were resuscitated with low-volume 3 per cent HTS or with conventional ICS. A cohort analysis was performed comparing resuscitation strategies. Univariate analysis of continuous data was done with Student t test followed by multivariate analysis. Of 188 patients included, 76 were in the low-volume HTS group and 112 in the ICS group. Demographics were similar between the groups. Over the next 48 hours after DCS in HTS versus ISC groups, intravenous fluids were given: 1920 ± 455 mL versus 8400 ± 1200 mL (P < 0.0001); urine output was 4320 ± 480 mL versus 1940 ± 480 mL(P < 0.0001); mean TICU length of stay was 10 ± 8 versus 16 ± 15 days (P < 0.01); prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome was 4.0 versus 13.4 per cent (P = 0.02); sepsis was 6.6 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.06); multisystem organ failure was: 2.6 versus 16.1 per cent (P < 0.01); and 30-day mortality was 5.3 versus 15.2 per cent (P = 0.03). There was no difference for prevalence of renal failure at 5.3 versus 3.6 per cent (P = 0.58). Low-volume resuscitation with HTS administered after DCS on arrival to the TICU may have a protective effect on the polytrauma patient. We believe that this study demonstrates a role for low-volume resuscitation with HTS to improve outcomes in patients undergoing DCS.

  9. Goat milk with and without increased concentrations of lysozyme improves repair of intestinal cell damage induced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) causes diarrhea, malnutrition and poor growth in children. Human breast milk decreases disease-causing bacteria by supplying nutrients and antimicrobial factors such as lysozyme. Goat milk with and without human lysozyme (HLZ) may improve the repair of intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC. This work investigates the effect of the milks on intestinal barrier function repair, bacterial adherence in Caco-2 and HEp-2 cells, intestinal cell proliferation, migration, viability and apoptosis in IEC-6 cells in the absence or presence of EAEC. Methods Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6, ATCC, Rockville, MD) were used for proliferation, migration and viability assays and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD) and human larynx carcinoma (HEp-2, ATCC, Rockville, MD) cells were used for bacterial adhesion assays. Goats expressing HLZ in their milk were generated and express HLZ in milk at concentration of 270 μg/ml . Cells were incubated with pasteurized milk from either transgenic goats expressing HLZ or non-transgenic control goats in the presence and absence of EAEC strain 042 (O44:H18). Results Cellular proliferation was significantly greater in the presence of both HLZ transgenic and control goat milk compared to cells with no milk. Cellular migration was significantly decreased in the presence of EAEC alone but was restored in the presence of milk. Milk from HLZ transgenic goats had significantly more migration compared to control milk. Both milks significantly reduced EAEC adhesion to Caco-2 cells and transgenic milk resulted in less colonization than control milk using a HEp-2 assay. Both milks had significantly increased cellular viability as well as less apoptosis in both the absence and presence of EAEC. Conclusions These data demonstrated that goat milk is able to repair intestinal barrier function damage induced by EAEC and that goat milk with a higher concentration of

  10. Negative control of CSL gene transcription by stress/DNA damage response and p53.

    PubMed

    Menietti, Elena; Xu, Xiaoying; Ostano, Paola; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Lefort, Karine; Dotto, G Paolo

    2016-07-01

    CSL is a key transcriptional repressor and mediator of Notch signaling. Despite wide interest in CSL, mechanisms responsible for its own regulation are little studied. CSL down-modulation in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) leads to conversion into cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF), promoting keratinocyte tumors. We show here that CSL transcript levels differ among HDF strains from different individuals, with negative correlation with genes involved in DNA damage/repair. CSL expression is negatively regulated by stress/DNA damage caused by UVA, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), smoke extract, and doxorubicin treatment. P53, a key effector of the DNA damage response, negatively controls CSL gene transcription, through suppression of CSL promoter activity and, indirectly, by increased p21 expression. CSL was previously shown to bind p53 suppressing its activity. The present findings indicate that p53, in turn, decreases CSL expression, which can serve to enhance p53 activity in acute DNA damage response of cells.

  11. Control of radiation damage in MoS(2) by graphene encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Zan, Recep; Ramasse, Quentin M; Jalil, Rashid; Georgiou, Thanasis; Bangert, Ursel; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2013-11-26

    Recent dramatic progress in studying various two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals and their heterostructures calls for better and more detailed understanding of their crystallography, reconstruction, stacking order, etc. For this, direct imaging and identification of each and every atom is essential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) are ideal and perhaps the only tools for such studies. However, the electron beam can in some cases induce dramatic structure changes, and radiation damage becomes an obstacle in obtaining the desired information in imaging and chemical analysis in the (S)TEM. This is the case of 2D materials such as molybdenum disulfide MoS2, but also of many biological specimens, molecules, and proteins. Thus, minimizing damage to the specimen is essential for optimum microscopic analysis. In this article we demonstrate, on the example of MoS2, that encapsulation of such crystals between two layers of graphene allows for a dramatic improvement in stability of the studied 2D crystal and permits careful control over the defect nature and formation in it. We present STEM data collected from single-layer MoS2 samples prepared for observation in the microscope through three distinct procedures. The fabricated single-layer MoS2 samples were either left bare (pristine), placed atop a single-layer of graphene, or finally encapsulated between single graphene layers. Their behavior under the electron beam is carefully compared, and we show that the MoS2 sample "sandwiched" between the graphene layers has the highest durability and lowest defect formation rate compared to the other two samples, for very similar experimental conditions.

  12. Designing for Damage: Robust Flight Control Design using Sliding Mode Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vetter, T. K.; Wells, S. R.; Hess, Ronald A.; Bacon, Barton (Technical Monitor); Davidson, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A brief review of sliding model control is undertaken, with particular emphasis upon the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. Sliding model control design is interpreted in the frequency domain. The inclusion of asymptotic observers and control 'hedging' is shown to reduce the effects of neglected parasitic dynamics. An investigation into the application of observer-based sliding mode control to the robust longitudinal control of a highly unstable is described. The sliding mode controller is shown to exhibit stability and performance robustness superior to that of a classical loop-shaped design when significant changes in vehicle and actuator dynamics are employed to model airframe damage.

  13. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  14. Application of polymeric damage removal treatment results in multi-fold well productivity improvement: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, H.D.; Tjon-Joe-Pin, R.M.

    1995-11-01

    Well productivity can be significantly reduced by permeability damage. The damage in many cases is due to inadequate degradation of gelled treating fluids and the residual polymeric filter cakes on the formation face. Several methods have previously been employed to remove polymeric damage in an effort to increase well productivity with limited success. Polymer specific enzymes have been incorporated into a newly developed technique to facilitate removal of polymeric damage. The new remedial treatment is environmentally safe and can be applied over a wide pH range and at temperatures as high as 300 F. Laboratory analysis using the new system has shown that multi-fold permeability improvements can be achieved through polymeric damage removal. A case study of several wells suffering from polymeric damage was conducted. Production histories and return flow analysis were evaluated to characterize the damage and guide the remedial treatment design. Several wells treated with the polymeric damage removal treatment demonstrate multi-fold improvements in well productivity.

  15. Robust Damage-Mitigating Control of Aircraft for High Performance and Structural Durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, Jeffrey; Ray, Asok; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the concept and a design methodology for robust damage-mitigating control (DMC) of aircraft. The goal of DMC is to simultaneously achieve high performance and structural durability. The controller design procedure involves consideration of damage at critical points of the structure, as well as the performance requirements of the aircraft. An aeroelastic model of the wings has been formulated and is incorporated into a nonlinear rigid-body model of aircraft flight-dynamics. Robust damage-mitigating controllers are then designed using the H(infinity)-based structured singular value (mu) synthesis method based on a linearized model of the aircraft. In addition to penalizing the error between the ideal performance and the actual performance of the aircraft, frequency-dependent weights are placed on the strain amplitude at the root of each wing. Using each controller in turn, the control system is put through an identical sequence of maneuvers, and the resulting (varying amplitude cyclic) stress profiles are analyzed using a fatigue crack growth model that incorporates the effects of stress overload. Comparisons are made to determine the impact of different weights on the resulting fatigue crack damage in the wings. The results of simulation experiments show significant savings in fatigue life of the wings while retaining the dynamic performance of the aircraft.

  16. Improved adhesion of Ni films on X-ray damaged polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.; Pepper, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation shows that the adhesion of evaporated Ni on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is enhanced by irradiating the PTFE surface prior to evaporation. Evidence obtained with the aid of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is presented concerning the association of the enhanced adhesion with an interfacial chemical reaction. Evaporated Ni clearly adheres better to the X-ray damaged PTFE surface than to the undamaged surface. There is evidence that the improved adhesion is not related to the Ni-C bond, but rather to the NiF2. A possible mechanism which may be consistent with the data is the formation of a F-Ni-C complex, where C is a member of the polymer chain.

  17. Improving the Resistance to Sliding Contact Damage of Zirconia Using Elastic Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Won; Liu, Lela; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics with high strength have been identified as a material of choice for sliding components in a variety of biomedical and engineering applications. Despite the high flexural strength, zirconia prostheses are still vulnerable to wear and surface damage. We hypothesize that such tribological damage may be substantially mitigated by an engineered grading of elastic modulus at the ceramic surface. In this study, graded structures were fabricated by infiltrating glass into the top and bottom surfaces of zirconia plates, with resulting diminished modulus in the outer surfaces. The plates were then subjected to frictional sliding tests using a hard spherical indenter. Compared to non-infiltrated controls, infiltrated specimens showed a significant increase in the fracture loads, by over a factor of 3. The increase in the sliding contact resistance is attributed to the diminishing tensile stresses at the graded lower-modulus surface. The results confirm that suitably graded structures can be highly beneficial in the design of next-generation orthopedic and dental prostheses. PMID:20552616

  18. Continuum Fatigue Damage Modeling for Critical Design, Control, and Fault Prognosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a simplified continuum (continuous with respect to time, stress, etc.) fatigue damage model for use in critical design, Life Extending Control and fault prognosis. The work is based on the local strain cyclic damage modeling method. New nonlinear explicit equation forms of cyclic damage in terms of stress amplitude are derived to facilitate the continuum modelling. Stress based continuum models are derived. Extension to plastic strain-strain rate models is also presented. Progress toward a non-zero mean stress based is presented. Also new nonlinear explicit equation forms in terms of stress amplitude are derived for this case. Application of the various models to design, control, and fault prognosis is considered.

  19. Improved Sizing of Impact Damage in Composites Based on Thermographic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell Patricia A.; Leckey, Cara A.; Rogge, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Impact damage in thin carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites often results in a relatively small region of damage at the front surface, with increasing damage near the back surface. Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of the composite tend to underestimate the size of the back surface damage, since the smaller near surface damage gives the largest thermographic indication. A method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the impact damage that is much closer to the size of the damage estimated from other NDE techniques such as microfocus x-ray computed tomography and pulse echo ultrasonics. Examples of the application of the technique to experimental data acquired on specimens with impact damage are presented. The method is also applied to the results of thermographic simulations to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  20. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  1. The evolution of damage control orthopedics: current evidence and practical applications of early appropriate care.

    PubMed

    D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude G; O'Toole, Robert V

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the evolution of literature and practice related to fracture care in polytrauma patients. Particular emphasis is given to the management of femoral shaft fractures and the concept of damage control in these complex patients. The application of these guidelines in common clinical practice is also discussed.

  2. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  3. Improving attendance in weight-control programs.

    PubMed

    Mullen, P D; Culjat, D

    1980-01-01

    This field study evaluated the use of a food dairy as a screening device for admission to a behaviorally oriented weight-reduction program for its effectiveness in improving attendance. All study participants were required (1) to attend an orientation meeting where the program was described and questions were solicited and (2) to pay a $25, nonrefundable fee. During the orientation experimental-group attendees were told that a 2-week food dairy was a requirement for admission to the series. It was expected the experimental requirement would decrease the number of less motivated enrollees, thereby reducing early termination and improving attendance. Keeping the record was in itself expected to modify eating behavior. This would have the effect of adding 2 weeks to the program and, therefore, weight loss at the end of the program was expected to be greater. In general, the hypotheses were confirmed. A smaller proportion of those who had the food-dairy requirement enrolled. a significantly larger proportion of experimental-group women enrollees attended at least three-quarters of the sessions. The attendance records of control-group and experimental-group men were not significantly different. Mean weight loss at the end of the program was greater for those enrolled under the experimental condition. Achievement of a weight loss of at least 8 pounds was found to be positively related to attendance.

  4. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  5. Damage by wind-blown sand and its control along Qinghai-Tibet Railway in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke-cun; Qu, Jian-jun; Liao, Kong-tai; Niu, Qing-he; Han, Qing-jie

    2010-01-01

    Qinghai-Tibet Railway, with an average altitude of 4500 m above sea level, is the longest railway in a high altitude region. It passes through 550 km-long permafrost belt and crosses the Kunlun and Tanggulha Mountain on Tibetan Plateau. Since it opened in 2006, damage by wind-blown sand began to and rapidly spread along the railway. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the climatic conditions, the damage by wind-blown sand and its control along Qinghai-Tibet Railway.

  6. Improved photoluminescence efficiency in UV nanopillar light emitting diode structures by recovery of dry etching damage.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Dae-Woo; Jang, Lee-Woon; Jeon, Ju-Won; Park, Jae-Woo; Song, Young Ho; Jeon, Seong-Ran; Ju, Jin-Woo; Baek, Jong Hyeob; Lee, In-Hwan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we have fabricated 375-nm-wavelength InGaN/AlInGaN nanopillar light emitting diodes (LED) structures on c-plane sapphire. A uniform and highly vertical nanopillar structure was fabricated using self-organized Ni/SiO2 nano-size mask by dry etching method. To minimize the dry etching damage, the samples were subjected to high temperature annealing with subsequent chemical passivation in KOH solution. Prior to annealing and passivation the UV nanopillar LEDs showed the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency about 2.5 times higher than conventional UV LED structures which is attributed to better light extraction efficiency and possibly some improvement of internal quantum efficiency due to partially relieved strain. Annealing alone further increased the PL efficiency by about 4.5 times compared to the conventional UV LEDs, while KOH passivation led to the overall PL efficiency improvement by more than 7 times. Combined results of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggest that annealing decreases the number of lattice defects and relieves the strain in the surface region of the nanopillars whereas KOH treatment removes the surface oxide from nanopillar surface. PMID:23858920

  7. A single portion of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) improves protection against DNA damage but not vascular function in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Del Bó, Cristian; Riso, Patrizia; Campolo, Jonica; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Brambilla, Ada; Rizzolo, Anna; Porrini, Marisa

    2013-03-01

    It has been suggested that anthocyanin-rich foods may exert antioxidant effects and improve vascular function as demonstrated mainly in vitro and in the animal model. Blueberries are rich sources of anthocyanins and we hypothesized that their intake could improve cell protection against oxidative stress and affect endothelial function in humans. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of one portion (300 g) of blueberries on selected markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant protection (endogenous and oxidatively induced DNA damage) and of vascular function (changes in peripheral arterial tone and plasma nitric oxide levels) in male subjects. In a randomized cross-over design, separated by a wash out period ten young volunteers received one portion of blueberries ground by blender or one portion of a control jelly. Before and after consumption (at 1, 2, and 24 hours), blood samples were collected and used to evaluate anthocyanin absorption (through mass spectrometry), endogenous and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage in blood mononuclear cells (through the comet assay), and plasma nitric oxide concentrations (through a fluorometric assay). Peripheral arterial function was assessed by means of Endo-PAT 2000. Blueberries significantly reduced (P < .01) H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage (-18%) 1 hour after blueberry consumption compared to control. No significant differences were observed for endogenous DNA damage, peripheral arterial function and nitric oxide levels after blueberry intake. In conclusion, one portion of blueberries seems sufficient to improve cell antioxidant defense against DNA damage, but further studies are necessary to understand their role on vascular function.

  8. Damage-mitigating control of aircraft for high performance and life extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplin, Jeffrey

    1998-12-01

    A methodology is proposed for the synthesis of a Damage-Mitigating Control System for a high-performance fighter aircraft. The design of such a controller involves consideration of damage to critical points of the structure, as well as the performance requirements of the aircraft. This research is interdisciplinary, and brings existing knowledge in the fields of unsteady aerodynamics, structural dynamics, fracture mechanics, and control theory together to formulate a new approach towards aircraft flight controller design. A flexible wing model is formulated using the Finite Element Method, and the important mode shapes and natural frequencies are identified. The Doublet Lattice Method is employed to develop an unsteady flow model for computation of the unsteady aerodynamic loads acting on the wing due to rigid-body maneuvers and structural deformation. These two models are subsequently incorporated into a pre-existing nonlinear rigid-body aircraft flight-dynamic model. A family of robust Damage-Mitigating Controllers is designed using the Hinfinity-optimization and mu-synthesis method. In addition to weighting the error between the ideal performance and the actual performance of the aircraft, weights are also placed on the strain amplitude at the root of each wing. The results show significant savings in fatigue life of the wings while retaining the dynamic performance of the aircraft.

  9. Improvement of Poly Profile in Sub 30 nm Device By Damage Engineering and Tilted Implantation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Chul-Young; Kwak, Noh-Yeal; Lee, Sang-Soo; Shin, Seung-Woo; Ko, Min-Sung; Kim, Jae-Mun; Lee, Byung-Seok; Kim, Jin-Woong; Oh, Choong-Young; Kim, Yong-Su; Colombeau, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, P31 out-gassing of floating gate by succeeding thermal processes happens in NAND FLASH that use floating gate structure, and this P31 out gassing causes degradation of PDR and cell characteristics in sub-30 nm device. Usually, there is a method to keep PDR of in-situ doped poly-Si by increasing the concentration of P31, but this method also causes cell characteristics degradation by trap charge of tunnel oxide. So, we used another method of ion implantation to control P31 out-gassing concentration of floating gate by declining effective channel length. If we use methods of low energy and zero tilt implantation, P31 Trap by dopant channeling occurs in tunnel oxide. So, we evaluated methods of low energy and tilted implantation. But in this case, there were poly loss and bending, due to the physical collision damage of implantation. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of tilt change, direction and temperature control of ion implantation to minimize poly loss of floating gate.

  10. Chronic caloric restriction reduces tissue damage and improves spatial memory in a rat model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rich, Nicholas J; Van Landingham, Jacob W; Figueiroa, Silvia; Seth, Rohit; Corniola, Rikki S; Levenson, Cathy W

    2010-10-01

    Although it has been known for some time that chronic caloric or dietary restriction reduces the risk of neurodegenerative disorders and injury following ischemia, the possible role of chronic restriction in improving outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been previously studied. Therefore, 2-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two dietary groups, an ad libitum fed group (AL) and a caloric-restriction group (CR) that was provided with 70% of the food intake of AL rats (n = 10/group). After 4 months, a weight-drop device (300 g) was used to produce a 2-mm bilateral medial frontal cortex contusion following craniotomy. Additional animals in each dietary group (n = 10) were used as sham-operated controls. The CR diet resulted in body weights that were reduced by 30% compared with AL controls. Not only did CR decrease the size of the cortical lesion after injury, there were marked improvements in spatial memory as measured by Morris water maze that included an increase in the number of animals successfully finding the platform as well as significantly reduced time to finding the hidden platform. Western analysis, used to examine the expression of proteins that play a role in neuronal survival, revealed significant increases in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the cortical region around the site of injury and in the hippocampus in CR rats after injury. These findings suggest that molecular mechanisms involved in cell survival may play a role in reducing tissue damage and improving cognition after TBI and that these mechanisms can be regulated by dietary interventions. PMID:20544832

  11. Improving conveyor efficiency by controlling fugitive material

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbeck, L.J.

    1996-11-01

    The conveyor belt has been identified as one of the major sources of what call DURT-fugitive material that escapes from bulk handling systems. This presentation is focused on ways to dramatically improve belt conveyor designs to control DURT. This information can`t be found in any of the computer design software currently used to guide engineers. It is the result of the author`s examination of DURT-generating conveyors all over the world, in all types of industries. The solution to conveyor DURT starts with the client--the people who will live with the conveyor and its fugitive material on a daily basis. Too often the client specifies the tonnage he expects the conveyor to deliver but does not include in the same specification a target for cleanliness. Until these specifications list a quantitative amount of belt carryback permissible and the amount of spillage allowed to leak out at the transfer points--and until design and engineering firms are held accountable for these performance levels--belt conveyors will continue to be a major source of DURT. This paper examines a typical conveyor transfer point and reviews a number of items that are seldom given more than a cursory look at the design stage, but which can contribute heavily to fugitive material problems.

  12. Timing control improves seabed survey data quality

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.

    1996-04-01

    Seateam has completed development of and field-proven the Dolphin data acquisition and timing system for high-density surveys offshore. The Dolphin project was initiated to improve quality control of survey sensor data and ensure time synchronization, thus leading to faster turnaround of seabed terrain information. Data received from survey sensors is asynchronous, so the system must provide for data correlation. This includes establishment of data latency, i.e., the time difference between data creation and timing of the message at first-byte arrival at the recording system. Until recently, asynchronous data from multiple sensors was collected by a single computer, regardless of whether it had additional intelligent or non-intelligent serial cards. This computer was fully responsible for time stamping all incoming data, plus associated storage and distribution. Though this initially sufficed and is still applicable to low-density data, increasingly larger data volumes required an associated boost in the capability to time stamp data prior to eventual correction.

  13. Improving laser damage resistance of 355 nm high-reflective coatings by co-evaporated interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huanbin; Zhu, Meiping; Chai, Yingjie; Yi, Kui; Sun, Jian; Cui, Yun; Shao, Jianda

    2016-03-15

    355 nm high-reflective multilayer coatings with or without coevaporated interfaces (CEIs) were prepared by electron beam evaporation under the same deposition condition. Their transmission spectra, surface roughness, and mechanical stress properties were evaluated. Elemental composition analysis of the multilayer interfaces was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and laser-induced damage thresholds were obtained in both 1-on-1 and 300-on-1 testing modes. The coatings with CEIs reveal a lower mechanical stress and a higher laser damage resistance when irradiated with high laser fluence, and the corresponding damage modeling indicates that CEIs can significantly decrease defect density. The resulting damage morphologies show that CEI coatings can significantly suppress coating delamination and exhibit a "bulk-like" damage behavior, demonstrating better damage performance against high-power lasers. PMID:26977682

  14. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-01-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process. PMID:27484188

  15. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  16. Optimal Ozone Control with Inclusion of Spatiotemporal Marginal Damages and Electricity Demand.

    PubMed

    Mesbah, S Morteza; Hakami, Amir; Schott, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Marginal damage (MD), or damage per ton of emission, is a policy metric used for effective pollution control and reducing the corresponding adverse health impacts. However, for a pollutant such as NOx, the MD varies by the time and location of the emissions, a complication that is not adequately accounted for in the currently implemented economic instruments. Policies accounting for MD information would aim to encourage emitters with large MDs to reduce their emissions. An optimization framework is implemented to account for NOx spatiotemporal MDs calculated through adjoint sensitivity analysis and to simulate power plants' behavior under emission and simplified electricity constraints. The results from a case study of U.S. power plants indicate that time-specific MDs are high around noon and low in the evening. Furthermore, an emissions reduction of about 40% and a net benefit of about $1200 million can be gained for this subset of power plants if a larger fraction of the electricity demand is supplied by power plants at low-damage times and in low-damage locations. The results also indicate that the consideration of temporal effects in NOx control policies results in a comparable net benefit to the consideration of spatial or spatiotemporal effects, thus providing a promising option for policy development.

  17. Tai Chi Improves Oxidative Stress Response and DNA Damage/Repair in Young Sedentary Females

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xing-Yu; Eungpinichpong, Wichai; Silsirivanit, Atit; Nakmareong, Saowanee; Wu, Xiu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks of Tai Chi (TC) exercise on antioxidant capacity, and DNA damage/repair in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Ten female students from a Chinese university voluntarily participated in this program. All of them practiced the 24-form simplified Tai Chi, 5 times weekly, for 12 weeks. Plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), hydroxyl radical inhibiting capacity (OH·-IC), 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks. Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the last set of the training session at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. [Results] Plasma SOD and OH·-IC levels were increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline (0 weeks). Gpx and GSH levels did not change significantly throughout the study period. The plasma MDA level was decreased significantly at 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. While the plasma 8-OHdG level did not change throughout the study period, the plasma OGG1 level was significantly increased at 8 and 12 weeks compared to the baseline value. [Conclusion] TC practice for 12 weeks efficiently improved the oxidative stress response in young females who did not perform regular physical exercise. The TC exercise also increased the DNA repairing capacity. PMID:25013276

  18. Deoxyadenosine family: improved synthesis, DNA damage and repair, analogs as drugs.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Himadri; Kar, Indrani; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2013-08-01

    Improved synthesis of 2'-deoxyadenosine using Escherichia coli overexpressing some enzymes and gram-scale chemical synthesis of 2'-deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates reported recently are described in this review. Other topics include DNA damage induced by chromium(VI), Fenton chemistry, photoinduction with lumazine, or by ultrasound in neutral solution; 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine isomers as potential biomarkers; and a recapitulation of purine 5',8-cyclonucleoside studies. The mutagenicities of some products generated by oxidizing 2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, nucleotide pool sanitization, and translesion synthesis are also reviewed. Characterizing cross-linking between nucleosides in opposite strands of DNA and endonuclease V-mediated deoxyinosine excision repair are discussed. The use of purine nucleoside analogs in the treatment of rarer chronic lymphoid leukemias is reviewed. Some analogs at the C8 position induced delayed polymerization arrest during HIV-1 reverse transcription. The susceptibility of clinically metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis to two analogs, toyocamycin and 2-fluoro-2'-deoxyadenosine, were tested in vitro. GS-9148, a dAMP analog, was translocated to the priming site in a complex with reverse transcriptase and double-stranded DNA to gain insight into the mechanism of reverse transcriptase inhibition. PMID:25436589

  19. Betulinic acid prevents alcohol-induced liver damage by improving the antioxidant system in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Yuan, Liyun; Wu, Jing; Tu, Di; Fang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane-type triterpene, has a wide range of bioactivities. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective activity of BA and the potential mechanism underlying the ability of this compound to prevent liver damage induced by alcohol in vivo. Mice were given oral doses of BA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg) daily for 14 days, and induced liver injury by feeding 50% alcohol orally at the dosage of 10 ml/kg after 1 h last administration of BA. BA pretreatment significantly reduced the serum levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total cholesterol, and triacylglycerides in a dose-dependent manner in the mice administered alcohol. Hepatic levels of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase were remarkably increased, while malondialdehyde contents and microvesicular steatosis in the liver were decreased by BA in a dose-dependent manner after alcohol-induced liver injury. These findings suggest that the mechanism underlying the hepatoprotective effects of BA might be due to increased antioxidant capacity, mainly through improvement of the tissue redox system, maintenance of the antioxidant system, and decreased lipid peroxidation in the liver. PMID:24378582

  20. Methodology to improve process understanding of surface runoff causing damages to buildings by analyzing insurance data records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, Daniel; Prasuhn, Volker; Weingartner, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Several case studies in Switzerland highlight that many buildings which are damaged by floods are not located within the inundation zones of rivers, but outside the river network. In urban areas, such flooding can be caused by drainage system surcharge, low infiltration capacity of the urbanized landscape etc. However, in rural and peri-urban areas inundations are more likely caused by surface runoff formed on natural and arable land. Such flash floods have very short response time, occur rather diffusely and, thus, are very difficult to observe directly. In our approach, we use data records from private, but mostly from public insurance companies. The latter, present in 19 out of the total 26 Cantons of Switzerland, insure (almost) every building within the respective administrative zones and, in addition, hold a monopoly position. Damage claims, including flood damages, are usually recorded and, thus, data records from such public insurance companies are a very profitable data source to better understand surface runoff leading to damages. Although practitioners agree that this process is relevant, there seems to be a knowledge gap concerning spatial and temporal distributions as well as triggers and influencing factors of such damage events. Within the framework of a research project, we want to address this research gap and improve the understanding of the process chain from surface runoff formation up to possible damages to buildings. This poster introduces the methodology, which will be applied to a dataset including data from the majority of all 19 public insurance companies for buildings in Switzerland, counting over 50'000 damage claims, in order to better understand surface runoff. The goal is to infer spatial and temporal patterns as well as drivers and influencing factors of surface runoff possibly causing damages. In particular, the workflow of data acquisition, harmonization and treatment is outlined. Furthermore associated problems and challenges are

  1. Concepts for improving the damage tolerance of composite compression panels. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The residual strength of specimens with damage and the sensitivity to damage while subjected to an applied inplane compression load were determined for flatplate specimens and blade-stiffened panels. The results suggest that matrix materials that fail by delamination have the lowest damage tolerance capability. Alternate matrix materials or laminates which are transversely reinforced suppress the delamination mode of failure and change the failure mode to transverse shear crippling which occurs at a higher strain value. Several damage-tolerant blade-stiffened panel design concepts are evaluated. Structural efficiency studies conducted show only small mass penalties may result from incorporating these damage-tolerant features in panel design. The implication of test results on the design of aircraft structures was examined with respect to FAR requirements.

  2. DNA replication and damage checkpoints and meiotic cell cycle controls in the fission and budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, H; Nurse, P

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms ensure the order of cell cycle events to preserve genomic integrity. Among these, the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints prevent chromosome segregation when DNA replication is inhibited or DNA is damaged. Recent studies have identified an outline of the regulatory networks for both of these controls, which apparently operate in all eukaryotes. In addition, it appears that these checkpoints have two arrest points, one is just before entry into mitosis and the other is prior to chromosome separation. The former point requires the central cell-cycle regulator Cdc2 kinase, whereas the latter involves several key regulators and substrates of the ubiquitin ligase called the anaphase promoting complex. Linkages between these cell-cycle regulators and several key checkpoint proteins are beginning to emerge. Recent findings on post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions of the checkpoint proteins provide new insights into the checkpoint responses, although the functional significance of these biochemical properties often remains unclear. We have reviewed the molecular mechanisms acting at the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the modifications of these controls during the meiotic cell cycle. We have made comparisons with the controls in fission yeast and other organisms, mainly the distantly related budding yeast. PMID:10861204

  3. Improved laser damage threshold performance of calcium fluoride optical surfaces via Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Svrluga, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-11-01

    Optics are not keeping up with the pace of laser advancements. The laser industry is rapidly increasing its power capabilities and reducing wavelengths which have exposed the optics as a weak link in lifetime failures for these advanced systems. Nanometer sized surface defects (scratches, pits, bumps and residual particles) on the surface of optics are a significant limiting factor to high end performance. Angstrom level smoothing of materials such as calcium fluoride, spinel, magnesium fluoride, zinc sulfide, LBO and others presents a unique challenge for traditional polishing techniques. Exogenesis Corporation, using its new and proprietary Accelerated Neutral Atom Beam (ANAB) technology, is able to remove nano-scale surface damage and particle contamination leaving many material surfaces with roughness typically around one Angstrom. This surface defect mitigation via ANAB processing can be shown to increase performance properties of high intensity optical materials. This paper describes the ANAB technology and summarizes smoothing results for calcium fluoride laser windows. It further correlates laser damage threshold improvements with the smoothing produced by ANAB surface treatment. All ANAB processing was performed at Exogenesis Corporation using an nAccel100TM Accelerated Particle Beam processing tool. All surface measurement data for the paper was produced via AFM analysis on a Park Model XE70 AFM, and all laser damage testing was performed at Spica Technologies, Inc. Exogenesis Corporation's ANAB processing technology is a new and unique surface modification technique that has demonstrated to be highly effective at correcting nano-scale surface defects. ANAB is a non-contact vacuum process comprised of an intense beam of accelerated, electrically neutral gas atoms with average energies of a few tens of electron volts. The ANAB process does not apply mechanical forces associated with traditional polishing techniques. ANAB efficiently removes surface

  4. Controlling the response to DNA damage by the APC/C-Cdh1.

    PubMed

    de Boer, H Rudolf; Guerrero Llobet, S; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-03-01

    Proper cell cycle progression is safeguarded by the oscillating activities of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An important player in the regulation of mitotic cyclins is the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. Prior to entry into mitosis, the APC/C remains inactive, which allows the accumulation of mitotic regulators. APC/C activation requires binding to either the Cdc20 or Cdh1 adaptor protein, which sequentially bind the APC/C and facilitate targeting of multiple mitotic regulators for proteasomal destruction, including Securin and Cyclin B, to ensure proper chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Emerging data have indicated that the APC/C, particularly in association with Cdh1, also functions prior to mitotic entry. Specifically, the APC/C-Cdh1 is activated in response to DNA damage in G2 phase cells. These observations are in line with in vitro and in vivo genetic studies, in which cells lacking Cdh1 expression display various defects, including impaired DNA repair and aberrant cell cycle checkpoints. In this review, we summarize the current literature on APC/C regulation in response to DNA damage, the functions of APC/C-Cdh1 activation upon DNA damage, and speculate how APC/C-Cdh1 can control cell fate in the context of persistent DNA damage.

  5. Dimethylformamide improves the in vitro characteristics of thawed stallion spermatozoa reducing sublethal damage.

    PubMed

    Morillo Rodriguez, A; Balao da Silva, C; Macías-García, B; Gallardo Bolaños, J M; Tapia, J A; Aparicio, I M; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Peña, F J

    2012-12-01

    A total of 42 ejaculates were used in the experiment; six ejaculates per stallion, obtained from seven Pure Spanish stallions (PRE), were split and frozen in freezing media with different concentrations and combinations of cryoprotectant (CPA): (i) Cáceres (skim milk based extender) containing 2.5% glycerol (2.5GL), (ii) Cáceres containing 1.5% glycerol and 1.5% dimethylformamide (1.5%GL-1.5%DMFA), (iii) Cáceres extender supplemented with 1.5% glycerol and 2.5% dimethylformamide (1.5%GL-2.5%DMFA) and (iv) Cáceres extender supplemented with 4% dimethylformamide (4%DMFA). After at least 4 weeks of storage in liquid nitrogen (LN), straws were thawed and semen analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis and flow cytometry (membrane lipid architecture (Merocyanine 540), integrity and sublethal damage (YoPro-1) and mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1)). After thawing, better results were observed in samples frozen in 4%DMFA or in combinations of 1.5%GL-2.5%DMFA, in fact total motility increased by 16% in the 4%DMFA group compared to 2.5%GL (P < 0.05). Also, there was an increment in the percentage of progressive motile sperm in the 1.5%GL-2.5%DMFA group (9.8% 2.5GL vs 19% in the 1.5%GL-2.5%DMFA group p < 0.05); also, samples frozen in the 4%DMFA group had more intact (YoPro-1 negative) sperm post-thawing, 29.3% in 2.5%GL vs 36.7% in 4%DMFA group (p < 0.05). Membrane lipid architecture was not affected by any of the cryoprotectants tested, while samples frozen in 4%DFMA had a lower percentage of mitochondria with lower membrane potential. It is concluded that DMFA improves the outcome of cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa mainly reducing sublethal cryodamage.

  6. Rotorcraft flying qualities improvement using advanced control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Postlethwaite, I.; Howitt, J.; Foster, N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on recent experience gained when a multivariable helicopter flight control law was tested on the Large Motion Simulator (LMS) at DRA Bedford. This was part of a study into the application of multivariable control theory to the design of full-authority flight control systems for high-performance helicopters. In this paper, we present some of the results that were obtained during the piloted simulation trial and from subsequent off-line simulation and analysis. The performance provided by the control law led to level 1 handling quality ratings for almost all of the mission task elements assessed, both during the real-time and off-line analysis.

  7. Iron-control additives improve acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.; Dill, W. ); Besler, M. )

    1989-07-24

    Iron sulfide and sulfur precipitation in sour wells can be controlled with iron-sequestering agents and sulfide modifiers. Oil production has been routinely increased in sour wells where precipitation of iron sulfide and elemental sulfur has been brought under control. Production increases have been especially noteworthy on wells that had a history of rapid production decline after acid stimulation. Twenty-fold production increases have been recorded. Key to the production increase has been to increase permeability with: Iron chelating agents that control precipitation of iron sulfide. A sulfide modifier that reduces precipitation of solids in the presence of excessive amounts of hydrogen sulfide and prevents precipitation of elemental sulfur.

  8. Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric mucosal damage induced by intensive stress

    PubMed Central

    Akinci, Aysin; Cetin, Asli; Ates, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress has been considered to play a primary role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Material and methods Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + saline, stress + melatonin, stress + ascorbic acid and stress + β-carotene groups. The rats from stress groups were exposed to starvation, immobilization and cold by immobilizing for 8 h at +4°C following 72-hour food restriction. Following stress application, melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene were administered for 7 days. Specimens of gastric tissue were prepared for microscopic and biochemical examinations. Results Mean histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased but mean tissue glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were increased in treatment groups vs. stress groups in general. Mean histopathological damage scores of the stress + Mel group was lower than those of stress + D, stress + S, stress + β-car (p < 0.05) and stress + Asc groups (p < 0.005). Additionally, mean tissue catalase activity of the stress + Mel group was higher than that of stress + S (p < 0.005), stress + D (p < 0.05) and stress + β-car groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric damage induced by intensive stress. We suggest that as well as the direct antioxidant and free radical scavenging potency of melatonin, its indirect effect via the brain-gut axis might account for its greater beneficial action against stress-induced gastric damage. PMID:26528359

  9. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-07-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  10. Improved Electronic Control for Electrostatic Precipitators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators remove particulate matter from smoke created by burning refuse. Smoke exposed to electrostatic field, and particles become electrically charged and migrate to electrically charged collecting surfaces. New microprocessor-based electronic control maintains precipitator power at maximum particulate-collection level. Control automatically senses changes in smoke composition due to variations in fuel or combustion and adjusts precipitator voltage and current accordingly. Also, sensitive yet stable fault detection provided.

  11. Improved internal control for molecular diagnosis assays.

    PubMed

    Vinayagamoorthy, T; Maryanski, Danielle; Vinayagamoorthy, Dilanthi; Hay, Katie S L; Yo, Jacob; Carter, Mark; Wiegel, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The two principal determining steps in molecular diagnosis are the amplification and the identification steps. Accuracy of DNA amplification is primarily determined by the annealing sequence of the PCR primer to the analyte DNA. Accuracy for identification is determined either by the annealing region of a labelled probe for the real time PCR analysis, or the annealing of a sequencing primer for DNA sequencing analysis, that binds to the respective analyte (amplicon). Presently, housekeeping genes (Beta globin, GAPDH) are used in molecular diagnosis to verify that the PCR conditions are optimum, and are thus known as amplification controls [1-4]. Although these genes have been useful as amplification controls, they lack the true definition of an internal control because the primers and annealing conditions are not identical to the analyte being assayed. This may result in a false negative report [5]. The IC-Code platform technology described here provides a true internal control where the internal control and analyte share identical PCR primers annealing sequences for the amplification step and identical sequencing primer annealing sequence for the identification step. •The analyte and internal control have the same PCR and sequencing annealing sequences.•This method assures for little or no false negatives and false positives due to the method's design of using identical annealing conditions for the internal control and analyte, and by using DNA sequencing analysis for the identification step of the analyte, respectively.•This method also allows for a set lower limit of detection to be used by varying the amount of internal control used in the assay.

  12. As we age: Does slippage of quality control in the immune system lead to collateral damage?

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2015-09-01

    The vertebrate adaptive immune system is remarkable for its possession of a very broad range of antigen receptors imbuing the system with exquisite specificity, in addition to the phagocytic and inflammatory cells of the innate system shared with invertebrates. This system requires strict control both at the level of the generation the cells carrying these receptors and at the level of their activation and effector function mediation in order to avoid autoimmunity and mitigate immune pathology. Thus, quality control checkpoints are built into the system at multiple nodes in the response, relying on clonal selection and regulatory networks to maximize pathogen-directed effects and minimize collateral tissue damage. However, these checkpoints are compromised with age, resulting in poorer immune control manifesting as tissue-damaging autoimmune and inflammatory phenomena which can cause widespread systemic disease, paradoxically compounding the problems associated with increased susceptibility to infectious disease and possibly cancer in the elderly. Better understanding the reasons for slippage of immune control will pave the way for developing rational strategies for interventions to maintain appropriate immunity while reducing immunopathology.

  13. GC-directed control improves refining

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, G.F. )

    1991-02-01

    The increasing role of refinery product quality control is significant. Driven not only for meeting product specification and economic goals, refiners must also satisfy new purchaser demands. That is, the emphasis to monitor product quality on-line in an accurate, timely manner is greater now than ever, due largely to the expanding use of statistical methods (SQC/SPC) in analyzing and manipulating process operation. Consequently, the need for reliable composition control is essential in maintaining refinery prosperity. Process gas chromatographs are frequently used to monitor the performance of distillation, absorption and stripping towers by providing near-real-time stream composition, particular component concentration, or calculated parameter (Rvp, Btu content, etc.) information. This paper reports that appreciably greater benefit can be achieved when process gas chromatographs (or GCs) provide on-line feedback data to process control schemes.

  14. Experimental Analysis of Proton-Induced Displacement and Ionization Damage Using Gate-Controlled Lateral PNP Bipolar Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, D. R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Barnaby, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of proton-irradiated bipolar transistors are affected by ionization damage to the insulating oxide and displacement damage to the semiconductor bulk. While both types of damage degrade the transistor, it is important to understand the mechanisms individually and to be able to analyze them separately. In this paper, a method for analyzing the effects of ionization and displacement damage using gate-controlled lateral PNP bipolar junction transistors is described. This technique allows the effects of oxide charge, surface recombination velocity, and bulk traps to be measured independently.

  15. G6PD protects from oxidative damage and improves healthspan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega-Pereira, Sandrina; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Brioche, Thomas; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Flores, Juana M.; Viña, Jose; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly generated by cells and ROS-derived damage contributes to ageing. Protection against oxidative damage largely relies on the reductive power of NAPDH, whose levels are mostly determined by the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Here, we report a transgenic mouse model with moderate overexpression of human G6PD under its endogenous promoter. Importantly, G6PD-Tg mice have higher levels of NADPH, lower levels of ROS-derived damage, and better protection from ageing-associated functional decline, including extended median lifespan in females. The G6PD transgene has no effect on tumour development, even after combining with various tumour-prone genetic alterations. We conclude that a modest increase in G6PD activity is beneficial for healthspan through increased NADPH levels and protection from the deleterious effects of ROS. PMID:26976705

  16. A critical review of boiler controls for improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, A.

    1988-08-01

    Control of industrial equipment has improved with concerns for energy conservation and powerful low-cost microprocessors. These control system have been applied to boilers regardless of where they are used and their size. This paper addresses some critical issues and misconceptions about boiler controls. Combustion control is sometimes shown to be the primary control for a boiler and drum level control is included within the combustion control loops. But many important control loops are omitted, although they are related to combustion and boiler controls. In addition, literature is not cited on boiler control, which has over 60 years of history.

  17. Chlorophyllase 1, a Damage Control Enzyme, Affects the Balance between Defense Pathways in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kariola, Tarja; Brader, Günter; Li, Jing; Palva, E. Tapio

    2005-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is central to plant response to several pathogens. One of the sources of ROS is the chloroplast because of the photoactive nature of the chlorophylls. Chlorophyllase 1 (encoded by AtCLH1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is quickly induced after tissue damage (e.g., caused by the bacterial necrotroph Erwinia carotovora or the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola). RNA interference silencing of AtCLH1 resulted in failure to degrade free chlorophyll after tissue damage and in resistance to E. carotovora. Both inoculation with E. carotovora and exposure to high light caused elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in AtCLH1 silenced plants. This was accompanied by expression of marker genes for systemic acquired resistance and induction of antioxidant defenses. Interestingly, downregulation of AtCLH1 resulted in increased susceptibility to A. brassicicola, resistance to which requires jasmonate signaling. We propose that AtCLH1 is involved in plant damage control and can modulate the balance between different plant defense pathways. PMID:15598807

  18. Improved fluid control valve extends diaphragm life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Glashan, W. F.

    1965-01-01

    Wear resistance of flexible diaphragms in fluid control valves is increased by incorporating a soft rubber washer at the bottom of the piston, a flexible buffer between the diaphragm and the valve seat, and a fluid feedback arrangement. The stress and wear of components at the valve seat are minimized.

  19. Magnetic Bearing Controller Improvements for High Speed Flywheel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Timothy P.; Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Provenza, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetic bearing control system for a high-speed flywheel system is described. The flywheel utilizes a five axis active magnetic bearing system, using eddy current sensors for position feedback to the bearing controller. Magnetic bearing controller features designed to improve flywheel operation and testing are described. Operational improvements include feed forward control to compensate for rotor imbalance, moving notch filtering to compensate for synchronous and harmonic rotational noise, and fixed notching to prevent rotor bending mode excitation. Testing improvements include adding safe gain, bearing current hold, bearing current zero, and excitation input features. Performance and testing improvements provided by these features are measured and discussed.

  20. Fabrication of mitigation pits for improving laser damage resistance in dielectric mirrors by femtosecond laser machining

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Justin E.; Qiu, S. Roger; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20

    Femtosecond laser machining is used to create mitigation pits to stabilize nanosecond laser-induced damage in multilayer dielectric mirror coatings on BK7 substrates. In this paper, we characterize features and the artifacts associated with mitigation pits and further investigate the impact of pulse energy and pulse duration on pit quality and damage resistance. Our results show that these mitigation features can double the fluence-handling capability of large-aperture optical multilayer mirror coatings and further demonstrate that femtosecond laser macromachining is a promising means for fabricating mitigation geometry in multilayer coatings to increase mirror performance under high-power laser irradiation.

  1. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Management Controls...

  2. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management Controls...

  3. Interfacing brain with computer to improve communication and rehabilitation after brain damage.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Pichiorri, F; Schettini, F; Toppi, J; Risetti, M; Formisano, R; Molinari, M; Astolfi, L; Cincotti, F; Mattia, D

    2016-01-01

    Communication and control of the external environment can be provided via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) to replace a lost function in persons with severe diseases and little or no chance of recovery of motor abilities (ie, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, brainstem stroke). BCIs allow to intentionally modulate brain activity, to train specific brain functions, and to control prosthetic devices, and thus, this technology can also improve the outcome of rehabilitation programs in persons who have suffered from a central nervous system injury (ie, stroke leading to motor or cognitive impairment). Overall, the BCI researcher is challenged to interact with people with severe disabilities and professionals in the field of neurorehabilitation. This implies a deep understanding of the disabled condition on the one hand, and it requires extensive knowledge on the physiology and function of the human brain on the other. For these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach and the continuous involvement of BCI users in the design, development, and testing of new systems are desirable. In this chapter, we will focus on noninvasive EEG-based systems and their clinical applications, highlighting crucial issues to foster BCI translation outside laboratories to eventually become a technology usable in real-life realm. PMID:27590975

  4. Damage Control Plan for International Space Station Recharge Tank Assembly Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA has retired the Space Shuttle Program, a new method of transporting compressed gaseous nitrogen and oxygen needed to be created for delivery of these crucial life support resources to the International Space Station (ISS). One of the methods selected by NASA includes the use of highly pressurized, unprotected Recharge Tank Assemblies (RTAs) utilizing Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). A COPV consists of a thin liner wrapped with a fiber composite and resin or epoxy. It is typically lighter weight than an all metal pressure vessel of similar volume and therefore provides a higher-efficiency means for gas storage. However COPVs are known to be susceptible to damage resulting from handling, tool drop impacts, or impacts from other objects. As a result, a comprehensive Damage Control Plan has been established to mitigate damage to the RTA COPV throughout its life cycle. The DCP is intended to evaluate and mitigate defined threats during manufacturing, shipping and handling, test, assembly level integration, shipment while pressurized, launch vehicle integration and mission operations by defining credible threats and methods for preventing potential damage while still maintaining the primary goal of resupplying ISS gas resources. A comprehensive threat assessment is performed to identify all threats posed to the COPV during the different phases of its lifecycle. The threat assessment is then used as the basis for creating a series of general inspection, surveillance and reporting requirements which apply across all phases of the COPV's life, targeted requirements only applicable to specific work phases and a series of training courses for both ground personnel and crew aboard the ISS. A particularly important area of emphasis deals with creating DCP requirements for a highly pressurized, large and unprotected RTA COPV for use during Inter Vehicular Activities (IVA) operations in the micro gravity environment while supplying pressurized gas to the

  5. Air Traffic Control Improvement Using Prioritized CSMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    Version 7 simulations of the industry-standard network simulation software "OPNET" are presented of two applications of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast mode (ADS-B), over VHF Data Link mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for air traffic between just three cities. All aircraft are assumed to have the same equipage. The simulation involves Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations and 105 aircraft taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. All communication is modeled as unreliable. Collision-less, prioritized carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) is successfully tested. The statistics presented include latency, queue length, and packet loss. This research may show that a communications system simpler than the currently accepted standard envisioned may not only suffice, but also surpass performance of the standard at a lower cost of deployment.

  6. Blending Gyro Signals To Improve Control Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Interference by structural vibrations reduced by adding signals from spatially separated gyros. Technique involves blending signals from rate gyroscopes located at different parts of structure to obtain composite signal that more nearly represents rotation of entire structure. Aircraft vibrations perpendicular to pitch axis contribute to rotations sensed by pitch-rate gyros. Proper blending of signals from gyros suppress contribution of dominant vibrational mode. Most likely applications of concept are flight-control systems for aircraft.

  7. MWD can improve well safety, control

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, J.E.; Rao, M.V.

    1988-02-15

    Measuring while drilling (MWD) can help improve well safety and at the same time reduce trouble and total drilling costs. Detection of geologically overpressured zones with the technique is now commonplace, but virtually no advance has been made in the art of detection of influx of formation fluids into the wellbore. This third of five articles in a series describes the most recently available MWD techniques of pressure prediction and discusses the need for influx detection and possible means for realizing this in the future.

  8. Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

  9. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Christian E.; Gross, James J.; Turnbull, Oliver H.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty – defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal – did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered. PMID:24711799

  10. Reappraisal generation after acquired brain damage: The role of laterality and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Salas, Christian E; Gross, James J; Turnbull, Oliver H

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been growing interest in the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal. Findings suggest that reappraisal activates a set of areas in the left hemisphere (LH), which are commonly associated with language abilities and verbally mediated cognitive control. The main goal of this study was to investigate whether individuals with focal damage to the LH (n = 8) were more markedly impaired on a reappraisal generation task than individuals with right hemisphere lesions (RH, n = 8), and healthy controls (HC, n = 14). The reappraisal generation task consisted of a set of ten pictures from the IAPS, depicting negative events of different sorts. Participants were asked to quickly generate as many positive reinterpretations as possible for each picture. Two scores were derived from this task, namely difficulty and productivity. A second goal of this study was to explore which cognitive control processes were associated with performance on the reappraisal task. For this purpose, participants were assessed on several measures of cognitive control. Findings indicated that reappraisal difficulty - defined as the time taken to generate a first reappraisal - did not differ between LH and RH groups. However, differences were found between patients with brain injury (LH + RH) and HC, suggesting that brain damage in either hemisphere influences reappraisal difficulty. No differences in reappraisal productivity were found across groups, suggesting that neurological groups and HC are equally productive when time constraints are not considered. Finally, only two cognitive control processes inhibition and verbal fluency- were inversely associated with reappraisal difficulty. Implications for the neuroanatomical and neuropsychological bases of reappraisal generation are discussed, and implications for neuro-rehabilitation are considered.

  11. Controlled DNA double-strand break induction in mice reveals post-damage transcriptome stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongkyu; Sturgill, David; Tran, Andy D.; Sinclair, David A.; Oberdoerffer, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repair can cause extensive epigenetic changes. As a result, DSBs have been proposed to promote transcriptional and, ultimately, physiological dysfunction via both cell-intrinsic and cell-non-autonomous pathways. Studying the consequences of DSBs in higher organisms has, however, been hindered by a scarcity of tools for controlled DSB induction. Here, we describe a mouse model that allows for both tissue-specific and temporally controlled DSB formation at ∼140 defined genomic loci. Using this model, we show that DSBs promote a DNA damage signaling-dependent decrease in gene expression in primary cells specifically at break-bearing genes, which is reversed upon DSB repair. Importantly, we demonstrate that restoration of gene expression can occur independently of cell cycle progression, underlining its relevance for normal tissue maintenance. Consistent with this, we observe no evidence for persistent transcriptional repression in response to a multi-day course of continuous DSB formation and repair in mouse lymphocytes in vivo. Together, our findings reveal an unexpected capacity of primary cells to maintain transcriptome integrity in response to DSBs, pointing to a limited role for DNA damage as a mediator of cell-autonomous epigenetic dysfunction. PMID:26687720

  12. Advances in damage control resuscitation and surgery: implications on the organization of future military field forces.

    PubMed

    Tien, Homer; Beckett, Andrew; Garraway, Naisan; Talbot, Max; Pannell, Dylan; Alabbasi, Thamer

    2015-06-01

    Medical support to deployed field forces is increasingly becoming a shared responsibility among allied nations. National military medical planners face several key challenges, including fiscal restraints, raised expectations of standards of care in the field and a shortage of appropriately trained specialists. Even so, medical services are now in high demand, and the availability of medical support may become the limiting factor that determines how and where combat units can deploy. The influence of medical factors on operational decisions is therefore leading to an increasing requirement for multinational medical solutions. Nations must agree on the common standards that govern the care of the wounded. These standards will always need to take into account increased public expectations regarding the quality of care. The purpose of this article is to both review North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) policies that govern multinational medical missions and to discuss how recent scientific advances in prehospital battlefield care, damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery may inform how countries within NATO choose to organize and deploy their field forces in the future. PMID:26100784

  13. Advances in damage control resuscitation and surgery: implications on the organization of future military field forces.

    PubMed

    Tien, Homer; Beckett, Andrew; Garraway, Naisan; Talbot, Max; Pannell, Dylan; Alabbasi, Thamer

    2015-06-01

    Medical support to deployed field forces is increasingly becoming a shared responsibility among allied nations. National military medical planners face several key challenges, including fiscal restraints, raised expectations of standards of care in the field and a shortage of appropriately trained specialists. Even so, medical services are now in high demand, and the availability of medical support may become the limiting factor that determines how and where combat units can deploy. The influence of medical factors on operational decisions is therefore leading to an increasing requirement for multinational medical solutions. Nations must agree on the common standards that govern the care of the wounded. These standards will always need to take into account increased public expectations regarding the quality of care. The purpose of this article is to both review North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) policies that govern multinational medical missions and to discuss how recent scientific advances in prehospital battlefield care, damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery may inform how countries within NATO choose to organize and deploy their field forces in the future.

  14. Advances in damage control resuscitation and surgery: implications on the organization of future military field forces

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Col Homer; Beckett, Maj Andrew; Garraway, LCol Naisan; Talbot, LCol Max; Pannell, Capt Dylan; Alabbasi, Thamer

    2015-01-01

    Medical support to deployed field forces is increasingly becoming a shared responsibility among allied nations. National military medical planners face several key challenges, including fiscal restraints, raised expectations of standards of care in the field and a shortage of appropriately trained specialists. Even so, medical services are now in high demand, and the availability of medical support may become the limiting factor that determines how and where combat units can deploy. The influence of medical factors on operational decisions is therefore leading to an increasing requirement for multinational medical solutions. Nations must agree on the common standards that govern the care of the wounded. These standards will always need to take into account increased public expectations regarding the quality of care. The purpose of this article is to both review North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) policies that govern multinational medical missions and to discuss how recent scientific advances in prehospital battlefield care, damage control resuscitation and damage control surgery may inform how countries within NATO choose to organize and deploy their field forces in the future. PMID:26100784

  15. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  16. Towards an improved wind speed scale and damage description adapted for Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Bernold; Groenemeijer, Pieter; Dirksen, Erik; Hubrig, Martin; Holzer, Alois M.; Dotzek, Nikolai

    2011-06-01

    We propose an updated wind speed scale description adapted for Central Europe considering wind impact to buildings as well as to vegetation. The scale is motivated by the need of a broadly applicable, accurate and consistent tornado or downburst intensity rating system based on a standardised wind speed scale for the purpose of climatological homogeneity. The description comprises building and vegetation damage characteristics, which can be found in Central Europe - but similar in other parts of the world, occurring with the various classes of the Fujita- and T-scales. The scale description is supplemented by photographs of typical damage. For practical application, an ensemble-based use of a decision matrix for specific building structures and vegetation types is suggested.

  17. Citric acid improves lead (pb) phytoextraction in brassica napus L. by mitigating pb-induced morphological and biochemical damages.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Ali, Shafaqat; Hameed, Amjad; Farid, Mujahid; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Najeeb, Ullah; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is an environmentally friendly and a cost-effective strategy for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, lower bioavailability of some of the metals in polluted environments e.g. lead (Pb) is a major constraint of phytoextraction process that could be overcome by applying organic chelators. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to evaluate the role of citric acid (CA) in enhancing Pb phytoextraction. Brassica napus L. seedlings were grown in hydroponic media and exposed to various treatments of Pb (50 and 100 μM) as alone or in combination with CA (2.5mM) for six weeks. Pb-induced damage in B. napus toxicity was evident from elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 that significantly inhibited plant growth, biomass accumulation, leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters. Alternatively, CA application to Pb-stressed B. napus plants arrested lipid membrane damage by limiting MDA and H2O2 production and by improving antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, CA significantly increased the Pb accumulation in B. napus plants. The study concludes that CA has a potential to improve Pb phytoextraction without damaging plant growth. PMID:25164201

  18. Citric acid improves lead (pb) phytoextraction in brassica napus L. by mitigating pb-induced morphological and biochemical damages.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Ali, Shafaqat; Hameed, Amjad; Farid, Mujahid; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Najeeb, Ullah; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2014-11-01

    Phytoextraction is an environmentally friendly and a cost-effective strategy for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. However, lower bioavailability of some of the metals in polluted environments e.g. lead (Pb) is a major constraint of phytoextraction process that could be overcome by applying organic chelators. We conducted a glasshouse experiment to evaluate the role of citric acid (CA) in enhancing Pb phytoextraction. Brassica napus L. seedlings were grown in hydroponic media and exposed to various treatments of Pb (50 and 100 μM) as alone or in combination with CA (2.5mM) for six weeks. Pb-induced damage in B. napus toxicity was evident from elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 that significantly inhibited plant growth, biomass accumulation, leaf chlorophyll contents and gas exchange parameters. Alternatively, CA application to Pb-stressed B. napus plants arrested lipid membrane damage by limiting MDA and H2O2 production and by improving antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, CA significantly increased the Pb accumulation in B. napus plants. The study concludes that CA has a potential to improve Pb phytoextraction without damaging plant growth.

  19. Protein energy-malnutrition: does the in vitro zinc sulfate supplementation improve chromosomal damage repair?

    PubMed

    Padula, Gisel; González, Horacio F; Varea, Ana; Seoane, Analía I

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is originated by a cellular imbalance between nutrient/energy supply and body's demand. Induction of genetic damage by PEM was reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic effect of the in vitro zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) supplementation of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from children with PEM. Twenty-four samples from 12 children were analyzed. Anthropometric and biochemical diagnosis was made. For the anthropometric assessment, height-for-age index, weight-for-age index, and weight-for-height index were calculated (WHO, 2005). Micronutrient status was evaluated. A survey for assessed previous exposure to potentially genotoxic agents was applied. Results were statistically evaluated using paired sample t test and χ (2) test. Each sample was fractionated and cultured in two separate flasks to performed two treatments. One was added with 180 μg/dl of ZnSO4 (PEMs/ZnSO4) and the other remains non-supplemented (PEMs). Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage were assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). All participants have at least one type of malnutrition and none have anemia, nor iron, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiency. All PEMs/ZnSO4 samples have a significant reduction in the micronucleus (MNi) frequency compared with PEMs (t = 6.25685; p < 0.001). Nuclear division index (NDI) increase in PEMs/ZnSO4 (t = -17.4226; p < 0.001). Nucleoplasmic bridge (NPBs) frequency was four times smaller in PEMs/ZnSO4 (χ (2) = 40.82; p < 0.001). No nuclear buds (NBuds) were observed. Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage observed in children suffering from PEM can be repaired in vitro with zinc sulfate supplementation.

  20. Image Processing and control of a programmable spatial light modulator for optic damage protection

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Leach, R; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Matone, J; Heebner, J

    2010-12-06

    The heart of the National Ignition Facility is a megajoule-class laser system consisting of 192 beams used to drive inertial confinement fusion reactions. A recently installed system of programmable, liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulators adds the capability of arbitrarily shaping the spatial beam profiles in order to enhance operational flexibility. Its primary intended use is for introducing 'blocker' obscurations shadowing isolated flaws on downstream optical elements that would otherwise be damaged by high fluence laser illumination. Because an improperly shaped blocker pattern can lead to equipment damage, both the position and shape of the obscurations must be carefully verified prior to high-fluence operations. An automatic alignment algorithm is used to perform detection and estimation of the imposed blocker centroid positions compared to their intended locations. Furthermore, in order to minimize the spatially-varying nonlinear response of the device, a calibration of the local magnification is performed at multiple sub-image locations. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing of this device that helps to enhance the safety and longevity of the overall system.

  1. Summary of property damage control programs of the United States Department of Energy CY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, George P.; Maybee, Walter W.

    1980-10-01

    Calendar year 1979 was the second full year of operation of the Department of Energy. This report summarizes the loss experience in overall terms and itemizes facility and program achievements in property protection. Planned projects for CY 1980 are included and several subjects of interest to loss-control specialists are discussed in detail. Property damage from all causes was $2.5 million, of which $0.65 million was due to fire, the major cause of losses in both the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. Combined losses for the 2 full years of Department of Energy experience total over $20 million, of which over $13 million is due to fire. The fire loss ratio for 1979 was 0.13 cents for each $100 of property values at risk, more than an order-of-magnitude less than that expeienced by the better class of insured private property. Final decontamination and cleanup costs necessitated by a product spill at a solvent-refined coal pilot plant at the end of 1979 may exceed $2 million. Even including this estimate, the total loss from all causes (fire, explosion, mechanical or electrical damage, acts of nature, radioactive and non-radioactive contamination/cleanup costs, and a variety of miscellaneous causes), would yield a loss ratio of about 1 cent for each $100 of property. This indicated the overall property protection program is exemplary.

  2. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  3. Exploiting radiation damage control on apatite (U Th)/He dates in cratonic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, Rebecca M.

    2009-01-01

    Apatites from four pairs of samples of Precambrian basement from the western Canadian shield were analyzed by (U-Th)/He thermochronometry to test for the influence of radiation damage on apatite (U-Th)/He dates in this cratonic region. Recent studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of radiation damage increases the apatite He retentivity, so that apatites with a span of effective U concentrations, eU, that experienced the same thermal history may be characterized by a range of closure temperatures. In this investigation, each sample pair consisted of a mafic dike cross-cutting felsic gneisses from a single outcrop or nearby outcrops that contained apatites with a span of eU. The apatites yielded (U-Th)/He dates from 846 to 123 Ma, and were positively correlated with eU within each sample pair. These results can be explained using a model that tracks the evolution of He mobility in response to the accumulation of radiation damage. When coupled with regional geological constraints, the data appear to require partial to complete He loss due to burial and reheating in Phanerozoic time. New apatite fission- track dates and length data were obtained for five of these samples. The apatite fission- track dates are Proterozoic regardless of apatite eU. Thermal history simulations indicate that the apatite fission-track data are compatible with the (U-Th)/He results, although the thermal histories are not identical in detail and the fission-track results alone do not require Phanerozoic heating. Together the data are consistent with burial of this region by ≥ 1 km of Phanerozoic strata that were subsequently denuded, thus pointing toward significant Phanerozoic deposition in the North American cratonic interior hundreds of kilometers east of where previously documented. The results suggest that exploiting radiation damage control on apatite (U-Th)/He dates through investigation of surface sample apatites with a span of closure temperatures can impose tighter

  4. Ethyl Pyruvate Protects against Blood-Brain Barrier Damage and Improves Long-Term Neurological Outcomes in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Wang, Hailian; Pu, Hongjian; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Guohua; Hu, Xiaoming; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Gao, Yanqin

    2015-01-01

    Aims Many traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors sustain neurological disability and cognitive impairments due to the lack of defined therapies to reduce TBI-induced long-term brain damage. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown neuroprotection in several models of acute brain injury. The present study therefore investigated the potential beneficial effect of EP on long-term outcomes after TBI and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Male adult rats were subjected to unilateral controlled cortical impact injury. EP was injected intraperitoneally 15 min after TBI and again at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h after TBI. Neurological deficits, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and neuroinflammation were assessed. Results EP improved sensorimotor and cognitive functions and ameliorated brain tissue damage up to 28 d post-TBI. BBB breach and brain edema were attenuated by EP at 48 h after TBI. EP suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production from peripheral neutrophils and reduced the number of MMP-9-overproducing neutrophils in the spleen, and therefore mitigated MMP-9-mediated BBB breakdown. Moreover, EP exerted potent anti-inflammatory effects in cultured microglia and inhibited the elevation of inflammatory mediators in the brain after TBI. Conclusion EP confers long-term neuroprotection against TBI, possibly through breaking the vicious cycle among MMP-9-mediated BBB disruption, neuroinflammation and long-lasting brain damage. PMID:25533312

  5. GaAs 904-nm laser irradiation improves myofiber mass recovery during regeneration of skeletal muscle previously damaged by crotoxin.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucila H; Silva, Meiricris T; Gutierrez, Rita M; Conte, Talita C; Toledo, Cláudio A; Aoki, Marcelo S; Liebano, Richard E; Miyabara, Elen H

    2012-09-01

    This work investigated the effect of gallium arsenide (GaAs) irradiation (power: 5 mW; intensity: 77.14 mW/cm(2), spot: 0.07 cm(2)) on regenerating skeletal muscles damaged by crotoxin (CTX). Male C57Bl6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 5 each): control, treated only with laser at doses of 1.5 J or 3 J, CTX-injured and, CTX-injured and treated with laser at doses of 1.5 J or 3 J. The injured groups received a CTX injection into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. After 3 days, TA muscles were submitted to GaAs irradiation at doses of 1.5 or 3 J (once a day, during 5 days) and were killed on the eighth day. Muscle histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) in order to determine the myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA), the previously injured muscle area (PIMA) and the area density of connective tissue. The gene expression of MyoD and myogenin was detected by real-time PCR. GaAs laser at a dose of 3 J, but not 1.5 J, significantly increased the CSA of regenerating myofibers and reduced the PIMA and the area density of intramuscular connective tissue of CTX-injured muscles. MyoD gene expression increased in the injured group treated with GaAs laser at a dose of 1.5 J. The CTX-injured, 3-J GaAs laser-treated, and the CTX-injured and treated with 3-J laser groups showed an increase in myogenin gene expression when compared to the control group. Our results suggest that GaAs laser treatment at a dose of 3 J improves skeletal muscle regeneration by accelerating the recovery of myofiber mass.

  6. Tf-lipoplex-mediated c-Jun silencing improves neuronal survival following excitotoxic damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, A L C; Costa, P; de Almeida, L P; Simões, S; Plesnila, N; Culmsee, C; Wagner, E; de Lima, M C Pedroso

    2010-03-19

    Excitotoxicity is one of the main features responsible for neuronal cell death after acute brain injury and in several neurodegenerative disorders, for which only few therapeutic options are currently available. In this work, RNA interference was employed to identify and validate a potential target for successful treatment of excitotoxic brain injury, the transcription factor c-Jun. The nuclear translocation of c-Jun and its upregulation are early events following glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage in primary neuronal cultures. We present evidence for the efficient knockdown of this transcription factor using a non-viral vector consisting of cationic liposomes associated to transferrin (Tf-lipoplexes). Tf-lipoplexes were able to deliver anti-c-Jun siRNAs to neuronal cells in culture, resulting in efficient silencing of c-Jun mRNA and protein and in a significant decrease of cell death following glutamate-induced damage or oxygen-glucose deprivation. This formulation also leads to a significant c-Jun knockdown in the mouse hippocampus in vivo, resulting in the attenuation of both neuronal death and inflammation following kainic acid-mediated lesion of this region. Furthermore, a strong reduction of seizure activity and cytokine production was observed in animals treated with anti-c-Jun siRNAs. These findings demonstrate the efficient delivery of therapeutic siRNAs to the brain by Tf-lipoplexes and validate c-Jun as a promising therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disorders involving excitotoxic lesions. PMID:19913061

  7. The marriage of surgical simulation and telementoring for damage-control surgical training of operational first responders: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Tien, Homer; LaPorta, Anthony T.; Lavell, Kit; Keillor, Jocelyn; Wright Beatty, Heather E.; McKee, Jessica Lynn; Brien, Susan; Roberts, Derek J.; Wong, Jonathan; Ball, Chad G.; Beckett, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable posttraumatic death. Many such deaths may be potentially salvageable with remote damage-control surgical interventions. As recent innovations in information technology enable remote specialist support to point-of-care providers, advanced interventions, such as remote damage-control surgery, may be possible in remote settings. METHODS An anatomically realistic perfused surgical training mannequin with intrinsic fluid loss measurements (the “Cut Suit”) was used to study perihepatic packing with massive liver hemorrhage. The primary outcome was loss of simulated blood (water) during six stages, namely, incision, retraction, direction, identification, packing, and postpacking. Six fully credentialed surgeons performed the same task as 12 military medical technicians who were randomized to remotely telementored (RTM) (n = 7) or unmentored (UTM) (n=5) real-time guidance by a trauma surgeon. RESULTS There were no significant differences in fluid loss between the surgeons and the UTM group or between the UTM and RTM groups. However, when comparing the RTM group with the surgeons, there was significantly more total fluid loss (p = 0.001) and greater loss during the identification (p = 0.002), retraction (p = 0.035), direction (p = 0.014), and packing(p = 0.022) stages. There were no significant differences in fluid loss after packing between the groups despite differences in the number of sponges used; RTM group used more sponges than the surgeons and significantly more than the UTM group (p = 0.048). However, mentoring significantly increased self-assessed nonsurgeon procedural confidence (p = 0.004). CONCLUSION Perihepatic packing of an exsanguinating liver hemorrhage model was readily performed by military medical technicians after a focused briefing. While real-time telementoring did not improve fluid loss, it significantly increased nonsurgeon procedural confidence, which may augment the feasibility of the

  8. Damage control surgery in patient with delayed rupture of pseudoaneurysm after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Yong; Ju, Jae Kyun; Kim, Jung Chul

    2012-08-01

    Delayed rupture of post-traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the visceral arteries, especially the pancreaticoduodenal artery, is uncommon. Here, we describe a 55-year-old man hemorrhaging from a pseudoaneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (IPDA). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed active bleeding in the IPDA and large amounts of hemoperitoneum and hemoretroperitoneum. Selective mesenteric angiography showed that the pseudoaneurysm arose from the IPDA, and treatment by angioembolization failed because the involved artery was too tortuous to fit with a catheter. Damage control surgery with surgical ligation and pad packing was successfully performed. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and was discharged 19 days after the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of ruptured pseudoaneurysm of an IPDA after blunt abdominal trauma from Korea. PMID:22880189

  9. Bone maintenance and remodeling: a control system based on fatigue damage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D

    1997-07-01

    This paper explores the relationship between damage, repair, and remodeling in compact bone. A model of microcrack growth is developed that takes account of recent findings on the behaviour of small fatigue cracks in other materials. This is combined with a simple model of a repair process, envisaged as a constant rate of decrease in crack length. The system that results is capable of achieving a stable and precise control of crack length without the need to measure it. This is very useful because it implies that bone does not require the complexities of crack-measuring transducers or active decision-making processes. A simple explanation is suggested for the presence of a "lazy zone" of remodeling equilibrium strains, and the limits of this zone are quantified. The model is developed through a necessarily simplified geometry and loading scheme but can be extended to provide a general solution applicable to in vivo conditions.

  10. Control of small mammal damage in the Alberta oil sands reclamation and afforestation program

    SciTech Connect

    Radvanyi, A.

    1980-12-01

    Open-pit mining procedures being conducted in the oil sands of northeast Alberta greatly disrupt many acres of the environment. The reclamation and afforestation program intended to restore the forest habitat encountered an unanticipated problem when a large percentage of young nursery-raised trees planted on a tailings pond dyke and on overburden dump sites were found to have been girdled by a population of meadow voles which had become established in the dense grass habitat created to stabilize steep sandy slopes of the spoil piles. The study monitored small mammal populations through a high, low, and a second high level commensurate with the 3- to 4-year population cycle of small mammals. A control technique utilizing grain treated with an anticoagulant rodenticide made available to the mice in poisoned bait feeder stations effectively reduced small mammal numbers to very low levels and reduced girdling damage from an average of 50% to 1-2%.

  11. Improved Process control of wood waste fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Process Control Solutions, Inc.

    2004-01-30

    This project's principal aim was the conceptual and feasibility stage development of improved process control methods for wood-waste-fired water-tube boilers operating in industrial manufacturing applications (primarily pulp and paper). The specific objectives put forth in the original project proposal were as follows: (1) fully characterize the wood-waste boiler control inter-relationships and constraints through data collection and analysis; (2) design an improved control architecture; (3) develop and test an appropriate control and optimization algorithm; and (4) develop and test a procedure for reproducing the approach and deriving the benefits on similar pulp and paper wood-waste boilers. Detailed tasks were developed supporting these objectives.

  12. Lectin from Crataeva tapia Bark Improves Tissue Damages and Plasma Hyperglycemia in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Amanda Alves; Araújo, Tiago Ferreira da Silva; da Fonseca, Caíque Silveira Martins; da Mota, Diógenes Luís; de Medeiros, Paloma Lys; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Correia, Maria Tereza dos Santos; Lima, Vera Lúcia de Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Crataeva tapia is a plant popularly used for diabetes treatment, in Brazil. Progressive decline in renal and hepatic functions has been described in patients with diabetes mellitus, and mortality rate is increased in patients with chronic liver and renal disease. This study aimed to evaluate whether Crataeva tapia bark lectin (CrataBL) improves hyperglycemia and renal and hepatic damage in diabetic mice. CrataBL was purified by ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose, and intraperitoneal administration of CrataBL to alloxan-induced diabetic mice at dose of 10 mg/Kg/day and 20 mg/Kg/day for 10 days significantly reduced serum glucose levels by 14.9% and 55.9%, respectively. Serum urea, creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were also significantly reduced after treatment with both doses of CrataBL. Furthermore, histological analysis of liver, kidney, and pancreas revealed an improvement in the tissue morphology upon treatment with CrataBL. The results suggest that CrataBL has a beneficial hypoglycemic activity and improves the renal and hepatic complications of diabetes. Therefore, this lectin may be a promising agent for the treatment of diabetes, and this might be the basis for its use in the folk medicine as an alternative treatment to manage diabetes-related complications such as hyperglycemia and tissue damage. PMID:24324521

  13. Improvement and extension of data from ATS-6 Solar Cell Radiation Damage Experiment (SCRDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhammer, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The ATS 6 solar cell radiation damage experiment data through 2 1/3 years of synchronous orbit operation are presented. Comparisons are made of the performances of the 13 different types of solar cell/cover configurations, including solar cell and cover thickness variations, base resistivity variation, new cover processes and materials, and the COMSAT violet cell. These performances are also compared to the performance of the LES 6 solar cell experiment, the ATS 6 main solar arrays, and laboratory spectrum electron irradiations. It is found that the cells of the ATS 6 experiment generally performed as expected through 6 to 9 months in orbit, but that at 2 1/3 years they were severely degraded in current. The short circuit current degradation after 2 1/3 years in orbit appears to exhibit an anomalous additional degradation of 5 to 9 percent over what was experienced in synchronous orbit operation.

  14. The bisphosphonate alendronate improves the damage associated with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, I; Daddaoua, A; López-Posadas, R; Nieto, A; Suárez, M D; Zarzuelo, A; Martínez-Augustin, O; de Medina, F Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates are drugs used successfully in the treatment of osteoporosis. They act inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase. This mechanism may also produce anti-inflammatory effects. The therapeutic activity of alendronate was tested in vivo using a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Experimental approach: The trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of colitis in the rat was used. Rats were treated orally with alendronate and its efficacy compared with that of oral sulphasalazine or vehicle, starting 2 h after colitis induction. The status of the animals was assessed 5 days later. Key results: Alendronate treatment (25 or 75 mg kg-1 day-1) resulted in a decrease in the colonic damage score and loss of body weight (at 25 mg kg-1 day-1 only). This was associated to a dramatic reduction in the mRNA levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). The magnitude of the beneficial effect was comparable to that of sulphasalazine (at a 6-20 fold higher dose). Thus sulphasalazine post-treatment reduced the mRNA levels of IL-1β/IL-1ra and MCP-1 to the same extent as alendronate and additionally lowered colonic alkaline phosphatase activity, but failed to affect body weight loss or colonic damage score. Alendronate failed to exert beneficial effects when administered intraperitoneally. Conclusions and Implications: Oral but not intraperitoneal alendronate significantly protected the colon in experimental rat colitis. Inflammatory bowel disease patients might benefit from exposure to oral alendronate. PMID:17375077

  15. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  16. Characterization of propagation and scattering via wavefield imaging for improved in situ imaging of damage in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2016-04-01

    Detection, localization, and characterization of impact damage in composites using in situ transducers are important objectives for the aerospace industry to both reduce maintenance costs and prevent failures. A network of piezoelectric transducers spatially distributed over an area of interest is one practical configuration for utilizing guided waves to accomplish these objectives. Detecting and localizing barely visible impact damage with such a sparse array has been demonstrated in prior work, and improvements in localization were demonstrated by incorporating fairly crude estimates of scattering patterns in the imaging algorithms. Here we obtain more estimates of scattering patterns from a simulated defect by employing baseline subtraction of wavefield data recorded in a circle centered at the scatterer. Scattering patterns are estimated from the wavefield residual signals before and after simulated damage is introduced and the estimated scattering patterns are then incorporated into sparse array imaging via the minimum variance imaging method. Images created with different scattering patterns are compared and the efficacy of the methodology is assessed.

  17. Genetic improvement of tomato by targeted control of fruit softening.

    PubMed

    Uluisik, Selman; Chapman, Natalie H; Smith, Rebecca; Poole, Mervin; Adams, Gary; Gillis, Richard B; Besong, Tabot M D; Sheldon, Judith; Stiegelmeyer, Suzy; Perez, Laura; Samsulrizal, Nurul; Wang, Duoduo; Fisk, Ian D; Yang, Ni; Baxter, Charles; Rickett, Daniel; Fray, Rupert; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Powell, Ann L T; Harding, Stephen E; Craigon, Jim; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fich, Eric A; Sun, Li; Domozych, David S; Fraser, Paul D; Tucker, Gregory A; Grierson, Don; Seymour, Graham B

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the rate of softening to extend shelf life was a key target for researchers engineering genetically modified (GM) tomatoes in the 1990s, but only modest improvements were achieved. Hybrids grown nowadays contain 'non-ripening mutations' that slow ripening and improve shelf life, but adversely affect flavor and color. We report substantial, targeted control of tomato softening, without affecting other aspects of ripening, by silencing a gene encoding a pectate lyase. PMID:27454737

  18. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-26

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  19. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  20. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technology is considered to be a key technology to reduce the maintenance cost and meanwhile ensure the operational safety of aircraft structures. It has gradually developed from theoretic and fundamental research to real-world engineering applications in recent decades. The problem of reliable damage monitoring under time-varying conditions is a main issue for the aerospace engineering applications of SHM technology. Among the existing SHM methods, Guided Wave (GW) and piezoelectric sensor-based SHM technique is a promising method due to its high damage sensitivity and long monitoring range. Nevertheless the reliability problem should be addressed. Several methods including environmental parameter compensation, baseline signal dependency reduction and data normalization, have been well studied but limitations remain. This paper proposes a damage propagation monitoring method based on an improved Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM). It can be used on-line without any structural mechanical model and a priori knowledge of damage and time-varying conditions. With this method, a baseline GMM is constructed first based on the GW features obtained under time-varying conditions when the structure under monitoring is in the healthy state. When a new GW feature is obtained during the on-line damage monitoring process, the GMM can be updated by an adaptive migration mechanism including dynamic learning and Gaussian components split-merge. The mixture probability distribution structure of the GMM and the number of Gaussian components can be optimized adaptively. Then an on-line GMM can be obtained. Finally, a best match based Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence is studied to measure the migration degree between the baseline GMM and the on-line GMM to reveal the weak cumulative changes of the damage propagation mixed in the time-varying influence. A wing spar of an aircraft is used to validate the proposed method. The results indicate that the crack

  1. Hybrid Automaton Based Controller Design for Damage Mitigation of Islanded Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sudipta

    Spurred by increasingly unpredictable weather, high penetration of renewable resources and a period of focused US government policy, it is widely expected that microgrids within the electric distribution system will show exponential growth in the coming decade. Microgrids comprise of power generation, delivery and consumption assets within restricted electrical boundaries and under contiguous control oversight that enables holistic management of these assets. Microgrids can be islanded and operated independent of a larger electric power network, and as such, a primary function of microgrids is to enhance the energy reliability of the underlying loads. In this work, we focus on naval shipboard power systems. Apart from being islanded, in the true sense, resiliency and damage mitigation are key considerations in the design and operation of these power systems. Islanded power systems encompass a rich diversity of discrete and continuous dynamic behavior in multiple time-scales. A high penetration of devices with power electronics interface, low inherent system inertia, and high density of switching devices can lead to rapid disturbance propagation and system failure without advanced damage mitigation strategies. Hybrid systems formalism incorporates continuous dynamics as well as discrete switching behavior into a modeling and control framework, thus allowing a complete system description while crystallizing concepts of safety into system design criteria. We build on existing work to enhance a Dynamic Mixed Integer Programming (DMIP) model of a power system that combines continuous time differential algebraic models with switching dynamics synthesized into mixed integer inequalities. We use this model to derive an optimal system reconfiguration strategy to prevent voltage collapse of a benchmark shipboard power system. However, this methodology is restricted by the computational complexity of dynamic programming and scalability of non-automated processes. To overcome

  2. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage: A Randomized, Double-Blind, and Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-11-01

    Although previous reports have linked DNA damage with both transmissions across generations as well as our own survival, it is unknown how to reverse the lesion. Based on the data from a Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial, this study aimed to assess the efficacy of folic acid supplementation (FAS) on DNA oxidative damage reversal.In this randomized clinical trial (RCT), a total of 450 participants were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups to receive folic acid (FA) 0.4 mg/day (low-FA), 0.8 mg/day (high-FA), or placebo (control) for 8 weeks. The urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and creatinine (Cr) concentration at pre- and post-FAS were measured with modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. A multivariate general linear model was applied to assess the individual effects of FAS and the joint effects between FAS and hypercholesterolemia on oxidative DNA damage improvement. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02235948.Of the 438 subjects that received FA fortification or placebo, the median (first quartile, third quartile) of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr for placebo, low-FA, and high-FA groups were 58.19 (43.90, 82.26), 53.51 (38.97, 72.74), 54.73 (39.58, 76.63) ng/mg at baseline and 57.77 (44.35, 81.33), 51.73 (38.20, 71.30), and 50.65 (37.64, 76.17) ng/mg at the 56th day, respectively. A significant decrease of urinary 8-OHdG was observed after 56 days FA fortification (P < 0.001). Compared with the placebo, after adjusting for some potential confounding factors, including the baseline urinary 8-OHdG/Cr, the urinary 8-OHdG/Cr concentration significantly decreased after 56 days FAS [β (95% confidence interval) = -0.88 (-1.62, -0.14) and P = 0.020 for low-FA; and β (95% confidence interval) = -2.68 (-3.42, -1.94) and P < 0.001 for high-FA] in a dose-response fashion (Ptrend < 0.001). Test of

  3. Tectonic control of the damaged areas by land subsidence: Ameca, Jalisco Mexico, a study case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Elguera, J.; Malagon, A.; Maciel, R.; Alatorre, M. A.; Perez, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Miocene to Quaternary Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), one of the largest mexican volcanic arcs built on the North America plate, covers about 1000 km along central Mexico from the Pacific ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. The structure of west-central Mexico is dominated by a complex assemblage of crustal blocks bounded by major tectonic structures of the TMVB. These are the NW-SE Tepic-Zacoalco, the N-S Colima, and the E-W Chapala grabens, which separate the Jalisco and Michoacan blocks from the stable North American plate. The three grabens join south of Guadalajara to form what has been long interpreted as an active triple junction. The Tepic-Zacoalco rift is composed of the eastern part of the Plan de Barrancas-Santa Rosa graben and by the Ameca and Zacoalco half-grabens. The Ameca city is located in the Ameca half-graben. From 80´s several houses and buildings (more than 300) have been affected by land subsidence for more than two decades. The damage area follows a specific pattern with NW trend which is similar to the regional faults. The land subsidence is associated with the water extraction. We suggest that the distribution of the damage area is controlled by the fault system in combination with the water extraction. Because of the Ameca half-graben has been affected by historical and present day earthquakes and considering the subsurface geology (sandstones, siltstone intercalated with conglomerates) sudden collapses can be expected.

  4. Open abdomen in gastrointestinal surgery: Which technique is the best for temporary closure during damage control?

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo A F; Barros, Emily Alves; de Carvalho, Sabrina Marques; Nascimento, Vinicius Pereira; Cruvinel Neto, José; Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the 3 main techniques of temporary closure of the abdominal cavity, vacuum assisted closure (vacuum-assisted closure therapy - VAC), Bogota bag and Barker technique, in damage control surgery. METHODS After systematic review of the literature, 33 articles were selected to compare the efficiency of the three procedures. Criteria such as cost, infections, capacity of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, diseases associated with the technique, among others were analyzed. RESULTS The Bogota bag and Barker techniques present as advantage the availability of material and low cost, what is not observed in the VAC procedure. The VAC technique is the most efficient, not only because it reduces the tension on the boarders of the lesion, but also removes stagnant fluids and debris and acts at cellular level increasing cell proliferation and division. Bogota bag presents the higher rates of skin laceration and evisceration, greater need for a stent for draining fluids and wash-ups, higher rates of intestinal adhesion to the abdominal wall. The Barker technique presents lack of efficiency in closing the abdominal wall and difficulty on maintaining pressure on the dressing. The VAC dressing can generate irritation and dermatitis when the drape is applied, in addition to pain, infection and bleeding, as well as toxic shock syndrome, anaerobic sepsis and thrombosis. CONCLUSION The VAC technique, showed to be superior allowing a better control of liquid on the third space, avoiding complications such as fistula with small mortality, low infection rate, and easier capability on primary closure of the abdominal cavity.

  5. Control of Trx1 redox state modulates protection against methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage via stabilization of p21.

    PubMed

    Gu, Li; Gao, Wei; Yang, Hui Min; Wang, Bei Bei; Wang, Xiao Na; Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) is known to play an important role in protecting against cell death. However, the mechanism for control of Trx1 in cell death resulting from DNA damage has not been fully investigated. In this study, we used the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) to investigate the protective effects of Trx1 against DNA damage and cell death in HEK293 cells. We found that MMS application caused dose-dependent changes in the Trx1 redox state determined by redox western blotting. At lower concentrations, both reduced and oxidized Trx1 were observed, whereas the reduced band was fully oxidized at the higher concentration. Trx1 overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown in cells revealed that reduced Trx1 after exposure to lower doses of MMS attenuated DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, and level of the DNA-damage marker histone γ-H2AX, possibly through scavenging intracellular ROS and an increase in p21 protein level via enhancing its stability. However, oxidized Trx1 lost its protective ability to DNA damage in response to higher concentration of MMS. Corresponding to the redox state control of Trx1, cell death induced by different dose of MMS was also found, by inhibiting phosphorylations of p38 and 4E-BP1. These results indicate that reduced Trx1 plays important protective roles against MMS-induced DNA damage and cell death, suggesting that cell protection is regulated by the intracellular redox state. Control of the redox state of Trx1 and its regulating proteins may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the control of cancer.

  6. Targeting Chk2 improves gastric cancer chemotherapy by impairing DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-González, A; Belda-Iniesta, C; Bargiela-Iparraguirre, J; Dominguez, G; García Alfonso, P; Perona, R; Sanchez-Perez, I

    2013-03-01

    Our results demonstrate that the addition of cisplatin after paclitaxel-induced mitotic arrest was more effective than individual treatment on gastric adenocarcinoma cells (MKN45). However, the treatment did not induce benefits in cells derived from lymph node metastasis (ST2957). Time-lapse microscopy revealed that cell death was caused by mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis induction, as the use of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk decreased cell death. We propose that the molecular mechanism mediating this cell fate is a slippage suffered by these cells, given that our Western blot (WB) analysis revealed premature cyclin B degradation. This resulted in the cell exiting from mitosis without undergoing DNA damage repair, as demonstrated by the strong phosphorylation of H2AX. A comet assay indicated that DNA repair was impaired, and Western blotting showed that the Chk2 protein was degraded after sequential treatment (paclitaxel-cisplatin). Based on these results, the modulation of cell death during mitosis may be an effective strategy for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:23271172

  7. Controllable Solid Propulsion Combustion and Acoustic Knowledge Base Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCauley, Rachel; Fischbach, Sean; Fredrick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Controllable solid propulsion systems have distinctive combustion and acoustic environments that require enhanced testing and analysis techniques to progress this new technology from development to production. In a hot gas valve actuating system, the movement of the pintle through the hot gas exhibits complex acoustic disturbances and flow characteristics that can amplify induced pressure loads that can damage or detonate the rocket motor. The geometry of a controllable solid propulsion gas chamber can set up unique unsteady flow which can feed acoustic oscillations patterns that require characterization. Research in this area aids in the understanding of how best to design, test, and analyze future controllable solid rocket motors using the lessons learned from past government programs as well as university research and testing. This survey paper will give the reader a better understanding of the potentially amplifying affects propagated by a controllable solid rocket motor system and the knowledge of the tools current available to address these acoustic disturbances in a preliminary design. Finally the paper will supply lessons learned from past experiences which will allow the reader to come away with understanding of what steps need to be taken when developing a controllable solid rocket propulsion system. The focus of this survey will be on testing and analysis work published by solid rocket programs and from combustion and acoustic books, conference papers, journal articles, and additionally from subject matter experts dealing currently with controllable solid rocket acoustic analysis.

  8. EUFODOS: European Forest Downstream Services - Improved Information on Forest Structure and Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmugl, M.; Gallaun, H.; Wack, R.; Granica, K.; Schardt, M.

    2013-05-01

    Forests play a key role in the European economy and environment. This role incorporates ecological functions which can be affected by the occurrence of insect infestations, forest fire, heavy snowfall or windfall events. Local or Regional Authorities (LRAs) thus require detailed information on the degradation status of their forests to be able to take appropriate measures for their forest management plans. In the EUFODOS project, state-of-the-art satellite and laser scanning technologies are used to provide forest authorities with cost-effective and comprehensive information on forest structure and damage. One of the six test sites is located in the Austrian province of Styria where regional forest authorities have expressed a strong need for detailed forest parameters in protective forest. As airborne laser-scanning data is available, it will be utilized to derive detailed forest parameters such as the upper forest border line, tree height, growth classes, forest density, vertical structure or volume. At the current project status, the results of (i) the forest border line, (ii) the segmentation of forest stands and (iii) the tree top detection are available and presented including accuracy assessment and interim results are shown for timber volume estimations. The final results show that the forest border can be mapped operationally with an overall accuracy of almost 99% from LiDAR data. For the segmentation of forest stands, a comparison of the automatically derived result with visual-manual delineation showed in general a more detailed segmentation result, but for all visual-manual segments a congruence of 87% within a 4 m buffer. Tree top detections were compared to stem numbers estimated based on angle-count samplings in a field campaign, which led to a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.79.

  9. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  10. Temporary vascular shunt for damage control of extremity vascular injury: A toolbox for trauma surgeons.

    PubMed

    Hornez, E; Boddaert, G; Ngabou, U D; Aguir, S; Baudoin, Y; Mocellin, N; Bonnet, S

    2015-12-01

    In an emergency, a general surgeon may be faced with the need to treat arterial trauma of the extremities when specialized vascular surgery is not available in their hospital setting, either because an arterial lesion was not diagnosed during pre-admission triage, or because of iatrogenic arterial injury. The need for urgent control of hemorrhage and limb ischemia may contra-indicate immediate transfer to a hospital with a specialized vascular surgery service. For a non-specialized surgeon, hemostasis and revascularization rely largely on damage control techniques and the use of temporary vascular shunts (TVS). Insertion of a TVS is indicated for vascular injuries involving the proximal portion of extremity vessels, while hemorrhage from distal arterial injuries can be treated with simple arterial ligature. Proximal and distal control of the injured vessel must be obtained, followed by proximal and distal Fogarty catheter thrombectomy and lavage with heparinized saline. The diameter of the TVS should be closely approximated to that of the artery; use of an oversized TVS may result in intimal tears. Systematic performance of decompressive fasciotomy is recommended in order to prevent compartment syndrome. In the immediate postoperative period, the need for systematic use of anticoagulant or anti-aggregant medications has not been demonstrated. The patient should be transferred to a specialized center for vascular surgery as soon as possible. The interval before definitive revascularization depends on the overall condition of the patient. The long-term limb conservation results after placement of a TVS are identical to those obtained when initial revascularization is performed.

  11. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control: A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    The main objectives of this Program Project is to develop strategy and technology for the study of gene structure, organization and function in a multi-disciplinary, highly coordinated manner. In Project I, Molecular Cytology, the establishment of all instrumentation for the computerized microscopic imaging system (CMIS) has been completed with the software in place, including measurement of the third dimension (along the Z-axis). The technique is now at hand to measure single copy DNA in the nucleus, single copy mRNA in the cell, and finally, we are in the process of developing mathematical approaches for the analysis of the relative spatial 3-D relationship among the chromosomes and the individual genes in the interphasal nucleus. Also, we have a sensitive and reliable method for measuring single-stranded DNA breaks which will be useful for the determination of damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation. In Project II, the mapping of restriction fragments by 2-D enzymatic and electrophoretic analysis has been perfected for application. In Project III, a major finding is that the binding constant and effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotide analogues, Matagen, can be significantly improved by substituting 2{prime}-O-methylribos methylphosphonate backbones for the current 2{prime}-deoxyribomethylphosphonate backbones. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Interhemispheric and Intrahemispheric Control of Emotion: A Focus on Unilateral Brain Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borod, Joan C.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses neocortical contributions to emotional processing. Examines parameters critical to neuropsychological study of emotion: interhemispheric and intrahemispheric factors, processing mode, and communication channel. Describes neuropsychological theories of emotion. Reviews studies of right-brain-damaged, left-brain-damaged, and normal adults,…

  13. A directed-overflow and damage-control N -glycosidase in riboflavin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Frelin, Océane; Huang, Lili; Hasnain, Ghulam; Jeffryes, James G.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Rocca, James R.; Wang, Bing; Rice, Jennifer; Roje, Sanja; Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Gregory, Jesse F.; Edison, Arthur S.; Henry, Christopher  S.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2015-02-15

    Plants and bacteria synthesize the essential human micronutrient riboflavin (vitamin B2) via the same multistep pathway. The early intermediates of this pathway are notoriously reactive, and may be overproduced in vivo because riboflavin biosynthesis enzymes lack feedback controls. Here we demonstrate disposal of riboflavin intermediates by COG3236 (DUF1768), a protein of previously unknown function that is fused to two different riboflavin pathway enzymes in plants and bacteria (RIBR and RibA, respectively). We present cheminformatic, biochemical, genetic, and genomic evidence to show that: (i) plant and bacterial COG3236 proteins cleave the N-glycosidic bond of the first two intermediates of riboflavin biosynthesis, yielding relatively innocuous products; (ii) certain COG3236 proteins are in a multienzyme riboflavin biosynthesis complex that gives them privileged access to riboflavin intermediates; and (iii) COG3236 action in Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli helps maintain flavin levels. We find COG3236 proteins thus illustrate two emerging principles in chemical biology: directed overflow metabolism, in which excess flux is diverted out of a pathway, and the pre-emption of damage from reactive metabolites.

  14. Role of Damage Control Surgery in the Treatment of Hinchey III and IV Sigmoid Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; Cavaliere, Davide; Farinella, Eriberto; Renzi, Claudio; Cannata, Gaspare; Desiderio, Jacopo; Farinacci, Federico; Barberini, Francesco; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare; Fingerhut, Abe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Many of the treatment strategies for sigmoid diverticulitis are actually focusing on nonoperative and minimally invasive approaches. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the actual role of damage control surgery (DCS) in the treatment of generalized peritonitis caused by perforated sigmoid diverticulitis. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published from 1960 to July 2013. Comparative and noncomparative studies that included patients who underwent DCS for complicated diverticulitis were considered. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, duration of open abdomen, intensive care unit length of stay, reoperation, bowel resection performed at first operation, fecal diversion, method, and timing of closure of abdominal wall were the main outcomes of interest. According to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses algorithm for the literature search and review, 10 studies were included in this systematic review. DCS was exclusively performed in diverticulitis patients with septic shock or requiring vasopressors intraoperatively. Two surgical different approaches were highlighted: limited resection of the diseased colonic segment with or without stoma or reconstruction in situ, and laparoscopic washing and drainage without colonic resection. Despite the heterogeneity of patient groups, clinical settings, and interventions included in this review, DCS appears to be a promising strategy for the treatment of Hinchey III and IV diverticulitis, complicated by septic shock. A tailored approach to each patient seems to be appropriate. PMID:25437034

  15. A directed-overflow and damage-control N -glycosidase in riboflavin biosynthesis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frelin, Océane; Huang, Lili; Hasnain, Ghulam; Jeffryes, James G.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Rocca, James R.; Wang, Bing; Rice, Jennifer; Roje, Sanja; Yurgel, Svetlana N.; et al

    2015-02-15

    Plants and bacteria synthesize the essential human micronutrient riboflavin (vitamin B2) via the same multistep pathway. The early intermediates of this pathway are notoriously reactive, and may be overproduced in vivo because riboflavin biosynthesis enzymes lack feedback controls. Here we demonstrate disposal of riboflavin intermediates by COG3236 (DUF1768), a protein of previously unknown function that is fused to two different riboflavin pathway enzymes in plants and bacteria (RIBR and RibA, respectively). We present cheminformatic, biochemical, genetic, and genomic evidence to show that: (i) plant and bacterial COG3236 proteins cleave the N-glycosidic bond of the first two intermediates of riboflavin biosynthesis,more » yielding relatively innocuous products; (ii) certain COG3236 proteins are in a multienzyme riboflavin biosynthesis complex that gives them privileged access to riboflavin intermediates; and (iii) COG3236 action in Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli helps maintain flavin levels. We find COG3236 proteins thus illustrate two emerging principles in chemical biology: directed overflow metabolism, in which excess flux is diverted out of a pathway, and the pre-emption of damage from reactive metabolites.« less

  16. Growth control switch by a DNA-damage-inducible toxin-antitoxin system in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Clare L; Martins, Daniel; Redder, Peter; Frandi, Antonio; Mignolet, Johann; Chapalay, Julien Bortoli; Chambon, Marc; Turcatti, Gerardo; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems (TASs) are thought to respond to various stresses, often inducing growth-arrested (persistent) sub-populations of cells whose housekeeping functions are inhibited. Many such TASs induce this effect through the translation-dependent RNA cleavage (RNase) activity of their toxins, which are held in check by their cognate antitoxins in the absence of stress. However, it is not always clear whether specific mRNA targets of orthologous RNase toxins are responsible for their phenotypic effect, which has made it difficult to accurately place the multitude of TASs within cellular and adaptive regulatory networks. Here, we show that the TAS HigBA of Caulobacter crescentus can promote and inhibit bacterial growth dependent on the dosage of HigB, a toxin regulated by the DNA damage (SOS) repressor LexA in addition to its antitoxin HigA, and the target selectivity of HigB's mRNA cleavage activity. HigB reduced the expression of an efflux pump that is toxic to a polarity control mutant, cripples the growth of cells lacking LexA, and targets the cell cycle circuitry. Thus, TASs can have outcome switching activity in bacterial adaptive (stress) and systemic (cell cycle) networks. PMID:27572440

  17. Structural damage to meiotic chromosomes impairs DNA recombination and checkpoint control in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Höög, Christer

    2006-05-22

    Meiosis in human oocytes is a highly error-prone process with profound effects on germ cell and embryo development. The synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3) transiently supports the structural organization of the meiotic chromosome axis. Offspring derived from murine Sycp3(-)(/)(-) females die in utero as a result of aneuploidy. We studied the nature of the proximal chromosomal defects that give rise to aneuploidy in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes and how these errors evade meiotic quality control mechanisms. We show that DNA double-stranded breaks are inefficiently repaired in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes, thereby generating a temporal spectrum of recombination errors. This is indicated by a strong residual gammaH2AX labeling retained at late meiotic stages in mutant oocytes and an increased persistence of recombination-related proteins associated with meiotic chromosomes. Although a majority of the mutant oocytes are rapidly eliminated at early postnatal development, a subset with a small number of unfinished crossovers evades the DNA damage checkpoint, resulting in the formation of aneuploid gametes. PMID:16717125

  18. A directed-overflow and damage-control N-glycosidase in riboflavin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Frelin, Océane; Huang, Lili; Hasnain, Ghulam; Jeffryes, James G; Ziemak, Michael J; Rocca, James R; Wang, Bing; Rice, Jennifer; Roje, Sanja; Yurgel, Svetlana N; Gregory, Jesse F; Edison, Arthur S; Henry, Christopher S; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D

    2015-02-15

    Plants and bacteria synthesize the essential human micronutrient riboflavin (vitamin B2) via the same multi-step pathway. The early intermediates of this pathway are notoriously reactive and may be overproduced in vivo because riboflavin biosynthesis enzymes lack feedback controls. In the present paper, we demonstrate disposal of riboflavin intermediates by COG3236 (DUF1768), a protein of previously unknown function that is fused to two different riboflavin pathway enzymes in plants and bacteria (RIBR and RibA respectively). We present cheminformatic, biochemical, genetic and genomic evidence to show that: (i) plant and bacterial COG3236 proteins cleave the N-glycosidic bond of the first two intermediates of riboflavin biosynthesis, yielding relatively innocuous products; (ii) certain COG3236 proteins are in a multi-enzyme riboflavin biosynthesis complex that gives them privileged access to riboflavin intermediates; and (iii) COG3236 action in Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli helps maintain flavin levels. COG3236 proteins thus illustrate two emerging principles in chemical biology: directed overflow metabolism, in which excess flux is diverted out of a pathway, and the pre-emption of damage from reactive metabolites. PMID:25431972

  19. A directed-overflow and damage-control N-glycosidase in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Frelin, Océane; Huang, Lili; Hasnain, Ghulam; Jeffryes, James G.; Ziemak, Michael J.; Rocca, James R.; Wang, Bing; Rice, Jennifer; Roje, Sanja; Yurgel, Svetlana N.; Gregory, Jesse F.; Edison, Arthur S.; Henry, Christopher S.; deCrécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Plants and bacteria synthesize the essential human micronutrient riboflavin (vitamin B2) via the same multistep pathway. The early intermediates of this pathway are notoriously reactive, and may be overproduced in vivo because riboflavin biosynthesis enzymes lack feedback controls. Here we demonstrate disposal of riboflavin intermediates by COG3236 (DUF1768), a protein of previously unknown function that is fused to two different riboflavin pathway enzymes in plants and bacteria (RIBR and RibA, respectively). We present cheminformatic, biochemical, genetic, and genomic evidence to show that: (i) plant and bacterial COG3236 proteins cleave the N-glycosidic bond of the first two intermediates of riboflavin biosynthesis, yielding relatively innocuous products; (ii) certain COG3236 proteins are in a multienzyme riboflavin biosynthesis complex that gives them privileged access to riboflavin intermediates; and (iii) COG3236 action in Arabidopsis thaliana and Escherichia coli helps maintain flavin levels. COG3236 proteins thus illustrate two emerging principles in chemical biology: directed overflow metabolism, in which excess flux is diverted out of a pathway, and the pre-emption of damage from reactive metabolites. PMID:25431972

  20. APC/CCdh1 controls CtIP stability during the cell cycle and in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Lafranchi, Lorenzo; de Boer, Harmen R; de Vries, Elisabeth GE; Ong, Shao-En; Sartori, Alessandro A; van Vugt, Marcel ATM

    2014-01-01

    Human cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms for responding to DNA damage to maintain genome stability and prevent carcinogenesis. For instance, the cell cycle can be arrested at different stages to allow time for DNA repair. The APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase mainly regulates mitotic exit but is also implicated in the DNA damage-induced G2 arrest. However, it is currently unknown whether APC/CCdh1 also contributes to DNA repair. Here, we show that Cdh1 depletion causes increased levels of genomic instability and enhanced sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Using an integrated proteomics and bioinformatics approach, we identify CtIP, a DNA-end resection factor, as a novel APC/CCdh1 target. CtIP interacts with Cdh1 through a conserved KEN box, mutation of which impedes ubiquitylation and downregulation of CtIP both during G1 and after DNA damage in G2. Finally, we find that abrogating the CtIP–Cdh1 interaction results in delayed CtIP clearance from DNA damage foci, increased DNA-end resection, and reduced homologous recombination efficiency. Combined, our results highlight the impact of APC/CCdh1 on the maintenance of genome integrity and show that this is, at least partially, achieved by controlling CtIP stability in a cell cycle- and DNA damage-dependent manner. PMID:25349192

  1. Triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise improves session volume load and reduces muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen P; Mabon, Tom; Pryde, Mitchell; Feebrey, Sarah; Cannon, Jack

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that triphasic multinutrient supplementation during acute resistance exercise would enhance muscular performance, produce a more favorable anabolic profile, and reduce biochemical markers of muscle damage in strength-trained athletes. Fifteen male strength-trained athletes completed two acute lower-body resistance exercise sessions to fatigue 7 days apart. After a 4-hour fast, participants consumed either a multinutrient supplement (Musashi 1-2-3 Step System, Notting Hill, Australia) (SUPP) or placebo (PLA) beverage preexercise (PRE), during (DUR), and immediately postexercise (IP). Session volume loads were calculated as kilograms × repetitions. Lower-body peak power was measured using unloaded repeated countermovement jumps, and blood samples were collected to assess biochemistry, serum hormones, and muscle damage markers at PRE, DUR, IP, 30 minutes postexercise (P30), and 24 hours postexercise (P24h). The SUPP demonstrated increased glucose concentrations at DUR and IP compared with at PRE (P < .01), whereas PLA demonstrated higher glucose at P30 compared with at PRE (P < .001). Session volume load was higher for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). Cortisol increased at DUR, IP, and P30 compared with at PRE in both treatments (P < .05); however, SUPP also displayed lower cortisol at P24h compared with at PRE and PLA (P < .01). The total testosterone response to exercise was higher for PLA compared with SUPP (P < .01); however, total creatine kinase and C-reactive protein responses to exercise were lower for SUPP compared with PLA (P < .05). These data indicate that although triphasic multinutrient supplementation did not produce a more favorable anabolic profile, it improved acute resistance exercise performance while attenuating muscle damage in strength-trained athletes.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen can induce neuroplasticity and improve cognitive functions of patients suffering from anoxic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Hadanny, A.; Golan, H.; Fishlev, G.; Bechor, Y.; Volkov, O.; Suzin, G.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Efrati, S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Cognitive impairment may occur in 42–50% of cardiac arrest survivors. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) has recently been shown to have neurotherapeutic effects in patients suffering from chronic cognitive impairments (CCI) consequent to stroke and mild traumatic brain injury. The objective of this study was to assess the neurotherapeutic effect of HBO2 in patients suffering from CCI due to cardiac arrest. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with CCI caused by cardiac arrest, treated with 60 daily sessions of HBO2. Evaluation included objective computerized cognitive tests (NeuroTrax), Activity of Daily Living (ADL) and Quality of life questionnaires. The results of these tests were compared with changes in brain activity as assessed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain imaging. Results: The study included 11 cases of CCI patients. Patients were treated with HBO2, 0.5–7.5 years (mean 2.6 ± 0.6 years) after the cardiac arrest. HBO2 was found to induce modest, but statistically significant improvement in memory, attention and executive function (mean scores) of 12% , 20% and 24% respectively. The clinical improvements were found to be well correlated with increased brain activity in relevant brain areas as assessed by computerized analysis of the SPECT imaging. Conclusions: Although further research is needed, the results demonstrate the beneficial effects of HBO2 on CCI in patients after cardiac arrest, even months to years after the acute event. PMID:26409406

  3. Use of controlled vocabularies to improve biomedical information retrieval tasks.

    PubMed

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Vishnyakova, Dina; Ruch, Patrick; Lovis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of biomedical vocabulary is a major obstacle for information retrieval in large biomedical collections. Therefore, using biomedical controlled vocabularies is crucial for managing these contents. We investigate the impact of query expansion based on controlled vocabularies to improve the effectiveness of two search engines. Our strategy relies on the enrichment of users' queries with additional terms, directly derived from such vocabularies applied to infectious diseases and chemical patents. We observed that query expansion based on pathogen names resulted in improvements of the top-precision of our first search engine, while the normalization of diseases degraded the top-precision. The expansion of chemical entities, which was performed on the second search engine, positively affected the mean average precision. We have shown that query expansion of some types of biomedical entities has a great potential to improve search effectiveness; therefore a fine-tuning of query expansion strategies could help improving the performances of search engines.

  4. Open abdomen in gastrointestinal surgery: Which technique is the best for temporary closure during damage control?

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Junior, Marcelo A F; Barros, Emily Alves; de Carvalho, Sabrina Marques; Nascimento, Vinicius Pereira; Cruvinel Neto, José; Fonseca, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the 3 main techniques of temporary closure of the abdominal cavity, vacuum assisted closure (vacuum-assisted closure therapy - VAC), Bogota bag and Barker technique, in damage control surgery. METHODS After systematic review of the literature, 33 articles were selected to compare the efficiency of the three procedures. Criteria such as cost, infections, capacity of reconstruction of the abdominal wall, diseases associated with the technique, among others were analyzed. RESULTS The Bogota bag and Barker techniques present as advantage the availability of material and low cost, what is not observed in the VAC procedure. The VAC technique is the most efficient, not only because it reduces the tension on the boarders of the lesion, but also removes stagnant fluids and debris and acts at cellular level increasing cell proliferation and division. Bogota bag presents the higher rates of skin laceration and evisceration, greater need for a stent for draining fluids and wash-ups, higher rates of intestinal adhesion to the abdominal wall. The Barker technique presents lack of efficiency in closing the abdominal wall and difficulty on maintaining pressure on the dressing. The VAC dressing can generate irritation and dermatitis when the drape is applied, in addition to pain, infection and bleeding, as well as toxic shock syndrome, anaerobic sepsis and thrombosis. CONCLUSION The VAC technique, showed to be superior allowing a better control of liquid on the third space, avoiding complications such as fistula with small mortality, low infection rate, and easier capability on primary closure of the abdominal cavity. PMID:27648164

  5. Antecedent conditions control carbon loss and downstream water quality from shallow, damaged peatlands.

    PubMed

    Grand-Clement, E; Luscombe, D J; Anderson, K; Gatis, N; Benaud, P; Brazier, R E

    2014-09-15

    Losses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from drained peatlands are of concern, due to the effects this has on the delivery of ecosystem services, and especially on the long-term store of carbon and the provision of drinking water. Most studies have looked at the effect of drainage in deep peat; comparatively, little is known about the behaviour of shallow, climatically marginal peatlands. This study examines water quality (DOC, Abs(400), pH, E4/E6 and C/C) during rainfall events from such environments in the south west UK, in order to both quantify DOC losses, and understand their potential for restoration. Water samples were taken over a 19 month period from a range of drains within two different experimental catchments in Exmoor National Park; data were analysed on an event basis. DOC concentrations ranging between 4 and 21 mg L(-1) are substantially lower than measurements in deep peat, but remain problematic for the water treatment process. Dryness plays a critical role in controlling DOC concentrations and water quality, as observed through spatial and seasonal differences. Long-term changes in depth to water table (30 days before the event) are likely to impact on DOC production, whereas discharge becomes the main control over DOC transport at the time scale of the rainfall/runoff event. The role of temperature during events is attributed to an increase in the diffusion of DOC, and therefore its transport. Humification ratios (E4/E6) consistently below 5 indicate a predominance of complex humic acids, but increased decomposition during warmer summer months leads to a comparatively higher losses of fulvic acids. This work represents a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of the behaviour and functioning of shallow damaged peatlands in climatically marginal locations. The findings also provide a sound baseline knowledge to support research into the effects of landscape restoration in the future. PMID:25010944

  6. Effects of Response Preparation on Developmental Improvements in Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz, Sarah; Stephanie, Davis; Luna, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Studies in adults indicate that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control, but it remains unclear whether preparation contributes to improvements in inhibitory control over the course of childhood and adolescence. In order to assess the role of response preparation in developmental improvements in inhibitory control, we parametrically manipulated the duration of the instruction period in an antisaccade (AS) task given to participants ages 8 to 31 years. Regressions showing a protracted development of AS performance were consistent with existing research, and two novel findings emerged. First, all participants showed improved performance with increased preparation time, indicating that response preparation is crucial to inhibitory control at all stages of development. Preparatory processes did not deteriorate at even the longest preparatory period, indicating that the youngest participants were able to sustain preparation at even the longest interval. Second, developmental trajectories did not differ for different preparatory period lengths, highlighting that the processes supporting response preparation continue to mature in tandem with improvements in AS performance. Our findings suggest that developmental improvements are not simply due to an inhibitory system that is faster to engage but may also reflect qualitative changes in the processes engaged during the preparatory period. PMID:20347061

  7. 48 CFR 1845.7209-3 - Loss, damage, or destruction of Government property while in contractor's possession or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Loss, damage, or destruction of Government property while in contractor's possession or control. 1845.7209-3 Section 1845.7209-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION...

  8. Sun and ski holidays improve vitamin D status, but are associated with high levels of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bibi; Wulf, Hans C; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Philipsen, Peter A; Thieden, Elisabeth; Olsen, Peter; Heydenreich, Jakob; Dadvand, Payam; Basagaña, Xavier; Liljendahl, Tove S; Harrison, Graham I; Segerbäck, Dan; Schmalwieser, Alois W; Young, Antony R; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Skin cancer is caused by solar UVR, which is also essential for vitamin D production. DNA damage (thymine dimers: T-T dimers) and vitamin D (25(OH)D) synthesis are both initiated by solar UVB. We aimed to investigate the simultaneous adverse and beneficial effects of solar UVB exposure in holidaymakers. Sun-seekers and skiers (n=71) were observed over 6 days through on-site monitoring, personal diary entries, and recording of personal UVB exposure doses with electronic dosimeters. Urine and blood samples were analyzed for T-T dimers and 25(OH)D, respectively. The volunteers had a statistically significant increase in vitamin D. There were strong associations between UVB exposure and post-holiday levels of T-T dimers and vitamin D, as well as between post-holiday T-T dimers and vitamin D. We conclude that UVB-induced vitamin D synthesis is associated with considerable DNA damage in the skin. These data, on two major health predictors, provide a basis for further field studies that may result in better understanding of the risks and benefits of "real life" solar exposure. However, vitamin D status can be improved more safely through the use of vitamin D dietary supplements.

  9. Evaluation of biological and biorational control tactics for suppression of Nantucket pine tip moth damage in Virginia pine Christmas trees.

    PubMed

    Philip, Michael M; Orr, David B; Hain, Fred P

    2005-04-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the potential of the egg parasitoid Trichogramma exiguum Pinto and Platner (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae), the newly registered insect growth regulator (IGR) tebufenozide (Confirm), and a modified spray technique (top whorl only pesticide application) for suppression of Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), damage in Virginia pine, Pinus virginiana Mill., Christmas trees. Augmentative releases of T. exiguum failed to increase parasitism levels in release plots compared with controls, and significant reduction in tip moth damage did not occur. High predation levels on released T. exiguum may have contributed to the failure of parasitoid augmentations. Whole-tree and top whorl tebufenozide treatments provided significantly greater damage control than corresponding applications of acephate (Orthene), a commonly used pesticide in Christmas trees. Damage to trees receiving whole-tree chemical applications did not differ significantly from trees receiving top whorl treatments for most measurements of damage. Top whorl chemical treatments resulted in a 67% reduction in time required for application and a 70% reduction in pesticide used.

  10. Progesterone Reduces Secondary Damage, Preserves White Matter, and Improves Locomotor Outcome after Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; González, Susana; Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Lima, Analía; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; De Nicola, Alejandro F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Progesterone is an anti-inflammatory and promyelinating agent after spinal cord injury, but its effectiveness on functional recovery is still controversial. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic progesterone administration on tissue preservation and functional recovery in a clinically relevant model of spinal cord lesion (thoracic contusion). Using magnetic resonance imaging, we observed that progesterone reduced both volume and rostrocaudal extension of the lesion at 60 days post-injury. In addition, progesterone increased the number of total mature oligodendrocytes, myelin basic protein immunoreactivity, and the number of axonal profiles at the epicenter of the lesion. Further, progesterone treatment significantly improved motor outcome as assessed using the Basso-Bresnahan-Beattie scale for locomotion and CatWalk gait analysis. These data suggest that progesterone could be considered a promising therapeutical candidate for spinal cord injury. PMID:24460450

  11. Redox-dependent regulation, redox control and oxidative damage in plant cells subjected to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    Stress development intricately involves uncontrolled redox reactions and oxidative damage to functional macromolecules. Three phases characterize progressing abiotic stress and the stress strength; in the first phase redox-dependent deregulation in metabolism, in the second phase detectable development of oxidative damage and in the third phase cell death. Each phase is characterized by traceable biochemical features and specific molecular responses that reflect on the one hand cell damage but on the other hand indicate specific regulation and redox signalling aiming at compensation of stress impact. PMID:20387040

  12. Development and applications of Krotov method of global control improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasina, Irina V.; Trushkova, Ekaterina A.; Baturina, Olga V.; Bulatov, Alexander V.; Guseva, Irina S.

    2016-06-01

    This is a survey of works on main properties, application and development of the Krotov method of global control improvement very popular among researchers of modern problems in quantum physics and quantum chemistry, applying actively optimal control methods. The survey includes a brief description of the method in comparison with well known gradient method demonstrating such its serious advantage as absence of tuning parameters; investigations aimed to make its special version for the quantum system well defined and more effective; and generalization for wide classes of control systems, including the systems of heterogeneous structure.

  13. Improved Steam Turbine Leakage Control with a Brush Seal Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Raymond E.; Pastrana, Ryan; Wolfe, Chris; Burnett, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents an improved steam turbine leakage control system with a brush seal design. The contents include: 1) Typical Design Characteristics; 2) Typical Brush Seal Locations; 3) Reduced Leakage Rates; 4) Performance Benefits; 5) System Considerations; 6) Rotor Dynamics; 7) Laboratory Tests and 8) Field Experience.

  14. Improved polyacrylamide treatments for water control in producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltoun, A.; Kohler, N. ); Guerrini, Y. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on two polyacrylamide processes for water control in producing wells which improve the efficiency of conventional polyacrylamide treatment without inducing any risk of well plugging by crosslinkers. Treatment of a gas-storage well strongly decreased water production without any adverse effect on gas injection or production for at least 3 years.

  15. Damage control surgery and casualty evacuation: techniques for surgeons, lessons for military medical planners.

    PubMed

    Parker, Paul J

    2006-12-01

    Damage Control Surgery (DCS) is a three-phase team-based approach to maximal injury penetrating abdominal trauma. In Phase I, the hypothermic, coagulopathic, acidotic, hypotensive casualty undergoes a proactively planned one-hour time limited laparotomy by an appropriately trained surgical trauma team. In phase II physiological stabilization takes place in the Intensive Care Unit. In phase III--definitive repair occurs. DCS is extremely resource intensive but will save lives on the battlefield. A military DCS patient will perioperatively require fourteen units of blood and seven units of fresh frozen plasma--half the blood stock of a light-scaled FST. Two DCS patients will in one day, exhaust this FSTs oxygen supply. We know that hypothermic patients with an iliac vascular injury (initial core temp < 34 degrees C) suffer four-fold increases in their mortality, yet we cannot heat our tents above 20 degrees C during a mild British winter. Our primary casualty retrieval is excessively slow. A simple casevac request has to go to too much 'middle-management' before a flight decision is made. In Vietnam, wounded soldiers arrived in hospital within twenty-five minutes of injury. In Iraq in 2005, that figure is over one hundred and ten minutes. We use support or anti-tank helicopters that are re-roled on an adhoc basis for the critical care and transport of our sickest patients. We still do not have a dedicated all-weather military helicopter evacuation fleet despite significant evidence that intensive care unit level military evacuation is safe and eminently achievable in both in the primary and secondary care setting. Should we not be asking why?

  16. Improving active space telescope wavefront control using predictive thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2015-01-01

    Active control algorithms for space telescopes are less mature than those for large ground telescopes due to differences in the wavefront control problems. Active wavefront control for space telescopes at L2, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), requires weighing control costs against the benefits of correcting wavefront perturbations that are a predictable byproduct of the observing schedule, which is known and determined in advance. To improve the control algorithms for these telescopes, we have developed a model that calculates the temperature and wavefront evolution during a hypothetical mission, assuming the dominant wavefront perturbations are due to changes in the spacecraft attitude with respect to the sun. Using this model, we show that the wavefront can be controlled passively by introducing scheduling constraints that limit the allowable attitudes for an observation based on the observation duration and the mean telescope temperature. We also describe the implementation of a predictive controller designed to prevent the wavefront error (WFE) from exceeding a desired threshold. This controller outperforms simpler algorithms even with substantial model error, achieving a lower WFE without requiring significantly more corrections. Consequently, predictive wavefront control based on known spacecraft attitude plans is a promising approach for JWST and other future active space observatories.

  17. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    PubMed

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased. PMID:27188144

  18. [Arm Motor Function Recovery during Rehabilitation with the Use of Hand Exoskeleton Controlled by Brain-Computer Interface: a Patient with Severe Brain Damage].

    PubMed

    Biryukova, E V; Pavlova, O G; Kurganskaya, M E; Bobrov, P D; Turbina, L G; Frolov, A A; Davydov, V I; Sil'tchenko, A V; Mokienko, O A

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of motor function recovery in a patient with severe brain damage in the course of neurorehabilitation using hand exoskeleton controlled by brain-computer interface. For estimating the motor function of paretic arm, we used the biomechanical analysis of movements registered during the course of rehabilitation. After 15 weekly sessions of hand exoskeleton control, the following results were obtained: a) the velocity profile of goal-directed movements of paretic hand became bell-shaped, b) the patient began to extend and abduct the hand which was flexed and adducted in the beginning of rehabilitation, and c) the patient began to supinate the forearm which was pronated in the beginning of rehabilitation. The first result is an evidence of the general improvement of the quality of motor control, while the second and third results prove that the spasticity of paretic arm has decreased.

  19. Multi-level overlay techniques for improving DPL overlay control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlie; Pai, Y. C.; Yu, Dennis; Pang, Peter; Yu, Chun Chi; Wu, Robert (Hsing-Chien); Huang, Eros (Chien Jen); Chen, Marson (Chiun-Chieh); Tien, David; Choi, Dongsub

    2012-03-01

    Overlay continues to be one of the key challenges for lithography in semiconductor manufacturing, especially in light of the accelerated pace of device node shrinks. This reality will be especially evident at 20nm node where DPL and multi-layer overlay will require 4nm or less in overlay control across many critical layers in order to meet device yield entitlements. The motivation for this paper is based on improving DPL overlay control in face of the high complexity involved with multi-layer overlay requirements. For example, the DPL-2nd-litho layer will need to achieve tight registration with the DPL-1st-litho layer, and at the same time, it will need to achieve tight overlay to the reference-litho layer, which in some cases can also be a DPL layer. Of course, multi-level overlay measurements are not new, but the combination of increased complexity of multi-DPL layers and extremely challenging overlay specifications for 20nm node together will necessitate a better understanding of multi-level overlay control, specifically in terms of root cause analysis of multi-layer related overlay errors and appropriate techniques for improvement In this paper, we start with the identification of specific overlay errors caused by multi-layer DPL processing on full film stack product wafers. After validation of these findings with inter-lot and intra-lot controlled experiments, we investigate different advanced control techniques to determine how to optimize overlay control and minimize both intra-lot and inter-lot sources of error. A new approach to overlay data analysis will also be introduced that combines empirical data with target image quality data to more accurately determine and better explain the root cause error mechanism as well as provide effective strategies for improved overlay control.

  20. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-Mee, Wipawee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai

    2014-01-01

    To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv). At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism. PMID:24672632

  1. Mangifera indica fruit extract improves memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-Mee, Wipawee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai

    2014-01-01

    To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg · kg(-1) BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv). At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg · kg(-1) BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  2. USP17- and SCFβTrCP--regulated degradation of DEC1 controls the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; D'Annibale, Sara; Magliozzi, Roberto; Low, Teck Yew; Jansen, Petra; Shaltiel, Indra A; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Medema, Rene H; Guardavaccaro, Daniele

    2014-11-15

    In response to genotoxic stress, DNA damage checkpoints maintain the integrity of the genome by delaying cell cycle progression to allow for DNA repair. Here we show that the degradation of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor DEC1, a critical regulator of cell fate and circadian rhythms, controls the DNA damage response. During unperturbed cell cycles, DEC1 is a highly unstable protein that is targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation by the SCF(βTrCP) ubiquitin ligase in cooperation with CK1. Upon DNA damage, DEC1 is rapidly induced in an ATM/ATR-dependent manner. DEC1 induction results from protein stabilization via a mechanism that requires the USP17 ubiquitin protease. USP17 binds and deubiquitylates DEC1, markedly extending its half-life. Subsequently, during checkpoint recovery, DEC1 proteolysis is reestablished through βTrCP-dependent ubiquitylation. Expression of a degradation-resistant DEC1 mutant prevents checkpoint recovery by inhibiting the downregulation of p53. These results indicate that the regulated degradation of DEC1 is a key factor controlling the DNA damage response.

  3. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  4. Instrumentation and control improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.J.; Planchon, H.P.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe instrumentation and control (I&C) system improvements at Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11). The improvements are focused on three objectives; to keep the reactor and balance of plant (BOP) I&C systems at a high level of reliability, to provide diagnostic systems that can provide accurate information needed for analysis of fuel performance, and to provide systems that will be prototypic of I&C systems of the next generation of liquid metal reactor (LMR) plants.

  5. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  6. Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors for Improved Wind Turbine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Mehul P. Patel; Srikanth Vasudevan; Robert C. Nelson; Thomas C. Corke

    2008-08-01

    Orbital Research Inc is developing an innovative Plasma Aerodynamic Control Effectors (PACE) technology for improved performance of wind turbines. The PACE system is aimed towards the design of "smart" rotor blades to enhance energy capture and reduce aerodynamic loading and noise using flow-control. The PACE system will provide ability to change aerodynamic loads and pitch distribution across the wind turbine blade without any moving surfaces. Additional benefits of the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that should translate into a substantially reduced initial cost. During the Phase I program, the ORI-UND Team demonstrated (proof-of-concept) performance improvements on select rotor blade designs using PACE concepts. Control of both 2-D and 3-D flows were demonstrated. An analytical study was conducted to estimate control requirements for the PACE system to maintain control during wind gusts. Finally, independent laboratory experiments were conducted to identify promising dielectric materials for the plasma actuator, and to examine environmental effects (water and dust) on the plasma actuator operation. The proposed PACE system will be capable of capturing additional energy, and reducing aerodynamic loading and noise on wind turbines. Supplementary benefits from the PACE system include reduced blade structure weight and complexity that translates into reduced initial capital costs.

  7. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Augustin; McFadden, Geoffrey B.; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Kohn, Kurt W.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage), the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1) that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase) is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation) and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression) arms of the circadian regulation and 2) that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage. PMID:26020938

  8. Colonic resection in the setting of damage control laparotomy: is delayed anastomosis safe?

    PubMed

    Miller, Preston R; Chang, Michael C; Hoth, J Jason; Holmes, James H; Meredith, J Wayne

    2007-06-01

    Based on a large body of literature concerning the subject, trauma surgeons are becoming more comfortable with anastomosis rather than stoma creation in patients with destructive colon injuries requiring resection. This literature was largely generated before the widespread acceptance of the importance of damage control laparotomy (DCL). Thus, when such injuries occur in patients initially left in colonic discontinuity after DCL, the question of anastomosis versus stoma becomes more difficult, and there are no data to guide management decisions. The goal of this report is to describe the results of our early experience with delayed anastomosis (DA) after destructive colon injury in the setting of DCL. We reviewed the records of patients with destructive colon injuries at our Level I trauma center over a 5.5-year period for demographics, injury characteristics, and outcome. Studied outcomes included anastomotic leak, intra-abdominal abscess, and colon injury-related death. The decision to proceed with DA was based on individual surgeon opinion at the time of re-exploration. From January 1, 2000 to July 31, 2006, 92 patients sustained colon injury, 55 of which required resection (31 blunt mechanism and 24 penetrating). Twenty-two resections occurred in the setting of DCL. Six of these patients underwent stoma creation and 11 underwent DA. Three died before reoperation, and two had an anastomosis created during the initial DCL. The remaining 33 resections occurred during initial definitive operation, and 21 underwent anastomosis, whereas 12 had a stoma created. Comparing the 11 patients undergoing DA with the 21 undergoing immediate anastomosis, the anastomotic leak rate (0% vs 5%), abscess rate (36% vs 24%), and colon related-death rate (9% vs 0%; all P > 0.05) were similar. Six patients undergoing DA had a right hemicolectomy with ileocolonic anastomosis, four had a segmental left colon resection, and one had a near total abdominal colectomy with ileosigmoid

  9. Controlled architecture for improved macromolecular memory within polymer networks.

    PubMed

    DiPasquale, Stephen A; Byrne, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    This brief review analyzes recent developments in the field of living/controlled polymerization and the potential of this technique for creating imprinted polymers with highly structured architecture with macromolecular memory. As a result, it is possible to engineer polymers at the molecular level with increased homogeneity relating to enhanced template binding and transport. Only recently has living/controlled polymerization been exploited to decrease heterogeneity and substantially improve the efficiency of the imprinting process for both highly and weakly crosslinked imprinted polymers. Living polymerization can be utilized to create imprinted networks that are vastly more efficient than similar polymers produced using conventional free radical polymerization, and these improvements increase the role that macromolecular memory can play in the design and engineering of new drug delivery and sensing platforms. PMID:27322505

  10. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  11. Improved Controller for a Three-Axis Piezoelectric Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Palmer, Dean

    2009-01-01

    An improved closed-loop controller has been built for a three-axis piezoelectric positioning stage. The stage can be any of a number of commercially available or custom-made units that are used for precise three-axis positioning of optics in astronomical instruments and could be used for precise positioning in diverse fields of endeavor that include adaptive optics, fabrication of semiconductors, and nanotechnology.

  12. Traffic improvement and transportation pollution control in Xiamen

    SciTech Connect

    Dongxing Yuan; Zilin, Wu

    1996-12-31

    in this paper, the urban traffic improvement and transportation control in Xiamen are highlighted. Xiamen is a port city and an economical special zone of China. As the economy grows, the transportation is developing dramatically and becoming the key for further economic development. The air quality is threatened by the rapid growth of the vehicles in the city. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The municipal government takes great effort to improve the traffic condition, as well as to reduce green house gases and protect air environment. Some management and technical measures are carried out. Those management measures are mainly as follows: (1) systematic planning of the city arrangement and city functional division, and integrated planning of the urban roads system, (2) putting great emphasis on tail gas monitoring and management, and (3) establishing optimized utilization of motor vehicles. Those included in the main technical measures are (1) making the roads clear, (2) enlarging traffic capacity, and (3) developing the public transport. The most urgent task in improving urban traffic is to establish a sound traffic system. The city municipal government and Transportation Management Bureau plan to make a series of reforms to improve the urban traffic condition, such as building high quality road around the city, reducing the number of one way roads and replacing gasoline buses with electric buses. An optimized traffic system of Xiamen, taking public transport as the main means, is the key to meet the needs of both traffic improvement and urban transportation pollution control.

  13. An improved method for the isolation of rat alveolar type II lung cells: Use in the Comet assay to determine DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is a cause of serious diseases, including lung cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and heart disease. DNA damage is thought to be one of the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke (CS) initiates disease in the lung. Indeed, CS induced DNA damage can be measured in vitro and in vivo. The potential of the Comet assay to measure DNA damage in isolated rat lung alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC II) was explored as a means to include a genotoxicity end-point in rodent sub-chronic inhalation studies. In this study, published AEC II isolation methods were improved to yield viable cells suitable for use in the Comet assay. The improved method reduced the level of basal DNA damage and DNA repair in isolated AEC II. CS induced DNA damage could also be quantified in isolated cells following a single or 5 days CS exposure. In conclusion, the Comet assay has the potential to determine CS or other aerosol induced DNA damage in AEC II isolated from rodents used in sub-chronic inhalation studies.

  14. New and future strategies to improve asthma control in children.

    PubMed

    Anderson, William C; Szefler, Stanley J

    2015-10-01

    Symptomatic asthma in childhood has lifelong effects on lung function and disease severity, emphasizing the need for improved pediatric asthma control. Control of pediatric risk and impairment domains can be achieved through increased medication adherence or new therapeutic strategies. Developing electronic monitoring device technology with reminders might be a key noninvasive resource to address poor adherence in children and adolescents in a clinical setting. In patients who have persistently poor control despite optimal medication compliance, newly emerging pharmaceuticals, including inhaled therapies and biologics, might be key to their treatment. However, barriers exist to their development in the pediatric population, and insights must be drawn from adult studies, which has its own unique limitations. Biomarkers to direct the use of such potentially expensive therapies to those patients most likely to benefit are imperative. In this review the current literature regarding strategies to improve pediatric asthma control is addressed with the goal of exploring the potential and pitfalls of strategies that might be available in the near future.

  15. Improved control and characterization of adjustable x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allured, Ryan; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Marquez, Vanessa; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul B.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Wallace, Margeaux L.

    2015-09-01

    We report on improvements in our efforts to control and characterize piezoelectrically adjustable, thin glass optics. In the past, an optical profilometer and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor have been used to measure influence functions for a at adjustable mirror. An electronics system has since been developed to control > 100 actuator cells and has been used in a full calibration of a high-yield at adjustable mirror. The calibrated influence functions have been used to induce a pre-determined figure change to the mirror, representing our first attempt at figure control of a full mirror. Furthermore, we have adapted our metrology systems for cylindrical optics, allowing characterization of Wolter-type mirrors. We plan to use this metrology to perform the first piezoelectric figure correction of a cylindrical mirror over the next year.

  16. Biological control of vaginosis to improve reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Mastromarino, P.; Hemalatha, R.; Barbonetti, A.; Cinque, B.; Cifone, M.G.; Tammaro, F.; Francavilla, F.

    2014-01-01

    The human vaginal microbiota plays an important role in the maintenance of a woman's health, as well as of her partner's and newborns’. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with ascending infections and obstetrical complications, such as chorioamnionitis and preterm delivery, as well as with urinary tract infections and sexually transmitted infections. In BV the overgrowth of anaerobes produces noxious substances like polyamines and other compounds that trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β and IL-8. BV can profoundly affect, with different mechanisms, all the phases of a woman's life in relation to reproduction, before pregnancy, during fertilization, through and at the end of pregnancy. BV can directly affect fertility, since an ascending dissemination of the involved species may lead to tubal factor infertility. Moreover, the increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases contributes to damage to reproductive health. Exogenous strains of lactobacilli have been suggested as a means of re-establishing a normal healthy vaginal flora. Carefully selected probiotic strains can eliminate BV and also exert an antiviral effect, thus reducing viral load and preventing foetal and neonatal infection. The administration of beneficial microorganisms (probiotics) can aid recovery from infection and restore and maintain a healthy vaginal ecosystem, thus improving female health also in relation to reproductive health. PMID:25673551

  17. Biological control of vaginosis to improve reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Mastromarino, P; Hemalatha, R; Barbonetti, A; Cinque, B; Cifone, M G; Tammaro, F; Francavilla, F

    2014-11-01

    The human vaginal microbiota plays an important role in the maintenance of a woman's health, as well as of her partner's and newborns'. When this predominantly Lactobacillus community is disrupted, decreased in abundance and replaced by different anaerobes, bacterial vaginosis (BV) may occur. BV is associated with ascending infections and obstetrical complications, such as chorioamnionitis and preterm delivery, as well as with urinary tract infections and sexually transmitted infections. In BV the overgrowth of anaerobes produces noxious substances like polyamines and other compounds that trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 β and IL-8. BV can profoundly affect, with different mechanisms, all the phases of a woman's life in relation to reproduction, before pregnancy, during fertilization, through and at the end of pregnancy. BV can directly affect fertility, since an ascending dissemination of the involved species may lead to tubal factor infertility. Moreover, the increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted diseases contributes to damage to reproductive health. Exogenous strains of lactobacilli have been suggested as a means of re-establishing a normal healthy vaginal flora. Carefully selected probiotic strains can eliminate BV and also exert an antiviral effect, thus reducing viral load and preventing foetal and neonatal infection. The administration of beneficial microorganisms (probiotics) can aid recovery from infection and restore and maintain a healthy vaginal ecosystem, thus improving female health also in relation to reproductive health. PMID:25673551

  18. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  19. Biomarkers and childhood asthma: improving control today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew H

    2005-01-01

    Although we aim to normalize the lives of children with asthma by controlling their day and night symptoms and preventing exacerbations and morbidity, optimal childhood asthma management may result when the assessment and monitoring of asthma includes measured biomarkers--meaning objective, biological measures of lung dysfunction and inflammation. Precedence for such an approach to optimizing disease control and outcomes can be appreciated in comparing asthma with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) management in children. Optimal management of these chronic conditions shares the fundamental goals to eliminate day and night symptoms and prevent exacerbations and morbidity. However, IDDM management focuses primarily on peripheral blood biomarkers of tight control (i.e., daily serum glucose levels) and predictors of long-term morbidity (i.e., hemoglobin A1C, or hemoglobin "remodeling" due to chronically poor control of glucose) for optimal assessment and monitoring and to best achieve these clinical objectives (Alemzadeh R, et al. Diabetes mellitus in children. In Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th ed. Behrman RE, Kliegman RM, and Jenson HB (Eds). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Co., 1947-1972, 2004). The improved outcomes in IDDM have resulted primarily from the progress to a biomarker-based assessment to achieve tight, optimal control and not, presently, as a dramatic change in therapy. The progress in IDDM management provides a compelling paradigm to consider for improving childhood asthma management. Indeed, the time is good to not only consider some newly available biomarkers, but also to reconsider some biomarkers of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy that could be broadly used today. This article reconsiders the use of current and emerging measures of lung dysfunction, inflammation, and atopy in assessing tight control and long-term risk. Concluding emphasis will be placed on what can be implemented today.

  20. Tissue Damage Markers after a Spinal Manipulation in Healthy Subjects: A Preliminary Report of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Achalandabaso, A.; Plaza-Manzano, G.; Lomas-Vega, R.; Martínez-Amat, A.; Camacho, M. V.; Gassó, M.; Hita-Contreras, F.; Molina, F.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal manipulation (SM) is a manual therapy technique frequently applied to treat musculoskeletal disorders because of its analgesic effects. It is defined by a manual procedure involving a directed impulse to move a joint past its physiologic range of movement (ROM). In this sense, to exceed the physiologic ROM of a joint could trigger tissue damage, which might represent an adverse effect associated with spinal manipulation. The present work tries to explore the presence of tissue damage associated with SM through the damage markers analysis. Thirty healthy subjects recruited at the University of Jaén were submitted to a placebo SM (control group; n = 10), a single lower cervical manipulation (cervical group; n = 10), and a thoracic manipulation (n = 10). Before the intervention, blood samples were extracted and centrifuged to obtain plasma and serum. The procedure was repeated right after the intervention and two hours after the intervention. Tissue damage markers creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), troponin-I, myoglobin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and aldolase were determined in samples. Statistical analysis was performed through a 3 × 3 mixed-model ANOVA. Neither cervical manipulation nor thoracic manipulation did produce significant changes in the CPK, LDH, CRP, troponin-I, myoglobin, NSE, or aldolase blood levels. Our data suggest that the mechanical strain produced by SM seems to be innocuous to the joints and surrounding tissues in healthy subjects. PMID:25609853

  1. Umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells improve heat tolerance and hypothalamic damage in heat stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ling-Shu; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Lin, Ying-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Heatstroke is characterized by excessive hyperthermia associated with systemic inflammatory responses, which leads to multiple organ failure, in which brain disorders predominate. This definition can be almost fulfilled by a mouse model of heatstroke used in the present study. Unanesthetized mice were exposed to whole body heating (41.2°C for 1 hour) and then returned to room temperature (26°C) for recovery. Immediately after termination of whole body heating, heated mice displayed excessive hyperthermia (body core temperature ~42.5°C). Four hours after termination of heat stress, heated mice displayed (i) systemic inflammation; (ii) ischemic, hypoxic, and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus; (iii) hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment (reflected by plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone and corticosterone); (iv) decreased fractional survival; and (v) thermoregulatory deficits (e.g., they became hypothermia when they were exposed to room temperature). These heatstroke reactions can be significantly attenuated by human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells therapy. Our data suggest that human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells therapy may improve outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing systemic inflammation as well as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment.

  2. mTOR Inhibition Improves Anaemia and Reduces Organ Damage in a Murine Model of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Tran, Jennifer; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Harro, David; Campbell, Andrew D.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to play an important role in red blood cell physiology, with inhibition of mTOR signalling leading to alterations in erythropoiesis. To determine if mTOR inhibition would improve anaemia in sickle cell disease (SCD), mice with SCD were treated with the dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, INK128. 1 week after daily oral drug treatment, erythrocyte count, haemoglobin, and haematocrit were all significantly increased while reticulocyte counts were reduced. These parameters remained stable during 3 weeks of treatment. Similar effects were observed following oral treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor, sirolimus. Sirolimus treatment prolonged the lifespan of sickle cell erythrocytes in circulation, reduced spleen size, and reduced renal and hepatic iron accumulation in SCD mice. Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, stroke size was reduced in SCD mice treated with sirolimus. In conclusion, mTOR inhibition is protective against anaemia and organ damage in a murine model of SCD. PMID:27030515

  3. Recent Developments and Challenges Implementing New and Improved Stress Intensity Factor (K) Solutions in NASGRO for Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; McClung, R. Craig; Lee, Yi-Der; Guo, Yajun; Beek, Joachim M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth analysis software has been available to damage tolerance analysts for many years in either commercial products or via proprietary in-house codes. The NASGRO software has been publicly available since the mid-80s (known as NASA/FLAGRO up to 1999) and since 2000 has been sustained and further developed by a collaborative effort between Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), and the members of the NASGRO Industrial Consortium. Since the stress intensity factor (K) is the foundation of fracture mechanics and damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structures, a significant focus of development efforts in the past fifteen years has been geared towards enhancing legacy K solutions and developing new and efficient numerical K solutions that can handle the complicated stress gradients computed by today’s analysts using detailed finite element models of fatigue critical locations. This paper provides an overview of K solutions that have been recently implemented or improved for the analysis of geometries such as two unequal through cracks at a hole and two unequal corner cracks at a hole, as well as state-of-the-art weight function models capable of computing K in the presence of univariant and/or bivariant stress gradients and complicated residual stress distributions. Some historical background is provided to review how common K solutions have evolved over the years, including selective examples from the literature and from new research. Challenges and progress in rectifying discrepancies between older legacy solutions and newer models are reviewed as well as approaches and challenges for verification and validation of K solutions. Finally, a summary of current challenges and future research and development needs is presented. A key theme throughout the presentation of this paper will be how members of the aerospace industry have collaborated with software developers to develop a practical analysis tool that is

  4. Steroids alone or as adjunctive therapy with doxycycline fail to improve oviduct damage in mice infected with Chlamydia muridarum.

    PubMed

    Corr, Tammy E; Sullivan, Jeanne; Frazer, Lauren C; Andrews, Charles W; O'Connell, Catherine M; Darville, Toni

    2014-06-01

    In women, Chlamydia trachomatis can ascend from the cervix to the fallopian tubes, where an overly aggressive host inflammatory response can cause scarring that leads to chronic pelvic pain, infertility, or ectopic pregnancy. Although screening and treatment programs for women have resulted in decreased rates of sequelae, morbidities associated with oviduct scarring continue to occur. Since corticosteroids have anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects, we tested the ability of dexamethasone to inhibit inflammation and prevent oviduct scarring in mice genitally infected with Chlamydia muridarum. The administration of 1 or 2.5 mg/kg of body weight of dexamethasone on days 7 to 21 of infection resulted in reduced accumulation of inflammatory cells in the oviducts compared to that in controls. However, a concomitant increase in bacterial burden was observed, and chronic oviduct disease was not reduced. Adjunctive administration of a prolonged (21-day) or short (3-day) course of dexamethasone in combination with the antibiotic doxycycline also failed to reduce chronic oviduct pathology compared to antibiotic treatment alone. Steroids administered alone or adjunctively with antibiotics failed to prevent oviduct damage in this murine model of C. trachomatis infection. PMID:24695778

  5. Controlled Delivery of Zoledronate Improved Bone Formation Locally In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiang; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Gao, Xupeng; Xu, Wenjing; Lu, Shibi

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been widely used in clinical treatment of bone diseases with increased bone resorption because of their strong affinity for bone and their inhibition of bone resorption. Recently, there has been growing interest in their improvement of bone formation. However, the effect of local controlled delivery of BPs is unclear. We used polylactide acid-glycolic acid copolymer (PLGA) as a drug carrier to deliver various doses of the bisphosphonate zoledronate (Zol) into the distal femur of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats. After 6 weeks, samples were harvested and analyzed by micro-CT and histology. The average bone mineral density and mineralized bone volume fraction were higher with medium- and high-dose PLGA-Zol (30 and 300 µg Zol, respectively) than control and low-dose Zol (3 µg PLGA-Zol; p<0.05). Local controlled delivery of Zol decreased the numbers of osteoclast and increased the numbers of osteoblast. Moreover, local controlled delivery of medium- and high-dose Zol accelerated the expression of bone-formation markers. PLGA used as a drug carrier for controlled delivery of Zol may promote local bone formation. PMID:24618585

  6. Ubiquitin-SUMO circuitry controls activated fanconi anemia ID complex dosage in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson; Weinert, Brian T; Passmore, Lori A; Patel, Ketan J; Olsen, Jesper V; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase core complex, and the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1/PIAS4 and is antagonized by the SUMO protease SENP6. SUMOylation of the ID complex drives substrate selectivity by triggering its polyubiquitylation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to promote its removal from sites of DNA damage via the DVC1-p97 ubiquitin segregase complex. Deregulation of ID complex SUMOylation compromises cell survival following replication stress. Our results uncover a regulatory role for SUMOylation in the FA pathway, and we propose that ubiquitin-SUMO signaling circuitry is a mechanism that contributes to the balance of activated ID complex dosage at sites of DNA damage.

  7. Improving Myoelectric Control for Amputees through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lizhi; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    Most prosthetic myoelectric control studies have shown good performance for unimpaired subjects. However, performance is generally unacceptable for amputees. The primary problem is the poor quality of electromyography (EMG) signals of amputees compared with healthy individuals. To improve clinical performance of myoelectric control, this study explored transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate brain activity and enhance EMG quality. We tested six unilateral transradial amputees by applying active and sham anodal tDCS separately on two different days. Surface EMG signals were acquired from the affected and intact sides for 11 hand and wrist motions in the pre-tDCS and post-tDCS sessions. Autoregression coefficients and linear discriminant analysis classifiers were used to process the EMG data for pattern recognition of the 11 motions. For the affected side, active anodal tDCS significantly reduced the average classification error rate (CER) by 10.1%, while sham tDCS had no such effect. For the intact side, the average CER did not change on the day of sham tDCS but increased on the day of active tDCS. These results demonstrated that tDCS could modulate brain function and improve EMG-based classification performance for amputees. It has great potential in dramatically reducing the length of learning process of amputees for effectively using myoelectrically controlled multifunctional prostheses.

  8. Add-on simple adaptive control improves performance of classical control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Haim; Rusnak, Ilan

    2014-12-01

    The Simple Adaptive Control (SAC) controls an augmented plant that comprises the true plant with parallel feed-forward. The Almost Strictly Positive Real (ASPR) property of the augmented plant leads to asymptotic following. Prior publications have shown that, based only on the prior knowledge on stabilizability properties of systems (usually available), the parallel feed-forward configuration (PFC) allows adaptive control of realistic systems, even if they are both unstable and non-minimum phase. However, it was commonly thought that the PFC addition requires a price when compared with good linear time invariant (LTI) designs that do not use any addition to the plant. The paper shows that the use of SAC with PFC as Add-On to LTI system design improves the performance. Although SAC directly controls the augmented error, it always gives improved performance, i.e., smaller tracking error and reduced sensitivity to plant disturbance, with respect to the best LTI controller.

  9. Monocular occlusion can improve binocular control and reading in dyslexics.

    PubMed

    Stein, J F; Richardson, A J; Fowler, M S

    2000-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental condition which causes 5-10% of children to have unexpected difficulty learning to read. Many dyslexics have impaired development of the magnocellular component of the visual system, which is important for timing visual events and controlling eye movements. Poor control of eye movement may lead to unstable binocular fixation, and hence unsteady vision; this could explain why many dyslexics report that letters appear to move around, causing visual confusion. Previous research has suggested that such binocular confusion can be permanently alleviated by temporarily occluding one eye. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess the binocular control and reading progress of dyslexic children with initially unstable binocular control after the left eye was patched. One hundred and forty-three dyslexics were studied. They were selected from children aged 7-11 years referred to a learning disabilities clinic if they were dyslexic and had unstable binocular control. They were randomly assigned to wear yellow spectacles with or without the left lens occluded, and were followed for 9 months. Significantly more of the children who were given occlusion gained stable binocular fixation in the first 3 months (59%) compared with children given the unoccluded glasses (36%). This advantage was independent of IQ or initial reading ability. Furthermore, at all the 3-month follow-ups, children were more likely to have gained stable binocular control if they had been wearing the occluded glasses. Gaining stable binocular control significantly improved reading. The children who did so with the help of occlusion improved their reading by 9.4 months in the first 3 months, compared with 3.9 months in those who were not patched and did not gain stable fixation. Over the whole 9 months, children who received occlusion and gained stable fixation nearly doubled their rate of progress in reading compared with those who remained unstable. At

  10. Mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage in arthritis and their control by herbal products.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M; Astry, Brian; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology) in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis. PMID:23476694

  11. Identification of pathways controlling DNA damage induced mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lis, Ewa T; O'Neill, Bryan M; Gil-Lamaignere, Cristina; Chin, Jodie K; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2008-05-01

    Mutation in response to most types of DNA damage is thought to be mediated by the error-prone sub-branch of post-replication repair and the associated translesion synthesis polymerases. To further understand the mutagenic response to DNA damage, we screened a collection of 4848 haploid gene deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for decreased damage-induced mutation of the CAN1 gene. Through extensive quantitative validation of the strains identified by the screen, we identified ten genes, which included error-prone post-replication repair genes known to be involved in induced mutation, as well as two additional genes, FYV6 and RNR4. We demonstrate that FYV6 and RNR4 are epistatic with respect to induced mutation, and that they function, at least partially, independently of post-replication repair. This pathway of induced mutation appears to be mediated by an increase in dNTP levels that facilitates lesion bypass by the replicative polymerase Pol delta, and it is as important as error-prone post-replication repair in the case of UV- and MMS-induced mutation, but solely responsible for EMS-induced mutation. We show that Rnr4/Pol delta-induced mutation is efficiently inhibited by hydroxyurea, a small molecule inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, suggesting that if similar pathways exist in human cells, intervention in some forms of mutation may be possible.

  12. Mediators of Inflammation-Induced Bone Damage in Arthritis and Their Control by Herbal Products

    PubMed Central

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M.; Astry, Brian; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints leading to bone and cartilage damage. Untreated inflammatory arthritis can result in severe deformities and disability. The use of anti-inflammatory agents and biologics has been the mainstay of treatment of RA. However, the prolonged use of such agents may lead to severe adverse reactions. In addition, many of these drugs are quite expensive. These limitations have necessitated the search for newer therapeutic agents for RA. Natural plant products offer a promising resource for potential antiarthritic agents. We describe here the cellular and soluble mediators of inflammation-induced bone damage (osteoimmunology) in arthritis. We also elaborate upon various herbal products that possess antiarthritic activity, particularly mentioning the specific target molecules. As the use of natural product supplements by RA patients is increasing, this paper presents timely and useful information about the mechanism of action of promising herbal products that can inhibit the progression of inflammation and bone damage in the course of arthritis. PMID:23476694

  13. A Multifaceted Prospective Memory Intervention to Improve Medication Adherence: Design of a Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Kathie C.; Einstein, Gilles O.; Morrow, Daniel G.; Hepworth, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive agents is critical because control of elevated blood pressure is the single most important way to prevent stroke and other end organ damage. Unfortunately, nonadherence remains a significant problem. Previous interventions designed to improve adherence have demonstrated only small benefits of strategies that target single facets such as understanding medication directions. The intervention described here is informed by prospective memory theory and performance of older adults in laboratory-based paradigms and uses a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to improve adherence. It incorporates multiple strategies designed to support key components of prospective remembering involved in taking medication. The intervention is delivered by nurses in the home with an education control group for comparison. Differences between groups in overall adherence following the intervention and 6 months later will be tested. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels also will be examined between groups and as it relates to adherence. Intra-individual regression is planned to examine change in adherence over time and its predictors. Finally, we will examine the association between executive function/working memory and adherence, predicting that adherence will be related to executive/working memory in the control group but not in the intervention group. PMID:23010608

  14. A multifaceted prospective memory intervention to improve medication adherence: design of a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Insel, Kathleen C; Einstein, Gilles O; Morrow, Daniel G; Hepworth, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to prescribed antihypertensive agents is critical because control of elevated blood pressure is the single most important way to prevent stroke and other end organ damage. Unfortunately, nonadherence remains a significant problem. Previous interventions designed to improve adherence have demonstrated only small benefits of strategies that target single facets such as understanding medication directions. The intervention described here is informed by prospective memory theory and performance of older adults in laboratory-based paradigms and uses a comprehensive, multifaceted approach to improve adherence. It incorporates multiple strategies designed to support key components of prospective remembering involved in taking medication. The intervention is delivered by nurses in the home with an education control group for comparison. Differences between groups in overall adherence following the intervention and 6 months later will be tested. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels also will be examined between groups and as they relate to adherence. Intra-individual regression is planned to examine change in adherence over time and its predictors. Finally, we will examine the association between executive function/working memory and adherence, predicting that adherence will be related to executive/working memory in the control group but not in the intervention group. PMID:23010608

  15. Temporary transarticular K-wire fixation of critical ankle injuries at risk: a neglected "damage control" strategy?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jamie; Ly, Anhchi; Mauffrey, Cyril; Stahel, Philip F

    2015-02-01

    High-energy ankle fracture-dislocations are at significant risk for postoperative complications. Closed reduction and temporary percutaneous transarticular K-wire fixation was first described more than 50 years ago. This simple and effective "damage control" strategy is widely practiced in Europe, yet appears largely forgotten and abandoned in the United States. Anecdotal opposing arguments include the notion that drilling K-wires through articular cartilage may damage the joint and contribute to postinjury arthritis. This article describes the experience in a US academic level I trauma center with transarticular pinning of selected critical ankle fracture-dislocations followed by delayed definitive fracture fixation once the soft tissues are healed. Median patient follow-up of 2 years showed that the transarticular pinning technique was performed safely, not associated with increased postoperative complication rates, and characterized by good subjective outcomes using the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Foot and Ankle Outcome Score questionnaire.

  16. Improving reliability in the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider) control system

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, N.; Spencer, N.; Tinsman, J.

    1989-10-01

    During the past year, considerable emphasis has been placed on improving the overall reliability of the SLC control system. The Errorlog Facility has proven a useful tool to diagnose hardware and software problems. By analyzing the various error messages and their correlations, one can usually determine the software component or hardware module causing faults. Daily summaries help to identify problems so that they can be remedied before they become catastrophic; thereby bringing about a considerable increase in performance. We discuss the various tools we use and our operational experience with them. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  17. DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-02-27

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  18. Improved control of EGR during speed/load transients

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, I.J.; Brunt, M.F.J.

    1996-09-01

    A new exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system has been devised. The system utilizes the throttle plate as a secondary controller of EGR flow. Over a series of sudden-deceleration tests, from various engine speeds and loads to idle, the new system showed a complete absence of the misfires which characterized the standard system. Furthermore, EGR flow characteristics differed markedly between the new and standard systems. The new system improved the responsiveness of the EGR system, potentially reducing both HC and NO{sub x} emissions. Further advantages of the new system include simplicity and low component cost.

  19. A flexibility-based method via the iterated improved reduction system and the cuckoo optimization algorithm for damage quantification with limited sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare Hosseinzadeh, Ali; Bagheri, Abdollah; Ghodrati Amiri, Gholamreza; Koo, Ki-Young

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a novel and effective damage diagnosis algorithm is proposed to localize and quantify structural damage using incomplete modal data, considering the existence of some limitations in the number of attached sensors on structures. The damage detection problem is formulated as an optimization problem by computing static displacements in the reduced model of a structure subjected to a unique static load. The static responses are computed through the flexibility matrix of the damaged structure obtained based on the incomplete modal data of the structure. In the algorithm, an iterated improved reduction system method is applied to prepare an accurate reduced model of a structure. The optimization problem is solved via a new evolutionary optimization algorithm called the cuckoo optimization algorithm. The efficiency and robustness of the presented method are demonstrated through three numerical examples. Moreover, the efficiency of the method is verified by an experimental study of a five-story shear building structure on a shaking table considering only two sensors. The obtained damage identification results for the numerical and experimental studies show the suitable and stable performance of the proposed damage identification method for structures with limited sensors.

  20. Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and diabetes complications. Nearly one in three Americans adults has high blood pressure, and the cost associated with treating this condition is staggering. The Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control is a resource developed by the American Medical Group Foundation in partnership with the American Medical Group Association. The goal of this toolkit is to mobilize health care practitioners to work together through team-based approaches to achieve an 80% control rate of high blood pressure among their patient population. The toolkit can be used by health educators, clinic administrators, physicians, students, and other clinic staff as a step-by-step resource for developing the infrastructure needed to better identify and treat individuals with high blood pressure or other chronic conditions.

  1. Molecular technology: improving strategies for controlling hydatid disease and cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    McManus, D P

    1990-06-01

    Recombinant DNA and related technologies are providing valuable, novel reagents for application in control strategies against the major parasitic diseases, including hydatid disease and cysticercosis. The impact of these powerful techniques for improving diagnosis and identification of various life cycle stages of Echinococcus spp. and Taenia solium, essential pre-requisites for epidemiological studies and for evaluating control programs, is beyond question. Furthermore, the use of molecular technology for characterizing sub-specific variants of strains of both Echinococcus and T. solium has led to important revisions of our understanding of the diseases they cause. In light of the recent remarkable development of a recombinant vaccine against T. ovis, the first practical parasite vaccine to be produced, the prospects for rapid development of similar vaccines against the medically important taeniids appear to be very encouraging.

  2. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  3. Improved Position Sensor for Feedback Control of Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert; Savage, Larry; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    An improved optoelectronic apparatus has been developed to provide the position feedback needed for controlling the levitation subsystem of a containerless-processing system. As explained, the advantage of this apparatus over prior optoelectronic apparatuses that have served this purpose stems from the use of an incandescent lamp, instead of a laser, to illuminate the levitated object. In containerless processing, a small object to be processed is levitated (e.g., by use of a microwave, low-frequency electromagnetic, electrostatic, or acoustic field) so that it is not in contact with the wall of the processing chamber or with any other solid object during processing. In the case of electrostatic or low-frequency electromagnetic levitation, real-time measurement of the displacement of the levitated object from its nominal levitation position along the vertical axis (and, in some cases, along one or two horizontal axes) is needed for feedback control of the levitating field.

  4. Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors for heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and diabetes complications. Nearly one in three Americans adults has high blood pressure, and the cost associated with treating this condition is staggering. The Measure Up Pressure Down: Provider Toolkit to Improve Hypertension Control is a resource developed by the American Medical Group Foundation in partnership with the American Medical Group Association. The goal of this toolkit is to mobilize health care practitioners to work together through team-based approaches to achieve an 80% control rate of high blood pressure among their patient population. The toolkit can be used by health educators, clinic administrators, physicians, students, and other clinic staff as a step-by-step resource for developing the infrastructure needed to better identify and treat individuals with high blood pressure or other chronic conditions. PMID:27440782

  5. Converging Redundant Sensor Network Information for Improved Building Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Tiller; D. Phil; Gregor Henze; Xin Guo

    2007-09-30

    This project investigated the development and application of sensor networks to enhance building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, but current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of these systems. For example, most of these systems rely on single monitoring points to detect occupancy, when more than one monitoring point could improve system performance. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. During the initial project phase, a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Phase II of the project demonstrated that a network of several sensors provides a more accurate measure of occupancy than is possible using systems based on single monitoring points. This phase also established that analysis algorithms could be applied to the sensor network data stream to improve the accuracy of system performance in energy management and security applications. In Phase III of the project, the sensor network from Phase I was complemented by a control strategy developed based on the results from the first two project phases: this controller was implemented in a small sample of work areas, and applied to lighting control. Two additional technologies were developed in the course of completing the project. A prototype web-based display that portrays the current status of each detector in a sensor network monitoring building occupancy was designed and implemented. A new capability that enables occupancy sensors in a sensor network to dynamically set the 'time delay' interval based on ongoing occupant behavior in the space was also designed and implemented.

  6. Improved Sensitivity Relations in State Constrained Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettiol, Piernicola; Frankowska, Hélène; Vinter, Richard B.

    2015-04-15

    Sensitivity relations in optimal control provide an interpretation of the costate trajectory and the Hamiltonian, evaluated along an optimal trajectory, in terms of gradients of the value function. While sensitivity relations are a straightforward consequence of standard transversality conditions for state constraint free optimal control problems formulated in terms of control-dependent differential equations with smooth data, their verification for problems with either pathwise state constraints, nonsmooth data, or for problems where the dynamic constraint takes the form of a differential inclusion, requires careful analysis. In this paper we establish validity of both ‘full’ and ‘partial’ sensitivity relations for an adjoint state of the maximum principle, for optimal control problems with pathwise state constraints, where the underlying control system is described by a differential inclusion. The partial sensitivity relation interprets the costate in terms of partial Clarke subgradients of the value function with respect to the state variable, while the full sensitivity relation interprets the couple, comprising the costate and Hamiltonian, as the Clarke subgradient of the value function with respect to both time and state variables. These relations are distinct because, for nonsmooth data, the partial Clarke subdifferential does not coincide with the projection of the (full) Clarke subdifferential on the relevant coordinate space. We show for the first time (even for problems without state constraints) that a costate trajectory can be chosen to satisfy the partial and full sensitivity relations simultaneously. The partial sensitivity relation in this paper is new for state constraint problems, while the full sensitivity relation improves on earlier results in the literature (for optimal control problems formulated in terms of Lipschitz continuous multifunctions), because a less restrictive inward pointing hypothesis is invoked in the proof, and because

  7. [Plan to improve malaria control towards its elimination in Mesoamerica].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario Henry; Betanzos-Reyes, Angel Francisco

    2011-01-01

    To develop a plan to strengthen the control of malaria towards its elimination. In 2009, under the coordination of the National Public HealthInstitute ofMexico, atransdisciplinary equipment of technical and operative experts was conformed to carry out a situational analysis of malaria and control programs and for the selection of effective practices of intervention that would be incorporated to the plan, within the framework of an exercise in Theory of Change. Criteria for thestratificationof thelocalities, based ontheirtransmission characteristics were established. The structural and operative limitations of the control programs were identified. A plan of interventions was elaborated to improve the coverage of epidemiological surveillance, anti-malaria interventions and opportune diagnosis and treatment of cases. The plan delineates progressive phases of implementation: reorganization, intensification of interventions and evaluation of elimination feasibility. The adoption of a regional strategic plan will provide guidance and administrative elements to conform a system that coordinates the activities of the national control programs and facilitate the elimination of malaria in the region.

  8. Reg3α Overexpression Protects Pancreatic β Cells from Cytokine-Induced Damage and Improves Islet Transplant Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Xu, Yuemei; Shuai, Xuanyu; Shi, Xuhui; Chen, Xiang; Huang, Wenbin; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Zhang, Zhihong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    The process of islet transplantation for treating type 1 diabetes has been limited by the high level of graft failure. This may be overcome by locally delivering trophic factors to enhance engraftment. Regenerating islet-derived protein 3α (Reg3α) is a pancreatic secretory protein which functions as an antimicrobial peptide in control of inflammation and cell proliferation. In this study, to investigate whether Reg3α could improve islet engraftment, a marginal mass of syngeneic islets pretransduced with adenoviruses expressing Reg3α or control EGFP were transplanted under the renal capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Mice receiving islets with elevated Reg3α production exhibited significantly lower blood glucose levels (9.057 ± 0.59 mmol/L versus 13.48 ± 0.35 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (1.80 ± 0.17 ng/mL versus 1.16 ± 0.16 ng/mL, P < 0.05) compared with the control group. The decline of apoptotic events (0.57% ± 0.15% versus 1.06% ± 0.07%, P < 0.05) and increased β-cell proliferation (0.70% ± 0.10% versus 0.36% ± 0.14%, P < 0.05) were confirmed in islet grafts overexpressing Reg3α by morphometric analysis. Further experiments showed that Reg3α production dramatically protected cultured islets and pancreatic β cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis and the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, exposure to cytokines led to the activation of MAPKs in pancreatic β cells, which was reversed by Reg3α overexpression in contrast to control group. These results strongly suggest that Reg3α could enhance islet engraftments through its cytoprotective effect and advance the therapeutic efficacy of islet transplantation. PMID:25826674

  9. Improved aircraft dynamic response and fatigue life during ground operations using an active control landing gear system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.; Edson, R.

    1978-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom aircraft landing analysis incorporating a series-hydraulic active control main landing gear has been developed and verified using preliminary experimental data from drop tests of a modified main landing gear from a 2722 kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane. The verified analysis was also employed to predict the landing dynamics of a supersonic research airplane with an active control main landing gear system. The results of this investigation have shown that this type of active gear is feasible and indicate a potential for improving airplane dynamic response and reducing structural fatigue damage during ground operations by approximately 90% relative to that incurred with the passive gear.

  10. Guidance and control system research for improved terminal area operations. [terminal controlled vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, R. M.; Creedon, J. F.; Bundick, W. T.; Young, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Several guidance and control system research and development activities aimed at improving the operational capabilities of commercial aircraft in the terminal area are described. The guidance and control systems were designed to improve the capacity and efficiency of terminal area operations, enhance the approach and landing capability of aircraft in adverse weather conditions, and reduce the impact of aircraft noise perceived on the ground. Specific performance features include the ability to capture and track steep glideslopes, use short final approaches, perform flares with reduced longitudinal touchdown dispersion and execute high speed runway rollout and turnoff. Results obtained from simulation studies or flight tests are shown for each of the algorithms.

  11. Independent ankle motion control improves robotic balance simulator.

    PubMed

    Pospisil, Eric R; Luu, Billy L; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Croft, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    We present a validation study for the effectiveness of an additional ankle-tilt platform to enhance somatosensory ankle feedback available to subjects actuating a 6-axis robotic balance simulator platform. To address this need, we have developed and integrated a device to permit independent manipulation of ankle rotation while the whole-body is actuated by the balance simulator. The addition of ankle rotation is shown to provide both quantitative and qualitative improvements to the balance simulation experience compared to when the ankle joint is referenced to the motion of the balance simulator. Eight out of ten subjects reported that balancing on the simulator with ankle motion required less conscious effort. This self-reported improvement corresponded to a 32% decrease in the mean-removed RMS amplitude for sway angle, demonstrating better balance control for subjects actuating the simulator. The new ankle-tilt platform enables examination of the contributions of ankle proprioception to the control of standing balance in human subjects.

  12. Association of sugar content QTL and PQL with physiological traits relevant to frost damage resistance in pea under field and controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Estelle; Fontaine, Véronique; Vuylsteker, Christophe; Sellier, Hélène; Bodèle, Sylvie; Voedts, Najia; Devaux, Rosemonde; Frise, Marlène; Avia, Komlan; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Bahrman, Nasser; Hanocq, Eric; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Delbreil, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    To increase yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.), autumn sowing would be preferable. Hence, frost tolerance of pea became a major trait of interest for breeders. In order to better understand the cold acclimation in pea, Champagne a frost tolerant line and Terese, a frost sensitive line, and their recombinant inbred lines (RIL) were studied. RIL frost tolerance was evaluated by a frost damage scale under field as well as controlled conditions. A quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach was used to identify chromosomal regions linked to frost tolerance. The detected QTL explained from 6.5 to 46.5% of the phenotypic variance. Amongst them, those located on linkage groups 5 and 6 were consistent with over all experiments, in field as well as in controlled environments. In order to improve the understanding of the frost tolerance mechanisms, several cold acclimation key characters such as concentration of sugars, electrolyte leakage, osmotic pressure, and activity of RuBisCO were assessed. Some of these physiological QTL colocalised with QTL for frost damage, in particular two raffinose QTL on LG5 and LG6 and one RuBisCO activity QTL on LG6, explaining 8.8 to 27.0% of the phenotypic variance. In addition, protein quantitative loci were mapped; some of them colocalised with frost damage and physiological QTL on LG5 and LG6, explaining 16.0-43.6% of the phenotypic variance. Raffinose metabolism and RuBisCO activity and its effect on photosynthesis might play a major role in cold acclimation of pea.

  13. Can the parasitoid Necremnus tutae (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) improve existing biological control of the tomato leafminer Tuta aboluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)?

    PubMed

    Calvo, F J; Soriano, J D; Stansly, P A; Belda, J E

    2016-08-01

    Necremnus tutae is native to the Mediterranean region where it has been observed in greenhouses parasitizing the invasive Tuta absoluta on tomato. The objective of the present study was to determine whether augmentative releases of N. tutae can improve existing biological control of T. absoluta based on predation by Nesidicoris tenuis. Two experiments were carried out, of which the first evaluated different N. tutae release rates (1 and 2 N. tutae m-2 week-1). The parasitoid reduced plant and fruit damage, especially at the higher rate. However, such reduction was considered insufficient given the large numbers of parasitoids needed and still unacceptable level of fruit damage. The second experiment focused on combining the most efficient rate of N. tutae of those evaluated during the first experiment, with the pre- and post-planting release of N. tenuis and supplemental additions of Ephestia kuehniella eggs. Addition of N. tutae decreased leaf damage by T. absoluta regardless the release method for N. tenuis, but the pre-plant release of N. tenuis alone was sufficient to prevent fruit damage by T. absoluta. This suggested that the addition of N. tutae may not be necessary to obtain satisfactory control of T. absoluta following pre-plant application of N. tenuis, although different options for using N. tutae in commercial crops may still be possible.

  14. Condensing economizers for thermal efficiency improvements and emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, J.P.; Carbonara, J.; Litzke, W.; Butcher, T.A.

    1993-12-31

    Flue gas condensing economizers improve the thermal efficiency of boilers by recovering sensible heat and water vapor latent heat from flue gas exhaust. In addition to improving thermal efficiency, condensing economizers also have the potential to act as control devices for emissions of particulates, SO{sub x}, and air toxics. Both Consolidated Edison of New York and Brookhaven National LaborAtory are currently working on condensing economizer technology with an emphasis on developing their potential for emissions control. Con Edison is currently conducting a condensing economizer demonstration at their oil-fired 74th Street Station in New York. Since installing this equipment in February of 1992 a heat rate improvement of 800 Btu/kWh has been seen. At another location, Ravenswood Station, a two stage condensing economizer has been installed in a pilot test. In this advanced configuration -the ``Integrated Flue Gas Treatment or IFGT system- two heat exchanger sections are installed and sprays of water with and without SO{sub 2} sorbents are included. Detailed studies of the removal of particulates, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and selected air toxics have been done for a variety of operating conditions. Removal efficiencies for SO{sub 2} have been over 98% and for SO{sub 3} over 65%. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s studies involve predicting and enhancing particulate capture in condensing economizers with an emphasis on small, coal-fired applications. This work is funded by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the Department of Energy. Flyash capture efficiencies as high as 97% have been achieved to date with a single stage economizer.

  15. Optimisation of active suspension control inputs for improved vehicle ride performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čorić, Mirko; Deur, Joško; Xu, Li; Tseng, H. Eric; Hrovat, Davor

    2016-07-01

    A collocation-type control variable optimisation method is used in the paper to analyse to which extent the fully active suspension (FAS) can improve the vehicle ride comfort while preserving the wheel holding ability. The method is first applied for a cosine-shaped bump road disturbance of different heights, and for both quarter-car and full 10 degree-of-freedom vehicle models. A nonlinear anti-wheel hop constraint is considered, and the influence of bump preview time period is analysed. The analysis is then extended to the case of square- or cosine-shaped pothole with different lengths, and the quarter-car model. In this case, the cost function is extended with FAS energy consumption and wheel damage resilience costs. The FAS action is found to be such to provide a wheel hop over the pothole, in order to avoid or minimise the damage at the pothole trailing edge. In the case of long pothole, when the FAS cannot provide the wheel hop, the wheel is travelling over the pothole bottom and then hops over the pothole trailing edge. The numerical optimisation results are accompanied by a simplified algebraic analysis.

  16. Control of in vivo collateral damage generated by T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Gill, Ronald G; Boon, Louis; Ellestad, Kristofor K; Anderson, Colin C

    2013-08-15

    An ongoing dilemma faced during an immune response is generating an effective, often proinflammatory response to eliminate pathogens and/or infected cells while also minimizing collateral damage to adjacent noninfected tissues. The factors limiting bystander cell injury during an Ag-specific immune response in vivo are largely unknown. In this study, using an in vivo model of islet transplants in TCR transgenic mice, we show that both CD4 and CD8 T cells do have the capacity to inflict adjacent tissue damage and that this injury is greatly enhanced in sensitized hosts. CD4 T cell-mediated killing of specific and bystander cells occurred via different mechanisms. Unlike specific target cell killing, CD4-mediated bystander injury required tissue Fas expression and was inhibited with anti-IFN-γ Ab treatment in vivo. Moreover, bystander cell injury was not entirely nonspecific but rather required, in naive recipients, that the MHC allele expressed by the bystanders was self. Importantly, the coinhibitor programmed death-1 plays an important role in restraining bystander cell injury mediated either by defined TCR transgenic T cells or by polyclonal T cell populations. Thus, the differential requirements for specific versus bystander cell injury suggest that there are opportunities for inhibiting immune pathology without compromising Ag-specific immunity in vivo.

  17. A family of metal-dependent phosphatases implicated in metabolite damage-control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Zallot, Rémi; Balmant, Kelly; Ziemak, Michael J; Shanklin, John; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Fiehn, Oliver; Gregory, Jesse F; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F; Hanson, Andrew D

    2016-08-01

    DUF89 family proteins occur widely in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but their functions are unknown. Here we define three DUF89 subfamilies (I, II, and III), with subfamily II being split into stand-alone proteins and proteins fused to pantothenate kinase (PanK). We demonstrated that DUF89 proteins have metal-dependent phosphatase activity against reactive phosphoesters or their damaged forms, notably sugar phosphates (subfamilies II and III), phosphopantetheine and its S-sulfonate or sulfonate (subfamily II-PanK fusions), and nucleotides (subfamily I). Genetic and comparative genomic data strongly associated DUF89 genes with phosphoester metabolism. The crystal structure of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subfamily III protein YMR027W revealed a novel phosphatase active site with fructose 6-phosphate and Mg(2+) bound near conserved signature residues Asp254 and Asn255 that are critical for activity. These findings indicate that DUF89 proteins are previously unrecognized hydrolases whose characteristic in vivo function is to limit potentially harmful buildups of normal or damaged phosphometabolites. PMID:27322068

  18. Thrombin mutant W215A/E217A treatment improves neurological outcome and attenuates central nervous system damage in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Verbout, Norah G; Yu, Xiaolin; Healy, Laura D; Phillips, Kevin G; Tucker, Erik I; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J T; Offner, Halina

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory disease characterized by demyelination and axonal damage of the central nervous system. The pathogenesis of MS has also been linked to vascular inflammation and local activation of the coagulation system, resulting in perivascular fibrin deposition. Treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, with antithrombotic and antiinflammatory activated protein C (APC) reduces disease severity. Since recombinant APC (Drotecogin alfa), originally approved for the treatment of severe sepsis, is not available for human MS studies, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacologic activation of endogenous protein C could likewise improve the outcome of EAE. Mice were immunized with murine myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptides and at the onset of EAE symptoms, were treated every other day with either WE thrombin (25 μg/kg; i.v.), a selective recombinant protein C activator thrombin analog, or saline control. Mice were monitored for changes in disease score until euthanized for ex vivo analysis of inflammation. Administration of WE thrombin significantly ameliorated clinical severity of EAE, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination, suppressed the activation of macrophages comprising the CD11b + population and reduced accumulation of fibrin (ogen) in the spinal cord. These data suggest that symptomatic MS may respond to a treatment strategy that involves temporal pharmacological enhancement of endogenous APC generation. PMID:24810631

  19. Optical control of filamentation-induced damage to DNA by intense, ultrashort, near-infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Kasuba, K. C.; Bharambe, H.; D'Souza, J. S.; Rathod, K. D.; Mathur, D.

    2016-06-01

    We report on damage to DNA in an aqueous medium induced by ultrashort pulses of intense laser light of 800 nm wavelength. Focusing of such pulses, using lenses of various focal lengths, induces plasma formation within the aqueous medium. Such plasma can have a spatial extent that is far in excess of the Rayleigh range. In the case of water, the resulting ionization and dissociation gives rise to in situ generation of low-energy electrons and OH-radicals. Interactions of these with plasmid DNA produce nicks in the DNA backbone: single strand breaks (SSBs) are induced as are, at higher laser intensities, double strand breaks (DSBs). Under physiological conditions, the latter are not readily amenable to repair. Systematic quantification of SSBs and DSBs at different values of incident laser energy and under different external focusing conditions reveals that damage occurs in two distinct regimes. Numerical aperture is the experimental handle that delineates the two regimes, permitting simple optical control over the extent of DNA damage.

  20. Optical control of filamentation-induced damage to DNA by intense, ultrashort, near-infrared laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Kasuba, K. C.; Bharambe, H.; D’Souza, J. S.; Rathod, K. D.; Mathur, D.

    2016-01-01

    We report on damage to DNA in an aqueous medium induced by ultrashort pulses of intense laser light of 800 nm wavelength. Focusing of such pulses, using lenses of various focal lengths, induces plasma formation within the aqueous medium. Such plasma can have a spatial extent that is far in excess of the Rayleigh range. In the case of water, the resulting ionization and dissociation gives rise to in situ generation of low-energy electrons and OH-radicals. Interactions of these with plasmid DNA produce nicks in the DNA backbone: single strand breaks (SSBs) are induced as are, at higher laser intensities, double strand breaks (DSBs). Under physiological conditions, the latter are not readily amenable to repair. Systematic quantification of SSBs and DSBs at different values of incident laser energy and under different external focusing conditions reveals that damage occurs in two distinct regimes. Numerical aperture is the experimental handle that delineates the two regimes, permitting simple optical control over the extent of DNA damage. PMID:27279565

  1. Advanced control strategy for plant heat rate improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, P.; Frerichs, D.K.; Kyr, D.

    1995-12-31

    Florida Power & Light Company (FPL) supplies electricity to about half of the population of Florida, roughly 6.5 million people. The load base is largely residential/business with the obvious seasonal extremes due to the climate. FPL`s generating capacity is 16,320 MW composed of 70% traditional fossil cycle, 18% nuclear, and 12% gas turbine. The system load profile coupled with bulk power purchases is such that the 400 MW class units (9 Foster Wheeler drum type units comprising 24% of total capacity) are now forced to cycle daily all year, and to come off line on weekends during the winter months. The current economic realities of power generation force utility companies to seek methods to improve plant heat rate, and FPL is no exception. FPL believed it possible to achieve the goal of lower heat rate and follow the required load demand with the 400 MW class units through the use of an advanced control strategy implemented totally within the unit`s Distributed Control System (DCS). As of the writing of this paper, the project is still ongoing. This paper will present the theory and methodology of the advanced control strategy along with the current design and implementation status and results obtained to date.

  2. Improving the Effect and Efficiency of FMD Control by Enlarging Protection or Surveillance Zones

    PubMed Central

    Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils; Boklund, Anette

    2015-01-01

    An epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in a FMD-free country with large exports of livestock and livestock products would result in profound economic damage. This could be reduced by rapid and efficient control of the disease spread. The objectives of this study were to estimate the economic impact of a hypothetical FMD outbreak in Denmark based on changes to the economic assumptions of the model, and to investigate whether the control of an FMD epidemic can be improved by combining the enlargement of protection or surveillance zones with pre-emptive depopulation or emergency vaccination. The stochastic spatial simulation model DTU-DADS was used to simulate the spread of FMD in Denmark. The control strategies were the basic EU and Danish strategy, pre-emptive depopulation, suppressive or protective vaccination, enlarging protection or surveillance zones, and a combination of pre-emptive depopulation or emergency vaccination with enlarged protection or surveillance zones. Herds are detected either based on basic detection through the appearance of clinical signs, or as a result of surveillance in the control zones. The economic analyses consisted of direct costs and export losses. Sensitivity analysis was performed on uncertain and potentially influential input parameters. Enlarging the surveillance zones from 10 to 15 km, combined with pre-emptive depopulation over a 1-km radius around detected herds resulted in the lowest total costs. This was still the case even when the different input parameters were changed in the sensitivity analysis. Changing the resources for clinical surveillance did not affect the epidemic consequences. In conclusion, an FMD epidemic in Denmark would have a larger economic impact on the agricultural sector than previously anticipated. Furthermore, the control of a potential FMD outbreak in Denmark may be improved by combining pre-emptive depopulation with an enlarged protection or surveillance zone. PMID:26664996

  3. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the infrared damage rate of a thermal control coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the infrared reflectance of ZnO silicone white thermal coatings were investigated. Narrow band ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths in the 2200A to 3500A range by a monochromator and a high pressure, 150-W Eimac xenon lamp. The sample was irradiated while in a vacuum of at least 0.000001 torr, and infrared reflectance was measured in situ with a spectroreflectometer at 19,500A. Reflectance degradation was studied as a function of wavelength, time, intensity, and dose. Damage was wavelength dependent at constant exposure, but no maximum was evident above the shortest wavelength investigated here. The degradation rate at constant intensity was an exponential function of time and varies with intensity.

  4. Advanced materials for control of post-earthquake damage in bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Kshitij C.; Saiid Saiidi, M.; Cruz, Carlos A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents analytical modeling to study the seismic response of bridge systems with conventional and advanced details. For validation, a 33 m quarter-scale model of a four-span bridge incorporating innovative materials and details seismically tested on the shake tables at the University of Nevada, Reno was taken. The bridge specimen involved use of advanced materials and details to reduce damage at plastic hinges and minimize residual displacements. A three-dimensional, nonlinear model incorporating the response of the innovative materials was developed to study the bridge response using the finite-element software OpenSees. Existing finite-element formulations were used to capture the response of the advanced materials used in the bridge. The analytical model was found to be able to reproduce comparable bent displacements and bent shear forces within reasonable accuracy. The validated model was further used to study different types of bridges under suite of scaled bi-directional near-fault ground motions. Comparisons were made on behavior of five different bridge types, first conventional reinforced concrete bridge, second post-tensioned column bridge, third bridge with elastomeric rubber elements at the plastic hinge zone, fourth bridge with nickel-titanium superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) reinforcing bar and fifth bridge with CuAlMn superelastic SMA reinforcing bar. Both the SMA used bridges also utilized engineered cementitious composite element at the plastic hinge zone. The results showed effectiveness of the innovative interventions on the bridges in providing excellent recentering capabilities with minimal damage to the columns.

  5. Improving the precision of sample-based forest damage inventories through two-phase sampling and post-stratification using remotely sensed auxiliary information.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Cornelia; Wulff, Sören; Reese, Heather; Ståhl, Göran

    2016-04-01

    Many countries have a national forest inventory (NFI) designed to produce statistically sound estimates of forest parameters. However, this type of inventory may not provide reliable results for forest damage which usually affects only small parts of the forest in a country. For this reason, specially designed forest damage inventories are performed in many countries, sometimes in coordination with the NFIs. In this study, we evaluated a new approach for damage inventory where existing NFI data form the basis for two-phase sampling for stratification and remotely sensed auxiliary data are applied for further improvement of precision through post-stratification. We applied Monte Carlo sampling simulation to evaluate different sampling strategies linked to different damage scenarios. The use of existing NFI data in a two-phase sampling for stratification design resulted in a relative efficiency of 50 % or lower, i.e., the variance was at least halved compared to a simple random sample of the same size. With post-stratification based on simulated remotely sensed auxiliary data, there was additional improvement, which depended on the accuracy of the auxiliary data and the properties of the forest damage. In many cases, the relative efficiency was further reduced by as much as one-half. In conclusion, the results show that substantial gains in precision can be obtained by utilizing auxiliary information in forest damage surveys, through two-phase sampling, through post-stratification, and through the combination of these two approaches, i.e., post-stratified two-phase sampling for stratification.

  6. Compact vehicle drive module having improved thermal control

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Andreas A.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Beihoff, Bruce C.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

    2006-01-03

    An electric vehicle drive includes a thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support, which may be controlled in a closed-loop manner. Interfacing between circuits, circuit mounting structure, and the support provide for greatly enhanced cooling. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

  7. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  8. Improving immunization of programmable logic controllers using weighted median filters.

    PubMed

    Paredes, José L; Díaz, Dhionel

    2005-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of improving immunization of programmable logic controllers (PLC's) to electromagnetic interference with impulsive characteristics. A filtering structure, based on weighted median filters, that does not require additional hardware and can be implemented in legacy PLC's is proposed. The filtering operation is implemented in the binary domain and removes the impulsive noise presented in the discrete input adding thus robustness to PLC's. By modifying the sampling clock structure, two variants of the filter are obtained. Both structures exploit the cyclic nature of the PLC to form an N-sample observation window of the discrete input, hence a status change on it is determined by the filter output taking into account all the N samples avoiding thus that a single impulse affects the PLC functionality. A comparative study, based on a statistical analysis, of the different filters' performances is presented. PMID:15868861

  9. ECG-synchronized DSA exposure control: improved cervicothoracic image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, W.M.; Gould, R.; Norman, D.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cox, L.

    1984-10-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized x-ray exposure sequence was used to acquire digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) images during 13 arterial injection studies of the aortic arch or carotid bifurcations. These gated images were compared with matched ungated DSA images acquired using the same technical factors, contrast material volume, and patient positioning. Subjective assessments by five experienced observers of edge definition, vessel conspicuousness, and overall diagnostic quality showed overall preference for one of the two acquisition methods in 69% of cases studied. Of these, the ECG-synchronized exposure series were rated superior in 76%. These results, as well as the relatively simple and inexpensive modifications required, suggest that routine use of ECG exposure control can facilitate improved arterial DSA evaluations of suspected cervicothoracic vascular disease.

  10. Metabolic Correction in the Management of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improving Clinical Results Beyond Symptom Control

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Massari, Jorge R.; Gonzalez, Michael J.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Allende-Vigo, Myriam Z.; Duconge, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Current Clinical Management Guidelines of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy (DPN) are based on adequate glucose control and symptomatic pain relief. However, meticulous glycemic control could delay the onset or slow the progression of diabetic neuropathy in patients with DM type 2, but it does not completely prevent the progression of the disease. Complications of DPN as it continues its natural course, produce increasing pain and discomfort, loss of sensation, ulcers, infections, amputations and even death. In addition to the increased suffering, disability and loss of productivity, there is a very significant economic impact related to the treatment of DPN and its complications. In USA alone, it has been estimated that there are more than 5,000,000 patients suffering from DPN and the total annual cost of treating the disease and its complications is over $10,000 million dollars. In order to be able to reduce complications of DPN, it is crucial to improve or correct the metabolic conditions that lead to the pathology present in this condition. Pathophysiologic mechanisms implicated in diabetic neuropathy include: increased polyol pathway with accumulation of sorbitol and reduced Na+/K+-ATPase activity, microvascular damage and hypoxia due to nitric oxide deficit and increased oxygen free radical activity. Moreover, there is a decrease in glutathione and increase in homocysteine. Clinical trials in the last two decades have demonstrated that the use of specific nutrients can correct some of these metabolic derangements, improving symptom control and providing further benefits such as improved sensorium, blood flow and nerve regeneration. We will discuss the evidence on lipoic acid, acetyi-L-carnitine, benfotiamine and the combination of active B vitamins L-methylfolate, methylcobalamin and piridoxal-6-phosphate. In addition, we discuss the role of metforrnin, an important drug in the management of diabetes, and the presence of specific polymorphic genes, in the risk

  11. Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with A Modern Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Anthony J.; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    We are in the middle of a cooperative astronomy education project to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). We have completed an overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, and have made it available for hundreds of students at both schools, and once per week to the public. We have written an assessment test which was distributed to the students at the beginning and end of the Fall 2006 semester, which will be used as a baseline to determine whether the laboratory activities, which are currently under development, improve student learning in the Fall 2007 semester next year. The studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories will be designed to challenge student misconceptions. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we will cycle students through concurrent activities. This is enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We demonstrate the productivity of our newly refurbished telescope, show the baseline results of our assessment, and present samples of activities under development. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

  12. Performance improvement of robots using a learning control scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, Ramuhalli; Chiang, Pen-Tai; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Many applications of robots require that the same task be repeated a number of times. In such applications, the errors associated with one cycle are also repeated every cycle of the operation. An off-line learning control scheme is used here to modify the command function which would result in smaller errors in the next operation. The learning scheme is based on a knowledge of the errors and error rates associated with each cycle. Necessary conditions for the iterative scheme to converge to zero errors are derived analytically considering a second order servosystem model. Computer simulations show that the errors are reduced at a faster rate if the error rate is included in the iteration scheme. The results also indicate that the scheme may increase the magnitude of errors if the rate information is not included in the iteration scheme. Modification of the command input using a phase and gain adjustment is also proposed to reduce the errors with one attempt. The scheme is then applied to a computer model of a robot system similar to PUMA 560. Improved performance of the robot is shown by considering various cases of trajectory tracing. The scheme can be successfully used to improve the performance of actual robots within the limitations of the repeatability and noise characteristics of the robot.

  13. Geologic control of severe expansive clay damage to a subdivision in the Pierre Shale, southwest Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, J.D.; West, M.W.; Noe, D.C.; Olsen, H.W.; McCarty, D.K.

    1996-01-01

    Shortly after construction of a subdivision in the southwest Denver metropolitan area in 1986, a portion of the subdivision built directly on steeply-dipping strata of the Pierre Shale began experiencing damaging differential movements, causing house foundations to fail and pavements to warp and crack. This formation is a Late Cretaceous marine clay-shale composed predominantly of fluvial mixed-layer illite/smectite and quartz. During deposition of the shale, periodic and explosive volcanism generated thin beds of bentonite, consisting initially of volcanic ash and subsequently altered to nearly pure smectite. Some of these bentonite beds were exposed in a trench adjacent to the subdivision and perpendicular to the strike of the steeply-dipping strata. The thickest bentonite beds correlated well with linear heave features that these beds parallel the bedrock strike throughout the subdivision were mapped via severely deformed pavements. Mineralogical data show the bentonite bed that correlates with the worst damage within the subdivision consists of about 62% smectite by weight with mixed-layer illite/smectite expandability of 92%. By comparison, a sample of the typical silty claystone, which is fluvial mixed-layer illite/smectite mixed with detrital quartz from the adjacent strata, had about 23% smectite by weight with 70% to 90% illite/smectite expandability. Geotechnical tests for swell potential show that samples of 2 bentonite beds swelled 39% to 43% compared to 2% to 8% for samples of the typical silty claystone. It is proposed that differential swell resulting from stratigraphically-controlled differences in clay mineralogy and grain-size is the primary factor controlling extreme damage for this geologic setting.

  14. Effectiveness of fencing and hunting to control Lama guanicoe browsing damage: Implications for Nothofagus pumilio regeneration in harvested forests.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pastur, Guillermo; Soler, Rosina; Ivancich, Horacio; Lencinas, María V; Bahamonde, Héctor; Peri, Pablo L

    2016-03-01

    Browsing damage by native ungulates is often to be considered one of the reasons of regeneration failure in Nothofagus pumilio silvicultural systems. Fencing and hunting in forests at regeneration phase have been proposed to mitigate browsing effects. This study aims to determine effectiveness of these control methods in harvested forests, evaluating browsing damage over regeneration, as well as climate-related constraints (freezing or desiccation). Forest structure and regeneration plots were established in two exclosures against native ungulates (Lama guanicoe) by wire fences in the Chilean portion of Tierra del Fuego island, where tree regeneration density, growth, abiotic damage and quality (multi-stems and base/stem deformation) were assessed. Exclosures did not influence regeneration density (at the initial stage with < 1.3 m high, and at the advanced stage with >1.3 m high). However, sapling height at 10-years old was significantly lower outside (40-50 cm high) than inside exclosures (80-100 cm), and also increased their annual height growth, probably as a hunting effect. Likewise, quality was better inside exclosures. Alongside browsing, abiotic conditions negatively influenced sapling quality in the regeneration phase (20%-28% of all seedlings), but greatly to taller plants (as those from inside exclosure). This highlights the importance of considering climatic factors when analysing browsing effects. For best results, control of guanaco in recently harvested areas by fencing should be applied in combination with a reduction of guanaco density through continuous hunting. The benefits of mitigation actions (fencing and hunting) on regeneration growth may shorten the regeneration phase period in shelterwood cutting forests (30-50% less time), but incremental costs must be analysed in the framework of management planning by means of long-term studies. PMID:26708647

  15. Effectiveness of fencing and hunting to control Lama guanicoe browsing damage: Implications for Nothofagus pumilio regeneration in harvested forests.

    PubMed

    Martínez Pastur, Guillermo; Soler, Rosina; Ivancich, Horacio; Lencinas, María V; Bahamonde, Héctor; Peri, Pablo L

    2016-03-01

    Browsing damage by native ungulates is often to be considered one of the reasons of regeneration failure in Nothofagus pumilio silvicultural systems. Fencing and hunting in forests at regeneration phase have been proposed to mitigate browsing effects. This study aims to determine effectiveness of these control methods in harvested forests, evaluating browsing damage over regeneration, as well as climate-related constraints (freezing or desiccation). Forest structure and regeneration plots were established in two exclosures against native ungulates (Lama guanicoe) by wire fences in the Chilean portion of Tierra del Fuego island, where tree regeneration density, growth, abiotic damage and quality (multi-stems and base/stem deformation) were assessed. Exclosures did not influence regeneration density (at the initial stage with < 1.3 m high, and at the advanced stage with >1.3 m high). However, sapling height at 10-years old was significantly lower outside (40-50 cm high) than inside exclosures (80-100 cm), and also increased their annual height growth, probably as a hunting effect. Likewise, quality was better inside exclosures. Alongside browsing, abiotic conditions negatively influenced sapling quality in the regeneration phase (20%-28% of all seedlings), but greatly to taller plants (as those from inside exclosure). This highlights the importance of considering climatic factors when analysing browsing effects. For best results, control of guanaco in recently harvested areas by fencing should be applied in combination with a reduction of guanaco density through continuous hunting. The benefits of mitigation actions (fencing and hunting) on regeneration growth may shorten the regeneration phase period in shelterwood cutting forests (30-50% less time), but incremental costs must be analysed in the framework of management planning by means of long-term studies.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of an automated telephone intervention to improve blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Teresa N; Ho, Timothy S; Handler, Joel; Kanter, Michael H; Goldberg, Ruthie A; Reynolds, Kristi

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a telephonic outreach program to improve blood pressure (BP) control among patients with hypertension. The authors identified adults 18 years and older with uncontrolled BP within the previous 12 months. Patients received either an automated telephone call advising them to have a walk-in BP check (n=31,619) or usual care (n=33,154). The primary outcome was BP control at 4 weeks. Significantly more patients who received the intervention achieved BP control compared with the usual care group (32.5% vs 23.7%; P<.0001). Patients in the intervention arm with cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or diabetes mellitus achieved better BP control. Older age, female sex, and having a household income above the median were associated with BP control. When designing quality-improvement interventions to increase BP control rates, health care organizations should consider utilizing an automated telephone outreach campaign. PMID:24034658

  17. Human recombinant factor VIIa may improve heat intolerance in mice by attenuating hypothalamic neuronal apoptosis and damage.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Hsien; Yung, Ming-Chi

    2014-10-01

    Intolerance to heat exposure is believed to be associated with hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis impairment [reflected by decreases in blood concentrations of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone]. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of human recombinant factor VIIa (rfVIIa) on heat intolerance, HPA axis impairment, and hypothalamic inflammation, ischemic and oxidative damage, and apoptosis in mice under heat stress. Immediately after heat stress (41.2 °C for 1 h), mice were treated with vehicle (1 mL/kg of body weight) or rfVIIa (65-270 µg/kg of body weight) and then returned to room temperature (26 °C). Mice still alive on day 4 of heat exposure were considered survivors. Cellular ischemia markers (e.g., glutamate, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio), oxidative damage markers (e.g., nitric oxide metabolite, hydroxyl radials), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α) in hypothalamus were determined. In addition, blood concentrations of both ACTH and corticosterone were measured. Hypothalamic cell damage was assessed by determing the neuronal damage scores, whereas the hypothalamic cell apoptosis was determined by assessing the numbers of cells stained with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated αUTP nick-end labeling, caspase-3-positive cells, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecula-1-positive cells in hypothalamus. Compared with vehicle-treated heated mice, rfVIIa-treated heated mice had significantly higher fractional survival (8/10 vs 1/10), lesser thermoregulatory deficit (34.1 vs 24.8 °C), lesser extents of ischemic, oxidative, and inflammatory markers in hypothalamus, lesser neuronal damage scores and apoptosis in hypothalamus, and lesser HPA axis impairment. Human recombinant factor VIIa appears to exert a protective effect against heatstroke by attenuating hypothalamic cell apoptosis (due to ischemic, inflammatory, and oxidative damage

  18. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

  19. Glycosylation: impact, control and improvement during therapeutic protein production.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rita; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of the biopharmaceutical industry represented a major revolution for modern medicine, through the development of recombinant therapeutic proteins that brought new hope for many patients with previously untreatable diseases. There is a ever-growing demand for these therapeutics that forces a constant technological evolution to increase product yields while simultaneously reducing costs. However, the process changes made for this purpose may also affect the quality of the product, a factor that was initially overlooked but which is now a major focus of concern. Of the many properties determining product quality, glycosylation is regarded as one of the most important, influencing, for example, the biological activity, serum half-life and immunogenicity of the protein. Consequently, monitoring and control of glycosylation is now critical in biopharmaceutical manufacturing and a requirement of regulatory agencies. A rapid evolution is being observed in this context, concerning the influence of glycosylation in the efficacy of different therapeutic proteins, the impact on glycosylation of a diversity of parameters/processes involved in therapeutic protein production, the analytical methodologies employed for glycosylation monitoring and control, as well as strategies that are being explored to use this property to improve therapeutic protein efficacy (glycoengineering). This work reviews the main findings on these subjects, providing an up-to-date source of information to support further studies.

  20. Saccades Improve Postural Control: A Developmental Study in Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Ajrezo, Layla; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Dual-task performance is known to affect postural stability in children. This study focused on the effect of oculomotor tasks like saccadic eye movements on postural stability, studied in a large population of children by recording simultaneously their eye movements and posture. Materials and Methods Ninety-five healthy children from 5.8 to 17.6 years old were examined. All children were free of any vestibular, neurological, ophtalmologic and orthoptic abnormalities. Postural control was measured with a force platform TechnoConcept®, and eye movements with video oculography (MobilEBT®). Children performed two oculomotor tasks: fixation of a stable central target and horizontal saccades. We measured the saccade latency and the number of saccades during fixation as well as the surface, length and mean velocity of the center of pressure. Results During postural measurement, we observed a correlation between the age on the one hand and a decrease in saccade latency as well as an improvement in the quality of fixation on the other. Postural sway decreases with age and is reduced in the dual task (saccades) in comparison with a simple task of fixation. Discussion - Conclusion These results suggest a maturation of neural circuits controlling posture and eye movements during childhood. This study also shows the presence of an interaction between the oculomotor system and the postural system. Engaging in oculomotor tasks results in a reduction of postural sway. PMID:24278379

  1. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1999-01-19

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

  2. Electrotactile EMG feedback improves the control of prosthesis grasping force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweisfurth, Meike A.; Markovic, Marko; Dosen, Strahinja; Teich, Florian; Graimann, Bernhard; Farina, Dario

    2016-10-01

    Objective. A drawback of active prostheses is that they detach the subject from the produced forces, thereby preventing direct mechanical feedback. This can be compensated by providing somatosensory feedback to the user through mechanical or electrical stimulation, which in turn may improve the utility, sense of embodiment, and thereby increase the acceptance rate. Approach. In this study, we compared a novel approach to closing the loop, namely EMG feedback (emgFB), to classic force feedback (forceFB), using electrotactile interface in a realistic task setup. Eleven intact-bodied subjects and one transradial amputee performed a routine grasping task while receiving emgFB or forceFB. The two feedback types were delivered through the same electrotactile interface, using a mixed spatial/frequency coding to transmit 8 discrete levels of the feedback variable. In emgFB, the stimulation transmitted the amplitude of the processed myoelectric signal generated by the subject (prosthesis input), and in forceFB the generated grasping force (prosthesis output). The task comprised 150 trials of routine grasping at six forces, randomly presented in blocks of five trials (same force). Interquartile range and changes in the absolute error (AE) distribution (magnitude and dispersion) with respect to the target level were used to assess precision and overall performance, respectively. Main results. Relative to forceFB, emgFB significantly improved the precision of myoelectric commands (min/max of the significant levels) for 23%/36% as well as the precision of force control for 12%/32%, in intact-bodied subjects. Also, the magnitude and dispersion of the AE distribution were reduced. The results were similar in the amputee, showing considerable improvements. Significance. Using emgFB, the subjects therefore decreased the uncertainty of the forward pathway. Since there is a correspondence between the EMG and force, where the former anticipates the latter, the emgFB allowed for

  3. Hierarchical Control Scheme for Improving Transient Voltage Recovery of a DFIG-Based WPP

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinho; Muljadi, Eduard; Kang, Yong Cheol

    2015-06-05

    Modern grid codes require that wind power plants (WPPs) inject reactive power according to the voltage dip at a point of interconnection (POI). This requirement helps to support a POI voltage during a fault. However, if a fault is cleared, the POI and wind turbine generator (WTG) voltages are likely to exceed acceptable levels unless the WPP reduces the injected reactive power quickly. This might deteriorate the stability of a grid by allowing the disconnection of WTGs to avoid any damage. This paper proposes a hierarchical control scheme of a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG)-based WPP. The proposed scheme aims to improve the reactive power injecting capability during the fault and suppress the overvoltage after the fault clearance. To achieve the former, an adaptive reactive power-to-voltage scheme is implemented in each DFIG controller so that a DFIG with a larger reactive power capability will inject more reactive power. To achieve the latter, a washout filter is used to capture a high frequency component contained in the WPP voltage, which is used to remove the accumulated values in the proportional-integral controllers. Test results indicate that the scheme successfully supports the grid voltage during the fault, and recovers WPP voltages without exceeding the limit after the fault clearance.

  4. Impaired L1 and executive control after left basal ganglia damage in a bilingual Basque-Spanish person with aphasia.

    PubMed

    Adrover-Roig, Daniel; Galparsoro-Izagirre, Nekane; Marcotte, Karine; Ferré, Perrine; Wilson, Maximiliano A; Inés Ansaldo, Ana

    2011-06-01

    Bilinguals must focus their attention to control competing languages. In bilingual aphasia, damage to the fronto-subcortical loop may lead to pathological language switching and mixing and the attrition of the more automatic language (usually L1). We present the case of JZ, a bilingual Basque-Spanish 53-year-old man who, after haematoma in the left basal ganglia, presented with executive deficits and aphasia, characterised by more impaired language processing in Basque, his L1. Assessment with the Bilingual Aphasia Test revealed impaired spontaneous and automatic speech production and speech rate in L1, as well as impaired L2-to-L1 sentence translation. Later observation led to the assessment of verbal and non-verbal executive control, which allowed JZ's impaired performance on language tasks to be related to executive dysfunction. In line with previous research, we report the significant attrition of L1 following damage to the left basal ganglia, reported for the first time in a Basque-Spanish bilingual. Implications for models of declarative and procedural memory are discussed.

  5. [Effect of Astragali Radix in improving early renal damage in metabolic syndrome rats through ACE2/Mas pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong-ying; Liang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Li, Ning-yin; Xu, Han; Yang, Mi-na; Lin, Xin; Yu, Heng; Chang, Peng; Yu, Jing

    2015-11-01

    To study the expression of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin (Ang) 1-7 specific receptor Mas protain in renal blood vessels of metabolic syndrome ( MS) rats and its anti-oxidative effect. A total of 80 male SD rats were divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC, the same volume of normal saline), the MS group (high fat diet), the MS + Astragali Radix group (MS + HQ, 6 g x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage) and the MS + Valsartan group (MS + XST, 30 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) in gavage). After four weeks of intervention, their general indexes, biochemical indexes and blood pressure were measured; plasma and renal tissue Ang II, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide demutase (SOD) levels were measured with radioimmunoassay. The protein expressions of Mas receptor, AT1R, ACE and ACE2 were detected by western blot analysis. According to the result, compared with the NC group, the MS group and the MS + HQ group showed significant increases in systolic and diastolic pressures, body weight, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, free fatty acid and Ang II level of MS rats (P < 0.05). The MS + XST group showed notable decreases in systolic and diastolic pressures than that of the MS group. The MS group showed significant increases in the SOD activity and NO level and decrease in the MDA level after being intervened with Astragali Radix. ACE and AT1R protein expressions in renal tissues of the MS group were higher than that in the NC group, but with lower ACE2 and -Mas receptor expressions (all P < 0.05). Compared with the MS group, the MS + HQ group showed significant increase in Mas receptor expression in renal tissues, whereas the MS + XST group showed notable decrease in AT1R (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, Astragali Radix can increase the Mas receptor expressions in renal tissues, decrease ACE expression and change local Ang II, MDA, NO and SOD in kidneys, so as to protect early damages in renal tissues. PMID:27071265

  6. A coordinated MIMO control design for a power plant using improved sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Rahmat-Allah; Samani, Siavash Golmohammadi

    2014-03-01

    For the participation of the steam power plants in regulating the network frequency, boilers and turbines should be co-ordinately controlled in addition to the base load productions. Lack of coordinated control over boiler-turbine may lead to instability; oscillation in producing power and boiler parameters; reduction in the reliability of the unit; and inflicting thermodynamic tension on devices. This paper proposes a boiler-turbine coordinated multivariable control system based on improved sliding mode controller (ISMC). The system controls two main boiler-turbine parameters i.e., the turbine revolution and superheated steam pressure of the boiler output. For this purpose, a comprehensive model of the system including complete and exact description of the subsystems is extracted. The parameters of this model are determined according to our case study that is the 320MW unit of Islam-Abad power plant in Isfahan/Iran. The ISMC method is simulated on the power plant and its performance is compared with the related real PI (proportional-integral) controllers which have been used in this unit. The simulation results show the capability of the proposed controller system in controlling local network frequency and superheated steam pressure in the presence of load variations and disturbances of boiler. PMID:24112644

  7. A coordinated MIMO control design for a power plant using improved sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Mohammad; Hooshmand, Rahmat-Allah; Samani, Siavash Golmohammadi

    2014-03-01

    For the participation of the steam power plants in regulating the network frequency, boilers and turbines should be co-ordinately controlled in addition to the base load productions. Lack of coordinated control over boiler-turbine may lead to instability; oscillation in producing power and boiler parameters; reduction in the reliability of the unit; and inflicting thermodynamic tension on devices. This paper proposes a boiler-turbine coordinated multivariable control system based on improved sliding mode controller (ISMC). The system controls two main boiler-turbine parameters i.e., the turbine revolution and superheated steam pressure of the boiler output. For this purpose, a comprehensive model of the system including complete and exact description of the subsystems is extracted. The parameters of this model are determined according to our case study that is the 320MW unit of Islam-Abad power plant in Isfahan/Iran. The ISMC method is simulated on the power plant and its performance is compared with the related real PI (proportional-integral) controllers which have been used in this unit. The simulation results show the capability of the proposed controller system in controlling local network frequency and superheated steam pressure in the presence of load variations and disturbances of boiler.

  8. Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels: Database Extension Task 3.0 and Impact Damage Effects Control Task 8.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Ross, William L., Sr.; Tapphorn, Ralph M.

    2002-01-01

    This document represents efforts accomplished at the NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) in support of the Enhanced Technology for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV) Program, a joint research and technology effort among the U.S. Air Force, NASA, and the Aerospace Corporation. WSTF performed testing for several facets of the program. Testing that contributed to the Task 3.0 COPV database extension objective included baseline structural strength, failure mode and safe-life, impact damage tolerance, sustained load/impact effect, and materials compatibility. WSTF was also responsible for establishing impact protection and control requirements under Task 8.0 of the program. This included developing a methodology for establishing an impact control plan. Seven test reports detail the work done at WSTF. As such, this document contributes to the database of information regarding COPV behavior that will ensure performance benefits and safety are maintained throughout vessel service life.

  9. Effects of low-level laser therapy on performance, inflammatory markers, and muscle damage in young water polo athletes: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo; de Lira, Fábio Santos; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; de Paiva Carvalho, Rodrigo Leal

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of 5 days of 810-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) intervention on inflammatory and muscle damage markers and performance in young water polo players. Twenty young male water polo players participated in the study, which was designed as a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Active LLLT or an identical placebo LLLT were delivered to eight points on the adductor muscle region immediately after each training day. Performance was measured by a 200-m maximal swimming (P200) and a 30-s crossbar jump test (30CJ) which was performed every day before training, and blood samples were drawn pre and post the final LLLT intervention to measure interleukins (IL) and muscle damage markers. There was no significant change in the P200 exercise in the LLLT group compared with the placebo group but there was a moderate improvement in the 30CJ (8.7 ± 2.6 %). IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha presented increased (P < 0.016) concentration within group 48 h after the last LLLT intervention compared to pre, 0, and 24 h, but did not differ between groups. IL-10 increased over time in the placebo group and reached a moderate effect compared to the LLLT group. The creatine kinase decreased significantly (P = 0.049) over the time within the LLLT treatment group, but there was no significant change in lactate dehydrogenase (P = 0.150). In conclusion, LLLT resulted in a non-significant, but small to moderate effect on inflammatory and muscle damage markers and a moderate effect on performance in water polo players. In addition, the lack of positive results could be due to the small area covered by irradiation and this should be considered in future studies. PMID:26873498

  10. Single-Lever Power Control for General Aviation Aircraft Promises Improved Efficiency and Simplified Pilot Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    General aviation research is leading to major advances in internal combustion engine control systems for single-engine, single-pilot aircraft. These advances promise to increase engine performance and fuel efficiency while substantially reducing pilot workload and increasing flight safety. One such advance is a single-lever power control (SLPC) system, a welcome departure from older, less user-friendly, multilever engine control systems. The benefits of using single-lever power controls for general aviation aircraft are improved flight safety through advanced engine diagnostics, simplified powerplant operations, increased time between overhauls, and cost-effective technology (extends fuel burn and reduces overhaul costs). The single-lever concept has proven to be so effective in preliminary studies that general aviation manufacturers are making plans to retrofit current aircraft with the technology and are incorporating it in designs for future aircraft.

  11. Fracture mode control: a bio-inspired strategy to combat catastrophic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haimin; Xie, Zhaoqian; He, Chong; Dao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of natural biomaterials have attracted intense attention from researchers with focus on the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Nevertheless, no material is unconquerable under sufficiently high load. If fracture is unavoidable, constraining the damage scope turns to be a practical way to preserve the integrity of the whole structure. Recent studies on biomaterials have revealed that many structural biomaterials tend to be fractured, under sufficiently high indentation load, through ring cracking which is more localized and hence less destructive compared to the radial one. Inspired by this observation, here we explore the factors affecting the fracture mode of structural biomaterials idealized as laminated materials. Our results suggest that fracture mode of laminated materials depends on the coating/substrate modulus mismatch and the indenter size. A map of fracture mode is developed, showing a critical modulus mismatch (CMM), below which ring cracking dominates irrespective of the indenter size. Many structural biomaterials in nature are found to have modulus mismatch close to the CMM. Our results not only shed light on the mechanics of inclination to ring cracking exhibited by structural biomaterials but are of great value to the design of laminated structures with better persistence of structural integrity.

  12. Fracture mode control: a bio-inspired strategy to combat catastrophic damage

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Haimin; Xie, Zhaoqian; He, Chong; Dao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties of natural biomaterials have attracted intense attention from researchers with focus on the strengthening and toughening mechanisms. Nevertheless, no material is unconquerable under sufficiently high load. If fracture is unavoidable, constraining the damage scope turns to be a practical way to preserve the integrity of the whole structure. Recent studies on biomaterials have revealed that many structural biomaterials tend to be fractured, under sufficiently high indentation load, through ring cracking which is more localized and hence less destructive compared to the radial one. Inspired by this observation, here we explore the factors affecting the fracture mode of structural biomaterials idealized as laminated materials. Our results suggest that fracture mode of laminated materials depends on the coating/substrate modulus mismatch and the indenter size. A map of fracture mode is developed, showing a critical modulus mismatch (CMM), below which ring cracking dominates irrespective of the indenter size. Many structural biomaterials in nature are found to have modulus mismatch close to the CMM. Our results not only shed light on the mechanics of inclination to ring cracking exhibited by structural biomaterials but are of great value to the design of laminated structures with better persistence of structural integrity. PMID:25619564

  13. Genetic Control or Repair and Adaptive Response to Low-Level DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. Haber

    2009-10-05

    Research was focused on how a single double-strand break - a model of low-dose ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage - could be studied in a simple model system, budding yeast. Breaks were induced in several different ways. We used the site-specific HO endonuclease to create a single DSB in all cells of the population so that its fate could be extensively analyzed genetically and molecularly. We also used two heterologous systems, the plant DS element and the Rag1/Rag2 proteins, to generate different types of DSBs, these containing hairpin ends that needed to be cleaved open before end-joining could take place. All three approaches yielded important new findings. We also extended our analysis of the Mre11 protein that plays key roles in both NHEJ and in homologous recombination. Finally we analyzed the poorly understood recombination events that were independent of the key recombination protein, Rad52. This line of inquiry was strongly motivated by the fact that vertebrate cells do not rely strongly on Rad52 for homologous recombination, so that some clues about alternative mechanisms could be gained by understanding how Rad52-independent recombination occurred. We found that the Mre11 complex was the most important element in Rad52-independent recombination.

  14. The propagation of self-control: Self-control in one domain simultaneously improves self-control in other domains.

    PubMed

    Tuk, Mirjam A; Zhang, Kuangjie; Sweldens, Steven

    2015-06-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 144(3) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2015-24174-008). The affiliations for co-authors Kuangjie Zhang and Steven Sweldens were incorrect. All versions of this article have been corrected.] A rich tradition in self-control research has documented the negative consequences of exerting self-control in 1 task for self-control performance in subsequent tasks. However, there is a dearth of research examining what happens when people exert self-control in multiple domains simultaneously. The current research aims to fill this gap. We integrate predictions from the most prominent models of self-control with recent neuropsychological insights in the human inhibition system to generate the novel hypothesis that exerting effortful self-control in 1 task can simultaneously improve self-control in completely unrelated domains. An internal meta-analysis on all 18 studies we conducted shows that exerting self-control in 1 domain (i.e., controlling attention, food consumption, emotions, or thoughts) simultaneously improves self-control in a range of other domains, as demonstrated by, for example, reduced unhealthy food consumption, better Stroop task performance, and less impulsive decision making. A subset of 9 studies demonstrates the crucial nature of task timing-when the same tasks are executed sequentially, our results suggest the emergence of an ego depletion effect. We provide conservative estimates of the self-control facilitation (d = |0.22|) as well as the ego depletion effect size (d = |0.17|) free of data selection and publication biases. These results (a) shed new light on self-control theories, (b) confirm recent claims that previous estimates of the ego depletion effect size were inflated due to publication bias, and (c) provide a blueprint for how to handle the power issues and associated file drawer problems commonly encountered in multistudy research projects. PMID

  15. The propagation of self-control: Self-control in one domain simultaneously improves self-control in other domains.

    PubMed

    Tuk, Mirjam A; Zhang, Kuangjie; Sweldens, Steven

    2015-06-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 144(3) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2015-24174-008). The affiliations for co-authors Kuangjie Zhang and Steven Sweldens were incorrect. All versions of this article have been corrected.] A rich tradition in self-control research has documented the negative consequences of exerting self-control in 1 task for self-control performance in subsequent tasks. However, there is a dearth of research examining what happens when people exert self-control in multiple domains simultaneously. The current research aims to fill this gap. We integrate predictions from the most prominent models of self-control with recent neuropsychological insights in the human inhibition system to generate the novel hypothesis that exerting effortful self-control in 1 task can simultaneously improve self-control in completely unrelated domains. An internal meta-analysis on all 18 studies we conducted shows that exerting self-control in 1 domain (i.e., controlling attention, food consumption, emotions, or thoughts) simultaneously improves self-control in a range of other domains, as demonstrated by, for example, reduced unhealthy food consumption, better Stroop task performance, and less impulsive decision making. A subset of 9 studies demonstrates the crucial nature of task timing-when the same tasks are executed sequentially, our results suggest the emergence of an ego depletion effect. We provide conservative estimates of the self-control facilitation (d = |0.22|) as well as the ego depletion effect size (d = |0.17|) free of data selection and publication biases. These results (a) shed new light on self-control theories, (b) confirm recent claims that previous estimates of the ego depletion effect size were inflated due to publication bias, and (c) provide a blueprint for how to handle the power issues and associated file drawer problems commonly encountered in multistudy research projects.

  16. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  17. Engine Control Improvement through Application of Chaotic Time Series Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.B., Jr.; Daw, C.S.

    2003-07-15

    The objective of this program was to investigate cyclic variations in spark-ignition (SI) engines under lean fueling conditions and to develop options to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) in compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines at high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates. The CIDI activity builds upon an earlier collaboration between ORNL and Ford examining combustion instabilities in SI engines. Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to understand the fundamental causes of combustion instability in spark-ignition engines operating with lean fueling. The results of this earlier activity demonstrated that such combustion instabilities are dominated by the effects of residual gas remaining in each cylinder from one cycle to the next. A very simple, low-order model was developed that explained the observed combustion instability as a noisy nonlinear dynamical process. The model concept lead to development of a real-time control strategy that could be employed to significantly reduce cyclic variations in real engines using existing sensors and engine control systems. This collaboration led to the issuance of a joint patent for spark-ignition engine control. After a few years, the CRADA was modified to focus more on EGR and CIDI engines. The modified CRADA examined relationships between EGR, combustion, and emissions in CIDI engines. Information from CIDI engine experiments, data analysis, and modeling were employed to identify and characterize new combustion regimes where it is possible to simultaneously achieve significant reductions in NOx and PM emissions. These results were also used to develop an on-line combustion diagnostic (virtual sensor) to make cycle-resolved combustion quality assessments for active feedback control. Extensive experiments on engines at Ford and ORNL led to the development of the virtual sensor concept that may be able to detect simultaneous reductions in NOx and PM

  18. The use of plastic optical fibres and shape memory alloys for damage assessment and damping control in composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Cantwell, W. J.

    2003-08-01

    This paper reports the use of a plastic fibre sensor for detecting impact damage in carbon fibre epoxy cantilever beams by monitoring their damping response under free vibration loading conditions. The composite beams were impacted at impact energies up to 8 J. The residual strengths and stiffnesses of the damaged laminates were measured in order to relate reductions in their mechanical properties to changes in their damping characteristics. Here, optical fibre sensors were surface bonded to carbon fibre composite beams which were subjected to free vibration tests to monitor their dynamic response. In the second part of this study, Ni-Ti shape memory alloy (SMA) wires were employed to control and modify the damping response of a composite beam. The SMA wires were initially trained to obtain the desired shape when activated. Here, the trained SMA wires were heated locally using a nickel/chromium wire that was wrapped around the trained region of the SMA. By using this method to activate the SMA wire (as opposed to direct electrical heating), it is possible to obtain localized actuation without heating the entire length of the wire. This procedure minimizes any damage to the host material that may result from local heat transfer between the SMA wire and the composite structure. In addition, the reduction in power requirements to achieve SMA activation permits the use of small-size power packs which can in turn lead to a potential weight reduction in weight-critical applications. The findings of this study demonstrate that a trained SMA offers a superior damping capability to that exhibited by an 'as-supplied' flat-annealed wire.

  19. [Improvement of dissolution test using micro-controlled roller pump].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Noriaki; Konishi, Nahoko; Nitta, Tadahisa; Taga, Atsushi; Ito, Yoshimasa

    2012-01-01

    The dissolution test is a core performance test in pharmaceutical development and quality control of solid drug products. The conventional HPLC dissolution method (batch-sampling method) involves many steps including the filtration, collection and replenishment of sample solutions. We previously reported a dissolution test that involved microdialysis methods (microdialysis-HPLC method) and allowed many steps to be omitted. However, the recovery rate of theophylline by the microdialysis-HPLC method was lower, and the decrease in the flow rate through the dialysis probe caused variation between each tablet. In this study, we have attempted to improve the dissolution test by using a precise micro-controlled roller pump and microfiltering probe (microfiltering-HPLC method). Sustained release preparations of Theodur (100 mg) were used, and the test solutions used were water, buffer at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8, and pH 6.8-buffer containing 0.1-1% polysorbate 80 or sodium lauryl sulfate. In all test solutions, the microfiltering-HPLC method was able to accomplish continuous sampling of sample solutions, and the recovery rate of theophylline was over 90%. The dissolution behavior by the microfiltering-HPLC method tends to reflect the pharmaceutical design in comparison with the batch-sampling method, and the standard deviations by the microfiltering-HPLC are lower than with the batch-sampling method. In addition, the microfiltering-HPLC method allows many steps to be omitted, such as the filtration, collection and replenishment of sample solutions. These findings provide significant information that can be used in the pharmaceutical development and quality assessment of solid drug products.

  20. Curcumin prevents muscle damage by regulating NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways and improves performance: an in vivo model

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Kazim; Pala, Ragip; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Oguzhan; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Exercise (Ex) increases reactive oxygen species and impairs antioxidant defense systems. Recent data suggest that curcumin (CW) possesses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effects of CW supplementation on Ex performance, endurance, and changes in serum and muscle proteins in rats after exhaustive Ex. Materials and methods Twenty-eight (28) male Wistar rats (age: 8 weeks and body weight: 180±20 g) were divided into four treatment groups: 1) control (C; no Ex), 2) C + CW (no Ex + CW), 3) C + Ex, and 4) C + Ex + CW (Ex + CW). CW was administered as 100 mg/kg CurcuWin®, providing 20 mg of curcuminoids daily for 6 weeks. A motor-driven rodent treadmill was used to carry out the Ex protocols. During a 5-day period, animals in chronic Ex groups were put through different regimens: day 1, 10 m/min for 10 minutes; day 2, 20 m/min for 10 minutes; day 3, 25 m/min for 10 minutes; day 4, 25 m/min for 20 minutes; and day 5, 25 m/min for 30 minutes. Animals were exercised at 25 m/min for 45 min/d for 5 d/wk for 6 weeks. Blood and muscle samples were analyzed for muscle markers, oxidative stress, and antioxidant markers. Results Lactate and muscle malondialdehyde levels decreased in the CW-treated groups (P<0.0001). However, activities of antioxidant enzyme levels increased in the CW-treated groups. Run to exhaustion (minutes) improved in the CW-treated groups. Muscle nuclear factor-κB (P<0.05) and heat shock protein 70 (P<0.05) levels were much lowered in the CW treated group followed by Ex group. In addition, muscle inhibitors of kappa B, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, thioredoxin-1, sirtuin 1, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, and glucose transporter 4 protein levels in the Ex + CW group were higher than those in the control and Ex groups (P<0.05). Conclusion This study suggests that novel CW has the

  1. Curcumin prevents muscle damage by regulating NF-κB and Nrf2 pathways and improves performance: an in vivo model

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Kazim; Pala, Ragip; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Oguzhan; Orhan, Cemal; Sahin, Nurhan; Juturu, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Exercise (Ex) increases reactive oxygen species and impairs antioxidant defense systems. Recent data suggest that curcumin (CW) possesses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effects of CW supplementation on Ex performance, endurance, and changes in serum and muscle proteins in rats after exhaustive Ex. Materials and methods Twenty-eight (28) male Wistar rats (age: 8 weeks and body weight: 180±20 g) were divided into four treatment groups: 1) control (C; no Ex), 2) C + CW (no Ex + CW), 3) C + Ex, and 4) C + Ex + CW (Ex + CW). CW was administered as 100 mg/kg CurcuWin®, providing 20 mg of curcuminoids daily for 6 weeks. A motor-driven rodent treadmill was used to carry out the Ex protocols. During a 5-day period, animals in chronic Ex groups were put through different regimens: day 1, 10 m/min for 10 minutes; day 2, 20 m/min for 10 minutes; day 3, 25 m/min for 10 minutes; day 4, 25 m/min for 20 minutes; and day 5, 25 m/min for 30 minutes. Animals were exercised at 25 m/min for 45 min/d for 5 d/wk for 6 weeks. Blood and muscle samples were analyzed for muscle markers, oxidative stress, and antioxidant markers. Results Lactate and muscle malondialdehyde levels decreased in the CW-treated groups (P<0.0001). However, activities of antioxidant enzyme levels increased in the CW-treated groups. Run to exhaustion (minutes) improved in the CW-treated groups. Muscle nuclear factor-κB (P<0.05) and heat shock protein 70 (P<0.05) levels were much lowered in the CW treated group followed by Ex group. In addition, muscle inhibitors of kappa B, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha, thioredoxin-1, sirtuin 1, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, and glucose transporter 4 protein levels in the Ex + CW group were higher than those in the control and Ex groups (P<0.05). Conclusion This study suggests that novel CW has the

  2. Dual-tasking postural control in patients with right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Bourlon, Clémence; Lehenaff, Laurent; Batifoulier, Cécile; Bordier, Aurélie; Chatenet, Aurélia; Desailly, Eric; Fouchard, Christian; Marsal, Muriel; Martinez, Marianne; Rastelli, Federica; Thierry, Anaïs; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Duret, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The control of dual-tasking effects is a daily challenge in stroke neurorehabilitation. It maybe one of the reasons why there is poor functional prognosis after a stroke in the right hemisphere, which plays a dominant role in posture control. The purpose of this study was to explore cognitive motor interference in right brain-lesioned and healthy subjects maintaining a standing position while performing three different tasks: a control task, a simple attentional task and a complex attentional task. We measured the sway area of the subjects on a force platform, including the center of pressure and its displacements. Results showed that stroke patients presented a reduced postural sway compared to healthy subjects, who were able to maintain their posture while performing a concomitant attentional task in the same dual-tasking conditions. Moreover, in both groups, the postural sway decreased with the increase in attentional load from cognitive tasks. We also noticed that the stability of stroke patients in dual-tasking conditions increased together with the weight-bearing rightward deviation, especially when the attentional load of the cognitive tasks and lower limb motor impairments were high. These results suggest that stroke patients and healthy subjects adopt a similar postural regulation pattern aimed at maintaining stability in dual-tasking conditions involving a static standing position and different attention-related cognitive tasks. Our results indicate that attention processes might facilitate static postural control.

  3. Low-cost teleoperator-controlled vehicle for damage assessment and radiation dose measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Tyree, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    A low-cost, disposable, radio-controlled, remote-reading, ionizing radiation and surveillance teleoperator re-entry vehicle has been built. The vehicle carries equipment, measures radiation levels, and evaluates building conditions. The basic vehicle, radio control with amplifiers, telemetry, elevator, and video camera with monitor cost less than $2500. Velcro-mounted alpha, beta-gamma, and neutron sensing equipment is used in the present system. Many types of health physics radiation measuring equipment may be substituted on the vehicle. The system includes a black-and-white video camera to observe the environment surrounding the vehicle. The camera is mounted on a vertical elevator extendible to 11 feet above the floor. The present vehicle uses a video camera with an umbilical cord between the vehicle and the operators. Preferred operation would eliminate the umbilical. Video monitoring equipment is part of the operator control system. Power for the vehicle equipment is carried on board and supplied by sealed lead-acid batteries. Radios are powered by 9-V alkaline batteries. The radio control receiver, servo drivers, high-power amplifier and 49-MHz FM transceivers were irradiated at moderate rates with neutron and gamma doses to 3000 Rem and 300 Rem, respectively, to ensure system operation.

  4. Controlling incipient oxidation of pyrite for improved rejection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.; Tao, D.P.

    1996-04-01

    It is well known that superficial oxidation of pyrite produces a hydrophobic sulfur-rich surface and creates problems in separating the mineral from coal using surface-based processes such as flotation and agglomeration. Numerous studies of pyrite oxidation have been conducted but most of them were concerned with the advanced stages of oxidation, and as a result it was not possible to establish a relationship between oxidation and flotation behavior. A better understanding of the mechanisms and kinetics of the incipient oxidation reactions, which may vary with the origin, morphology, texture, and solid state properties of pyrite, can lead to the development of new processes that can improve pyrite rejection from coal. This project is aimed at better understanding of the mechanisms involved during the initial stages of pyrite oxidation to foster the development of advanced coal cleaning technologies. Studies were conducted by fracturing pyrite electrodes in-situ in an electrochemical cell to create virgin surfaces. Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical techniques were employed to characterize the incipient oxidation of pyrite in aqueous solutions. Microflotation tests were conducted to obtain information on the hydrophobicity of pyrite under controlled E{sub h} and pH conditions, and the results were correlated with electrochemical studies.

  5. Adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition toward improved multifunctional prosthesis control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie

    2015-04-01

    The non-stationary property of electromyography (EMG) signals in real life settings usually hinders the clinical application of the myoelectric pattern recognition for prosthesis control. The classical EMG pattern recognition approach consists of two separate steps: training and testing, without considering the changes between training and testing data induced by electrode shift, fatigue, impedance changes and psychological factors, and often results in performance degradation. The aim of this study was to develop an adaptive myoelectric pattern recognition system, aiming to retrain the classifier online with the testing data without supervision, providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications. This paper presents an adaptive unsupervised classifier based on support vector machine (SVM) to improve the classification performance. Experimental data from 15 healthy subjects were used to evaluate performance. Preliminary study on intra-session and inter-session EMG data was conducted to verify the performance of the unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier. The unsupervised adaptive SVM classifier outperformed the conventional SVM by 3.3% and 8.0% for the combination of time-domain and autoregressive features in the intra-session and inter-session tests, respectively. The proposed approach is capable of incorporating the useful information in testing data to the classification model by taking into account the overtime changes in the testing data with respect to the training data to retrain the original classifier, therefore providing a self-correction mechanism for suppressing misclassifications.

  6. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  7. The role of Dbf4/Drf1-dependent kinase Cdc7 (Ddk) in DNA damage checkpoint control

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiya; Lau, Eric; Chiang, Gary G.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Dbf4/Drf1-dependent S-phase promoting kinase Cdc7 (Ddk) is thought to be an essential target inactivated by the S-phase checkpoint machinery that inhibits DNA replication. However, we show here that the complex formation, chromatin-association, and kinase activity of Ddk are not inhibited during the DNA damage-induced S-phase checkpoint response in Xenopus egg extracts and mammalian cells. Instead, we find that Ddk plays an active role in regulating S-phase checkpoint signaling. Addition of purified Ddk to Xenopus egg extracts or overexpression of Dbf4 in HeLa cells downregulates ATR-Chk1 checkpoint signaling and overrides the inhibition of DNA replication and cell cycle progression induced by DNA damaging agents. These results indicate that Ddk functions as an upstream regulator to monitor S-phase checkpoint signaling. We propose that Ddk modulates the S-phase checkpoint control by attenuating checkpoint signaling and triggering DNA replication re-initiation during the S-phase checkpoint recovery. PMID:19111665

  8. Improved control configuration of PWM rectifiers based on neuro-fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Hakan; Kececioglu, O Fatih; Gani, Ahmet; Yildiz, Ceyhun; Sekkeli, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that rectifiers are used widely in many applications required AC/DC transformation. With technological advances, many studies are performed for AC/DC converters and many control methods are proposed in order to improve the performance of these rectifiers in recent years. Pulse width modulation (PWM) based rectifiers are one of the most popular rectifier types. PWM rectifiers have lower input current harmonics and higher power factor compared to classical diode and thyristor rectifiers. In this study, neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) which has robust, nonlinear structure and do not require the mathematical model of the system to be controlled has been proposed for PWM rectifiers. Three NFCs are used in control scheme of proposed PWM rectifier in order to control the dq-axis currents and DC voltage of PWM rectifier. Moreover, simulation studies are carried out to demonstrate the performance of the proposed control scheme at MATLAB/Simulink environment in terms of rise time, settling time, overshoot, power factor, total harmonic distortion and power quality. PMID:27504240

  9. Modulated control system for improved regulation in on/off mode automatic controllers

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.

    1982-09-20

    A modulated control system is provided for improving regulation of the bed level in a fixed-bed coal gasifier into which coal is fed from a rotary coal feeder. A nuclear bed level gauge using a cobalt source and an ion chamber detector is used to detect the coal bed level in the gasifier. The detector signal is compared to a bed level set point signal in a primary controller which operates in proportional/integral modes to produce an error signal. The error signal is modulated by the injection of a triangular wave signal of a frequency of about 0.0004 Hz and an amplitude of about 80% of the primary deadband. The modulated error signal is fed to a triple-deadband secondary controller which jogs the coal feeder speed up or down by on/off control of a feeder speed change driver such that the gasifier bed level is driven toward the set point while preventing excessive cycling (oscillation) common in on/off mode automatic controllers of this type. Regulation of the bed level is achieved without excessive feeder speed control jogging. 3 figures.

  10. Improving the laser damage resistance of oxide thin films and multilayers via tailoring ion beam sputtering parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosar, M. B.; Ozhan, A. E. S.; Aydogdu, G. H.

    2015-05-01

    Ion beam sputtering is one of the widely used methods for manufacturing laser optical components due to its advantages such as uniformity, reproducibility, suitability for multilayer coatings and growth of dielectric materials with high packing densities. In this study, single Ta2O5 layers and Ta2O5/SiO2 heterostructures were deposited on optical quality glass substrates by dual ion beam sputtering. We focused on the effect of deposition conditions like substrate cleaning, assistance by 12 cm diameter ion beam source and oxygen partial pressure on the laser-induced damage threshold of Ta2O5 single layers. Afterwards, the obtained information is employed to a sample design and produces a Ta2O5/SiO2 multilayer structure demonstrating low laser-induced damage without a post treatment procedure.

  11. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer. PMID:25006864

  12. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer.

  13. Blood Pressure Profile and Hypertensive Organ Damage in COPD Patients and Matched Controls. The RETAPOC Study

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, Rafael; Mateos-Colino, Alfonso; Pena-Seijo, Marta; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Martín-Vázquez, Francisco J.; Pose-Reino, Antonio; Domínguez-Pin, Nuria; Garnacho-Gayarre, Nuria; Pérez-de-Llano, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest that there is a pathogenic link between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, increased sympathetic tone has been described in several respiratory diseases. Our objective was to determine whether hypertension mediated by sympathetic overactivity is a mechanism that explains the association between COPD and cardiovascular diseases. Methods Prospective nested case-control observational study; 67 COPD patients were matched 1:1 by sex and age to controls with smoking history. 24 hour-blood pressure monitoring, urinary catecholamines and their metabolites measurement, echocardiography, carotid ultrasound examination, nocturnal oximetry and retinography were performed. Findings classic cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities were similarly distributed between cases and controls. No significant differences for blood pressure variables (difference for mean systolic blood pressure: -0·13 mmHg; 95% CI: -4·48,4·20; p = 0·94; similar results for all blood presssure variables) or catecholamines values were found between both groups. There was a tendency for lower left ventricle ejection fraction in the COPD cases, that approached statistical significance (64·8 ± 7·4 vs 67·1 ± 6·2, p = 0·05). There were no differences in the retinal arteriovenous ratio, the carotid intima-media thickness, or the number of carotid plaques, between cases and controls. Fibrinogen values were higher in the COPD group (378·4 ± 69·6 vs 352·2 ± 45·6 mg/dL, p = 0·01) and mean nocturnal oxygen saturation values were lower for COPD patients (89·0 ± 4·07 vs 92·3 ± 2·2%, p < 0·0001). Interpretation Hypertension induced by sympathetic overactivity does not seem to be a mechanism that could explain the association between COPD and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27362479

  14. Combination therapy of molecular hydrogen and hyperoxia improves survival rate and organ damage in a zymosan-induced generalized inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    HONG, YUNCHUAN; SUN, LI; SUN, RUIQIANG; CHEN, HONGGUANG; YU, YONGHAO; XIE, KELIANG

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a leading cause of mortality in critically ill patients. Hyperoxia treatment may be beneficial to critically ill patients. However, the clinical use of hyperoxia is hindered as it may exacerbate organ injury by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen gas (H2) exerts a therapeutic antioxidative effect by selectively reducing ROS. Combination therapy of H2 and hyperoxia has previously been shown to significantly improve survival rate and organ damage extent in mice with polymicrobial sepsis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether combination therapy with H2 and hyperoxia could improve survival rate and organ damage in a zymosan (ZY)-induced generalized inflammation model. The results showed that the inhalation of H2 (2%) or hyperoxia (98%) alone improved the 14-day survival rate of ZY-challenged mice from 20 to 70 or 60%, respectively. However, combination therapy with H2 and hyperoxia could increase the 14-day survival rate of ZY-challenged mice to 100%. Furthermore, ZY-challenged mice showed significant multiple organ damage characterized by increased serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, as well as lung, liver and kidney histopathological scores at 24 h after ZY injection. These symptoms where attenuated by H2 or hyperoxia alone; however, combination therapy with H2 and hyperoxia had a more marked beneficial effect against lung, liver and kidney damage in ZY-challenged mice. In addition, the beneficial effects of this combination therapy on ZY-induced organ damage were associated with decreased serum levels of the oxidative product 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, increased activity of superoxide dismutase and reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokines high-mobility group box 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In conclusion, combination therapy with H2 and hyperoxia provides enhanced therapeutic efficacy against multiple organ damage in

  15. Dynamic response of the Trinity River Relief Bridge to controlled pile damage: modeling and experimental data analysis comparing Fourier and Hilbert Huang techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ray Ruichong; King, Robert; Olson, Larry; Xu, You-Lin

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the implementation of a method for nonlinear, nonstationary data processing, namely the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) in traditional vibration-based approaches to characterizing structural damage and shows the frequency signature of local structural damage in nonstationary vibration recordings. In particular, following the review of traditional approaches to characterizing structural damage from nonstationary vibration recordings, this study first offers the justifications of the HHT as an alternative and complementary data process in addressing the nonstationarity of the vibration. With the use of recordings from controlled field vibration tests of substructures in the Trinity River Relief Bridge in Texas in its intact, minor- and severe-damage pile states, this study then shows that the HHT-based approach can single out some natural frequencies of the structure from a mixed frequency content in recordings that also contain the time-dependent excitation and noise frequencies. Subsequently, this study exposes that the frequency downshift for the damaged pile relative to the undamaged one is an indicative index for the damage extent. The above results are also validated by an ANSYS model-based analysis. Finally, a comprehensive HHT-based characterization of structural damage is discussed, and the potential use for cost-effective, efficient structural damage diagnosis procedures and health-monitoring systems is provided.

  16. Improving Apple IPM by maximizing opportunities for biological control.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of biological control in controlling arthropod pests in commercial apple production is for the most part not well understood. We make the case that conditions at this time are especially good for making a concerted effort to integrate biological control into IPM systems. Pest control progr...

  17. 3D positional control of magnetic levitation system using adaptive control: improvement of positioning control in horizontal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshimasa; Fujitani, Yasuhiro; Kato, Norihiko; Tsuda, Naoaki; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a technique that levitates and conveys a hand, a kind of micro-robot, by applying magnetic forces: the hand is assumed to have a function of holding and detaching the objects. The equipment to be used in our experiments consists of four pole-pieces of electromagnets, and is expected to work as a 4DOF drive unit within some restricted range of 3D space: the three DOF are corresponding to 3D positional control and the remaining one DOF, rotational oscillation damping control. Having used the same equipment, Khamesee et al. had manipulated the impressed voltages on the four electric magnetics by a PID controller by the use of the feedback signal of the hand's 3D position, the controlled variable. However, in this system, there were some problems remaining: in the horizontal direction, when translating the hand out of restricted region, positional control performance was suddenly degraded. The authors propose a method to apply an adaptive control to the horizontal directional control. It is expected that the technique to be presented in this paper contributes not only to the improvement of the response characteristic but also to widening the applicable range in the horizontal directional control.

  18. Remote damage control resuscitation and the Solstrand Conference: defining the need, the language, and a way forward.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Strandenes, Geir; Cap, Andrew P; Rentas, Francisco J; Glassberg, Elon; Mott, Jeff; Dubick, Michael A; Spinella, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) is emerging as a standard practice in civilian and military trauma care. Primary objectives include resolution of immediate life threats followed by optimization of physiological status in the perioperative period. To accomplish this, DCR employs a unique hypotensive-hemostatic resuscitation strategy that avoids traditional crystalloid intravenous fluids in favor of early blood component use in ratios mimicking whole blood. The presence of uncontrolled major hemorrhage (UMH) coupled with a delay in access to hemostatic surgical intervention remains a primary contributor to preventable death in both combat and in many domestic settings, including rural areas and disaster sites. As a result, civilian and military emergency care leaders throughout the world have sought a means to project DCR principles forward of the traditional trauma resuscitation bay, into such remote environments as disaster scenes, rural health facilities, and the contemporary battlefield. After reflecting on experiences from past conflicts, defining current capability gaps, and examining available and potential solutions, a strategy for "remote damage control resuscitation" (RDCR) has been proposed. In order for RDCR to progress from concept to clinical strategy, it will be necessary to define existing gaps in knowledge and clinical capability; develop a lexicon so that investigators and operators may understand each other; establish coherent research and development agendas; and execute comprehensive investigations designed to predict, diagnose, and mitigate the consequences of hemorrhagic shock and acute traumatic coagulopathy before they become irreversible. This article seeks to introduce the concept of RDCR; to reinforce the importance of identifying and optimally managing UMH and the resulting shock state as part of a comprehensive approach to out-of-hospital stabilization and en route care; and to propose investigational strategies to enable the

  19. Abbreviated laparotomy or damage control laparotomy: Why, when and how to do it?

    PubMed

    Voiglio, E J; Dubuisson, V; Massalou, D; Baudoin, Y; Caillot, J L; Létoublon, C; Arvieux, C

    2016-08-01

    The goal of abbreviated laparotomy is to treat severely injured patients whose condition requires an immediate surgical operation but for whom a prolonged procedure would worsen physiological impairment and metabolic failure. Indeed, in severely injured patients, blood loss and tissue injuries enhance the onset of the "bloody vicious circle", triggered by the triad of acidosis-hypothermia-coagulopathy. Abbreviated laparotomy is a surgical strategy that forgoes the completeness of operation in favor of a physiological approach, the overriding preference going to rapidity and limiting the procedure to control the injuries. Management is based on sequential association of the shortest possible preoperative resuscitation with surgery limited to essential steps to control injury (stop the bleeding and contamination), without definitive repair. The latter will be ensured during a scheduled re-operation after a period of resuscitation aiming to correct physiological abnormalities induced by the trauma and its treatment. This strategy necessitates a pre-defined plan and involvement of the entire medical and nursing staff to reduce time loss to a strict minimum. PMID:27542655

  20. Eicosanoids: Exploiting Insect Immunity to Improve Biological Control Programs.

    PubMed

    Stanley, David; Haas, Eric; Miller, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Insects, like all invertebrates, express robust innate, but not adaptive, immune reactions to infection and invasion. Insect immunity is usually resolved into three major components. The integument serves as a physical barrier to infections. Within the hemocoel, the circulating hemocytes are the temporal first line of defense, responsible for clearing the majority of infecting bacterial cells from circulation. Specific cellular defenses include phagocytosis, microaggregation of hemocytes with adhering bacteria, nodulation and encapsulation. Infections also stimulate the humoral component of immunity, which involves the induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and activation of prophenoloxidase. These peptides appear in the hemolymph of challenged insects 6-12 hours after the challenge. Prostaglandins and other eicosanoids are crucial mediators of innate immune responses. Eicosanoid biosynthesis is stimulated by infection in insects. Inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthesis lethally renders experimental insects unable to clear bacterial infection from hemolymph. Eicosanoids mediate specific cell actions, including phagocytosis, microaggregation, nodulation, hemocyte migration, hemocyte spreading and the release of prophenoloxidase from oenocytoids. Some invaders have evolved mechanisms to suppress insect immunity; a few of them suppress immunity by targeting the first step in the eicosanoid biosynthesis pathways, the enzyme phospholipase A₂. We proposed research designed to cripple insect immunity as a technology to improve biological control of insects. We used dsRNA to silence insect genes encoding phospholipase A₂, and thereby inhibited the nodulation reaction to infection. The purpose of this article is to place our view of applying dsRNA technologies into the context of eicosanoid actions in insect immunity. The long-term significance of research in this area lies in developing new pest management technologies to contribute to food security

  1. Eicosanoids: Exploiting Insect Immunity to Improve Biological Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, David; Haas, Eric; Miller, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Insects, like all invertebrates, express robust innate, but not adaptive, immune reactions to infection and invasion. Insect immunity is usually resolved into three major components. The integument serves as a physical barrier to infections. Within the hemocoel, the circulating hemocytes are the temporal first line of defense, responsible for clearing the majority of infecting bacterial cells from circulation. Specific cellular defenses include phagocytosis, microaggregation of hemocytes with adhering bacteria, nodulation and encapsulation. Infections also stimulate the humoral component of immunity, which involves the induced expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and activation of prophenoloxidase. These peptides appear in the hemolymph of challenged insects 6–12 hours after the challenge. Prostaglandins and other eicosanoids are crucial mediators of innate immune responses. Eicosanoid biosynthesis is stimulated by infection in insects. Inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthesis lethally renders experimental insects unable to clear bacterial infection from hemolymph. Eicosanoids mediate specific cell actions, including phagocytosis, microaggregation, nodulation, hemocyte migration, hemocyte spreading and the release of prophenoloxidase from oenocytoids. Some invaders have evolved mechanisms to suppress insect immunity; a few of them suppress immunity by targeting the first step in the eicosanoid biosynthesis pathways, the enzyme phospholipase A2. We proposed research designed to cripple insect immunity as a technology to improve biological control of insects. We used dsRNA to silence insect genes encoding phospholipase A2, and thereby inhibited the nodulation reaction to infection. The purpose of this article is to place our view of applying dsRNA technologies into the context of eicosanoid actions in insect immunity. The long-term significance of research in this area lies in developing new pest management technologies to contribute to food security in

  2. Exercise-induced muscle damage is reduced in resistance-trained males by branched chain amino acids: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well documented that exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) decreases muscle function and causes soreness and discomfort. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation has been shown to increase protein synthesis and decrease muscle protein breakdown, however, the effects of BCAAs on recovery from damaging resistance training are unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of a BCAA supplementation on markers of muscle damage elicited via a sport specific bout of damaging exercise in trained volunteers. Methods Twelve males (mean ± SD age, 23 ± 2 y; stature, 178.3 ± 3.6 cm and body mass, 79.6 ± 8.4 kg) were randomly assigned to a supplement (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6) group. The damaging exercise consisted of 100 consecutive drop-jumps. Creatine kinase (CK), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), muscle soreness (DOMS), vertical jump (VJ), thigh circumference (TC) and calf circumference (CC) were measured as markers of muscle damage. All variables were measured immediately before the damaging exercise and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h post-exercise. Results A significant time effect was seen for all variables. There were significant group effects showing a reduction in CK efflux and muscle soreness in the BCAA group compared to the placebo (P<0.05). Furthermore, the recovery of MVC was greater in the BCAA group (P<0.05). The VJ, TC and CC were not different between groups. Conclusion The present study has shown that BCAA administered before and following damaging resistance exercise reduces indices of muscle damage and accelerates recovery in resistance-trained males. It seems likely that BCAA provided greater bioavailablity of substrate to improve protein synthesis and thereby the extent of secondary muscle damage associated with strenuous resistance exercise. Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT01529281. PMID:22569039

  3. Controlling Hypertension to Prevent Target Organ Damage: Perspectives from the World Hypertension League President.

    PubMed

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2016-01-01

    The evidence from epidemiological and observational studies over the past five decades consistently identify a significant association of blood pressure level and disease risks for both sexes, all races and cultures, as well as all age groups. The evidence is strong such that clinical guidelines and intervention programs focus on blood pressure management and lower blood pressure levels for primary and secondary stroke prevention supported and promoted by numerous organizations including the World Hypertension League. These comprehensive components of population risk reduction are ideal models for the clinical medicine and population health partnership, and timely for global implementation. The accelerated decline in blood pressure-related outcomes (eg, stroke mortality), which began in the 1970s in the US and Western countries, included models for aggressive detection, treatment and control strategies for hypertension. These strategies can be implemented on a global scale to respond to the global risks from blood pressure, which is developing in the most vulnerable populations. PMID:27440963

  4. Quality control in the application of flow cytometry to studies of environmentally-induced genetic damage

    SciTech Connect

    McCreedy, C.D.; Robinson, J.P.; Dallas, C.E.; Jagoe, C.H.

    1999-07-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has been used to demonstrate altered DNA content in fish, reptiles, birds and mammals exposed to radionuclides, PAHs and other contaminants. However, artifacts resulting from sample preparation, handling, variations in instrument parameters or other factors may confound such measurements. Some artifacts resemble genotoxic responses and so could lead to erroneous positive conclusions. As part of ongoing studies of effects of various pollutants on DNA content in fishes, the authors tested sample handling and preparation methods for the induction of artifacts. The authors describe QA/QC methods, including control of staining, conditions, doublet discrimination by comparison of peak versus integral fluorescence, internal DNA standards, and the use of time versus fluorescence plots. Consistent application of these practices is essential to obtain valid measurements of DNA content in environmental samples, and neglect of these can result in poor quality data and the acceptance of incorrect hypotheses.

  5. Cross-cultural management of pest animal damage: a case study of feral buffalo control in Australia's Kakadu National Park.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Cathy J; Whitehead, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Government agencies responsible for pest animal management often assume that their views and assumptions about the benefits of control are widely shared, especially if these pests are exotics. This was certainly the case when tens of thousands of feral Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) were to be culled in Australia's Kakadu National Park as part of a national Brucellosis and Tuberculosis Eradication Campaign (BTEC). Implementation of the campaign sparked considerable dispute between officials and aboriginal and non-aboriginal interests about the risks posed by buffalo relative to their value as a potential resource. Drawing upon a variety of written and oral sources relating to the era of buffalo control in Kakadu, this paper critically analyzes the way in which detriment caused by buffalo was appraised and managed under the BTEC program. In particular, the paper focuses the ways in which the BTEC program affected aboriginal people in Kakadu, who view buffalo as a source of customary and economic benefit as well as a source of change on their lands. The paper then considers what lessons can be learned from the BTEC for the development of sensible feral management objectives and strategies. It is argued that effective management of feral animals such as buffalo will require environmental managers to engage with local people and involve them in the definition and management of pest animal damage and methods of control.

  6. Technical innovations that may facilitate real-time telementoring of damage control surgery in austere environments: a proof of concept comparative evaluation of the importance of surgical experience, telepresence, gravity and mentoring in the conduct of damage control laparotomies

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Maj Andrew W.; LaPorta, Anthony; Brien, Susan; Leslie, Tim; Glassberg, Col Elon; McKee, Jessica; Ball, Chad G.; Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn; Roberts, Derek J.; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bleeding to death is the most preventable cause of posttraumatic death worldwide. Despite the fact that many of these deaths are anatomically salvageable with relatively basic surgical interventions, they remain lethal in actuality in prehospital environments when no facilities and skills exist to contemplate undertaking basic damage control surgery (DCS). With better attention to prehospital control of extremity hemorrhage, intracavitary bleeding (especially intraperitoneal) remains beyond the scope of prehospital providers. However, recent revolutions in the informatics and techniques of telementoring (TMT), DCS and highly realistic accelerated training of motivated first responders suggests that basic life-saving DCS may have applicability to save bleeding patients in austere environments previously considered unsalvageable. Especially with informatic advances, any provider with Internet connectivity can potentially be supported by highly proficient specialists with content expertise in the index problem. This unprecedented TMT support may allow highly motivated but inexperienced personnel to provide advanced surgical interventions in extreme environments in many austere locations both on and above the planet. PMID:26100783

  7. Water Chemistry Control System for Recovery of Damaged and Degraded Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.; Thomas, J.

    2011-02-18

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the government of Serbia have led the project cosponsored by the U.S, Russia, European Commission, and others to repackage and repatriate approximately 8000 spent fuel elements from the RA reactor fuel storage basins at the VIN?A Institute of Nuclear Sciences to Russia for reprocessing. The repackaging and transportation activities were implemented by a Russian consortium which includes the Sosny Company, Tekhsnabeksport (TENEX) and Mayak Production Association. High activity of the water of the fuel storage basin posed serious risk and challenges to the fuel removal from storage containers and repackaging for transportation. The risk centered on personnel exposure, even above the basin water, due to the high water activity levels caused by Cs-137 leached from fuel elements with failed cladding. A team of engineers from the U.S. DOE-NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Vinca Institute, and the IAEA performed the design, development, and deployment of a compact underwater water chemistry control system (WCCS) to remove the Cs-137 from the basin water and enable personnel safety above the basin water for repackaging operations. Key elements of the WCCS system included filters, multiple columns containing an inorganic sorbent, submersible pumps and flow meters. All system components were designed to be remotely serviceable and replaceable. The system was assembled and successfully deployed at the Vinca basin to support the fuel removal and repackaging activities. Following the successful operations, the Cs-137 is now safely contained and consolidated on the zeolite sorbent used in the columns of the WCCS, and the fuel has been removed from the basins. This paper reviews the functional requirements, design, and deployment of the WCCS.

  8. Hemispheric specificity for proprioception: Postural control of standing following right or left hemisphere damage during ankle tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Noémie C; Maynard, Luc; Abbas, Djawad; Mesure, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Right brain damage (RBD) following stroke often causes significant postural instability. In standing (without vision), patients with RBD are more unstable than those with left brain damage (LBD). We hypothesised that this postural instability would relate to the cortical integration of proprioceptive afferents. The aim of this study was to use tendon vibration to investigate whether these changes were specific to the paretic or non-paretic limbs. 14 LBD, 12 RBD patients and 20 healthy subjects were included. Displacement of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) was recorded during quiet standing, then during 3 vibration conditions (80 Hz - 20s): paretic limb, non-paretic limb (left and right limbs for control subjects) and bilateral. Vibration was applied separately to the peroneal and Achilles tendons. Mean antero-posterior position of the CoP, variability and velocity were calculated before (4s), during and after (24s) vibration. For all parameters, the strongest perturbation was during Achilles vibrations. The Achilles non-paretic condition induced a larger backward displacement than the Achilles paretic condition. This condition caused specific behaviour on the velocity: the LBD group was perturbed at the onset of the vibrations, but gradually recovered their stability; the RBD group was significantly perturbed thereafter. After bilateral Achilles vibration, RBD patients required the most time to restore initial posture. The reduction in use of information from the paretic limb may be a central strategy to deal with risk-of-fall situations such as during Achilles vibration. The postural behaviour is profoundly altered by lesions of the right hemisphere when proprioception is perturbed. PMID:26358149

  9. Hemispheric specificity for proprioception: Postural control of standing following right or left hemisphere damage during ankle tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Noémie C; Maynard, Luc; Abbas, Djawad; Mesure, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Right brain damage (RBD) following stroke often causes significant postural instability. In standing (without vision), patients with RBD are more unstable than those with left brain damage (LBD). We hypothesised that this postural instability would relate to the cortical integration of proprioceptive afferents. The aim of this study was to use tendon vibration to investigate whether these changes were specific to the paretic or non-paretic limbs. 14 LBD, 12 RBD patients and 20 healthy subjects were included. Displacement of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) was recorded during quiet standing, then during 3 vibration conditions (80 Hz - 20s): paretic limb, non-paretic limb (left and right limbs for control subjects) and bilateral. Vibration was applied separately to the peroneal and Achilles tendons. Mean antero-posterior position of the CoP, variability and velocity were calculated before (4s), during and after (24s) vibration. For all parameters, the strongest perturbation was during Achilles vibrations. The Achilles non-paretic condition induced a larger backward displacement than the Achilles paretic condition. This condition caused specific behaviour on the velocity: the LBD group was perturbed at the onset of the vibrations, but gradually recovered their stability; the RBD group was significantly perturbed thereafter. After bilateral Achilles vibration, RBD patients required the most time to restore initial posture. The reduction in use of information from the paretic limb may be a central strategy to deal with risk-of-fall situations such as during Achilles vibration. The postural behaviour is profoundly altered by lesions of the right hemisphere when proprioception is perturbed.

  10. Regulatory Control or Oxidative Damage? Proteomic Approaches to Interrogate the Role of Cysteine Oxidation Status in Biological Processes*

    PubMed Central

    Held, Jason M.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation is a double-edged sword for cellular processes and its role in normal physiology, cancer and aging remains only partially understood. Although oxidative stress may disrupt biological function, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions in a cell are often tightly regulated and play essential physiological roles. Cysteines lie at the interface between these extremes since the chemical properties that make specific thiols exquisitely redox-sensitive also predispose them to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species during stress. Thus, these modifications can be either under reversible redox regulatory control or, alternatively, a result of reversible or irreversible oxidative damage. In either case, it has become increasingly important to assess the redox status of protein thiols since these modifications often impact such processes as catalytic activity, conformational alterations, or metal binding. To better understand the redox changes that accompany protein cysteine residues in complex biological systems, new experimental approaches have been developed to identify and characterize specific thiol modifications and/or changes in their overall redox status. In this review, we describe the recent technologies in redox proteomics that have pushed the boundaries for detecting and quantifying redox cysteine modifications in a cellular context. While there is no one-size-fits-all analytical solution, we highlight the rationale, strengths, and limitations of each technology in order to effectively apply them to specific biological questions. Several technological limitations still remain unsolved, however these approaches and future developments play an important role toward understanding the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling in health and disease. PMID:22159599

  11. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-resistant cultivar selection

    PubMed Central

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L; Fiore, Arlene M

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the projected 50% increase in global grain demand by 2030 without further environmental degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant negative impact on crop yields, one way to increase future production is to reduce O3-induced agricultural losses. We present two strategies whereby O3 damage to crops may be reduced. We first examine the potential benefits of an O3 mitigation strategy motivated by climate change goals: gradual emission reductions of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas and tropospheric O3 precursor that has not yet been targeted for O3 pollution abatement. Our second strategy focuses on adapting crops to O3 exposure by selecting cultivars with demonstrated O3 resistance. We find that the CH4 reductions considered would increase global production of soybean, maize, and wheat by 23–102 Mt in 2030 – the equivalent of a ∼2–8% increase in year 2000 production worth $3.5–15 billion worldwide (USD2000), increasing the cost effectiveness of this CH4 mitigation policy. Choosing crop varieties with O3 resistance (relative to median-sensitivity cultivars) could improve global agricultural production in 2030 by over 140 Mt, the equivalent of a 12% increase in 2000 production worth ∼$22 billion. Benefits are dominated by improvements for wheat in South Asia, where O3-induced crop losses would otherwise be severe. Combining the two strategies generates benefits that are less than fully additive, given the nature of O3 effects on crops. Our results demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3-induced reductions in crop yields. PMID:23504903

  12. Signal pulses superimposed on power supply lines improve electrical control

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    To manipulate or monitor the operation of cranes and hoists, control engineers typically create control schemes that add numerous conductors, festoon systems, bulky dedicated conductor rails, radio and infrared controls. With modern power line communication equipment, power and intelligence can be combined to: add an unlimited number of control circuits without adding a single wire; have data communication without special cables; and eliminate bulky festoon systems and heavy cable track. Available from US Safety Trolley Corp., a SmartRail system superimposes data and control information on the power line to create a fully functional Local Area Network (LAN). The system network is based on the CEBus protocol EIA/IS-60 and uses a spread spectrum power line carrier technology. The heart of this system is the controller which manages all communication and control tasks. A power line coupling circuit couples the data signal from the controller to the a-c power conductors. These power conductors are often TRI-BAR/FOUR-BAR continuous conductor bar systems or existing conductor bar systems. The combination results in a secure data communications and control system for moving equipment.

  13. Wild Raspberry Subjected to Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion Improves the Protective Capacity against Ethyl Carbamate-Induced Oxidative Damage in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Li, Ya; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC), a probable human carcinogen, occurs widely in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that EC-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. Wild raspberries are rich in polyphenolic compounds, which possess potent antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of wild raspberry extracts produced before (RE) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (RD) on EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. Our primary data showed that ethyl carbamate could result in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in Caco-2 cells and raspberry extract after digestion (RD) may be more effective than that before digestion (RE) in attenuating toxicity caused by ethyl carbamate. Further investigation by fluorescence microscope revealed that RD may significantly ameliorate EC-induced oxidative damage by scavenging the overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), maintaining mitochondrial function and preventing glutathione (GSH) depletion. In addition, HPLC-ESI-MS results showed that the contents of identified polyphenolic compounds (esculin, kaempferol O-hexoside, and pelargonidin O-hexoside) were remarkably increased after digestion, which might be related to the better protective effect of RD. Overall, our results demonstrated that raspberry extract undergoing simulated gastrointestinal digestion may improve the protective effect against EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells.

  14. Caffeic acid improves cell viability and protects against DNA damage: involvement of reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Chen, L.J.; Jiang, F.; Yang, Y.; Wang, X.X.; Zhang, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is an adaptive response to a variety of oxidative stresses that renders cells resistant to harmful doses of stressing agents. Caffeic acid (CaA) is an important antioxidant that has protective effects against DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether CaA-induced protection is a hormetic effect remains unknown, as is the molecular mechanism that is involved. We found that a low concentration (10 μM) of CaA increased human liver L-02 cell viability, attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated decreases in cell viability, and decreased the extent of H2O2-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In L-02 cells exposed to H2O2, CaA treatment reduced ROS levels, which might have played a protective role. CaA also activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal pathway in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of ERK by its inhibitor U0126 or by its specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked the CaA-induced improvement in cell viability and the protective effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. This study adds to the understanding of the antioxidant effects of CaA by identifying a novel molecular mechanism of enhanced cell viability and protection against DNA damage. PMID:25831202

  15. Wild Raspberry Subjected to Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion Improves the Protective Capacity against Ethyl Carbamate-Induced Oxidative Damage in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Li, Ya; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC), a probable human carcinogen, occurs widely in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that EC-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. Wild raspberries are rich in polyphenolic compounds, which possess potent antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of wild raspberry extracts produced before (RE) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (RD) on EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. Our primary data showed that ethyl carbamate could result in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in Caco-2 cells and raspberry extract after digestion (RD) may be more effective than that before digestion (RE) in attenuating toxicity caused by ethyl carbamate. Further investigation by fluorescence microscope revealed that RD may significantly ameliorate EC-induced oxidative damage by scavenging the overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), maintaining mitochondrial function and preventing glutathione (GSH) depletion. In addition, HPLC-ESI-MS results showed that the contents of identified polyphenolic compounds (esculin, kaempferol O-hexoside, and pelargonidin O-hexoside) were remarkably increased after digestion, which might be related to the better protective effect of RD. Overall, our results demonstrated that raspberry extract undergoing simulated gastrointestinal digestion may improve the protective effect against EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. PMID:26788245

  16. Wild Raspberry Subjected to Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion Improves the Protective Capacity against Ethyl Carbamate-Induced Oxidative Damage in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Lingxia; Li, Ya; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC), a probable human carcinogen, occurs widely in many fermented foods. Previous studies indicated that EC-induced cytotoxicity was associated with oxidative stress. Wild raspberries are rich in polyphenolic compounds, which possess potent antioxidant activity. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effect of wild raspberry extracts produced before (RE) and after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion (RD) on EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. Our primary data showed that ethyl carbamate could result in cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in Caco-2 cells and raspberry extract after digestion (RD) may be more effective than that before digestion (RE) in attenuating toxicity caused by ethyl carbamate. Further investigation by fluorescence microscope revealed that RD may significantly ameliorate EC-induced oxidative damage by scavenging the overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), maintaining mitochondrial function and preventing glutathione (GSH) depletion. In addition, HPLC-ESI-MS results showed that the contents of identified polyphenolic compounds (esculin, kaempferol O-hexoside, and pelargonidin O-hexoside) were remarkably increased after digestion, which might be related to the better protective effect of RD. Overall, our results demonstrated that raspberry extract undergoing simulated gastrointestinal digestion may improve the protective effect against EC-induced oxidative damage in Caco-2 cells. PMID:26788245

  17. Pump-off controllers improve sucker rod lift economics

    SciTech Connect

    Amezcua, J.D.

    1982-02-01

    A controversal issue in the production of reservoir fluids is the application, field acceptance and reliability of automatic pump-off control (POC) devices on rod pumped wells. Three distinct types of pump-off controllers were selected for an extensive evaluation and results indicate that they offer an economical means of operating pumping wells and that field acceptance is attainable.

  18. Vapor-modulated heat pipe for improved temperature control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Ludeke, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Dryout induced by vapor throttling makes control of equipment temperature less dependent on variations in sink environment. Mechanism controls flow of vapor in heat pipe by using valve in return path to build difference in pressure and also difference in saturation temperature of the vapor. In steady state, valve closes just enough to produce partial dryout that achieves required temperature drop.

  19. The Origin of Aging: Imperfectness-Driven Non-Random Damage Defines the Aging Process and Control of Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties preclude ideal biomolecules and perfect biological functions. This inherent imperfectness leads to the generation of damage by every biological process, at all levels, from small molecules to cells. The damage is too numerous to be repaired, is partially invisible to natural selection and manifests as aging. I propose that it is the inherent imperfectness of biological systems that is the true root of the aging process. As each biomolecule generates specific forms of damage, the cumulative damage is largely non-random and is indirectly encoded in the genome. I consider this concept in light of other proposed theories of aging and integrate these disparate ideas into a single model. I also discuss the evolutionary significance of damage accumulation and strategies for reducing damage. Finally, I suggest ways to test this integrated model of aging. PMID:23769208

  20. Operability improvement of deepsea riser by active control

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Keisuke; Yoshida, Koichiro; Ishida, Shigeki

    1995-12-31

    In the operation of deepsea drilling, it becomes increasing difficult to keep the riser inclination angles at joints located at both ends of the riser within the allowable limits. This paper presents an active control of the riser inclination at both ends of riser. The current profile is such that the surface current decays linearly and vanishes at 1,000 m. The inclination angles are kept with the allowable range by a few thrusts attached along the riser and vessel positioning. The coupled equations of motion of vessel and 16 in. 4,000 M riser are formulated. Using these equations, optimal control of the system is formulated. Control responses of the riser are calculated and compared with uncontrolled cases to examine the effect of the control. The best vessel positioning and control gains are determined from a series of simulations changing the combination of parameters. The parameters are surface current speed and riser top tensions.

  1. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE CRYOGENIC CONTROL SYSTEM ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    HOLTROP,K.L; ANDERSON,P.M; MAUZEY,P.S

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The cryogenic facility that is part of the DIII-D tokamak system supplies liquid nitrogen and liquid helium to the superconducting magnets used for electron cyclotron heating, the D{sub 2} pellet injection system, cryopumps in the DIII-D vessel, and cryopanels in the neutral beam injection system. The liquid helium is liquefied on site using a Sulzer liquefier that has a 150 l/h liquefaction rate. Control of the cryogenic facility at DIII-D was initially accomplished through the use of three different programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Recently, two of those three PLCs, a Sattcon PLC controlling the Sulzer liquefier and a Westinghouse PLC, were removed and all their control logic was merged into the remaining PLC, a Siemens T1555. This replacement was originally undertaken because the removed PLCs were obsolete and unsupported. However, there have been additional benefits from the replacement. The replacement of the RS-232 serial links between the graphical user interface and the PLCs with a high speed Ethernet link allows for real-time display and historical trending of nearly all the cryosystem's data. this has greatly increased the ability to troubleshoot problems with the system, and has permitted optimization of the cryogenic system's performance because of the increased system integration. To move the control logic of the Sattcon control loops into the T1555, an extensive modification of the basic PID control was required. These modifications allow for better control of the control loops and are now being incorporated in other control loops in the system.

  2. Dapsone improves functional deficit and diminishes brain damage evaluated by 3-Tesla magnetic resonance image after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Mondragón-Lozano, Rodrigo; Heras-Romero, Yessica; Mendez-Armenta, Marisela; Osorio-Rico, Laura; Nava-Ruiz, Concepción; Ríos, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of death and the first of disability in the world population. We have shown that dapsone acts as an antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic agent after brain Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rats; however, its therapeutic efficacy, measured by imaging has not been characterized. In this context, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dapsone by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate imaging markers with motor function and oxidative stress after transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R). We used male rats throughout the experiment. Functional deficit after I/R was assessed by using Longa scale. The area of brain tissue damage was measured by histology. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Finally, difussion tensor MRI was employed to measure the fractional anisotropy (FA), as a MRI marker of the pathophysiologic brain status. Results showed a better functional recovery and less damaged tissue in animals treated with dapsone vs control group. The values of FA were higher in animals receiving treatment, indicating a better preservation of brain structure. At early stages of the damage, dapsone was able to reduce both oxidative markers (Nrf-2 and ROS). Our findings provide new evidence for the efficacy of dapsone when administered during the acute phase after I/R and that quantitative sequences of MRI are useful for characterizing its potential therapeutic benefits after stroke.

  3. The effects of anatabine on non-invasive indicators of muscle damage: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anatabine (ANA), a minor tobacco alkaloid found in the Solanaceae family of plants, may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity, which may be useful to aid in recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine the effects of ANA supplementation on the recovery of isometric strength and selected non-invasive indicators of muscle damage. Methods A double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover design was used to study eighteen men (mean ± SD age = 22.2 ± 3.1 yrs; body mass = 80.3 ± 15.7 kg) who participated in two randomly-ordered conditions separated by a washout period. The ANA condition consisted of consuming 6–12 mg anatabine per day for 10 days, while testing took place during days 7–10. The placebo (PLA) condition was identical except that the PLA supplement contained no ANA. Maximal voluntary isometric peak torque (PT) of the forearm flexors, arm circumference, hanging joint angle, and subjective pain ratings were measured before (PRE), immediately after (POST), and 24, 48, and 72 h after six sets of 10 maximal, eccentric isokinetic forearm flexion muscle actions. Resting heart rate and blood pressure were measured at PRE and 72 h in each condition. Results For PT, hanging joint angle, arm circumference, and subjective pain ratings, there were no condition x time (p > 0.05) interactions, there were no main effects for condition (p > 0.05), but there were main effects for time (p < 0.001). There were no condition x time (p > 0.05) interactions and no main effects for condition (p > 0.05) or time (p > 0.05) for blood pressure or resting heart rate. Conclusions ANA supplementation had no effect on the recovery of muscle strength, hanging joint angle, arm swelling, or subjective pain ratings after a bout of maximal eccentric exercise in the forearm flexors. Therefore, ANA may not be beneficial for those seeking to improve recovery from heavy eccentric

  4. An Improved Wavefront Control Algorithm for Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Basinger, Scott A.; Redding, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Wavefront sensing and control is required throughout the mission lifecycle of large space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). When an optic of such a telescope is controlled with both surface-deforming and rigid-body actuators, the sensitivity-matrix obtained from the exit pupil wavefront vector divided by the corresponding actuator command value can sometimes become singular due to difference in actuator types and in actuator command values. In this paper, we propose a simple approach for preventing a sensitivity-matrix from singularity. We also introduce a new "minimum-wavefront and optimal control compensator". It uses an optimal control gain matrix obtained by feeding back the actuator commands along with the measured or estimated wavefront phase information to the estimator, thus eliminating the actuator modes that are not observable in the wavefront sensing process.

  5. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health...

  6. Improving hypertension control among excessive alcohol drinkers: a randomised controlled trial in France. The WALPA Group.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, T; Nicaud, V; Darné, B; Rueff, B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To improve blood pressure control among hypertensive ( > 140/90 mmHg) excessive alcohol drinkers. DESIGN--Fourteen worksite physicians were randomised onto an intervention group and a control group. The intervention was based on training the worksite physicians and follow up of those hypertensive subjects defined as excessive drinkers. Follow up was based on self monitoring of alcohol consumption by the subject, in view of the results of their gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity determination. SETTING--Fourteen workplaces in France - mainly in the industrial sector. SUBJECTS--Altogether 15 301 subjects were screened by the 14 physicians: 129 of these were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--This was the difference between the initial systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the SBP one year later (delta BP). Secondary criteria were the difference between the initial and final diastolic blood pressure (delta DBP) and delta BP at two years; antihypertensive treatment; state alcohol consumption (delta AC); delta GGT; and body mass index (delta BMI). RESULTS--The decrease in SBP levels was significantly larger in the intervention group than in the control group: at one year, delta SBP values were -11.9 (15.6) mmHg and -4.6 (13.8) respectively (p < 0.05). This benefit was still observed after two years of follow up (-13.8 (17.4) mmHg v -7.5 (14.2) mmHg (p < 0.05)). No difference was observed in DBP. The percentage of treated subjects did not differ between groups. At one year, delta AC was larger in the intervention group (-2.8 (5.2) U/d) than in the control group (-1.6 (3.4) (p < 0.1)). delta GGT and delta BMI did not differ between the two groups. A weak positive correlation was observed between delta AC and delta SBP (r = 0.16). CONCLUSION--An intervention aimed at the hypertensive excessive drinkers in a working population was found to be effective in reducing SBP on a long term basis (two years). The mechanisms of reduction in alcohol

  7. Improving proactive control with training on language switching in bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoyun; Kang, Chunyan; Wu, Yanjing; Ma, Fengyang; Guo, Taomei

    2015-04-15

    The present study examined how a short period of language switching training affects nonverbal cognitive control, as measured by the AX version of the Continuous Performance Test. A group of Chinese-English bilinguals were trained over 10 days on a picture naming task that required switching between languages. We recorded their behavioral performance and event-related potentials before and after the training to examine its effects on cognitive performance. The behavioral measurement of proactive control, that is, goal maintenance before the occurrence of the target, is significantly larger in the post-training phase as compared with the pretraining phase, indicating a proactive control shift. The event-related potential results show that the training led to an increase in the mean amplitude of the N2 component, elicited by both the cue and the probe stimuli. A group of control participants who did not undergo training showed an enlarged N2 only for the probe but not for the cue stimuli in the second as compared with the first phase of testing. No variations in behavioral performance were found in the control group between the two phases of testing. These findings suggest that language switching training enhances proactive control in bilinguals.

  8. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity.

  9. Research Article Flavocoxid Protects Against Cadmium-Induced Disruption of the Blood-Testis Barrier and Improves Testicular Damage and Germ Cell Impairment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Micali, Antonio; Pisani, Antonina; Puzzolo, Domenico; Bitto, Alessandra; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Pizzino, Gabriele; Irrera, Natasha; Galfo, Federica; Arena, Salvatore; Pallio, Giovanni; Mecchio, Anna; Germanà, Antonino; Bruschetta, Daniele; Laurà, Rosaria; Magno, Carlo; Marini, Herbert; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) causes male infertility. There is the need to identify safe treatments counteracting this toxicity. Flavocoxid is a flavonoid that induces a balanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 peroxidase moieties and of 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) and has efficacy in the male genitourinary system. We investigated flavocoxid effects on Cd-induced testicular toxicity in mice. Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups: 2 control groups received 0.9% NaCl (vehicle; 1 ml/kg/day) or flavocoxid (20 mg/kg/day ip); 2 groups were challenged with cadmium chloride (CdCl2; 2 mg/kg/day ip) and administered with vehicle or flavocoxid. The treatment lasted for 1 or 2 weeks. The testes were processed for biochemical and morphological studies. CdCl2 increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, malondialdehyde (MDA), B-cell-lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein (Bax), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), transforming growth factor (TGF) -β3, decreased Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin-B, occludin, N-Cadherin, induced structural damages in the testis and disrupted the blood-testis barrier. Many TUNEL-positive germ cells and changes in claudin-11, occludin, and N-cadherin localization were present. Flavocoxid administration reduced, in a time-dependent way, p-ERK 1/2, TNF-α, COX-2, 5-LOX, MDA, Bax, FSH, LH, TGF-β3, augmented Bcl-2, testosterone, inhibin B, occludin, N-Cadherin, and improved the structural organization of the testis and the blood-testis barrier. Few TUNEL-positive germ cells were present and a morphological retrieval of the intercellular junctions was observed. In conclusion, flavocoxid has a protective anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic function against Cd-induced toxicity in mice testis. We suggest that flavocoxid may play a relevant positive role against environmental levels of Cd, otherwise deleterious to gametogenesis and tubular integrity. PMID

  10. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability - System Dynamics Modeling and Control System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M.; Kisner, Roger A.; Fugate, David L.

    2013-10-01

    This report documents the current status of the modeling, control design, and embedded control research for the magnetic bearing canned rotor pump being used as a demonstration platform for deeply integrating instrumentation and controls (I{\\&}C) into nuclear power plant components. This pump is a highly inter-connected thermo/electro/mechanical system that requires an active control system to operate. Magnetic bearings are inherently unstable system and without active, moment by moment control, the rotor would contact fixed surfaces in the pump causing physical damage. This report details the modeling of the pump rotordynamics, fluid forces, electromagnetic properties of the protective cans, active magnetic bearings, power electronics, and interactions between different dynamical models. The system stability of the unforced and controlled rotor are investigated analytically. Additionally, controllers are designed using proportional derivative (PD) control, proportional integral derivative (PID) control, voltage control, and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control. Finally, a design optimization problem that joins the electrical, mechanical, magnetic, and control system design into one problem to balance the opposing needs of various design criteria using the embedded system approach is presented.

  11. Inhibition of the group I mGluRs reduces acute brain damage and improves long-term histological outcomes after photothrombosis-induced ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hailong; Zhang, Nannan; Sun, Grace; Ding, Shinghua

    2013-01-01

    Group I mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors), including mGluR1 and mGluR5, are GPCRs (G-protein coupled receptors) and play important roles in physiology and pathology. Studies on their role in cerebral ischaemia have provided controversial results. In this study, we used a PT (photothrombosis)-induced ischaemia model to investigate whether antagonists to the group I mGluRs may offer acute and long-term protective effects in adult mice. Our results demonstrated that administration with mGluR5 antagonist MPEP [2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine] or mGluR1 antagonist LY367385 by intraperitoneal injection at 3 h after PT decreased brain infarct volume evaluated one day after ischaemia. Additive effects on infarct volume were observed upon co-injection with MPEP and LY367385. These antagonists also significantly alleviated neurodegeneration and apoptosis in the penumbra. In addition, when evaluated 2 weeks after PT, they reduced infarct volume and tissue loss, attenuated glial scar formation, and inhibited cell proliferation in the penumbra. Importantly, co-injection with MPEP and LY367385 reduced the expression levels of calpain, a Ca2+-activated protease known to mediate ischaemia-induced neuronal death. Injection of calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, could inhibit neuronal death and brain damage after PT but injection of calpeptin together with MPEP and LY367385 did not further improve the protective effects mediated by MPEP and LY367385. These results suggest that inhibition of group I mGluRs is sufficient to protect ischaemic damage through the calpain pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate that inhibition of group I mGluRs can mitigate PT-induced brain damage through attenuating the effects of calpain, and improve long-term histological outcomes. PMID:23772679

  12. FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior Strategies) to Improve Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior) Strategies approach to improve behavior in children and adolescents with complex behavioral challenges. FAB Strategies include evidence-based environmental adaptations, sensory modulation, positive behavioral support, and physical self-regulation strategies. FAB Strategies can be used by…

  13. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve diabetes-induced cognitive impairment by exosome transfer into damaged neurons and astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masako; Nagaishi, Kanna; Konari, Naoto; Saito, Yuki; Chikenji, Takako; Mizue, Yuka; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of dementia is higher in diabetic patients, but no effective treatment has been developed. This study showed that rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) can improve the cognitive impairments of STZ-diabetic mice by repairing damaged neurons and astrocytes. The Morris water maze test demonstrated that cognitive impairments induced by diabetes were significantly improved by intravenous injection of BM-MSCs. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus, degeneration of neurons and astrocytes, as well as synaptic loss, were prominent in diabetes, and BM-MSC treatment successfully normalized them. Since a limited number of donor BM-MSCs was observed in the brain parenchyma, we hypothesized that humoral factors, especially exosomes released from BM-MSCs, act on damaged neurons and astrocytes. To investigate the effectiveness of exosomes for treatment of diabetes-induced cognitive impairment, exosomes were purified from the culture media and injected intracerebroventricularly into diabetic mice. Recovery of cognitive impairment and histological abnormalities similar to that seen with BM-MSC injection was found following exosome treatment. Use of fluorescence-labeled exosomes demonstrated that injected exosomes were internalized into astrocytes and neurons; these subsequently reversed the dysfunction. The present results indicate that exosomes derived from BM-MSCs might be a promising therapeutic tool for diabetes-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27102354

  14. Image Control, not Damage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin M.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for school districts to practice active community relations in order to positively influence information flowing to the community. Addresses performing a communications audit and ways to disseminate information to the public. (EV)

  15. Improving Control in a Joule-Thomson Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borders, James; Pearson, David; Prina, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    A report discusses a modified design of a Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigerator under development to be incorporated into scientific instrumentation aboard a spacecraft. In most other JT refrigerators (including common household refrigerators), the temperature of the evaporator (the cold stage) is kept within a desired narrow range by turning a compressor on and off as needed. This mode of control is inadequate for the present refrigerator because a JT-refrigerator compressor performs poorly when the flow from its evaporator varies substantially, and this refrigerator is required to maintain adequate cooling power. The proposed design modifications include changes in the arrangement of heat exchangers, addition of a clamp that would afford a controlled heat leak from a warmer to a cooler stage to smooth out temperature fluctuations in the cooler stage, and incorporation of a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control system that would regulate the heat leak to maintain the temperature of the evaporator within a desired narrow range while keeping the amount of liquid in the evaporator within a very narrow range in order to optimize the performance of the compressor. Novelty lies in combining the temperature- and cooling-power-regulating controls into a single control system.

  16. Active Wake Redirection Control to Improve Energy Yield (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Fleming, P.; DeGeorge, E.; Bulder, B; White, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Wake effects can dramatically reduce the efficiency of waked turbines relative to the unwaked turbines. Wakes can be deflected, or 'redirected,' by applying yaw misalignment to the turbines. Yaw misalignment causes part of the rotor thrust vector to be pointed in the cross-stream direction, deflecting the flow and the wake. Yaw misalignment reduces power production, but the global increase in wind plant power due to decreased wake effect creates a net increase in power production. It is also a fairly simple control idea to implement at existing or new wind plants. We performed high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics simulations of the wake flow of the proposed Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW) that predict that under certain waking conditions, wake redirection can increase plant efficiency by 10%. This means that by applying wake redirection control, for a given watersheet area, a wind plant can either produce more power, or the same amount of power can be produced with a smaller watersheet area. With the power increase may come increased loads, though, due to the yaw misalignment. If misalignment is applied properly, or if layered with individual blade pitch control, though, the load increase can be mitigated. In this talk we will discuss the concept of wake redirection through yaw misalignment and present our CFD results of the FACW project. We will also discuss the implications of wake redirection control on annual energy production, and finally we will discuss plans to implement wake redirection control at FACW when it is operational.

  17. Damage-control orthopedics versus early total care in the treatment of borderline high-energy pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Han, Gengfen; Wang, Ziming; Du, Quanyin; Xiong, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Siyu; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Aimin

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of damage-control orthopedics (DCO) vs early total care (ETC) in the treatment of borderline high-energy pelvic fractures. Seventy-two patients with borderline high-energy pelvic fractures were retrospectively reviewed; 39 received DCO and 33 received ETC. Demographic data and initial injury severities were comparable between groups, except for Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) head scores and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores. Regarding postoperative complications, the incidence rates of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score were significantly lower in the DCO group compared with the ETC group. Similar results were also observed in subgroups stratified by age (younger than 40 years and 40 years and older). Regarding patients with Tile B fractures, there was no significant difference between groups in incidence rates of overall postoperative complications. However, in patients with Tile C fractures, especially in those 40 years and older, the DCO group had a lower incidence rate of ALI and had lower APACHE II scores than did the ETC group. This study's findings indicate that DCO is the most suitable therapeutic option for patients with Tile C fractures, especially for those 40 years and older, whereas ETC is preferred for patients with Tile B fractures, provided that it is possible to avoid a second operation as well as any delays in patient mobilization.

  18. Enhancing supply chain performance with improved order-control policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilakantan, K.

    2010-09-01

    This article takes up the study of the dynamics of a single product in a prototype three-stage supply chain system, at the downstream warehouse end of the chain, under a responsive chain strategy. The dynamics under various ordering policies and the parameters which will yield desired responses are systematically analysed, both for deterministic and stochastic systems. Higher-order control policies are then proposed and analysed. The considered key performance criteria are the permanent inventory deviations from the desired levels, or the offset, the maximum dip in inventory, the 'undershoot', the damping effect and decay rates, and the duration of time in the negative region, for deterministic systems; and additionally, the inventory variance for stochastic systems. It is shown that the disadvantages of the conventional (proportional-integral-derivative) control policies, like large negative deviations, low decay rates, and high inventory variance, can be overcome by the use of higher-order control policies proposed herein.

  19. Compact Microscope Imaging System With Intelligent Controls Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is a diagnostic microscope analysis tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. This compact miniature microscope, which can perform tasks usually reserved for conventional microscopes, has unique advantages in the fields of microscopy, biomedical research, inline process inspection, and space science. Its unique approach integrates a machine vision technique with an instrumentation and control technique that provides intelligence via the use of adaptive neural networks. The CMIS system was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center specifically for interface detection used for colloid hard spheres experiments; biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement, and tracking; and detection of anode and cathode defects for laboratory samples using microscope technology.

  20. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this, quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis, we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback.

  1. Quantum effects improve the energy efficiency of feedback control.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    The laws of thermodynamics apply equally well to quantum systems as to classical systems, and because of this, quantum effects do not change the fundamental thermodynamic efficiency of isothermal refrigerators or engines. We show that, despite this fact, quantum mechanics permits measurement-based feedback control protocols that are more thermodynamically efficient than their classical counterparts. As part of our analysis, we perform a detailed accounting of the thermodynamics of unitary feedback control and elucidate the sources of inefficiency in measurement-based and coherent feedback. PMID:24827219

  2. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  3. Automated Boiler Combustion Controls for Emission Reduction and Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-12-02

    In the late 1980s, then President Bush visited Krakow, Poland. The terrible air quality theremotivated him to initiate a USAID-funded program, managed by DOE, entitled "Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program." The primary objective of this program was to encourage the formation of commercial ventures between U.S. and Polish firms to provide equipment and/or services to reduce pollution from low-emission sources in Krakow, Poland. This program led to the award of a number of cooperative agreements, including one to Control Techtronics International. The technical objective of CTI's cooperative agreement is to apply combustion controls to existing boiler plants in Krakow and transfer knowledge and technology through a joint U.S. and Polish commercial venture. CTI installed automatic combustion controls on five coal boilers for the district heating system in Krakow. Three of these were for domestic hot-water boilers, and two were for steam for industrial boilers. The following results have occurred due to the addition of CTI's combustion controls on these five existing boilers: ! 25% energy savings ! 85% reduction in particulate emissions The joint venture company CTI-Polska was then established. Eleven additional technical and costing proposals were initiated to upgrade other coal boilers in Krakow. To date, no co-financing has been made available on the Polish side. CTI-Polska continues in operation, serving customers in Russia and Ukraine. Should the market in Poland materialize, the joint venture company is established there to provide equipment and service.

  4. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  5. Systematic control of nonmetallic materials for improved fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The elements of a systematic fire safety program are summarized and consist of fire safety criteria, design considerations, testing of materials, development of nonmetallic materials, nonmetallic materials information systems, design reviews, and change control. The system described in this report was developed for the Apollo spacecraft. The system can, however, be tailored to many industrial, commercial, and military activities.

  6. Improved Intrapulse Raman Scattering Control via Asymmetric Airy Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Wabnitz, Stefan; Kashyap, Raman; Chen, Zhigang; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of tuning the frequency of a laser pulse via the use of an Airy pulse-seeded soliton self-frequency shift. The intrinsically asymmetric nature of Airy pulses, typically featured by either leading or trailing oscillatory tails (relatively to the main lobe), is revealed through the nonlinear generation of both a primary and a secondary Raman soliton self-frequency shift, a phenomenon which is driven by the soliton fission processes. The resulting frequency shift can be carefully controlled by using time-reversed Airy pulses or, alternatively, by applying an offset to the cubic phase modulation used to generate the pulses. When compared with the use of conventional chirped Gaussian pulses, our technique brings about unique advantages in terms of both efficient frequency tuning and feasibility, along with the generation and control of multicolor Raman solitons with enhanced tunability. Our theoretical analysis agrees well with our experimental observations.

  7. Improving overlay control through proper use of multilevel query APC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Timothy H.; Carlson, Alan; Crow, David A.

    2003-06-01

    Many state-of-the-art fabs are operating with increasingly diversified product mixes. For example, at Cypress Semiconductor, it is not unusual to be concurrently running multiple technologies and many devices within each technology. This diverse product mix significantly increases the difficulty of manually controlling overlay process corrections. As a result, automated run-to-run feedforward-feedback control has become a necessary and vital component of manufacturing. However, traditional run-to-run controllers rely on highly correlated historical events to forecast process corrections. For example, the historical process events typically are constrained to match the current event for exposure tool, device, process level and reticle ID. This narrowly defined process stream can result in insufficient data when applied to lowvolume or new-release devices. The run-to-run controller implemented at Cypress utilizes a multi-level query (Level-N) correlation algorithm, where each subsequent level widens the search criteria for available historical data. The paper discusses how best to widen the search criteria and how to determine and apply a known bias to account for tool-to-tool and device-to-device differences. Specific applications include offloading lots from one tool to another when the first tool is down for preventive maintenance, utilizing related devices to determine a default feedback vector for new-release devices, and applying bias values to account for known reticle-to-reticle differences. In this study, we will show how historical data can be leveraged from related devices or tools to overcome the limitations of narrow process streams. In particular, this paper discusses how effectively handling narrow process streams allows Cypress to offload lots from a baseline tool to an alternate tool.

  8. The use of a subfascial vicryl mesh buttress to aid in the closure of massive ventral hernias following damage-control laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Adam M; Low, David W

    2003-09-01

    Damage control laparotomy for life-threatening abdominal conditions has gained wide acceptance in the management of exsanguinating trauma patients as well as septic patients with acute abdomen. Survivors considered too ill to undergo definitive abdominal wall closure are temporized, often with skin grafting on granulated viscera. These maneuvers compromise the integrity of the anterior abdominal wall and result in a subset of patients with loss of abdominal domain and massive, debilitating ventral hernias. A retrospective review was conducted of 21 such patients (16 men, five women) who underwent elective abdominal wall reconstruction at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania between November of 1998 and October of 2000. The purpose of this study was to report the authors' experience with these complex abdominal wall reconstructions. A double-layer, subfascial Vicryl mesh buttress was used in all repairs to aid in reestablishing abdominal wall integrity. The mean hernia size was 813 cm2 (range, 75 to 1836 cm2), and the average interval to definitive repair was 24.4 months (range, 3 weeks to 11 years). Mean follow-up was 13.5 months (range, 1 month to 40 months). Twenty patients (95 percent) had successful ventral hernia repair. Four patients with massive hernias (924 to 1836 cm2) required submuscular Marlex mesh implantation. Two patients (10 percent) developed abdominal compartment syndrome that required surgical decompression. One patient (5 percent) developed an incisional hernia at a prior colostomy site. Four patients (19 percent) had superficial skin dehiscence that healed secondarily with daily wound care. There were no mesh infections. In most cases, successful single-stage repair of large ventral hernias following damage control laparotomy can be achieved using a subfascial Vicryl mesh buttress in combination with other established reconstructive techniques. Massive defects exceeding 900 cm2 typically require permanent mesh implantation to achieve

  9. A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

  10. (abstract) Mission Operations and Control Assurance: Flight Operations Quality Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welz, Linda L.; Bruno, Kristin J.; Kazz, Sheri L.; Witkowski, Mona M.

    1993-01-01

    Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA), a recent addition to flight operations teams at JPL. provides a system level function to instill quality in mission operations. MO&CA's primary goal at JPL is to help improve the operational reliability for projects during flight. MO&CA tasks include early detection and correction of process design and procedural deficiencies within projects. Early detection and correction are essential during development of operational procedures and training of operational teams. MO&CA's effort focuses directly on reducing the probability of radiating incorrect commands to a spacecraft. Over the last seven years at JPL, MO&CA has become a valuable asset to JPL flight projects. JPL flight projects have benefited significantly from MO&CA's efforts to contain risk and prevent rather than rework errors. MO&CA's ability to provide direct transfer of knowledge allows new projects to benefit directly from previous and ongoing experience. Since MO&CA, like Total Quality Management (TQM), focuses on continuous improvement of processes and elimination of rework, we recommend that this effort be continued on NASA flight projects.

  11. Antioxidative Role of Hatikana (Leea macrophylla Roxb.) Partially Improves the Hepatic Damage Induced by CCl4 in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Samina; Rahman, Md. Atiar; Aklima, Jannatul; Hasan, Md. Rakibul; Hasan Chowdhury, J. M. Kamirul

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the protective role of Leea macrophylla extract on CCl4-induced acute liver injury in rats. Different fractions of Leea macrophylla (Roxb.) crude extract were subjected to analysis for antioxidative effects. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as normal control, hepatic control, and reference control (silymarin) group and treatment group. Evaluations were made for the effects of the fractions on serum enzymes and biochemical parameters of CCl4-induced albino rat. Histopathological screening was also performed to evaluate the changes of liver tissue before and after treatment. Different fractions of Leea macrophylla showed very potent 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging effect, FeCl3 reducing effect, superoxide scavenging effect, and iron chelating effect. Carbon tetrachloride induction increased the level of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and other biochemical parameters such as lipid profiles, total protein, and CK-MB. In contrast, treatment of Leea macrophylla reduced the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as biochemical parameters activities. L. macrophylla partially restored the lipid profiles, total protein, and CK-MB. Histopathology showed the treated liver towards restoration. Results evidenced that L. macrophylla can be prospective source of hepatic management in liver injury. PMID:26221590

  12. Advanced regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control strategies for IGCC targeted towards improving power ramp-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    As part of ongoing R&D activities at the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training & Research (AVESTAR™) Center, this paper highlights strategies for enhancing low-level regulatory control and system-wide coordinated control strategies implemented in a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon capture. The underlying IGCC plant dynamic model contains 20 major process areas, each of which is tightly integrated with the rest of the power plant, making individual functionally-independent processes prone to routine disturbances. Single-loop feedback control although adequate to meet the primary control objective for most processes, does not take into account in advance the effect of these disturbances, making the entire power plant undergo large offshoots and/or oscillations before the feedback action has an opportunity to impact control performance. In this paper, controller enhancements ranging from retuning feedback control loops, multiplicative feed-forward control and other control techniques such as split-range control, feedback trim and dynamic compensation, applicable on various subsections of the integrated IGCC plant, have been highlighted and improvements in control responses have been given. Compared to using classical feedback-based control structure, the enhanced IGCC regulatory control architecture reduces plant settling time and peak offshoots, achieves faster disturbance rejection, and promotes higher power ramp-rates. In addition, improvements in IGCC coordinated plant-wide control strategies for “Gasifier-Lead”, “GT-Lead” and “Plantwide” operation modes have been proposed and their responses compared. The paper is concluded with a brief discussion on the potential IGCC controller improvements resulting from using advanced process control, including model predictive control (MPC), as a supervisory control layer.

  13. Early MEK1/2 Inhibition after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats Reduces Brain Damage and Improves Outcome by Preventing Delayed Vasoconstrictor Receptor Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background Global cerebral ischemia following cardiac arrest is associated with increased cerebral vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow, contributing to delayed neuronal cell death and neurological detriments in affected patients. We hypothesize that upregulation of contractile ETB and 5-HT1B receptors, previously demonstrated in cerebral arteries after experimental global ischemia, are a key mechanism behind insufficient perfusion of the post-ischemic brain, proposing blockade of this receptor upregulation as a novel target for prevention of cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed neuronal cell death after global cerebral ischemia. The aim was to characterize the time-course of receptor upregulation and associated neuronal damage after global ischemia and investigate whether treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 can prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and thereby improve functional outcome after global cerebral ischemia. Incomplete global cerebral ischemia was induced in Wistar rats and the time-course of enhanced contractile responses and the effect of U0126 in cerebral arteries were studied by wire myography and the neuronal cell death by TUNEL. The expression of ETB and 5-HT1B receptors was determined by immunofluorescence. Results Enhanced vasoconstriction peaked in fore- and midbrain arteries 3 days after ischemia. Neuronal cell death appeared initially in the hippocampus 3 days after ischemia and gradually increased until 7 days post-ischemia. Treatment with U0126 normalised cerebrovascular ETB and 5-HT1B receptor expression and contractile function, reduced hippocampal cell death and improved survival rate compared to vehicle treated animals. Conclusions Excessive cerebrovascular expression of contractile ETB and 5-HT1B receptors is a delayed response to global cerebral ischemia peaking 3 days after the insult, which likely contributes to the development of delayed neuronal damage. The enhanced cerebrovascular contractility can be

  14. Improved collagen bilayer dressing for the controlled release of drugs.

    PubMed

    Sripriya, Ramasamy; Kumar, Muthusamy Senthil; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar

    2004-08-15

    A novel bilayer dressing has been developed from bovine succinylated collagen. The dressing contains an antibiotic, Ciprofloxacin, for both immediate and time-regulated release for controlling the infection, as the infected open wounds need special care. The dressing consists of a sponge and a film, both prepared from succinylated bovine collagen. The sponge has a smooth surface on one side; its rough surface on the other side forms the bilayer system with the film. Both sponge and film act as an anionic reservoir to hold the cationic Ciprofloxacin. The drug, after dispersing in poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidione) (PVP) solution is allowed to spread in the bilayer system by diffusion. The drug stays in the bilayer system because of ionic binding, but starts releasing when comes in contact with the wound. Release of the drug is immediate, but it is regulated by ionic binding between the drug and succinylated collagen. The wound exudates, and there is a polarity-controlled release of the drug from the bilayer system. The PVP and bilayer system permits only time-regulated release, and the system lasts up to 5 days with therapeutically sufficient drug availability.

  15. CSMA Versus Prioritized CSMA for Air-Traffic-Control Improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2001-01-01

    OPNET version 7.0 simulations are presented involving an important application of the Aeronautical Telecommunications Network (ATN), Controller Pilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) over the Very High Frequency Data Link, Mode 2 (VDL-2). Communication is modeled for essentially all incoming and outgoing nonstop air-traffic for just three United States cities: Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. There are 32 airports in the simulation, 29 of which are either sources or destinations for the air-traffic of the aforementioned three airports. The simulation involves 111 Air Traffic Control (ATC) ground stations, and 1,235 equally equipped aircraft-taking off, flying realistic free-flight trajectories, and landing in a 24-hr period. Collisionless, Prioritized Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) is successfully tested and compared with the traditional CSMA typically associated with VDL-2. The performance measures include latency, throughput, and packet loss. As expected, Prioritized CSMA is much quicker and more efficient than traditional CSMA. These simulation results show the potency of Prioritized CSMA for implementing low latency, high throughput, and efficient connectivity.

  16. Management of full-thickness duodenal laceration in the damage control era: evolution to primary repair without diversion or decompression.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, John; Fabricant, Loic; Anton, Amy; Ham, Bruce; Schreiber, Martin; Mullins, Richard

    2011-06-01

    The management of duodenal laceration (DL) is controversial. We sought to determine the influence of damage control (DC) on the use of decompression/diversion/exclusion (DDE) techniques and the risk of duodenal-related complications (DRC). We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with full-thickness DL surviving more than 72 hours in the years 1989 to 2009. Forty-one patients with a median duodenal organ injury scale of 3 and a mean abdominal trauma index (ATI) of 45 ± 24 underwent laparotomy. Twenty-five patients (61%) were treated with DC and 16 (39%) with fascial closure (FC). Although the ATI of the patients treated with DC was greater than the ATI of the patients treated with FC (56 ± 23 vs 28 ± 17, P < 0.001), DRCs were equivalent (two vs three, nonsignificant). Twenty-one patients were treated in the first decade and 20 in the second decade. Between the first and second decades, there were trends toward an increased use of DC (52 to 70%, nonsignificant) and a decreased use of DDE (52 to 35%, nonsignificant) with a significant reduction in DRC (5 vs 0, P = 0.04). Among the 18 patients (44%) who underwent DDE procedures there were 2 DRCs (11%) related to DDE. Among the 23 patients who did not have DDE, there were three DRCs (13%), including two obstructions, one partial and one complete. When DC is used after DL, DDE may be unnecessary. Diversion is recommended, however, when the duodenum is at risk for obstruction after primary repair.

  17. Treatment with zinc, d-aspartate, and coenzyme Q10 protects bull sperm against damage and improves their ability to support embryo development.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, R; Barbato, V; Fiorentino, I; Braun, S; Rizos, D; Longobardi, S; Talevi, R

    2014-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are physiologically generated during mitochondrial respiration and are involved in several signaling mechanisms. However, under pathological conditions, the concentration of ROS may exceed the antioxidant scavenging systems and subsequently lead to cell damage. High ROS levels have been proven to be detrimental to spermatozoa and furthermore compromise sperm function through lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA strand breakage. Although the oral administration of antioxidants has been demonstrated to improve the semen quality in subfertile men, it is still a matter of debate if it can positively influence fertilization outcome and embryo developmental competence. Studies carried out in suitable animal models could resolve these fundamental questions. Hence, the main aims of the present study were to evaluate: (1) the effects of zinc, d-aspartate, and coenzyme Q10, included in the dietary supplement Genadis (Merck Serono), on bull sperm motility and DNA fragmentation; and (2) whether treated spermatozoa have a superior competence in fertilization and in supporting the development of healthy embryos. Our data indicate that this treatment prevents the loss of sperm motility and the rise in sperm DNA fragmentation over time. Moreover, blastocyst rate was found to be significantly higher in oocytes fertilized by treated spermatozoa, and these blastocysts harbored a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells.

  18. Pulsed electric field improves the bioprotective capacity of purées for different coloured carrot cultivars against H2O2-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Leong, Sze Ying; Oey, Indrawati; Burritt, David John

    2016-04-01

    This research aimed to study the effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) processing on the bioprotective capacity of carrot purée for White Belgian, Yellow Solar, Nantes, Nutri Red and Purple Haze cultivars against H2O2-induced oxidative damage. The bioprotective capacity was determined using cell viability, membrane integrity and nitric oxide (NO) production in a human Caco-2 cell culture assay. Total carotenoids, total anthocyanins, total vitamin C and total phenolics were also evaluated. Compared to the untreated purée, Purple Haze and Nutri Red processed at 303 kJ/kg completely increased Caco-2 cells resistance towards oxidative damage by recovering the cell viability and inhibiting NO production. For cultivar with low carotenoid levels, i.e. Yellow Solar, the application of 0.8 kV/cm resulted in a higher total carotenoid content in the purée than its untreated counterpart, leading to an improved bioprotective effect. This study clearly shows that PEF could add value to carrots by maximising bioprotective effects. PMID:26593539

  19. Spacecraft control section for the improved Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    The upgraded spacecraft control section for the Small Astronomy Satellite is able to point its thrust axis to any direction in space; it can also spin or slow its outer body rotation to zero for star-locked pointing of side viewing experiments. A programmable telemetry system and delayed command system enhance the inherent capability of a spacecraft designed to be used for a variety of experiments, each of which can be built independently and attached just prior to final acceptance testing and launch. The design of this new spacecraft, whose first launch is scheduled for 1975, is provided in sufficient detail to permit the reader to ascertain its suitability for specific experiments. A summary of the spacecraft characteristics, project reliability requirements, and environmental test conditions are included in the appendices.

  20. Improving plant competitiveness through conveyor dust control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbeck, L.J.

    1997-09-01

    In the past, three different approaches--containment, suppression, and collection--have been used to control dust arising at conveyor load zones. Dust containment consists of those mechanical systems employed to keep material inside the transfer point with the main material body. Dust suppression systems increase the mass of suspended dust particles, allowing them to fall from the airstream. Dust collection is the mechanical capture and return of airborne material after it becomes airborne from the main material body. Previously, these three approaches have always been seen as separate entities, offered by separate organizations competing in the marketplace. Each system claimed its own technology was the best solution, providing the most effective, most cost-efficient, most maintenance-free answer to fugitive material. These three technologies are evaluated.

  1. Fatigue Life Improving of Drill Rod by Inclusion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linzhu; Yang, Shufeng; Li, Jingshe; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Yinghao

    2016-08-01

    Large and hard inclusions often deteriorate the service performance and reduce the fatigue lifetime of drill rods. In this paper, the main reasons of the rupture of drill rods were analyzed by the examination of their fracture and it is found that the large inclusions were the main reason of breakage of rod drill. The inclusions were high of Ca content or Al2O3 rich. Smaller and better deformability inclusions were obtained by the optimization of refining slag, calcium treatment process and the flow control devices of tundish. Results of industrial experiment after optimization show that total oxygen content of drill rods decreased by more than 50%, macro-inclusions weight fraction decreased from about 4 mg/10 kg to about 0.3 mg/10 kg and the micro-inclusions average size decreased from 6 to 3.6 μm. The average using times of drill rods after optimization were increased by about 60%.

  2. CONVERGING REDUNDANT SENSOR NETWORK INFORMATION FOR IMPROVED BUILDING CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Dale K. Tiller; Gregor P. Henze

    2004-11-01

    Knowing how many people occupy a building, and where they are located, is a key component of building energy management and security. Commercial, industrial and residential buildings often incorporate systems used to determine occupancy, however, current sensor technology and control algorithms limit the effectiveness of both energy management and security systems. This topical report describes results from the first phase of a project to design, implement, validate, and prototype new technologies to monitor occupancy, control indoor environment services, and promote security in buildings. Phase I of the project focused on instrumentation and data collection. In this project phase a new occupancy detection system was developed, commissioned and installed in a sample of private offices and open-plan office workstations. Data acquisition systems were developed and deployed to collect data on space occupancy profiles. Analysis tools based on Bayesian probability theory were applied to the occupancy data generated by the sensor network. The inference of primary importance is a probability distribution over the number of occupants and their locations in a building, given past and present sensor measurements. Inferences were computed for occupancy and its temporal persistence in individual offices as well as the persistence of sensor status. The raw sensor data were also used to calibrate the sensor belief network, including the occupancy transition matrix used in the Markov model, sensor sensitivity, and sensor failure models. This study shows that the belief network framework can be applied to the analysis of data streams from sensor networks, offering significant benefits to building operation compared to current practice.

  3. Improved current control makes inverters the power sources of choice

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.; Harada, S.; Ueyama, T.

    1997-02-01

    It is now generally understood that by increasing the operating or switching frequency of a power source the size of the main transformer and main reactor can be shrunk. Thus, a 300-A DC welding power source weighing well under 100 lb can be produced. This makes the inverter power source an ideal choice for applications requiring equipment maneuverability. It is also generally understood that due to higher switching frequencies, a smoother output is obtained from inverter power sources. In the late 1980s, the company developed a new double-inverter power source by which inverted DC weld output is inverted back to AC weld output. This product was the first of its kind in the world. Again, the small compact size of this product was of great interest. Utilizing current waveform control, it was realized that fast response switching from electrode negative to electrode positive could be accurately controlled, offering benefits such as AC GTA welding with high-frequency start only, even at a low welding current. The primary benefit is the ability to limit the electrode positive half cycle to less than 5%. The electrode positive half cycle is responsible for tungsten erosion, which also creates the balling effect of a tungsten electrode. By limiting the electrode positive portion of the AC cycle to a very low level, a rather sharp point can be maintained on the tungsten, which creates a very concentrated, focused arc column. This ability provides excellent joint penetration in fillet welding of aluminum alloys, especially on thick plate. It also reduces the heat-affected zone in AC GTA welding of aluminum.

  4. Depth Sensing for Improved Control of Lower Limb Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Nili Eliana; Lenzi, Tommaso; Hargrove, Levi J

    2015-11-01

    Powered lower limb prostheses have potential to improve the quality of life of individuals with amputations by enabling all daily activities. However, seamless ambulation mode recognition is necessary to achieve this goal and is not yet a clinical reality. Current intent recognition systems use mechanical and EMG sensors to estimate prosthesis and user status. We propose to complement these systems by integrating information about the environment obtained through the depth sensing. This paper presents the design, characterization, and the early validation of a novel stair segmentation system based on Microsoft Kinect. Static and dynamic tests were performed. A first experiment showed how the resolution of the depth camera affects the speed and the accuracy of segmentation. A second test proved the robustness of the algorithm to different staircases. Finally, we performed an online walking test with the stair segmentation and related measures recorded online at >5 frames/s. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm allows for an accurate estimate of distance, angle of intersection, number of steps, stair height, and stair depth for a set of stairs in the environment. The online test produced an estimate of whether the individual was approaching stairs in real time with approximately 98.8% accuracy.

  5. Dynamic Event Tree advancements and control logic improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Mandelli, Diego; Sen, Ramazan Sonat; Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN is currently equipped with three different sampling categories: Forward samplers (Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Stratified, Grid Sampler, Factorials, etc.), Adaptive Samplers (Limit Surface search, Adaptive Polynomial Chaos, etc.) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) samplers (Deterministic and Adaptive Dynamic Event Trees). The main subject of this document is to report the activities that have been done in order to: start the migration of the RAVEN/RELAP-7 control logic system into MOOSE, and develop advanced dynamic sampling capabilities based on the Dynamic Event Tree approach. In order to provide to all MOOSE-based applications a control logic capability, in this Fiscal Year an initial migration activity has been initiated, moving the control logic system, designed for RELAP-7 by the RAVEN team, into the MOOSE framework. In this document, a brief explanation of what has been done is going to be reported. The second and most important subject of this report is about the development of a Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampler named “Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (HDET) and its Adaptive variant “Adaptive Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (AHDET). As other authors have already reported, among the different types of uncertainties, it is possible to discern two principle types: aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. The classical Dynamic Event Tree is in charge of treating the first class (aleatory) uncertainties; the dependence of the probabilistic risk assessment and analysis on the epistemic uncertainties are treated by an initial Monte Carlo sampling (MCDET). From each Monte Carlo sample, a DET analysis is run (in total, N trees). The Monte Carlo employs a pre-sampling of the

  6. Improved Control of Charging Voltage for Li-Ion Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, Paul; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2006-01-01

    were controlled by a computer, then this method of charge control could readily be implemented in software.

  7. Improvement of spatial memory disorder and hippocampal damage by exposure to electromagnetic fields in an Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Zuo, Hongyan; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Song, Tao; Wang, Shuiming; Xu, Xinping; Gao, Yabing; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Wang, Lifeng; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Although some epidemiological investigations showed a potential association between long-term exposure of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), no reasonable mechanism can explain this association, and the related animal experiments are rare. In this study, ELF-EMF exposure (50 Hz 400 µT 60 d) combined with D-galactose intraperitoneal (50 mg/kg, q.d., 42 d) and Aβ25-35 hippocampal (5 μl/unilateral, bilateral, single-dose) injection was implemented to establish a complex rat model. Then the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on AD development was studied by using the Morris water maze, pathological analysis, and comparative proteomics. The results showed that ELF-EMF exposure delayed the weight gain of rats, and partially improved cognitive and clinicopathologic symptoms of AD rats. The differential proteomic analysis results suggest that synaptic transmission, oxidative stress, protein degradation, energy metabolism, Tau aggregation, and inflammation involved in the effects mentioned above. Therefore, our findings indicate that certain conditions of ELF-EMF exposure could delay the development of AD in rats.

  8. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems. PMID:24648277

  9. Neural Conflict–Control Mechanisms Improve Memory for Target Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Ruth M.; Boehler, Carsten N.; De Belder, Maya; Egner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    According to conflict-monitoring models, conflict serves as an internal signal for reinforcing top-down attention to task-relevant information. While evidence based on measures of ongoing task performance supports this idea, implications for long-term consequences, that is, memory, have not been tested yet. Here, we evaluated the prediction that conflict-triggered attentional enhancement of target-stimulus processing should be associated with superior subsequent memory for those stimuli. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a novel variant of a face-word Stroop task that employed trial-unique face stimuli as targets, we were able to assess subsequent (incidental) memory for target faces as a function of whether a given face had previously been accompanied by congruent, neutral, or incongruent (conflicting) distracters. In line with our predictions, incongruent distracters not only induced behavioral conflict, but also gave rise to enhanced memory for target faces. Moreover, conflict-triggered neural activity in prefrontal and parietal regions was predictive of subsequent retrieval success, and displayed conflict-enhanced functional coupling with medial-temporal lobe regions. These data provide support for the proposal that conflict evokes enhanced top-down attention to task-relevant stimuli, thereby promoting their encoding into long-term memory. Our findings thus delineate the neural mechanisms of a novel link between cognitive control and memory. PMID:24108799

  10. Automation of Pressure Control Improves Whole Porcine Heart Decellularization.

    PubMed

    Momtahan, Nima; Poornejad, Nafiseh; Struk, Jeremy A; Castleton, Arthur A; Herrod, Brenden J; Vance, Brady R; Eatough, Jordan P; Roeder, Beverly L; Reynolds, Paul R; Cook, Alonzo D

    2015-11-01

    Whole heart decellularization combined with patient-specific cells may prove to be an extremely valuable approach to engineer new hearts. Mild detergents are commonly used in the decellularization process, but are known to denature and solubilize key proteins and growth factors and can therefore be destructive to the extracellular matrix (ECM) during the decellularization process. In this study, the decellularization of porcine hearts was accomplished in 24 h with only 6 h of sodium dodecyl sulfate exposure and 98% DNA removal. Automatically controlling the pressure during decellularization reduced the detergent exposure time while still completely removing immunogenic cell debris. Stimulation of macrophages was greatly reduced when comparing native tissue samples to the processed ECM. Complete cell removal was confirmed by analysis of DNA content. General collagen and elastin preservation was demonstrated. Glycosaminoglycans and collagen quantification both showed no significant differences in content after decellularization. The compression elastic modulus of the ECM after decellularization was lower than native at low strains, but there was no significant difference at high strains. Polyurethane casts of the vasculature of native and decellularized hearts demonstrated that the microvasculature network was preserved after decellularization. A static blood thrombosis assay using bovine blood was also developed. Finally, the recellularization potential of the ECM samples was demonstrated by reseeding cardiac fibroblasts and endothelial cells on the myocardium and endocardium samples.

  11. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems.

  12. Maintenance of Certification Part IV Quality-Improvement Project for Hypertension Control: A Preliminary Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kolasinski, Vallerie A; Price, David W

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-two American Board of Family Medicine and 19 American Board of Internal Medicine certified physicians completed projects to increase the percentage of hypertensive patients on their patient panels who had controlled blood pressure. Mean panel blood pressure control improved from 79.49% to 84.64%. The choice of improvement option was not associated with the level of improvement or with the participant's perception of the workload related to completing the project.

  13. Damage Tolerance of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Fracture control requirements have been developed to address damage tolerance of composites for manned space flight hardware. The requirements provide the framework for critical and noncritical hardware assessment and testing. The need for damage threat assessments, impact damage protection plans, and nondestructive evaluation are also addressed. Hardware intended to be damage tolerant have extensive coupon, sub-element, and full-scale testing requirements in-line with the Building Block Approach concept from the MIL-HDBK-17, Department of Defense Composite Materials Handbook.

  14. Whole Body Vibration Training - Improving Balance Control and Muscle Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Kramer, Andreas; Bernhardt, Sascha; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Exercise combined with whole body vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular, although additional effects of WBV in comparison to conventional exercises are still discussed controversially in literature. Heterogeneous findings are attributed to large differences in the training designs between WBV and “control” groups in regard to training volume, load and type. In order to separate the additional effects of WBV from the overall adaptations due to the intervention, in this study, a four-week WBV training setup was compared to a matched intervention program with identical training parameters in both training settings except for the exposure to WBV. In a repeated-measures matched-subject design, 38 participants were assigned to either the WBV group (VIB) or the equivalent training group (CON). Training duration, number of sets, rest periods and task-specific instructions were matched between the groups. Balance, jump height and local static muscle endurance were assessed before and after the training period. The statistical analysis revealed significant interaction effects of group×time for balance and local static muscle endurance (p<0.05). Hence, WBV caused an additional effect on balance control (pre vs. post VIB +13%, p<0.05 and CON +6%, p = 0.33) and local static muscle endurance (pre vs. post VIB +36%, p<0.05 and CON +11%, p = 0.49). The effect on jump height remained insignificant (pre vs. post VIB +3%, p = 0.25 and CON ±0%, p = 0.82). This study provides evidence for the additional effects of WBV above conventional exercise alone. As far as balance and muscle endurance of the lower leg are concerned, a training program that includes WBV can provide supplementary benefits in young and well-trained adults compared to an equivalent program that does not include WBV. PMID:24587114

  15. Quality Improvement in Surgery Combining Lean Improvement Methods with Teamwork Training: A Controlled Before-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Eleanor; Morgan, Lauren; New, Steve; Pickering, Sharon; Hadi, Mohammed; Collins, Gary; Rivero Arias, Oliver; Griffin, Damian; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate the effectiveness of combining teamwork training and lean process improvement, two distinct approaches to improving surgical safety. We conducted a controlled interrupted time series study in a specialist UK Orthopaedic hospital incorporating a plastic surgery team (which received the intervention) and an Orthopaedic theatre team acting as a control. Study Design We used a 3 month intervention with 3 months data collection period before and after it. A combined teamwork training and lean process improvement intervention was delivered by an experienced specialist team. Before and after the intervention we evaluated team non-technical skills using NOTECHS II, technical performance using the glitch rate and WHO checklist compliance using a simple 3 point scale. We recorded complication rate, readmission rate and length of hospital stay data for 6 months before and after the intervention. Results In the active group, but not the control group, full compliance with WHO Time Out (T/O) increased from 14 to 71% (p = 0.032), Sign Out attempt rate (S/O) increased from 0% to 50% (p<0.001) and Oxford NOTECHS II scores increased after the intervention (P = 0.058). Glitch rate decreased in the active group and increased in the control group (p = 0.001). Complications and length of stay appeared to rise in the control group and fall in the active group. Conclusions Combining teamwork training and systems improvement enhanced both technical and non-technical operating team process measures, and were associated with a trend to better safety outcome measures in a controlled study comparison. We suggest that approaches which address both system and culture dimensions of safety may prove valuable in reducing risks to patients. PMID:26381643

  16. Improving catalytic selectivity through control of adsorption orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Simon H.

    monolayer formed by 1,2-benzenedithiol, we determined that hydrodeoxygenation selectively occurred on catalyst particle steps and edges from an upright structure, whereas decarbonylation occurred on particle terraces from a flat-lying structure. Control of furfural adsorption orientation was also achieved through the use of NiCu bimetallic catalysts. The aromatic furan ring was repelled from surface Cu, leading to an upright structure. However, under hydrogenation conditions, Ni tended to be near the surface of thin films and catalysts, leading to less dramatic selectivity enhancement. The presence of a 1-octadecanethiol monolayer kinetically stabilized the surface termination, allowing Cu to remain at the surface.

  17. Plasma process control for improved PEO coatings on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    coating growth, and to determine plasma electron temperatures. The coating requirements for good tribological properties are somewhat different than for good corrosion performance. However, good tribological performance combined with good corrosion performance can be obtained through control of the PEO processing parameters.

  18. Towards Biological Control of Kudzu Through an Improved Understanding of Insect-Kudzu Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, D.; Barber, G.; DeBarr, G.; Thornton, M.

    2001-08-03

    The authors evaluated various approaches to the biological control of kudzu and exotic weed that infests the SRS. A large number of native pollinators were found to be attracted to kudzu. The viability of seed was found to be low, between 2% and 11%. This is the result of native Hemiptera. The results suggest that seed feeding insects should not be targeted for importation. Both kudzu and soybeans had the same level of abundance and diversity of herbivore insects and the same levels of defoliation. No vine or root damaging species were found. Efforts should be targeted to the latter insects to control kudzu.

  19. Reliability improvements of the Guri Hydroelectric Power Plant computer control system AGC and AVC

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, F.; Pescina, M. ); Llort, G. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the computer control system of a large hydroelectric powerplant and the reliability improvements made to the automatic generation control (AGC) and automatic voltage control (AVC) programs. hardware and software modifications were required to improve the interface between the powerplant and the regional load dispatch office. These modifications, and their impact on the AGC and AVC reliability, are also discussed. The changes that have been implemented are recommended for inclusion in new powerplant computer control systems, and as an upgrade feature for existing control systems.

  20. [Prevention and control of air pollution needs to strengthen further study on health damage caused by air pollution].

    PubMed

    Wu, T C

    2016-08-01

    Heath issues caused by air pollution such as particulate matter (PM) are much concerned and focused among air, water and soil pollutions because human breathe air for whole life span. Present comments will review physical and chemical characteristics of PM2.5 and PM10; Dose-response associations of PM10, PM2.5 and their components with mortality and risk of cardiopulmonary diseases, early health damages such as the decrease of lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage; And the roles of genetic variations and epigenetic changes in lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage related to PMs and their components. This comments list some limitations and perspectives about the associations of air pollution with health.

  1. [Prevention and control of air pollution needs to strengthen further study on health damage caused by air pollution].

    PubMed

    Wu, T C

    2016-08-01

    Heath issues caused by air pollution such as particulate matter (PM) are much concerned and focused among air, water and soil pollutions because human breathe air for whole life span. Present comments will review physical and chemical characteristics of PM2.5 and PM10; Dose-response associations of PM10, PM2.5 and their components with mortality and risk of cardiopulmonary diseases, early health damages such as the decrease of lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage; And the roles of genetic variations and epigenetic changes in lung functions and heart rate variability, DNA damage related to PMs and their components. This comments list some limitations and perspectives about the associations of air pollution with health. PMID:27539517

  2. Does self-control improve with practice? Evidence from a six-week training program.

    PubMed

    Miles, Eleanor; Sheeran, Paschal; Baird, Harriet; Macdonald, Ian; Webb, Thomas L; Harris, Peter R

    2016-08-01

    Can self-control be improved through practice? Several studies have found that repeated practice of tasks involving self-control improves performance on other tasks relevant to self-control. However, in many of these studies, improvements after training could be attributable to methodological factors (e.g., passive control conditions). Moreover, the extent to which the effects of training transfer to real-life settings is not yet clear. In the present research, participants (N = 174) completed a 6-week training program of either cognitive or behavioral self-control tasks. We then tested the effects of practice on a range of measures of self-control, including lab-based and real-world tasks. Training was compared with both active and no-contact control conditions. Despite high levels of adherence to the training tasks, there was no effect of training on any measure of self-control. Trained participants did not, for example, show reduced ego depletion effects, become better at overcoming their habits, or report exerting more self-control in everyday life. Moderation analyses found no evidence that training was effective only among particular groups of participants. Bayesian analyses suggested that the data were more consistent with a null effect of training on self-control than with previous estimates of the effect of practice. The implication is that training self-control through repeated practice does not result in generalized improvements in self-control. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. 75 FR 28261 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Improved Diagnostics for Lyme Borreliosis, Funding Opportunity... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces...

  4. Testosterone Plus Low-Intensity Physical Training in Late Life Improves Functional Performance, Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis, and Mitochondrial Quality Control in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen; Wong, Siu; Li, Michelle; Liang, Wentao; Liesa, Marc; Serra, Carlo; Jasuja, Ravi; Bartke, Andrzej; Kirkland, James L.; Shirihai, Orian; Bhasin, Shalender

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass in older men but has not been shown to consistently improve physical function and activity. It has been hypothesized that physical exercise is required to induce the adaptations necessary for translation of testosterone-induced muscle mass gain into functional improvements. However, the effects of testosterone plus low intensity physical exercise training (T/PT) on functional performance and bioenergetics are unknown. In this pilot study, we tested the hypothesis that combined administration of T/PT would improve functional performance and bioenergetics in male mice late in life more than low-intensity physical training alone. 28-month old male mice were randomized to receive T/PT or vehicle plus physical training (V/PT) for 2 months. Compare to V/PT control, administration of T/PT was associated with improvements in muscle mass, grip strength, spontaneous physical movements, and respiratory activity. These changes were correlated with increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and expression of markers for mitochondrial biogenesis. Mice receiving T/PT also displayed increased expression of key elements for mitochondrial quality control, including markers for mitochondrial fission-and-fusion and mitophagy. Concurrently, mice receiving T/PT also displayed increased expression of markers for reduced tissue oxidative damage and improved muscle quality. Conclusion: Testosterone administered with low-intensity physical training improves grip strength, spontaneous movements, and respiratory activity. These functional improvements were associated with increased muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and improved mitochondrial quality control. PMID:23240002

  5. Improvement of inter-field CDU by using on-product focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyeong Dong; Park, Tony; Hwang, Jong Hyun; Choi, Jin Phil; Kang, Young Seog

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces to improve inter-field CDU with on-product focus control by diffraction based focus (DBF) method. For DBF target selection, a robust focus metrology for focus control was obtained, and the selected DBF target was integrated on each seven spot of a product reticle. For on-product focus control, previously on-product focus monitoring was performed, and the monitored lots showed a stable focus fingerprint. Based on the result, Z and Z/ Rx/Ry corrections per field on wafers were applied. Focus uniformity of controlled wafers was improved up to 29% in comparison with non-corrected ones. To demonstrate the improvement of inter-field CDU, Full CDs on wafers were measured by SEM. As a result, inter-field CDU for controlled wafers was improved by 16% (3σ) compared with noncontrolled wafers.

  6. Low-glycaemic index diet to improve glycaemic control and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes: design and methods for a randomised, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chiavaroli, Laura; Mirrahimi, Arash; Ireland, Christopher; Mitchell, Sandra; Sahye-Pudaruth, Sandhya; Coveney, Judy; Olowoyeye, Omodele; Maraj, Tishan; Patel, Darshna; de Souza, Russell J; Augustin, Livia S A; Bashyam, Balachandran; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Nishi, Stephanie K; Leiter, Lawrence A; Josse, Robert G; McKeown-Eyssen, Gail; Moody, Alan R; Berger, Alan R; Kendall, Cyril W C; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) produces macrovascular and microvascular damage, significantly increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), renal failure and blindness. As rates of T2DM rise, the need for effective dietary and other lifestyle changes to improve diabetes management become more urgent. Low-glycaemic index (GI) diets may improve glycaemic control in diabetes in the short term; however, there is a lack of evidence on the long-term adherence to low-GI diets, as well as on the association with surrogate markers of CVD beyond traditional risk factors. Recently, advances have been made in measures of subclinical arterial disease through the use of MRI, which, along with standard measures from carotid ultrasound (CUS) scanning, have been associated with CVD events. We therefore designed a randomised, controlled, clinical trial to assess whether low-GI dietary advice can significantly improve surrogate markers of CVD and long-term glycaemic control in T2DM. Methods and analysis 169 otherwise healthy individuals with T2DM were recruited to receive intensive counselling on a low-GI or high-cereal fibre diet for 3 years. To assess macrovascular disease, MRI and CUS are used, and to assess microvascular disease, retinal photography and 24-hour urinary collections are taken at baseline and years 1 and 3. Risk factors for CVD are assessed every 3 months. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol and consent form have been approved by the research ethics board of St. Michael's Hospital. If the study shows a benefit, these data will support the use of low-GI and/or high-fibre foods in the management of T2DM and its complications. Trial Registration number NCT01063374; Pre-results. PMID:27388364

  7. The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module: A tool for improved engine efficiency and response

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, J.R.; Reinbold, E.O.; Mueller, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Waukesha Turbocharger Control Module allows optimum control of turbochargers on lean burn gaseous fueled engines. The Turbocharger Control Module is user programmed to provide either maximum engine efficiency or best engine response to load changes. In addition, the Turbocharger Control Module prevents undesirable turbocharger surge. The Turbocharger Control Module consists of an electronic control box, engine speed, intake manifold pressure, ambient temperature sensors, and electric actuators driving compressor bypass and wastegate valves. The Turbocharger Control Module expands the steady state operational environment of the Waukesha AT27GL natural gas engine from sea level to 1,525 m altitude with one turbocharger match and improves the engine speed turn down by 80 RPM. Finally, the Turbocharger Control Module improves engine response to load changes.

  8. [New therapeutic strategies to improve control of arterial hypertension and simplify the regimen of drug treatment].

    PubMed

    Segura de La Morena, Julián; García Donaire, José Antonio; Ruilope Urioste, Luis Miguel

    2010-05-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem of first magnitude, because of its high prevalence and the associated increase in cardiovascular and renal complications. For this reason, achieving adequate pressure control in a high percentage of patients is a priority for any health system. In our country there have been numerous studies examining the degree of control of hypertension. The percentage of patients achieving adequate control has increased progressively, but the margin of improvement is still very important. Among the factors that have contributed to this improved control is the use of antihypertensive drugs in combination, free or fixed. This article reviews the progress made in controlling hypertension, in which the combined use of antihypertensive drugs has played a key role and future therapeutic options to further improve the pressure control, with special attention to the fixed combination three antihypertensive drugs.

  9. 'Damage control orthopaedics' in patients with delayed referral to a tertiary care center: experience from a place where Composite Trauma Centers do not exist

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Shabir Ahmed; Bhat, Masood Iqbal; Mustafa, Ajaz; Mir, Mohammed Ramzan; Butt, Mohammed Farooq; Halwai, Manzoor Ahmed; Tabish, Amin; Ali, Murtaza Asif; Hamid, Arshiya

    2008-01-01

    Background Management of orthopaedic injuries in polytrauma cases continues to challenge the orthopaedic traumatologist. Mass disasters compound this challenge further due to delayed referral. Recently there has been increasing evidence showing that damage control surgery has advantages that are absent in the early total care modality. We studied the damage control modality in the management of polytrauma cases with orthopaedic injuries who had been referred to our hospital after more than 24 hours of sustaining their injuries in an earthquake. This study was conducted on 51 cases after reviewing their records and complete management one year after the trauma. Results At one year, out of the 62 fractures, 3 were still under treatment, while the others had united. As per the radiological and functional scoring there were 20 excellent, 29 good, 5 fair and 5 poor results. In spite of the delayed referral there was no mortality. Conclusion In situations of delayed referral in areas where composite trauma centers do not exist the damage control modality provides an acceptable method of treatment in the management of polytrauma cases. PMID:18271951

  10. Selective vascular isolation of the liver as part of initial damage control for grade 5 liver injuries: Shouldn’t we use it more frequently?☆

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Rifat; Khalaf, Hatem

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe liver trauma (grade 4 and 5) carries mortality greater than 40%. It represents a major surgical challenge in patients with hemodynamic instability who require an immediate exploratory laparotomy. Perihepatic packing and damage control can sometimes work, but for severe liver injuries, adjunct maneuvers might be needed (such as early embolization or hepatic artery ligation). During a patient’s first operation for severe liver trauma, anatomic resection is rarely tolerated. Materials and methods We managed a 31 year-old male with a blunt grade 5 right-lobe liver injury in severe hypovolemic shock. Results As part of the initial damage control operation, concurrently with intermittent Pringle maneuver, he underwent intra- and perihepatic packing; selective isolation and ligation of the right portal vein, right hepatic artery, and right hepatic vein; and repair of the retrohepatic inferior vena cava. Then, 36 h later, the patient underwent a right hepatectomy. Conclusion For patients with severe liver injuries, selective vascular isolation and ligation may be considered as part of damage control (in addition to intermittent Pringle maneuver) and might enable anatomic resection at a later stage. PMID:25569195

  11. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-01

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  12. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  13. The Innovative Vector Control Consortium: improved control of mosquito-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Janet; Beaty, Barry J; Rowland, Mark; Scott, Thomas W; Sharp, Brian L

    2006-07-01

    Few new insecticides have been produced for control of disease vectors for public health in developing countries over the past three decades, owing to market constraints, and the available insecticides are often poorly deployed. The Innovative Vector Control Consortium will address these market failures by developing a portfolio of chemical and technological tools that will be directly and immediately accessible to populations in the developing world. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has supported this new initiative to enable industry and academia to change the vector control paradigm for malaria and dengue and to ensure that vector control, alongside drugs, case management and vaccines, can be better used to reduce disease.

  14. Application of bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal to restore the proper response of cancer cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kozłowska, Emilia; Puszynski, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    Many diseases with a genetic background such as some types of cancer are caused by damage in the p53 signaling pathway. The damage changes the system dynamics providing cancer cells with resistance to therapy such as radiation therapy. The change can be observed as the difference in bifurcation diagrams and equilibria type and location between normal and damaged cells, and summarized as the changes of the mathematical model parameters and following changes of the eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Therefore a change in other model parameters, such as mRNA degradation rates, may restore the proper eigenvalues and by that proper system dynamics. From the biological point of view, the change of mRNA degradation rate can be achieved by application of the small interfering RNA (siRNA). Here, we propose a general mathematical framework based on the bifurcation theory and siRNA-based control signal in order to study how to restore the proper response of cells with damaged p53 signaling pathway to therapy by using ionizing radiation (IR) therapy as an example. We show the difference between the cells with normal p53 signaling pathway and cells with abnormalities in the negative (as observed in SJSA-1 cell line) or positive (as observed in MCF-7 or PNT1a cell lines) feedback loop. Then we show how the dynamics of these cells can be restored to normal cell dynamics by using selected siRNA.

  15. Improved methods in neural network-based adaptive output feedback control, with applications to flight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nakwan

    Utilizing the universal approximation property of neural networks, we develop several novel approaches to neural network-based adaptive output feedback control of nonlinear systems, and illustrate these approaches for several flight control applications. In particular, we address the problem of non-affine systems and eliminate the fixed point assumption present in earlier work. All of the stability proofs are carried out in a form that eliminates an algebraic loop in the neural network implementation. An approximate input/output feedback linearizing controller is augmented with a neural network using input/output sequences of the uncertain system. These approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics. All physical systems also have control position and rate limits, which may either deteriorate performance or cause instability for a sufficiently high control bandwidth. Here we apply a method for protecting an adaptive process from the effects of input saturation and time delays, known as "pseudo control hedging". This method was originally developed for the state feedback case, and we provide a stability analysis that extends its domain of applicability to the case of output feedback. The approach is illustrated by the design of a pitch-attitude flight control system for a linearized model of an R-50 experimental helicopter, and by the design of a pitch-rate control system for a 58-state model of a flexible aircraft consisting of rigid body dynamics coupled with actuator and flexible modes. A new approach to augmentation of an existing linear controller is introduced. It is especially useful when there is limited information concerning the plant model, and the existing controller. The approach is applied to the design of an adaptive autopilot for a guided munition. Design of a neural network adaptive control that ensures asymptotically stable tracking performance is also addressed.

  16. Control Improvement for Jump-Diffusion Processes with Applications to Finance

    SciTech Connect

    Baeuerle, Nicole; Rieder, Ulrich

    2012-02-15

    We consider stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes and formulate an algorithm which produces, starting from a given admissible control {pi}, a new control with a better value. If no improvement is possible, then {pi} is optimal. Such an algorithm is well-known for discrete-time Markov Decision Problems under the name Howard's policy improvement algorithm. The idea can be traced back to Bellman. Here we show with the help of martingale techniques that such an algorithm can also be formulated for stochastic control problems with jump-diffusion processes. As an application we derive some interesting results in financial portfolio optimization.

  17. The Team Education and Adherence Monitoring (TEAM) trial: pharmacy interventions to improve hypertension control in blacks.

    PubMed

    Svarstad, Bonnie L; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Shireman, Theresa I; Crawford, Stephanie Y; Palmer, Pamela A; Vivian, Eva M; Brown, Roger L

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that involving pharmacists is an effective strategy for improving patient adherence and blood pressure (BP) control. To date, few controlled studies have tested the cost-effectiveness of specific models for improving patient adherence and BP control in community pharmacies, where most Americans obtain prescriptions. We hypothesized that a team model of adherence monitoring and intervention in corporately owned community pharmacies can improve patient adherence, prescribing, and BP control among hypertensive black patients. The Team Education and Adherence Monitoring (TEAM) Trial is a randomized controlled trial testing a multistep intervention for improving adherence monitoring and intervention in 28 corporately owned community pharmacies. Patients in the 14 control pharmacies received "usual care," and patients in the 14 intervention pharmacies received TEAM Care by trained pharmacists and pharmacy technicians working with patients and physicians. Data collectors screened 1250 patients and enrolled 597 hypertensive black patients. The primary end points were the proportion of patients achieving BP control and reductions in systolic and diastolic BP measured after 6 and 12 months. Secondary end points were changes in adherence monitoring and intervention, patient adherence and barriers to adherence, prescribing, and cost-effectiveness. Researchers also will examine potential covariates and barriers to change. Involving pharmacists is a potentially powerful means of improving BP control in blacks. Pharmacists are in an excellent position to monitor patients between clinic visits and to provide useful information to patients and physicians. PMID:20031847

  18. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  19. Shallow subsurface control on earthquake damage patterns: first results from a 3D geological voxel model study (Tokyo Lowland, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafleu, Jan; Busschers, Freek; Tanabe, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The Tokyo Lowland is situated in a Neogene sedimentary basin near the triple junction of the North American, Pacific, and Philippine tectonic plates. The basin is filled with Neogene and Quaternary sediments up to a thickness of 3 km. In the upper 70 m of the basin, thick sequences of soft Holocene sediments occur which are assumed to have played a key role in the spatial variation of damage intensity during the 1923 Kanto earthquake (Magnitude 7.9 to 8.3). Historical records show this earthquake destroyed large parts of the Tokyo urban area which in that time was largely made up by wooden houses. Although the epicentre was 70 km to the southwest of Tokyo, severe damage occurred north of the city centre, presumably due to ground motion amplification in the soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface. In order to assess the presumed relation between the damage pattern of the 1923 earthquake and the occurrence of soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface, we constructed a 3D geological voxel model of the central part of the Tokyo Lowland. The model was constructed using a methodology originally developed for the lowlands of the Netherlands. The modelling workflow basically consists of three steps. First, some 10,000 borehole descriptions (gathered for geomechanical purposes), were subdivided into geological units that have uniform sediment characteristics, using both lithological and geomechanical (N-value) criteria. Second, 2D bounding surfaces were constructed, representing tops and bases of the geological units. These surfaces were used to place each voxel (100 by 100 by 1 m) within the correct geological unit. The N-values and lithological units in the borehole descriptions were subsequently used to perform a 3D stochastic interpolation of N-value and lithological class within each geological unit. Using a vertical voxel stack analysis, we were able to create a map showing the accumulated thickness of soft muds in the Holocene succession. A

  20. Interrupted Time Series Versus Statistical Process Control in Quality Improvement Projects.

    PubMed

    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus; Andersson Gäre, Boel; Elg, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    To measure the effect of quality improvement interventions, it is appropriate to use analysis methods that measure data over time. Examples of such methods include statistical process control analysis and interrupted time series with segmented regression analysis. This article compares the use of statistical process control analysis and interrupted time series with segmented regression analysis for evaluating the longitudinal effects of quality improvement interventions, using an example study on an evaluation of a computerized decision support system.

  1. Improved EHV line switching surge control by application of MO-arrestors and controlled switching

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A.; Lacorte, M.; Knudsen, O.

    1995-12-31

    Transmission line switching surges and its limitation by means of metal-oxide (MO) surge arresters and controlled switching are discussed. The benefits of these overvoltage control methods are analyzed based on extensive simulation studies of 550 kV transmission lines. The line length is taken as independent parameter and the degree of shunt-compensation is considered as well. The simulation studies show that MO arresters and controlled switching cope in most cases with the insulation coordination requirements of 550 kV networks, thus eliminating the need of closing resistors.

  2. ProactiveVector control strategies and improved monitoring and evaluation practices for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Beaty, Barry J; Morrison, Amy C; Scott, Thomas W

    2009-11-01

    Despite tremendous efforts by public health organizations in dengue-endemic countries, it has proven difficult to achieve effective and sustainable control of the primary dengue virus vector Aedes aegypti (L.) and to effectively disrupt dengue outbreaks. This problem has multiple root causes, including uncontrolled urbanization, increased global spread of dengue viruses, and vector and dengue control programs not being provided adequate resources. In this forum article, we give an overview of the basic elements of a vector and dengue control program and describe a continuous improvement cyclical model to systematically and incrementally improve control program performance by regular efforts to identify ineffective methods and inferior technology, and then replacing them with better performing alternatives. The first step includes assessments of the overall resource allocation among vector/dengue control program activities, the efficacy of currently used vector control methods, and the appropriateness of technology used to support the program. We expect this will reveal that 1) some currently used vector control methods are not effective, 2) resource allocations often are skewed toward reactive vector control measures, and 3) proactive approaches commonly are underfunded and therefore poorly executed. Next steps are to conceptualize desired changes to vector control methods or technologies used and then to operationally determine in pilot studies whether these changes are likely to improve control program performance. This should be followed by a shift in resource allocation to replace ineffective methods and inferior technology with more effective and operationally tested alternatives. The cyclical and self-improving nature of the continuous improvement model will produce locally appropriate management strategies that continually are adapted to counter changes in vector population or dengue virus transmission dynamics. We discuss promising proactive vector control

  3. ProactiveVector control strategies and improved monitoring and evaluation practices for dengue prevention.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Beaty, Barry J; Morrison, Amy C; Scott, Thomas W

    2009-11-01

    Despite tremendous efforts by public health organizations in dengue-endemic countries, it has proven difficult to achieve effective and sustainable control of the primary dengue virus vector Aedes aegypti (L.) and to effectively disrupt dengue outbreaks. This problem has multiple root causes, including uncontrolled urbanization, increased global spread of dengue viruses, and vector and dengue control programs not being provided adequate resources. In this forum article, we give an overview of the basic elements of a vector and dengue control program and describe a continuous improvement cyclical model to systematically and incrementally improve control program performance by regular efforts to identify ineffective methods and inferior technology, and then replacing them with better performing alternatives. The first step includes assessments of the overall resource allocation among vector/dengue control program activities, the efficacy of currently used vector control methods, and the appropriateness of technology used to support the program. We expect this will reveal that 1) some currently used vector control methods are not effective, 2) resource allocations often are skewed toward reactive vector control measures, and 3) proactive approaches commonly are underfunded and therefore poorly executed. Next steps are to conceptualize desired changes to vector control methods or technologies used and then to operationally determine in pilot studies whether these changes are likely to improve control program performance. This should be followed by a shift in resource allocation to replace ineffective methods and inferior technology with more effective and operationally tested alternatives. The cyclical and self-improving nature of the continuous improvement model will produce locally appropriate management strategies that continually are adapted to counter changes in vector population or dengue virus transmission dynamics. We discuss promising proactive vector control

  4. Damaged Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn V vehicle, carrying the unmarned orbital workshop for the Skylab-1 mission, lifted off successfully and all systems performed normally. Sixty-three seconds into the flight, engineers in the operation support and control center saw an unexpected telemetry indication that signalled that damages occurred on one solar array and the micrometeoroid shield during the launch. The micrometeoroid shield, a thin protective cylinder surrounding the workshop protecting it from tiny space particles and the sun's scorching heat, ripped loose from its position around the workshop. This caused the loss of one solar wing and jammed the other. Still unoccupied, the Skylab was stricken with the loss of the heat shield and sunlight beat mercilessly on the lab's sensitive skin. Internal temperatures soared, rendering the station uninhabitable, threatening foods, medicines, films, and experiments. This image, taken during a fly-around inspection by the Skylab-2 crew, shows a crippled Skylab in orbit. The crew found their home in space to be in serious shape; the heat shield gone, one solar wing gone, and the other jammed. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed, tested, rehearsed, and approved three repair options. These options included a parasol sunshade and a twin-pole sunshade to restore the temperature inside the workshop, and a set of metal cutting tools to free the jammed solar panel.

  5. Improving adherence to glaucoma medication: a randomised controlled trial of a patient-centred intervention (The Norwich Adherence Glaucoma Study)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving adherence to ocular hypertension (OH)/glaucoma therapy is highly likely to prevent or reduce progression of optic nerve damage. The present study used a behaviour change counselling intervention to determine whether education and support was beneficial and cost-effective in improving adherence with glaucoma therapy. Methods A randomised controlled trial with a 13-month recruitment and 8-month follow-up period was conducted. Patients with OH/glaucoma attending a glaucoma clinic and starting treatment with travoprost were approached. Participants were randomised into two groups and adherence was measured over 8 months, using an electronic monitoring device (Travalert® dosing aid, TDA). The control group received standard clinical care, and the intervention group received a novel glaucoma education and motivational support package using behaviour change counselling. Cost-effectiveness framework analysis was used to estimate any potential cost benefit of improving adherence. Results Two hundred and eight patients were recruited (102 intervention, 106 control). No significant difference in mean adherence over the monitoring period was identified with 77.2% (CI, 73.0, 81.4) for the control group and 74.8% (CI, 69.7, 79.9) for the intervention group (p = 0.47). Similarly, there was no significant difference in percentage intraocular pressure reduction; 27.6% (CI, 23.5, 31.7) for the control group and 25.3% (CI, 21.06, 29.54) for the intervention group (p = 0.45). Participants in the intervention group were more satisfied with information about glaucoma medication with a mean score of 14.47/17 (CI, 13.85, 15.0) compared with control group which was 8.51 (CI, 7.72, 9.30). The mean intervention cost per patient was GB£10.35 (

  6. Prevention and Control of Dental Disease through Improved Access to Comprehensive Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    Prevention of dental disease is the key to improving the nation's oral health. The American Dental Association (ADA) program of prevention and control of dental disease through improved access to comprehensive care concentrates on those who have special difficulties in receiving care: the poor, the elderly, the handicapped, the institutionalized…

  7. CF6 Jet Engine Performance Improvement: High Pressure Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, S. E.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An active clearance control system was developed which reduces fuel consumption and performance degradation. This system utilizes compressor discharge air during takeoff and fan discharge air during cruise to impinge on the shroud structure to improve the thermal response. The system was evaluated in component and engine tests. The test results demonstrated a performance improvement of 0.7 percent in cruise SFC.

  8. Evaluation of spatial and temporal patterns of insect damage and aflatoxin level in the pre-harvest corn fields to improve management tactics.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xinzhi; Wilson, Jeffrey P; Toews, Michael D; Buntin, G David; Lee, R Dewey; Li, Xin; Lei, Zhongren; He, Kanglai; Xu, Wenwei; Li, Xianchun; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A

    2014-10-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of insect damage in relation to aflatoxin contamination in a corn field with plants of uniform genetic background are not well understood. After previous examination of spatial patterns of insect damage and aflatoxin in pre-harvest corn fields, we further examined both spatial and temporal patterns of cob- and kernel-feeding insect damage, and aflatoxin level with two samplings at pre-harvest in 2008 and 2009. The feeding damage by each of the ear/kernel-feeding insects (i.e., corn earworm/fall armyworm damage on the silk/cob, and discoloration of corn kernels by stink bugs) and maize weevil population were assessed at each grid point with five ears. Sampling data showed a field edge effect in both insect damage and aflatoxin contamination in both years. Maize weevils tended toward an aggregated distribution more frequently than either corn earworm or stink bug damage in both years. The frequency of detecting aggregated distribution for aflatoxin level was less than any of the insect damage assessments. Stink bug damage and maize weevil number were more closely associated with aflatoxin level than was corn earworm damage. In addition, the indices of spatial-temporal association (χ) demonstrated that the number of maize weevils was associated between the first (4 weeks pre-harvest) and second (1 week pre-harvest) samplings in both years on all fields. In contrast, corn earworm damage between the first and second samplings from the field on the Belflower Farm, and aflatoxin level and corn earworm damage from the field on the Lang Farm were dissociated in 2009. PMID:23956115

  9. A case–control study to detect the extent of DNA damage in oral lichen planus and oral lichenoid reactions using comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Madhulika, N.; Rangdhol, R. Vishwanath; Sitra, G.; Ballaiah, John; Jaikumar, R. Arun; Brooklyin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to quantify the extent of DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid reactions (OLRs) using comet assay. Methodology: Lymphocytes from peripheral blood were subjected to alkaline comet assay. Comet length (CL), head diameter (HD), percentage of DNA in head, tail length (TL), percentage of DNA in tail, tail intensity, tail mean and tail moment were compared between study group (OLP and OLR) and control group using Student's t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to examine the linear association between the variables. Results: Significantly higher levels of DNA damage was present in study group as reflected by CL, HD and TL, tail intensity and tail moment with P = 0.0001; percentage of DNA in head and tail with P = 0.02 and tail mean with P = 0.012. Conclusion: This study brings out the fact that DNA damage measured by comet assay was greater in the study group when compared to the control group. As a reflection of uniqueness, this study crowns the scenario with respect to early detection and prevention of potentially malignant disorders and the process of malignant transformation. PMID:26538896

  10. Improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Norman D.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate covering the period from Nov. 1986 to Dec. 1993 is presented. A paper on the history, principles, and applications of helicopter individual-blade-control is included.

  11. Pterostilbene improves glycaemic control in rats fed an obesogenic diet: Involvement of skeletal muscle and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine whether pterostilbene improved glycaemic control in rats showing insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Rats were divided into 3 groups: control group and two groups treated with either 15 mg/kg/d (PT15) or 30 mg/kg/d of pterostilbene (PT30). HOMA-IR was decr...

  12. An improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with smoothness control functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents an improved nearly-orthogonal structured mesh generation system with a set of smoothness control functions, which were derived based on the ratio between the Jacobian of the transformation matrix and the Jacobian of the metric tensor. The proposed smoothness control functions are...

  13. PID controller design of nonlinear systems using an improved particle swarm optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei-Der; Shih, Shun-Peng

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, an improved particle swarm optimization is presented to search for the optimal PID controller gains for a class of nonlinear systems. The proposed algorithm is to modify the velocity formula of the general PSO systems in order for improving the searching efficiency. In the improved PSO-based nonlinear PID control system design, three PID control gains, i.e., the proportional gain Kp, integral gain Ki, and derivative gain Kd are required to form a parameter vector which is called a particle. It is the basic component of PSO systems and many such particles further constitute a population. To derive the optimal PID gains for nonlinear systems, two principle equations, the modified velocity updating and position updating equations, are employed to move the positions of all particles in the population. In the meanwhile, an objective function defined for PID controller optimization problems may be minimized. To validate the control performance of the proposed method, a typical nonlinear system control, the inverted pendulum tracking control, is illustrated. The results testify that the improved PSO algorithm can perform well in the nonlinear PID control system design.

  14. Endogenous IL-6 of mesenchymal stem cell improves behavioral outcome of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage neonatal rats by supressing apoptosis in astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; He, Mulan; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Liu, Jinngjing; Hou, Nali; Bin, Tan; Zhang, Yun; Li, Tingyu; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduces the neurological impairment caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) via immunomodulation. In the current study, we found that MSC transplantation improved learning and memory function and enhanced long-term potentiation in neonatal rats subjected to HIBD and the amount of IL-6 released from MSCs was far greater than that of other cytokines. However, the neuroprotective effect of MSCs infected with siIL-6-transduced recombinant lentivirus (siIL-6 MSCs) was significantly weakened in the behavioural tests and electrophysiological analysis. Meanwhile, the hippocampal IL-6 levels were decreased following siIL-6 MSC transplantation. In vitro, the levels of IL-6 release and the levels of IL-6R and STAT3 expression were increased in both primary neurons and astrocytes subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) following MSCs co-culture. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was upregulated and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was downregulated in OGD-injured astrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. However, the siIL-6 MSCs suppressed ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in the injured astrocytes and induced apoptosis number of the injured astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of MSC transplantation in neonatal HIBD rats is partly mediated by IL-6 to enhance anti-apoptosis of injured astrocytes via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:26766745

  15. Improvements to enforcement of multilateral environmental agreements to control international shipments of chemicals and wastes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Somboon, Vira; Wun'gaeo, Surichai; Middleton, Carl; Tingsabadh, Charit; Limjirakan, Sangchan

    2016-06-01

    Illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals has caused severe damage on human health and the environment, and brought big challenges to countries to meet their commitments to related multilateral environmental agreements. Synergy-building, like organising law enforcement operations, is critical to address illegal trade in waste and chemicals, and further improve the effectiveness of environmental enforcement. This article discusses how and why law enforcement operations can help countries to implement chemical and waste-related multilateral environmental agreements in a more efficient and effective way. The research explores key barriers and factors for organising law enforcement operations, and recommends methods to improve law enforcement operations to address illegal trade in hazardous waste and harmful chemicals. PMID:27118737

  16. Improving Control System Cyber-State Awareness using Known Secure Sensor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Miles McQueen

    2012-09-01

    Abstract—This paper presents design and simulation of a low cost and low false alarm rate method for improved cyber-state awareness of critical control systems - the Known Secure Sensor Measurements (KSSM) method. The KSSM concept relies on physical measurements to detect malicious falsification of the control systems state. The KSSM method can be incrementally integrated with already installed control systems for enhanced resilience. This paper reviews the previously developed theoretical KSSM concept and then describes a simulation of the KSSM system. A simulated control system network is integrated with the KSSM components. The effectiveness of detection of various intrusion scenarios is demonstrated on several control system network topologies.

  17. A Chinese Mind-Body Exercise Improves Self-Control of Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Siu, Nicolson Y.; Lau, Eliza M.; Cheung, Mei-chun

    2013-01-01

    Self-control problems commonly manifest as temper outbursts and repetitive/rigid/impulsive behaviors, in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which often contributes to learning difficulties and caregiver burden. The present study aims to compare the effect of a traditional Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercise, Nei Yang Gong, with that of the conventional Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) technique in enhancing the self-control of children with ASD. Forty-six age- and IQ-matched ASD children were randomly assigned to receive group training in Nei Yang Gong (experimental group) or PMR (control group) twice per week for four weeks. The participants’ self-control was measured by three neuropsychological tests and parental rating on standardized questionnaires, and the underlying neural mechanism was assessed by the participants’ brain EEG activity during an inhibitory-control task before and after intervention. The results show that the experimental group demonstrated significantly greater improvement in self-control than the control group, which concurs with the parental reports of reduced autistic symptoms and increased control of temper and behaviors. In addition, the experimental group showed enhanced EEG activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that mediates self-control, whereas the PMR group did not. The present findings support the potential application of Chinese Chan-based mind-body exercises as a form of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with self-control problems. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry; Registration No.: ChiCTR-TRC-12002561; URL: www.chictr.org. PMID:23874533

  18. Taekwondo Training Improves Sensory Organization and Balance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Tsang, William W. N.; Ng, Gabriel Y. F.

    2012-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) have poorer postural control and are more susceptible to falls and injuries than their healthy counterparts. Sports training may improve sensory organization and balance ability in this population. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of three months of Taekwondo (TKD) training on the…

  19. Improvement of Step Response of Voice Coil Motor (VCM) Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisaka, Masashi

    A method for designing a sensitivity function by taking into consideration the step response is proposed. The target for the position control is generated by a feedback, instead of a feedforward controller, to improve the step response profile for perturbations in plant gain. The sampling rate for generating the target is slower than the rate for the position control to suppress the mechanical resonances at a high-frequency range. The method is applied to the hard disk drive (HDD) benchmark, and an improved step response is obtained.

  20. Improved Temperature Dynamic Model of Turbine Subcomponents for Facilitation of Generalized Tip Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kypuros, Javier A.; Colson, Rodrigo; Munoz, Afredo

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes efforts conducted to improve dynamic temperature estimations of a turbine tip clearance system to facilitate design of a generalized tip clearance controller. This work builds upon research previously conducted and presented in and focuses primarily on improving dynamic temperature estimations of the primary components affecting tip clearance (i.e. the rotor, blades, and casing/shroud). The temperature profiles estimated by the previous model iteration, specifically for the rotor and blades, were found to be inaccurate and, more importantly, insufficient to facilitate controller design. Some assumptions made to facilitate the previous results were not valid, and thus improvements are presented here to better match the physical reality. As will be shown, the improved temperature sub- models, match a commercially validated model and are sufficiently simplified to aid in controller design.

  1. Stability Improvement of Two Wheel Driven Mobile Manipulator Using Nonlinear PD Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Murakami, Toshiyuki

    This paper proposes the stability improvement of two wheeled mobile manipulator using nonlinear Proportional Derivative (PD) controller. Nonlinear PD controller is a controller which automatically adjusts its gains according to the stability conditions on running. Lyapunov function based on kinetic energy of the system and position error are used to re-schedule the gains of the nonlinear PD controller. This method will expand the stability margin of the two wheeled mobile manipulator. Further advantages of this method are reducing the parameter uncertainty and difficulty of adjusting gains due to nonlinear nature of system. In the proposed approach, virtual double inverted pendulum is introduced for the control of the two wheeled mobile manipulator. The model based on the double inverted pendulum, makes it easy to design the controller. Here, wheel control and manipulator control are designed separately and unified by using two nonlinear PD controllers. Two nonlinear PD controllers are implemented for better stability. The method proposed in this paper has used nonlinear PD controller in work space of the manipulator controller together with null space control. Here the null space control increases the control stability of manipulator configuration. The effectiveness of the proposed method was confirmed by the experiment of two wheel mobile manipulator.

  2. Dominus: Nematode and pathogen control and improved weed control with fomesafen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few new chemical fumigants have been developed in recent years. One of the exceptions is a biofumigant with the active ingredient allylisothiocyanate (AITC), registered as the commercial product Dominus® (Isagro, USA). Excellent control of fungal plant pathogens and nematodes has been achieved wit...

  3. Cognitive Control and Language across the Life Span: Does Labeling Improve Reactive Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucenet, Joanna; Blaye, Agnès; Chevalier, Nicolas; Kray, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    How does cognitive control change with age, and what are the processes underlying these changes? This question has been extensively studied using versions of the task-switching paradigm, which allow participants to actively prepare for the upcoming task (Kray, Eber, & Karbach, 2008). Little is known, however, about age-related changes in this…

  4. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work.

  5. Improved Adaptive-Reinforcement Learning Control for morphing unmanned air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Valasek, John; Doebbler, James; Tandale, Monish D; Meade, Andrew J

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents an improved Adaptive-Reinforcement Learning Control methodology for the problem of unmanned air vehicle morphing control. The reinforcement learning morphing control function that learns the optimal shape change policy is integrated with an adaptive dynamic inversion control trajectory tracking function. An episodic unsupervised learning simulation using the Q-learning method is developed to replace an earlier and less accurate Actor-Critic algorithm. Sequential Function Approximation, a Galerkin-based scattered data approximation scheme, replaces a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method and is used to generalize the learning from previously experienced quantized states and actions to the continuous state-action space, all of which may not have been experienced before. The improved method showed smaller errors and improved learning of the optimal shape compared to the KNN. PMID:18632393

  6. Improved Adaptive-Reinforcement Learning Control for morphing unmanned air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Valasek, John; Doebbler, James; Tandale, Monish D; Meade, Andrew J

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents an improved Adaptive-Reinforcement Learning Control methodology for the problem of unmanned air vehicle morphing control. The reinforcement learning morphing control function that learns the optimal shape change policy is integrated with an adaptive dynamic inversion control trajectory tracking function. An episodic unsupervised learning simulation using the Q-learning method is developed to replace an earlier and less accurate Actor-Critic algorithm. Sequential Function Approximation, a Galerkin-based scattered data approximation scheme, replaces a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) method and is used to generalize the learning from previously experienced quantized states and actions to the continuous state-action space, all of which may not have been experienced before. The improved method showed smaller errors and improved learning of the optimal shape compared to the KNN.

  7. Improvements in the order, isotropy and electron density of glypican-1 crystals by controlled dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Wael; Svensson Birkedal, Gabriel; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Mani, Katrin; Logan, Derek T.

    2013-12-01

    The anisotropy of crystals of glypican-1 was significantly reduced by controlled dehydration using the HC1 device, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure. The use of controlled dehydration for improvement of protein crystal diffraction quality is increasing in popularity, although there are still relatively few documented examples of success. A study has been carried out to establish whether controlled dehydration could be used to improve the anisotropy of crystals of the core protein of the human proteoglycan glypican-1. Crystals were subjected to controlled dehydration using the HC1 device. The optimal protocol for dehydration was developed by careful investigation of the following parameters: dehydration rate, final relative humidity and total incubation time T{sub inc}. Of these, the most important was shown to be T{sub inc}. After dehydration using the optimal protocol the crystals showed significantly reduced anisotropy and improved electron density, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure.

  8. An Improved Method of Parameter Identification and Damage Detection in Beam Structures under Flexural Vibration Using Wavelet Multi-Resolution Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravanfar, Seyed Alireza; Abdul Razak, Hashim; Ismail, Zubaidah; Monajemi, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-step approach for optimally determining the location and severity of damage in beam structures under flexural vibration. The first step focuses on damage location detection. This is done by defining the damage index called relative wavelet packet entropy (RWPE). The damage severities of the model in terms of loss of stiffness are assessed in the second step using the inverse solution of equations of motion of a structural system in the wavelet domain. For this purpose, the connection coefficient of the scaling function to convert the equations of motion in the time domain into the wavelet domain is applied. Subsequently, the dominant components based on the relative energies of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) components of the acceleration responses are defined. To obtain the best estimation of the stiffness parameters of the model, the least squares error minimization is used iteratively over the dominant components. Then, the severity of the damage is evaluated by comparing the stiffness parameters of the identified model before and after the occurrence of damage. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and effective for the determination of damage location and accurate estimation of the loss in stiffness due to damage. PMID:26371005

  9. An Improved Method of Parameter Identification and Damage Detection in Beam Structures under Flexural Vibration Using Wavelet Multi-Resolution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Seyed Alireza; Razak, Hashim Abdul; Ismail, Zubaidah; Monajemi, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a two-step approach for optimally determining the location and severity of damage in beam structures under flexural vibration. The first step focuses on damage location detection. This is done by defining the damage index called relative wavelet packet entropy (RWPE). The damage severities of the model in terms of loss of stiffness are assessed in the second step using the inverse solution of equations of motion of a structural system in the wavelet domain. For this purpose, the connection coefficient of the scaling function to convert the equations of motion in the time domain into the wavelet domain is applied. Subsequently, the dominant components based on the relative energies of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) components of the acceleration responses are defined. To obtain the best estimation of the stiffness parameters of the model, the least squares error minimization is used iteratively over the dominant components. Then, the severity of the damage is evaluated by comparing the stiffness parameters of the identified model before and after the occurrence of damage. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and effective for the determination of damage location and accurate estimation of the loss in stiffness due to damage. PMID:26371005

  10. An Improved Method of Parameter Identification and Damage Detection in Beam Structures under Flexural Vibration Using Wavelet Multi-Resolution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Seyed Alireza; Razak, Hashim Abdul; Ismail, Zubaidah; Monajemi, Hooman

    2015-09-09

    This paper reports on a two-step approach for optimally determining the location and severity of damage in beam structures under flexural vibration. The first step focuses on damage location detection. This is done by defining the damage index called relative wavelet packet entropy (RWPE). The damage severities of the model in terms of loss of stiffness are assessed in the second step using the inverse solution of equations of motion of a structural system in the wavelet domain. For this purpose, the connection coefficient of the scaling function to convert the equations of motion in the time domain into the wavelet domain is applied. Subsequently, the dominant components based on the relative energies of the wavelet packet transform (WPT) components of the acceleration responses are defined. To obtain the best estimation of the stiffness parameters of the model, the least squares error minimization is used iteratively over the dominant components. Then, the severity of the damage is evaluated by comparing the stiffness parameters of the identified model before and after the occurrence of damage. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and effective for the determination of damage location and accurate estimation of the loss in stiffness due to damage.

  11. Distributed Hierarchical Control of Multi-Area Power Systems with Improved Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Du, Pengwei; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2012-12-12

    The conventional distributed hierarchical control architecture for multi-area power systems is revisited. In this paper, a new distributed hierarchical control architecture is proposed. In the proposed architecture, pilot generators are selected in each area to be equipped with decentralized robust control as a supplementary to the conventional droop speed control. With the improved primary frequency control, the system frequency can be restored to the nominal value without the help of secondary frequency control, which reduces the burden of the automatic generation control for frequency restoration. Moreover, the low frequency inter-area electromechanical oscillations can also be effectively damped. The effectiveness of the proposed distributed hierarchical control architecture is validated through detailed simulations.

  12. Maintenance of Certification Part IV Quality-Improvement Project for Hypertension Control: A Preliminary Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, Vallerie A; Price, David W

    2015-01-01

    Context: A Maintenance of Certification Part IV project was created on the basis of an existing, multifaceted hypertension improvement program. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the Maintenance of Certification project, the effects of the improvement options on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients, and the participants’ perception of the workload related to participation in the project. Design: Nonexperimental retrospective analysis. Setting: Kaiser Permanente hospitals and medical office buildings in Northern California. Intervention: Participants used one or more options from a defined menu of strategies to attempt to increase the percentage of hypertensive patients on their patient panels who had controlled blood pressure. Main Outcome Measure: Proportion of hypertensive patients with blood pressure ≤ 139/89 mm Hg. Results: Fifty-two American Board of Family Medicine and 19 American Board of Internal Medicine certified physicians completed projects. Mean panel blood pressure control improved from 79.49% (standard deviation [SD] = 11.32) to 84.64% (SD = 7.80). The choice of improvement option was not associated with the level of improvement or with the participants’ perception of the workload related to completing the project. Conclusion: Project participants improved the care of their patients without an increased perceived burden to their practice. We found no association between the choice of improvement option and either the level of improvement or the perception of workload. PMID:25785642

  13. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  14. Direct yaw moment control for distributed drive electric vehicle handling performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhuoping; Leng, Bo; Xiong, Lu; Feng, Yuan; Shi, Fenmiao

    2016-05-01

    For a distributed drive electric vehicle (DDEV) driven by four in-wheel motors, advanced vehicle dynamic control methods can be realized easily because motors can be controlled independently, quickly and precisely. And direct yaw-moment control (DYC) has been widely studied and applied to vehicle stability control. Good vehicle handling performance: quick yaw rate transient response, small overshoot, high steady yaw rate gain, etc, is required by drivers under normal conditions, which is less concerned, however. Based on the hierarchical control methodology, a novel control system using direct yaw moment control for improving handling performance of a distributed drive electric vehicle especially under normal driving conditions has been proposed. The upper-loop control system consists of two parts: a state feedback controller, which aims to realize the ideal transient response of yaw rate, with a vehicle sideslip angle observer; and a steering wheel angle feedforward controller designed to achieve a desired yaw rate steady gain. Under the restriction of the effect of poles and zeros in the closed-loop transfer function on the system response and the capacity of in-wheel motors, the integrated time and absolute error (ITAE) function is utilized as the cost function in the optimal control to calculate the ideal eigen frequency and damper coefficient of the system and obtain optimal feedback matrix and feedforward matrix. Simulations and experiments with a DDEV under multiple maneuvers are carried out and show the effectiveness of the proposed method: yaw rate rising time is reduced, steady yaw rate gain is increased, vehicle steering characteristic is close to neutral steer and drivers burdens are also reduced. The control system improves vehicle handling performance under normal conditions in both transient and steady response. State feedback control instead of model following control is introduced in the control system so that the sense of control intervention to

  15. Multileaf collimator performance monitoring and improvement using semiautomated quality control testing and statistical process control

    SciTech Connect

    Létourneau, Daniel McNiven, Andrea; Keller, Harald; Wang, An; Amin, Md Nurul; Pearce, Jim; Norrlinger, Bernhard; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: High-quality radiation therapy using highly conformal dose distributions and image-guided techniques requires optimum machine delivery performance. In this work, a monitoring system for multileaf collimator (MLC) performance, integrating semiautomated MLC quality control (QC) tests and statistical process control tools, was developed. The MLC performance monitoring system was used for almost a year on two commercially available MLC models. Control charts were used to establish MLC performance and assess test frequency required to achieve a given level of performance. MLC-related interlocks and servicing events were recorded during the monitoring period and were investigated as indicators of MLC performance variations. Methods: The QC test developed as part of the MLC performance monitoring system uses 2D megavoltage images (acquired using an electronic portal imaging device) of 23 fields to determine the location of the leaves with respect to the radiation isocenter. The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was assessed by detecting the MLC leaf positions on 127 megavoltage images of a static field. After initial calibration, the MLC performance monitoring QC test was performed 3–4 times/week over a period of 10–11 months to monitor positional accuracy of individual leaves for two different MLC models. Analysis of test results was performed using individuals control charts per leaf with control limits computed based on the measurements as well as two sets of specifications of ±0.5 and ±1 mm. Out-of-specification and out-of-control leaves were automatically flagged by the monitoring system and reviewed monthly by physicists. MLC-related interlocks reported by the linear accelerator and servicing events were recorded to help identify potential causes of nonrandom MLC leaf positioning variations. Results: The precision of the MLC performance monitoring QC test and the MLC itself was within ±0.22 mm for most MLC leaves

  16. JT9D-70/59 Improved High Pressure Turbine Active Clearance Control System. [for specific fuel consumption improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffin, W. O.

    1979-01-01

    The JT9D-70/59 high pressure turbine active clearance control system was modified to provide reduction of blade tip clearance when the system is activated during cruise operation. The modification increased the flow capacity and air impingement effectiveness of the cooling air manifold to augment turbine case shrinkage capability, and increased responsiveness of the airseal clearance to case shrinkage. The simulated altitude engine testing indicated a significant improvement in specific fuel consumption with the modified system. A 1000 cycle engine endurance test showed no unusual wear or performance deterioration effects on the engine or the clearance control system. Rig tests indicated that the air impingement and seal support configurations used in the engine tests are near optimum.

  17. Leveraging master-slave OpenFlow controller arrangement to improve control plane resiliency in SD-EONs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Bin; Ma, Shoujiang; Chen, Cen; Hu, Daoyun; Zhou, Wenshuang; Zhu, Zuqing

    2015-03-23

    In this paper, we study how to improve the control plane resiliency of software-defined elastic optical networks (SD-EONs) and design a master-slave OpenFlow (OF) controller arrangement. Specifically, we introduce two OF controllers (OF-Cs), i.e., the master and slave OF-Cs, and make them work in a collaborative way to protect the SD-EON against controller failures. We develop a controller communication protocol (CCP) to facilitate the cooperation of the two OF-Cs. With the CCP, the master OF-C (M-OF-C) can synchronize network status to the slave OF-C (S-OF-C) in real time, while S-OF-C can quickly detect the failure of M-OF-C and take over the network control and management (NC&M) tasks timely to avoid service disruption. We implement the proposed framework in an SD-EON control plane testbed built with high-performance servers, and perform NC&M experiments with different network failure scenarios to demonstrate its effectiveness. Experimental results indicate that the proposed system can restore services in both the data and control planes of SD-EON jointly while maintaining relatively good scalability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that realizes control plane resiliency in SD-EONs.

  18. FBXL5-mediated degradation of single-stranded DNA-binding protein hSSB1 controls DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Bin; Tang, Nai-Wang; Xu, Yun-Hua; Ye, Xiang-Yun; Li, Zi-Ming; Niu, Xiao-Min; Shen, Sheng-Ping; Lu, Shun; Xu, Ling

    2014-10-01

    Human single-strand (ss) DNA binding proteins 1 (hSSB1) has been shown to participate in DNA damage response and maintenance of genome stability by regulating the initiation of ATM-dependent signaling. ATM phosphorylates hSSB1 and prevents hSSB1 from ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. However, the E3 ligase that targets hSSB1 for destruction is still unknown. Here, we report that hSSB1 is the bona fide substrate for an Fbxl5-containing SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F box) E3 ligase. Fbxl5 interacts with and targets hSSB1 for ubiquitination and degradation, which could be prevented by ATM-mediated hSSB1 T117 phosphorylation. Furthermore, cells overexpression of Fbxl5 abrogated the cellular response to DSBs, including activation of ATM and phosphorylation of ATM targets and exhibited increased radiosensitivity, chemosensitivity and defective checkpoint activation after genotoxic stress stimuli. Moreover, the protein levels of hSSB1 and Fbxl5 showed an inverse correlation in lung cancer cells lines and clinical lung cancer samples. Therefore, Fbxl5 may negatively modulate hSSB1 to regulate DNA damage response, implicating Fbxl5 as a novel, promising therapeutic target for lung cancers.

  19. Antioxidant-rich coffee reduces DNA damage, elevates glutathione status and contributes to weight control: results from an intervention study.

    PubMed

    Bakuradze, Tamara; Boehm, Nadine; Janzowski, Christine; Lang, Roman; Hofmann, Thomas; Stockis, Jean-Pierre; Albert, Franz W; Stiebitz, Herbert; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Baum, Matthias; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2011-05-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence increasingly suggests coffee consumption to be correlated to prevention or delay of degenerative diseases connected with oxidative cellular stress. In an intervention study comprising 33 healthy volunteers, we examined DNA-protective and antioxidative effects exerted in vivo by daily ingestion of 750 mL of freshly brewed coffee rich in both green coffee bean constituents as well as roast products. The study design encompassed an initial 4 wk of wash-out, followed by 4 wk of coffee intake and 4 wk of second wash-out. At the start and after each study phase blood samples were taken to monitor biomarkers of oxidative stress response. In addition, body weight/composition and intake of energy/nutrients were recorded. In the coffee ingestion period, the primary endpoint, oxidative DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay (± FPG), was markedly reduced (p<0.001). Glutathione level (p<0.05) and GSR-activity (p<0.01) were elevated. Body weight (p<0.01)/body fat (p<0.05) and energy (p<0.001)/nutrient (p<0.001-0.05) intake were reduced. Our results allow to conclude that daily consumption of 3-4 cups of brew from a special Arabica coffee exerts health beneficial effects, as evidenced by reduced oxidative damage, body fat mass and energy/nutrient uptake.

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