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Sample records for improved nitrogen difference

  1. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  2. Simulation of the dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in different land uses in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region--based on the improved export coefficient model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shao, Jing'an; Wang, Dan; Ni, Jiupai; Xie, Deti

    2015-11-01

    much smaller than those of the paddy field. The dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in the woodland and meadow decreased after modification. The dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in the building lot were the lowest but showed an increase with the progression of time. These results demonstrate that the modified export coefficient model significantly improves the accuracy of dissolved pollutant load simulation for different land uses in the TGRR, especially the accuracy of dissolved nitrogen load simulation.

  3. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  4. Improvement of nitrogen retained dose using ammonia as a precursor in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, G.J.; Yang, P.; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Yao, Zh.Q.; Huang, N.; Chu, Paul K.

    2005-09-15

    The low nitrogen retained dose due to competition from oxygen coimplantation diminishes the efficacy of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation in silicon. In this work, we aim at improving the nitrogen retained dose by using ammonia as a precursor. Ammonia is introduced into the nitrogen plasma during plasma immersion ion implantation of silicon to improve the nitrogen reactivity and reduce the competition from oxygen in the residual vacuum. Our x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy results indicate that the ammonia precursor can indeed improve the N retained dose effectively, and the hydrophilic properties of the surface change with different ammonia to nitrogen ratios.

  5. [Response of lettuce to different nitrogen forms].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaohong; Li, Shengxiu; Wang, Zhaohui; Yin, Xiangtao; Chen, Shixiang

    2003-03-01

    Solution culture experiment was adopted to investigate the influence of different nitrogen forms on lettuce growth and development and their nitrogenous nutritional characteristics. The results showed that the affinity of the roots of lettuce seedlings to ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) was slightly higher than that to nitrate nitrogen (NO3(-)-N). Among three treatments of NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N+ NO3(-)-N and NH4(+)-N, the relative proportion of biological yields of lettuce was 100:56.9:12.4, and that of nitrogen uptake amount was 100:48.9:8.6, respectively. Nitrate nitrogen was the most suitable N source to lettuce growth. When the respective proportion of NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N was 50%, the growth of lettuce was inhibited to some extent. When the nitrogen source supplied as solely NH4(+)-N, lettuce was hard to grow normally. When supplying the same amount of NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N, lettuce showed a tendency to absorb more NH4(+)-N than NO3-N. At different culture stages, the ratio of NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N absorbtion was less than 1. It seemed that lettuce did prefer NH4(+)-N to NO3-N in absorbtion. However, ammonium nitrogen as nitrogen source was not suitable to lettuce for its metabolism. When nitrate nitrogen was not sufficient, it mainly affected the growth of lettuce shoot; when the ammonium nitrogen in nutrient solution was 50%, the root growth of lettuce seedlings was greatly inhibited, and some pathological symptoms appeared. Taking running water as water source (in which, NO3(-)-N concentration was about 0.5 mol.L-1) and lettuce was cultured by supplying sole NO3(-)-N for two weeks and then supplying NH4(+)-N, the growth of lettuce was greatly stimulated, in the meantime, the NO3(-)-N contents and total accumulation amount greatly decreased. Supplying urea as N source, the growth rate of lettuce was apparently inferior to other nitrogen forms, but no pathological symptoms appeared.

  6. [Nitrogen Fraction Distributions and Impacts on Soil Nitrogen Mineralization in Different Vegetation Restorations of Karst Rocky Desertification].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning; Ma, Zhi-min; Lan, Jia-cheng; Wu, Yu-chun; Chen, Gao-qi; Fu, Wa-li; Wen, Zhi-lin; Wang, Wen-jing

    2015-09-01

    In order to illuminate the impact on soil nitrogen accumulation and supply in karst rocky desertification area, the distribution characteristics of soil nitrogen pool for each class of soil aggregates and the relationship between aggregates nitrogen pool and soil nitrogen mineralization were analyzed in this study. The results showed that the content of total nitrogen, light fraction nitrogen, available nitrogen and mineral nitrogen in soil aggregates had an increasing tendency along with the descending of aggregate-size, and the highest content was occurred in < 0. 25 mm. The content of nitrogen fractions for all aggregate-classes followed in the order of abandoned land < grass land < brush land < brush-arbor land < arbor land in different sample plots. Artificial forest lands had more effects on the improvement of the soil nitrogen than honeysuckle land. In this study it also showed the nitrogen stockpiling quantity of each aggregate-size class was differed in all aggregate-size classes, in which the content of nitrogen fraction in 5-10 mm and 2-5 mm classes of soil aggregate-size were the highest. And it meant that soil nutrient mainly was stored in large size aggregates. Large size aggregates were significant to the storage of soil nutrient. For each class of soil aggregate-size, the contribution of the nitrogen stockpiling quantity of 0. 25-1 mm class to soil net nitrogen mineralization quantity was the biggest, and following >5mm and 2-5 mm classes, and the others were the smallest. With the positive vegetation succession, the weight percentage of > 5 mm aggregate-size classes was improved and the nitrogen storage of macro-aggregates also was increased. Accordingly, the capacity of soil supply mineral nitrogen and storage organic nitrogen were intensified.

  7. Can the anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen test improve predictions of fertilizer nitrogen rates in the Cornbelt?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Correctly estimating the amount of mineralizable nitrogen (N) can enhance nitrogen use efficiency. The anaerobic potentially mineralizable nitrogen (PMNAn) test is a tool that may help improve predictions of N uptake, grain yield, and the economical optimum nitrogen rate (EONR) of corn (Zea mays L...

  8. Understanding plant response to nitrogen limitation for the improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2011-02-01

    Development of genetic varieties with improved nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential for sustainable agriculture. Generally, NUE can be divided into two parts. First, assimilation efficiency involves nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation and second utilization efficiency involves N remobilization. Understanding the mechanisms regulating these processes is crucial for the improvement of NUE in crop plants. One important approach is to develop an understanding of the plant response to different N regimes, especially to N limitation, using various methods including transcription profiling, analysing mutants defective in their normal response to N limitation, and studying plants that show better growth under N-limiting conditions. One can then attempt to improve NUE in crop plants using the knowledge gained from these studies. There are several potential genetic and molecular approaches for the improvement of crop NUE discussed in this review. Increased knowledge of how plants respond to different N levels as well as to other environmental conditions is required to achieve this.

  9. Root responses to nitrogen pulse frequency under different nitrogen amounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing-Ye; Wang, Pu; Liu, Lu; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2017-04-01

    Responses of morphology and biomass allocation of roots to frequency of nitrogen (N) pulse potentially influence the fitness of plants, but such responses may be determined by root size. We grew 12 plant species of three functional groups (grasses, forbs, and legumes) under two N pulse frequencies (high vs. low supply frequency) and two N amounts (high vs. low supply amount). Compared to low-amount N supply, high-amount N supply stimulated biomass accumulation and root growth by either increasing the thickness and length of roots or decreasing the root mass fraction. Compared to low-frequency N supply, high-frequency N supply improved biomass accumulation and root growth in forbs or grasses, but not in legumes. Furthermore, the magnitude of the response to N frequency was significantly negatively correlated with root size at the species scale, but this was only true when the N amount was high. We conclude that root responses to N frequency are related to plant functional types, and non-legume species is more sensitive to N frequency than legume species. Our results also suggest that root size is a determinant of root responses to N frequency when N supply amount is high.

  10. Improving nitrogen reduction in waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Archer, H E; O'Brien, B M

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the performance of two waste stablisation ponds (WSP) systems in the South Island of New Zealand that have been upgraded to multiple ponds-in-series to improve effluent quality. Results of monitoring are provided which show that it is possible to achieve relatively low ammonia (approximately 1 g/m3) and total nitrogen (approximately 10 g/m3) effluent concentrations through the use of nitrification filter beds (rock trickling filters) and sand filters. Evidence suggests that the nitrification and denitrification processes in the extra biofilm surface area provided by the rock filters or rock bank protection is primarily responsible for the improved effluent quality. The paper also compares the WSP results with effluent quality predicted by published formulae. It is concluded that these formulae do not reliably predict the performance of WSP systems and the development of universally applicable design guidelines would be useful.

  11. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants.

  12. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants.

  13. The Nitrogen Contribution of Different Plant Parts to Wheat Grains: Exploring Genotype, Water, and Nitrogen Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Bragado, Rut; Serret, M. Dolors; Araus, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The flag leaf has been traditionally considered as the main contributor to grain nitrogen. However, during the reproductive stage, other organs besides the flag leaf may supply nitrogen to developing grains. Therefore, the contribution of the ear and other organs to the nitrogen supplied to the growing grains remains unclear. It is important to develop phenotypic tools to assess the relative contribution of different plant parts to the N accumulated in the grains of wheat which may helps to develop genotypes that use N more efficiently. We studied the effect of growing conditions (different levels of water and nitrogen in the field) on the nitrogen contribution of the spike and different vegetative organs of the plant to the grains. The natural abundance of δ15N and total N content in the flag blade, peduncle, whole spike, glumes and awns were compared to the δ15N and total N in mature grains to trace the origin of nitrogen redistribution to the grains. The δ15N and total N content of the different plant parts correlated positively with the δ15N and total N content of mature grains suggesting that all organs may contribute a portion of their N content to the grains. The potential contribution of the flag blade to grain N increased (by 46%) as the growing conditions improved, whereas the potential contribution of the glumes plus awns and the peduncle increased (46 and 31%, respectively) as water and nitrogen stress increased. In general, potential contribution of the ear providing N to growing grains was similar (42%) than that of the vegetative parts of the plants (30–40%), regardless of the growing conditions. Thus, the potential ear N content could be a positive trait for plant phenotyping, especially under water and nitrogen limiting conditions. In that sense, genotypic variability existed at least between old (tall) and modern (semidwarf) cultivars, with the ear from modern genotypes exhibiting less relative contribution to the total grain N. The combined

  14. The Nitrogen Contribution of Different Plant Parts to Wheat Grains: Exploring Genotype, Water, and Nitrogen Effects.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Bragado, Rut; Serret, M Dolors; Araus, José L

    2016-01-01

    The flag leaf has been traditionally considered as the main contributor to grain nitrogen. However, during the reproductive stage, other organs besides the flag leaf may supply nitrogen to developing grains. Therefore, the contribution of the ear and other organs to the nitrogen supplied to the growing grains remains unclear. It is important to develop phenotypic tools to assess the relative contribution of different plant parts to the N accumulated in the grains of wheat which may helps to develop genotypes that use N more efficiently. We studied the effect of growing conditions (different levels of water and nitrogen in the field) on the nitrogen contribution of the spike and different vegetative organs of the plant to the grains. The natural abundance of δ(15)N and total N content in the flag blade, peduncle, whole spike, glumes and awns were compared to the δ(15)N and total N in mature grains to trace the origin of nitrogen redistribution to the grains. The δ(15)N and total N content of the different plant parts correlated positively with the δ(15)N and total N content of mature grains suggesting that all organs may contribute a portion of their N content to the grains. The potential contribution of the flag blade to grain N increased (by 46%) as the growing conditions improved, whereas the potential contribution of the glumes plus awns and the peduncle increased (46 and 31%, respectively) as water and nitrogen stress increased. In general, potential contribution of the ear providing N to growing grains was similar (42%) than that of the vegetative parts of the plants (30-40%), regardless of the growing conditions. Thus, the potential ear N content could be a positive trait for plant phenotyping, especially under water and nitrogen limiting conditions. In that sense, genotypic variability existed at least between old (tall) and modern (semidwarf) cultivars, with the ear from modern genotypes exhibiting less relative contribution to the total grain N. The

  15. Epidural analgesia improves postoperative nitrogen balance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, M R; Fernades, A; Mordhorst, R; Kehlet, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative nitrogen balance was monitored in twelve patients undergoing hysterectomy under either epidural analgesia or general anaesthesia. The mean cumulative five-day nitrogen losses were significantly lower after epidural analgesia than after general anaesthesia. Nitrogen sparing presumably results from inhibiting the stress-induced release of catabolic hormones, since epidural analgesia abolished postoperative hyperglycaemia and increase in plasma cortisol concentrations. No adverse effects of inhibiting the stress response were observed. Neurogenic stimuli thus play a crucial part in the catabolic response to surgery. Inhibiting the endocrine metabolic response to trauma by neurogenic blockade may reduce the morbidity precipitated in high-risk patients by the catabolic response to surgery. PMID:638618

  16. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention install...

  17. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention install...

  18. Nitrogen stress-induced alterations in the leaf proteome of two wheat varieties grown at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Chandna, Ruby; Ahmad, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic nitrogen (N) is a key limiting factor of the agricultural productivity. Nitrogen utilization efficiency has significant impact on crop growth and yield as well as on the reduction in production cost. The excessive nitrogen application is accompanied with severe negative impact on environment. Thus to reduce the environmental contamination, improving NUE is need of an hour. In our study we have deployed comparative proteome analysis using 2-DE to investigate the effect of the nitrogen nutrition on differential expression pattern of leaf proteins in low-N sensitive and low-N tolerant wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties. Results showed a comprehensive picture of the post-transcriptional response to different nitrogen regimes administered which would be expected to serve as a basic platform for further characterization of gene function and regulation. We detected proteins related to photosynthesis, glycolysis, nitrogen metabolism, sulphur metabolism and defence. Our results provide new insights towards the altered protein pattern in response to N stress. Through this study we suggest that genes functioning in many physiological events coordinate the response to availability of nitrogen and also for the improvement of NUE of crops.

  19. Representing leaf and root physiological traits in CLM improves global carbon and nitrogen cycling predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghimire, Bardan; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles D.; Mu, Mingquan; Randerson, James T.

    2016-05-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However, current Earth System Models (ESMs) do not mechanistically represent functional nitrogen allocation for photosynthesis or the linkage between nitrogen uptake and root traits. The current version of CLM (4.5) links nitrogen availability and plant productivity via (1) an instantaneous downregulation of potential photosynthesis rates based on soil mineral nitrogen availability, and (2) apportionment of soil nitrogen between plants and competing nitrogen consumers assumed to be proportional to their relative N demands. However, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate; instead photosynthesis rates are governed by nitrogen that has been allocated to the physiological processes underpinning photosynthesis. Furthermore, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition has also been largely ignored in ESMs. We therefore present a new plant nitrogen model for CLM4.5 with (1) improved representations of linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity based on observed relationships in a global plant trait database and (2) plant nitrogen uptake based on root-scale Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics. Our model improvements led to a global bias reduction in GPP, LAI, and biomass of 70%, 11%, and 49%, respectively. Furthermore, water use efficiency predictions were improved conceptually, qualitatively, and in magnitude. The new model's GPP responses to nitrogen deposition, CO 2 fertilization, and climate also differed from the baseline model. The mechanistic representation of leaf-level nitrogen allocation and a theoretically consistent treatment of competition with belowground consumers led to overall improvements in global carbon cycling predictions.

  20. Representing leaf and root physiological traits in CLM improves global carbon and nitrogen cycling predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, Bardan; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles D.; Mu, Mingquan; Randerson, James T.

    2016-06-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However, current Earth System Models (ESMs) do not mechanistically represent functional nitrogen allocation for photosynthesis or the linkage between nitrogen uptake and root traits. The current version of CLM (4.5) links nitrogen availability and plant productivity via (1) an instantaneous downregulation of potential photosynthesis rates based on soil mineral nitrogen availability, and (2) apportionment of soil nitrogen between plants and competing nitrogen consumers assumed to be proportional to their relative N demands. However, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate; instead photosynthesis rates are governed by nitrogen that has been allocated to the physiological processes underpinning photosynthesis. Furthermore, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition has also been largely ignored in ESMs. We therefore present a new plant nitrogen model for CLM4.5 with (1) improved representations of linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity based on observed relationships in a global plant trait database and (2) plant nitrogen uptake based on root-scale Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics. Our model improvements led to a global bias reduction in GPP, LAI, and biomass of 70%, 11%, and 49%, respectively. Furthermore, water use efficiency predictions were improved conceptually, qualitatively, and in magnitude. The new model's GPP responses to nitrogen deposition, CO2 fertilization, and climate also differed from the baseline model. The mechanistic representation of leaf-level nitrogen allocation and a theoretically consistent treatment of competition with belowground consumers led to overall improvements in global carbon cycling predictions.

  1. Representing leaf and root physiological traits in CLM improves global carbon and nitrogen cycling predictions

    DOE PAGES

    Ghimire, Bardan; Riley, William J.; Koven, Charles D.; ...

    2016-05-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However, current Earth System Models (ESMs) do not mechanistically represent functional nitrogen allocation for photosynthesis or the linkage between nitrogen uptake and root traits. The current version of CLM (4.5) links nitrogen availability and plant productivity via (1) an instantaneous downregulation of potential photosynthesis rates based on soil mineral nitrogen availability, and (2) apportionment of soil nitrogen between plants and competing nitrogen consumers assumed to be proportional to their relative N demands. However, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate; instead photosynthesis ratesmore » are governed by nitrogen that has been allocated to the physiological processes underpinning photosynthesis. Furthermore, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition has also been largely ignored in ESMs. We therefore present a new plant nitrogen model for CLM4.5 with (1) improved representations of linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity based on observed relationships in a global plant trait database and (2) plant nitrogen uptake based on root-scale Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics. Our model improvements led to a global bias reduction in GPP, LAI, and biomass of 70%, 11%, and 49%, respectively. Furthermore, water use efficiency predictions were improved conceptually, qualitatively, and in magnitude. The new model's GPP responses to nitrogen deposition, CO 2 fertilization, and climate also differed from the baseline model. The mechanistic representation of leaf-level nitrogen allocation and a theoretically consistent treatment of competition with belowground consumers led to overall improvements in global carbon cycling predictions.« less

  2. Why the different responses between single and split nitrogen applications?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Split- opposed to single-nitrogen applications may improve corn (Zea mays L.) production, N use efficiency, and lessen environmental impacts due to fertilization. However, there has been an inconsistent response of yield, plant nitrogen (N) uptake, and residual soil nitrates (RSN) when comparing sin...

  3. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention installation is coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which facilitates high infiltration rates but fails to provide the anaerobic conditions and carbon availability necessary to promote nitrate removal by denitrification. EPA's research at the Urban Watershed Research Facility investigates the effects of media carbon amendments, introduced internal storage zones, plant type, and media volume on nitrogen removal. Initial bench-scale tests informed media and carbon amendment choices. A locally-available, sandy media with low organic matter content was added to eight experimental, pilot-scale rain gardens above a shallow pea gravel drainage layer. The media was separated from the pea gravel with a nonwoven geotextile. Double-shredded hardwood wood chips were chosen as a carbon amendment and added as a 20-cm layer 10 cm above the geotextile in four of the eight pilot-scale rain gardens; the other four did not receive the mulch layer. Four rain gardens were constructed with an elevated outlet pipe to create an internal storage zone; the other four drain freely. Pilot-scale rain gardens were constructed in tanks of two sizes to test the effects of media volume. After initial hydrologic

  4. Bioretention Design to Improve Nitrogen Removal | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bioretention has been shown to effectively remove a variety of stormwater stressors, including oil/grease, heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium. However, reported nitrate and total nitrogen removal performance is highly variable. The media typically used in bioretention installation is coarse-grained with low organic matter content, which facilitates high infiltration rates but fails to provide the anaerobic conditions and carbon availability necessary to promote nitrate removal by denitrification. EPA's research at the Urban Watershed Research Facility investigates the effects of media carbon amendments, introduced internal storage zones, plant type, and media volume on nitrogen removal. Initial bench-scale tests informed media and carbon amendment choices. A locally-available, sandy media with low organic matter content was added to eight experimental, pilot-scale rain gardens above a shallow pea gravel drainage layer. The media was separated from the pea gravel with a nonwoven geotextile. Double-shredded hardwood wood chips were chosen as a carbon amendment and added as a 20-cm layer 10 cm above the geotextile in four of the eight pilot-scale rain gardens; the other four did not receive the mulch layer. Four rain gardens were constructed with an elevated outlet pipe to create an internal storage zone; the other four drain freely. Pilot-scale rain gardens were constructed in tanks of two sizes to test the effects of media volume. After initial hydrologic

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shaohui; Zhao, Xinrui; Zou, Huijun; Fu, Jianwei; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-04-14

    In cultures containing multiple sources of nitrogen, Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a sequential use of nitrogen sources through a mechanism known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). To identify proteins differentially expressed due to NCR, proteomic analysis of S. cerevisiae S288C under different nitrogen source conditions was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), revealing 169 candidate protein spots. Among these 169 protein spots, 121 were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins were closely associated with four main biological processes through Gene Ontology (GO) categorical analysis. The identification of the potential proteins and cellular processes related to NCR offer a global overview of changes elicited by different nitrogen sources, providing clues into how yeast adapt to different nutritional conditions. Moreover, by comparing our proteomic data with corresponding mRNA data, proteins regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level could be distinguished. Biological significance In S. cerevisiae, different nitrogen sources provide different growth characteristics and generate different metabolites. The nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) process plays an important role for S. cerevisiae in the ordinal utilization of different nitrogen sources. NCR process can result in significant shift of global metabolic networks. Previous works on NCR primarily focused on transcriptomic level. The results obtained in this study provided a global atlas of the proteome changes triggered by different nitrogen sources and would facilitate the understanding of mechanisms for how yeast could adapt to different nutritional conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving representation of nitrogen uptake, allocation, and carbon assimilation in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen is the most important nutrient limiting plant carbon assimilation and growth, and is required for production of photosynthetic enzymes, growth and maintenance respiration, and maintaining cell structure. The forecasted rise in plant available nitrogen through atmospheric nitrogen deposition and the release of locked soil nitrogen by permafrost thaw in high latitude ecosystems is likely to result in an increase in plant productivity. However a mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen dynamics is lacking in earth system models. Most earth system models ignore the dynamic nature of plant nutrient uptake and allocation, and further lack tight coupling of below- and above-ground processes. In these models, the increase in nitrogen uptake does not translate to a corresponding increase in photosynthesis parameters, such as maximum Rubisco capacity and electron transfer rate. We present an improved modeling framework implemented in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) for dynamic plant nutrient uptake, and allocation to different plant parts, including leaf enzymes. This modeling framework relies on imposing a more realistic flexible carbon to nitrogen stoichiometric ratio for different plant parts. The model mechanistically responds to plant nitrogen uptake and leaf allocation though changes in photosynthesis parameters. We produce global simulations, and examine the impacts of the improved nitrogen cycling. The improved model is evaluated against multiple observations including TRY database of global plant traits, nitrogen fertilization observations and 15N tracer studies. Global simulations with this new version of CLM4.5 showed better agreement with the observations than the default CLM4.5-CN model, and captured the underlying mechanisms associated with plant nitrogen cycle.

  7. Microbial Biofertilizer Decreases Nicotine Content by Improving Soil Nitrogen Supply.

    PubMed

    Shang, Cui; Chen, Anwei; Chen, Guiqiu; Li, Huanke; Guan, Song; He, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Biofertilizers have been widely used in many countries for their benefit to soil biological and physicochemical properties. A new microbial biofertilizer containing Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Bacillus thuringiensis was prepared to decrease nicotine content in tobacco leaves by regulating soil nitrogen supply. Soil NO3(-)-N, NH4(+)-N, nitrogen supply-related enzyme activities, and nitrogen accumulation in plant leaves throughout the growing period were investigated to explore the mechanism of nicotine reduction. The experimental results indicated that biofertilizer can reduce the nicotine content in tobacco leaves, with a maximum decrement of 16-18 % in mature upper leaves. In the meantime, the total nitrogen in mature lower and middle leaves increased with the application of biofertilizer, while an opposite result was observed in upper leaves. Protein concentration in leaves had similar fluctuation to that of total nitrogen in response to biofertilizer. NO3(-)-N content and nitrate reductase activity in biofertilizer-amended soil increased by 92.3 and 42.2 %, respectively, compared to those in the control, whereas the NH4(+)-N and urease activity decreased by 37.8 and 29.3 %, respectively. Nitrogen uptake was improved in the early growing stage, but this phenomenon was not observed during the late growth period. Nicotine decrease is attributing to the adjustment of biofertilizer in soil nitrogen supply and its uptake in tobacco, which result in changes of nitrogen content as well as its distribution in tobacco leaves. The application of biofertilizer containing P. chrysosporium and B. thuringiensis can reduce the nicotine content and improve tobacco quality, which may provide some useful information for tobacco cultivation.

  8. Nitrogen excretion at different stages of growth and its association with production traits in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Shirali, M; Doeschl-Wilson, A; Knap, P W; Duthie, C; Kanis, E; van Arendonk, J A M; Roehe, R

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine nitrogen loss at different stages of growth and during the entire growing period and to investigate the associations between nitrogen excretion and production traits in growing pigs. Data from 315 pigs of an F(2) population which originated from crossing Pietrain sires with a commercial dam line were used. Nitrogen retention was derived from protein retention as measured using the deuterium dilution technique during different stages of growth (60 to 90 kg, 90 to 120 kg, and 120 to 140 kg). Pigs were fed ad libitum with 2 pelleted diets containing 17% (60 to 90 kg) and 16.5% (90 to 120 and 120 to 140 kg) CP. Average daily nitrogen excretion (ADNE) within each stage of growth was calculated on the basis of the accumulated difference between average daily nitrogen intake (ADNI) and average daily nitrogen retention (ADNR). Least ADNE, nitrogen excretion per BW gain (NEWG) and total nitrogen excretion (TNE) were observed during growth from 60 to 90 kg. In contrast, the greatest ADNE, NEWG, and TNE were found during growth from 120 to 140 kg. Statistical analyses indicated that gender, housing type, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RYR1) gene, and batch influenced nitrogen excretion (P < 0.05), but the degree and direction of influences differed between growth stages. Gender differences showed that gilts excreted less nitrogen than barrows (P < 0.05), which was associated with decreased feed conversion ratio (FCR; feed:gain) and lipid:protein gain ratio. Single-housed pigs showed reduced nitrogen excretion compared with group-housed pigs (P < 0.05). In comparison to other genotypes, pigs carrying genotype NN (homozygous normal) at the RYR1 locus had the least nitrogen excretion (P < 0.05) at all stages of growth except from 60 to 90 kg. The residual correlations indicated that NEWG and TNE have large positive correlations with FCR (r = 0.99 and 0.91, respectively) and moderate negative correlations with ADG (r = -0.53 and -0

  9. [Spectral characteristics of corn under different nitrogen treatments].

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Li, Min-Zan; Zhang, Yan-E; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hai-Hua

    2010-03-01

    The canopy spectral reflectance and chlorophyll content of corn were measured and analyzed under different nitrogen treatments. The trends of chlorophyll content were discussed based on different growth stages and different nitrogen levels. It was observed that the chlorophyll content increased with the increase in nitrogen, and could be affected by the environment changes including the temperature, rain, fertilizer treatment and so on. The characteristics of canopy spectral reflectance indicated that the canopy spectral reflectance changed significantly at different stages. In the visible region (400-750 nm), the reflectance increased and reached the maximum until the shooting stage, and decreased subsequently with the growth progress. In near-infrared region (750-1 000 nm), the spectral reflectance climbed sharply. It increased from tillering stage to shooting stage first, and then began to decline at trumpet stage and was raised again at anthesis-silking stage. At milking stage, the reflectance was decreased again. There were clear distinctions of visible reflectance in different nitrogen regions. At shooting stage, with the increase in nitrogen the reflectance decreased at chlorophyll absorption band (430-450 nm, 640-660 nm). Investigating the reflectance of the corn canopy under the different nitrogen treatment, it was found that the reflectance was higher in normal fertilizing region than others in 550 nm, with R(Normal) > R(Low) > R(High). At trumpet stage, the canopy reflectance in low fertilizing region was higher than others in the visible region. It was clear that the corn canopy reflectance of normal fertilizing region was the same as high fertilizing region. The results indicated over fertilizing could not help increase the corn nitrogen uptake. The study provided the basic information of chlorophyll measurement based on spectral technology and could help to guide the precision fertilizer in the field.

  10. NITRO: Understanding the Earth-Venus-Mars difference in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Dandouras, I.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen is a key element for life as an inevitable part of the amino acids and proteins. While nitrogen is abundant on the Earth (the amount in the soil, crust, and ocean are small compared to the atmospheric amount) and on Venus (only 3% but pressure is 90 times that of the Earth, resulting in three times more nitrogen than on the Earth), Martian atmosphere has very little nitrogen, about only 0.01% that of the Earth or Venus (with 10% of planetary mass). This contrasts the oxygen abundance, which is found in all three planets (Martian case, it is now believed to exist in the crust as oxidized rocks because the observed escape rate is equivalent only 10 m deep water). Considering the fact that nitrogen is much more difficult to be ionized than oxygen, due to triple chemical binding, absence of the nitrogen only on Mars is a mystery, while this absence might explain the absence of life at the present knowledge. From these viewpoints, it is important to understand the dynamics of nitrogen at different solar conditions, e.g., its difference from the oxygen dynamics for any planet. Such a study requires a dedicated space mission. We have recently proposed a small satellite mission to study this problem, NITRO. This mission will analyze the atmospheric escape and circulation in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth of heavy ions such as N+ and N2+, and will rely on a high mass resolution ion spectrometry instrumentation, capable of separationg nitrogen from oxygen ions. The science objectives and the instrumentation of the NITRO mission will be presented.

  11. Improved clinical facility for in vivo nitrogen measurement.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, S S; McNeill, K G; Mernagh, J R; Bayley, A J; Harrison, J E

    1990-04-01

    The design and construction of a hospital clinical facility for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for total body nitrogen (TBN) measurement is described. The use of 252Cf neutron sources gives a better signal-to-background ratio compared with 238Pu-Be sources of equal strength, thus yielding better reproducibility of measurements. By measuring the hydrogen and nitrogen signals separately using appropriate gating circuits, signal-to-background ratio is further improved. Measurements using a urea phantom (5.63 kg nitrogen as urea in 34.53 kg of water) show that 2 x 6 micrograms 252Cf sources gives a nitrogen signal-to-background ratio of 5.6 (compared with 3.4 in the case of a 2 x 10 Ci 238Pu-Be source) and a reproducibility for nitrogen signal of +/- 1.1% (CV) and for hydrogen signal (internal standard) of +/- 2.33% (CV). Approximately 30 minutes of patient's time is required for each TBN measurement with an estimated reproducibility of +/- 3.8% (CV). The radiation dose to the patient is about 0.2 mSv (effective dose equivalent; QF = 10) per 20 min measurement. A report for the clinician is produced within a few minutes after the measurement by a dedicated IBM-PC computer. The entire facility is clean, comfortable and the electronics and computer processing are simple and economical.

  12. Structural, mechanical and optical properties of nitrogen-implanted titanium at different pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaif, Mohamed; Mohamed, Sodky H.; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmed M.; Kolitsch, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a potent method to obtain hard and wear-resistant surface on Ti by nitrogen implantation. This presentation is one part of a sequence of experiments to optimize the microstructure and physical properties of TiN through adapting the plasma-processing parameters. In this work, nitrogen ions were implanted into samples of pure Ti at different nitrogen pulse frequency without using any external source of heating. The nitrogen-implanted surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), optical microscope, nano-indentation technique, ball-on-disk type tribometer, surface profilemeter, Tafel polarization technique for corrosion performance and ellipsometry. The outcomes show that, nitrogen PIII is an effectual method for nitriding titanium and nitrogen pulse frequency affected the microstructure and physical properties of the treated Ti. X-ray diffraction depicted the formation of α-Ti (N) and the cubic TiN after implanting titanium by nitrogen and the thickness of the nitrided layer increased as the nitrogen pulse frequency increased. The wear and corrosion resistance of the nitrogen-implanted titanium are improved and the friction coefficient decreased from nearly 0.8 for the un-implanted titanium to 0.3 for the implanted titanium, this ascribed to the formation of the titanium nitrided phases. Ellipsometric measurements were carried out on the PIII titanium samples at different nitrogen pulse frequency. The ellipsometric measurements show that, the thickness of the nitrided layer and surface roughness increased while the refractive index decreased with increasing nitrogen pulse frequency.

  13. Improvement in Adhesive Strength of PTFE using Nitrogen Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Iwao, Toru; Yumoto, Motoshige

    The adhesive strength doesn't improve so much even if the surface is activated. It is known that PTFE (polytetra fluoroethylene) is one of the collapse type polymer since the binding energy of main chain is smaller than that of side chain. Accordingly, it is assumed that adhesive strength may improve by suppressing the collapse of structure. It is also expected that introduction of cross-linking structure may suppress the collapse of structure. It was confirmed that a lot of polar radicals were introduced at the surface by nitrogen ion irradiation around 30 eV. Thus, to introduce the cross-linking structure several 100 eV nitrogen ions were irradiated after irradiation of nitrogen with 30 eV ion. As a result, adhesive strength irradiated by 300 eV improved more than that of 1000 eV. From the result of XPS (X-ray-Photoelectron-Spectroscopy) analysis, many C-N-C bonds contributing cross-linking structure was detected at a shallow layer by irradiation of ions with 300 eV. From these results, it is concluded that the depth of cross-link formation is important to improve the adhesive strength.

  14. Legumes are different: Leaf nitrogen, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark Andrew; Turnbull, Tarryn L; Sprent, Janet I; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-04-12

    Using robust, pairwise comparisons and a global dataset, we show that nitrogen concentration per unit leaf mass for nitrogen-fixing plants (N2FP; mainly legumes plus some actinorhizal species) in nonagricultural ecosystems is universally greater (43-100%) than that for other plants (OP). This difference is maintained across Koppen climate zones and growth forms and strongest in the wet tropics and within deciduous angiosperms. N2FP mostly show a similar advantage over OP in nitrogen per leaf area (Narea), even in arid climates, despite diazotrophy being sensitive to drought. We also show that, for most N2FP, carbon fixation by photosynthesis (Asat) and stomatal conductance (gs) are not related to Narea-in distinct challenge to current theories that place the leaf nitrogen-Asat relationship at the center of explanations of plant fitness and competitive ability. Among N2FP, only forbs displayed an Narea-gs relationship similar to that for OP, whereas intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi; Asat/gs) was positively related to Narea for woody N2FP. Enhanced foliar nitrogen (relative to OP) contributes strongly to other evolutionarily advantageous attributes of legumes, such as seed nitrogen and herbivore defense. These alternate explanations of clear differences in leaf N between N2FP and OP have significant implications (e.g., for global models of carbon fluxes based on relationships between leaf N and Asat). Combined, greater WUE and leaf nitrogen-in a variety of forms-enhance fitness and survival of genomes of N2FP, particularly in arid and semiarid climates.

  15. Improving nitrogen removal in two modified decentralized wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhihua; Nguyen, Huy Quang; Das, Atreyee; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2011-08-01

    Efficient nutrient removal in decentralized wastewater treatment systems is a challenging task. To improve the removal of organic matter and nitrogen from wastewater, two types of bioreactors using membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) and microbial fuel cell (MFC) techniques were evaluated. During more than 250 days of continuous-flow reactor operation, both reactors showed consistently high chemical oxygen demand removal (>86%). At an influent ammonium-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) concentration of 30 mg N/L, the average effluent NH4(+)-N concentrations were 6.2 and 0.5 mg N/L for the MABR and MFC reactor, respectively, while the effluent nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) concentrations were 5.4 mg/ L in the MABR and 19.2 mg/L in the MFC-based reactor. The overall total inorganic nitrogen removal efficiencies were 64% and 36% for the MABR and MFC reactor, respectively. At the measured dissolved oxygen concentrations of 5.2 and 0.23 mg/L in the aerobic/anoxic zone of the MFC and MABR, respectively, a specific oxygen uptake rate of 0.1 g O2/g VSS-d, resulting from ammonia oxidation, was detected in the settled sludge of the MFC, while no nitrifying activity of the sludge from the MABR was detected. Molecular microbial analysis demonstrated a link between the bacterial community structure and nitrifying activity. The relatively high abundance of Nitrosomonas europaea was associated with its detectable nitrification activity in the settled sludge of the MFC. The results suggest that MABR and MFC techniques have the potential to improve organic and nitrogen removal in decentralized wastewater systems.

  16. [Effects of different nitrogen regulators on nitrogen transformation in different soil types].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Tao; Xu, Jing; Sun, Zhi-Mei; Cui, Shao-Xiong; Wang, Xue

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to compare the inhibitory effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP) on nitrification in meadow-cinnamon soil and fluvo-aquic soil, the main soil types of North China Plain. The synergistic effect of DMP combined with urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ) on nitrogen transformation in fluvo-aquic soil was further studied. The results indicated that, in contrast to DCD, DMP had a stronger inhibitory effect on the nitrification in the two tested soils. In comparison with the treatment without any inhibitor, the soil NH(4+)-N content in the treatment with DMP increased significantly by 149.5%-387.2% at the peak of nitrogen transformation stage, and the soil NO(3-)-N content reduced by 22.3%-55.3%. The inhibitory effects of DCD and DMP in fluvo-aquic soil were both stronger than in meadow-cinnamon soil. In addition, the application of DMP combined with HQ had a significantly synergistic effect on soil nitrogen transformation.

  17. Relationship of Nitrogen Use Efficiency with the Activities of Enzymes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation of Finger Millet Genotypes Grown under Different Nitrogen Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Atul K.; Gaur, Vikram S.; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen responsiveness of three-finger millet genotypes (differing in their seed coat colour) PRM-1 (brown), PRM-701 (golden), and PRM-801 (white) grown under different nitrogen doses was determined by analyzing the growth, yield parameters and activities of nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase; GOGAT, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) at different developmental stages. High nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen utilization efficiency were observed in PRM-1 genotype, whereas high nitrogen uptake efficiency was observed in PRM-801 genotype. At grain filling nitrogen uptake efficiency in PRM-1 negatively correlated with NR, GS, GOGAT activities whereas it was positively correlated in PRM-701 and PRM-801, however, GDH showed a negative correlation. Growth and yield parameters indicated that PRM-1 responds well at high nitrogen conditions while PRM-701 and PRM-801 respond well at normal and low nitrogen conditions respectively. The study indicates that PRM-1 is high nitrogen responsive and has high nitrogen use efficiency, whereas golden PRM-701 and white PRM-801 are low nitrogen responsive genotypes and have low nitrogen use efficiency. However, the crude grain protein content was higher in PRM-801 genotype followed by PRM-701 and PRM-1, indicating negative correlation of nitrogen use efficiency with source to sink relationship in terms of seed protein content. PMID:22919342

  18. Integrating soil information into canopy sensor algorithms for improved corn nitrogen rate recommendation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop canopy sensors have proven effective at determining site-specific nitrogen (N) needs, but several Midwest states use different algorithms to predict site-specific N need. The objective of this research was to determine if soil information can be used to improve the Missouri canopy sensor algori...

  19. Physiological limitations and the genetic improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, F.O.; Manian, S. ); Drevon, J.J. )

    1988-01-01

    The rhizobium legume symbiosis continues to be of strategic importance particularly in the context of food production. As the world population grows, it is necessary that new developments take place in crop improvement. The development and application of new technologies in biological sciences over past years has made the entire area of plant-microbial interaction an exciting and challenging research area to be involved in. In view of the importance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation, it is not surprising that it still represents one of the priority areas for commercial development in agricultural biotechnology. Since this symbiosis involves an association between procaryotic and eucaryhotic partners, it requires of necessity a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach. This book focuses on physiological limitations affecting symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the potential for overcoming such limitations by using genetic technologies.

  20. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  1. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  2. Biotransformation of phosphogypsum in media containing different forms of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Rzeczycka, M; Mycielski, R; Kowalski, W; Gałazka, M

    2001-01-01

    Studies on the biotransformation of phosphogypsum (a waste product formed in the course of the production of phosphorous fertilizers) with the use of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) demonstrated that it is a good source of sulfates and biogenic elements for these bacteria, though the addition of organic carbon and nitrogen is necessary. The aim of this study was to investigate the form of nitrogen and C:N ratio in the medium on the growth of SRB community in cultures containing phosphogypsum. Batch community cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria were maintained in medium with phosphogypsum (5.0 g/l), different concentrations of sodium lactate (1.6 - 9.4 g/l) and different forms (NH4CI, CO(NH2)2, KNO3) and concentrations (0 - 250 mg/l) of nitrogen. The growth of SRB was studied in the C:N ratio of from 2:1 to 300:1. It was found that: 1 - the best source of nitrogen for SRB is urea, followed by ammonium, the worst were nitrates; 2 - the bacteria were also able to grow in medium without nitrogen but their activity was then by approximately 15% lower than in optimal growth conditions; 3 - in medium with KNO3 inhibition of sulfate reduction by approx. 50% was observed; 4 - the highest reduction of nitrates (removal of nitrate) in media with phosphogypsum and nitrates was at limiting concentrations of sodium lactate. This is probably caused by the selection under these conditions (low concentration of hydrogen sulfide) of denitrifying bacteria or sulfate reducing bacteria capable of using nitrates as an electron acceptor.

  3. Legumes are different: Leaf nitrogen, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark Andrew; Turnbull, Tarryn L.; Sprent, Janet I.; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Using robust, pairwise comparisons and a global dataset, we show that nitrogen concentration per unit leaf mass for nitrogen-fixing plants (N2FP; mainly legumes plus some actinorhizal species) in nonagricultural ecosystems is universally greater (43–100%) than that for other plants (OP). This difference is maintained across Koppen climate zones and growth forms and strongest in the wet tropics and within deciduous angiosperms. N2FP mostly show a similar advantage over OP in nitrogen per leaf area (Narea), even in arid climates, despite diazotrophy being sensitive to drought. We also show that, for most N2FP, carbon fixation by photosynthesis (Asat) and stomatal conductance (gs) are not related to Narea—in distinct challenge to current theories that place the leaf nitrogen–Asat relationship at the center of explanations of plant fitness and competitive ability. Among N2FP, only forbs displayed an Narea–gs relationship similar to that for OP, whereas intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi; Asat/gs) was positively related to Narea for woody N2FP. Enhanced foliar nitrogen (relative to OP) contributes strongly to other evolutionarily advantageous attributes of legumes, such as seed nitrogen and herbivore defense. These alternate explanations of clear differences in leaf N between N2FP and OP have significant implications (e.g., for global models of carbon fluxes based on relationships between leaf N and Asat). Combined, greater WUE and leaf nitrogen—in a variety of forms—enhance fitness and survival of genomes of N2FP, particularly in arid and semiarid climates. PMID:27035971

  4. [Effects of different applied nitrogen forms on pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) growth and its carbon and nitrogen accumulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Yang, Dan-Ni; Huang, Dan-Feng

    2012-04-01

    A hydroponic experiment was conducted to study the effects of different applied nitrogen forms, i.e., ammonium, nitrate, glycine, glutamine, alanine, bovine serum albumin (BSA), mixture of glycine and nitrate, and mixture of BSA and nitrate, on the growth and carbon and nitrogen accumulation of pakchoi (Brassica chinensis). The significant differences were observed in the B. chinensis dry mass, fresh mass, carbon and nitrogen accumulation, and soluble protein, soluble sugar, and free amino acid contents among different treatments. In treatment nitrate, the fresh mass and dry mass of B. chinensis shoot and root were the highest; in treatment glycine, the root growth and the carbon and nitrogen accumulation of B. chinensis were promoted obviously; among the treatments glycine, glutamine, and alanine, treatment glutamine was more beneficial to the shoot growth and nitrogen accumulation. The nutritional effect of the applied nitrogen forms was in the order of nitrate, glutamine > mixture of glycine and nitrate, mixture of BSA and nitrate, glycine, ammonium > alanine, BSA, zero nitrogen. It was suggested that organic nitrogen could be used as a source of nitrogen nutrition for B. chinensis growth, and different nitrogen forms could have different physiological effects onthe B. chinensis plants.

  5. [Effects of different fertilizer species on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Zou, Jing-Dong; Xu, Li-Li; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Feng-Ting; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Sun, Xiao-Min

    2014-08-01

    Enhanced fertilization could decrease nitrogen utilization rate and increase carbon and nitrogen leaching, leading to water pollution in agricultural ecosystem. A long-term field experiment had been established on a reddish paddy soil of Qianyanzhou Ecological Experimental Station (114 degrees 53'E, 26 degrees 48'N) in Jiangxi Province in 1998. Soil solution samples were collected by clay tube and vacuum pump. Four fertilizer species treatments were selected: control with no fertilizer (CK), straw return (ST), nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium mineral fertilizers (NPK) and pig manure (OM), aiming to evaluate the effects of different species of fertilizer on carbon and nitrogen leaching in a double rice cropping system. The results showed that: (1) ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) was the major type of N in soil leachate in reddish paddy soil. The application of NPK could significantly increase the ammonium nitrogen concentration (1.2 mg x L(-1) +/- 0.1 mg x L(-1)) compared with the CK, ST and OM treatments, and the application of OM could significantly increase the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (27.3 mg x L(-1) +/- 1.6 mg x L(-1)) in soil leachate. The carbon and nitrogen leaching were more notable in the vegetative growth stage than the reproductive growth stage of rice (P < 0.05); (2) the long-term application of NPK and OM increased the NH4(+) -N, DOC, soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents. The NPK was best beneficial to improve TN contents and OM to improve SOC contents. (3) The DOC contents in soil leachate and SOC in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01), while NH4(+) -N contents in soil leachate and TN contents in paddy soil had a positive correlation (P < 0.01).

  6. Improvement of Nitrogen Assimilation and Fermentation Kinetics under Enological Conditions by Derepression of Alternative Nitrogen-Assimilatory Pathways in an Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Jean-Michel; Barre, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Metabolism of nitrogen compounds by yeasts affects the efficiency of wine fermentation. Ammonium ions, normally present in grape musts, reduce catabolic enzyme levels and transport activities for nonpreferred nitrogen sources. This nitrogen catabolite repression severely impairs the utilization of proline and arginine, both common nitrogen sources in grape juice that require the proline utilization pathway for their assimilation. We attempted to improve fermentation performance by genetic alteration of the regulation of nitrogen-assimilatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One mutant carrying a recessive allele of ure2 was isolated from an industrial S. cerevisiae strain. This mutation strongly deregulated the proline utilization pathway. Fermentation kinetics of this mutant were studied under enological conditions on simulated standard grape juices with various nitrogen levels. Mutant strains produced more biomass and exhibited a higher maximum CO2 production rate than the wild type. These differences were primarily due to the derepression of amino acid utilization pathways. When low amounts of dissolved oxygen were added, the mutants could assimilate proline. Biomass yield and fermentation rate were consequently increased, and the duration of the fermentation was substantially shortened. S. cerevisiae strains lacking URE2 function could improve alcoholic fermentation of natural media where proline and other poorly assimilated amino acids are the major potential nitrogen source, as is the case for most fruit juices and grape musts. PMID:9758807

  7. Improvement of nitrogen assimilation and fermentation kinetics under enological conditions by derepression of alternative nitrogen-assimilatory pathways in an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Salmon, J M; Barre, P

    1998-10-01

    Metabolism of nitrogen compounds by yeasts affects the efficiency of wine fermentation. Ammonium ions, normally present in grape musts, reduce catabolic enzyme levels and transport activities for nonpreferred nitrogen sources. This nitrogen catabolite repression severely impairs the utilization of proline and arginine, both common nitrogen sources in grape juice that require the proline utilization pathway for their assimilation. We attempted to improve fermentation performance by genetic alteration of the regulation of nitrogen-assimilatory pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One mutant carrying a recessive allele of ure2 was isolated from an industrial S. cerevisiae strain. This mutation strongly deregulated the proline utilization pathway. Fermentation kinetics of this mutant were studied under enological conditions on simulated standard grape juices with various nitrogen levels. Mutant strains produced more biomass and exhibited a higher maximum CO2 production rate than the wild type. These differences were primarily due to the derepression of amino acid utilization pathways. When low amounts of dissolved oxygen were added, the mutants could assimilate proline. Biomass yield and fermentation rate were consequently increased, and the duration of the fermentation was substantially shortened. S. cerevisiae strains lacking URE2 function could improve alcoholic fermentation of natural media where proline and other poorly assimilated amino acids are the major potential nitrogen source, as is the case for most fruit juices and grape musts.

  8. Effects of improving nitrogen management on nitrogen utilization, nitrogen balance, and reactive nitrogen losses in a Mollisol with maize monoculture in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Zhang, Jin-Jing; Gao, Qiang; Feng, Guo-Zhong; Abelrahman, A M; Chen, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    Traditional fertilization led to higher apparent N surplus, and optimized fertilization can reduce residual nitrogen in soils with keeping high yield. But in continuous spring maize cropping zone in Mollisol in Northeast China, the effect of the optimized N management on N balance and comprehensive environment was not clear. The primary objective of this study was to compare the differences of two fertilizations (traditional farmer N management (FNM) with single basal fertilizer and improvement N management (INM) by soil testing with top-dressing) in gain yield, N uptake and N efficiency, soil N balance, reactive N losses, and environment assessment. The results showed that INM treatment has no remarkable effect on grain yield and N uptake; N partial factor productivity (PFPN) of INM treatment was 19.8 % significantly higher than the FNM treatment. Nmin in soils of INM treatment reached to 111.0 kg ha(-1), which was 27.1 % lower than the FNM treatment after 6 years of continuous maize cropping; the apparent N Losses (ANL) and apparent N surplus (ANS) of INM were only half of FNM by soil N balance analysis. In reactive N losses, comparing with FNM treatment, INM treatment reduced NH3 volatilization, N2O emission, N leaching, and N runoff by 17.8, 35.6, 45, and 38.3 %, respectively, during planting period, and in integrated environment assessment by life cycle assessment (LCA) method, producing 1 t maize grain, energy depletion, acidification, eutrophication, and climate change impacts of INM treatment decreased 26.19, 30.16, 32.61, and 22.75 %, respectively. Therefore, INM treatment is a better N management strategy in comprehensive analysis.

  9. An improved biofilter to control the dissolved organic nitrogen concentration during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huining; Gu, Li; Liu, Bing; Gan, Huihui; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Yu, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a key precursor of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) formed during disinfection in drinking water treatment. To effectively control DBPs, reduction of the DON concentration before the disinfection process is critical. Traditional biofilters can increase the DON concentration in the effluent, so an improved biofilter is needed. In this study, an improved biofilter was set up with two-layer columns using activated carbon and quartz sand under different influent patterns. Compared with the single-layer filter, the two-layer biofilter controlled the DON concentration more efficiently. The two-point influent biofilter controlled the DON concentration more effectively than the single-point influent biofilter. The improved biofilter resulted in an environment (including matrix, DO, and pH) suitable for microbial growth. Along the depth of the biofilter column, the environment affected the microbial biomass and microbial activity and thus affected the DON concentration.

  10. Improving dynamic phytoplankton reserve-utilization models with an indirect proxy for internal nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Martino E; Heimann, Kirsten; Connolly, Sean R

    2016-09-07

    Ecologists have often used indirect proxies to represent variables that are difficult or impossible to measure directly. In phytoplankton, the internal concentration of the most limiting nutrient in a cell determines its growth rate. However, directly measuring the concentration of nutrients within cells is inaccurate, expensive, destructive, and time-consuming, substantially impairing our ability to model growth rates in nutrient-limited phytoplankton populations. The red chlorophyll autofluorescence (hereafter "red fluorescence") signal emitted by a cell is highly correlated with nitrogen quota in nitrogen-limited phytoplankton species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of including flow cytometric red fluorescence as a proxy for internal nitrogen status to model phytoplankton growth rates. To this end, we used the classic Quota model and designed three approaches to calibrate its model parameters to data: where empirical observations on cell internal nitrogen quota were used to fit the model ("Nitrogen-Quota approach"), where quota dynamics were inferred only from changes in medium nutrient depletion and population density ("Virtual-Quota approach"), or where red fluorescence emission of a cell was used as an indirect proxy for its internal nitrogen quota ("Fluorescence-Quota approach"). Two separate analyses were carried out. In the first analysis, stochastic model simulations were parameterized from published empirical relationships and used to generate dynamics of phytoplankton communities reared under nitrogen-limited conditions. Quota models were fitted to the dynamics of each simulated species with the three different approaches and the performance of each model was compared. In the second analysis, we fit Quota models to laboratory time-series and we calculate the ability of each calibration approach to describe the observed trajectories of internal nitrogen quota in the culture. Results from both analyses concluded that the

  11. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  12. Nitrogen transformations and balance in constructed wetlands for slightly polluted river water treatment using different macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiming; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Rong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Cong; Xie, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen removal processing in different constructed wetlands treating different kinds of wastewater often varies, and the contribution to nitrogen removal by various pathways remains unclear. In this study, the seasonal nitrogen removal and transformations as well as nitrogen balance in wetland microcosms treating slightly polluted river water was investigated. The results showed that the average total nitrogen removal rates varied in different seasons. According to the mass balance approach, plant uptake removed 8.4-34.3 % of the total nitrogen input, while sediment storage and N(2)O emission contributed 20.5-34.4 % and 0.6-1.9 % of nitrogen removal, respectively. However, the percentage of other nitrogen loss such as N(2) emission due to nitrification and denitrification was estimated to be 2.0-23.5 %. The results indicated that plant uptake and sediment storage were the key factors limiting nitrogen removal besides microbial processes in surface constructed wetland for treating slightly polluted river water.

  13. Mapping quantitative trait loci for nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency in rice (Oryza sativa L.) at different nitrogen fertilizer levels.

    PubMed

    Dai, G J; Cheng, S H; Hua, Z T; Zhang, M L; Jiang, H B; Feng, Y; Shen, X H; Su, Y A; He, N; Ma, Z B; Ma, X Q; Hou, S G; Wang, Y R

    2015-09-08

    Genetic improvement is the fundamental basis for improving nitrogen-use efficiency. A better understanding of genetic factors controlling nitrogen uptake and utilization is required for crop genetic improvement. In this study, we identified the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with traits of nitrogen uptake and utilization by using the single-sequence repeat marker method and a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a super hybrid Xieyou9308. All the traits investigated were inherited quantitatively by continuous variation and showed normal distribution in phenotype with transgressive segregation in the RIL population. Most of the traits were significantly correlated with each other except for nitrogen absorption ability (NAA) with nitrogen harvest index (NHI) and NHI with agricultural nitrogen-absorption efficiency (ANAE). At logarithmic odds value of 2.3, total 13 candidate QTLs, including 4 for NAA, 2 for NHI, 2 for physiological nitrogen-use efficiency, 1 for agricultural nitrogen-use efficiency (ANUE), and 4 for ANAE, were detected and mapped on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 12. Significant pleiotropic effect or neighboring expression of QTLs was observed among traits. At position 64.8 cM on chromosome 4 near the marker RM5757, there was a QTL cluster of NAA, ANUE, and ANAE, and at chromosome 5 near the marker RM5968, there was a QTL cluster of NAA and ANUE. The QTL clusters might provide partial explanation and genetic mechanism for the observed correlations between nitrogen uptake and utilization efficiency traits and might form a basis for future breeding programs.

  14. Improvements in nitrogen technology prove economical for natural gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Butts, R.C.; Chou, K.

    1996-12-31

    A substantial quantity of high nitrogen gas reserves found throughout the US are not developed due to the cost and complexity involved in reducing the nitrogen content to acceptable pipeline specifications. Although technology to remove nitrogen has been available for several years, utilization has primarily been economical for volumes of gas 30 MMscfd or larger. BCCK has developed and patented a new process technology, Nitech, that provides an economic, efficient solution for removing high concentrations of nitrogen. Advantages the Nitech process offers include process flexibility, uncomplicated equipment design, simplified operation and maintenance, minimal electrical requirements, low recompression horsepower demands and high CO{sub 2} tolerance.

  15. Nitrogen balance as a tool to assess nitrogen mineralized from winery wastes under different irrigation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, Maria Isabel; Castellanos, Maria Teresa; Villena, Raquel; Ribas, Francisco; Jesús Cabello, Maria; Arce, Augusto; Cartagena, Maria Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Grape marc is a by-product coming from the winery industry, composed of skins, seeds and stalks generated during the crushing process. In Spain, large quantities of wine are produced every year (3,610,000 tonnes in 2010 (FAO, 2010)) with the consequent waste generation. With an adequate composting treatment, this waste can be applied to soils as a source of nutrients and organic matter. Compost N forms added to soil are mostly organic N forms, so organic N can be mineralized during the crop period and thus be taken up by the plants, immobilised, or leached. Compost N mineralization depends on factors such as compost C/N ratio but also on climate conditions. Estimation of N mineralization is necessary to optimise crop yield and minimize the risk of N losses to the environment, especially in zones vulnerable to nitrate pollution. The aim of this work was to assess mineralized N during the crop season when applying grape marc compost as fertilizer in a melon crop cultivated under different drip irrigation rates. A nitrogen balance in field conditions was carried out with three different doses of compost: 0 (D0), 6.7 (D1), 13.3 (D2) and 20 T/ha (D3); and two irrigation rates (100% ETc and 120% ETc). The field experiment was carried out in Ciudad Real, designated "vulnerable zone" by the "Nitrates Directive" 91/676/CEE. The soil was a shallow sandy-loam (Petrocalcic Palexeralfs), with 0.6 depth and a discontinuous petrocalcic horizon between 0.6 and 0.7 m. Nitrogen plant uptake and nitrate losses were measured weekly; mineral N in soil was determined before compost addition and at the end of the crop cycle. An estimation of soil mineralized N during the crop season using nitrogen balance is presented. Results are compared with data obtained in laboratory conditions. Acknowledgements: This project has been supported by INIA-RTA2010-00110-C03-01.

  16. Improvement of fluorescence intensity of nitrogen vacancy centers in self-formed diamond microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Furuyama, S.; Yaita, J.; Kondo, M.; Tahara, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Shimizu, M.; Kodera, T.; Hatano, M.

    2015-10-19

    We present umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures with metal mirrors at the bottom in order to improve the amount of collected photons from nitrogen vacancy centers. The metal mirrors at the bottom are self-aligned to the umbrella-shaped diamond microstructures which are selectively grown through holes created on a metal mask. By the finite-difference time-domain simulations, we found that the umbrella-shaped microstructures, which have an effect similar to solid immersion lens, could collect photons more efficiently than bulk or pillar-shaped microstructures. Improvement of the fluorescence intensity by factors of from 3 to 5 is shown experimentally.

  17. INTERNAL NITROGEN CYCLING IN WESTERN OREGON FORESTS WITH DIFFERENT NITROGEN STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen incorporation and retention in forest ecosystems should vary with site N status, because nitrogen often limits temperate forest productivity and microbial activity. We followed the incorporation of a pulse of 15N-ammonium into the roots, microbes and soil organic matter...

  18. An Improved Retrieval of Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Bucsela, Eric; Gleason, James F.; Palmer, Paul I.; Bey, Isabelle; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a retrieval of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument that improves in several ways over previous retrievals, especially in the accounting of Rayleigh and cloud scattering. Slant columns, which are directly fitted without low-pass filtering or spectral smoothing, are corrected for an artificial offset likely induced by spectral structure on the diffuser plate of the GOME instrument. The stratospheric column is determined from NO2 columns over the remote Pacific Ocean to minimize contamination from tropospheric NO2. The air mass factor (AMF) used to convert slant columns to vertical columns is calculated from the integral of the relative vertical NO2 distribution from a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data (Global Earth Observing System (GEOS)-CHEM), weighted by altitude dependent scattering weights computed with a radiative transfer model (Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer), using local surface albedos determined from GOME observations at NO2 wavelengths. The AMF calculation accounts for cloud scattering using cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, and cloud optical thickness from a cloud retrieval algorithm (GOME Cloud Retrieval Algorithm). Over continental regions with high surface emissions, clouds decrease the AMT by 20- 30% relative to clear sky. GOME is almost twice as sensitive to tropospheric NO2 columns over ocean than over land. Comparison of the retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns for July 1996 with GEOS-CHEM values tests both the retrieval and the nitrogen oxide radical (NOx) emissions inventories used in GEOS-CHEM. Retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are within 18% of GEOS-CHEM columns and are strongly spatially correlated (r = 0.78, n = 288, p less than 0.005). Retrieved columns show more NO2 than GEOS-CHEM columns over the Transvaal

  19. An Improved Retrieval of Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide from GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Randall V.; Chance, Kelly; Jacob, Daniel J.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Bucsela, Eric; Gleason, James F.; Palmer, Paul I.; Bey, Isabelle; Fiore, Arlene M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a retrieval of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite instrument that improves in several ways over previous retrievals, especially in the accounting of Rayleigh and cloud scattering. Slant columns, which are directly fitted without low-pass filtering or spectral smoothing, are corrected for an artificial offset likely induced by spectral structure on the diffuser plate of the GOME instrument. The stratospheric column is determined from NO2 columns over the remote Pacific Ocean to minimize contamination from tropospheric NO2. The air mass factor (AMF) used to convert slant columns to vertical columns is calculated from the integral of the relative vertical NO2 distribution from a global 3-D model of tropospheric chemistry driven by assimilated meteorological data (Global Earth Observing System (GEOS)-CHEM), weighted by altitude dependent scattering weights computed with a radiative transfer model (Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer), using local surface albedos determined from GOME observations at NO2 wavelengths. The AMF calculation accounts for cloud scattering using cloud fraction, cloud top pressure, and cloud optical thickness from a cloud retrieval algorithm (GOME Cloud Retrieval Algorithm). Over continental regions with high surface emissions, clouds decrease the AMT by 20- 30% relative to clear sky. GOME is almost twice as sensitive to tropospheric NO2 columns over ocean than over land. Comparison of the retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns for July 1996 with GEOS-CHEM values tests both the retrieval and the nitrogen oxide radical (NOx) emissions inventories used in GEOS-CHEM. Retrieved tropospheric NO2 columns over the United States, where NOx emissions are particularly well known, are within 18% of GEOS-CHEM columns and are strongly spatially correlated (r = 0.78, n = 288, p less than 0.005). Retrieved columns show more NO2 than GEOS-CHEM columns over the Transvaal

  20. Comparison of different critical nitrogen dilution curves for nitrogen diagnosis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Xiaojun; Cao, Qiang; Tian, Yongchao; Cao, Weixing

    2017-01-01

    The critical nitrogen (N) dilution curve is a suitable analytical tool for in-season estimation of N status to implement precision N management. This study was undertaken for a comprehensive comparison of N dilution curves in Japonica and Indica rice to investigate, whether a single curve can be used for both rice ecotypes and to determine the most robust plant index for assessing N status in rice ecotypes. The different N dilution curves were developed based on plant dry matter (PDM), leaf area index (LAI), leaf dry matter (LDM) and stem dry matter (SDM) for N diagnosis in Japonica and Indica rice. The comparison of N dilution curves of two rice ecotypes showed non-significant differences, therefore a single/unified curve can be used to assess plant N status for precision N management in both rice ecotypes. The relationships between PDM based, with LAI, LDM, and SDM based N nutrition index, accumulated N deficit and N requirement, indicated that leaf based approaches could be used as substitutes for PDM approach. The lower coefficient b values of LDM based curve (due to efficient physiological N use in leaves) implied that LDM was the most appropriate approach for developing N curve as compared to other approaches. PMID:28262685

  1. Comparison of different critical nitrogen dilution curves for nitrogen diagnosis in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Xiaojun; Cao, Qiang; Tian, Yongchao; Cao, Weixing

    2017-03-01

    The critical nitrogen (N) dilution curve is a suitable analytical tool for in-season estimation of N status to implement precision N management. This study was undertaken for a comprehensive comparison of N dilution curves in Japonica and Indica rice to investigate, whether a single curve can be used for both rice ecotypes and to determine the most robust plant index for assessing N status in rice ecotypes. The different N dilution curves were developed based on plant dry matter (PDM), leaf area index (LAI), leaf dry matter (LDM) and stem dry matter (SDM) for N diagnosis in Japonica and Indica rice. The comparison of N dilution curves of two rice ecotypes showed non-significant differences, therefore a single/unified curve can be used to assess plant N status for precision N management in both rice ecotypes. The relationships between PDM based, with LAI, LDM, and SDM based N nutrition index, accumulated N deficit and N requirement, indicated that leaf based approaches could be used as substitutes for PDM approach. The lower coefficient b values of LDM based curve (due to efficient physiological N use in leaves) implied that LDM was the most appropriate approach for developing N curve as compared to other approaches.

  2. Phenotyping two tomato genotypes with different nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, Maria Rosa; Longo, Caterina; Lupini, Antonio; Miller, Anthony J; Araniti, Fabrizio; Mercati, Francesco; Princi, Maria P; Sunseri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) supply usually limits crop production and optimizing N-use efficiency (NUE) to minimize fertilizer loss is important. NUE is a complex trait that can be dissected into crop N uptake from the soil (NUpE) and N utilization (NUtE). We compared NUE in 14 genotypes of three week old tomatoes grown in sand or hydroponic culture supplied with nitrate (NO3(-)). Culture method influenced measured NUE for some cultivars, but Regina Ostuni (RO) and UC82 were consistently identified as high and low NUE genotypes. To identify why these genotypes had contrasting NUE some traits were compared growing under 0.1 and 5 mM NO3(-) supply. UC82 showed greater root (15)NO3(-) influx at low and high supply, and stronger SlNRT2.1/NAR2.1 transporter expression under low supply when compared with RO. Conversely, RO showed a higher total root length and thickness compared to UC82. Compared with UC82, RO showed higher shoot SlNRT2.3 expression and NO3(-) storage at high supply, but similar NO3(-) reductase activity. After N-starvation, root cell electrical potentials of RO were significantly more negative than UC82, but nitrate elicited similar responses in both root types. Overall for UC82 and RO, NUtE may play a greater role than NUpE for improved NUE.

  3. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-06-13

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7-overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement.

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NLP7 improves plant growth under both nitrogen-limiting and -sufficient conditions by enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Jie; Tang, Hui; Yuan, Yang; Wang, Shi-Mei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhu, Qi-Sheng; Li, Shi-Gui; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is essential for plant survival and growth. Excessive application of nitrogenous fertilizer has generated serious environment pollution and increased production cost in agriculture. To deal with this problem, tremendous efforts have been invested worldwide to increase the nitrogen use ability of crops. However, only limited success has been achieved to date. Here we report that NLP7 (NIN-LIKE PROTEIN 7) is a potential candidate to improve plant nitrogen use ability. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, NLP7 increases plant biomass under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions with better-developed root system and reduced shoot/root ratio. NLP7–overexpressing plants show a significant increase in key nitrogen metabolites, nitrogen uptake, total nitrogen content, and expression levels of genes involved in nitrogen assimilation and signalling. More importantly, overexpression of NLP7 also enhances photosynthesis rate and carbon assimilation, whereas knockout of NLP7 impaired both nitrogen and carbon assimilation. In addition, NLP7 improves plant growth and nitrogen use in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Our results demonstrate that NLP7 significantly improves plant growth under both nitrogen-poor and -rich conditions by coordinately enhancing nitrogen and carbon assimilation and sheds light on crop improvement. PMID:27293103

  5. [Allelopathy and resources competition of rice under different nitrogen supplies].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jun; Lin, Wenxiong; Zhou, Junjian; Wu, Minhong; Chen, Xiangxu; He, Huaqin; Guo, Yuchun; Liang, Yiyuan

    2005-05-01

    In order to explore the bio-interference of allelopathic rice with barnyardgrass under different nitrogen supplies, a new bioassay method, i.e., allelopathy-competition separation based (ACS) approach was recommended in this study. The results indicated that ACS could be successfully used to distinguish the rice allelopathy from its resources competition in rice-weed co-culture system, and to evaluate its response characteristics under different N supplies. The test rice accession PI312777 had a higher ability in interfering target weed barnyardgrass (BYD), represented by its stable and higher ability in resources competition, as well as its increasing allelopathic potential in suppressing companion weed BYD when the N supply decreased in the co-cultured system. The reverse was true in the case of rice accession Lemont, which had a lower allelopathic potential under all N supply levels, and a lower ability in resources competition under normal or rich N supply. But, Lemont had an obviously increased ability in resources competition under lower N supply, which was considered as the result of econiche competition in rice-weed system.

  6. Nitrogen pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes.

    PubMed

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Fellner, Johann

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills occur primarily via leachate, where they pose a long-term pollution problem in the form of ammonium. In-situ aeration was proposed as a remediation measure to mitigate nitrogenous landfill emissions, turning the anaerobic environment to anoxic and subsequently aerobic. As in-depth studies of the nitrogen cycle during landfill aeration had been largely missing, it was the aim of this work to establish a detailed nitrogen balance for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of landfilled MSW based on lab-scale experiments, and also investigating the effect of different water regimes on nitrogen transformation during aeration. Six landfill simulation reactors were operated in duplicate under different conditions: aerated wet (with water addition and recirculation), aerated dry (without water addition) and anaerobic (wet). The results showed that more than 78 % of the initial total nitrogen (TNinit) remained in the solids in all set ups, with the highest nitrogen losses achieved with water addition during aeration. In this case, gaseous nitrogen losses (as N2 due to denitrification) amounted up to 16.6 % of TNinit and around 4 % of TNinit was discharged via leachate. The aerated dry set-up showed lower denitrification rates (2.6-8.8 % of TNinit was released as N2), but was associated with the highest N2O emissions (3.8-3.9 % of TNinit). For the anaerobic treatment the main pathway of nitrogen discharge was the leachate, where NH4 accounted for around 8 % of TNinit. These findings provide the basis for improved management strategies to enhance nitrogen removal during in-situ aeration of old landfills.

  7. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  8. Spectral measurements at different spatial scales in potato: relating leaf, plant and canopy nitrogen status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongschaap, Raymond E. E.; Booij, Remmie

    2004-09-01

    Chlorophyll contents in vegetation depend on soil nitrogen availability and on crop nitrogen uptake, which are important management factors in arable farming. Crop nitrogen uptake is important, as nitrogen is needed for chlorophyll formation, which is important for photosynthesis, i.e. the conversion of absorbed radiance into plant biomass. The objective of this study was to estimate leaf and canopy nitrogen contents by near and remote sensing observations and to link observations at leaf, plant and canopy level. A theoretical base is presented for scaling-up leaf optical properties to whole plants and crops, by linking different optical recording techniques at leaf, plant and canopy levels through the integration of vertical nitrogen distribution. Field data come from potato experiments in The Netherlands in 1997 and 1998, comprising two potato varieties: Eersteling and Bintje, receiving similar nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha -1) in varying application schemes to create differences in canopy nitrogen status during the growing season. Ten standard destructive field samplings were performed to follow leaf area index and crop dry weight evolution. Samples were analysed for inorganic nitrogen and total nitrogen contents. At sampling dates, spectral measurements were taken both at leaf level and at canopy level. At leaf level, an exponential relation between SPAD-502 readings and leaf organic nitrogen contents with a high correlation factor of 0.91 was found. At canopy level, an exponential relation between canopy organic nitrogen contents and red edge position ( λrep, nm) derived from reflectance measurements was found with a good correlation of 0.82. Spectral measurements (SPAD-502) at leaf level of a few square mm were related to canopy reflectance measurements (CropScan™) of approximately 0.44 m 2. Statistical regression techniques were used to optimise theoretical vertical nitrogen profiles that allowed scaling-up leaf chlorophyll measurements

  9. Water quality improvement through bioretention media: nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Davis, Allen P; Shokouhian, Mohammad; Sharma, Himanshu; Minami, Christie

    2006-03-01

    High nutrient inputs and eutrophication continue to be one of the highest priority water quality problems. Bioretention is a low-impact development technology that has been advocated for use in urban and other developed areas. This work provides an in-depth analysis on removal of nutrients from a synthetic stormwater runoff by bioretention. Results have indicated good removal of phosphorus (70 to 85%) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (55 to 65%). Nitrate reduction was poor (< 20%) and, in several cases, nitrate production was noted. Variations in flowrate (intensity) and duration had a moderate affect on nutrient removal. Mass balances demonstrate the importance of water attenuation in the facility in reducing mass nutrient loads. Captured nitrogen can be converted to nitrate between storm events and subsequently washed from the system. Analysis on the fate of nutrients in bioretention suggests that accumulation of phosphorus and nitrogen may be controlled by carefully managing growing and harvesting of vegetation.

  10. Nitrogen metabolism in pepper plants applied with different bioregulators.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Castilla, N; Romero, L

    2000-07-01

    Certain bioregulators were studied in relation to nitrogen metabolism of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Lamuyo). Plants were grown under controlled conditions and submitted to regular fertilization with macro- and micronutrients. Treatments were as follows: nontreated control (T0); fosfonutren [essential amino acids and micronutrients (46.9 mg L(-)(1))] (T1); biozyme [GA(3) (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus IAA (32.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus zeatin (83.2 mg L(-)(1)) plus chelated micronutrients] (T2); and GA(3) [16 mg L(-)(1)] (T3). The concentrations of NO(3)(-), organic N, amino acids, and proteins, the activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR), and finally the foliar dry weight and yield were analyzed. The results indicated that the application of certain bioregulators, such as fosfonutren (T1), which contain amino acids can cause a negative effect on the efficiency and utilization of NO(3)(-), resulting in a drastic loss in growth and yield, even under the control treatment, in which no bioregulator was applied. On the contrary, the application of certain bioregulators based principally on the combination of different hormones, as in the case of biozyme (T2), increased NO(3)(-) assimilation under our experimental conditions, due possibly to a greater availability of these bioregulators in the leaves and increased NR and NiR activities. This appears to explain why the T2 treatment gave the greatest foliar dry weight and fruit yield per plant in the experiment.

  11. Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.

    PubMed

    Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

    2012-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved estimation of nitrogen uptake in grasslands using the nitrogen dilution curve

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The critical nitrogen concentration (CNC) is a simple yet robust relationship that describes the changes in crop N during growth. We applied the concept of CNC to calculate N uptake across various cutting regimes. While it is well-established that decreasing cutting frequency changes growth rates, t...

  13. Improved predictability of fertilizer nitrogen need for corn following alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accounting for alfalfa nitrogen (N) credits to first-year corn reduces fertilizer N costs, over-application of N, and the risk of nitrate loss to ground water. It is equally important, however, to avoid inadequate N supply for corn. We analyzed nearly all previous research on fertilizer N response i...

  14. Root aeration improves growth and nitrogen accumulation in rice seedlings under low nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingwen; Liang, Jing; Xu, Zhihui; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Quansuo; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In wetland soils, changes in oxygen (O2) level in the rhizosphere are believed to influence the behaviour of nutrients and their usage by plants. However, the effect of aeration on nitrogen (N) acquisition under different N supply conditions remains largely unknown. In this study, the rice cultivars Yangdao 6 (YD6, with higher root aerenchyma abundance) and Nongken 57 (NK57, with lower root aerenchyma abundance) were used to evaluate the effects of aeration on rice growth and N accumulation. Our results showed that the number of adventitious roots and the root surface area increased significantly, and ethylene production and aerenchyma formation decreased in both cultivars after external aeration (EA). Five N treatments, including no N (−N), 0.125 mM NH4NO3 (LN), 1.25 mM Ca(NO3)2 (NO3-N), 1.25 mM (NH4)2SO4 (NH4-N) and 1.25 mM NH4NO3 (N/N), were applied to YD6 and NK57 for 2 days under internal aeration or EA conditions. External aeration increased the root biomass in both cultivars and the shoot biomass in NK57 by 18–50 %. The total N concentrations in roots of YD6 grown under −N and LN and of NK57 grown under NO3-N were increased by EA. Expression of OsPAD4, one of four putative genes regulating aerenchyma formation, showed a similar pattern alongside changes in the ethylene level in the EA-treated rice irrespective of the N treatments. Furthermore, expression of the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.1 was increased by EA under −N, LN and NO3-N conditions. Our data provide evidence of an interaction between O2 and the supply of N in ethylene production, aerenchyma formation and N nutrition through modification of the expression of OsPAD4 and OsNRT2.1. PMID:26578743

  15. Improved Eco-Friendly Recombinant Anabaena sp. Strain PCC7120 with Enhanced Nitrogen Biofertilizer Potential▿

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains are native to tropical paddy fields and contribute to the carbon and nitrogen economy of such soils. Genetic engineering was employed to improve the nitrogen biofertilizer potential of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120. Constitutive enhanced expression of an additional integrated copy of the hetR gene from a light-inducible promoter elevated HetR protein expression and enhanced functional heterocyst frequency in the recombinant strain. The recombinant strain displayed consistently higher nitrogenase activity than the wild-type strain and appeared to be in homeostasis with compatible modulation of photosynthesis and respiration. The enhanced combined nitrogen availability from the recombinant strain positively catered to the nitrogen demand of rice seedlings in short-term hydroponic experiments and supported better growth. The engineered strain is stable, eco-friendly, and useful for environmental application as nitrogen biofertilizer in paddy fields. PMID:21057013

  16. Improved eco-friendly recombinant Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 with enhanced nitrogen biofertilizer potential.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains are native to tropical paddy fields and contribute to the carbon and nitrogen economy of such soils. Genetic engineering was employed to improve the nitrogen biofertilizer potential of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120. Constitutive enhanced expression of an additional integrated copy of the hetR gene from a light-inducible promoter elevated HetR protein expression and enhanced functional heterocyst frequency in the recombinant strain. The recombinant strain displayed consistently higher nitrogenase activity than the wild-type strain and appeared to be in homeostasis with compatible modulation of photosynthesis and respiration. The enhanced combined nitrogen availability from the recombinant strain positively catered to the nitrogen demand of rice seedlings in short-term hydroponic experiments and supported better growth. The engineered strain is stable, eco-friendly, and useful for environmental application as nitrogen biofertilizer in paddy fields.

  17. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  18. Maximizing ammonium nitrogen removal from solution using different zeolites.

    PubMed

    Penn, Chad J; Warren, Jason G; Smith, Savannah

    2010-01-01

    Zeolite minerals are ideal for removing ammonium nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) from animal wastes, leachates, and industrial effluents. The objectives of this study were to compare NH4+ removal and kinetics among several commercially available zeolites under various conditions and determine if calorimetry could provide information regarding kinetics of NH4+ removal. Ammonium sorption onto potassium (K) saturated zeolites was compared using synthetic vs. natural swine effluent and with either traditional batch-shaken system or a "tea bag" approach in which zeolites were contained in a mesh sack and suspended in a solution of swine effluent. Ammonium sorption was measured at four retention times using a flow-through system, and the resulting heat response was measured using isothermal calorimetry. Ammonium removal was not significantly different in synthetic vs. natural swine effluent. Ammonium removal was lower in batch-stirred compared to batch-shaken systems, suggesting that diffusion between particles was rate-limiting in the former system. Flow-through cells possessing contact times > 100 s displayed greater NH4+ sorption than batch systems, suggesting that maintaining high NH4+ concentration in solution, removal of exchange products, and sufficient reaction time are critical to maximizing NH4+ removal by zeolites. Within 100 s after NH4+ addition, endothermic heat responses indicated that NH4(+)-K+ exchange had peaked; this was followed by significant heat rate reduction for 50 min. This confirmed findings of an initial fast NH4(+)-K+ exchange followed by a slower one and suggests the 100-s period of rapid reaction is an indicator of the minimum flow through retention time required to optimize NH4+ sorption to zeolites used in this study.

  19. Effect of different biochars on Nitrogen uptake in poplar trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Elizabeth; Tonon, Giustino; Scandellari, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Influence of biochar on soil nitrogen transformation and plant uptake has been reported. This paper presents preliminary results of plant N uptake in poplars by using 15N isotope tracer approach Two types of biochar were applied to two sets of pots containing only sand and each pot received a pre-rooted poplar cutting. Half of the pots were inoculated with commercial mycorrhizal gel and the other half were left without. It is intended to provide information on how biochar, mycorrhiza and root interaction mediate nitrogen uptake and organ allocation.

  20. Shelf life study of fresh celery (Apium graveolens L.) grown under different nitrogen fertilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Valeria; Muratore, Giuseppe; Russo, Marco Antonio; Belligno, Adalgisa

    2011-05-01

    Nitrogen fertilization is useful for obtaining higher growth and quality of productions, and the use of nitrogen fertilization is widespread. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen-rich fertilizers on quality characteristics of celery, shelf life tests of celery grown with 2 levels of nitrogen and 2 different nitrogen fertilizers were performed. The treatments of the celery samples were identified as follows: T1, mineral nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)); T2, mineral nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); T3, organic nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)); T4, organic nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); R4, residual organic nitrogen (120 kg ha(-1)); and C, untreated control. Celery plants were selected and packaged in either of the following 2 plastic films: antifog polyolefin (AFP) film or microperforated polypropylene (MPP) film. The nitrate contents, weight loss, hardness, changes in color parameters, and total phenols were studied for both packaging types during storage. The results demonstrated that celery fertilized with organic nitrogen and packaged in AFP film reached a shelf life of 37 d. The control sample packaged in MPP film was not marketable after 20 d, but the same untreated sample packaged in AFP film reached a shelf life of 30 d.

  1. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ammonia is the principal source of fixed nitrogen. It was produced by 17 companies at 34 plants in the United States during 2003. Fifty-three percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock.

  2. Validation of nitrogen dioxide measurements from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reburn, W. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Morris, P. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Taylor, F. W.; Kerridge, B. J.; Knight, R. J.; Ballard, J.; Kumer, J. B.; Massie, S. T.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are assessed. Channel 5 of the instrument was dedicated to observations of nitrogen dioxide and employed pressure-modulation and wideband radiometry to make measurements at 6.2 μm. This dual technique allows simultaneous determination of nitrogen dioxide mixing ratio and the aerosol extinction coefficient at this wavelength and therefore provides nitrogen dioxide data even in the presence of heavy aerosol loading. Approximately 180 days of data, in the period from September 1991 to July 1992, were obtained with, typically, over 2600 profiles per day for each retrieved species, covering an altitude range of 100-0.01 mbar. In this paper the version 10 data are assessed and a full error analysis is described. Comparisons with the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) on UARS and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) on Nimbus 7 are also presented. It is concluded that the morphology of the retrieved ISAMS fields is robust and consistent with concurrent as well as previous infrared satellite measurements. Random errors are estimated to be of the order of 10% for nighttime and 15% for daytime NO2 near the maxima of the distributions, and systematic errors are estimated to be of a similar size. However, there remains an unresolved systematic difference of about a factor of 2 between ISAMS and CLAES. Both random and systematic errors are likely to be reduced in future versions of the processing.

  3. The characteristics of TAG and EPA accumulation in Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 under different nitrogen supply regimes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yingying; Jiang, Junpeng; Wang, Haitao; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song; Yang, Qing; Wang, Weiliang

    2015-03-01

    The strategy of nitrogen limitation has been widely applied to enhance lipid production in microalgae. The changes of cellular composition, and the characteristics of triacylglycerol (TAG) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) accumulation in Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 were investigated. The results revealed that after nitrogen limitation TAG rather than carbohydrate was the dominant carbon sink in N. oceanica IMET1. Different nitrogen supplementation strategies were applied in order to achieve high TAG and EPA productivity, respectively. Limited nitrogen was supplied to improve TAG production, and a maximum productivity of 29.44 mg L(-1) d(-1) was obtained, which was a 6.74-fold increase compared to nitrogen-depleted cultivation. The highest EPA productivity of 7.66 mg L(-1) d(-1) was achieved under nitrogen-replete cultivation, which is different from the condition for TAG maximum productivity because the EPA is in glycolipids and phospholipids mainly. The fatty acid composition analysis identified the source of acyl group in TAG accumulation.

  4. Effects of the addition of different nitrogen sources in the tequila fermentation process at high sugar concentration.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, J; Gschaedler, A

    2007-04-01

    To study the effect of the addition of different nitrogen sources at high sugar concentration in the tequila fermentation process. Fermentations were performed at high sugar concentration (170 g l(-1)) using Agave tequilana Weber blue variety with and without added nitrogen from different sources (ammonium sulfate; glutamic acid; a mixture of ammonium sulfate and amino acids) during the exponential phase of growth. All the additions increased the fermentation rate and alcohol efficiency. The level of synthesis of volatile compounds depended on the source added. The concentration of amyl alcohols and isobutanol were decreased while propanol and acetaldehyde concentration increased. The most efficient nitrogen sources for fermentation rate were ammonium sulfate and the mixture of ammonium sulfate and amino acids. The level of volatile compounds produced depended upon types of nitrogen. The synthesis of some volatile compounds increased while others decreased with nitrogen addition. The addition of nitrogen could be a strategy for improving the fermentation rate and efficiency in the tequila fermentation process at high sugar Agave tequilana concentration. Furthermore, the sensory quality of the final product may change because the synthesis of the volatile compounds is modified.

  5. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  6. Detecting leaf nitrogen content in wheat with canopy hyperspectrum under different soil backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X.; Ren, H.; Cao, Z.; Tian, Y.; Cao, W.; Zhu, Y.; Cheng, T.

    2014-10-01

    Hyperspectral sensing techniques can be effective for rapid, non-destructive detecting of the nitrogen (N) status in crop plants; however, their accuracy is often affected by the soil background. Under different fractions of soil background, the canopy spectra and leaf nitrogen content (LNC) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were obtained from field experiments with different N rates and planting densities over 3 growing seasons. Five types of vegetation index (VIs: normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), ratio vegetation index (RVI), soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), optimize soil adjusted vegetation index (OSAVI), and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI)) were constructed based on three types of spectral information: (1) the original and the first derivative (FD) spectrum, (2) the spectrum adjusted with the vegetation coverage (FVcover), and (3) the pure spectrum extracted by a linear mixed model. Comprehensive relationships of above five types of VI with LNC were quantified for LNC detecting under different soil backgrounds. The results indicated that all five types of VI were significantly affected by the soil background, with R2 values of around 0.55 for LNC detecting, with the OSAVI (R514, R469)L=0.04 producing the best performance of all five indices. However, based on the FVcover, the coverage adjusted spectral index (CASI = NDVI(R513, R481)/(1 + FVcover)) produced the higher R2 value of 0.62 and the lower RRMSE of 13%, and was less sensitive to the leaf area index (LAI), leaf dry weight (LDW), FVcover, and leaf nitrogen accumulation (LNA). The results demonstrate that the newly developed CASI could improve the performance of LNC estimation under different soil backgrounds.

  7. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  8. Reducing nitrogen losses through ammonia volatilization and surface runoff to improve apparent nitrogen recovery of double cropping of late rice using controlled release urea.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Lu, Jianwei; Hou, Wenfeng; Pan, Yonghui; Wang, Yang; Khan, Muhammad Rizwan; Ren, Tao; Cong, Rihuan; Li, Xiaokun

    2017-04-01

    Controlled release fertilizer can reduce nitrogen losses to the environment while increasing grain yield and improving apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR) of rice. However, few studies have evaluated the comparative efficacy of different polymer-coated urea products on nitrogen (N) losses, ANR, and N uptake of rice. A 2-year field experiment was conducted to compare the effects of three different types of polymer-coated urea fertilizer on nitrogen losses through NH3 volatilization and surface runoff to the environment, ANR, grain yield, and N uptake as compared to conventional urea of rice. Six treatments including (1) control with 0 kg N ha(-1) (CK), (2) basal application of urea (Ub), (3) split application (Us) of urea (50% at transplanting, 25% at tillering, and 25% at panicle stages), (4) CRU-1 (polyurethane-coated urea), (5) CRU-2 (degradable polymer-coated urea), and (6) CRU-3 (water-based polymer-coated urea) all applied at 165 kg N ha(-1). It was found that CRU-2 resulted in the highest grain yield and panicle numbers among the N fertilization treatments in 2013 and 2014. Applying CRU could help increase N uptake in rice, reduce N losses through NH3 volatilization and surface runoff, and hence improve ANR. Its single dose can meet the nutrient demand of the rice plant. Controlled release urea could be adopted as an effective mitigation alternative to retard N losses through NH3 volatilization and surface runoff while improving ANR of double cropping of late rice.

  9. Biomarkers for detecting nitrogen deficiency during alcoholic fermentation in different commercial wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Chiva, Rosana; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Nitrogen deficiencies in grape musts are one of the main causes of stuck or sluggish wine fermentations. Several putative biomarkers were tested in order to analyze their appropriateness to detect nitrogen stress in the yeast. To this aim, four commercial wine strains (PDM, ARM, RVA and TTA) were grown in a synthetic grape must with different nitrogen concentrations. Trehalose accumulation, arginase activity and the expression of eleven genes were tested in these wine strains, known to have different nitrogen requirements. The overall response of the four strains was similar, with differences in response intensity (PDM and RVA with higher intensity) and response time (which was also related with nitrogen consumption time). Trehalose response was mostly related to entry into the stationary phase, whereas arginase activity was responsive to nitrogen depletion, although its measurement is too complicated to be used for routine monitoring during winemaking. The expression of the genes DAL4, DAL5, DUR3 and GAP1 was clearly related to nitrogen depletion and thus, GAP1 and DAL4 were selected as markers of nitrogen deficiency. In order to adapt expression analysis to winemaking conditions, the original strains were transformed into reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of the promoters for GAP1 and DAL4. The transformants had a similar fermentative capacity to the parental strains and were able to detect alterations in yeast physiological status due to nitrogen limitations.

  10. [Influence of soluble carbon and nitrogen on ammonia volatilization from different thermal zones soil].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xia; Han, Xiao-zeng; Qiao, Yun-fa; Wang, Shou-yu; Li, Xiao-hui; Yan, Jun

    2009-12-01

    A static absorption method was used to study the influence of soluble carbon and nitrogen on ammonia volatilization from different thermal zone soils, such as black soil, red soil and cinnamon soil, performed in laboratory. Results showed that nitrogen application enhanced ammonia volatilization significantly. The amount of ammonia volatilization in cinnamon soil ranged from 14.3 to 7.37 mg x kg(-1), which in black soil from 1.52 to 1.11 mg x kg(-1) and from 0.998 to 0.402 mg x kg(-1) in red soil applied with only nitrogen or nitrogen amended with soluble carbon. Moreover, soluble carbon decreased ammonia volatilization caused by nitrogen, and amounts of decrease were 27.0%, 48.5%, 60.0% in black soil, cinnamon soil and red soil separately. The amount of ammonia volatilization from black soil and cinnamon soil applied only nitrogen was in an order of CK > NPK > NPKOM, while contrary order appeared if nitrogen was amended with soluble carbon. However, it was the same order for red soil applied with only nitrogen or nitrogen amended with soluble carbon. In addition, the variances of NH4+ -N and NO3- -N contents in cinnamon soil were larger than other soils, which suggested that cinnamon soil had high potential of nitrogen loss.

  11. Global scale analysis and evaluation of an improved mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the Community Land Model (CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.; Randerson, J. T.; Mu, M.; Kattge, J.; Rogers, A.; Reich, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    In many ecosystems, nitrogen is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and productivity. However mechanistic representation of nitrogen uptake linked to root traits, and functional nitrogen allocation among different leaf enzymes involved in respiration and photosynthesis is currently lacking in Earth System models. The linkage between nitrogen availability and plant productivity is simplistically represented by potential photosynthesis rates, and is subsequently downregulated depending on nitrogen supply and other nitrogen consumers in the model (e.g., nitrification). This type of potential photosynthesis rate calculation is problematic for several reasons. Firstly, plants do not photosynthesize at potential rates and then downregulate. Secondly, there is considerable subjectivity on the meaning of potential photosynthesis rates. Thirdly, there exists lack of understanding on modeling these potential photosynthesis rates in a changing climate. In addition to model structural issues in representing photosynthesis rates, the role of plant roots in nutrient acquisition have been largely ignored in Earth System models. For example, in CLM4.5, nitrogen uptake is linked to leaf level processes (e.g., primarily productivity) rather than root scale process involved in nitrogen uptake. We present a new plant model for CLM with an improved mechanistic presentation of plant nitrogen uptake based on root scale Michaelis Menten kinetics, and stronger linkages between leaf nitrogen and plant productivity by inferring relationships observed in global databases of plant traits (including the TRY database and several individual studies). We also incorporate improved representation of plant nitrogen leaf allocation, especially in tropical regions where significant over-prediction of plant growth and productivity in CLM4.5 simulations exist. We evaluate our improved global model simulations using the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) framework. We conclude that

  12. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Supported Pd Catalyst for Improved Electrocatalytic Performance toward Ethanol Electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ying; Zhang, Xinyuan; Luo, Zhiyong; Tang, Dian; Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Teng; Xie, Zailai

    2017-07-01

    In this study, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was applied for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the presence of glucose and urea. The HTC process allowed the deposition of thin nitrogen-doped carbon layers on the surface of the CNTs. By controlling the ratio of glucose to urea, nitrogen contents of up to 1.7 wt% were achieved. The nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube-supported Pd catalysts exhibited superior electrochemical activity for ethanol oxidation relative to the pristine CNTs. Importantly, a 1.5-fold increase in the specific activity was observed for the Pd/HTC-N1.67%CNTs relative to the catalyst without nitrogen doping (Pd/HTC-CNTs). Further experiments indicated that the introduction of nitrogen species on the surface of the CNTs improved the Pd(0) loading and increased the binding energy.

  13. Responses to nitrogen pulses and growth under low nitrogen availability in invasive and native tree species with differing successional status.

    PubMed

    Osone, Yoko; Yazaki, Kenichi; Masaki, Takeshi; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    Invasive species are frequently found in recently disturbed sites. To examine how these disturbance-dependent invasive species exploit resource pulses resulting from disturbance, twelve physiological and morphological traits, including age-dependent responsiveness in leaf traits to nitrogen pulse, were compared between Bischofia javanica, an invasive tree species in Ogasawara islands, and three native Ogasawara species, each having a different successional status. When exposed to a nitrogen pulse, invasive B. javanica showed higher increases in photosynthetic capacity, leaf area, epidermal cell number and cell size in leaves of broad age classes, and root nitrogen absorption ability than two native mid-/late or late-successional species, but showed no particular superiority to a native pioneer species in these responses. Under low nitrogen, however, it showed the largest relative growth rate among the four species, while the native pioneer showed the lowest growth. From these results, we concluded that the combination of moderately high responsiveness to resource pulses and the ability to maintain steady growth under resource limitations may give B. javanica a competitive advantage over a series of native species with different successional status from early to late-successional stages.

  14. Reliable reference genes for normalization of gene expression in cucumber grown under different nitrogen nutrition.

    PubMed

    Warzybok, Anna; Migocka, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In plants, nitrogen is the most important nutritional factor limiting the yield of cultivated crops. Since nitrogen is essential for synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids and proteins, studies on gene expression in plants cultivated under different nitrogen availability require particularly careful selection of suitable reference genes which are not affected by nitrogen limitation. Therefore, the objective of this study was to select the most reliable reference genes for qPCR analysis of target cucumber genes under varying nitrogen source and availability. Among twelve candidate cucumber genes used in this study, five are highly homologous to the commonly used internal controls, whereas seven novel candidates were previously identified through the query of the cucumber genome. The expression of putative reference genes and the target CsNRT1.1 gene was analyzed in roots, stems and leaves of cucumbers grown under nitrogen deprivation, varying nitrate availability or different sources of nitrogen (glutamate, glutamine or NH3). The stability of candidate genes expression significantly varied depending on the tissue type and nitrogen supply. However, in most of the outputs genes encoding CACS, TIP41, F-box protein and EFα proved to be the most suitable for normalization of CsNRT1.1 expression. In addition, our results suggest the inclusion of 3 or 4 references to obtain highly reliable results of target genes expression in all cucumber organs under nitrogen-related stress.

  15. Optimization of Nitrogen Rate and Planting Density for Improving Yield, Nitrogen Use Efficiency, and Lodging Resistance in Oilseed Rape

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahbaz; Anwar, Sumera; Kuai, Jie; Ullah, Sana; Fahad, Shah; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2017-01-01

    Yield and lodging related traits are essential for improving rapeseed production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of plant density (D) and nitrogen (N) rates on morphological and physiological traits related to yield and lodging in rapeseed. We evaluated Huayouza 9 for two consecutive growing seasons (2014–2016) under three plant densities (LD, 10 plants m−2; MD, 30 plants m−2; HD, 60 plants m−2) and four N rates (0, 60, 120, and 180 kg ha−1). Experiment was laid out in split plot design using density as a main factor and N as sub-plot factor with three replications each. Seed yield was increased by increasing density and N rate, reaching a peak at HD with 180 kg N ha−1. The effect of N rate was consistently positive in increasing the plant height, pod area index, 1,000 seed weight, shoot and root dry weights, and root neck diameter, reaching a peak at 180 kg N ha−1. Plant height was decreased by increasing D, whereas the maximum radiation interception (~80%) and net photosynthetic rate were recorded at MD at highest N. Lodging resistance and nitrogen use efficiency significantly increased with increasing D from 10 to 30 plants m−2, and N rate up to 120 kg ha−1, further increase of D and N decreased lodging resistance and NUE. Hence, our study implies that planting density 30 plants m−2 can improve yield, nitrogen use efficiency, and enhance lodging resistance by improving crop canopy. PMID:28536581

  16. Transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to different nitrogen concentrations during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Ferreira, A; del Olmo, M; García-Martínez, J; Jiménez-Martí, E; Mendes-Faia, A; Pérez-Ortín, J E; Leão, C

    2007-05-01

    Gene expression profiles of a wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PYCC4072 were monitored during alcoholic fermentations with three different nitrogen supplies: (i) control fermentation (with enough nitrogen to complete sugar fermentation), (ii) nitrogen-limiting fermentation, and (iii) the addition of nitrogen to the nitrogen-limiting fermentation (refed fermentation). Approximately 70% of the yeast transcriptome was altered in at least one of the fermentation stages studied, revealing the continuous adjustment of yeast cells to stressful conditions. Nitrogen concentration had a decisive effect on gene expression during fermentation. The largest changes in transcription profiles were observed when the early time points of the N-limiting and control fermentations were compared. Despite the high levels of glucose present in the media, the early responses of yeast cells to low nitrogen were characterized by the induction of genes involved in oxidative glucose metabolism, including a significant number of mitochondrial associated genes resembling the yeast cell response to glucose starvation. As the N-limiting fermentation progressed, a general downregulation of genes associated with catabolism was observed. Surprisingly, genes encoding ribosomal proteins and involved in ribosome biogenesis showed a slight increase during N starvation; besides, genes that comprise the RiBi regulon behaved distinctively under the different experimental conditions. Here, for the first time, the global response of nitrogen-depleted cells to nitrogen addition under enological conditions is described. An important gene expression reprogramming occurred after nitrogen addition; this reprogramming affected genes involved in glycolysis, thiamine metabolism, and energy pathways, which enabled the yeast strain to overcome the previous nitrogen starvation stress and restart alcoholic fermentation.

  17. Increasing in-stream nitrogen concentrations under different bioenergy crop management practices in central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Thraen, Daniela; Rode, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how nitrogen fluxes respond to changes in land use and agriculture practices is crucial for improving instream water quality prediction. In central Germany, expansion of bioenergy crops such as maize and rape for ethanol production during the last decade led to increasing of fertilizer application rates. To examine the effect of these changes, surface water quality of a drinking water reservoir catchment was investigated for more than 30 years. The Weida catchment (99.5 km2) is part of the Elbe river basin and has a share of 67% agricultural land use with significant changes in agricultural practices within the investigation period. For the period 2004-2012, the share of maize and rape has been increased by 52% and 20%, respectively, for enhancing bioenergy production. To achieve our gaols, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was calibrated for discharge and inorganic nitrogen concentrations (IN) during the period 1997-2000.The model was validated successfully (with lowest performance of NSE = 0.78 and PBIAS = 3.74% for discharge) for three different periods 1983-1987, 1989-1996 and 2000-2003, which are charaterized by different fertilizer application rates. Results showed that the HYPE model reproduced reasonably well discharge and IN daily loads (with lowest NSE = 0.64 for IN-load). In addition, the HYPE model was evaluated successfully to predict the discharge and IN concentrations for the period 2004-2012, where detailed input data in terms of crops management (field-specific survey) have been considered. Land use and crop rotations scenarios, with high hypothetical percentage of acceptance by the farmers, revealed that continuous conversion of agricultural land into bioenergy crops, will most likely, lead to an enrichment of in-stream nitrogen, especially after spring storms.

  18. The Microbiome of Eucalyptus Roots under Different Management Conditions and Its Potential for Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Eduardo da Siva; Peixoto, Raquel Silva; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; Balieiro, Fabiano de Carvalho; Tiedje, James M; Rachid, Caio Tavora Coelho da Costa

    2017-06-21

    Eucalyptus plantations offer a cost-effective and renewable source of raw material. There is substantial interest in improving forestry production, especially through sustainable strategies such as the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria. However, little is known about Eucalyptus microbiology. In this study, the endophytic bacterial community was assessed in Eucalyptus urograndis roots using culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques with plants grown under different conditions. Three phyla accounted for approximately 95% of the community, with Actinobacteria corresponding to approximately 59%. This contrasts with previous studies in which Actinobacteria accounted for only 5 to 10%. Our data also revealed a high diversity of bacteria, with 359 different genera but a high level of dominance. Six genera, Mycobacterium, Bradyrhizobium, Streptomyces, Bacillus, Actinospica, and Burkholderia, accounted for more than 50% of the classified sequences. We observed a significant influence of the treatments on some genera, causing changes in the bacterial community structure. The obtained data also suggest that Eucalyptus may benefit from biological nitrogen fixation, with many abundant genera being closely related to nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Using N-depleted media, we also cultured 95 bacterial isolates, of which 24 tested positive for the nifH gene and were able to maintain growth without any N source in the medium.

  19. Improved Productivity of Neutral Lipids in Chlorella sp. A2 by Minimal Nitrogen Supply

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Junying; Chen, Weixian; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Xin; He, Chenliu; Rong, Junfeng; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen starvation is an efficient environmental pressure for increasing lipid accumulation in microalgae, but it could also significantly lower the biomass productivity, resulting in lower lipid productivity. In this study, green alga Chlorella sp. A2 was cultivated by using a minimal nitrogen supply strategy under both laboratory and outdoor cultivation conditions to evaluate biomass accumulation and lipid production. Results showed that minimal nitrogen supply could promote neutral lipid accumulation of Chlorella sp. A2 without a significant negative effect on cell growth. In laboratory cultivation mode, alga cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition could generate 74 and 416% (w/w) more neutral lipid productivity than cells cultured with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. In outdoor cultivation mode, lipid productivity of cells cultured with 18 mg L−1 d−1 urea addition is approximately 10 and 88% higher than the one with regular BG11 and nitrogen starvation media, respectively. Notably, the results of photosynthetic analysis clarified that minimal nitrogen supply reduced the loss of photosynthetic capacity to keep CO2 fixation during photosynthesis for biomass production. The minimal nitrogen supply strategy for microalgae cultivation could promote neutral lipid accumulation without a significant negative effect on cell growth, resulting in a significant improvement in the lipid productivity. PMID:27148237

  20. Discriminating tropical grass ( Cenchrus ciliaris) canopies grown under different nitrogen treatments using spectroradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Skidmore, Andrew K.; van Wieren, Sipke

    Techniques for estimating and mapping pasture quality are critical for a better understanding of wildlife and livestock grazing patterns. Nitrogen is one of the most important elements that determine quality in plants. We assessed the potential to discriminate differences in nitrogen concentration using high-resolution reflectance by growing Cenchrus ciliaris grass with different fertilization treatments in a greenhouse. Canopy spectral measurements from each treatment were taken under controlled laboratory conditions within a period of 4 weeks using a GER 3700 spectroradiometer. Results show that there were statistically significant differences in spectral reflectance between treatments within certain wavelength regions—an encouraging result for classifying and mapping grasslands with different levels of nutrients using hyperspectral remote sensing. We further investigated the effect of varying nitrogen supply to a specific absorption feature in the visible between 550 and 750 nm (R 550- 750) using continuum-removed spectra. Results show that the high nitrogen treatment had deeper and wider absorption pits as compared to the low nitrogen treatment as well as the control (no nitrogen), which is important for the prediction of nitrogen in grass canopies. This is a promising result for the remote sensing of canopy chemistry since emphasis can be shifted from the mid-infrared region (which is highly masked by water absorption) to the visible region. Overall, the results provide the possibility to map variation in pasture quality using hyperspectral remote sensing.

  1. Genetic Improvement in Short-Season Soybeans: II. Nitrogen Accumulation, Remobilization, and Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Kumudini, S.; Hume, D. J.; Chu, G.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic improvement in yield is conditional on surmounting yield-limiting factors. Nitrogen (N) has been considered an important limiting factor to soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] yield. The high demand for N by soybean seed was previously considered to lead to early leaf senescence through accelerated remobilization of N from the vegetative tissue. The consequent reduction in photosynthetic capacity was postulated to limit yield. The objectives of the current experiment were to determine the changes in N accumulation, remobilization, and partitioning associated with genetic yield improvement. Two groups of old, low-yielding ('Pagoda' and 'Mandarin Ottawa') and new, high-yielding ('Maple Glen' and 'OAC Bayfield') soybean cultivars of similar maturity were grown in side-by-side trials at the Elora Research Station, Ontario, in 1996 and 1997. Nitrogen and dry matter accumulation in leaf, stem + petiole, roots, and seeds were determined during the growing season. The newer cultivars had higher yields and higher seed N content. Contrary to the postulated association between leaf senescence and leaf N values, neither leaf N concentration nor leaf N content per unit leaf area (at R6) were association consistently with either yield or leaf area duration (LAD). Although most of the N in the seed was derived from N remobilized from vegetative tissue, the newer cultivars with their higher yields and LAD, remobilized no more N out of the vegetative tissue than did older, lower-yielding ones. The newer cultivars were distinct from their older counterparts in their ability to accumulate more N during the seed filling period (SFP). Genetic improvement of the short-season soybeans tested was a consequence of continued N accumulation during the SFP and was not due to differences in the genotype's capacity to remobilize or partition N to the seed.

  2. [Effects of different fertilization modes on vegetable growth, fertilizer nitrogen utilization, and nitrogen loss from vegetable field].

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-feng; Wang, Guo; Li, Wei-hua; Qiu, Xiao-xuan

    2009-03-01

    A field experiment with Chinese cabbage, water spinach, and three-colored amaranth cropped three times in one year was conducted to study the effects of seven fertilization modes, i.e., none fertilization, basal application of chemical fertilizers, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers, basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide, 1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure, and basal application of organic manure, on the plant height, yield, nitrogen accumulation, and fertilizer nitrogen utilization of the vegetables, and the loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N from vegetable field under natural rainfall condition. The results showed that comparing with none fertilization, the fertilization modes '1/2 basal application and 1/2 top-dressing of chemical fertilizers and organic manure' and 'basal application of chemical fertilizers and dicyandiamide' improved the agronomic properties of test vegetables, increased their yields by 103%-219% and 93%-226%, and nitrogen accumulation by 153% -216% and 231%-320%, respectively, and enhanced fertilizer nitrogen utilization rate. They also decreased the surface runoff loss of NO3- -N and NH4+ -N by 48.1% and 46.5%, respectively, compared with the mode 'basal application of chemical fertilizers', and hence, reduced the risk of agricultural non-point pollution. Therefore, these two fertilization modes could be popularized in vegetable production.

  3. Characterizing Denitrification Hot Spots and Hot Moments to Improve Understanding in a Mass Balance Approach to the Nitrogen Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. K.; Barclay, J. R.; Anderson, T. R.; Walter, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Several transformation processes of the nitrogen cycle control the availability of this primary nutrient to living organisms. Understanding the multiple processes that take place in the vadose zone is critical to developing management strategies, predicting air and aquatic impacts, and maximizing functionality of landscapes. The mass balance approach to studying the nitrogen cycle is useful in quantifying rates of these processes. In combination with field measurements, hypotheses about the rates of difficult-to-measure processes such as denitrification (DN), can be tested. In this study we extend the mass balance approach to investigate the significance of DN hot spots and hot moments on aggregate DN. Often in nitrogen balance approaches, DN is treated as the residual difference of the outputs and inputs derived from field measurements and farm management records. However, this provides little information about when and where DN occurs and assumes the remainder nitrogen is associated with this process. In this project we compare two methods of calculating DN as part of a farm nitrogen balance study. Method one uses an empirical relationship derived from in-situ DN measurements related to a soil topographic index. Method two characterizes the process with a model that tracks temperature, carbon availability, and soil moisture and is calibrated with in-situ DN measurements. When the nitrogen output by DN was calculated, both methods were successful in coming closer to closing the farm nitrogen balance. Results from method one identify annual hot spots of denitrification, while method two improves characterization of the daily hot moments of denitrification.

  4. Understanding nitrate uptake, signaling and remobilisation for improving plant nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya

    2017-08-28

    The majority of terrestrial plants use nitrate as their main source of nitrogen. Nitrate also acts as an important signalling molecule in vital physiological processes required for optimum plant growth and development. Improving nitrate uptake and transport, through activation by nitrate sensing, signalling and regulatory processes, would enhance plant growth, resulting in improved crop yields. The increased remobilisation of nitrate, and assimilated nitrogenous compounds, from source to sink tissues further ensures higher yields and quality. An updated knowledge of various transporters, genes, activators, and microRNAs, involved in nitrate uptake, transport, remobilisation, and nitrate-mediated root growth, is presented. An enhanced understanding of these components will allow for their orchestrated fine tuning in efforts to improving nitrogen use efficiency in plants. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Proteomics of rice leaf and grain at late growth stage under different nitrogen fertilization levels].

    PubMed

    Ning, Shu-ju; Zhao, Min; Xiang, Xiao-liang; Wei, Dao-zhi

    2010-10-01

    Taking super-rice Liangyoupeijiu as test material, and by the method of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), this paper studied the changes in the leaf and grain proteomics of the variety at its late growth stage under different levels of nitrogen fertilization (1/2 times of normal nitrogen level, 20 mg x L(-1); normal nitrogen level, 40 mg x L(-1); 2 times of normal nitrogen level, 80 mg x L(-1)), with the biological functions of 16 leaf proteins, 9 inferior grain proteins, and 4 superior grain proteins identified and analyzed. Nitrogen fertilization could affect and regulate the plant photosynthesis via affecting the activation of photosynthesis-related enzymes and of CO2, the light system unit, and the constitution of electron transfer chain at the late growth stage of the variety. It could also promote the expression of the enzymes related to the energy synthesis and growth in inferior grains. High nitrogen fertilization level was not beneficial to the synthesis of starch in superior grain, but sufficient nitrogen supply was still important for the substance accumulation and metabolism. Therefore, rational nitrogen fertilization could increase the photosynthesis rate of flag leaves, enhance the source function, delay the functional early ageing, and promote the grain-filling at late growth stage.

  6. Nitrogen Metabolism in Adaptation of Photosynthesis to Water Stress in Rice Grown under Different Nitrogen Levels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chu; Cao, Xiaochuang; Hu, Jijie; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Huang, Jianliang; Jin, Qianyu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the role of nitrogen (N) metabolism in the adaptation of photosynthesis to water stress in rice, a hydroponic experiment supplying with low N (0.72 mM), moderate N (2.86 mM), and high N (7.15 mM) followed by 150 g⋅L(-1) PEG-6000 induced water stress was conducted in a rainout shelter. Water stress induced stomatal limitation to photosynthesis at low N, but no significant effect was observed at moderate and high N. Non-photochemical quenching was higher at moderate and high N. In contrast, relative excessive energy at PSII level (EXC) was declined with increasing N level. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents were in parallel with EXC. Water stress decreased catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities at low N, resulting in increased H2O2 content and severer membrane lipid peroxidation; whereas the activities of antioxidative enzymes were increased at high N. In accordance with photosynthetic rate and antioxidative enzymes, water stress decreased the activities of key enzymes involving in N metabolism such as glutamate synthase and glutamate dehydrogenase, and photorespiratory key enzyme glycolate oxidase at low N. Concurrently, water stress increased nitrate content significantly at low N, but decreased nitrate content at moderate and high N. Contrary to nitrate, water stress increased proline content at moderate and high N. Our results suggest that N metabolism appears to be associated with the tolerance of photosynthesis to water stress in rice via affecting CO2 diffusion, antioxidant capacity, and osmotic adjustment.

  7. Modelling nitrogen retention in floodplains with different degrees of degradation for three large rivers in Germany.

    PubMed

    Natho, S; Venohr, M; Henle, K; Schulz-Zunkel, C

    2013-06-15

    Floodplains perform a variety of ecosystem functions and services - more than many other ecosystems. One of these ecosystem services is the reduction in nitrogen (N) loads and a subsequent improvement to the water quality. Since diffuse and also point nitrogen sources continue to cause a variety of problems in rivers and floodplains, inundated floodplains could act as net sinks for N and are therefore of great importance throughout Germany and Europe. This study analyses the effects of riparian floodplains on N-retention on the landscape scale for three large river systems with different degrees of degradation. Two approaches, differing in terms of the complexity of their respective input data and methods, were applied under wet and dry conditions. Whereas the proxy-based approach considers proxy values for N-retention, the model-based approach accounts for event-driven dynamic input data such as the extent of the inundated floodplain and incoming loads. Comparing the results of the two approaches it can be observed that floodplains of the near-natural river can retain up to 4% of the river load under wet conditions. During such conditions N-retention in floodplains is similar to that of rivers. For the two other floodplains, the results of the two approaches were quite different, showing lower N-retention capacities. However, for these floodplains as well, both approaches are suitable for calculating measurable N-retention rates, which is an important result because it also suggests that even degraded floodplains still preserve this particular ecosystem function and therefore still contribute to improving the quality of river water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  9. Interspecific difference in the photosynthesis-nitrogen relationship: patterns, physiological causes, and ecological importance.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Kouki

    2004-12-01

    The photosynthesis-nitrogen relationship is significantly different among species. Photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf nitrogen, termed as photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUE), has been considered an important leaf trait to characterise species in relation to their leaf economics, physiology, and strategy. In this review, I discuss (1) relations between PNUE and species ecology, (2) physiological causes and (3) ecological implications of the interspecific difference in PNUE. Species with a high PNUE tend to have high growth rates and occur in disturbed or high productivity habitats, while those with a low PNUE occur in stressful or low productivity habitats. PNUE is an important leaf trait that correlates with other leaf traits, such as leaf mass per area (LMA) and leaf life span, irrespective of life form, phylogeny, and biomes. Various factors are involved in the interspecific difference. In particular, nitrogen allocation within leaves and the mesophyll conductance for CO(2) diffusion are important. To produce tough leaves, plants need to allocate more biomass and nitrogen to make thick cell walls, leading to a reduction in the mesophyll conductance and in nitrogen allocation to the photosynthetic apparatus. Allocation of biomass and nitrogen to cell walls may cause the negative relationship between PNUE and LMA. Since plants cannot maximise both PNUE and leaf toughness, there is a trade-off between photosynthesis and persistence, which enables the existence of species with various leaf characteristics on the earth.

  10. Improvement of wine terroir management according to biogeochemical cycle of nitrogen in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najat, Nassr; Aude, Langenfeld; Mohammed, Benbrahim; Lionel, Ley; Laurent, Deliere; Jean-Pascal, Goutouly; David, Lafond; Marie, Thiollet-Scholtus

    2015-04-01

    Good wine terroir production implies a well-balanced Biogeochemical Cycle of Nitrogen (BCN) at field level i.e. in soil and in plant. Nitrogen is very important for grape quality and soil sustainability. The mineralization of organic nitrogen is the main source of mineral nitrogen for the vine. This mineralization depends mainly on the soil microbial activity. This study is focused on the functional microbial populations implicated in the BCN, in particular nitrifying bacteria. An experimental network with 6 vine sites located in Atlantic coast (Loire valley and Bordeaux) and in North-East (Alsace) of France has been set up since 2012. These vine sites represent a diversity of environmental factors (i.e. soil and climate). The adopted approach is based on the measure of several indicators to assess nitrogen dynamic in soil, i.e. nitrogen mineralization, regarding microbial biomass and activity. Statistical analyses are performed to determine the relationship between biological indicator and nitrogen mineralisation regarding farmer's practices. The variability of the BCN indicators seems to be correlated to the physical and chemical parameters in the soil of the field. For all the sites, the bacterial biomass is correlated to the rate and kinetic of nitrogen in soil, however this bioindicator depend also on others parameters. Moreover, the functional bacterial diversity depends on the soil organic matter content. Differences in the bacterial biomass and kinetic of nitrogen mineralization are observed between the sites with clayey (Loire valley site) and sandy soils (Bordeaux site). In some tested vine systems, effects on bacterial activity and nitrogen dynamic are also observed depending on the farmer's practices: soil tillage, reduction of inputs, i.e. pesticides and fertilizers, and soil cover management between rows. The BCN indicators seem to be strong to assess the dynamics of the nitrogen in various sites underline the functional diversity of the soils. These

  11. Post-refining removal of organic nitrogen compounds from diesel fuels to improve environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Mushrush, George W; Quintana, Marian A; Bauserman, Joy W; Willauer, Heather D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to remove the organic nitrogen compounds from petroleum-derived diesel fuels. These nitrogen compounds can cause environmental problems, as well as fuel instability problems that can degrade fuels and affect engine performance. Fuels were treated with two different filtering media, activated clay and silica tel. The methylene chloride extracts from both the activated clay and silica gel were subjected to GC/MS analysis. Close to 99% of the total organic nitrogen compounds were removed. About 60% of the nitrogen compounds identified consisted of pyridines, quinolines and tetra-hydroquinolines made up 26%, while indoles and carbazoles about 10% of the total nitrogen compounds. Of the nitrogen heterocyclics identified, indoles and carbazoles were linked to fuel instability reactions. The proposed method was tested on diesels fuels from a variety of countries and found to remove between 97.8 and 99.9% of the N-compounds. The results of this study showed that both of these filtering materials were effective in removing the organic nitrogen compounds and resulted in fuels that exhibited excellent storage stability. These simple filtering methods can be independent of the refining process and do result in an environmentally cleaner burning fuel.

  12. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization on leaf photosynthesis and respiration of different drought-resistance winter wheat varieties].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xucheng; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2006-11-01

    Under field condition, this paper measured the leaf gas exchange parameters and photosynthetic pigments content of different drought-resistance wheat varieties at all growth stages, with their responses to different nitrogen fertilization levels studied. The results showed that in treatment N180, the leaf G(s), P(n), and total photosynthetic pigments content of dry land varieties increased by 43.75%, 18.54% and 49.66% , while those of watered land varieties increased by 12.12% , 20.88% and 29.25%, respectively, compared with control. On the contrary, the respiration rate of dry land and watered land varieties decreased by 4.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Nitrogen supply accelerated the photosynthetic carbon assimilation, because the gas exchange capacity and photosynthetic pigments content increased while the respiration rate decreased with increasing nitrogen supply. The difference in photosynthetic capacity between different winter varieties was mainly dependent on non - stomatal factors. The dry land varieties had higher capacities of light energy absorption and photosynthetic carbon assimilation, because they had higher leaf photosynthetic pigments content but lower respiration rate. Compared with watered land varieties, dry land varieties had an 8.9% decrease of respiration rate and a 14.12% increase of P(n). At the same growth stage, the photosynthetic and respiration rates in the control varied consistently, while in treatments N180 and N360, the photosynthetic rate increased but the respiration rate decreased. Nitrogen fertilization promoted the absorbed light energy allocating to the process of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. It could be concluded that nitrogen supply was favorable to the improvement of winter wheat drought-resistance, because it could improve leaf gas exchange capacity, increase leaf photosynthetic pigments content, and optimize the allocation of absorbed light energy.

  13. Manipulation of microRNA expression to improve nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jeffrey J; Beatty, Perrin H; Good, Allen G; Muench, Douglas G

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen is the key limiting nutrient required for plant growth. The application of nitrogen-based fertilizers to crops has risen dramatically in recent years, resulting in significant yield increases. However, increased production has come at the cost of substantial negative environmental consequences. Higher crop production costs, increased consumption of food and fertilizer, and a growing global population have led to calls for a "second green revolution" using modern genetic manipulation techniques to improve the production, yield, and quality of crops. Considerable research is being directed toward the study and engineering of nitrogen use efficiency in crop plants. The end goal is to reduce the amount of nitrogen-based fertilizer used and thereby reduce production costs and environmental damage while increasing yields. In this review, we present an overview of recent advances in understanding the regulation of nitrogen metabolism by the action of microRNAs with a view toward engineering crops with increased nitrogen use efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of injection pressure difference on droplet size distribution and spray cone angle in spray cooling of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiufang; Xue, Rong; Ruan, Yixiao; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xingqun; Hou, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Spray cooling with liquid nitrogen as the working fluid has been widely employed in a plenty of fields requiring cooling at cryogenic temperature, such as the cryogenic wind tunnels and cooling super-conducting magnets. In this study, we built a liquid nitrogen spray system and experimentally investigated the influence of injection pressure difference on the droplet size distribution and the spray cone angle. The measurements using particle size analyser show increasing the injection pressure difference improves the atomization, as indicated by the homogenization and reduction of the droplet size. The initial spray cone angle is insensitive to the injection pressure difference. However, the far-field spray cone angle decreases dramatically with increasing the injection pressure difference. The results could enrich our knowledge of spray cooling of cryogenic fluids and benefit the design of cryogenic spray cooling systems.

  15. Improved diffusion methods for nitrogen and 15nitrogen analysis of Kjeldahl digests.

    PubMed

    Stevens, W B; Mulvaney, R L; Khan, S A; Hoeft, R G

    2000-01-01

    Simple methods are described that permit the use of either H3BO3 indicator solution or acidified filter disks to collect NH3 liberated by treatment of Kjeldahl digests with NaOH. These methods incorporate modifications to improve reliability, analytical capacity, and convenience. A semimicro digest was diluted to 25 mL with deionized water, and a 10 mL aliquot, containing up to 4 mg N (150 microg N for diffusions into acidified disks), was transferred to a shell vial, which was placed inside a 473 mL (1 pint) Mason jar containing 10 mL 10N NaOH. The NH3 liberated by overturning the vial was collected after 12 to 48 h at ambient temperature, or after 4 h at 45 to 50 degrees C on a hotplate, for quantitative and/or isotope-ratio analyses. With either H3BO3 indicator solution or acidified filter disks, recovery of diffused N was quantitative. Isotope-ratio analyses of diffused N from 15N-labeled chemical, plant, and soil samples were within 3% of analyses using steam distillation.

  16. [Effects of different nitrogen forms and their ratios on broccoli yield, quality, and nutrient absorption].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-Fan; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yu, Ji-Hua; Yang, Hai-Xing; Shi, Gui-Ying; Ma, Yan-Xia; Li, Jie

    2013-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different nitrogen forms ((NH2)2CO-N, NO(3-)-N, NH(4+)-N, and NO(3-)-NH4+) and their ratios on the yield formation, quality, and nutrient (N, P, and K) absorption of broccoli (Brassica oleracea). Fertilization with NO(3-)-N increased the accumulation of nitrate and soluble sugars in ball flower. When the NO(3-)-N: NH(4+)-N ratio was ranged from 3:7 to 5:5 and from 5:5 to 7:3, respectively, the accumulation of nitrate in the ball flower was reduced, while the soluble sugars content was promoted. Fertilization with (NH2)2CO-N and NH(4+)-N was conducive to the improvement of Vc content in the ball flower. N fertilization increased the accumulation of N, P, and K in plants, with the highest contents of N, P, and K observed at rosette stage. Throughout the entire growth period, NH(4+)-N fertilization improved the plant N content, whereas NO(3-)-N fertilization improved the plant K content. At different growth stages, the effects of different N sources on plant P content varied. As compared with applying single N forms, the NO(3-)-N:NH(4+)-N ratio ranged from 3:7 to 5:5 could improve the yield significantly. It was suggested that a combined application of NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N with an appropriate ratio could improve the productivity, quality, and economic return of broccoli.

  17. Nitrogen removal through different pathways in an aged refuse bioreactor treating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Lv, Zhuo; Hu, Chong; Yang, Xuezhi; Li, Xiangzhen

    2013-10-01

    In this study, an aged refuse bioreactor was constructed to remove nitrogen in a mature landfill leachate. The nitrogen removal efficiency and the microbial community composition in the bioreactor were investigated. The results showed that the aged refuse bioreactor removed more than 90 % of total nitrogen in the leachate under the nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 0.74 g/kg (vs) day, and the total nitrogen removal rate decreased to 62.2 % when NLR increased up to 2.03 g/kg (vs) day. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the average cell number of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the bioreactor was 1.58 × 10(8) cells/g, which accounted for 0.41 % of total bacteria. The number of anammox bacteria in the reactor was 1.09 × 10(8) cells/g, which accounted for 0.27 % of total bacteria. Isotopic (15)N tracing experiments showed that nearly 10 % of nitrogen was removed by anammox. High-throughout 454 pyrosequencing revealed that the predominant bacteria in the bioreactor were Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Gemmatimonadetes, including various nitrifiers and denitrifiers with diverse heterotrophic and autotrophic metabolic pathways, supporting that nitrogen was removed through different pathways in this aged refuse bioreactor.

  18. The nitrogen budget for different forest types in the central Congo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Marijn; Verbeeck, Hans; Cizungu, Landry; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of fundamental processes in different forest types is vital to understand the interaction of forests with their changing environment. Recent data analyses, as well as modeling activities have shown that the CO2 uptake by terrestrial ecosystems strongly depends on site fertility, i.e. nutrient availability. Accurate projections of future net forest growth and terrestrial CO2 uptake thus necessitate an improved understanding on nutrient cycles and how these are coupled to the carbon (C) cycle in forests. This holds especially for tropical forests, since they represent about 40-50% of the total carbon that is stored in terrestrial vegetation, with the Amazon basin and the Congo basin being the largest two contiguous blocks. However, due to political instability and reduced accessibility in the central Africa region, there is a strong bias in scientific research towards the Amazon basin. Consequently, central African forests are poorly characterized and their role in global change interactions shows distinct knowledge gaps, which is important bottleneck for all efforts to further optimize Earth system models explicitly including this region. Research in the Congo Basin region should combine assessments of both carbon stocks and the underlying nutrient cycles which directly impact the forest productivity. We set up a monitoring network for carbon stocks and nitrogen fluxes in four different forest types in the Congo Basin, which is now operative. With the preliminary data, we can get a glimpse of the differences in nitrogen budget and biogeochemistry of African mixed lowland rainforest, monodominant lowland forest, mixed montane forest and eucalypt plantations.

  19. A Novel Remote Sensing Approach for Prediction of Maize Yield Under Different Conditions of Nitrogen Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Díaz, Omar; Zaman-Allah, Mainassara A.; Masuka, Benhildah; Hornero, Alberto; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Prasanna, Boddupalli M.; Cairns, Jill E.; Araus, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Maize crop production is constrained worldwide by nitrogen (N) availability and particularly in poor tropical and subtropical soils. The development of affordable high-throughput crop monitoring and phenotyping techniques is key to improving maize cultivation under low-N fertilization. In this study several vegetation indices (VIs) derived from Red-Green-Blue (RGB) digital images at the leaf and canopy levels are proposed as low-cost tools for plant breeding and fertilization management. They were compared with the performance of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) measured at ground level and from an aerial platform, as well as with leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) and other leaf composition and structural parameters at flowering stage. A set of 10 hybrids grown under five different nitrogen regimes and adequate water conditions were tested at the CIMMYT station of Harare (Zimbabwe). Grain yield and leaf N concentration across N fertilization levels were strongly predicted by most of these RGB indices (with R2~ 0.7), outperforming the prediction power of the NDVI and LCC. RGB indices also outperformed the NDVI when assessing genotypic differences in grain yield and leaf N concentration within a given level of N fertilization. The best predictor of leaf N concentration across the five N regimes was LCC but its performance within N treatments was inefficient. The leaf traits evaluated also seemed inefficient as phenotyping parameters. It is concluded that the adoption of RGB-based phenotyping techniques may significantly contribute to the progress of plant breeding and the appropriate management of fertilization. PMID:27242867

  20. Improvement of crop yield in dry environments: benchmarks, levels of organisation and the role of nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Sadras, V O; Richards, R A

    2014-05-01

    Crop yield in dry environments can be improved with complementary approaches including selecting for yield in the target environments, selecting for yield potential, and using indirect, trait- or genomic-based methods. This paper (i) outlines the achievements of direct selection for yield in improving drought adaptation, (ii) discusses the limitations of indirect approaches in the context of levels of organization, and (iii) emphasizes trade-offs and synergies between nitrogen nutrition and drought adaptation. Selection for yield in the water- and nitrogen-scarce environments of Australia improved wheat yield per unit transpiration at a rate of 0.12kg ha(-1) mm(-1) yr(-1); for indirect methods to be justified, they must return superior rates of improvement, achieve the same rate at lower cost or provide other cost-effective benefits, such as expanding the genetic basis for selection. Slow improvement of crop adaptation to water stress using indirect methods is partially related to issues of scale. Traits are thus classified into three broad groups: those that generally scale up from low levels of organization to the crop level (e.g. herbicide resistance), those that do not (e.g. grain yield), and traits that might scale up provided they are considered in a integrated manner with scientifically sound scaling assumptions, appropriate growing conditions, and screening techniques (e.g. stay green). Predicting the scalability of traits may help to set priorities in the investment of research efforts. Primary productivity in arid and semi-arid environments is simultaneously limited by water and nitrogen, but few attempts are made to target adaptation to water and nitrogen stress simultaneously. Case studies in wheat and soybean highlight biological links between improved nitrogen nutrition and drought adaptation.

  1. Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-02-09

    Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

  2. Use of GIS-based site-specific nitrogen management for improving energy efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen (N) is a significant energy component of in support of crop production but it can be highly variable within fields. To our knowledge, no efforts have been made to employ GIS-based site-specific N management (SSNM) to assess and improve energy costs and efficiency. We examine recent SSNM ca...

  3. Suitability of different growth substrates as source of nitrogen for sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dev, Subhabrata; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Jayanta

    2015-11-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) mediated treatment of acid mine drainage is considered as a globally accepted technology. However, inadequate information on the role of nitrogen source in the augmentation of SRB significantly affects the overall treatment process. Sustenance of SRB depends on suitable nitrogen source which is considered as an important nutrient. This review focuses on the different nitrogen rich growth substrates for their effectiveness to support SRB growth and sulfate reduction in passive bioreactors. Compounds like NH4Cl, NH4HCO3, NO3 (-), aniline, tri-nitrotoluene, cornsteep liquor, peptone, urea, and chitin are reported to have served as nitrogen source for SRB. In association with fermentative bacteria, SRB can metabolize these complex compounds to NH4 (+), amines, and amino acids. After incorporation into cells, these compounds take part in the biosynthesis of nucleic acids, amino acids and enzyme co-factor. This work describes the status of current and the probable directions of the future research.

  4. Improved Exciton Dissociation at Semiconducting Polymer:ZnO Donor:Acceptor Interfaces via Nitrogen Doping of ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Kevin P; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Hoye, Robert L Z; Sadhanala, Aditya; Muñoz-Rojas, David; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L; Friend, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Exciton dissociation at the zinc oxide/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (ZnO/P3HT) interface as a function of nitrogen doping of the zinc oxide, which decreases the electron concentration from approximately 1019 cm−3 to 1017 cm−3, is reported. Exciton dissociation and device photocurrent are strongly improved with nitrogen doping. This improved dissociation of excitons in the conjugated polymer is found to result from enhanced light-induced de-trapping of electrons from the surface of the nitrogen-doped ZnO. The ability to improve the surface properties of ZnO by introducing a simple nitrogen dopant has general applicability. PMID:25520604

  5. [Measurement difference in paddy field nitrogen leakage by using different type lysimeters].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mi; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Jing-Ping; Xu, Wei; Ge, Chang-Shui; Chen, Wen-Yue

    2009-05-01

    Vertical and 'T' types of lysimeter were used to measure the concentrations of ammonia N, nitrate N, and total nitrogen (TN) in the leakage of paddy field in rice growth season under different N application levels. For ammonia N, its concentration measured with these two types of lysimeter all ranged in 0-8 mg x L(-1) in 2007 and 0-4 mg x L(-1) in 2006; for nitrate N, its concentration measured with vertical lysimeter was 0-4 mg x L(-1) in 2007 and basically the same in 2006, while that measured with 'T' type lysimeter was 0-20 mg x L(-1) in 2007 but lower in 2006. The TN concentration in the leakage was 0-60 mg x L(-1) in 2007, much higher than that (0-16 mg x L(-1)) in 2006. In the leakage, nitrate N was the dominant N form. The total leakage loss of N in whole rice growth season in 2007 was 15.81 kg x hm(-2) of TN and 9.33 kg x hm(-2) of nitrate N when measured with vertical lysimeter, and 7.21 kg x hm(-2) of TN and 4.25 kg x hm(-2) of nitrate N when measured with 'T' type lysimeter. Due to the difference in the pathways of ammonia-N and nitrate-N leakage, different methods for calculating N leakage should be employed when using the two types of lysimeter in measurement. The N leakage measured by vertical lysimeter was more close to that estimated by paddy plot-leaching measurement method.

  6. Farm nitrogen balances in six European landscapes as an indicator for nitrogen losses and basis for improved management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Bienkowski, J. F.; Bleeker, A.; Dragosits, U.; Drouet, J. L.; Durand, P.; Frumau, A.; Hutchings, N. J.; Kedziora, A.; Magliulo, V.; Olesen, J. E.; Theobald, M. R.; Maury, O.; Akkal, N.; Cellier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Improved management of nitrogen (N) in agriculture is necessary to achieve a sustainable balance between the production of food and other biomass, and the unwanted effects of N on water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity deterioration and human health. To analyse farm N-losses and the complex interactions within farming systems, efficient methods for identifying emissions hotspots and evaluating mitigation measures are therefore needed. The present paper aims to fill this gap at the farm and landscape scales. Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm N balances, N surpluses and for evaluating uncertainty for the 222 farms and 11 440 ha of farmland included in the study. In all landscapes, a large variation in the farm N surplus was found, and thereby a large potential for reductions. The highest average N surpluses were found in the most livestock-intensive landscapes of IT, FR, and NL; on average 202 ± 28, 179 ± 63 and 178 ± 20 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively. All landscapes showed hotspots, especially from livestock farms, including a special UK case with large-scale landless poultry farming. Overall, the average N surplus from the land-based UK farms dominated by extensive sheep and cattle grazing was only 31 ± 10 kg N ha-1 yr-1, but was similar to the N surplus of PL and DK (122 ± 20 and 146 ± 55 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively) when landless poultry farming was included. We found farm N balances to be a useful indicator for N losses and the potential for improving N management. Significant correlations to N surplus were found, both with ammonia air concentrations and nitrate concentrations in soils and groundwater, measured during the period of N management data collection in the landscapes from 2007-2009. This indicates that farm N surpluses may be used as an

  7. Static magnetic field treatment of seeds improves carbon and nitrogen metabolism under salinity stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Baghel, Lokesh; Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, Kadur Narayan

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness of magnetopriming was assessed for alleviation of salt-induced adverse effects on soybean growth. Soybean seeds were pre-treated with static magnetic field (SMF) of 200 mT for 1 h to evaluate the effect of magnetopriming on growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, and yield of soybean plants under different salinity levels (0, 25, and 50 mM NaCl). The adverse effect of NaCl-induced salt stress was found on growth, yield, and various physiological attributes of soybeans. Results indicate that SMF pre-treatment significantly increased plant growth attributes, number of root nodules, nodules, fresh weight, biomass accumulation, and photosynthetic performance under both non-saline and saline conditions as compared to untreated seeds. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence (OJIP) transients from magnetically treated plants gave a higher fluorescence yield at J-I-P phase. Nitrate reductase activity, PIABS , photosynthetic pigments, and net rate of photosynthesis were also higher in plants that emerged from SMF pre-treated seeds as compared to untreated seeds. Leghemoglobin content and hemechrome content in root nodules were also increased by SMF pre-treatment. Thus pre-sowing exposure of seeds to SMF enhanced carbon and nitrogen metabolism and improved the yield of soybeans in terms of number of pods, number of seeds, and seed weight under saline as well as non-saline conditions. Consequently, SMF pre-treatment effectively mitigated adverse effects of NaCl on soybeans. It indicates that magnetopriming of dry soybean seeds can be effectively used as a pre-sowing treatment for alleviating salinity stress. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:455-470, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cytokinin-dependent improvement in transgenic P(SARK)::IPT tobacco under nitrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Wilhelmi, María Del Mar; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Eva; Rosales, Miguel Angel; Blasco, Begoña; Rios, Juan Jose; Romero, Luis; Blumwald, Eduardo; Ruiz, Juan Manuel

    2011-10-12

    Wild-type (WT) and transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing isopentenyltransferase (IPT), a gene coding the rate-limiting step in cytokinin (CKs) synthesis, were grown under limited nitrogen (N) conditions to evaluate the role of CKs in NUE (N-use efficiency) and in different parameters that determine the quality of tobacco leaves. The results indicate that WT tobacco plants submitted to N deficiency show a decline in the leaf/root ratio, associated with a decrease in the NUE and in tobacco-leaf quality, defined by an increase in the quantity of nicotine. On the contrary, the transgenic plants submitted to N deficiency maintained the leaf/root ratio, presenting a higher NUE and greater quality of tobacco leaves than the WT plants, as the latter showed reduced nicotine and an increase in reducing sugars under severe N-deficiency conditions. Therefore, the overexpression of CKs under N deficiency could be a useful tool to improve tobacco cultivation, given that it could reduce N-fertilizer application and thereby provide economic savings and environmental benefits, maintaining yield and improving tobacco leaf quality.

  9. Responses of Nitrogen Utilization and Apparent Nitrogen Loss to Different Control Measures in the Wheat and Maize Rotation System.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhengping; Liu, Yanan; Li, Yingchun; Abawi, Yahya; Wang, Yanqun; Men, Mingxin; An-Vo, Duc-Anh

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and excessive application rates can decrease crop yield and increase N loss into the environment. Field experiments were carried out to understand the effects of N fertilizers on N utilization, crop yield and net income in wheat and maize rotation system of the North China Plain (NCP). Compared to farmers' N rate (FN), the yield of wheat and maize in reduction N rate by 21-24% based on FN (RN) was improved by 451 kg ha(-1), N uptakes improved by 17 kg ha(-1) and net income increased by 1671 CNY ha(-1), while apparent N loss was reduced by 156 kg ha(-1). The controlled-release fertilizer with a 20% reduction of RN (CRF80%), a 20% reduction of RN together with dicyandiamide (RN80%+DCD) and a 20% reduction of RN added with nano-carbon (RN80%+NC) all resulted in an improvement in crop yield and decreased the apparent N losses compared to RN. Contrasted with RN80%+NC, the total crop yield in RN80%+DCD improved by 1185 kg ha(-1), N uptake enhanced by 9 kg ha(-1) and net income increased by 3929 CNY ha(-1), while apparent N loss was similar. Therefore, a 37-39% overall decrease in N rate compared to farmers plus the nitrification inhibitor, DCD, was effective N control measure that increased crop yields, enhanced N efficiencies, and improved economic benefits, while mitigating apparent N loss. There is considerable scope for improved N use effieincy in the intensive wheat -maize rotation of the NCP.

  10. Responses of Nitrogen Utilization and Apparent Nitrogen Loss to Different Control Measures in the Wheat and Maize Rotation System

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhengping; Liu, Yanan; Li, Yingchun; Abawi, Yahya; Wang, Yanqun; Men, Mingxin; An-Vo, Duc-Anh

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and excessive application rates can decrease crop yield and increase N loss into the environment. Field experiments were carried out to understand the effects of N fertilizers on N utilization, crop yield and net income in wheat and maize rotation system of the North China Plain (NCP). Compared to farmers’ N rate (FN), the yield of wheat and maize in reduction N rate by 21–24% based on FN (RN) was improved by 451 kg ha-1, N uptakes improved by 17 kg ha-1 and net income increased by 1671 CNY ha-1, while apparent N loss was reduced by 156 kg ha-1. The controlled-release fertilizer with a 20% reduction of RN (CRF80%), a 20% reduction of RN together with dicyandiamide (RN80%+DCD) and a 20% reduction of RN added with nano-carbon (RN80%+NC) all resulted in an improvement in crop yield and decreased the apparent N losses compared to RN. Contrasted with RN80%+NC, the total crop yield in RN80%+DCD improved by 1185 kg ha-1, N uptake enhanced by 9 kg ha-1 and net income increased by 3929 CNY ha-1, while apparent N loss was similar. Therefore, a 37–39% overall decrease in N rate compared to farmers plus the nitrification inhibitor, DCD, was effective N control measure that increased crop yields, enhanced N efficiencies, and improved economic benefits, while mitigating apparent N loss. There is considerable scope for improved N use effieincy in the intensive wheat -maize rotation of the NCP. PMID:28228772

  11. Microcystin-tolerant Rhizobium protects plants and improves nitrogen assimilation in Vicia faba irrigated with microcystin-containing waters.

    PubMed

    Lahrouni, Majida; Oufdou, Khalid; El Khalloufi, Fatima; Benidire, Loubna; Albert, Susann; Göttfert, Michael; Caviedes, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Llorente, Ignacio D; Oudra, Brahim; Pajuelo, Eloísa

    2016-05-01

    Irrigation of crops with microcystins (MCs)-containing waters-due to cyanobacterial blooms-affects plant productivity and could be a way for these potent toxins entering the food chain. This study was performed to establish whether MC-tolerant rhizobia could benefit growth, nodulation, and nitrogen metabolism of faba bean plants irrigated with MC-containing waters. For that, three different rhizobial strains-with different sensitivity toward MCs-were used: RhOF96 (most MC-sensitive strain), RhOF125 (most MC-tolerant strain), or Vicz1.1 (reference strain). As a control, plants grown without rhizobia and fertilized by NH4NO3 were included in the study. MC exposure decreased roots (30-37 %) and shoots (up to 15 %) dry weights in un-inoculated plants, whereas inoculation with rhizobia protects plants toward the toxic effects of MCs. Nodulation and nitrogen content were significantly impaired by MCs, with the exception of plants inoculated with the most tolerant strain RhOF125. In order to deep into the effect of inoculation on nitrogen metabolism, the nitrogen assimilatory enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT)) were investigated: Fertilized plants showed decreased levels (15-30 %) of these enzymes, both in shoots and roots. By contrast, inoculated plants retained the levels of these enzymes in shoots and roots, as well as the levels of NADH-GOGAT activity in nodules. We conclude that the microcystin-tolerant Rhizobium protects faba bean plants and improves nitrogen assimilation when grown in the presence of MCs.

  12. Nitrogen Metabolism in Lactating Goats Fed with Diets Containing Different Protein Sources

    PubMed Central

    Santos, A. B.; Pereira, M. L. A.; Silva, H. G. O.; Pedreira, M. S.; Carvalho, G. G. P.; Ribeiro, L. S. O.; Almeida, P. J. P.; Pereira, T. C. J.; Moreira, J. V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate urea excretion, nitrogen balance and microbial protein synthesis in lactating goats fed with diets containing different protein sources in the concentrate (soybean meal, cottonseed meal, aerial part of cassava hay and leucaena hay). Four Alpine goats whose mean body weight was 42.6±6.1 kg at the beginning of the experiment, a mean lactation period of 94.0±9.0 days and a production of 1.7±0.4 kg of milk were distributed in a 4×4 Latin square with four periods of 15 days. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous, containing 103.0 g/kg of CP, 400 g/kg of Tifton 85 hay and 600 g/kg of concentrate. Diet containing cottonseed meal provided (p<0.05) increased excretion of urea and urea nitrogen in the urine (g/d and mg/kg of BW) when compared with leucaena hay. The diets affected the concentrations of urea nitrogen in plasma (p<0.05) and excretion of urea nitrogen in milk, being that soybean meal and cottonseed meal showed (p<0.05) higher than the average aerial part of the cassava hay. The use of diets with cottonseed meal as protein source in the concentrate in feeding of lactating goats provides greater nitrogen excretion in urine and negative nitrogen balance, while the concentrate with leucaena hay as a source of protein, provides greater ruminal microbial protein synthesis. PMID:25050000

  13. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods.

    PubMed

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands.

  14. Microbial Nitrogen-Cycle Gene Abundance in Soil of Cropland Abandoned for Different Periods

    PubMed Central

    Huhe; Borjigin, Shinchilelt; Buhebaoyin; Wu, Yanpei; Li, Minquan; Cheng, Yunxiang

    2016-01-01

    In Inner Mongolia, steppe grasslands face desertification or degradation because of human overuse and abandonment after inappropriate agricultural management. The soils in these abandoned croplands exist in heterogeneous environments characterized by widely fluctuating microbial growth. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of microbial genes encoding proteins involved in the nitrogen cycle was used to study Azotobacter species, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the soils from steppe grasslands and croplands abandoned for 2, 6, and 26 years. Except for nitrifying archaea and nitrous oxide-reducing bacteria, the relative genotypic abundance of microbial communities involved in nitrogen metabolism differed by approximately 2- to 10-fold between abandoned cropland and steppe grassland soils. Although nitrogen-cycle gene abundances varied with abandonment time, the abundance patterns of nitrogen-cycle genes separated distinctly into abandoned cropland versus light-grazing steppe grassland, despite the lack of any cultivation for over a quarter-century. Plant biomass and plant diversity exerted a significant effect on the abundance of microbial communities that mediate the nitrogen cycle (P < 0.002 and P < 0.03, respectively). The present study elucidates the ecology of bacteria that mediate the nitrogen cycle in recently abandoned croplands. PMID:27140199

  15. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 1: Laboratory measurements at different conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Vakkilainen, E. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-05-01

    Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis is high. There is only minor release during the drying stage. Ammonia is the main fixed nitrogen species formed. The rate of fixed nitrogen release increases with increasing temperature. The level of fixed nitrogen released by birch liquor is almost twice the level for pine liquor. Assuming complete conversion to NO, fixed nitrogen yields gave NO concentrations near typically measured values for flue gases in full scale recovery boilers. The purpose of this work was to gain more detailed information about the behavior of the fuel nitrogen in black liquor combustion. The work focused on the pyrolysis or devolatilization of the combustion process. Devolatilization is the stage at which the majority (typically 50--80%) of the liquor organics release from a fuel particle or droplet as gaseous species due to the rapid destruction of the organic macromolecules in the liquor. In this paper, the authors use the terms devolatilization and pyrolysis interchangeably with no difference in their meaning.

  16. Genome-wide mapping of nucleosome positions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to different nitrogen conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Du, Guocheng; Zou, Huijun; Xie, Guangfa; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhongping; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Well-organized chromatin is involved in a number of various transcriptional regulation and gene expression. We used genome-wide mapping of nucleosomes in response to different nitrogen conditions to determine both nucleosome profiles and gene expression events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nitrogen conditions influence general nucleosome profiles and the expression of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) sensitive genes. The nucleosome occupancy of TATA-containing genes was higher compared to TATA-less genes. TATA-less genes in high or low nucleosome occupancy, showed a significant change in gene coding regions when shifting cells from glutamine to proline as the sole nitrogen resource. Furthermore, a correlation between the expression of nucleosome occupancy induced NCR sensitive genes or TATA containing genes in NCR sensitive genes, and nucleosome prediction were found when cells were cultured in proline or shifting from glutamine to proline as the sole nitrogen source compared to glutamine. These results also showed that variation of nucleosome occupancy accompany with chromatin-dependent transcription factor could influence the expression of a series of genes involved in the specific regulation of nitrogen utilization. PMID:27659668

  17. Herbivore trampling as an alternative pathway for explaining differences in nitrogen mineralization in moist grasslands.

    PubMed

    Schrama, Maarten; Heijning, Pieter; Bakker, Jan P; van Wijnen, Harm J; Berg, Matty P; Olff, Han

    2013-05-01

    Studies addressing the role of large herbivores on nitrogen cycling in grasslands have suggested that the direction of effects depends on soil fertility. Via selection for high quality plant species and input of dung and urine, large herbivores have been shown to speed up nitrogen cycling in fertile grassland soils while slowing down nitrogen cycling in unfertile soils. However, recent studies show that large herbivores can reduce nitrogen mineralization in some temperate fertile soils, but not in others. To explain this, we hypothesize that large herbivores can reduce nitrogen mineralization in loamy or clay soils through soil compaction, but not in sandy soils. Especially under wet conditions, strong compaction in clay soils can lead to periods of soil anoxia, which reduces decomposition of soil organic matter and, hence, N mineralization. In this study, we use a long-term (37-year) field experiment on a salt marsh to investigate the hypothesis that the effect of large herbivores on nitrogen mineralization depends on soil texture. Our results confirm that the presence of large herbivores decreased nitrogen mineralization rate in a clay soil, but not in a sandy soil. By comparing a hand-mown treatment with a herbivore-grazed treatment, we show that these differences can be attributed to herbivore-induced changes in soil physical properties rather than to above-ground biomass removal. On clay soil, we find that large herbivores increase the soil water-filled porosity, induce more negative soil redox potentials, reduce soil macrofauna abundance, and reduce decomposition activity. On sandy soil, we observe no changes in these variables in response to grazing. We conclude that effects of large herbivores on nitrogen mineralization cannot be understood without taking soil texture, soil moisture, and feedbacks through soil macrofauna into account.

  18. Humus and nitrogen in soddy-podzolic soils of different agricultural lands in Perm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zav'yalova, N. E.

    2016-11-01

    Heavy loamy soddy-podzolic soils (Eutric Albic Retisols (Abruptic, Loamic, Cutanic)) under a mixed forest, a grass-herb meadow, a perennial legume crop (fodder galega, Galéga orientalis), and an eightcourse crop rotation (treatment without fertilization) have been characterized by the main fertility parameters. Differences have been revealed in the contents of humus and essential nutrients in the 0- to 20- and 20- to 40-cm layers of soils of the studied agricultural lands. The medium acid reaction and the high content of ash elements and nitrogen in stubble-root residues of legume grasses favor the accumulation of humic acids in the humus of soil under fodder galega; the CHA/CFA ratio is 0.95 in the 0- to 20-cm layer and 0.81 in the 20- to 40-cm layer (under forest, 0.61 and 0.41, respectively). The nitrogen pool in the upper horizon of the studied soddy-podzolic soil includes 61-76% nonhydrolyzable nitrogen and 17-25% difficultly hydrolyzable nitrogen. The content of easily hydrolyzable nitrogen varies depending on the type of agricultural land from 6% in the soil under mixed forest to 10% under crop rotation; the content of mineral nitrogen varies from 0.9 to 1.9%, respectively. The long-term use of plowland in crop rotation and the cultivation of perennial legume crop have increased the content of hydrolyzable nitrogen forms but have not changed the proportions of nitrogen fractions characteristic of this soil type.

  19. Improved spectral fitting of nitrogen dioxide from OMI in the 405-465 nm window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geffen, J. H. G. M.; Boersma, K. F.; Van Roozendael, M.; Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; De Smedt, I.; Sneep, M.; Veefkind, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    An improved nitrogen dioxide (NO2) slant column density retrieval for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) in the 405-465 nm spectral region is presented. Since the launch of OMI on board NASA's EOS-Aura satellite in 2004, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) retrievals of NO2 slant column densities have been the starting point for the KNMI DOMINO and NASA SP NO2 vertical column data as well as the OMI NO2 data of some other institutes. However, recent intercomparisons between NO2 retrievals from OMI and other UV/Vis and limb spectrometers, as well as ground-based measurements, suggest that OMI stratospheric NO2 is biased high. This study revises and, for the first time, fully documents the OMI NO2 retrieval in detail. The representation of the OMI slit function to convolve high-resolution reference spectra onto the relevant spectral grid is improved. The window used for the wavelength calibration is optimised, leading to much-reduced fitting errors. Ozone and water vapour spectra used in the fit are updated, reflecting the recently improved knowledge of their absorption cross section in the literature. The improved spectral fit also accounts for absorption by the O2-O2 collision complex and by liquid water over clear-water areas. The main changes in the improved spectral fitting result from the updates related to the wavelength calibration: the RMS error of the fit is reduced by 23% and the NO2 slant column by 0.85 × 1015 molec cm-2, independent of latitude, solar zenith angle and NO2 value. Including O2-O2 and liquid water absorption and updating the O3 and water vapour cross-section spectra further reduces NO2 slant columns on average by 0.35 × 1015 molec cm-2, accompanied by a further 9% reduction in the RMS error of the fit. The improved OMI NO2 slant columns are consistent with independent NO2 retrievals from other instruments to within a range that can be explained by photochemically driven diurnal increases in stratospheric NO2 and by

  20. Improving Model Representation of Reduced Nitrogen in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Human activity, including fossil fuel combustion and agriculture has greatly increased the amount of reactive nitrogen (RN) in the atmosphere and its subsequent deposition to land. Increases in deposition of RN compounds can adversely affect sensitive ecosystems and is a growing problem in many natural areas. The National Park Service in conjunction with Colorado State University researchers and assistance from the Forest Service conducted the Grand Teton Reactive Nitrogen Deposition Study (GrandTReNDS) involving spatially and temporally detailed measurements of RN during spring/summer 2011. In this work it was found that during summer months at the high elevation site Grand Targhee, 62% of the nitrogen deposition was due to reduced nitrogen, about equally split between dry and wet deposition, oxidized nitrogen accounted for 27% of the total, and the remaining was wet deposited organic nitrogen. An important next step to GrandTReNDS is the use of chemical transport models (CTMs) to estimate source contributions to RN in the park. Given the large contribution of reduced nitrogen species to total nitrogen deposition in the park, understanding and properly characterizing ammonia in CTMs is critical to estimating the total nitrogen deposition. A model performance evaluation of the CAMx uni-directional model and CMAQ bi-direction and uni-directional 2011 model simulations versus GrandTReNDS and other datasets was conducted. Preliminary results suggest that, in some areas, model performance of ambient ammonia concentration is more sensitive to the spatial resolution of the model and the accuracy of the spatial representation of emissions than to the incorporation of bi-directional flux. Additional model sensitivity runs, including sensitivity to resolution (with and without bi-directional flux capabilities), changes to model estimated ammonia dry deposition velocities, and improved representation of the spatial distribution of ammonia emissions, are used to identify the

  1. [Characteristics of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen under different land use types in Shanghai].

    PubMed

    Shi, Li-jiang; Zheng, Li-bo; Mei, Xue-ying; Yu, Li-zhong; Jia, Zheng-chang

    2010-09-01

    By the methods of field sampling and laboratory analysis, this paper studied the variations of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and SOC density under different land use types in Shanghai. Significant differences were observed in the test parameters among different land use types. The SOC density was the highest in paddy field (3.86 kg x m(-2)), followed by in upland (3.17 kg x m(-2)), forestland (3.15 kg x m(-2)), abandoned land (2.73 kg x m(-2)), urban lawn (2.65 kg x m(-2)), garden land (2.13 kg x m(-2)), and tidal flat (1.38 kg x m(-2)). The assessment on the effects of three types of land use change on the test parameters showed that the conversion of paddy field into upland resulted in a significant decrease of SOC and TN contents and SOC density; the abandonment of farmland was not an effective way in improving SOC storage in the Yangtze Delta region with abundant water and heat resources, high soil fertility, and high level of field management; while the 4-5 years conversion of paddy field into artificial forestland decreased the SOC and TN contents and SOC density, suggesting that in a short term, the soil carbon sequestration effect of the conversion from paddy field to forestland was at a low level, due to the limitation of vegetation productivity.

  2. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  3. [XPS and Raman spectral analysis of nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films with different nitrogen content].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wang-Shou; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Han, Jie-Cai; Tian, Gui; Tan, Man-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C : N) films were prepared on the polished C--Si substrates by introducing highly pure nitrogen gas into the cathode region and the depositing chamber synchronously using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. The nitrogen content in the films was controlled by changing the flow rate of nitrogen gas. The configuration of ta-C : N films was investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and visible Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that the nitrogen content in the films increased from 0.84 at% to 5.37 at% monotonously when the nitrogen flow rate was varied from 2 seem to 20 sccm. The peak position of C (1s) core level moved towards higher binding energy with the increase in nitrogen content. The shift of C (1s) peak position could be ascribed to the chemical bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms even though more three-fold coordinated sp2 configuration as in graphite was formed when the films were doped with more nitrogen atoms. Additionally, the half width of C(1s) peak gradually was also broadened with increasing nitrogen content. In order to discover clearly the changing regularities of the microstructure of the films, the XPS C(1s) spectra and Raman spectra were deconvoluted using a Gaussian-Lorentzian mixed lineshape. It was shown that the tetrahedral hybridization component was still dominant even though the ratio of sp2/sp3 obtained from C(1s) spectra rose with the increase in nitrogen content. The Raman measurements demonstrated that the G peak position shifted towards higher frequency from 1,561 to 1,578 cm(-1) and the ratio of ID/IG also rose with the increase in nitrogen content. Both results indicated that the graphitizing tendency could occur with the increase in nitrogen content in the films.

  4. Mapping genetic variants underlying differences in the central nitrogen metabolism in fermenter yeasts.

    PubMed

    Jara, Matías; Cubillos, Francisco A; García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Aguilera, Omayra; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism.

  5. Mapping Genetic Variants Underlying Differences in the Central Nitrogen Metabolism in Fermenter Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    García, Verónica; Salinas, Francisco; Aguilera, Omayra; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Different populations within a species represent a rich reservoir of allelic variants, corresponding to an evolutionary signature of withstood environmental constraints. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are widely utilised in the fermentation of different kinds of alcoholic beverages, such as, wine and sake, each of them derived from must with distinct nutrient composition. Importantly, adequate nitrogen levels in the medium are essential for the fermentation process, however, a comprehensive understanding of the genetic variants determining variation in nitrogen consumption is lacking. Here, we assessed the genetic factors underlying variation in nitrogen consumption in a segregating population derived from a cross between two main fermenter yeasts, a Wine/European and a Sake isolate. By linkage analysis we identified 18 main effect QTLs for ammonium and amino acids sources. Interestingly, majority of QTLs were involved in more than a single trait, grouped based on amino acid structure and indicating high levels of pleiotropy across nitrogen sources, in agreement with the observed patterns of phenotypic co-variation. Accordingly, we performed reciprocal hemizygosity analysis validating an effect for three genes, GLT1, ASI1 and AGP1. Furthermore, we detected a widespread pleiotropic effect on these genes, with AGP1 affecting seven amino acids and nine in the case of GLT1 and ASI1. Based on sequence and comparative analysis, candidate causative mutations within these genes were also predicted. Altogether, the identification of these variants demonstrate how Sake and Wine/European genetic backgrounds differentially consume nitrogen sources, in part explaining independently evolved preferences for nitrogen assimilation and representing a niche of genetic diversity for the implementation of practical approaches towards more efficient strains for nitrogen metabolism. PMID:24466135

  6. [Effect of drought on photosynthetic characteristics and growth of Jatropha curcas seedlings under different nitrogen levels].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Hu, Ting-Xing; Liu, Yong-An; Yao, Shi-Fei; Ma, Juan; Liu, Weng-Ting; He, Cao

    2010-03-01

    A pot experiment with controlled water supply was conducted to study the effects of drought stress (continuous drought for 0 d, 5 d, 10 d, ... 45 d) on the photosynthetic characteristics and growth of Jatropha curcas seedlings under different nitrogen fertilization levels (N0, 0 kg N x hm(-2); N(L), 96 kg N x hm(-2; N(M), 288 kg N x hm(-2); N(H), 480 kg N x hm(-2)). With the enhancement of drought stress, the leaf relative water content (RWC1), height growth (Z(h)), basal diameter growth (Z(d), leaf area (L(a)), net photosynthetic rate ( P(n)), transpiration rate (T(r)), and stomatal conductance (G(s)) decreased significantly (P < 0.01), irrespective of nitrogen fertilization level. The chlorophyll (Chl) content and water use efficiency (WUE) increased first and decreased then, while the intercellular CO2, concentration (C(i)) had an increase after an initial decrease. Under adequate water condition, nitrogen fertilization promoted the photosynthesis and growth of J. curcas seedlings to different degrees, and the effect was increased with increasing nitrogen fertilization level. Under drought stress, the effects of nitrogen nutrition on the photosynthesis and growth were dependent on drought intensity and nitrogen fertilization level. Specifically, increasing nitrogen fertilization level could promote the photosynthesis and growth of J. curcas seedlings under mild drought, the promotion effect of N(M) was higher than that of N(L) and N(H) under moderate drought, and N(L) had the best promotion effect while N(H) weakened the effect or made it negative under severe drought.

  7. Combined Spectral Index to Improve Ground-Based Estimates of Nitrogen Status in Dryland Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the single ratio Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and ground-based remote sensing for estimating crop yield potential and basing in-season nitrogen (N) fertilizer application. The NDVI is positively related to crop N status and leaf ar...

  8. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for Nitrogen Fixation and its Application to Improve Plant Growth under Nitrogen-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Setten, Lorena; Soto, Gabriela; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Fox, Ana Romina; Lisi, Christian; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Angeletti, Mauro; Pagano, Elba; Díaz-Paleo, Antonio; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops. PMID:23675499

  9. Field observations of soil water content and nitrogen distribution on two hillslopes of different shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Huang, Manli; Hua, Jianlan; Zhang, Zhentin; Ni, Lixiao; Li, Ping; Chen, Yong; Zhu, Liang

    2015-06-01

    nitrogen concentrations compared to its mid and lower positions. Nitrogen storage in the low segment soil profile of the CCS was higher than its up segment, but they were similar on the CVS. The nitrogen redistributions on the hillslopes were dominantly from water regimes, in particular, from the lateral subsurface flow. Due to the diversity of water regimes in different shaped hillslopes, the interception of lateral subsurface flow and its nitrogen pollution should receive more attention in a humid region.

  10. [Assessment on the availability of nitrogen fertilization in improving carbon sequestration potential of China's cropland soil].

    PubMed

    Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Han, Bing; Ouyang, Zhi-Yun; Duan, Xiao-Nan; Zheng, Hua

    2008-10-01

    With reference to the situation of nitrogen fertilization in 2003 and the recommendations from agricultural experts on fertilization to different crops, two scenarios, namely, 'current situation' and 'fertilization as recommended', were set for estimating the current and potential carbon sequestration of China's cropland soil under nitrogen fertilization. After collecting and analyzing the typical data from the long-term agricultural experiment stations all over China, and based on the recent studies of soil organic matter and nutrient dynamics, we plotted China into four agricultural regions, and estimated the carbon sequestration rate and potential of cropland soil under the two scenarios in each province of China. Meanwhile, with the data concerning fossil fuel consumption for fertilizer production and nitrogen fertilization, the greenhouse gas leakage caused by nitrogen fertilizer production and application was estimated with the help of the parameters given by domestic studies and IPCC. We further proposed that the available carbon sequestration potential of cropland soil could be taken as the criterion of the validity and availability of carbon sequestration measures. The results showed that the application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer could bring about a carbon sequestration potential of 21.9 Tg C x a(-1) in current situation, and 30.2 Tg C x a(-1) with fertilization as recommended. However, under the two scenarios, the greenhouse gas leakage caused by fertilizer production and application would reach 72.9 Tg C x a(-1) and 91.4 Tg C x a(-1), and thus, the actual available carbon sequestration potential would be -51.0 Tg C x a(-1) and -61.1 Tg C x a(-1), respectively. The situation was even worse under the 'fertilization as recommended' scenario, because the increase in the amount of nitrogen fertilization would lead to 10. 1 Tg C x a(-1) or more net greenhouse gas emission. All these results indicated that the application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer

  11. Improving yield potential in crops under elevated CO2: Integrating the photosynthetic and nitrogen utilization efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Surya; Seneweera, Saman; Rodin, Joakim; Materne, Michael; Burch, David; Rothstein, Steven J.; Spangenberg, German

    2012-01-01

    Increasing crop productivity to meet burgeoning human food demand is challenging under changing environmental conditions. Since industrial revolution atmospheric CO2 levels have linearly increased. Developing crop varieties with increased utilization of CO2 for photosynthesis is an urgent requirement to cope with the irreversible rise of atmospheric CO2 and achieve higher food production. The primary effects of elevated CO2 levels in most crop plants, particularly C3 plants, include increased biomass accumulation, although initial stimulation of net photosynthesis rate is only temporal and plants fail to sustain the maximal stimulation, a phenomenon known as photosynthesis acclimation. Despite this acclimation, grain yield is known to marginally increase under elevated CO2. The yield potential of C3 crops is limited by their capacity to exploit sufficient carbon. The “C fertilization” through elevated CO2 levels could potentially be used for substantial yield increase. Rubisco is the rate-limiting enzyme in photosynthesis and its activity is largely affected by atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen availability. In addition, maintenance of the C/N ratio is pivotal for various growth and development processes in plants governing yield and seed quality. For maximizing the benefits of elevated CO2, raising plant nitrogen pools will be necessary as part of maintaining an optimal C/N balance. In this review, we discuss potential causes for the stagnation in yield increases under elevated CO2 levels and explore possibilities to overcome this limitation by improved photosynthetic capacity and enhanced nitrogen use efficiency. Opportunities of engineering nitrogen uptake, assimilatory, and responsive genes are also discussed that could ensure optimal nitrogen allocation toward expanding source and sink tissues. This might avert photosynthetic acclimation partially or completely and drive for improved crop production under elevated CO2 levels. PMID:22833749

  12. Significance of nitrogen removal mass in uremic patients on different modalities of dialysis therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, T W; Huang, T P; Wang, M L

    2000-02-01

    While most nephrologists use Kt/V values for dialysis prescriptions, some researchers are beginning to view the role of solute removal mass as an indicator of adequate dialysis. This study, using nitrogen as a surrogate for solute removal, probed whether solute removal mass can be used as the target of adequate dialysis. Mathematical formulas for easy bedside calculation of nitrogen removal mass were used to avoid the problems associated with direct measurement. The weekly removal mass of urea nitrogen (M) and the urea generation rate (G) of 32 conventional hemodialysis (HD) and 21 continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients were calculated. All the patients were anuric, clinically stable, and under adequate dialysis pursuant to either the criterion of the urea index, Kt/V, or clinical requirements. The difference in MHD (MHD = 41.9 +/- 9.5 g/week, MCAPD = 38.8 +/- 11.9 g/week) and G (GHD = 3.90 +/- 1.02 mg/min, GCAPD = 3.85 +/- 1.21 mg/min) between the two groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.119 and p = 0.868, respectively). When protein nitrogen leaking through the peritoneal membrane was considered and added to MCAPD, nitrogen removal in CAPD patients (M'CAPD = 42.3 +/- 13.0 g/week) approached that in HD patients (p = 0.886). There was no correlation between dialysis dosage and urea removal mass in either the CAPD or HD groups. Urea nitrogen removal mass is similar to the protein catabolic rate (PCR) in stable patients. It is meaningful in dialysis evaluation only when it is used simultaneously with blood urea nitrogen measurement. However, because M changes at the inception of dialysis, it more significant than PCR in the evaluation of unstable patients.

  13. Assessing the mechanisms responsible for differences between nitrogen requirements of saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts in alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Brice, Claire; Sanchez, Isabelle; Tesnière, Catherine; Blondin, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation, and its abundance determines the fermentation rate and duration. The capacity to ferment under conditions of nitrogen deficiency differs between yeasts. A characterization of the nitrogen requirements of a set of 23 strains revealed large differences in their fermentative performances under nitrogen deficiency, and these differences reflect the nitrogen requirements of the strains. We selected and compared two groups of strains, one with low nitrogen requirements (LNRs) and the other with high nitrogen requirements (HNRs). A comparison of various physiological traits indicated that the differences are not related to the ability to store nitrogen or the protein content. No differences in protein synthesis activity were detected between strains with different nitrogen requirements. Transcriptomic analysis revealed expression patterns specific to each of the two groups of strains, with an overexpression of stress genes in HNR strains and a stronger expression of biosynthetic genes in LNR strains. Our data suggest that differences in glycolytic flux may originate from variations in nitrogen sensing and signaling under conditions of starvation.

  14. Assessing the Mechanisms Responsible for Differences between Nitrogen Requirements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Yeasts in Alcoholic Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Brice, Claire; Sanchez, Isabelle; Tesnière, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation, and its abundance determines the fermentation rate and duration. The capacity to ferment under conditions of nitrogen deficiency differs between yeasts. A characterization of the nitrogen requirements of a set of 23 strains revealed large differences in their fermentative performances under nitrogen deficiency, and these differences reflect the nitrogen requirements of the strains. We selected and compared two groups of strains, one with low nitrogen requirements (LNRs) and the other with high nitrogen requirements (HNRs). A comparison of various physiological traits indicated that the differences are not related to the ability to store nitrogen or the protein content. No differences in protein synthesis activity were detected between strains with different nitrogen requirements. Transcriptomic analysis revealed expression patterns specific to each of the two groups of strains, with an overexpression of stress genes in HNR strains and a stronger expression of biosynthetic genes in LNR strains. Our data suggest that differences in glycolytic flux may originate from variations in nitrogen sensing and signaling under conditions of starvation. PMID:24334661

  15. Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: Implications for soil carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garten, Charles T.; Ashwood, Tom L.

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate (≥53 μm) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 μm). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

  16. Increased Needle Nitrogen Contents Did Not Improve Shoot Photosynthetic Performance of Mature Nitrogen-Poor Scots Pine Trees

    PubMed Central

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Lutz, Martina; Räntfors, Mats; Näsholm, Torgny; Wallin, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that temperate and boreal forests are limited by nitrogen (N) availability. However, few studies have provided a detailed account of how carbon (C) acquisition of such forests reacts to increasing N supply. We combined measurements of needle-scale biochemical photosynthetic capacities and continuous observations of shoot-scale photosynthetic performance from several canopy positions with simple mechanistic modeling to evaluate the photosynthetic responses of mature N-poor boreal Pinus sylvestris to N fertilization. The measurements were carried out in August 2013 on 90-year-old pine trees growing at Rosinedalsheden research site in northern Sweden. In spite of a nearly doubling of needle N content in response to the fertilization, no effect on the long-term shoot-scale C uptake was recorded. This lack of N-effect was due to strong light limitation of photosynthesis in all investigated canopy positions. The effect of greater N availability on needle photosynthetic capacities was also constrained by development of foliar phosphorus (P) deficiency following N addition. Thus, P deficiency and accumulation of N in arginine appeared to contribute toward lower shoot-scale nitrogen-use efficiency in the fertilized trees, thereby additionally constraining tree-scale responses to increasing N availability. On the whole our study suggests that the C uptake response of the studied N-poor boreal P. sylvestris stand to enhanced N availability is constrained by the efficiency with which the additional N is utilized. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the ability of the trees to use the greater N availability for additional light capture. For stands that have not reached canopy closure, increase in leaf area following N fertilization would be the most effective way for improving light capture and C uptake while for mature stands an increased leaf area may have a rather limited effect on light capture owing to increased self-shading. This raises the

  17. Effects of different sources of fertilizer nitrogen on growth and nutrition of western hemlock seedlings.

    Treesearch

    M.A. Radwan; Dean S. DeBell

    1980-01-01

    Twelve different nitrogen (N) fertilizer treatments were tested on potted western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) seedlings. Fertilizers affected soil N and pH, and growth and foliar chemical composition of seedlings. Urea plus N-Serve and sulfur-coated urea appear more promising for promoting growth than other fertilizers tested. Results...

  18. Sweetgum Response to Nitrogen Fertilization on Sites of Different Quality and Land Use History

    Treesearch

    D. Andrew Scott; Donald J. Kaczmarek; James A. Burger; Michael B. Kane

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer management in young hardwood plantations is difficult due to our lack of understanding of the site-specific mechanisms that control tree response. Differences in landuse history and soil characteristics can alter the plant response to added N considerably. Foliage biomass, N content, N concentration, resorption, and soil N supply characteristics...

  19. Responses of Rice Cultivars with Different Nitrogen Use Efficiency to Partial Nitrate Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. L.; Ye, L. T.; Fan, X. R.; Xu, G. H.; Shen, Q. R.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims There is increased evidence that partial nitrate (NO3−) nutrition (PNN) improves growth of rice (Oryza sativa), although the crop prefers ammonium (NH4+) to NO3− nutrition. It is not known whether the response to NO3− supply is related to nitrogen (N) use efficiency (NUE) in rice cultivars. Methods Solution culture experiments were carried out to study the response of two rice cultivars, Nanguang (High-NUE) and Elio (Low-NUE), to partial NO3− supply in terms of dry weight, N accumulation, grain yield, NH4+ uptake and ammonium transporter expression [real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)]. Key Results A ratio of 75/25 NH4+-N/NO3−-N increased dry weight, N accumulation and grain yield of ‘Nanguang’ by 30, 36 and 21 %, respectively, but no effect was found in ‘Elio’ when compared with those of 100/0 NH4+-N/NO3−-N. Uptake experiments with 15N-NH4+ showed that NO3− increased NH4+ uptake efficiency in ‘Nanguang’ by increasing Vmax (14 %), but there was no effect on Km. This indicated that partial replacement of NH4+ by NO3− could increase the number of the ammonium transporters but did not affect the affinity of the transporters for NH4+. Real-time PCR showed that expression of OsAMT1s in ‘Nanguang’ was improved by PNN, while that in ‘Elio’ did not change, which is in accordance with the differing responses of these two cultivars to PNN. Conclusions Increased NUE by PNN can be attributed to improved N uptake. The rice cultivar with a higher NUE has a more positive response to PNN than that with a low NUE, suggesting that there might be a relationship between PNN and NUE. PMID:17428833

  20. Nitrogen nutrient status induces sexual differences in responses to cadmium in Populus yunnanensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lianghua; Han, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2011-01-01

    Populus yunnanensis was employed as a model species to detect sexual differences in growth, physiological, biochemical, and ultrastructural responses to cadmium (Cd) stress, nitrogen (N) deposition, and their combination. Compared with the control conditions, Cd decreased plant biomass, damaged the photosynthetic apparatus, visible as a decreased maximum efficiency of photosystem II (PSII; Fv/Fm) and effective quantum yield of PSII (Yield), depressed gas exchange capacity, and induced oxidative stress, visible as the disruption of antioxidative enzymes and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in both sexes. On the other hand, Cd toxicity was mitigated by the recovery of gas exchange capacity, a decrease in ROS, and improvement of the redox imbalance in both sexes when N deposition was applied. However, males showed a higher gas exchange capacity, lower enzyme inhibition and ROS accumulation, stronger abilities to maintain cellular redox homeostasis, and a better maintenance of chloroplast ultrastructure than did females when exposed to Cd stress alone. Although males exhibited a higher Cd content in leaves than did females, males also accumulated higher levels of non-protein thiols (NP-SHs) and free amino acids (FAAs) for detoxification than did females. Sexual differences induced by Cd, visible, for example, in Fv/Fm, Yield, net photosynthesis rate (A), and stomatal conductance (gs), decreased under N deposition, as no significant differences between the sexes existed in these parameters under the combined treatment. The results indicated that females are more sensitive to Cd stress and suffer more injuries than do males. Moreover, N deposition can mitigate Cd toxicity and decrease sexual differences in Cd sensitivity. PMID:21778178

  1. PCS Nitrogen: Combustion Fan System Optimization Improves Performance and Saves Energy at a Chemical Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2005-01-01

    This U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program case study describes how, in 2003, PCS Nitrogen, Inc., improved the efficiency of the combustion fan on a boiler at the company's chemical fertilizer plant in Augusta, Georgia. The project saved $420,000 and 76,400 million British thermal units (MBtu) per year. In addition, maintenance needs declined, because there is now less stress on the fan motor and bearings and less boiler feed water usage. This project was so successful that the company has implemented more efficiency improvements that should result in energy cost savings of nearly $1 million per year.

  2. Genetic engineering of improved nitrogen use efficiency in rice by the tissue-specific expression of alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Shrawat, Ashok K; Carroll, Rebecka T; DePauw, Mary; Taylor, Gregory J; Good, Allen G

    2008-09-01

    Summary Nitrogen is quantitatively the most essential nutrient for plants and a major factor limiting crop productivity. One of the critical steps limiting the efficient use of nitrogen is the ability of plants to acquire it from applied fertilizer. Therefore, the development of crop plants that absorb and use nitrogen more efficiently has been a long-term goal of agricultural research. In an attempt to develop nitrogen-efficient plants, rice (Oryza sativa L.) was genetically engineered by introducing a barley AlaAT (alanine aminotransferase) cDNA driven by a rice tissue-specific promoter (OsAnt1). This modification increased the biomass and grain yield significantly in comparison with control plants when plants were well supplied with nitrogen. Compared with controls, transgenic rice plants also demonstrated significant changes in key metabolites and total nitrogen content, indicating increased nitrogen uptake efficiency. The development of crop plants that take up and assimilate nitrogen more efficiently would not only improve the use of nitrogen fertilizers, resulting in lower production costs, but would also have significant environmental benefits. These results are discussed in terms of their relevance to the development of strategies to engineer enhanced nitrogen use efficiency in crop plants.

  3. Operation and Improvement of Liquid Nitrogen Pumps with Radial High- Temperature Superconductor Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. X.; Jiang, D. H.; Deng, Z. G.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W. J.; Shin, D. I.; Gu, X.; Lin, N.; Shao, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews the advantages of replacing the mechanical bearings of low-temperature pumps by radial high- temperature superconductor (HTS) bearings. Radial HTS bearings have the advantage of being non-abrasive, so that the working life is increased significantly. In this article, two types of liquid nitrogen pump with radial HTS bearings are proposed. To reduce heat leakage, one pump uses a permanent magnet (PM) coupling and the other uses a long hollow pipe coupling. Successful stable operation of these two pumps means that radial HTS bearings have the potential to be applied in liquid nitrogen pumps. Test results show that the flow rate is influenced mainly by rotational speed but not by the coupling component. Further designs of the two types of pump for practical applications are described, and their characteristics are analyzed: the pump with a PM coupling has lower heat leakage, whereas the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling can solve the force creep problem of the HTS bearing. The design of the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling is based on the pump that is already in practical use, and therefore has greater feasibility for practical applications. Finally, improvements of the liquid nitrogen pump by improving the structure of the pump and the performance of the radial HTS bearing are discussed.

  4. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Biomass and Wood Chemistry of Populus under Different Nitrogen Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, E.; Osorio, L.; Drost, D. R.; Miles, B. L.; Boaventura-Novaes, C. R. D.; Benedict, C.; Dervinis, C.; Yu, Q.; Sykes, R.; Davis, M.; Martin, T. A.; Peter, G. F.; Kirst, M.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic control of carbon allocation and partitioning in woody perennial plants is poorly understood despite its importance for carbon sequestration, biofuels and other wood-based industries. It is also unclear how environmental cues, such as nitrogen availability, impact the genes that regulate growth, biomass allocation and wood composition in trees. We phenotyped 396 clonally replicated genotypes of an interspecific pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus for wood composition and biomass traits in above- and below-ground organs. The loci that regulate growth, carbon allocation and partitioning under two nitrogen conditions were identified, defining the contribution of environmental cues to their genetic control. Sixty-three quantitative trait loci were identified for the 20 traits analyzed. The majority of quantitative trait loci are specific to one of the two nitrogen treatments, demonstrating significant nitrogen-dependent genetic control. A highly significant genetic correlation was observed between plant growth and lignin/cellulose composition, and quantitative trait loci co-localization identified the genomic position of potential pleiotropic regulators. Pleiotropic loci linking higher growth rates to wood with less lignin are excellent targets to engineer tree germplasm improved for pulp, paper and cellulosic ethanol production. The causative genes are being identified with a genetical genomics approach.

  5. Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed soybean roots differ in their nodulation and nitrogen fixation response to genistein and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Dolatabadian, Aria; Modarres Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated response differences of normal and transformed (so-called 'hairy') roots of soybean (Glycine max L. (Merr.), cv L17) to the Nod-factor inducing isoflavone genistein and salinity by quantifying growth, nodulation, nitrogen fixation and biochemical changes. Composite soybean plants were generated using Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of non-nodulating mutant nod139 (GmNFR5α minus) with complementing A. rhizogenes K599 carrying the wild-type GmNFR5α gene under control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter. We used genetic complementation for nodulation ability as only nodulated roots were scored. After hairy root emergence, primary roots were removed and composite plants were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum (strain CB1809) pre-induced with 10 μM genistein and watered with NaCl (0, 25, 50 and 100 mM). There were significant differences between hairy roots and natural roots in their responses to salt stress and genistein application. In addition, there were noticeable nodulation and nitrogen fixation differences. Composite plants had better growth, more root volume and chlorophyll as well as more nodules and higher nitrogenase activity (acetylene reduction) compared with natural roots. Decreased lipid peroxidation, proline accumulation and catalase/peroxidase activities were found in 'hairy' roots under salinity stress. Genistein significantly increased nodulation and nitrogen fixation and improved roots and shoot growth. Although genistein alleviated lipid peroxidation under salinity stress, it had no significant effect on the activity of antioxidant enzymes. In general, composite plants were more competitive in growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixation than normal non-transgenic even under salinity stress conditions.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhiza improve growth, nitrogen uptake, and nitrogen use efficiency in wheat grown under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiancan; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Shengqun; Liu, Fulai

    2016-02-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on plant growth, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) accumulation, and partitioning was investigated in Triticum aestivum L. plants grown under elevated CO2 in a pot experiment. Wheat plants inoculated or not inoculated with the AM fungus were grown in two glasshouse cells with different CO2 concentrations (400 and 700 ppm) for 10 weeks. A (15)N isotope labeling technique was used to trace plant N uptake. Results showed that elevated CO2 increased AM fungal colonization. Under CO2 elevation, AM plants had higher C concentration and higher plant biomass than the non-AM plants. CO2 elevation did not affect C and N partitioning in plant organs, while AM symbiosis increased C and N allocation into the roots. In addition, plant C and N accumulation, (15)N recovery rate, and N use efficiency (NUE) were significantly higher in AM plants than in non-AM controls under CO2 enrichment. It is concluded that AM symbiosis favors C and N partitioning in roots, increases C accumulation and N uptake, and leads to greater NUE in wheat plants grown at elevated CO2.

  7. Environmental analysis of sunflower production with different forms of mineral nitrogen fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, D; Bardi, L; Fierro, A; Jez, S; Basosi, R

    2013-11-15

    Environmental profiles of mineral nitrogen fertilizers were used to evaluate the environmental disturbances related to their use in cultivation systems in Europe. Since the production of mineral fertilizers requires a large amount of energy, the present study of bioenergy systems is relevant in order to achieve crop yields less dependent on fossil fuels and to reduce the environmental impact due to fertilization. In this study, the suitability of the LCA methodology to analyze the environmental impact of sunflower cultivation systems with different forms of mineral nitrogen fertilizers urea and ammonium nitrate was investigated. Effects on climate change were estimated by the use of Ecoinvent 2.2 database default value for soil N2O emission factor (1%) and local emission data (0.8%) of mineral nitrogen applied to soils. LCA analysis showed a higher impact on environmental categories (human health and ecosystem quality) for the system in which urea was used as a nitrogen source. Use of urea fertilizer showed a higher impact on resource consumption due to fossil fuel consumption. Use of mineral nitrogen fertilizers showed a higher environmental burden than other inputs required for sunflower cultivation systems under study. Urea and ammonium nitrate showed, respectively, a 7.8% and 4.9% reduced impact of N2O as greenhouse gas by using direct field data of soil N2O emission factor compared to the default soil emission factor of 2006 IPCC Guidelines. Use of ammonium nitrate as mineral nitrogen fertilizer in sunflower cultivation would have a lower impact on environmental categories considered. Further environmental analysis of available technologies for fertilizer production might be also evaluated in order to reduce the environmental impacts of each fertilizer.

  8. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase: a target for improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency?

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Hanne C; Eriksson, Dennis; Møller, Inge S; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2014-10-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development. A number of more refined overexpression strategies exploiting gene stacking combined with tissue and cell specific targeting to overcome metabolic bottlenecks are considered along with their potential in relation to new N management strategies.

  9. Collaborative Project: Building improved optimized parameter estimation algorithms to improve methane and nitrogen fluxes in a climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Natalie

    2016-11-29

    Soils in natural and managed ecosystems and wetlands are well known sources of methane, nitrous oxides, and reactive nitrogen gases, but the magnitudes of gas flux to the atmosphere are still poorly constrained. Thus, the reasons for the large increases in atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide since the preindustrial time period are not well understood. The low atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide, despite being more potent greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide, complicate empirical studies to provide explanations. In addition to climate concerns, the emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from soils are important to the changing nitrogen balance in the earth system, subject to human management, and may change substantially in the future. Thus improved modeling of the emission fluxes of these species from the land surface is important. Currently, there are emission modules for methane and some nitrogen species in the Community Earth System Model’s Community Land Model (CLM-ME/N); however, there are large uncertainties and problems in the simulations, resulting in coarse estimates. In this proposal, we seek to improve these emission modules by combining state-of-the-art process modules for emissions, available data, and new optimization methods. In earth science problems, we often have substantial data and knowledge of processes in disparate systems, and thus we need to combine data and a general process level understanding into a model for projections of future climate that are as accurate as possible. The best methodologies for optimization of parameters in earth system models are still being developed. In this proposal we will develop and apply surrogate algorithms that a) were especially developed for computationally expensive simulations like CLM-ME/N models; b) were (in the earlier surrogate optimization Stochastic RBF) demonstrated to perform very well on computationally expensive complex partial differential equations in

  10. Persistence of biological nitrogen fixation in high latitude grass-clover grasslands under different management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakakis, Vasileios; Sturite, Ievina; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) can substantially contribute to N supply in permanent grasslands, improving N yield and forage quality, while reducing inorganic N inputs. Among the factors critical to the performance of BNF in grass-legume mixtures are selected grass and legume species, proportion of legumes, the soil-climatic conditions, in particular winter conditions, and management practices (e.g. fertilization and compaction). In high latitude grasslands, low temperatures can reduce the performance of BNF by hampering the legumés growth and by suppressing N2 fixation. Estimation of BNF in field experiments is not straightforward. Different methods have been developed providing different results. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of BNF, in a newly established field experiment in North Norway over four years. The grassland consisted of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) and red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) sawn in three proportions (0, 15 and 30% in total) together with timothy (Pheum pretense L.) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis L.). Three levels of compaction were applied each year (no tractor, light tractor, heavy tractor) together with two different N rates (110 kg N/ha as cattle slurry or 170 kg N/ha as cattle slurry and inorganic N fertilizer). We applied two different methods, the 15N natural abundance and the difference method, to estimate BNF in the first harvest of each year. Overall, the difference method overestimated BNF relative to the 15N natural abundance method. BNF in the first harvest was compared to winter survival of red and white clover plants, which decreased with increasing age of the grassland. However, winter conditions did not seem to affect the grassland's ability to fix N in spring. The fraction of N derived from the atmosphere (NdfA) in white and red clover was close to 100% in each spring, indicating no suppression of BNF. BNF increased the total N yield of the grasslands by up to 75%, mainly due to high

  11. Ecotype-specific improvement of nitrogen status in European grasses after drought combined with rewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfin Khan, Mohammed A. S.; Kreyling, Juergen; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Jentsch, Anke

    2016-11-01

    Drought stress and associated low soil moisture can decrease N status of forage plants by reducing nitrogen (N) uptake. Conversely, rainfall and associated favorable soil moisture can improve plant N status. Yet, it is unclear to which degree drought combined with rewetting can buffer negative effects of drought on N status of forage plants and their populations. Here, we compared shoot N status (N concentration, total N uptake and C/N ratio) of four temperate grass species. Particularly, we investigated ecotypes (populations) grown from seeds from four to six European provenances/species after a drought treatment combined with rewetting (10 day harvest delay) versus continuously watered conditions for control. The experimental combination of drought and rewetting significantly increased shoot N concentration (+96%), N uptake (+31%); and decreased C/N ratio (-46%), biomass production (-29%) and C concentration (-1.4%) compared to control. Shoot N status was found to be different between target grass species and also within their populations under drought combined with rewetting treatment. Presumably drought-adapted populations did not perform better than populations from moist sites indicating no evidence of local adaptation. The drought combined with rewetting event could buffer the negative effects of drought. Shoot N status of grasses after drought and rewetting even exceeded control plants. This surprising finding can potentially be explained by higher N uptake, lack of growth dilution effects or delayed plant maturation. Furthermore, within-species shoot N status responses to drought combined with rewetting event were ecotype-specific, hinting at diverse responses of different population. For rangeland management, we recommend that if a drought event occurs during the growing season, harvesting should be delayed beyond a following rain event.

  12. [Effects of poplar-amaranth intercropping system on the soil nitrogen loss under different nitrogen applying levels].

    PubMed

    Chu, Jun; Xue, Jian-Hui; Wu, Dian-Ming; Jin, Mei-Juan; Wu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of soil nitrogen loss were investigated based on field experiments in two types of poplar-amaranth intercropping systems (spacing: L1 2 m x 5 m, L2 2 m x 15 m) with four N application rates, i. e., 0 (N1), 91 (N2), 137 (N3) and 183 (N4) kg · hm(-2). The regulation effects on the soil surface runoff, leaching loss and soil erosion were different among the different types of intercropping systems: L1 > L2 > L3 (amaranth monocropping). Compared with the amaranth monocropping, the soil surface runoff rates of L1 and L2 decreased by 65.1% and 55.9%, the soil leaching rates of L1 and L2 with a distance of 0.5 m from the poplar tree row de- creased by 30.0% and 28.9%, the rates with a distance of 1. 5 m decreased by 25. 6% and 21.9%, and the soil erosion rates decreased by 65.0% and 55.1%, respectively. The control effects of two intercropping systems on TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N in soil runoff and leaching loss were in the order of L1 > L2 > L3. Compared with the amaranth monocropping, TN, NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N loss rates in soil runoff of L1 decreased by 62.9%, 45.1% and 69.2%, while the loss rates of L2 decreased by 23.4%, 6.9% and 46.2% under N1 (91 kg · hm(-2)), respectively. High- er tree-planting density and closer positions to the polar tree row were more effective on controlling the loss rates of NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N caused by soil leaching. The loss proportion of NO(3-)-N in soil runoff decreased with the increasing nitrogen rate under the same tree-planting density, while that of NH(4+)-N increased. Leaching loss of NO(3-)-N had a similar trend with that of NH(4+)-N, i. e. , N3 > N2 > N1 > N0.

  13. Untangling the effects of root age and tissue nitrogen on root respiration in Populus tremuloides at different nitrogen supply.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, Christian; Tagliavini, Massimo; Schmitt, Armin Otto; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-05-01

    Root respiration is a major contributor to terrestrial carbon flux. Many studies have shown root respiration to increase with an increase in root tissue nitrogen (N) concentration across species and study sites. Studies have also shown that both root respiration and root N concentration typically decrease with root age. The effects of added N may directly increase respiration of existing roots or may affect respiration by shifting the age structure of a root population by stimulating growth. To the best of our knowledge, no study has ever examined the effect of added N as a function of root age on root respiration. In this study, root respiration of 13-year-old Populus tremuloides Michx. trees grown in the field and 1-year-old P. tremuloides seedlings grown in containers was analyzed for the relative influence of root age and root N concentration independent of root age on root respiration. Field roots were first tracked using root windows and then sampled at known age. Nitrogen was either applied or not to small patches beneath the windows. In a pot experiment, each plant was grown with its root system split between two separate pots and N was applied at three different levels, either at the same or at different rates between pots. Root N concentration ranged between 1.4 and 1.7% in the field experiment and 1.8 and 2.6% in the seedling experiment. We found that addition of N increased root N concentration of only older roots in the field but of roots of all ages in the potted seedlings. In both experiments, the age-dependent decline in root respiration was largely consistent, and could be explained by a negative power function. Respiration decreased ∼50% by 3 weeks of age. Although root age was the dominant factor affecting respiration in both experiments, in the field experiment, root N also contributed to root respiration independent of root age. These results add further insight into respiratory responses of roots to N addition and mechanisms underlying the

  14. Carbon and nitrogen cycles in European ecosystems respond differently to global warming.

    PubMed

    Beier, C; Emmett, B A; Peñuelas, J; Schmidt, I K; Tietema, A; Estiarte, M; Gundersen, P; Llorens, L; Riis-Nielsen, T; Sowerby, A; Gorissen, A

    2008-12-15

    The global climate is predicted to become significantly warmer over the next century. This will affect ecosystem processes and the functioning of semi natural and natural ecosystems in many parts of the world. However, as various ecosystem processes may be affected to a different extent, balances between different ecosystem processes as well as between different ecosystems may shift and lead to major unpredicted changes. In this study four European shrubland ecosystems along a north-south temperature gradient were experimentally warmed by a novel nighttime warming technique. Biogeochemical cycling of both carbon and nitrogen was affected at the colder sites with increased carbon uptake for plant growth as well as increased carbon loss through soil respiration. Carbon uptake by plant growth was more sensitive to warming than expected from the temperature response across the sites while carbon loss through soil respiration reacted to warming in agreement with the overall Q10 and response functions to temperature across the sites. Opposite to carbon, the nitrogen mineralization was relatively insensitive to the temperature increase and was mainly affected by changes in soil moisture. The results suggest that C and N cycles respond asymmetrically to warming, which may lead to progressive nitrogen limitation and thereby acclimation in plant production. This further suggests that in many temperate zones nitrogen deposition has to be accounted for, not only with respect to the impact on water quality through increased nitrogen leaching where N deposition is high, but also in predictions of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems under future climatic conditions. Finally the results indicate that on the short term the above-ground processes are more sensitive to temperature changes than the below ground processes.

  15. Altering blood flow does not reveal differences between nitrogen and helium kinetics in brain or in skeletal miracle in sheep.

    PubMed

    Doolette, David J; Upton, Richard N; Grant, Cliff

    2015-03-01

    In underwater diving, decompression schedules are based on compartmental models of nitrogen and helium tissue kinetics. However, these models are not based on direct measurements of nitrogen and helium kinetics. In isoflurane-anesthetized sheep, nitrogen and helium kinetics in the hind limb (n = 5) and brain (n = 5) were determined during helium-oxygen breathing and after return to nitrogen-oxygen breathing. Nitrogen and helium concentrations in arterial, femoral vein, and sagittal sinus blood samples were determined using headspace gas chromatography, and venous blood flows were monitored continuously using ultrasonic Doppler. The experiment was repeated at different states of hind limb blood flow and cerebral blood flow. Using arterial blood gas concentrations and blood flows as input, parameters and model selection criteria of various compartmental models of hind limb and brain were estimated by fitting to the observed venous gas concentrations. In both the hind limb and brain, nitrogen and helium kinetics were best fit by models with multiexponential kinetics. In the brain, there were no differences in nitrogen and helium kinetics. Hind limb models fit separately to the two gases indicated that nitrogen kinetics were slightly faster than helium, but models with the same kinetics for both gases fit the data well. In the hind limb and brain, the blood:tissue exchange of nitrogen is similar to that of helium. On the basis of these results, it is inappropriate to assign substantially different time constants for nitrogen and helium in all compartments in decompression algorithms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Improvements to the treatment of organic nitrogen chemistry & deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  17. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  18. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  19. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  20. Improvements to the treatment of organic nitrogen chemistry & deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  1. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  2. Impact of different recirculation schemes on nitrogen removal and overall performance of a laboratory scale MBR.

    PubMed

    Bracklow, U; Manigas, L; Drews, A; Vocks, M; Barjenbruch, M; Kraume, M

    2007-01-01

    For membrane bioreactors (MBR) with enhanced nutrients removal, rather complex recirculation schemes based on the biological requirements are commonly recommended. The aim of this work was to evaluate other recirculation options. For a laboratory scale MBR, four different recirculation schemes were tested. The MBR was operated with COD degradation, nitrification, post-denitrification without carbon dosing and biological phosphorus removal. For all configurations, efficient COD, nitrogen and phosphorus removal could be achieved. There were no big differences in elimination efficiency between the configurations (COD elimination: 96.6-97.9%, nitrogen removal: 89.7-92.1% and phosphorus removal: 97.4-99.4%). Changes in the degradation, release and uptake rates were levelled out by the changes in contact time and biomass distribution. With relatively constant outflow concentrations, different configurations are still interesting with regard to oxygen consumption, simplicity of plant operation or support of certain degradation pathways such as biological phosphorus removal or denitrification.

  3. Differences in nitrogen metabolism between Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, the two etiologic agents of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Chang, Yun; Roh, Jamin; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2012-01-01

    Two members of the Cryptococcus neoformans-gattii species complex, the etiologic agents of cryptococcosis, can be differentiated by biological, biochemical, serological and molecular typing techniques. Based on their differences in carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns, cost effective and very specific diagnostic tests using D-proline and canvanine-glycine-bromthymol blue (CGB) media have been formulated and are widely used for identification of the two species. However, these methods have yet to be tested for strains with confirmed molecular types to assess the degree of specificity for each molecular type in the two species. We collected global isolates of every major molecular type available and tested their patterns of nitrogen utilization. We confirmed specificity of the CGB test to be 100% regardless of molecular type while the D-proline test yielded 8-38% false negative results in three of the four C. gattii molecular types, VGI-VGIII. The utilization pattern of a new set of amino acids: D-alanine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine, showed species specificity comparable to that of D-proline. We discovered that the transcription factor Gat1 (Are1) regulates the utilization of nitrogen differently between C. neoformans and C. gattii strains. Unlike in C. neoformans, expression of the genes encoding glycine decarboxylase complex in C. gatti was only partially suppressed by nitrogen catabolite repression in the presence of ammonium. GAT1 in C. neoformans controlled the induction of three of the four genes encoding the glycine decarboxylase complex when glycine was used as the sole nitrogen source while in C. gattii its regulation of these genes was less stringent. Moreover, while virulence of C. neoformans strains in mice was not affected by Gat1, the transcription factor positively influenced the virulence of C. gattii strain.

  4. GABA accumulation in response to different nitrogenous compounds in unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Simab; Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2015-01-01

    GABA accumulation and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity, the principal enzyme involved in GABA formation, was investigated in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild-type (WT) and gad knockout mutant strains grown in medium containing different nitrogenous compounds. Nitrate was the best nitrogen source for GAD activity and GABA accumulation followed by nitrite, ammonium, and urea. An increase in the accumulation of GABA was observed in WT and mutant cells grown for 24 h in medium supplemented with 0.5 mM putrescine or spermidine with a parallel increase in GAD activity. The mutant could not accumulate GABA at all the conditions tested except when supplemented with putrescine or spermidine, where high GABA levels were observed in both WT and mutant strains. Glutamate supplementation up to 10 mM for 24 h resulted in a significant increase in both GAD activity and GABA content. Overall results suggested that optimization of nitrogen source and nitrogenous compounds supplementation was effective for the enhancement of GABA accumulation in Synechocystis.

  5. Need for a mission to understand the Earth-Venus-Mars difference in Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Dandouras, Iannis; Rathsman, Peter

    2013-04-01

    This presentation is based on a satellite mission proposal that was submitted to ESA's call for a Small Mission in June 2012. Although the mission was not selected, its science was recommended by the Solar System Exploration Working Group. Nitrogen is a key element for life as an inevitable part of the amino acid and protein. While nitrogen is abundant on the Earth (the amount in the soil, crust, and ocean are small compared to the atmospheric amount) and on Venus (only 3% but pressure is 90 times of the Earth, resulting in three times as the Earth), Martian atmosphere has very little nitrogen, about only 0.01% of the Earth or Venus (with 10% of planetary mass). This contrasts the oxygen abundance, which is found in all three planets (Martian case, it is now believed to exist in the crust as oxidized rocks because the observed escape rate is equivalent only 10 m deep water). Considering the fact that nitrogen is much more difficult to be ionized than oxygen due to triple chemical binding and that dependence of the ion outflow from the ionosphere on the geomagnetic activity is more drastic for cold nitrogen ion than cold oxygen ions, absence of the nitrogen only on the Mars is a mystery, while this absence might explain the absence of life on Mars at the present knowledge. From these viewpoints, it is important to understand the dynamic of N+ and N2+ at different solar conditions, e.g., its difference from oxygen dynamics for whatever the planet. One reason for lack of such measurement except cold ions is the difficulty in separating hot N+ from O+ in the modern time-of-flight instruments, but it is now most likely possible to separate O+ and N+ using magnetic mass analyzer if we mask H+ and if we limit the angular coverage to minimize contamination. The nitrogen study in space requires a dedicated space mission that covers both the polar region and inner magnetosphere. Instrumentation for such a mission also benefits study of inner magnetospheric study, substorm

  6. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments

    PubMed Central

    Cendrero-Mateo, M. Pilar; Moran, M. Susan; Papuga, Shirley A.; Thorp, K.R.; Alonso, L.; Moreno, J.; Ponce-Campos, G.; Rascher, U.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. PMID:26482242

  7. Plant chlorophyll fluorescence: active and passive measurements at canopy and leaf scales with different nitrogen treatments.

    PubMed

    Cendrero-Mateo, M Pilar; Moran, M Susan; Papuga, Shirley A; Thorp, K R; Alonso, L; Moreno, J; Ponce-Campos, G; Rascher, U; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Most studies assessing chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) have examined leaf responses to environmental stress conditions using active techniques. Alternatively, passive techniques are able to measure ChlF at both leaf and canopy scales. However, the measurement principles of both techniques are different, and only a few datasets concerning the relationships between them are reported in the literature. In this study, we investigated the potential for interchanging ChlF measurements using active techniques with passive measurements at different temporal and spatial scales. The ultimate objective was to determine the limits within which active and passive techniques are comparable. The results presented in this study showed that active and passive measurements were highly correlated over the growing season across nitrogen treatments at both canopy and leaf-average scale. At the single-leaf scale, the seasonal relation between techniques was weaker, but still significant. The variability within single-leaf measurements was largely related to leaf heterogeneity associated with variations in CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, and less so to variations in leaf chlorophyll content, leaf size or measurement inputs (e.g. light reflected and emitted by the leaf and illumination conditions and leaf spectrum). This uncertainty was exacerbated when single-leaf analysis was limited to a particular day rather than the entire season. We concluded that daily measurements of active and passive ChlF at the single-leaf scale are not comparable. However, canopy and leaf-average active measurements can be used to better understand the daily and seasonal behaviour of passive ChlF measurements. In turn, this can be used to better estimate plant photosynthetic capacity and therefore to provide improved information for crop management. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Improved anaerobic digestion performance and biogas production from poultry litter after lowering its nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos

    2015-11-01

    Poultry litter (PL) was pre-treated in order to reduce its nitrogen content and to increase the C/N ratio. The pre-treatment consisted of a first anaerobiosis phase of about 60days in order to accumulate ammonia nitrogen, followed by an ammonia stripping phase by heating the substrate at 80°C for 24h. The digestion was performed with PL and pre-treated PL (TPL) after ammonia stripping as mono-substrate under four total solids loads, i.e. 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. The TPL after ammonia stripping displayed lower ammonia (62-73%) and VFA (41-65%) concentrations compared to digesters with raw PL, while bio-methane yield increased about 8-124%. Bio-methane yields in the series with TPL after ammonia stripping were about 193, 196, 215 and 147 [Formula: see text] /kgCOD, based on the COD added, for 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% TS load, respectively. The results indicate that lowering nitrogen content using the suggested process improves bio-methane yields significantly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of Nitrogen Doped Graphene for Improved High Capacity Potassium Ion Battery Anodes.

    PubMed

    Share, Keith; Cohn, Adam P; Carter, Rachel; Rogers, Bridget; Pint, Cary L

    2016-10-09

    Potassium is an earth abundant alternative to lithium for rechargeable batteries, but a critical limitation in potassium ion battery anodes is the low capacity of KC8 graphite intercalation compounds in comparison to conventional LiC6. Here we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of few-layered graphene can increase the storage capacity of potassium from a theoretical maximum of 278 mAh/g in graphite to over 350 mAh/g, competitive with anode capacity in commercial lithium-ion batteries and the highest reported anode capacity so far for potassium ion batteries. Control studies distinguish the importance of nitrogen dopant sites as opposed to sp3 carbon defect sites to achieve the improved performance, which also enables > 6X increase in rate performance of doped versus undoped materials. Finally, in-situ Raman spectroscopy studies elucidate the staging sequence for doped and undoped materials and demonstrate the mechanism of the observed capacity enhancement to be correlated with distributed storage at local nitrogen sites in a staged KC8 compound. This study demonstrates a pathway to overcome the limitations of graphitic carbons for anodes in potassium ion batteries by atomically precise engineering of nanomaterials.

  10. Improvement of rice seedling growth and nitrogen use efficiency by seed inoculation with endophytic denitrifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Zhai, Yanyan; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of seed inoculation with endophytic denitrifiers on rice seedling growth and nitrogen use efficiency under low- and high-urea conditions. Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 were isolated from rice plant tissues. Rice seeds inoculated with the denitrifiers were sown in soil fertilized with 100 and 300 mg/kg urea concentrations, respectively. The denitrifiers increased soil ammonia concentrations or kept high ammonia concentration for a longer time in soils. However, soil nitrate concentrations with the denitrifier treatments were lower than that of the control. All the denitrifier treatments increased the chlorophyll content by more than 200% under the low urea condition. Compared to the control, the denitrifier inoculation treatments significantly increased shoot length, fresh weight, and dry weight of rice seedlings under the low- and high-urea conditions (P < 0.05). The chlorophyll concentrations, shoot length, wet weight, and dry weight of all the denitrifier treatments under the low urea fertilization were significantly higher than those of the control under the high-urea fertilization (P < 0.05). The nitrogen use efficiency of rice seedlings might be attributable to nitrate reductases of the denitrifiers, acting as the rice nitrate reductase. The treatment of endophytic denitrifiers significantly improved rice seedling growth and nitrogen use efficiency under both low- and high-urea conditions.

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Legumes establish root symbioses with rhizobia that provide plants with nitrogen (N) through biological N fixation (BNF), as well as with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that mediate improved plant phosphorus (P) uptake. Such complex relationships complicate our understanding of nutrient acquisition by legumes and how they reward their symbiotic partners with carbon along gradients of environmental conditions. In order to disentangle the interplay between BNF and AM symbioses in two Medicago species (Medicago truncatula and M. sativa) along a P-fertilization gradient, we conducted a pot experiment where the rhizobia-treated plants were either inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis 'PH5' and grown in two nutrient-poor substrates subjected to one of three different P-supply levels. Throughout the experiment, all plants were fertilized with (15)N-enriched liquid N-fertilizer to allow for assessment of BNF efficiency in terms of the fraction of N in the plants derived from the BNF (%NBNF). We hypothesized (1) higher %NBNF coinciding with higher P supply, and (2) higher %NBNF in mycorrhizal as compared to non-mycorrhizal plants under P deficiency due to mycorrhiza-mediated improvement in P nutrition. We found a strongly positive correlation between total plant P content and %NBNF, clearly documenting the importance of plant P nutrition for BNF efficiency. The AM symbiosis generally improved P uptake by plants and considerably stimulated the efficiency of BNF under low P availability (below 10 mg kg(-1) water extractable P). Under high P availability (above 10 mg kg(-1) water extractable P), the AM symbiosis brought no further benefits to the plants with respect to P nutrition even as the effects of P availability on N acquisition via BNF were further modulated by the environmental context (plant and substrate combinations). As a response to elevated P availability in the substrate, the extent of root length colonization by AM fungi was

  12. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Legumes establish root symbioses with rhizobia that provide plants with nitrogen (N) through biological N fixation (BNF), as well as with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi that mediate improved plant phosphorus (P) uptake. Such complex relationships complicate our understanding of nutrient acquisition by legumes and how they reward their symbiotic partners with carbon along gradients of environmental conditions. In order to disentangle the interplay between BNF and AM symbioses in two Medicago species (Medicago truncatula and M. sativa) along a P-fertilization gradient, we conducted a pot experiment where the rhizobia-treated plants were either inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis ‘PH5’ and grown in two nutrient-poor substrates subjected to one of three different P-supply levels. Throughout the experiment, all plants were fertilized with 15N-enriched liquid N-fertilizer to allow for assessment of BNF efficiency in terms of the fraction of N in the plants derived from the BNF (%NBNF). We hypothesized (1) higher %NBNF coinciding with higher P supply, and (2) higher %NBNF in mycorrhizal as compared to non-mycorrhizal plants under P deficiency due to mycorrhiza-mediated improvement in P nutrition. We found a strongly positive correlation between total plant P content and %NBNF, clearly documenting the importance of plant P nutrition for BNF efficiency. The AM symbiosis generally improved P uptake by plants and considerably stimulated the efficiency of BNF under low P availability (below 10 mg kg-1 water extractable P). Under high P availability (above 10 mg kg-1 water extractable P), the AM symbiosis brought no further benefits to the plants with respect to P nutrition even as the effects of P availability on N acquisition via BNF were further modulated by the environmental context (plant and substrate combinations). As a response to elevated P availability in the substrate, the extent of root length colonization by AM fungi was

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-01-28

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

  14. Improvement of nitrogen accumulation and metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by the endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Ma, Hai-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Mi; Jia, Yong; Hu, Jing; Li, Xia; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2014-09-01

    The fungal endophyte Phomopsis liquidambari can enhance nitrogen (N) uptake and metabolism of rice plants under hydroponic conditions. To investigate the effects of P. liquidambari on N accumulation and metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under field conditions during the entire growing season (S1, the seedling stage; S2, the tillering stage; S3, the heading stage; S4, the ripening stage), we utilized pot experiments to examine metabolic and physiological levels in both shoot and root tissues of rice, with endophyte (E+) and without endophyte (E-), in response to three different N levels. We found that under low-N treatment, P. liquidambari symbiosis increased the rice yield and N use efficiency by 12% and by 11.59%, respectively; that the total N contents in E+ rice plants at the four growth stages were separately increased by 29.05%, 14.65%, 21.06% and 18.38%, respectively; and that the activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase in E+ rice roots and shoots were significantly increased by fungal infection during the S1 to S3 stages. Moreover, P. liquidambari significantly increased the free NH4(+), NO3(-), amino acid and soluble protein contents in infected rice tissues under low-N treatment during the S1 to S3 stages. The obtained results offer novel data concerning the systemic changes induced by P. liquidambari in rice during the entire growth period and confirm the hypothesis that the rice-P. liquidambari interaction improved the N accumulation and metabolism of rice plants, consequently increasing rice N utilization in nutrient-limited soil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of cooling rate on the survival of cryopreserved rooster sperm: Comparison of different distances in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, M; Mosca, F; Abdel Sayed, A; Zaniboni, L; Mangiagalli, M G; Colombo, E; Cerolini, S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present trial was to study the effect of different freezing rates on the survival of cryopreserved rooster semen packaged in straws. Slow and fast freezing rates were obtained keeping straws at different distances in the vapor above the surface of the nitrogen during freezing. Adult Lohmann roosters (n=27) were used. Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, semen was packaged in straws and frozen comparing the distances of 1, 3 and 5cm in nitrogen vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 2, the distances of 3, 7 and 10cm above the surfaces of the liquid nitrogen were compared. Sperm viability, motility and progressive motility and the kinetic variables were assessed in fresh and cryopreserved semen samples. The recovery rates after freezing/thawing were also calculated. In Experiment 1, there were no significant differences among treatments for all semen quality variables. In Experiment 2, the percentage of viable (46%) and motile (22%) sperm in cryopreserved semen was greater when semen was placed 3cm compared with 7 and 10cm in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. The recovery rate of progressive motile sperm after thawing was also greater when semen was stored 3cm in the vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen. More rapid freezing rates are required to improve the survival of rooster sperm after cryopreservation and a range of distances from 1 to 5cm in nitrogen vapor above the surface of the liquid nitrogen is recommended for optimal sperm viability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Regulation effect of water and nitrogen on cotton biomass and yield under different drip irrigation patterns].

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-ling; Zhang, Fu-cang

    2010-11-01

    Three levels (low, medium, and high) of irrigation amount and nitrogen application rate were installed in a field experiment to study the regulation effect of water and nitrogen on the cotton biomass and yield under different drip irrigation patterns. Under the irrigation patterns 1 lateral 4 rows, 2 laterals 4 rows, and 2 laterals 6 rows, when the irrigation amount increased from low (90, 140, and 140 mm) to medium level (150, 200, and 200 mm), the aboveground dry biomass was increased by 9.2%, 37.9%, and 23.5%, and the seed yield was increased by 19.1%, 14.1%, and 16.0%, respectively. When the irrigation amount increased from medium to high level (210, 260, and 260 mm), the aboveground dry biomass was increased by 15.8%, 19.1%, and 16.7%, and the seed yield was increased by 7.7%, 11.2%, and 9.5%, respectively. When the nitrogen application rate changed from low (67.6 kg x hm(-2)) to medium level (95.2 kg x hm(-2)) the aboveground dry biomass under irrigation pattern 2 laterals 4 rows was increased by 14.3%, the seed yield under irrigation pattern 1 lateral 4 rows was increased by 22. 2% , while these two parameters under other irrigation patterns had no significant change. When the nitrogen application rate changed from medium to high level (122.8 kg x hm(-2)), the seed yield under the irrigation patterns 1 lateral 4 rows, 2 laterals 4 rows, and 2 laterals 6 rows was increased by 7.4%, 13.9%, and 9.9%, respectively, but the aboveground dry biomass had no significant change. Comparing with that under the irrigation patterns 1 lateral 4 rows and 2 laterals 6 rows, the regulation effect of water and nitrogen on the aboveground dry biomass and seed yield under irrigation pattern 2 laterals 4 rows was more apparent. As for the same water and nitrogen treatments, the aboveground dry biomass and seed yield were higher under the irrigation pattern 2 laterals 4 rows, suggesting that this drip irrigation pattern was most appropriate to the water- and nitrogen management of

  17. Emission of Nitrous Oxide in Temperate Forests with Different Stages of Nitrogen Saturation in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoyan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term nitrogen deposition has caused a problem called nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems globally. Aber et al. (1989) suggested that nitrogen saturation activate soil nitrification in forest systems, which is the main process of N2O production in aerobic condition. Thus, nitrogen saturation may affect significantly the N2O emission from forests, while the impact on flux has not been quantitatively evaluated yet. In the present study, 3-year monitoring of N2O emission was performed in an N-saturated forests (Tama Hill, Tokyo): the emission rate of N2O was measured monthly by a closed chamber method at 12 plots along a slope, and the net nitrification rate of surface soil (0-10 cm) was measured 4 times in situ. In addition, a comparative research was conducted in summer in eight temperate forests with different stages of nitrogen saturation in central Japan; the N2O flux, soil moisture, nitrogen availability and stream water NO3- concentration were measured at each site. In an N-saturated forests, the annual N2O emission was estimated to be 0.88 kg N ha-1year-1 , showing a typical seasonal variation . The seasonal patterns of N2O emission were significantly related to soil moisture and ambient temperature. We also found high spatial variation of N2O flux among 12 plots along the slope, which was generally higher at the bottom. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the rate of N2O emission and the net nitrification rate with WFPS<60%, while it was unclear in some humid spots with WFPS>60% , probably due to the effect of denitrification. In comparison sites, the N2O emission rate ranged nearly 16-fold from 0.13-2.11 g N ha-1day-1 was linearly related to the stream water NO3- concentration ranged 10-fold from 0.14 to 1.4 mg N/L. Our results revealed N enrichment in forest obviously stimulate soil N2O emission. Keywords: Nitrous oxide, nitrogen saturation, nitrification, temperate forest

  18. Vertical distribution and retention mechanism of nitrogen and phosphorus in soils with different macrophytes of a natural river mouth wetland.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Qiuwen; Ren, Kuixiao; Chen, Kaining

    2015-03-01

    Wetland vegetation can improve water quality through several processes including direct assimilation and the indirect effects of sedimentation and mineralization. This research takes the Zhucao River mouth of Daxi reservoir as a study case to investigate the vertical distribution of nitrogen and phosphorus in the soil of a natural wetland covered by different plants prior to any restoration action. There are four native emergent macrophytes (Typha latifolia L., Polygonum hydropiper L., Juncus effuses L., Phragmites communis L.) in the wetland. The total nitrogen (TN) and nitrate contents decreased with the soil depth for all vegetation types, and the mean TN and nitrate concentrations were higher in vegetative soil than in bare ground. The maximum TN concentration was found in the surface soil (0-2 cm) covered by P. communis. Ammonium decreased with the soil depth in vegetative areas, while it increased with soil depth in bare ground. The rank order of P fractions was organic P (OP) > P associated with Ca (Ca-P) > P associated with Fe/Al (Fe/Al-P). Total phosphorus (TP) and OP showed vertical profiles similar to that of TN. The mean concentrations of TP, Ca-P and Fe/Al-P were higher in vegetative soil than in bare ground. The maximum mean TP was also found in soil covered by P. communis. Loss on ignition (LOI) was significantly correlated with TN and TP (P < 0.05). Organic matter accumulation may be the main pathway to retain nitrogen and phosphorus in the wetland. Nitrogen and phosphorus sequestration in P. communis soil was the highest of the four dominant plants. The results could support the restoration of other degraded river mouth wetlands of the reservoir.

  19. Monitoring changes in soil organic carbon pools, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur under different agricultural management practices in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bibhash C; Datta, Siba Prasad; Rattan, Raj K; Singh, Anil K

    2010-12-01

    Soil organic matter not only affects sustainability of agricultural ecosystems, but also extremely important in maintaining overall quality of environment as soil contains a significant part of global carbon stock. Hence, we attempted to assess the influence of different tillage and nutrient management practices on various stabilized and active soil organic carbon pools, and their contribution to the extractable nitrogen phosphorus and sulfur. Our study confined to the assessment of impact of agricultural management practices on the soil organic carbon pools and extractable nutrients under three important cropping systems, viz. soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat. Results indicated that there was marginal improvement in Walkley and Black content in soil under integrated and organic nutrient management treatments in soybean-wheat, maize-wheat, and rice-wheat after completion of four cropping cycles. Improvement in stabilized pools of soil organic carbon (SOC) was not proportional to the applied amount of organic manures. While, labile pools of SOC were increased with the increase in amount of added manures. Apparently, green manure (Sesbania) was more effective in enhancing the lability of SOC as compared to farmyard manure and crop residues. The KMnO(4)-oxidizable SOC proved to be more sensitive and consistent as an index of labile pool of SOC compared to microbial biomass carbon. Under different cropping sequences, labile fractions of soil organic carbon exerted consistent positive effect on the extractable nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in soil.

  20. Responses of photosynthesis, nitrogen and proline metabolism to salinity stress in Solanum lycopersicum under different levels of nitrogen supplementation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhulika; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, effect of different levels of nitrogen (N0, deprived; N25, sub-optimum; N75, optimum and N150, supra-optimum) in Solanum lycopersicum L. seedlings under NaCl (NaCl1, 0.3 g kg(-1) sand and NaCl2, 0.5 g kg(-1)sand) stress was investigated. Biomass accumulation, pigments, K(+) concentration, nitrate and nitrite contents were declined by NaCl in dose dependent manner. As compared to control (N75 without NaCl), fresh weight declined by 4% and 11%, and dry weight by 7 and 13% when seedlings were grown under N75+NaCl1 and N75+NaCl2 combinations, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence parameters (JIP-test): the size and number of active reaction centres of photosynthetic apparatus (Fv/F0), efficiency of water splitting complex (F0/Fv), quantum yield of primary photochemistry (φP0 or Phi_P0), yield of electron transport per trapped excitation (Ψ0 or Psi_0), the quantum yield of electron transport (φE0), and performance index of PS II (PIABS) and parameters related to energy fluxes per reaction centre (ABS/RC, TR0/RC, ET0/RC and DI0/RC) were also affected by NaCl. However, toxic effect of NaCl on photosystem II photochemistry was ameliorated by N. The lower dose (NaCl1) of NaCl exerts damaging effect on oxidation side of PS II, while higher dose (NaCl2) damages PS II reaction centre and its reduction side. Moreover, control seedlings (N75 without NaCl) when exposed to NaCl1 and NaCl2 exhibited a significant enhancement in respiration rate by 6 and 16%, Na(+) accumulation by 111 and 169% in shoot, and 141 and 223% in root and ammonium contents by 19 and 34% respectively. Nitrate and ammonium assimilating enzymes such as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) were adversely affected by NaCl stress while glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) showed reverse trend. N addition caused further enhancement in free proline, and activity of Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), while

  1. Corrosion behaviors of Mo coating on stainless steel 316 substrates implanted by different nitrogen ion fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Madjid; Bafandeh, Nastaran

    2014-03-01

    The molybdenum nitride coating was produced by nitrogen ion implantation of the molybdenum layer deposited on the stainless steel 316 (SS) substrates. At first, molybdenum layers were deposited on the substrates by ion beam sputtering method, then nitrogen ions with an energy of 30 keV and a fluence between 1×1017 and 12×1017 N+ cm-2 were implanted in Mo/SS system. Crystal structure and topography of the surface are investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) image respectively. XRD patterns showed the formation of molybdenum nitride phases in all implanted samples. Corrosion tests showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the nitrogen applied fluences. A considerable improvement of corrosion performance by increasing ions fluences was observed. The lowest corrosion current density with amount of 0.1 μA/cm2 was obtained at 12×1017 ions/cm2 fluence in our case.

  2. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  3. Nitrogen turnover of three different agricultural soils determined by 15N triple labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Sebastian R.; Kleineidam, Kristina; Strasilla, Nicol; Schlüter, Steffen; Reent Köster, Jan; Well, Reinhard; Müller, Christoph; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    To meet the demand for data to improve existing N turnover models and to evaluate the effect of different soil physical properties on gross nitrogen (N) transformation rates, we investigated two arable soils and a grassland soil after addition of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), where either ammonium (NH4+), or nitrate (NO3-), or both pools have been labelled with 15N at 60 atom% excess (triple 15N tracing method). Besides NH4+, NO3- and nitrite (NO2-) contents with their respective 15N enrichment, nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) fluxes have been determined. Each soil was adjusted to 60 % of maximum water holding capacity and pre-incubated at 20˚ C for two weeks. After application of the differently labelled N fertilizer, the soils were further incubated at 20˚ C under aerobic conditions in a He-N2-O2 atmosphere (21 % O2, 76 He, 2% N2) to increase the sensitivity of N2 rates via the 15N gas flux method. Over a 2 week period soil N pools were quantified by 2 M KCl extraction (adjusted to pH 7 to prevent nitrite losses) (Stevens and Laughlin, 1995) and N gas fluxes were measured by gas chromatography in combination with IRMS. Here, we present the pool sizes and fluxes as well as the 15N enrichments during the study. Results are discussed in light of the soil differences that were responsible for the difference in gross N dynamics quantified by the 15N tracing model Ntrace (Müller et al., 2007). References Müller, C., T. Rütting, J. Kattge, R.J. Laughlin, and R.J. Stevens, (2007) Estimation of parameters in complex 15N tracing models by Monte Carlo sampling. Soil Biology & Biochemistry. 39(3): p. 715-726. Stevens, R.J. and R.J. Laughlin, (1995) Nitrite transformations during soil extraction with potassium chloride. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 59(3): p. 933-938.

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Massel, Karen; Campbell, Bradley C.; Mace, Emma S.; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tao, Yongfu; Worland, Belinda G.; Jordan, David R.; Botella, Jose R.; Godwin, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and utilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT) genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR) genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum. PMID:27826302

  5. Surface runoff and nitrogen (N) loss in a bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forest under different fertilization regimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qichun; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Wang, Jinwen; Song, Qiujin; Xue, Qiaoyun; Yu, Yan; Lin, Xianyong; Hussain, Sayed

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) losses from agricultural fields have been extensively studied. In contrast, surface runoff and N losses have rarely been considered for bamboo forests that are widespread in regions such as southern China. The thriving of bamboo industries has led to increasing fertilizer use in bamboo forests. In this study, we evaluated surface runoff and N losses in runoff following different fertilization treatments under field conditions in a bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) forest in the catchment of Lake Taihu in Jiangsu, China. Under three different fertilization regimes, i.e., control, site-specific nutrient management (SSNM), and farmer's fertilization practice (FFP), the water runoff rate amounted to 356, 361, and 342 m(3) ha(-1) and accounted for 1.91, 1.98, and 1.85% of the water input, respectively, from June 2009 to May 2010. The total N losses via surface runoff ranged from 1.2 to 1.8 kg ha(-1). Compared with FFP, the SSNM treatment reduced total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved nitrogen (DN) losses by 31 and 34%, respectively. The results also showed that variations in N losses depended mainly on runoff fluxes, not N concentrations. Runoff samples collected from all treatments throughout the year showed TN concentrations greater than 0.35 mg L(-1), with the mean TN concentration in the runoff from the FFP treatment reaching 8.97 mg L(-1). The loss of NO3(-)-N was greater than the loss of NH4(+)-N. The total loss of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) reached 23-41% of the corresponding DN. Therefore, DON is likely the main N species in runoff from bamboo forests and should be emphasized in the assessment and management of N losses in bamboo forest.

  6. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    stages of influx, availability of the mantle-type fluid at the site of diamond growth became limited, leading to Rayleigh fractionation. These fractionation trends are clearly depicted by δ15N-[N] but are not detected when examining co-variation diagrams involving δ13C. Also on the level of individual diamonds, large (≥ 5‰) variations in δ15N are associated with δ13C values that typically are constant within analytical uncertainty. The much smaller isotope fractionation factor for carbon (considering carbonate- or methane-rich fluids as possible carbon sources) compared to nitrogen leads to an approximately one order of magnitude lower sensitivity of δ13C values to Rayleigh fractionation processes (i.e. during fractionation, a 1‰ change in δ13C is associated with a 10‰ change in δ15N). As a consequence, even minor heterogeneity in the primary isotopic composition of diamond forming carbon (e.g., due to addition of minor subducted carbon) will completely blur any possible co-variations with δ15N or [N]. We suggest this strong difference in isotope effects for C and N to be the likely cause of observations of an apparently decoupled behaviour of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in diamond.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2003-11-30

    temperature programmed desorption studies a strong interaction between manganese and cerium. Presence of manganese not only enhanced the reduction rate of NO by methane, but also significantly improved the N{sub 2} selectivity. To increase the activity of the Mn-promoted catalyst, the manganese content of the catalyst need to be optimized and different methods of catalyst preparation and different reactor types need to be investigated to lower the transport limitations in the reactor.

  8. Autotrophic nitrogen removal in sequencing batch biofilm reactors at different oxygen supply modes.

    PubMed

    Wantawin, C; Juateea, J; Noophan, P L; Munakata-Marr, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventional nitrification-denitrification treatment is a common way to treat nitrogen in wastewater, but this process is costly for low COD/N wastewaters due to the addition of air and external carbon-source. However, ammonia may alternatively be converted to dinitrogen gas by autotrophic bacteria utilizing aerobically autotrophically produced nitrite as an electron acceptor under anoxic conditions. Lab-scale sequencing batch biofilm reactors (SBBRs) inoculated with normal nitrifying sludge were employed to study the potential of an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification-denitrification process initiated with typical nitrifying sludge for treating a synthetic ammonia wastewater devoid of organic carbon in one step. The ring-laced fibrous carrier (length 0.32 m, surface area 3.4 m2/m) was fixed vertically in a 3 L reactor. Two different air supply modes were applied:continuous aeration to control dissolved oxygen at 1.5 mg/L and intermittent aeration. High nitrogen removals of more than 50% were obtained in both SBBRs. At an ammonia loading of 0.882 gm N/m2-day [hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 hr], the SBBR continuously aerated to 1.5 mg DO/L had slightly higher nitrogen removal (64%) than the intermittently alternated SBBR (55%). The main form of residual nitrogen in the effluent was ammonia, at concentrations of 25 mg/L and 37 mg N/L in continuous and intermittent aeration SBBRs, respectively. Ammonia was completely consumed when ammonia loading was reduced to 0.441 gm N/m2-day [HRT extended to 48 hr]. The competitive use of nitrite by aerobic nitrite oxidizing bacteria (ANOB) with anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (anammox bacteria) during the expanded aeration period under low remaining ammonia concentration resulted in higher nitrate production and lower nitrogen loss in the continuous aeration SBBR than in the intermittent aeration SBBR. The nitrogen removal efficiencies in SBBRs with continuous and alternating aerated were 80% and 86% respectively

  9. XPS study of nitrogen dioxide adsorption on metal oxide particle surfaces under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen dioxide on gamma aluminium oxide (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and alpha iron oxide (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) particle surfaces under various conditions of relative humidity, presence of molecular oxygen and UV light has been investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to monitor the different surface species that form under these environmental conditions. Adsorption of NO(2) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces results primarily in the formation of surface nitrate, NO(3)(-) with an oxidation state of +5, as indicated by a peak with binding energy of 407.3 eV in the N1s region. An additional minority species, sensitive to the presence of relative humidity and molecular oxygen, is also observed in the N1s region with lower binding energy of 405.9 eV. This peak is assigned to a surface species in the +4 oxidation state. When irradiated with UV light, other species form on the surface. These surface-bound photochemical products all have lower binding energy, between 400 and 402 eV, indicating reduced nitrogen species in the range of N oxidations states spanning +1 to -1. Co-adsorbed water decreases the amount of these reduced surface-bound products while the presence of molecular oxygen completely suppresses the formation of all reduced nitrogen species on aluminum oxide particle surfaces. For NO(2) on iron oxide particle surfaces, photoreduction is enhanced relative to gamma-Al(2)O(3) and surface bound photoreduced species are observed under all environmental conditions. Complementing the experimental data, N1s core electron binding energies (CEBEs) were calculated using DFT for a number of nitrogen-containing species in the gas phase and adsorbed on an Al(8)O(12) cluster. A range of CEBEs is calculated for various nitrogen species in different adsorption modes and oxidation states. These calculated values are discussed in light of the peaks observed in the XPS N1s region and the possible species that form following NO(2) adsorption and

  10. [Evaluation of nitrogen loss way in summer maize system under different fertilizer N managements].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Hu, Ke-Lin; Li, Guang-De; Wang, Huan-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate nitrogen (N) loss from soil-crop systems under different fertilizer N managements, and to provide some suggestions on optimizing fertilizer management practices. The experiment was carried in high yield production area of Huantai county in Shandong province in 2009. Four kinds of fertilizer N application practices were designed, including CK, farmer practice (FP), optimizing fertilizer application (OPT) and controlled release fertilizer (CRT) for studying the fate of N during the maize growth season in 2009. The water and nitrogen management model (WNMM) was used to simulate the dynamics of soil water and N fate. The results indicated that the ratio of nitrate leaching and NH3 volatilization accounting of fertilizer N ranged from 6% to 18% and 5% to 34%, and their means were 12.7% and 20.7%, respectively. The amount of N leaching under OPT was 14.5 kg x hm(-2), was the lowest in all treatments. The amount of NH3 volatilization under CRT was 7.6 kg x hm(-2), respectively, was the lowest in all treatments. The order of total N loss under four treatments followed as: FP > OPT > CRF approximately CK. Both OPT and CRT treatments are the best management practices considering their high grain yield, water and nitrogen use efficiencies, and environmental protection.

  11. Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces Competition during Microvinification under Different Sugar and Nitrogen Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lleixà, Jessica; Manzano, Maria; Mas, Albert; Portillo, María del C.

    2016-01-01

    The inoculation of wines with autochthonous yeast allows obtaining complex wines with a peculiar microbial footprint characteristic from a wine region. Mixed inoculation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. cerevisiae is of interest for the wine industry for technological and sensory reasons. However, the interactions between these yeasts are not well understood, especially those regarding the availability of nutrients. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of nitrogen and sugar concentration on the evolution of mixed yeast populations on controlled laboratory-scale fermentations monitored by density, plate culturing, PCR-DGGE and sugar and nitrogen consumption. Furthermore, the effect of the time of inoculation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae respect the initial co-inoculation of three non-Saccharomyces yeasts was evaluated over the evolution of fermentation. Our results have shown that S. cerevisiae inoculation during the first 48 h conferred a stabilizing effect over the fermentations with non-Saccharomyces strains tested and, generally, reduced yeast diversity at the end of the fermentation. On the other hand, nitrogen limitation increased the time of fermentation and also the proportion of non-Saccharomyces yeasts at mid and final fermentation. High sugar concentration resulted in different proportions of the inoculated yeast depending on the time of S. cerevisiae inoculation. This work emphasizes the importance of the concentration of nutrients on the evolution of mixed fermentations and points to the optimal conditions for a stable fermentation in which the inoculated yeasts survived until the end. PMID:27994585

  12. Effects of different carbon and nitrogen sources on naphthoquinone production of Cordyceps unilateralis BCC 1869.

    PubMed

    Prathumpai, W; Kocharin, K; Phimmakong, K; Wongsa, P

    2007-02-01

    The production of six naphthoquinone derivatives, erythrostominone, deoxyerythrostominone, 4-O-methyl erythrostominone, epierythrostominol, deoxyerythrostominol, and 3,5,8-trihydroxy-6-methoxy-2-(5-oxohexa- 1,3-dienyl)-1,4-naphthoquinone, was examined during the growth of Cordyceps unilateralis BCC 1869 on different carbon and nitrogen sources. Erythrostominone production by the fungus accounted for more than 50% of total naphthoquinones, but production of each of the other five derivatives accounted for less than 20% of total naphthoquinones. The highest volumetric production rate of erythrostominone and overall naphthoquinone production rate were obtained on mannose as a sole carbon source and ammonium sulfate as a sole nitrogen source (4922.4 +/- 118.8 mg/[L.d] and 5.03 g/[L.d], respectively). The highest growth rate was obtained on arabinose (0.043 h-1), whereas the maximum overall naphthoquinone concentration was obtained on lactose (2 g/L) at 237 h. These naphthoquinones were produced with no pH control and were first detected at a pH of about 3.0 to 4.0. These results suggest that carbon and nitrogen influenced directly the production of naphthoquinones.

  13. Confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen onto different heat transfer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Xu, G. H.; Fu, X.; Li, C. R.

    2011-06-01

    Jet impingement of liquid nitrogen owns many applications in the cryogenic cooling aspects, such as, cooling of high-power chips in the electronic devices and cryoprobes in the cryosurgery. In the present study, we systematically investigated the confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen from a tube of about 2.0 mm in diameter onto the heat transfer surfaces of about 5.0 mm in basement diameter with different heat transfer surface geometries and conditions, i.e., flat surface, hemispherical surface and flat surface with a needle. The effects of many influential factors, such as, the geometry of the heat transfer surface, jet velocity, distance between the nozzle exit and heat transfer surface, heat transfer surface condition, and some other, on the heat transfer were investigated. The heat transfer correlations were also proposed by using the experimental data, and it was found that the heat transfer mechanism of liquid impingement in the confined space was dominated by the convective evaporation rather than the nucleate boiling in the present case. The critical heat flux (CHF) of the confined jet impingement was measured and the visualization of the corresponding flow patterns of the confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen was also conducted simultaneously to understand the heat transfer phenomena.

  14. Experimental analysis of a nitrogen removal process simulation of wastewater land treatment under three different wheat planting densities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Qi; Chen, Jia-Jun; Tian, Kai-Ming; Lu, Yan

    2002-07-01

    Nitrogen contaminant transport, transformation and uptake simulation experiments were conducted in green house under three different planting density of winter wheat. They were Group A, planting density of 0.0208 plants/cm2, Group B, 0.1042 plants/cm2, and Group C, 0.1415 plants/cm2. The capacity and ratio of nitrogen removal were different on three kinds of conditions of wastewater land treatment. From analysis of wastewater treatment capacity, wastewater concentration and irrigation intensity for Group C were suitable and nitrogen quantity added was 2 times of that for Group B, 2.6 times for Group A while nitrogen residue was only 7.06%. Hence, wastewater irrigation and treatment design with purpose of waste water treatment should select the design with maximum capacity, optimal removal ratio and least residue in soil, which was closely related to crop planting density, crop growth status and also background nitrogen quantity in soil.

  15. Nitrogen transformations under different conditions in open ponds by means of microalgae-bacteria consortium treating pig slurry.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, Cristina; Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz; García-González, Maria Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Four open ponds inoculated with microalgae-bacteria consortium treating different swine slurries (fresh and anaerobically digested) were evaluated in terms of nitrogen transformation under optimal and real conditions of temperature and illumination. Ammonium complete depletion was not achieved. Ponds operated under real conditions presented lower ammonium removal. Elimination capacities were around 26 mg N/Ld and were subsequently increased with increasing inlet ammonium loading rate. Different nitrogen transformation was observed depending on substrate source. When anaerobically digested slurry was fed to the ponds, nitrification followed by biomass uptake and denitrification were the main nitrogen transformation taking place depending on inlet ammonium loading rate and operational conditions. Ponds fed with fresh slurry exhibited denitrification as the main nitrogen removal mechanism for the pond operated under real conditions while under optimal conditions stripping, denitrification and biomass uptake contributed similarly. Therefore, this study confirmed that the so-claimed nitrogen recovery by microalgae biomass is frequently overestimated.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-09-01

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments

  17. Effects of different nitrogen reduction modes on yield of spring maize and nitrate - N residue in soils of the southern Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Tinghui; Dong, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    【Objectives】Excessive fertilization in farmland caused nitrate leaching and accumulation in soil, which not only reduced the fertilizer utilization rate, but also had potential environmental problems. The effects of different nitrogen reduction modes on yield of spring maize and soil NO3-N in the southern Loess Plateau were discussed, and scientific fertilization suggestions were put forward, which were of great significance to instruct local maize fertilization and protect environment safety. 【Methods】A field experiment was conducted in the south of the Loess Plateau for three years. Spring maize was planted with half plastic film mulching in one crop per annum.The experiment consisted of 5 N fertilization treatments: control treatment (CK),conventional N fertilization rate (Con), optimal N fertilizationⅠ(OptⅠ), optimal N fertilizationⅡ (Opt Ⅱ) and optimal N fertilization Ⅲ(Opt Ⅲ), The changes of yield of maize, nitrogen uptake and soil NO3-N were measured.【Results】The results showed that, compared with the conventional fertilization, the grain yield and N uptake of maize had no significant change under the three optimal N fertilization application models, the rate of the grain yield's change is 100 300kg/hm2. Compared with the conventional fertilization, agronomic efficiency of fertilizer-nitrogen and N partial fertilizer productivity were increased by 20.2% 23.2% and 21.9% 23.7%, respectively. The accumulation of nitrate nitrogen in profile (0-200 cm) decreased by 90.7 kg / hm2, 97.3 kg / hm2, 100.7 kg / hm2 ,respectively, with the decreases of 44.7%, 47.9% and 49.6% respectively.【Conclusions】The optimum nitrogen fertilization pattern did not affect spring maize yield and N uptake, and could improve agronomic efficiency of fertilizer-nitrogen and N partial fertilizer productivity. Under the same nitrogen application rate, the effects of adding nitrification inhibitor or slow-release fertilizer on nitrate-N residue were not obvious

  18. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Two Bornean Nepenthes Species with Differences in Nitrogen Acquisition Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sickel, Wiebke; Grafe, T Ulmar; Meuche, Ivonne; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Keller, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Carnivorous plants of the genus Nepenthes have been studied for over a century, but surprisingly little is known about associations with microorganisms. The two species Nepenthes rafflesiana and Nepenthes hemsleyana differ in their pitcher-mediated nutrient sources, sequestering nitrogen from arthropod prey and arthropods as well as bat faeces, respectively. We expected bacterial communities living in the pitchers to resemble this diet difference. Samples were taken from different parts of the pitchers (leaf, peristome, inside, outside, digestive fluid) of both species. Bacterial communities were determined using culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Bacterial richness and community structure were similar in leaves, peristomes, inside and outside walls of both plant species. Regarding digestive fluids, bacterial richness was higher in N. hemsleyana than in N. rafflesiana. Additionally, digestive fluid communities were highly variable in structure, with strain-specific differences in community composition between replicates. Acidophilic taxa were mostly of low abundance, except the genus Acidocella, which strikingly reached extremely high levels in two N. rafflesiana fluids. In N. hemsleyana fluid, some taxa classified as vertebrate gut symbionts as well as saprophytes were enriched compared to N. rafflesiana, with saprophytes constituting potential competitors for nutrients. The high variation in community structure might be caused by a number of biotic and abiotic factors. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were present in both study species, which might provide essential nutrients to the plant at times of low prey capture and/or rare encounters with bats.

  19. Sexually different physiological responses of Populus cathayana to nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Hao; Zhao, Hongxia; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that there are significant sexual differences in the morphological and physiological responses of Populus cathayana Rehder under stressful conditions. However, little is known about sex-specific differences in responses to nutrient deficiencies. In this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) deficiencies on the morphological, physiological and chloroplast ultrastructural traits of P. cathayana males and females were investigated. The results showed that N and P deficiencies significantly decreased plant growth, foliar N and P contents, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis, and instantaneous photosynthetic N- and P-use efficiencies (PNUE and PPUE) in both sexes. Males had higher photosynthesis, higher PNUE and PPUE rates, and a lower accumulation of plastoglobules in chloroplasts than did females when exposed to N- and P-deficiency conditions. Nitrogen-deficient males had higher glutamate dehydrogenase and peroxidase activities, and a more intact chloroplast ultrastructure, but less starch accumulation than did N-deficient females. Phosphorus-deficient males had higher nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and acid phosphatase activities, but a lower foliar N : P ratio and less PSII damage than did P-deficient females. These results suggest that N and P deficiencies cause greater negative effects on females than on males, and that the different sexes of P. cathayana may employ different strategies to cope with N and P deficiencies.

  20. Determination of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass of southern-Taiga soils by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. I.; Malysheva, T. I.; Maslov, M. N.; Kuznetsova, E. Yu.; Menyailo, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    The results of methods for determining microbial biomass carbon vary in reproducibility among soils. The fumigation-extraction and substrate-induced respiration methods give similar results for Albic Luvisol and Gleyic Fluvisol, while the results of the rehydration method are reliably higher. In Histic Fluvisol, relatively similar results are obtained using the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods, and the substrate-induced respiration method gives almost halved results. The seasonal dynamics of microbial biomass carbon also varies depending on the method used. The highest difference is typical for the warm period, when the concentrations found by the extraction and substrate-induced methods poorly agree between two out of three soils studied. The concentration of microbial biomass nitrogen is less sensitive to the analytical method: the differences between the results of the fumigation-extraction and rehydration methods are statistically insignificant in the all soils. To reveal stable relationships between the results of determining microbial carbon and the soil properties and analytical method, a large diversity of soils should be studied. This will allow for proposing of conversion factors for the recalculation of the obtained values to the concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass for different soils (or soil groups) and, hence, the more correct comparison of the results obtained by different methods.

  1. Can Active Canopy Sensing Technologies and Soil Nitrogen Content Help Us Improve Corn-Nitrogen Management in Minnesota?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drane, Benjamin Clark

    Polymethacrylimide (PMI) foams are becoming the preferred material choice for sandwich structure cores. Rohacell, one of the industry's leading PMI foams, demonstrates varying degrees of nonlinear elastic behavior. In order to capture this behavior, a hyperelastic material model was calibrated from test data using a novel specimen geometry. The calibration of hyperelastic foam models typically requires experimental data from difficult and expensive test methods. Motivated by this, a relatively inexpensive test method called the planar tension test was employed to calibrate a compressible hyperelastic foam model called Hyperfoam. Although the planar tension test is typically used only on hyperelastic elastomers, it is hypothesized that using it on Rohacell will improve the performance of the Hyperfoam model. Three different grades of Rohacell were chosen for investigation: 200 WF, 200 HERO, and 71 HERO. A redesign of the classic planar tension test was developed through iterative modeling to be suitable for a brittle material. This test, along with the uniaxial tension test, was used to calibrate six different variations of the Hyperfoam model for all three Rohacell grades. The performance of the model variations was measured by comparing the model predictions to experimental data. Digital image correlation (DIC), a non-contact strain measurement method, was implemented. Further validation was sought in the design, fabrication, and testing of a unique shear test specimen termed the "Offset-Hole Shear" test, or simply the OHS test. The planar tension test data obtained in the present study did not improve the accuracy of the Hyperfoam model but rather worsened its performance. Furthermore, calibrating the Hyperfoam model with only uniaxial data provided better behavioral prediction than when the model was calibrated with both uniaxial and planar tension data. When the Hyperfoam model was calibrated with only uniaxial tension data, it was shown for all grades of

  2. Differences in Plant Traits among N-fixing Trees in Hawaii Affect Understory Nitrogen Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    August-Schmidt, E.; D'Antonio, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixing trees are frequently used to restore soil functions to degraded ecosystems because they can increase soil organic matter and N availability. Although N-fixers are lumped into a single functional group, the quality and quantity of the plant material they produce and the rate at which they accrete and add N to the cycling pool likely vary. This talk will focus on the questions: (1) How does N-cycling differ among N-fixing tree species? And (2) Which plant traits are most important in distinguishing the soil N environment? To address these questions, we investigated planted stands of two Hawaiian native N-fixing trees (Acacia koa and Sophora chrysophylla) and `natural' stands of an invasive N-fixing tree (Morella faya) in burned seasonal submontane woodlands in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. We measured the relative availability of nitrogen in the soil pool and understory plant community as well as characterizing the rate and amount of N cycling in these stands both in the field and using long term soil incubations in the laboratory. We found that N is cycled very differently under these three N-fixers and that this correlates with differences in their leaf traits. S. chrysophylla had the highest foliar %N and highest specific leaf area, and stands of these trees are associated with faster N-cycling, resulting in greater N availability compared to all other site types. Incubated S. chrysophylla soils mineralized almost twice as much N as any other soil type over the course of the experiment. The comparatively high-N environment under S. chrysophylla suggests that litter quality may be more important than litter quantity in determining nitrogen availability to the understory community.

  3. Effects of cryptogamic covers on the global carbon and nitrogen balance as investigated by different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bettina; Porada, Philipp; Elbert, Wolfgang; Burrows, Susannah; Caesar, Jennifer; Steinkamp, Jörg; Tamm, Alexandra; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Büdel, Burkhard; Kleidon, Axel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    needed by the organisms to build up biomass. The predicted requirement for nitrogen ranges from 3.5 to 34 Tg a-1, again being in a reasonable range compared to the data analysis approach. In experimental field studies (3rd approach), we analyzed the net primary production of biological soil crusts, i.e. one major group of cryptogamic covers. The microclimatic conditions (water status, temperature, light intensity) of different types of biological soil crusts were monitored at 5-minute intervals over a whole year. Conducting a factorial analysis of CO2 gas exchange of the crusts in the lab, we obtained the net photosynthesis or respiration rate for all microclimatic conditions encountered in the field. The latter results were combined with the microclimate data, assigning CO2 gas exchange values to each microclimate measurement tuple. Integration over the year resulted in an annual carbon fixation of ~5 g m-2 a-1, being nearly identical to the numbers obtained during the data analysis approach. In summary, our three different approaches clearly revealed that cryptogamic covers have a considerable effect on the global terrestrial C and N cycle, which must not be neglected in global carbon and nitrogen balances.

  4. Phenotypic and molecular characterisation of efficient nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter strains from rice fields for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Ranjan K; Ansari, Mohammad W; Dangar, Tushar K; Mohanty, Santanu; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is highly effective in the field and potentially useful to reduce adverse effects chemical fertilisers. Here, Azotobacter species were selected via phenotypic, biochemical and molecular characterisations from different rice fields. Acetylene reduction assay of Azotobacter spp. showed that Azotobacter vinelandii (Az3) fixed higher amount of nitrogen (121.09 nmol C2H4 mg(-1) bacteria h(-1)). Likewise, its plant growth functions, viz. siderophore, hydrogen cyanide, salicylic acid, IAA, GA3, zeatin, NH3, phosphorus solubilisation, ACC deaminase and iron tolerance, were also higher. The profile of gDNA, plasmid DNA and cellular protein profile depicted inter-generic and inter-specific diversity among the isolates of A. vinelandii. The PCR-amplified genes nifH, nifD and nifK of 0.87, 1.4 and 1.5 kb , respectively, were ascertained by Southern blot hybridisation in isolates of A. vinelandii. The 16S rRNA sequence from A. vinelandii (Az3) was novel, and its accession number (JQ796077) was received from NCBI data base. Biofertiliser formulation of novel A. vinelandii isolates along with commercial one was evaluated in rice (Oriza sativa L. var. Khandagiri) fields. The present finding revealed that treatment T4 (Az3) (A. vinelandii) are highly efficient to improved growth and yield of rice crop.

  5. Improved nitrogen management utilizing ground-penetrating-radar: A nine-year investigation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water availability and efficient use of nitrogen are critical components of a sustainable and profitable agricultural system. Since nitrogen is typically excessively applied, considerable nitrogen may leach to and move through the subsurface. Our hypothesis is that knowledge of the subsurface hydr...

  6. Split Nitrogen Application Improves Wheat Baking Quality by Influencing Protein Composition Rather Than Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Cheng; auf’m Erley, Gunda Schulte; Rossmann, Anne; Schuster, Ramona; Koehler, Peter; Mühling, Karl-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The use of late nitrogen (N) fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g., booting, heading or anthesis) to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume) needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems. PMID:27313585

  7. Split Nitrogen Application Improves Wheat Baking Quality by Influencing Protein Composition Rather Than Concentration.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cheng; Auf'm Erley, Gunda Schulte; Rossmann, Anne; Schuster, Ramona; Koehler, Peter; Mühling, Karl-Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The use of late nitrogen (N) fertilization (N application at late growth stages of wheat, e.g., booting, heading or anthesis) to improve baking quality of wheat has been questioned. Although it increases protein concentration, the beneficial effect on baking quality (bread loaf volume) needs to be clearly understood. Two pot experiments were conducted aiming to evaluate whether late N is effective under controlled conditions and if these effects result from increased N rate or N splitting. Late N fertilizers were applied either as additional N or split from the basal N at late boot stage or heading in the form of nitrate-N or urea. Results showed that late N fertilization improved loaf volume of wheat flour by increasing grain protein concentration and altering its composition. Increasing N rate mainly enhanced grain protein quantitatively. However, N splitting changed grain protein composition by enhancing the percentages of gliadins and glutenins as well as certain high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS), which led to an improved baking quality of wheat flour. The late N effects were greater when applied as nitrate-N than urea. The proportions of glutenin and x-type HMW-GS were more important than the overall protein concentration in determining baking quality. N splitting is more effective in improving wheat quality than the increase in the N rate by late N, which offers the potential to cut down N fertilization rates in wheat production systems.

  8. Fuel nitrogen release during black liquor pyrolysis; Part 2: Comparisons between different liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, K.; Nikkanen, S. ); Hupa, M. . Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-08-01

    This continuation of earlier work reports fuel nitrogen release for black liquors at two temperatures during pyrolysis of single droplets in an oxygen-free environment. Approximately half of the 20--60% fuel nitrogen released was ammonia and half was molecular nitrogen. The total amount of fixed nitrogen released during pyrolysis was almost linearly proportional to the liquor nitrogen content. The yield of fixed nitrogen for birch liquors was significantly higher than for pine liquors, and the yield for bagasse liquor was extremely high.

  9. Small genetic differences between ericoid mycorrhizal fungi affect nitrogen uptake by Vaccinium.

    PubMed

    Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Meharg, Andrew A; Duff, Elizabeth I; Anderson, Ian C; Alexander, Ian J

    2009-01-01

    Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to differ in their pattern of nitrogen (N) use in pure culture. Here, we investigate whether this functional variation is maintained in symbiosis using three ascomycetes from a clade not previously shown to include ericoid mycorrhizal taxa. Vaccinium macrocarpon and Vaccinium vitis-idaea were inoculated with three fungal strains known to form coils in Vaccinium roots, which differed in their patterns of N use in liquid culture. (15)N was used to trace the uptake of -N, -N and glutamine-N into shoots. (15)N transfer differed among the three fungal strains, including two that had identical internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences, and was quantitatively related to fungal growth in liquid culture at low carbon availability. These results demonstrate that functional differences among closely related ericoid mycorrhizal fungi are maintained in symbiosis with their hosts, and suggest that N transfer to plant shoots in ericoid mycorrhizas is under fungal control.

  10. Raman spectra of single walled carbon nanotubes at high temperatures: pretreating samples in a nitrogen atmosphere improves their thermal stability in air.

    PubMed

    Molina-Duarte, J; Espinosa-Vega, L I; Rodríguez, A G; Guirado-López, R A

    2017-03-08

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study dedicated to analyzing the structural stability and chemical reactivity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the presence of air and nitrogen atmospheres in the temperature interval of 300-1000 K. The temperature dependence of the radial breathing mode (RBM) region of the Raman spectra is irreversible in the presence of air, but it is reversible up to 1000 K in a nitrogen atmosphere. Our density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that irreversibility is due to partial degradation of SWCNTs produced by dissociative chemical adsorption of molecular oxygen on intrinsic defects of the nanotube surface. Oxygen partially opens the nanotubes forming semi-tubes with a non-uniform diameter distribution observed by Raman scattering. In contrast, heating CNTs in a nitrogen atmosphere seems to lead to the formation of nitrogen-doped SWCNTs. Our DFT calculations indicate that in general the most common types of nitrogen doping (e.g., pyridinic, pyrrolic, and substitutional) modify the location of the RBM frequency, leading also to frequency shifts and intensity changes of the surrounding modes. However, by performing a systematic comparison between calculated and measured spectra we have been able to infer the possible adsorbed configurations adopted by N species on the nanotube surface. Interestingly, by allowing previously nitrogen-exposed SWCNTs to interact with air at different temperatures (up to 1000 K) we note that the RBM region remains nearly unperturbed, defining thus our nitrogen-pretreated SWCNTs as more appropriate carbon nanostructures for high temperature applications in realistic environments. We believe that we have implemented a post-growth heat-treatment process that improves the stability of carbon nanotubes preserving their diameter and inducing a defect-healing process of the carbon wall.

  11. Differences in phosphorus and nitrogen delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Richard B; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Nolan, Jacqueline V; Brakebill, John W

    2008-02-01

    Seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been linked to increased nitrogen fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basins, though recent evidence shows that phosphorus also influences productivity in the Gulf. We developed a spatially explicit and structurally detailed SPARROW water-quality model that reveals important differences in the sources and transport processes that control nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the Gulf. Our model simulations indicate that agricultural sources in the watersheds contribute more than 70% of the delivered N and P. However, corn and soybean cultivation is the largest contributor of N (52%), followed by atmospheric deposition sources (16%); whereas P originates primarily from animal manure on pasture and rangelands (37%), followed by corn and soybeans (25%), other crops (18%), and urban sources (12%). The fraction of in-stream P and N load delivered to the Gulf increases with stream size, but reservoir trapping of P causes large local- and regional-scale differences in delivery. Our results indicate the diversity of management approaches required to achieve efficient control of nutrient loads to the Gulf. These include recognition of important differences in the agricultural sources of N and P, the role of atmospheric N, attention to P sources downstream from reservoirs, and better control of both N and P in close proximity to large rivers.

  12. Differences in phosphorus and nitrogen delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Boyer, E.W.; Nolan, J.V.; Brakebill, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been linked to increased nitrogen fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basins, though recent evidence shows that phosphorus also influences productivity in the Gulf. We developed a spatially explicit and structurally detailed SPARROW water-quality model that reveals important differences in the sources and transport processes that control nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the Gulf. Our model simulations indicate that agricultural sources in the watersheds contribute more than 70% of the delivered N and P. However, corn and soybean cultivation is the largest contributor of N (52%), followed by atmospheric deposition sources (16%); whereas P originates primarily from animal manure on pasture and rangelands (37%), followed by corn and soybeans (25%), other crops (18%), and urban sources (12%). The fraction of in-stream P and N load delivered to the Gulf increases with stream size, but reservoir trapping of P causes large local- and regional-scale differences in delivery. Our results indicate the diversity of management approaches required to achieve efficient control of nutrient loads to the Gulf. These include recognition of important differences in the agricultural sources of N and P, the role of atmospheric N, attention to P sources downstream from reservoirs, and better control of both N and P in close proximity to large rivers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  13. Using Data to Improve Instruction: Different Approaches for Different Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieman, Rob

    2014-01-01

    What data should teachers use, and how should they use these data to improve their teaching? In this review, a diverse set of literature that addresses this question is categorized according to three distinct approaches: the diagnostic approach, the methods approach, and the teacher approach. Within the diagnostic approach, teachers collect data…

  14. Effect of different forage species on the nitrogen uptake in Hulunbeir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Jun; Xu, Xing-Liang; Tang, Xue-Juan; Yang, Gui-Xia; Zhang, Zhao; Xin, Xiao-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of determining factors for nitrogen uptake preferences and how they are modified in changing environments are critical to understand ecosystem nitrogen cycling and to predict plant responses to future environmental changes. However, it remains unclear in this aspect for the main managed grassland (Medicago sativa, Bromus inermis, Leymus chinensis) and crop (Brassica campestris) under field condition in Hulunbeir area of Inner Mongolia of China. Two 15N tracer experiments utilizing a unique differential labelled nitrogen source were employed in both managed grassland (M. sativa, B. inermis and L. chinensis) and crop (B. campestris) in Hulunbeir area of Inner Mongolia of China. Tracing both labels in the above-and below ground plant biomass, soil NH4 + -N or NO3 ‑ -N and NH4 + -N or NO3 - -N uptake by plants. There were differences between soil NO3 ‑-N concentration and NH4+-N concentration, and NO3 ‑-N concentration was higher than NH4 +-N concentration. NO3 ‑-N concentration was led by different grass species. The NH4 +-N concentration in August were higher than in July on the whole, the highest value for B. campestris and the lowest for B. inermis. The plant N concentration in B. inermis, L. chinensis and B. campestris showed decreasing trend, its mean value decreased by 20.1, 47.9 and 26.7%, respectively, and M. sativa increased by 13.7%. Among the four species, the individuals exhibited a preference for 15NO3 -, indicated by higher 15N signatures in 15NO3-treatment than in 15NH4 + treatment.

  15. Improving Student Writing Through Different Writing Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Sean; Haley, Jennifer

    This report describes a program for improving writing skills through choices of structured and unstructured writing process. The purpose of this program is to increase their ability to produce quality writing as measured by the district's fourth grade writing rubric. The targeted population consisted of an average fourth grade class, located in a…

  16. Within-season yield prediction with different nitrogen inputs under rain-fed condition using CERES-Wheat model in the northwest of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengpeng; Song, Mingdan; Feng, Hao; Zhao, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Yield prediction within season is of great use to improve agricultural risk management and decision making. The objectives of this study were to access the yield forecast performance with increasing nitrogen inputs and to determine when the acceptable predicted yield can be achieved using the CERES-Wheat model. the calibrated model simulated wheat yield very well under various water and nitrogen conditions. Long-term simulation demonstrated that nitrogen input enlarged the annual variability of wheat yield generally. Within-season yield prediction showed that, regardless of nitrogen inputs, yield forecasts in the later growing season improved the accuracy and reduced the uncertainty of yield prediction. In a low-yielding year (2011-2012) and a high-yielding year (1991-1992), the date of acceptable predicted yield was achieved 62 and 65 days prior to wheat maturity, respectively. In a normal-yielding year (1983-1984), inadequate precipitation after the jointing stage in most historical years led to the underestimation of wheat yield and the date of accurate yield prediction was delayed to 235-250 days after simulation (7-22 days prior to maturity) for different N inputs. Yield prediction was highly influenced by the distribution of meteorological elements during the growing season and may show great improvement if future weather can be reliably forecast early. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Evaluation of two approaches for improved nitrogen oxides monitoring in urban atmospheres. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, C.W.; Kelly, T.J.; Ward, G.F.

    1994-11-09

    Currently, instrumentation used to monitor nitrogen oxides in urban monitoring networks measure NO and `NOx`, where NOx includes NO and NO2 and no other NOy constituents. These NOx measurements are subject to a positive bias from other oxidized nitrogen species (NOy) and it is believed that NOy measurements are useful in many ways including photochemical grid model diagnostics and emissions inventory verification. This report describes an evaluation of two approaches to monitor both NOx and NOy. System A makes use of two chemiluminescence instruments to monitor NO, NOy and NO2. One of the instruments detects NO by its chemiluminescent reaction with O3, while the other detects NO2 by its chemiluminescent reaction with luminol. A heated molybdenum catalytic converter is used to reduce NOy constituents to NO for detection. System B utilizes the luminol chemiluminescence reaction to detect NO2 and employs multiple catalysts to obtain measurements of NOx and NOy. Nitric oxide is determined as the difference between NOx and NO2. These two approaches are evaluated in terms of linearity, converter efficiency, interferences and detection limits.

  18. Improving Plant Nitrogen Use Efficiency through Alteration of Amino Acid Transport Processes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Perchlik, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of nitrogen (N) uptake and utilization in plants could potentially increase crop yields while reducing N fertilization and, subsequently, environmental pollution. Within most plants, N is transported primarily as amino acids. In this study, pea (Pisum sativum) plants overexpressing AMINO ACID PERMEASE1 (AAP1) were used to determine if and how genetic manipulation of amino acid transport from source to sink affects plant N use efficiency. The modified plants were grown under low, moderate, or high N fertilization regimes. The results showed that, independent of the N nutrition, the engineered plants allocate more N via the vasculature to the shoot and seeds and produce more biomass and higher seed yields than wild-type plants. Dependent on the amount of N supplied, the AAP1-overexpressing plants displayed improved N uptake or utilization efficiency, or a combination of the two. They also showed significantly increased N use efficiency in N-deficient as well as in N-rich soils and, impressively, required half the amount of N to produce as many fruits and seeds as control plants. Together, these data support that engineering N allocation from source to sink presents an effective strategy to produce crop plants with improved productivity as well as N use efficiency in a range of N environments. PMID:28733388

  19. Rapidly growing tropical trees mobilize remarkable amounts of nitrogen, in ways that differ surprisingly among species

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ann E.; Raich, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Fast-growing forests such as tropical secondary forests can accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and thereby play an important role in the atmospheric CO2 balance. Because nitrogen (N) cycling is inextricably linked with C cycling, the question becomes: Where does the N come from to match high rates of C accumulation? In unique experimental 16-y-old plantations established in abandoned pasture in lowland Costa Rica, we used a mass-balance approach to quantify N accumulation in vegetation, identify sources of N, and evaluate differences among tree species in N cycling. The replicated design contained four broad-leaved evergreen tree species growing under similar environmental conditions. Nitrogen uptake was rapid, reaching 409 (±30) kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1, double the rate reported from a Puerto Rican forest and greater than four times that observed at Hubbard Brook Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Nitrogen amassed in vegetation was 874 (±176) kg⋅ha−1, whereas net losses of soil N (0–100 cm) varied from 217 (±146) to 3,354 (±915) kg⋅ha−1 (P = 0.018) over 16 y. Soil C:N, δ13C values, and N budgets indicated that soil was the main source of biomass N. In Vochysia guatemalensis, however, N fixation contributed >60 kg⋅ha−1⋅y−1. All species apparently promoted soil N turnover, such that the soil N mean residence time was 32–54 y, an order of magnitude lower than the global mean. High rates of N uptake were associated with substantial N losses in three of the species, in which an average of 1.6 g N was lost for every gram of N accumulated in biomass. PMID:22689942

  20. Rapidly growing tropical trees mobilize remarkable amounts of nitrogen, in ways that differ surprisingly among species.

    PubMed

    Russell, Ann E; Raich, James W

    2012-06-26

    Fast-growing forests such as tropical secondary forests can accumulate large amounts of carbon (C), and thereby play an important role in the atmospheric CO(2) balance. Because nitrogen (N) cycling is inextricably linked with C cycling, the question becomes: Where does the N come from to match high rates of C accumulation? In unique experimental 16-y-old plantations established in abandoned pasture in lowland Costa Rica, we used a mass-balance approach to quantify N accumulation in vegetation, identify sources of N, and evaluate differences among tree species in N cycling. The replicated design contained four broad-leaved evergreen tree species growing under similar environmental conditions. Nitrogen uptake was rapid, reaching 409 (± 30) kg · ha(-1) · y(-1), double the rate reported from a Puerto Rican forest and greater than four times that observed at Hubbard Brook Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Nitrogen amassed in vegetation was 874 (± 176) kg · ha(-1), whereas net losses of soil N (0-100 cm) varied from 217 (±146) to 3,354 (± 915) kg · ha(-1) (P = 0.018) over 16 y. Soil C:N, δ(13)C values, and N budgets indicated that soil was the main source of biomass N. In Vochysia guatemalensis, however, N fixation contributed >60 kg · ha(-1) · y(-1). All species apparently promoted soil N turnover, such that the soil N mean residence time was 32-54 y, an order of magnitude lower than the global mean. High rates of N uptake were associated with substantial N losses in three of the species, in which an average of 1.6 g N was lost for every gram of N accumulated in biomass.

  1. [Soil soluble organic nitrogen content in different forest stands in Wanmulin Nature Reserve].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Gao, Ren; Yang, Yu-sheng; Yang, Zhi-jie; Chen, Guang-shui

    2010-07-01

    An investigation was made on the soil soluble organic nitrogen (SON) in two natural forests Altingia gracilies (ALG) and Castanopsis carlesii (CAC) and an adjacent 35-year-old Cunninghamia lanceolata (CUL) plantation in Wanmulin Nature Reserve in Jianou, Fujian Province. Among the three forest stands, ALG had a significantly higher content of soil SON, being 95.3, 78.3, and 72.5 mg x kg(-1) in 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, and 10-20 cm soil layers, respectively (P<0.05), while CAC and CUL had lesser differences in their soil SON content, which was 74.5, 70.1, and 65.6 mg x kg(-1) in the three soil layers for CAC, and 78.6, 68.9, and 69.1 mg x kg(-1) in the three soil layers for CUL, respectively. The proportion of SON to total soluble nitrogen (TSN) in 0-20 cm soil layer was 79.17-80.78% for CAC, 68.64%-74.51% for CUL, and 59.97%-69.66% for ALG. With increasing soil depth, the proportion of soil SON to soil TSN and total nitrogen (TN) for the three forest stands all increased. Soil SON content had a significant positive correlation with soil organic carbon (r=0.982, P<0.01), and also, had definite correlations with soil TSN, TN, NH4(+)-N, and NO3(-)-N. It also correlated with the factors such as forest type, topography, altitude, and tree age.

  2. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Rietjens, I.M.; Poelen, M.C.; Hempenius, R.A.; Gijbels, M.J.; Alink, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study the toxic mechanisms of action of ozone and nitrogen dioxide were compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone appeared to be 10 times more toxic than nitrogen dioxide. alpha-Tocopherol protected equally well against ozone and nitrogen dioxide. It was demonstrated that alpha-tocopherol provided its protection by its action as a radical scavenger and not by its stabilizing structural membrane effect, as (1) concentrations of alpha-tocopherol that already provided optimal protection against ozone and nitrogen dioxide did not influence the membrane fluidity of alveolar macrophages and (2) neither one of the structural alpha-tocopherol analogs tested (phytol and the methyl ether of alpha-tocopherol) could provide a protection against ozone or nitrogen dioxide comparable to the one provided by alpha-tocopherol. It was concluded that reactive intermediates scavenged by alpha-tocopherol are important in the toxic mechanism of both ozone and nitrogen dioxide induced cell damage. However, further results presented strongly confirmed that the kind of radicals and/or reactive intermediates, and thus the toxic reaction mechanism involved, must be different in ozone- and nitrogen dioxide-induced cell damage. This was concluded from the observations that showed that (1) vitamin C provided significantly better protection against nitrogen dioxide than against an equally toxic dose of ozone, (2) glutathione depletion affected the cellular sensitivity toward ozone to a significantly greater extent than the sensitivity towards nitrogen dioxide, and (3) the scavenging action of alpha-tocopherol was accompanied by a significantly greater reduction in its cellular level during nitrogen dioxide exposure than during exposure to ozone.

  3. Nitrogen removal and its relationship with the nitrogen-cycle genes and microorganisms in the horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands with different design parameters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo; Liu, You-Sheng; Wei, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; He, Liang-Ying; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Fan-Rong

    2017-04-10

    This study aims to investigate nitrogen removal and its relationship with the nitrogen-cycle genes and microorganisms in the horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CWs) with different design parameters. Twelve mesocosm-scale CWs with four substrates and three hydraulic loading rates were set up in the outdoor. The result showed the CWs with zeolite as substrate and HLR of 20 cm/d were selected as the best choice for the TN and NH3-N removal. It was found that the single-stage mesocosm-scale CWs were incapable to achieve high removals of TN and NH3-N due to inefficient nitrification process in the systems. This was demonstrated by the lower abundance of the nitrification genes (AOA and AOB) than the denitrification genes (nirK and nirS), and the less diverse nitrification microorganisms than the denitrification microorganisms in the CWs. The results also show that microorganism community structure including nitrogen-cycle microorganisms in the constructed wetland systems was affected by the design parameters especially the substrate type. These findings show that nitrification is a limiting factor for the nitrogen removal by CWs.

  4. Effect of 21 different nitrogen sources on global gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Godard, Patrice; Urrestarazu, Antonio; Vissers, Stéphan; Kontos, Kevin; Bontempi, Gianluca; van Helden, Jacques; André, Bruno

    2007-04-01

    We compared the transcriptomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells growing under steady-state conditions on 21 unique sources of nitrogen. We found 506 genes differentially regulated by nitrogen and estimated the activation degrees of all identified nitrogen-responding transcriptional controls according to the nitrogen source. One main group of nitrogenous compounds supports fast growth and a highly active nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) control. Catabolism of these compounds typically yields carbon derivatives directly assimilable by a cell's metabolism. Another group of nitrogen compounds supports slower growth, is associated with excretion by cells of nonmetabolizable carbon compounds such as fusel oils, and is characterized by activation of the general control of amino acid biosynthesis (GAAC). Furthermore, NCR and GAAC appear interlinked, since expression of the GCN4 gene encoding the transcription factor that mediates GAAC is subject to NCR. We also observed that several transcriptional-regulation systems are active under a wider range of nitrogen supply conditions than anticipated. Other transcriptional-regulation systems acting on genes not involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., the pleiotropic-drug resistance and the unfolded-protein response systems, also respond to nitrogen. We have completed the lists of target genes of several nitrogen-sensitive regulons and have used sequence comparison tools to propose functions for about 20 orphan genes. Similar studies conducted for other nutrients should provide a more complete view of alternative metabolic pathways in yeast and contribute to the attribution of functions to many other orphan genes.

  5. Improved RDX detoxification with starch addition using a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium from soil contaminated with explosives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yang, Jihoon; Yoo, Byungun; Park, Joonhong

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we developed and characterized a novel nitrogen-fixing aerobic microbial consortium for the complete detoxification of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). Aerobic RDX biodegradation coupled with microbial growth and nitrogen fixation activity were effectively stimulated by the co-addition of starch and RDX under nitrogen limiting conditions. In the starch-stimulated nitrogen-fixing RDX degradative consortium, the RDX degradation activity was correlated with the xplA and nifH gene copy numbers, suggesting the involvement of nitrogen fixing populations in RDX biodegradation. Formate, nitrite, nitrate, and ammonia were detected as aerobic RDX degradation intermediates without the accumulation of any nitroso-derivatives or NDAB (4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal), indicating nearly complete mineralization. Pyrosequencing targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the Rhizobium, Rhizobacter and Terrimonas population increased as the RDX degradation activity increased, suggesting their involvement in the degradation process. These findings imply that the nitrogen-fixing aerobic RDX degrading consortium is a valuable microbial resource for improving the detoxification of RDX-contaminated soil or groundwater, especially when combined with rhizoremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving the accuracy of central difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, Eli

    1988-01-01

    General difference approximations to the fluid dynamic equations require an artificial viscosity in order to converge to a steady state. This artificial viscosity serves two purposes. One is to suppress high frequency noise which is not damped by the central differences. The second purpose is to introduce an entropy-like condition so that shocks can be captured. These viscosities need a coefficient to measure the amount of viscosity to be added. In the standard scheme, a scalar coefficient is used based on the spectral radius of the Jacobian of the convective flux. However, this can add too much viscosity to the slower waves. Hence, it is suggested that a matrix viscosity be used. This gives an appropriate viscosity for each wave component. With this matrix valued coefficient, the central difference scheme becomes closer to upwind biased methods.

  7. Variations in dissolved organic nitrogen concentration in biofilters with different media during drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huining; Zhang, Kefeng; Jin, Huixia; Gu, Li; Yu, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is potential precursor of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), especially nitrogenous DBPs. In this study, we investigated the impact of biofilters on DON concentration changes in a drinking water plant. A small pilot plant was constructed next to a sedimentation tank in a drinking water plant and included activated carbon, quartz sand, anthracite, and ceramsite biofilters. As the biofilter layer depth increased, the DON concentration first decreased and then increased, and the variation in DON concentration differed among the biofilters. In the activated carbon biofilter, the DON concentration was reduced by the largest amount in the first part of the column and increased by the largest amount in the second part of the column. The biomass in the activated carbon filter was less than that in the quartz sand filter in the upper column. The heterotrophic bacterial proportion among bacterial flora in the activated carbon biofilter was the largest, which might be due to the significant reduction in DON in the first part of the column. Overall, the results indicate that the DON concentration in biofiltered water can be controlled via the selection of appropriate biofilter media. We propose that a two-layer biofilter with activated carbon in the upper layer and another media type in the lower layer could best reduce the DON concentration.

  8. Use of quaternary ammonium salts of nitrogen containing polymers for improved carburetor detergency

    SciTech Connect

    Biasotti, J.B.; Vartanian, P.F.

    1980-01-15

    A quaternary ammonium salt is described of a copolymer, said copolymer being the olefin polymerization product of: (A) a nitrogen amine free ester of a C/sub 1/-C/sub 6/ olefinically unsaturated aliphatic mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acid having a tertiary nitrogen atom; and (B) an olefinically unsaturated co-monomer containing a basic nitrogen atom in a side chain; a fuel component, especially gasoline, containing such quaternary ammonium salt of such copolymer as a detergent.

  9. Improving nitrogen utilization efficiency of aquaponics by introducing algal-bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yingke; Hu, Zhen; Zou, Yina; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Zhuoran; Zhang, Jianda; Nie, Lichao

    2017-08-22

    Aquaponics is a promising technology combining aquaculture with hydroponics. In this study, algal-bacterial consortia were introduced into aquaponics, i.e., algal-bacterial based aquaponics (AA), to improve the nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) of aquaponics. The results showed that the NUE of AA was 13.79% higher than that of media-based aquaponics (MA). In addition, higher NO3(-) removal by microalgae assimilation led to better water quality in AA, which made up for the deficiencies of poor aquaponic management of nitrate. As a result of lower NO3(-) concentrations and dramatically higher dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations caused by microalgae photosynthesis in the photobioreactor, the N2O emission of AA was 89.89% lower than that of MA, although nosZ gene abundance in MA's hydroponic bed was approximately 30 times over that in AA. Considering the factors mentioned above, AA would improve the sustainability of aquaponics and have a good application foreground. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Attempts to improve nitrogen utilization efficiency of aquaponics through nitrifies addition and filler gradation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Jinhe; Yan, Runxin

    2016-04-01

    Aquaponics has attracted worldwide attention in recent years and is considered as an alternative technology for conventional aquaculture. In this study, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and pakchoi (Brassica chinensis) were cultured in lab-scale aquaponics, and attempts were conducted to enhance its nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) through two optimization methods, i.e., nitrifies addition (NA) and filler gradation (FG). Results showed that NA and FG could improve the NUE of aquaponics by 8.8 and 16.0%, respectively, compared with control. The total ammonia (TAN) and nitrite (NO2(-)) concentrations in NA and FG systems were maintained at relatively low level (TAN < 0.5 mg/L, NO2(-) < 0.1 mg/L), which demonstrated that both the NA and FG could provide non-toxic water environment for fish culture. Nitrous oxide conversion ratio of the control, NA, and FG were 0.8, 1.2, and 1.7%, respectively, indicating that media-based aquaponics also contributed to global warming. Although the two proposed attempts in this study caused more N2O emission, they made new breakthrough in improving the NUE of aquaponics.

  11. [Seasonal dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in fine roots and their differences between successive rotation poplar plantations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ping; Xu, Tan; Zhu, Wan-rui; Wang, Hua-tian; Zhang, Guang-can; Li, Chuan-rong; Jiang, Yue-zhong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, poplar fine roots in two successive rotation plantations were sampled over seasons. Root samples were grouped from first to five orders to examine the seasonal dynamics of carbon and nitrogen contents of poplar fine roots with orders, and compared their differences between two successive rotation plantations, and finally to find the relationships between the fine root growth and the productivity decline of successive rotation poplar plantations. The results showed that non-structure carbohydrates (NSC) content increased significantly with root orders, while nitrogen content decreased. The contents of total carbon and NSC were significantly related to total nitrogen content. Root orders explained 98.2% variance of carbon and nitrogen contents of poplar fine roots, and the difference between rotations only explained 1.7% of variance. Poplar fine roots consisted of more carbon and less nitrogen with root orders, and the seasonal changes in contents of total carbon, total nitrogen and NSC showed significant difference between rotations, while.that of the C:N ratio didn' t show significant difference. Root order and season showed interaction effect on carbon and nitrogen dynamic. The C:N ratio was about 20:1 in lower order roots, and more than 30:1 in higher order roots. The C:N ratio in summer and autumn was significantly less than those in other seasons, while NSC content was the highest in November. This study indicated that the allocation of carbon and nitrogen in fine roots was closely correlated with fine root orders. Both NSC content and C:N ratio were of greatly important ecological significance in fine root turnover and growth regulation.

  12. Oxidative stress response and nitrogen utilization are strongly variable in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains with different fermentation performances.

    PubMed

    Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Nadai, Chiara; Toniolo, Chiara; Nardi, Tiziana; Giacomini, Alessio; Valle, Giorgio; Blondin, Bruno; Corich, Viviana

    2014-05-01

    We used RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze the expression profile of four vineyard strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different fermentation performances. The expression profiles obtained in two steps of the fermentation process were compared with those obtained for the industrial wine strain EC1118 and for the laboratory strain S288c. The two strains with low fermentation efficiency, namely, S288c and the vineyard strain R103, exhibited markedly different expression profiles when compared to the other four strains. We also found that the vineyard strains P283 and P301 are characterized by a high expression of the transcription factor Met32p in the first step of the fermentation. Met32p, in coordination with the Hap4p transcription factor, determined the over-expression of the genes involved in the respiration processes, in the response to oxidative stress and in the sulfur amino acids biosynthesis. These combined actions are likely to increase the level of antioxidants whose protective effect could contribute to improve the fermentation process. Gene expression and phenotypic data revealed that the vineyard strain P301 has low nitrogen utilization in comparison to the other wine strains, combined with high fermentation efficiency. Analysis of the genes involved in fermentation stress response revealed a lower expression in strains characterized by low fermentation efficiency, particularly in the first fermentation phase. These findings evidenced the high variability of transcriptional profiles among different wine yeast strains and clarify their connection with complex phenotypic traits, such as the fermentation efficiency and the nitrogen sources utilization.

  13. Effects of Nitrogen and Shading on Root Morphologies, Nutrient Accumulation, and Photosynthetic Parameters in Different Rice Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shenggang; Liu, Haidong; Mo, Zhaowen; Patterson, Bob; Duan, Meiyang; Tian, Hua; Hu, Shuijing; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and illumination intensity are two key factors which affect rice growth. However, their influences on total nitrogen accumulation, photosynthetic rate, root morphologies, and yields are not fully understood. We conducted two field experiments to (1) evaluate the effects of shading under different N treatments on photosynthetic parameters, root morphologies, total nutrient accumulation, and grain yields of rice; and (2) elucidate the relationship between total nutrient accumulation and root morphologies under different shading conditions and nitrogen treatments. Three nitrogen rates, three shading treatments, and three different rice cultivars were used in two field experiments. Double shading during the grain-filling stage decreased total nutrient accumulation, altered root morphological characteristics, and decreased yields in rice. There were also significant interaction effects between nitrogen and shading on photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. Significant interactions were found among cultivars and shading for photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate. Correlation analysis revealed that total nitrogen accumulation (TNA) and potassium accumulation (TKA) were significantly positively correlated with total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. N application could alleviate the detrimental effects of shading on total nutrient accumulation and grain yield in rice. PMID:27557779

  14. Effects of Nitrogen and Shading on Root Morphologies, Nutrient Accumulation, and Photosynthetic Parameters in Different Rice Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shenggang; Liu, Haidong; Mo, Zhaowen; Patterson, Bob; Duan, Meiyang; Tian, Hua; Hu, Shuijing; Tang, Xiangru

    2016-08-25

    Nitrogen availability and illumination intensity are two key factors which affect rice growth. However, their influences on total nitrogen accumulation, photosynthetic rate, root morphologies, and yields are not fully understood. We conducted two field experiments to (1) evaluate the effects of shading under different N treatments on photosynthetic parameters, root morphologies, total nutrient accumulation, and grain yields of rice; and (2) elucidate the relationship between total nutrient accumulation and root morphologies under different shading conditions and nitrogen treatments. Three nitrogen rates, three shading treatments, and three different rice cultivars were used in two field experiments. Double shading during the grain-filling stage decreased total nutrient accumulation, altered root morphological characteristics, and decreased yields in rice. There were also significant interaction effects between nitrogen and shading on photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. Significant interactions were found among cultivars and shading for photosynthetic rate and transpiration rate. Correlation analysis revealed that total nitrogen accumulation (TNA) and potassium accumulation (TKA) were significantly positively correlated with total root length, root superficial area, and root volume. N application could alleviate the detrimental effects of shading on total nutrient accumulation and grain yield in rice.

  15. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  16. Studies on the storage life of irradiated potatoes of different maturities as influenced by different levels of nitrogen during growth and different harvest dates

    SciTech Connect

    Badshah, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effects of irradiation levels on potato tubers of different maturities grown with 0.0, 182 and 364 kg/ha nitrogen in 16-16-16 NPK fertilizer, harvested on different dates and stored at 10 and 15.5{degree}C. Tubers from the 1986 crop were harvested on September 15, 1986. Tubers from the 1987 crop were harvested when 0-5%, 50%, and 100% of the vines had died. Gamma irradiation was applied to the tubers of the 1986 crop at dosage 0, 5, 10 and 20 krad; and 0 and 7.5 krad for the tubers of 1987 crop. The 1986 study indicated that increasing fertilizer and irradiation levels significantly decreased sprouting, percent weight loss and specific gravity of tubers. The loss of ascorbic acid, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, and the amount of reducing, and non-reducing sugars were significantly decreased by increasing nitrogen levels. The content of leucine, reducing sugars and ascorbic acid levels were decreased by irradiation. Higher storage temperatures caused greater loss of arginine, isoleucine, valine and ascorbic acid. No significant changes were found in protein, lysine and aromatic amino acids. Tubers stored at 15.5{degree}C showed greater metabolic changes as indicated by sprouting, weight loss; changes in permeability, protein, amino acids, sugars and ascorbic acid contents. The 5 krad irradiation treatment resulted in complete sprout inhibition of tubers from 364 kg/ha nitrogen levels at 10{degree}C storage. Twenty krad dosage while inhibiting sprouting at 15.5{degree}C, caused greater loss of ascorbic acid. The results of 1987 studies showed that tubers from higher nitrogen levels irradiated with 7.5 krad significantly decreased weight loss.

  17. Nitrogen Source and Rate Management Improve Maize Productivity of Smallholders under Semiarid Climates

    PubMed Central

    Amanullah; Iqbal, Asif; Ali, Ashraf; Fahad, Shah; Parmar, Brajendra

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important factor affecting maize (Zea mays L.) yield and income of smallholders under semiarid climates. Field experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of different N-fertilizer sources [urea, calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), and ammonium sulfate (AS)] and rates (50, 100, 150, and 200 kg ha−1) on umber of rows ear−1 (NOR ear−1), number of seeds row−1 (NOS row−1), number of seeds ear−1 (NOS ear−1), number of ears per 100 plants (NOEP 100 plants−1), grain yield plant−1, stover yield (kg ha−1), and shelling percentage (%) of maize genotypes “Local cultivars (Azam and Jalal) vs. hybrid (Pioneer-3025).” The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm of the University of Agriculture Peshawar during summers of 2008 (year one) and 2010 (year two). The results revealed that the N treated (rest) plots (the average of all the experimental plots treated with N) had produced higher yield and yield components, and shelling percentage over N-control plots (plots where N was not applied). Application of nitrogen at the higher rate increased yield and yield components in maize (200 > 150 > 100 > 50 kg N ha−1). Application of AS and CAN had more beneficial impact on yield and yield components of maize as compared to urea (AS > CAN > urea). Hybrid maize (P-3025) produced significantly higher yield and yield components as well as higher shelling percentage than the two local cultivars (P-3025 > Jalal = Azam). Application of ammonium sulfate at the rate of 200 kg N ha−1 to hybrid maize was found most beneficial in terms of higher productivity and grower's income in the study area. For the two local cultivars, application of 150 kg N ha−1 was found more beneficial over 120 kg N ha−1 (recommended N rate) in terms of greater productivity and growers income. PMID:27965685

  18. Methane emission from fields with differences in nitrogen fertilizers and rice varieties in Taiwan paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Huang, Shan-Ney; Lin, Chin-Wei

    2003-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are one of the major biogenic methane sources. In this study, methane emission rates were measured after transplanting in paddy fields with application of two kinds of nitrogen fertilizers (ammonium sulfate, NH4+-N and potassium nitrate, NO3(-)-N) and with two kinds of rice varieties (Japonica and Indica). The experiment was conducted in fields located at Tainan District Agricultural Improvement Station in Chia-Yi county (23 degrees 25'08"N, 120 degrees 16'26"E) of southern Taiwan throughout the first and the second crop seasons in 1999. The seasonal methane flux in the first crop season with NH4+-N and NO3(-)-N ranged from 2.48 to 2.78 and from 8.65 to 9.22 g CH4 m(-2); and the values ranged 24.6-34.2 and 36.4-52.6 g CH4 m(-2) in the second crop season, respectively. In the first crop season, there were significantly increased 3.1-3.7-fold in methane emission fluxes due to plantation of Indica rice. In comparison of two rice varieties, the Indica rice variety showed a tendency for larger methane emission than the Japonica rice variety in the second crop season. Moreover, ammonium sulfate treatment significantly reduced CH4 emissions by 37-85% emissions compared to potassium nitrate plots. It was concluded that the CH4 emission was markedly dependent on the type of nitrogen fertilizer and rice variety in Taiwan paddy soils.

  19. Proteome changes in wheat subjected to different nitrogen and sulfur fertilizations.

    PubMed

    Grove, Harald; Hollung, Kristin; Moldestad, Anette; Færgestad, Ellen Mosleth; Uhlen, Anne Kjersti

    2009-05-27

    Controlling the quality of wheat for breadmaking is a major concern for the milling and baking industry. Wheat flour quality depends on both the genetic background and environmental factors during growth and storage. Amount and timing of application of fertilizer are factors that affect wheat quality. This study investigated the effect of different levels of nitrogen and sulfur on the tris-soluble and glutenin protein fractions by 2D-electrophoresis. Multivariate analysis was performed to study changes in the proteome pattern. In the tris-soluble fraction 20 proteins were changed in abundance due to S fertilization, whereas 16 proteins were changed in the glutenin protein fraction. It was found that induced sulfur deficiency during growth resulted in the most pronounced effect on protein composition. Understanding which proteins are affected by varying levels of fertilizers may help tailor specific traits in various wheat varieties.

  20. Dynamics of triacylglycerol and EPA production in Phaeodactylum tricornutum under nitrogen starvation at different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Remmers, Ilse M; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H; Lamers, Packo P

    2017-01-01

    Lipid production in microalgae is highly dependent on the applied light intensity. However, for the EPA producing model-diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, clear consensus on the impact of incident light intensity on lipid productivity is still lacking. This study quantifies the impact of different incident light intensities on the biomass, TAG and EPA yield on light in nitrogen starved batch cultures of P. tricornutum. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum TAG and EPA contents were found to be independent of the applied light intensity. The lipid yield on light was reduced at elevated light intensities (>100 μmol m-2 s-1). The highest TAG yield on light (112 mg TAG molph-1) was found at the lowest light intensity tested (60 μmol m-2 s-1), which is still relatively low to values reported in literature for other algae. Furthermore, mass balance analysis showed that the EPA fraction in TAG may originate from photosynthetic membrane lipids.

  1. Improving nitrogen management for corn in southern Idaho and southwest Oregon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Funding is being sought from multiple sources to update nitrogen fertilizer recommendations for irrigated corn in southern Idaho and southwest Oregon. This paper summarizes the justifications and main objectives of this proposed research. Nitrogen needs to be correctly managed in corn production sys...

  2. [Soil carbon and nitrogen storage of different land use types in northwestern Shanxi Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Dong, Yun-Zhong; Wang, Yong-Liang; Zhang, Jian-Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) storage under five different land use patterns, i. e. , poplar and Caragana microphylla plantation, C. microphylla artificial shrubland, poplar plantation, bare land and cropland were studied in the hilly [ness Plateau of northwestern Shanxi. The results showed that the contents, densities and storage of SOC and TN varied remarkably under the different land-use patterns. Soil carbon and nitrogen contents and storage in the 0-20 cm soil layer were significantly higher in the 20-40 cm and 40-60 cm soil layers under each of the five land use patterns. In the same soil layer, the contents and densities of SOC and TN under the five land use patterns were in the order of poplar and C. microphylla plantation > C. microphylla artificial shrubland > poplar plantation > bare land > cropland. The SOC storage in the 0-60 cm soil layer was in the order of poplar and C. microphylla plantation (30.09 t x hm(-2)) > C. microphylla artificial shrubland (24.78 t x hm(-2)) > poplar plantation (24.14 t x hm(-2)) > bare land (22.06 t x hm(-2)) > cropland (17.59 t x hm(-2)). Soil TN storage had the same trend as SOC storage, and TN storage in the 0-60 cm soil layer was the highest (4.94 t x hm(-2)) in poplar and Caragana microphylla plantation, followed by C. microphylla artificial shrubland (3.53 t x hm(-2)), poplar plantation (3.51 t x hm(-2)), bare land (3.40 t x hm(-2)), and cropland (2.71 t x hm(-2)). Poplar and C. microphylla plantation and C. microphylla artificial shrubland were the good land use patterns in the process of vegetation construction and ecological restoration in the hilly Loess Plateau of northwestern Shanxi.

  3. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  4. The response of diatom central carbon metabolism to nitrogen starvation is different from that of green algae and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Hockin, Nicola Louise; Mock, Thomas; Mulholland, Francis; Kopriva, Stanislav; Malin, Gill

    2012-01-01

    The availability of nitrogen varies greatly in the ocean and limits primary productivity over large areas. Diatoms, a group of phytoplankton that are responsible for about 20% of global carbon fixation, respond rapidly to influxes of nitrate and are highly successful in upwelling regions. Although recent diatom genome projects have highlighted clues to the success of this group, very little is known about their adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. Here, we compare the proteome of the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (CCMP 1335) at the onset of nitrogen starvation with that of nitrogen-replete cells using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 3,310 protein spots were distinguishable, and we identified 42 proteins increasing and 23 decreasing in abundance (greater than 1.5-fold change; P < 0.005). Proteins involved in the metabolism of nitrogen, amino acids, proteins, and carbohydrates, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis were represented. Comparison of our proteomics data with the transcriptome response of this species under similar growth conditions showed good correlation and provided insight into different levels of response. The T. pseudonana response to nitrogen starvation was also compared with that of the higher plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus. We have found that the response of diatom carbon metabolism to nitrogen starvation is different from that of other photosynthetic eukaryotes and bears closer resemblance to the response of cyanobacteria.

  5. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  6. Improving spatial nitrogen dioxide prediction using diffusion tubes: A case study in West Central Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannullo, Francesca; Lee, Duncan; Waclawski, Eugene; Leyland, Alastair H.

    2015-10-01

    It has been well documented that air pollution adversely affects health, and epidemiological pollution-health studies utilise pollution data from automatic monitors. However, these automatic monitors are small in number and hence spatially sparse, which does not allow an accurate representation of the spatial variation in pollution concentrations required for these epidemiological health studies. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) diffusion tubes are also used to measure concentrations, and due to their lower cost compared to automatic monitors are much more prevalent. However, even combining both data sets still does not provide sufficient spatial coverage of NO2 for epidemiological studies, and modelled concentrations on a regular grid from atmospheric dispersion models are also available. This paper proposes the first modelling approach to using all three sources of NO2 data to make fine scale spatial predictions for use in epidemiological health studies. We propose a geostatistical fusion model that regresses combined NO2 concentrations from both automatic monitors and diffusion tubes against modelled NO2 concentrations from an atmospheric dispersion model in order to predict fine scale NO2 concentrations across our West Central Scotland study region. Our model exhibits a 47% improvement in fine scale spatial prediction of NO2 compared to using the automatic monitors alone, and we use it to predict NO2 concentrations across West Central Scotland in 2006.

  7. Nitrogen Utilization and Environmental Losses from Organic Farming and Biochar's Potential to Improve N Efficiency.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. I.; SIX, J. W. U. A.

    2014-12-01

    The response of plant performance and nitrogen (N) dynamics to biochar amendments were studied across various levels of N input for two growing seasons in mesocosms representing an organic lettuce production systems. A silt loam soil was amended with pine chip (PC) and walnut shell (WS) biochar (10 t ha-1) in combination with five organic N fertilization rates 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of 225 kg N ha-1. N output through harvest, leachate, and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were determined to assess N utilization and environmental losses of biochar-amended soils. Analysis of plant performance indicate that PC and WS biochar did not provide any increases in plant biomass in soils that received less than business-as-usual fertilization rates. At 100% N fertilization rate, biochar amendments (both PC and WS) improved lettuce biomass production, which resulted in significant increases in NUE with no effects on N2O emissions. Furthermore, N losses via leaching were decreased by PC biochar at 100% N fertilization rates. Thus, due to increases in plant biomass and decreases in N losses via leachate, PC biochar significantly decreased the ratio of N lost over N exported in biomass. Findings from this study suggest that biochar can provide some beneficial effects to organic farming systems, however, not in all circumstances, given the effects seem to vary with biochar type and fertilization level.

  8. Nitrogen fixation in different biogeochemical niches along a 120 000-year chronosequence in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Menge, Duncan N L; Hedin, Lars O

    2009-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major nitrogen (N) input in many terrestrial ecosystems, yet we know little about the mechanisms and feedbacks that control this process in natural ecosystems. We here examine BNF in four taxonomically and ecologically different groups over the course of forest ecosystem development. At nine sites along the Franz Josef soil chronosequence (South Westland, New Zealand) that range in age from 7 to 120000 yr old, we quantified BNF from the symbiotic plant Coriaria arborea, cyanolichens (primarily Pseudocyphellaria spp.), bryophytes (many species), and heterotrophic bacteria in leaf litter. We specifically examined whether these groups could act as "nitrostats" at the ecosystem level, turning BNF on when N is scarce (early in primary succession) and off when N is plentiful (later in succession and retrogression). Coriaria was abundant and actively fixing (approximately 11 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) in the youngest and most N-poor site (7 yr old), consistent with nitrostat dynamics. Coriaria maintained high BNF rates independent of soil N availability, however, until it was excluded from the community after a single generation. We infer that Coriaria is an obligate N fixer and that the nitrostat feedback is mechanistically governed by species replacement at the community level, rather than down-regulation of BNF at the physiological scale. Biological nitrogen fixation inputs from lichens (means of 0-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), bryophytes (0.7-10 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)), and litter (1-2 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1)) were driven primarily by changes in density, which peaked at intermediate-aged sites (and increased with soil N availability) for both lichens and bryophytes, and grew monotonically with soil age (but did not change with soil N) for litter. This non-nitrostatic link between soil N availability and lichen/bryophyte BNF likely stems from increased tree biomass in more fertile sites, which increases epiphytic moisture conditions

  9. Wheat productivity responses in the rice-based system under different no-till techniques and nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Muhammad Hamid; Ahmad, Riaz; Jabbar, Abdul; Munir, Hassan; Hussain, Muzzammil

    2017-08-03

    No-till wheat is gaining popularity in rice-based cropping system as it provides a better chance for timely planting of wheat, management of crop residues, as well as environmental and soil sustainability. However, fertilizer application in no-tillage requires careful attention in order to optimize efficiency of fertilizer use by crops. The present study was conducted to develop the most favorable and economical no-till technique along with best blend of nitrogen for successful wheat production in residue-based cropping system. The experiment was composed of five no-till techniques viz., (1) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with turbo seeder, (2) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with happy seeder, (3) even spreading of loose rice residue and wheat sowing with zone disc tiller, (4) wheat sowing with conventional zero tillage drill after manual removal of rice residues, and (5) wheat sowing with conventional zero tillage drill after burning of rice residues. There were five blends of nitrogen (N) including (1) 100% N from urea, (2) 75% N from urea and 25% N from ammonium sulfate (AS), (3) 50% N from urea and 50% N from AS, (4) 25% N from urea and 75% N from AS, and (5) 100% N from AS. Different no-till techniques and N treatments significantly affected the stand establishment and yield-related traits of wheat during both growing seasons. Soil physical condition was improved by turbo seeder treatment, while it remained poor in residue burned field sown by conventional zero tillage drill. The results over the years revealed that turbo-seeded wheat with N fertilization in the form of 50% urea + 50% AS performed better in terms of productive tillers, grain yield and benefit cost ratio than other no-till techniques along different blends of nitrogen during both years of study. In crux, wheat sowing by turbo seeder along N fertilization in the form of 50% urea + 50% AS treatment is a viable and economical option to increase the

  10. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, J G; Beinart, R A; Stewart, F J; Delong, E F; Girguis, P R

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking physiological poise to environmental conditions, but recovering samples from the deep sea is challenging, as the long recovery times can change expression profiles before preservation. Here, we present a novel, in situ RNA sampling and preservation device, which we used to compare the symbiont metatranscriptomes associated with Alviniconcha, a genus of vent snail, in which specific host–symbiont combinations are predictably distributed across a regional geochemical gradient. Metatranscriptomes of these symbionts reveal key differences in energy and nitrogen metabolism relating to both environmental chemistry (that is, the relative expression of genes) and symbiont phylogeny (that is, the specific pathways employed). Unexpectedly, dramatic differences in expression of transposases and flagellar genes suggest that different symbiont types may also have distinct life histories. These data further our understanding of these symbionts' metabolic capabilities and their expression in situ, and suggest an important role for symbionts in mediating their hosts' interaction with regional-scale differences in geochemistry. PMID:23619306

  11. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2013-02-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (<2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  12. Diversity pattern of nitrogen fixing microbes in nodules of Trifolium arvense (L.) at different initial stages of ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Engel, M.; Fischer, D.; Buegger, F.; Elmer, M.; Welzl, G.; Schloter, M.

    2012-09-01

    Legumes can be considered as pioneer plants during ecosystem development, as they form a symbiosis with different nitrogen fixing rhizobia species, which enable the plants to grow on soils with low available nitrogen content. In this study we compared the abundance and diversity of nitrogen fixing microbes based on the functional marker gene nifH, which codes for a subunit of the Fe-protein of the dinitrogenase reductase, in nodules of different size classes of Trifolium arvense (L.). Additionally, carbon and nitrogen contents of the bulk soil and plant material were measured. Plants were harvested from different sites, reflecting 2 (2a) and 5 (5a) yr of ecosystem development, of an opencast lignite mining area in the south of Cottbus, Lower Lusatia (Germany) where the artificial catchment "Chicken Creek" was constructed to study the development of terrestrial ecosystems. Plants from the 5a site revealed higher amounts of carbon and nitrogen, although nifH gene abundances in the nodules and carbon and nitrogen contents between the two soils did not differ significantly. Analysis of the nifH clone libraries showed a significant effect of the nodule size on the community composition of nitrogen fixing microbes. Medium sized nodules (2-5 mm) contained a uniform community composed of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, whereas the small nodules (< 2 mm) consisted of a diverse community including clones with non-Rhizobium nifH gene sequences. Regarding the impact of the soil age on the community composition a clear distinction between the small and the medium nodules can be made. While clone libraries from the medium nodules were pretty similar at both soil ages, soil age had a significant effect on the community compositions of the small nodules, where the proportion of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii increased with soil age.

  13. Submerged Friction-Stir Welding (SFSW) Underwater and Under Liquid Nitrogen: An Improved Method to Join Al Alloys to Mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofid, Mohammad Ammar; Abdollah-Zadeh, Amir; Ghaini, Farshid Malek; Gür, Cemil Hakan

    2012-12-01

    Submerged friction-stir welding (SFSW) underwater and under liquid nitrogen is demonstrated as an alternative and improved method for creating fine-grained welds in dissimilar metals. Plates of AZ31 (Mg alloy) and AA5083 H34 were joined by friction-stir welding in three different environments, i.e., in air, water, and liquid nitrogen at 400 rpm and 50 mm/min. The temperature profile, microstructure, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness, and tensile testing results were evaluated. In the stir zone of an air-welded specimen, formation of brittle intermetallic compounds of Al3Mg2, Al12Mg17, and Al2Mg3 contributed to cracking in the weld nugget. These phases were formed because of constitutional liquation. Friction-stir welding underwater and under liquid nitrogen significantly suppresses the formation of intermetallic compounds because of the lower peak temperature. Furthermore, the temperature profiles plotted during this investigation indicate that the largest amount of ∆ T is generated by the weld under liquid nitrogen, which is performed at the lowest temperature. It is shown that in low-temperature FSW, the flow stress is higher, plastic contribution increases, and so adiabatic heating, a result of high strain and high strain-rate deformation, drives the recrystallization process beside frictional heat.

  14. Hair from different ethnic groups vary in elemental composition and nitrogen and phosphorus mineralisation in soil.

    PubMed

    Malepfane, N M; Muchaonyerwa, P

    2017-02-01

    Disposal of hair wastes at landfills causes nitrate leaching to ground water, and use of the waste as fertiliser could be a viable option. This study was to determine elemental composition of major hair types in South Africa and their nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) release in soil. Wastes of African, White and Indian hair were obtained from local salons and analysed for carbon (C), N and sulphur (S) with the Leco CNS analyzer, and P, bases, aluminium (Al) and micronutrients, with the ICP. We also conducted an incubation study to determine changes in mineral N and P in soil. Hair wastes were added to soil at increasing rates based on N, incubated at 25 °C with destructive sampling after 0, 28, 56 and 84 days and pH, ammonium-N, nitrate-N and extractable P measured. All data were subjected to analysis of variance. Indian and White hair had higher N than African. White hair had higher C and lower potassium (K) than those of other types. The Fe levels in hair were in the order White > African > Indian, whilst those of Al were African > Indian > White. African hair had higher calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and cobalt (Co) than the other types. Ammonium-N and nitrate-N releases were in the order: Indian > African > White, especially at higher rates. Ammonium-N increased in the first 28 days and declined thereafter, when nitrate-N increased and pH decreased. The findings implied that hair types differ in elemental composition and nitrogen release in soil, with implications on pollution and soil fertility.

  15. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Saima; Huma, Nuzhat; Pasha, Imran; Sameen, Aysha; Mukhtar, Omer; Khan, Muhammad Issa

    2016-01-01

    Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%), solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%), total solids (18.05%±0.05%), protein (5.15%±0.06%) and casein (3.87%±0.04%) contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%), buffalo (0.68%±0.02%) and sheep (0.66%±0.02%) milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82), cow (r = 0.88), sheep (r = 0.86) and goat milk (r = 0.98). The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g), camel (96±2.2 mg/g) and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g) milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products. PMID:26954163

  16. Spectral red edge parameters for winter wheat under different nitrogen support levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yisong; Hu, Chunsheng; Dai, Hui; Lei, Yuping

    2005-09-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is not only an important technical method in observing global ecosystems and vegetation cover change, but also a main aspect of studies on precision agriculture. In order to monitor crop nutrient supply condition and to realize precision fertilization, spectral red edge parameter for winter wheat was studied. Experiments were carried out through 8 years since 1997 under four nitrogen support levels in Luancheng Station, Hebei province (e.g., 0, 100, 200 and 300 kg N ha-1). Canopy reflectance spectrum was measured by ASD HandHeld Spectroradiometer (325-1075 nm) during 2002 and 2004. The dynamics of red edge parameters for physiological stages of winter wheat canopy were calculated using first derivative curve. Analyses revealed that the red edge of the wheat canopy reflectance spectrum locates between 720-740 nm. All the different trial had distinct "red shift" trait, but higher N stress had shorter "red edge" wavelength. Position of red edge turned "blue shift" after pregnant period. Red edge swing is a first-order derivative spectrum when wavelength reached red edge position, red edge swing double peak shape showed that the pregnant period was the best stage to detect nitrogen deficiency. Red edge swing correlated with relative chlorophyll content and leaf N content. Area of red edge peak is the value of first-order derivative spectra accumulative total between 680 and 750 nm. These parameters can be used to estimate LAI and N accumulating quantities, and these results provide information needed for the development of variable-rate N application technology.

  17. Difference in leaf water use efficiency/photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency of Bt-cotton and its conventional peer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruqing; Sun, Shucun; Liu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    This study is to test the effects of Bt gene introduction on the foliar water/nitrogen use efficiency in cotton. We measured leaf stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, and transpiration rate under light saturation condition at different stages of a conventional cultivar (zhongmian no. 16) and its counterpart Bt cultivar (zhongmian no. 30) that were cultured on three levels of fertilization, based on which leaf instantaneous water use efficiency was derived. Leaf nitrogen concentration was measured to calculate leaf photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, and leaf δ13C was used to characterize long term water use efficiency. Bt cultivar was found to have lower stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rates and transpiration rates, but higher instantaneous and long time water use efficiency. In addition, foliar nitrogen concentration was found to be higher but net photosynthetic rate was lower in the mature leaves of Bt cultivar, which led to lower photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. This might result from the significant decrease of photosynthetic rate due to the decrease of stomatal conductance. In conclusion, our findings show that the introduction of Bt gene should significantly increase foliar water use efficiency but decrease leaf nitrogen use efficiency in cotton under no selective pressure. PMID:27628897

  18. Difference in leaf water use efficiency/photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency of Bt-cotton and its conventional peer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruqing; Sun, Shucun; Liu, Biao

    2016-09-15

    This study is to test the effects of Bt gene introduction on the foliar water/nitrogen use efficiency in cotton. We measured leaf stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rate, and transpiration rate under light saturation condition at different stages of a conventional cultivar (zhongmian no. 16) and its counterpart Bt cultivar (zhongmian no. 30) that were cultured on three levels of fertilization, based on which leaf instantaneous water use efficiency was derived. Leaf nitrogen concentration was measured to calculate leaf photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, and leaf δ(13)C was used to characterize long term water use efficiency. Bt cultivar was found to have lower stomatal conductance, net photosynthetic rates and transpiration rates, but higher instantaneous and long time water use efficiency. In addition, foliar nitrogen concentration was found to be higher but net photosynthetic rate was lower in the mature leaves of Bt cultivar, which led to lower photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency. This might result from the significant decrease of photosynthetic rate due to the decrease of stomatal conductance. In conclusion, our findings show that the introduction of Bt gene should significantly increase foliar water use efficiency but decrease leaf nitrogen use efficiency in cotton under no selective pressure.

  19. Product selectivity of visible-light photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide using titanium dioxide doped by different nitrogen-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Huang, Zhengfeng; Cheng, Xudong; Wang, Qingli; Chen, Yi; Dong, Peimei; Zhang, Xiwen

    2015-11-01

    The influence of nitrogen-source on the photocatalytic properties of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is herein first investigated from the perspective of the chemical bond form of the nitrogen element in the nitrogen-source. The definitive role of groups such as Nsbnd N from the nitrogen-source on the surface of as-prepared samples in the selectivity of the dominant product of photocatalytic reduction is demonstrated. Well-crystallized one-dimensional Nsbnd TiO2 nanorod arrays with a preferred orientation of the rutile (3 1 0) facet are manufactured via a hydrothermal treatment using hydrazine and ammonia variously as the source of nitrogen. Significant selectivity of the dominant reduced products has been exhibited for Nsbnd TiO2 prepared from different nitrogen-sources in carbon dioxide photocatalytic reduction under visible light illumination. CH4 is the main product with N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2, while CO is the main product with NH3-doped Nsbnd TiO2, which can be attributed to the existence of the reducing Nsbnd N groups in the N2H4-doped Nsbnd TiO2 surfaces after the hydrothermal treatment. Compared with the approaches previously reported, the facile one-step route utilized here accomplishes the fabrication of Nsbnd TiO2 possessing visible-light activity and attainment of selectivity of dominant photocatalytic reduction product simultaneously by choosing a nitrogen-source with appropriate chemical bond form, which provides a completely new approach to understanding the effects of doping treatment on photocatalytic properties.

  20. Cellular responses and biodegradation of amoxicillin in Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen on the interactions between amoxicillin and Microcystis aeruginosa was investigated using a 7-day exposure test. Growth of M. aeruginosa was not significantly (p>0.05) affected by amoxicillin at the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), stimulated by 500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at a moderate nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1) and enhanced by 200-500 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at the highest nitrogen level of 5 mg L(-1). The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the synthesis of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione (GSH) were more sensitive to amoxicillin and were stimulated at all nitrogen levels. At the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were not effective at eliminating amoxicillin-induced ROS, resulting in the highest malondialdehyde content in M. aeruginosa. The biodegradation of 18.5-30.5% of amoxicillin by M. aeruginosa was coupled to increasing GST activity and GSH content. Elevated nitrogen concentrations significantly enhanced (p<0.05) the stimulation effect of amoxicillin on the growth of M. aeruginosa, the antioxidant responses to amoxicillin and the biodegradation of amoxicillin in M. aeruginosa. The nitrogen-dependent hormesis effect of the coexisting amoxicillin contaminant on the M. aeruginosa bloom should be fully considered during the control of M. aeruginosa bloom.

  1. Identifying different mechanisms in the control of a nitrogen-vacancy center system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouzhi; Yang, Ling; Cao, Dewen; Wang, Yaoxiong; Shuang, Feng; Gao, Fang

    2017-10-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center system has shown great potential in quantum computing due to its long decoherence time at room temperature by encoding the qubit in dressed states [28]. The corresponding control mechanisms, which is expressed by the pathways linking the initial and target states, can be naturally investigated with the Hamiltonian-encoding and observable-decoding (HE-OD) method in the interaction adiabatic representation. This is proved by the fact that the mechanisms change slightly with different detunings, magnetic and driving field intensities, and the dominant pathway is always | g 〉 → | d 〉 → | g 〉 , with | g 〉 and | d 〉 as the first two lowest dressed states. Cases are different in the diabatic representation. The orders of dominant pathways increase the driving field intensities. Tendencies of quantum pathway amplitudes with driving fields, magnetic fields and detunings change at different conditions, which can be analyzed from the Dyson series. HE-OD analysis show that the two states | g 〉 and | d 〉 in the interaction adiabatic representation are preferable to be employed as a qubit than the state pair |0〉 and | - 1 〉 in the diabatic representation under the current Hamiltonian and parameters.

  2. Over-expression of OsPTR6 in rice increased plant growth at different nitrogen supplies but decreased nitrogen use efficiency at high ammonium supply.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaorong; Xie, Dan; Chen, Jingguang; Lu, Haiyan; Xu, Yanling; Ma, Cui; Xu, Guohua

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen (N) plays a critical role in plant growth and productivity and PTR/NRT1 transporters are critical for rice growth. In this study, OsPTR6, a PTR/NRT1 transporter, was over-expressed in the Nipponbare rice cultivar by Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation using the ubiquitin (Ubi) promoter. Three single-copy T2 generation transgenic lines, named OE1, OE5 and OE6, were produced and subjected to hydroponic growth experiments in different nitrogen treatments. The results showed the plant height and biomass of the over-expression lines were increased, and plant N accumulation and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities were enhanced at 5.0mmol/L NH4(+) and 2.5mmol/L NH4NO3. The expression of OsATM1 genes in over-expression lines showed that the OsPTR6 over expression increased OsAMT1.1, OsATM1.2 and OsAMT1.3 expression at 0.2 and 5.0mmol/L NH4(+) and 2.5mmol/L NH4NO3. However, nitrogen utilisation efficiency (NUE) was decreased at 5.0mmol/LNH4(+). These data suggest that over-expression of the OsPTR6 gene could increase rice growth through increasing ammonium transporter expression and glutamine synthetase activity (GSA), but decreases nitrogen use efficiency under conditions of high ammonium supply. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Irrigation frequency alters nutrient uptake in container-grown Rhododendron plants grown with different rates of nitrogen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of irrigation frequency (same amount of water per day given at different times) on nutrient uptake of container-grown evergreen Rhododendron ‘P.J.M. Compact’ (PJM) and ‘English Roseum’ (ER) and deciduous Rhododendron ‘Gibraltar’ (AZ) grown with different rates of nitrogen (N) fertilize...

  4. Carbon and nitrogen balance of leaf-eating sesarmid crabs ( Neoepisesarma versicolor) offered different food sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongtham, Nalinee; Kristensen, Erik

    2005-10-01

    Carbon and nitrogen budgets for the leaf-eating crab, Neoepisesarma versicolor, were established for individuals living on pure leaf diets. Crabs were fed fresh (green), senescent (yellow) and partly degraded (brown) leaves of the mangrove tree Rhizophora apiculata. Ingestion, egestion and metabolic loss of carbon and nitrogen were determined from laboratory experiments. In addition, bacterial abundance in various compartments of the crabs' digestive tract was enumerated after dissection of live individuals. Ingestion and egestion rates (in terms of dry weight) were highest, while the assimilation efficiency was poorest for crabs fed on brown leaves. The low assimilation efficiency was more than counteracted by the high ingestion rate providing more carbon for growth than for crabs fed green and yellow leaves. In any case, the results show that all types of leaves can provide adequate carbon while nitrogen was insufficient to support both maintenance (yellow leaves) and growth (green, yellow and brown leaves). Leaf-eating crabs must therefore obtain supplementary nitrogen by other means in order to meet their nitrogen requirement. Three hypotheses were evaluated: (1) crabs supplement their diet with bacteria and benthic microalgae by ingesting own faeces and/or selective grazing at the sediment surface; (2) assimilation of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria in the crabs' own intestinal system; and (3) nitrogen storage following occasional feeding on animal tissues (e.g. meiofauna and carcasses). It appears that hypothesis 1 is of limited importance for N. versicolor since faeces and sediment can only supply a minor fraction of the missing nitrogen due to physical constraints on the amount of material the crabs can consume. Hypothesis 2 can be ruled out because tests showed no nitrogen fixation activity in the intestinal system of N. versicolor. It is therefore likely that leaf-eating crabs provide most of their nitrogen requirement from intracellular deposits

  5. Effects of nitrogen composition on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast and the absorption of peptides with different molecular weights.

    PubMed

    Mo, Fen; Zhao, Haifeng; Lei, Hongjie; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-11-01

    Four kinds of worts with different nitrogen compositions were used to examine their effects on fermentation performance of brewer's yeast. The absorption pattern of peptides with different molecular weights (Mw) in yeast cells during wort fermentation was also investigated. Results showed that both the nitrogen composition and level had significant impacts on the yeast biomass accumulation, ethanol production, and free amino nitrogen and sugars consumption rates. Worts supplemented with wheat gluten hydrolysates increased 11.5% of the biomass, 5.9% of fermentability, and 0.6% of ethanol content and decreased 25.6% of residual sugar content during wort fermentation. Moreover, yeast cells assimilated peptides with various Mw differently during fermentation. Peptides with Mw below 1 kDa decreased quickly, and the rate of assimilation was more than 50% at the end of fermentation, while those with Mw above 10 kDa almost could not be assimilated by yeast. All these results further indicated that the level and composition of wort nitrogen had significant impacts on the growth and fermentation performances of brewer's yeast, and peptides with Mw below 1 kDa were one of preferred nitrogen sources for brewer's yeast.

  6. Effect on nitrogen retention by adults of different proportions of indispensable amino acids in isonitrogenous cereal-based based diets.

    PubMed

    Clark, H E; Brewer, M F; Bailey, L B

    1978-01-01

    Nitrogen retention of adults who consumed diets in which cereals furnished 6.0 g N and 0.9 g of lysine was improved by increasing lysine to 1.8 g without altering other amino acids. In a second experiment, 70% of the 6.0 g of dietary N was supplied by rice + wheat and 30% by mixtures of amino acids so designed that the total intakes of amino acids were equivalent to those in diets containing 6.0 g N from whole egg (E), egg + potato (EP), rice + wheat (RW), rice + soy (RS), wheat + milk (WM) or corn + beans (CB). Mean N balances of young men in descending order were, g/day: E 0.69 +/- 0.23, RS 0.44 +/- 0.15, EP 0.43 +/- 0.09, WM 0.24 +/- 0.16, CB 0.16 +/- 0.13 and RW -0.02 +/- 0.10. In the same order, these diet provided, g/day: lysine 2.6, 1.9, 2.3, 1.6, 1.4 and 1.0; S-acids 2.2, 1.7, 1.6, 2.2, 1.9 and 2.3; and tryptophan 0.7, 0.4, 0.6, 0.5, 0.3 and 0.4. N balances resulting from diets E, RS and EP did not differ significantly from each other but E was superior to CB and RW (P less than 0.01). Relative amounts and propertions of the essential amino acids could be varied without altering nitrogen retention until at least one amino acid became limiting. Several patterns of indispensable amino acids therefore may be equally effective in meeting needs of adults, but both amounts and relative proportions should be considered.

  7. [Effects of applying different kind fertilizers on enzyme activities related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Qiu-Bing; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Min; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Feng-Ting; Bu, Jin-Feng; Wang, Hui-min

    2013-04-01

    Based on the long-term fixed position experimental data from Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1998, this paper analyzed the effects of applying different kind fertilizers (straw, ST; pig manure, OM; and chemical fertilizer, NPK) on the nutrients (C, N, and P) status and the activities of related enzymes ( beta-1,4-glucosidase, betaG; beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; L-leucine aminopeptidase, LAP; and acid phosphatase, AP) in reddish paddy soil. With the application of OM, the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP increased significantly, as compared with other treatments, and were 1.4, 2. 6, and 1.9 times higher than the control (CK) , respectively. Applying OM also improved the ratio of soil organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N), but decreased the soil betaG/(NAG+LAP) ratio, suggesting that pig manure could benefit the degradation of soil cellulose and the accumulation of soil organic carbon. Applying NPK increased the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP, but decreased the AP activity, with a decrement of 34% as compared with CK. Under the application of NPK, the soilbetaG/AP and (NAG+ LAP)/AP ratios increased, but the ratios of soil organic carbon to total phosphorus (C/P) and of soil total nitrogen to total phosphorus (N/P) decreased, indicating that chemical fertilizers could induce the accumulation of soil inorganic phosphorus, and inhibit the microbial functions of degrading polysaccharides and phosphate phospholipids.

  8. High throughput RNA sequencing of a hybrid maize and its parents shows different mechanisms responsive to nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yong-Mei; Meyer, Ann; Downs, Gregory S; Shi, Xuejiang; El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Lukens, Lewis; Rothstein, Steven J

    2014-01-28

    Development of crop varieties with high nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is crucial for minimizing N loss, reducing environmental pollution and decreasing input cost. Maize is one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide and its productivity is closely linked to the amount of fertilizer used. A survey of the transcriptomes of shoot and root tissues of a maize hybrid line and its two parental inbred lines grown under sufficient and limiting N conditions by mRNA-Seq has been conducted to have a better understanding of how different maize genotypes respond to N limitation. A different set of genes were found to be N-responsive in the three genotypes. Many biological processes important for N metabolism such as the cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process and the cellular amino acid metabolic process were enriched in the N-responsive gene list from the hybrid shoots but not from the parental lines' shoots. Coupled to this, sugar, carbohydrate, monosaccharide, glucose, and sorbitol transport pathways were all up-regulated in the hybrid, but not in the parents under N limitation. Expression patterns also differed between shoots and roots, such as the up-regulation of the cytokinin degradation pathway in the shoots of the hybrid and down-regulation of that pathway in the roots. The change of gene expression under N limitation in the hybrid resembled the parent with the higher NUE trait. The transcript abundances of alleles derived from each parent were estimated using polymorphic sites in mapped reads in the hybrid. While there were allele abundance differences, there was no correlation between these and the expression differences seen between the hybrid and the two parents. Gene expression in two parental inbreds and the corresponding hybrid line in response to N limitation was surveyed using the mRNA-Seq technology. The data showed that the three genotypes respond very differently to N-limiting conditions, and the hybrid clearly has a unique expression pattern

  9. High throughput RNA sequencing of a hybrid maize and its parents shows different mechanisms responsive to nitrogen limitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of crop varieties with high nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is crucial for minimizing N loss, reducing environmental pollution and decreasing input cost. Maize is one of the most important crops cultivated worldwide and its productivity is closely linked to the amount of fertilizer used. A survey of the transcriptomes of shoot and root tissues of a maize hybrid line and its two parental inbred lines grown under sufficient and limiting N conditions by mRNA-Seq has been conducted to have a better understanding of how different maize genotypes respond to N limitation. Results A different set of genes were found to be N-responsive in the three genotypes. Many biological processes important for N metabolism such as the cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process and the cellular amino acid metabolic process were enriched in the N-responsive gene list from the hybrid shoots but not from the parental lines’ shoots. Coupled to this, sugar, carbohydrate, monosaccharide, glucose, and sorbitol transport pathways were all up-regulated in the hybrid, but not in the parents under N limitation. Expression patterns also differed between shoots and roots, such as the up-regulation of the cytokinin degradation pathway in the shoots of the hybrid and down-regulation of that pathway in the roots. The change of gene expression under N limitation in the hybrid resembled the parent with the higher NUE trait. The transcript abundances of alleles derived from each parent were estimated using polymorphic sites in mapped reads in the hybrid. While there were allele abundance differences, there was no correlation between these and the expression differences seen between the hybrid and the two parents. Conclusions Gene expression in two parental inbreds and the corresponding hybrid line in response to N limitation was surveyed using the mRNA-Seq technology. The data showed that the three genotypes respond very differently to N-limiting conditions, and the hybrid clearly

  10. Nitrogen Index

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  11. The Fluorescent Properties of Dissolved Organic Matter and Assessment of Total Nitrogen in Overlying Water with Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang Hua; Kuan, Wang; Song, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Ming; Huang, Jian; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Shan; Wang, Meng

    2016-03-01

    This paper used excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to probe the fluorescence properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the overlying water with different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions, investigating the relationship between protein-like fluorescence intensity and total nitrogen concentration. The resulting fluorescence spectra revealed three protein-like components (high-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tyrosine, low-excitation wavelength tryptophan) and two fulvic-like components (ultraviolet fulvic-like components, visible fulvic-like components) in the overlying water. Moreover, the protein-like components were dominant in the overlying water's DOM. The fluorescence intensity of the protein-like components decreased significantly after aeration. Two of the protein-like components--the low-excitation wavelength tyrosine and the low-excitation wavelength tryptophan--were more susceptible to degradation by microorganisms within the degradable organic matter with respect to the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine. In contrast, the ultraviolet and visible fulvic-like fluorescence intensity increased along with increasing DO concentration, indicating that the fulvic-like components were part of the refractory organics. The fluorescence indices of the DOM in the overlying water were between 1.65-1.80, suggesting that the sources of the DOM were related to terrigenous sediments and microbial metabolic processes, with the primary source being the contribution from microbial metabolism. The fluorescence indices increased along with DO growth, which showed that microbial biomass and microbial activity gradually increased with increasing DO while microbial metabolism also improved, which also increased the biogenic components in the overlying water. The fluorescence intensity of the high-excitation wavelength tyrosine peak A showed a good linear relationship with the total nitrogen concentration at higher DO concentrations of 2

  12. Denitrification of soil nitrogen in coastal and inland salt marshes with different flooding frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Wang, Xin; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Denitrification is an important process for removing nitrogen in wetlands, and it is influenced by many environmental factors. However, little information is available on the relationship between hydrologic conditions and denitrification. In this study three typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including short-term flooding wetlands (STFW), seasonal-flooding wetlands (SFW) and tidal flooding wetlands (TFW) were chosen as the study sites in the Yellow River Delta. In contrast, five typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including 100-year floodplain (H), 10-year floodplain (T), 5-year floodplain (F), 1-year floodplain (O) and permanently flooded floodplain (B) were chosen as the study sites in Xianghai wetlands. This study reflected that the denitrification rates decreased with depth along soil profiles in both inland and coastal salt marsh soils. Flooding periods, soil depth and their interaction showed significant effects on the denitrification processes. Generally, higher flooding frequencies will cause higher denitrification rates in salt marshes. Moreover, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with soil moisture content in both wetlands. Additionally, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with organic matter and NO3-_N content while negatively correlated with soil pH and salinity in inland salt marshes. Therefore, the changes in soil properties (e.g. SOM, TN, pH and salinity) can become an important way to control NO3- levels in inland salt marshes.

  13. Developmental changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism affect tea quality in different leaf position.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Wei-Jun; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Shen, Chen; Yan, Peng; Li, Xin; Han, Wen-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Leaf position represents a specific developmental stage that influences both photosynthesis and respiration. However, the precise relationships between photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that affect tea quality are largely unknown. Here, we show that the effective quantum yield of photosystem II [ΦPSⅡ] as well as total chlorophyll concentration (TChl) of tea leaves increased gradually with leaf maturity. Moreover, respiration rate (RR) together with total nitrogen concentration (TN) decreased persistently, but total carbon remained unchanged during leaf maturation. Analyses of major N-based organic compounds revealed that decrease in TN was attributed to a significant decrease in the concentration of caffeine and amino acids (AA) in mature leaves. Furthermore, soluble sugar (SS) decreased, but starch concentration increased with leaf maturity, indicating that source-sink relationship was altered during tea leaf development. Detailed correlation analysis showed that ΦPSⅡ was negatively correlated with RR, SS, starch, tea polyphenol (TP), total catechins and TN, but positively correlated with TChl; while RR was positively correlated with TN, SS, TP and caffeine, but negatively correlated with TChl and starch concentrations. Our results suggest that biosynthesis of chlorophyll, catechins and polyphenols is closely associated with photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that greatly influences the relationship between primary and secondary metabolism in tea plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Preference for different inorganic nitrogen forms among plant functional types and species of the Patagonian steppe.

    PubMed

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E; Yahdjian, Laura

    2013-11-01

    We have explored species-specific preferences for nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) as an alternative niche separation in ecosystems where nitrogen (N) is present mostly in inorganic forms. The Patagonian steppe is dominated by shrubs and grasses. Shrubs absorb water and nutrients from deep soil layers, which are poor in N, while grasses have the opposite pattern, absorbing most of their water and nutrients from the upper layers of the soil. We hypothesized that the preferences of shrub and grass for inorganic N forms are different and that the rate of potential N uptake is greater in shrubs than in grasses. To test this hypothesis, we grew individuals of six dominant species in solutions of different NH4(+):NO3(-) concentration ratios. Nitrate uptake was found to be higher in shrubs, while ammonium uptake was similar between plant functional types. The NH4(+):NO3(-) uptake ratio was significantly lower for shrubs than grasses. Shrubs, which under field conditions have deeper rooting systems than grasses, showed a higher N absorption capacity than grasses and a preference for the more mobile N form, nitrate. Grasses, which had lower N uptake rates than shrubs, preferred ammonium over nitrate. These complementary patterns between grasses and shrubs suggest a more thorough exploitation of resources by diverse ecosystems than those dominated by just one functional type. The loss of one plant functional group or a significant change in its abundance would therefore represent a reduction in resource use efficiency and ecosystem functioning.

  15. Hormesis effects of amoxicillin on growth and cellular biosynthesis of Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-04-01

    Coexisting antibiotic contaminants have potential to regulate cyanobacterial bloom, and the regulation is likely affected by nitrogen supply. A typical cyanobaterium Microcystis aeruginosa was cultured with 0.05-50 mg L(-1) of nitrogen and exposed to 100-600 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin for 7 days. Algal growth was not significantly (p > 0.05) affected by amoxicillin at the lowest nitrogen level of 0.05 mg L(-1), stimulated by 600 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at a moderate nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1) and enhanced by 100-600 ng L(-1) of amoxicillin at higher nitrogen levels of 5-50 mg L(-1). Amoxicillin affected chlorophyll-a, psbA gene, and rbcL gene in a similar manner as algal growth, suggesting a regulation of algal growth via the photosynthesis system. At each nitrogen level, synthesis of protein and polysaccharides as well as production and release of microcystins (MCs) increased in response to environmental stress caused by amoxicillin. Expression of ntcA and mcyB showed a positive correlation with the total content of MCs under exposure to amoxicillin at nitrogen levels of 0.05-50 mg L(-1). Nitrogen and amoxicillin significantly (p < 0.05) interact with each other on the regulation of algal growth, synthesis of chlorophyll-a, production and release of MCs, and expression of ntcA and mcyB. The nitrogen-dependent stimulation effect of coexisting amoxicillin contaminant on M. aeruginosa bloom should be fully considered during the combined pollution control of M. aeruginosa and amoxicillin.

  16. Dynamic Model Improves Agronomic and Environmental Outcomes for Maize Nitrogen Management over Static Approach.

    PubMed

    Sela, Shai; van Es, Harold M; Moebius-Clune, Bianca N; Marjerison, Rebecca; Moebius-Clune, Daniel; Schindelbeck, Robert; Severson, Keith; Young, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Large temporal and spatial variability in soil nitrogen (N) availability leads many farmers across the United States to over-apply N fertilizers in maize ( L.) production environments, often resulting in large environmental N losses. Static Stanford-type N recommendation tools are typically promoted in the United States, but new dynamic model-based decision tools allow for highly adaptive N recommendations that account for specific production environments and conditions. This study compares the Corn N Calculator (CNC), a static N recommendation tool for New York, to Adapt-N, a dynamic simulation tool that combines soil, crop, and management information with real-time weather data to estimate optimum N application rates for maize. The efficiency of the two tools in predicting the Economically Optimum N Rate (EONR) is compared using field data from 14 multiple N-rate trials conducted in New York during the years 2011 through 2015. The CNC tool was used with both realistic grower-estimated potential yields and those extracted from the CNC default database, which were found to be unrealistically low when compared with field data. By accounting for weather and site-specific conditions, the Adapt-N tool was found to increase the farmer profits and significantly improve the prediction of the EONR (RMSE = 34 kg ha). Furthermore, using a dynamic instead of a static approach led to reduced N application rates, which in turn resulted in substantially lower simulated environmental N losses. This study shows that better N management through a dynamic decision tool such as Adapt-N can help reduce environmental impacts while sustaining farm economic viability. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Policies for agricultural nitrogen management—trends, challenges and prospects for improved efficiency in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Hansen, Birgitte; Hasler, Berit; Hertel, Ole; Hutchings, Nicholas J.; Jacobsen, Brian H.; Stoumann Jensen, Lars; Kronvang, Brian; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Schjørring, Jan K.; Sillebak Kristensen, Ib; Graversgaard, Morten; Termansen, Mette; Vejre, Henrik

    2014-11-01

    With more than 60% of the land farmed, with vulnerable freshwater and marine environments, and with one of the most intensive, export-oriented livestock sectors in the world, the nitrogen (N) pollution pressure from Danish agriculture is severe. Consequently, a series of policy action plans have been implemented since the mid 1980s with significant effects on the surplus, efficiency and environmental loadings of N. This paper reviews the policies and actions taken and their ability to mitigate effects of reactive N (Nr) while maintaining agricultural production. In summary, the average N-surplus has been reduced from approximately 170 kg N ha-1 yr-1 to below 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 during the past 30 yrs, while the overall N-efficiency for the agricultural sector (crop + livestock farming) has increased from around 20-30% to 40-45%, the N-leaching from the field root zone has been halved, and N losses to the aquatic and atmospheric environment have been significantly reduced. This has been achieved through a combination of approaches and measures (ranging from command and control legislation, over market-based regulation and governmental expenditure to information and voluntary action), with specific measures addressing the whole N cascade, in order to improve the quality of ground- and surface waters, and to reduce the deposition to terrestrial natural ecosystems. However, there is still a major challenge in complying with the EU Water Framework and Habitats Directives, calling for new approaches, measures and technologies to mitigate agricultural N losses and control N flows.

  18. Critical nutrient thresholds needed to control eutrophication and synergistic interactions between phosphorus and different nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghui; Qin, Lihuan; Bao, Linlin; Li, Yayong; Li, Xuyong

    2016-10-01

    Eutrophication is one of the greatest threats to global freshwater ecosystems. The phytoplankton responses to nutrient inputs vary in different water bodies, so it is particularly important to determine the nutrient thresholds and synergistic interactions between nutrients in different freshwater ecosystems. Field sampling and bioassay experiments were conducted to determine the thresholds of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) in Miyun Reservoir. A separate nutrient addition bioassay was designed to assess the synergistic interactions between these nutrients. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations were used to estimate phytoplankton biomass. The results showed the following: (1) nutrient threshold bioassay indicated that eutrophication thresholds of SRP, NO3-N, and NH4-N should be targeted at below 0.04 mg P L(-1), 0.5 mg N L(-1), and 0.3 mg N L(-1), respectively, to limit the growth of phytoplankton. (2) The stimulatory effect of "NH4-N plus P" on phytoplankton biomass was greater than "NO3-N plus P" at the same N concentration, and "NH4-N plus NO3-N" did not show such associated stimulatory effect as "NH4-N plus P" or "NO3-N plus P". (3) The average concentrations of total phosphorus (TP), NO3-N, and NH4-N in Miyun Reservior were 0.017 mg P L(-1), 0.620 mg N L(-1), and 0.143 mg N L(-1), respectively. The reservoir-wide average Chl a is below 20 μg L(-1) on an annual basis. (4) Ammonium was an important factor for the growth of phytoplankton and inputs of both NH4-N and NO3-N should be reduced to control bloom formation. Our findings imply that although P load reduction is important, appropriate reductions of all forms of N in watershed is recommended in the nutrient management strategy for Miyun Reservoir.

  19. OPPORTUNITIES IN NITROGEN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH; IMPROVING APPLICATIONS FOR PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES AND IDENTIFYING NEW TOOLS FOR MANAGING NITROGEN FLUX AND INPUT IN ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence and distribution of undesirable quantities of bioavailable nitrogenous compounds in the environment are issues of long-standing concern. Importantly for us today, deleterious effects associated with high levels of nitrogen in the ecosystem are becoming everyday news...

  20. OPPORTUNITIES IN NITROGEN MANAGEMENT RESEARCH; IMPROVING APPLICATIONS FOR PROVEN TECHNOLOGIES AND IDENTIFYING NEW TOOLS FOR MANAGING NITROGEN FLUX AND INPUT IN ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence and distribution of undesirable quantities of bioavailable nitrogenous compounds in the environment are issues of long-standing concern. Importantly for us today, deleterious effects associated with high levels of nitrogen in the ecosystem are becoming everyday news...

  1. Does anatoxin-a influence the physiology of Microcystis aeruginosa and Acutodesmus acuminatus under different light and nitrogen conditions?

    PubMed

    Chia, Mathias Ahii; Cordeiro-Araújo, Micheline Kézia; Lorenzi, Adriana Sturion; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria do Carmo

    2016-11-01

    Due to changing global climatic conditions, a lot of attention has been given to cyanobacteria and their bioactive secondary metabolites. These conditions are expected to increase the frequency of cyanobacterial blooms, and consequently, the concentrations of cyanotoxins in aquatic ecosystems. Unfortunately, there are very few studies that address the effects of cyanotoxins on the physiology of phytoplankton species under different environmental conditions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the cyanotoxin anatoxin-a (ATX-A) on Microcystis aeruginosa (cyanobacteria) and Acutodesmus acuminatus (chlorophyta) under varying light and nitrogen conditions. Low light (LL) and nitrogen limitation (LN) resulted in significant cell density reduction of the two species, while the effect of ATX-A on M. aeruginosa was not significant. However, under normal (NN) and high nitrogen (HN) concentrations, exposure to ATX-A resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) lower cell density of A. acuminatus. Pigment content of M. aeruginosa significantly (p < 0.05) declined in the presence of ATX-A, regardless of the light condition. Under each light condition, exposure to ATX-A caused a reduction in total microcystin (MC) content of M. aeruginosa. The detected MC levels varied as a function of nitrogen and ATX-A concentrations. The production of reactive oxygen species (H2O2) and antioxidant enzyme activities of both species were significantly altered by ATX-A under different light and nitrogen conditions. Our results revealed that under different light and nitrogen conditions, the response of M. aeruginosa and A. acuminatus to ATX-A was variable, which demonstrated the need for different endpoints of environmental factors during ecotoxicological investigations.

  2. Detection of nitrogen-overfertilized rice plants with leaf positional difference in hyperspectral vegetation index*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi-fa; Liu, Zhan-yu; Huang, Jing-feng

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to compare the applicability of the single leaf (the uppermost leaf L1 and the third uppermost leaf L3) modified simple ratio (mSR705 index) and the leaf positional difference in the vegetation index between L1 and L3 (mSR705L1−mSR705L3) in detecting nitrogen (N)-overfertilized rice plants. A field experiment consisting of three rice genotypes and five N fertilization levels (0, 75, 180, 285, and 390 kg N/ha) was conducted at Xiaoshan, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China in 2008. The hyperspectral reflectance (350–2500 nm) and the chlorophyll concentration (ChlC) of L1 and L3 were measured at different stages. The mSR705L1 and mSR705L3 indices appeared not to be highly sensitive to the N rates, especially when the N rate was high (above 180 kg N/ha). The mean mSR705L1−mSR705L3 across the genotypes increased significantly (P<0.05) or considerably from 180 to 285 kg N/ha treatment and from 285 to 390 kg N/ha treatment at all the stages. Also, use of the difference (mSR705L1−mSR705L3) greatly reduced the influence of the stages and genotypes in assessing the N status with reflectance data. The results of this study show that the N-overfertilized rice plants can be effectively detected with the leaf positional difference in the mSR705 index. PMID:20506579

  3. Locomotion speed of the benthic foraminifer Ammonia tepida exposed to different nitrogen and carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauffrais, Thierry; Jesus, Bruno; Geslin, Emmanuelle; Briand, Floriane; Jézéquel, Véronique Martin

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia tepida is a dominant benthic foraminifer colonizing intertidal mudflat sediments. Horizontal locomotion speeds were monitored using time-lapse image analysis over 6 and 24 h. Experimental conditions were based on foraminifera exposed to dry sediment re-suspended in artificial sea water (ASW) without any nutrient addition (condition DS), to combusted sediment re-suspended in in ASW also without any nutrient addition (condition CS), or to combusted sediment re-suspended in ASW enriched with either: nitrate, urea, glucose, soil extract (SE), extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), benthic diatoms (Entomoneis paludosa) or natural microphytobenthic assemblages (MPB). Significant differences were already measured after 6 h between A. tepida mean locomotion speeds at the different experimental conditions. However, differences were clearer after 24 h where the slowest A. tepida mean locomotion speed was measured in specimens placed in CS (1.00 ± 0.30 mm h- 1) and the highest mean locomotion speed in DS (2.99 ± 0.22 mm h- 1). Three different groups were defined according to their locomotion speed, (1) foraminifera exposed to DS had a locomotion speed significantly higher than all other conditions, (2) foraminifera placed in conditions enriched in SE, Glucose, Urea and EPS had intermediary locomotion speeds (1.8-2.5 mm h- 1), and (3) conditions with foraminifera showing the lowest locomotion speeds (1-1.6 mm h- 1) were CS, nitrate, MPB and E. paludosa. Thus, foraminifera exposed to organic matter (DS, SE, Glucose and Urea) showed faster locomotion speeds than foraminifera exposed to inorganic matter (CS, nitrate) or live preys (E. paludosa, MPB). Dissolved organic matter enrichment enhanced foraminifera locomotion speed, which might be a behavioural response to satisfy their carbon and/or nitrogen requirements, and the lowest locomotion speed observed when feeding on live preys might be a consequence of longer time required for live prey phagocytosis.

  4. Growth and nutrient removal properties of the diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex under different nitrogen sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, Panneerselvam; Manimaran, Kuppusamy; Sampathkumar, Pitchai; Rameshkumar, Lakshmanan

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the suitability of the marine diatoms, Chaetoceros curvisetus and C. simplex for the removal of macronutrients from different wastewater, the growth and nitrate-phosphate removal properties were studied with nitrate, ammonium and urea nitrogen sources. Three separate experiments were conducted using modified F/2 medium with 12.35 mg L-1 total nitrogen and 1.12 mg L-1 total phosphorous (simulating the typical concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus in secondary effluent) as growth medium. The maximum cell densities of C. curvisetus and C. simplex were 7.16 ± 0.34 × 104 cells mL-1 in {{NO}}3^{ - } and 3.88 ± 0.32 × 105 cells mL-1 in urea, respectively. The maximum chlorophyll a per cell was 1.7 and 4.7 pg for C. simplex and C. curvisetus, cultured with urea and nitrate, respectively. The high protein contents of 4.7 pg cell-1 in C. simplex with urea and 19.7 pg cell-1 in C. curvisetus nitrate nitrogen sources were found. The higher cell density and protein content of both species from urea and nitrate nitrogen sources ( p < 0.05) have shown that these were utilized by microalgae and were converted to protein. The C. simplex and C. curvisetus showed maximum removal efficiencies of nitrate by 97.86 and 91.62 % and phosphate by 98.5 and 100 %, respectively when urea used as nitrogen source than ammonia. The results indicated the C. simplex was more efficient than C. curvisetus and suitable for the removal of macronutrients when cultured with urea and nitrate nitrogen sources.

  5. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  6. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  7. Improving nitrogen removal using a fuzzy neural network-based control system in the anoxic/oxic process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingzhi; Ma, Yongwen; Wan, Jinquan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yangmei; Yoo, Changkyoo

    2014-10-01

    Due to the inherent complexity, uncertainty, and posterity in operating a biological wastewater treatment process, it is difficult to control nitrogen removal in the biological wastewater treatment process. In order to cope with this problem and perform a cost-effective operation, an integrated neural-fuzzy control system including a fuzzy neural network (FNN) predicted model for forecasting the nitrate concentration of the last anoxic zone and a FNN controller were developed to control the nitrate recirculation flow and realize nitrogen removal in an anoxic/oxic (A/O) process. In order to improve the network performance, a self-learning ability embedded in the FNN model was emphasized for improving the rule extraction performance. The results indicate that reasonable forecasting and control performances had been achieved through the developed control system. The effluent COD, TN, and the operation cost were reduced by about 14, 10.5, and 17 %, respectively.

  8. Experimental Study on Rising Velocity of Different Nitrogen Bubbles in of Circular Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Yiping; Wang, Jing

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen bubble rising velocity in bottom of circular pipe has been studied by virtual experiment with high-speed camera. The obtained images are processed systematically. Based on Cole's and Mendelson's empirical formula of bubble rising velocity, fitting formula of nitrogen bubble rising velocity in bottom of circular pipe has been acquired through analyzing nitrogen bubble rising velocity. The treatment results of experimental data show that the rising velocity is related with the diameter of bubbles. And rising velocity of slug bubble is relative to L/D and change law is found. Through this experiment, we research rising velocity's change law, which is the spade work to study propagation mechanism of nitrogen slug bubble in circular pipe.

  9. Effects of three different PAHs on nitrogen-fixing bacterial diversity in mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu-Lin; Wang, You-Shao; Sun, Cui-Ci; Peng, Ya-Lan; Deng, Chao

    2012-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of great environmental and human health concerns due to their widespread occurrence, persistence and carcinogenic properties. There is now compelling evidence that the mangrove sediment microbial structure is susceptible to PAHs contamination. The study aimed to assess the effects of PAHs on the nitrogen-fixing bacterial community of mangrove sediment. Three types of PAHs, naphthalene (NAP), a two-ring PAH; fluorene (FLU), a three-ring PAH; and pyrene (PYR), a four-ring PAH; were applied at three doses. After 7 and 24 days of incubation, the nitrogen-fixing bacterial population and diversity were evidenced in the nifH gene polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile. DGGE pattern shows that the nitrogen-fixing bacterial community changed significantly with the types and doses of PAHs, and the incubation time. As far as single PAH is concerned, high concentration of PAH has larger impact on the nitrogen-fixing bacteria than low concentration of PAH. Besides, among the three types of PAHs, NAP has the greatest short term toxicity; PYR has the strongest long-term impact, whereas FLU has relatively higher long-time effect. Multidimensional scaling analysis and correspondence analysis are two reliable multivariate analysis methods for investigating the relationship between the nitrogen-fixing bacterial community and PAHs contamination. Investigating the effect of PAHs on the nitrogen-fixing bacterial diversity could yield useful information for understanding the process of biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen in mangrove sediment. The present study reveals that nitrogen-fixing bacterial community can be used as an important parameter indicating the impact of PAHs on mangrove sediment ecosystem.

  10. Improvement in nitrogen fixation capacity could be part of the domestication process in soybean.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Qi, X; Li, M-W; Xie, M; Gao, Y; Cheung, M-Y; Wong, F-L; Lam, H-M

    2016-08-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in soybeans is a complex process involving the interplay between the plant host and the symbiotic rhizobia. As nitrogen supply has a crucial role in growth and development, higher nitrogen fixation capacity would be important to achieve bigger plants and larger seeds, which were important selection criteria during plant domestication by humans. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the nitrogen fixation-related performance in 31 cultivated and 17 wild soybeans after inoculation with the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov. USDA110 and the fast-growing Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii CCBAU45436. Our results showed that, in general, cultivated soybeans gave better performance in BNF. Electron microscopic studies indicated that there was an exceptionally high accumulation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate bodies in bacteroids in the nodules of all wild soybeans tested, suggesting that the C/N balance in wild soybeans may not be optimized for nitrogen fixation. Furthermore, we identified new quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for total ureides and total nodule fresh weight by employing a recombinant inbred population composed of descendants from a cross between a cultivated and a wild parent. Using nucleotide diversity (θπ), divergence index (Fst) and distribution of fixed single-nucleotide polymorphisms as parameters, we found that some regions in the total ureides QTL on chromosome 17 and the total nodule fresh weight QTL on chromosome 12 exhibited very low diversity among cultivated soybeans, suggesting that these were traits specially selected during the domestication and breeding process.

  11. Combined use of nitrogen and coatings to improve the quality of mechanically harvested Manzanilla olives.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Eva; Sánchez, Antonio H; Romero, Concepción; Brenes, Manuel

    2015-03-15

    The combined effect of an edible coating and a nitrogen atmosphere on the quality of Manzanilla olives mechanically harvested and processed as Spanish-style green olives was assessed. The percentage of olives free of any brown spots ranged between 35-50%, 10-25% and 50-65% for fruit directly processed, storage under nitrogen and coated and storage under nitrogen respectively. Moreover, olives stored in the open air developed brown spots due to the oxidation of oleuropein. By contrast, the anoxic conditions prevented oleuropein from undergoing enzymatic oxidation but not from its enzymatic hydrolysis. Hence, the phenolic derivative HyEDA was formed in olives stored under nitrogen, and this substance was rapidly oxidized in the open air to give rise to brown spots although to a lesser extent in the coated fruit. Therefore, the postharvest storage of coated olives under nitrogen can be a good method to prevent bruise damage in mechanically harvested fruit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement in nitrogen fixation capacity could be part of the domestication process in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, N; Qi, X; Li, M-W; Xie, M; Gao, Y; Cheung, M-Y; Wong, F-L; Lam, H-M

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in soybeans is a complex process involving the interplay between the plant host and the symbiotic rhizobia. As nitrogen supply has a crucial role in growth and development, higher nitrogen fixation capacity would be important to achieve bigger plants and larger seeds, which were important selection criteria during plant domestication by humans. To test this hypothesis, we monitored the nitrogen fixation-related performance in 31 cultivated and 17 wild soybeans after inoculation with the slow-growing Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens sp. nov. USDA110 and the fast-growing Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) fredii CCBAU45436. Our results showed that, in general, cultivated soybeans gave better performance in BNF. Electron microscopic studies indicated that there was an exceptionally high accumulation of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate bodies in bacteroids in the nodules of all wild soybeans tested, suggesting that the C/N balance in wild soybeans may not be optimized for nitrogen fixation. Furthermore, we identified new quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for total ureides and total nodule fresh weight by employing a recombinant inbred population composed of descendants from a cross between a cultivated and a wild parent. Using nucleotide diversity (θπ), divergence index (Fst) and distribution of fixed single-nucleotide polymorphisms as parameters, we found that some regions in the total ureides QTL on chromosome 17 and the total nodule fresh weight QTL on chromosome 12 exhibited very low diversity among cultivated soybeans, suggesting that these were traits specially selected during the domestication and breeding process. PMID:27118154

  13. Does nitrogen deposition affect plant-derived and microbial organic matter compounds differently?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, Alexander; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2010-05-01

    The IPCC report 2007 assesses soil nitrogen availability as a key factor in predicting future carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems. However, various studies reported contrasting N effects on SOM dynamics, but the reasons for this are not well understood. One potential explanation is that decomposition processes of individual organic molecules respond differently to nitrogen. Compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of C (and N) can be used to trace isotopically labeled molecules in soil. While such an isotopic label can be relatively easily obtained in arable soils via crop changes from C3 to C4 plants, this option does not exist for forests. Therefore, no data on molecular dynamics of forest soils and their response to changes in environmental conditions (increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and in N deposition) exist so far. Nonetheless, labeling of forest ecosystems is possible by fumigation with labeled CO2, although only very few of these experiments are available worldwide. In a new project, we will use archived soil samples from a CO2 enrichment experiment in large open-top chambers. This experiment had been conducted in a factorial design to study interactions between CO2 fumigation and N deposition on model forest ecosystems growing on two contrasting soils. The analysis of 13C signatures in SOM fractions indicated a retarded mineralization of old SOM in fine particle size fractions. In this study, we will apply compound-specific isotope analysis to trace added CO2 into plant and microbial biomarkers in soils. Thus, we will obtain systematic data on molecular dynamics in forest soils based on a 13C labeling approach. In particular, we will test the hypothesis that decomposition of N-containing compounds (such as microbial amino sugars) does not respond to N additions, in contrast to decomposition of N-free compounds, such as lignin. The experimental design also enables us to address potential interactive effects of CO2, N and soil

  14. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in mesocosms of five different European peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, Christian; Zajac, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition, a key growth limiting nutrient in ombrotrophic peatlands, can cause various shifts in peatland N cycling. Quantification of N transformation rates and fluxes within peatlands that are induced by long-term N deposition is crucial for understanding the mechanisms and robustness of N retention. Using a 15N labeled tracer under steady state conditions at two water table levels, we investigated the fate of N in mesocosms from five European peatlands, which have a history of differing long-term N load. Peat contained the largest N pool, followed by Sphagnum (0 - 5 cm), shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. We found a decline of N recovery from the peat and an increase of N recovery from shrubs and the dissolved pool across the N deposition gradient. Sphagnum mosses not only intercepted large amounts of 15N in the mesocosms (0.2 - 0.35 mg g-1) but they also retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Polluted sites (Lille Vildmose, Frölichshaier Sattelmoor) contained the largest dissolved nitrogen pools and the highest nitrate concentrations. At the same time the recoveries of their Sphagnum pools were in the range of the recovery recorded for the Sphagnum layer from the 'clean' site (Degerö Stormyr). Our experiment shows that a decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, might not be an evidence for Sphagnum saturation. As long as N is required for the synthesis of biomass Sphagnum species can thrive even at strongly elevated long-term N loads. A change in WT position from -28 to -8 cm influenced CO2 fluxes from mesocosms only to a small degree, which implies that small changes in water table position may be less important in controlling CO2 exchange with the atmosphere than often assumed. Although water table rise was a main driver for increase of methane emissions in all cores, short time lags (3

  15. Modelling of in-stream nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations using different sampling strategies for calibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Jiang, Sanyuan; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    It is known that a good evaluation and prediction of surface water pollution is mainly limited by the monitoring strategy and the capability of the hydrological water quality model to reproduce the internal processes. To this end, a compromise sampling frequency, which can reflect the dynamical behaviour of leached nutrient fluxes responding to changes in land use, agriculture practices and point sources, and appropriate process-based water quality model are required. The objective of this study was to test the identification of hydrological water quality model parameters (nitrogen and phosphorus) under two different monitoring strategies: (1) regular grab-sampling approach and (2) regular grab-sampling with additional monitoring during the hydrological events using automatic samplers. First, the semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was successfully calibrated (1994-1998) for discharge (NSE = 0.86), nitrate-N (lowest NSE for nitrate-N load = 0.69), particulate phosphorus and soluble phosphorus in the Selke catchment (463 km2, central Germany) for the period 1994-1998 using regular grab-sampling approach (biweekly to monthly for nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations). Second, the model was successfully validated during the period 1999-2010 for discharge, nitrate-N, particulate-phosphorus and soluble-phosphorus (lowest NSE for soluble phosphorus load = 0.54). Results, showed that when additional sampling during the events with random grab-sampling approach was used (period 2011-2013), the hydrological model could reproduce only the nitrate-N and soluble phosphorus concentrations reasonably well. However, when additional sampling during the hydrological events was considered, the HYPE model could not represent the measured particulate phosphorus. This reflects the importance of suspended sediment during the hydrological events increasing the concentrations of particulate phosphorus. The HYPE model could

  16. Managing nitrogen inputs into seagrass meadows near a coastal city: flow-on from research to environmental improvement plans.

    PubMed

    Nayar, S; Collings, G; Pfennig, P; Royal, M

    2012-05-01

    Increased human habitation has led to a 30 to 50-fold increase in nutrient loads to the coastal waters of Adelaide, resulting in the loss of over 5000 ha of seagrass meadows. The rate of loss since the 1940s has been irregular, averaging 85 ha yr(-1), marked by a substantial peak between 1971 and 1977. A modelling approach allowed comparison of the annual input with the annual uptake rates for the different biotic components in the seagrass bed. In 2005, the estimated uptake of ammonium (465 t yr(-1)) and nitrate (3.04 t yr(-1)) by the seagrass and associated epiphytes in the Adelaide region accounted for 31% of the ammonium and <1% of the nitrate that is currently discharged into the coastal waters. Environment Improvement Programs, such as the one implemented in 1996, may reduce the total nitrogen loads to 700 t yr(-1), possibly stemming further losses and facilitating recolonisation of new seagrass. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Impacts of Rac- and S-metolachlor on cyanobacterial cell integrity and release of microcystins at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Zhang, Lijuan; Fan, Jiajia; Wen, Yuezhong

    2017-08-01

    Pesticide residues and nitrogen overload (which caused cyanobacteria blooms) have been two serious environmental concerns. In particular, chiral pesticides with different structures may have various impacts on cyanobacteria. Nitrogen may affect the behavior between pesticides and cyanobacteria (e.g., increase the adverse effects of pesticides on cyanobacteria). This study evaluated the impacts of Rac- and S-metolachlor on the cell integrity and toxin release of Microcystis aeruginosa cells at different nitrogen levels. The results showed that (both of the configurations: Rac-, S-) metolachlor could inhibit M. aeruginosa cell growth under most conditions, and the inhibition rates were increased with the growing concentrations of nitrogen and metolachlor. However, cyanobacterial growth was promoted in 48 h under environmental relevant condition (1 mg/L metolachlor and 0.15 mg/L nitrogen). Therefore, the water authorities should adjust the treatment parameters to remove possible larger numbers of cyaonbacteria under that condition. On the other hand, the inhibition degree of M. aeruginosa cell growth by S-metolachlor treatments was obviously larger than Rac-metolachlor treatments. S-metolachlor also had a stronger ability in compromising M. aeruginosa cells than Rac-metolachlor treatments. Compared to control samples, more extracellular toxins (12%-86% increases) were detected after 5 mg/L S-metolachlor treatment for 72 h at different nitrogen levels, but the variations of extracellular toxins caused by 5 mg/L Rac-metolachlor addition could be neglected. Consequently, higher concentrations of metolachlor in source waters are harmful to humans, but it may prevent cyanobacterial blooms. However, the potential risks (e.g. build-up of extracellular toxins) should be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Different responses of alpine plants to nitrogen addition: effects on plant-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Peng; Yang, Hao; Mou, Chengxiang; Mo, Li

    2016-01-01

    The different responses of plant species to resource stress are keys to understand the dynamics of plant community in a changing environment. To test the hypothesis that nitrogen (N) increase would benefit N competitive species, rather than N stress-tolerant species, to compete with neighbours, we conducted an experiment with neighbour removal, N addition and soil moisture as treatments in an alpine grassland on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. Both growths and competitive-response abilities (CRA, the ability to tolerate the inhibitory effects of neighbors) of Kobresia macrantha, Polygonum viviparum and Potentilla anserine in wet site were facilitated by N addition, conversely, both growths and CRA of Taraxacum mongolicum and Ligularia virgaurea were suppressed by N addition, indicating that the responses of CRA of target species under N addition were consistent with the N utilization strategies of them. Moreover, the facilitative effects of N addition on competitive-response abilities of Kobresia macrantha and Polygonum viviparum were not found at the dry site, illustrating that soil moisture can alter the changes of neighbour effects caused by N addition. Life strategy of dominant species in plant community on the undisturbed southeastern Tibetan Plateau may shift from N stress-tolerant to N competitive, if the N increases continuously. PMID:27922131

  19. Stoichiometric Characteristics of Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus in Leaves of Differently Aged Lucerne (Medicago sativa) Stands

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhennan; Lu, Jiaoyun; Yang, Mei; Yang, Huimin; Zhang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    Element concentration within a plant which is vital to function maintenance and adaptation to environment, may change with plant growth. However, how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) vary stoichiometrically with stand growth, i.e., ages or cuts, was still untouched in perennial species. This study tested the hypothesis that lucerne (Medicago sativa) C:N, C:P, and N:P should change with stand age and cut. Leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P changed with stand age, showing various trends in different cuts of lucerne. Generally the greatest stoichiometric ratios were measured in 8 year stand and in the second cut. They were affected significantly and negatively by total N and P concentrations of leaf, but not by organic C concentration. There were significantly positive correlations among leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P. However, leaf C:N, C:P, and N:P were hardly affected by soil features. Conclusively, lucerne C, N, and P stoichiometry are age- and cut-specific, and regulated mainly by leaf N, P concentrations and stoichiometry. There are few correlations with soil fertility. To our knowledge, it is the first try to elucidate the stoichiometry in the viewpoint of age and cut with a perennial herbaceous legume. PMID:26697029

  20. Influence of coexisting spiramycin contaminant on the harm of Microcystis aeruginosa at different nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Wang, Feng; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-03-21

    The influence of nitrogen on the effects of the antibiotic contaminant spiramycin on Microcystis aeruginosa was studied through a 7-day exposure test. At current contamination levels of 0.5-100 mg L(-1) for nitrogen and 0.1-0.4 μg L(-1) for spiramycin, the two factors significantly interacted with each other (p<0.05) on the synthesis of chlorophyll-a and protein, the production and release of microcystins as well as the expression of ntcA gene and mcyB gene in M. aeruginosa. Nitrogen significantly affected the toxicity of spiramycin on algal growth (p<0.05) via regulation of protein synthesis. The photosynthesis system including chlorophyll-a, the psbA gene, and the rbcL gene participated in stress responses to spiramycin. Coexisting spiramycin contaminant increased the harm of M. aeruginosa by stimulating the production and release of MCs at a nitrogen level of 0.5 mg L(-1), but alleviated M. aeruginosa pollution at higher nitrogen levels of 5-100 mg L(-1) by inhibiting algal growth, the production of microcystins and the expression of ntcA and mcyB. The nitrogen-dependent effects of spiramycin should be considered in the control of M. aeruginosa bloom in the presence of spiramycin.

  1. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process.

  2. Effects of Chlorella sp. on nutrient treatment in cultures with different carbon to nitrogen ratios.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Hui; Gau, Sue-Huai; Li, Ming-Guo; Chen, Yi-Ju; Sun, Chang-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella sp. is often used in the treatment of wastewater to produce lipids, a practice which could go beyond wastewater treatment and be used to generate green energy. Our objectives here are to explore how the ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) affects the removal of carbon and nitrogen in a wastewater treatment system, while simultaneously generating biomass and lipids. In this study, the C/N ratio is adjusted to 0.002, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 32. The results indicate that a C/N of 10 is sufficient to ensure the consumption of carbon and nitrogen, achieving the lowest concentration in the shortest culturing time (32 h). When nitrogen is lacking in the culture, there will be a slight decrease in the rate of carbon consumption which leads to a limitation of nitrogen and an increase in the lipid/cell density even at 96 h of culture time. The highest lipid content (0.57 g/L) and lipid increase rate (0.4 g/L) occurs with a C/N of 32. The greatest amount of biomass, 1.42 g/L is achieved when the C/N is 32. The carbon concentration is the main factor affecting the nitrogen consumption and the increase in the biomass and lipid content.

  3. Biochemical studies on strain differences of mice in the susceptibility to nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ichinose, T.; Suzuki, A.K.; Tsubone, H.; Sagai, M.

    1982-11-01

    Strain differences of mice in their susceptibility to nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) were examined by measuring the activities of antioxidative protective enzymes, and the amounts of antioxidants and lipid peroxides in lungs. Four strains of mice: ICR, BALB/c, ddy and C57BL/6 were used in this study and their LC/sub 50/ values after exposure to NO/sub 2/ for 16 hr were: 38, 49, 51 and 64 ppm, respectively. Genetic strain differences were observed in the enzyme activities, the antioxidant contents and lipid peroxide contents among these four different strains. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GP/sub x/), glutathione S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the contents of non-protein sulfyhdryls (NPSH), ..cap alpha..-tocopherol (..cap alpha..-Toc) and total lipids in lungs of the four strains were related to their LC/sub 50/, while TBA reactants in lungs of the four strains were inversely related to their LC/sub 50/. After exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 16 hr, the activities of the protective enzymes and the contents of NPSH decreased, while the level of ..cap alpha..-Toc increased markedly. The activities of GP/sub x/, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, SOD and disulfide reductase, and the contents of NPSH, ..cap alpha..-Toc and total lipids were also related to their LC/sub 50/. On the other hand, TBA reactants increased higher than those of the control groups and were inversely related to their LC/sub 50/. These results suggest that the protective enzymes and the antioxidants are important factors as defence mechanism in lungs to NO/sub 2/ and that the intensity of the protective systems in pigmented strains is generally greater than that in albino strains.

  4. Carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: global carbon cycle impact from an improved plant nitrogen cycle in the Community Land Model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingjie; Fisher, Joshua B; Brzostek, Edward R; Phillips, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    Plants typically expend a significant portion of their available carbon (C) on nutrient acquisition - C that could otherwise support growth. However, given that most global terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) do not include the C cost of nutrient acquisition, these models fail to represent current and future constraints to the land C sink. Here, we integrated a plant productivity-optimized nutrient acquisition model - the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen Model - into one of the most widely used TBMs, the Community Land Model. Global plant nitrogen (N) uptake is dynamically simulated in the coupled model based on the C costs of N acquisition from mycorrhizal roots, nonmycorrhizal roots, N-fixing microbes, and retranslocation (from senescing leaves). We find that at the global scale, plants spend 2.4 Pg C yr(-1) to acquire 1.0 Pg N yr(-1) , and that the C cost of N acquisition leads to a downregulation of global net primary production (NPP) by 13%. Mycorrhizal uptake represented the dominant pathway by which N is acquired, accounting for ~66% of the N uptake by plants. Notably, roots associating with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi - generally considered for their role in phosphorus (P) acquisition - are estimated to be the primary source of global plant N uptake owing to the dominance of AM-associated plants in mid- and low-latitude biomes. Overall, our coupled model improves the representations of NPP downregulation globally and generates spatially explicit patterns of belowground C allocation, soil N uptake, and N retranslocation at the global scale. Such model improvements are critical for predicting how plant responses to altered N availability (owing to N deposition, rising atmospheric CO2 , and warming temperatures) may impact the land C sink.

  5. A facile fabrication of nitrogen-doped electrospun In2O3 nanofibers with improved visible-light photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na; Shao, Changlu; Li, Xinghua; Miao, Fujun; Wang, Kexin; Liu, Yichun

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysis demonstrates to be an effective approach for eliminating most types of environment contaminants and for producing hydrogen. Herein, a facile synthesis route combining electrospinning technique and thermal treatment method under NH3 atmosphere has been presented as a straightforward protocol for the fabrication of nitrogen-doped In2O3 (N-In2O3) nanofibers, the nitrogen content of which can be well controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature. Photocatalytic tests show that the N-In2O3 nanofibers demonstrate an improved degradation rate of Rhodamine B (RB) compared with pure In2O3 nanofibers under visible-light irradiation. This can be attributed to the nitrogen atom introducing at interstitial sites as well as the generation of oxygen vacancy on the surface of In2O3 nanofibers, resulting in the enhanced utilization of visible light for the N-In2O3 nanofibers. Furthermore, the obtained N-In2O3 nanofibers with the advantage of ultra-long one-dimensional nanostructures can be recycled several times by facile sedimentation and hence present almost no decrease in photocatalytic activity indicative of a well regeneration capability. Therefore, the as-fabricated nitrogen-doped In2O3 nanofibers as a promising photocatalyst present good photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant in waste water for practical application.

  6. Analysis of nitrification in agricultural soil and improvement of nitrogen circulation with autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Toshihide; Horii, Sachie; Sato, Takanobu; Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Kubo, Motoki

    2013-02-01

    Accumulations of inorganic nitrogen (NH₄⁺, NO₂⁻, and NO₃⁻) were analyzed to evaluate the nitrogen circulation activity in 76 agricultural soils. Accumulation of NH₄⁺ was observed, and the reaction of NH₄⁺→ NO₂⁻ appeared to be slower than that of NO₂⁻ → NO₃⁻ in agricultural soil. Two autotrophic and five heterotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were isolated and identified from the soils, and the ammonia-oxidizing activities of the autotrophic AOB were 1.0 × 10³-1.0 × 10⁶ times higher than those of heterotrophic AOB. The relationship between AOB number, soil bacterial number, and ammonia-oxidizing activity was investigated with 30 agricultural soils. The ratio of autotrophic AOB number was 0.00032-0.26% of the total soil bacterial number. The soil samples rich in autotrophic AOB (>1.0 × 10⁴ cells/g soil) had a high nitrogen circulation activity, and additionally, the nitrogen circulation in the agricultural soil was improved by controlling the autotrophic AOBs.

  7. Effect of nitrogen fertilisation on the amino acid digestibility of different triticale genotypes in caecectomised laying hens.

    PubMed

    Siegert, Wolfgang; Boguhn, Jeannette; Maurer, Hans Peter; Weiss, Jochen; Zuber, Tobias; Möhring, Jens; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen fertilisation and genotype on the amino acid (AA) digestibility of triticale grain was investigated in caecectomised laying hens. Three genotypes, Grenado, EAW6002 and Lasko, were cultivated with and without nitrogen fertilisation at the end of the heading stage. The six triticale variants as well as a basal diet were each used to feed seven laying hens in a 7 × 7 Latin square design. Nitrogen fertilisation influenced the digestibility of Cys, Glu, Phe and Ser in some triticale genotypes and reduced Ala, Ile, Lys, Met and Val digestibility in all genotypes (P < 0.05). Nitrogen fertilisation increased the concentration of all AAs in the grain. Consequently, the concentration of digestible AAs in the grains was increased for most AAs upon nitrogen fertilisation. Overall, Lys had the lowest digestibility, whereas that of Glu and Pro was the highest. For the triticale genotypes, the level of AA digestibility was highest for EAW6002 followed by Lasko and Grenado, with significant differences (P < 0.05) between genotypes for some but not all AAs. The results indicated that the accuracy of the digestible AA supply for hen feeding might benefit from considering fertilisation and genotype-specific digestibility data in feed formulation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effects of Different Inorganic Nitrogen Sources on Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism in Primary Leaves of Non-nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Marques, I A; Oberholzer, M J; Erismann, K H

    1983-03-01

    Young bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Saxa) were fed with three different types of inorganic nitrogen, after being grown on nitrogen-free nutrient solution for 8 days. The pattern of (14)CO(2) fixation was investigated in photosynthesizing primary leaf discs of 11-day-old plants (3 days with nitrogen source) and in a pulse-chase experiment in 13-day-old plants (5 days with nitrogen source).Ammonium caused, in contrast to nitrate nutrition, a higher level of (14)C incorporation into sugar phosphates but a lower incorporation of label into malate, glycolate, glycerate, aspartate, and alanine. The labeling kinetics of glycine and serine were little changed by the nitrogen source. Ammonium feeding also produced an increase in the ratio of extractable activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and an increase in dark respiration and the CO(2) compensation concentration. Net photosynthesis was higher in plants assimilating nitrate.The results point to stimulated turnover of the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle metabolites, reduced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation, and altered turnover rates within the photosynthetic carbon oxidation cycle in ammonium-fed plants. Mechanisms of the regulation of primary carbon metabolism are proposed and discussed.

  9. Global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the nitrate leaching and crop yield simulation under different water and nitrogen management practices

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural system models have become important tools in studying water and nitrogen (N) dynamics, as well as crop growth, under different management practices. Complexity in input parameters often leads to significant uncertainty when simulating dynamic processes such as nitrate leaching or crop y...

  10. The Impacts of Different Meteorology Data Sets on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the SWAT Watershed Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated how different meteorology data sets impacts nitrogen fate and transport responses in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We used two meteorology data sets: National Climatic Data Center (observed) and Mesoscale Model 5/Weather Research ...

  11. Tomato response to legume cover crop and nitrogen: differing enhancement patterns of fruit yield, photosynthesis and gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomatoes responded to soil and residue from a hairy vetch cover crop differently on many levels than tomato response to inorganic nitrogen. Tomato fruit production, plant biomass parameters, and photosynthesis were higher in plants grown in vetch than bare soil. Tomato growth and photosynthesis metr...

  12. The Impacts of Different Meteorology Data Sets on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the SWAT Watershed Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we investigated how different meteorology data sets impacts nitrogen fate and transport responses in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. We used two meteorology data sets: National Climatic Data Center (observed) and Mesoscale Model 5/Weather Research ...

  13. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in MII-MIII cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates.

  14. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in MII–MIII cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1–3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3–5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5–1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates. PMID:26456850

  15. Combined effect of nitrogen doping and nanosteps on microcrystalline diamond films for improvement of field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengui, U. A.; Campos, R. A.; Alves, K. A.; Antunes, E. F.; Hamanaka, M. H. M. O.; Corat, E. J.; Baldan, M. R.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped microcrystalline diamond (N-MCD) films were grown on Si substrates using a hot filament reactor with methanol solution of urea as N source. Electrostatic self-assembly seeding of nanocrystalline diamond were used to obtain continuous and uniform films. Simultaneous changes in grains morphology and work function of diamond by nitrogen doping decreased the threshold field and the angular coefficient of Fowler-Nordhein plots. The field emission properties of our N-MCD films are comparable to carbon nanotube films.

  16. VARYING STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF DIFFERENT COASTAL MARSH PLANTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH WASTEWATER NITROGEN AND LAND USE IN NEW ENGLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of coastal biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of salt marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spar...

  17. VARYING STABLE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC RATIOS OF DIFFERENT COASTAL MARSH PLANTS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIPS WITH WASTEWATER NITROGEN AND LAND USE IN NEW ENGLAND, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of coastal biota have been used as indicators of sources of anthropogenic nitrogen. In this study the relationships of the stable nitrogen isotopic ratios of salt marsh plants, Iva frutescens (L.), Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud, Spar...

  18. The allocation of assimilated carbon to shoot growth: in situ assessment in natural grasslands reveals nitrogen effects and interspecific differences.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao Ying; Berone, Germán Darío; Agnusdei, Mónica Graciela; Palma, Ricardo Manuel Rodríguez; Schäufele, Rudi; Lattanzi, Fernando Alfredo

    2014-04-01

    In grasslands, sustained nitrogen loading would increase the proportion of assimilated carbon allocated to shoot growth (A shoot), because it would decrease allocation to roots and also encourage the contribution of species with inherently high A shoot. However, in situ measurements of carbon allocation are scarce. Therefore, it is unclear to what extent species that coexist in grasslands actually differ in their allocation strategy or in their response to nitrogen. We used a mobile facility to perform steady-state (13)C-labeling of field stands to quantify, in winter and autumn, the daily relative photosynthesis rate (RPR~tracer assimilated over one light-period) and A shoot (~tracer remaining in shoots after a 100 degree days chase period) in four individual species with contrasting morpho-physiological characteristics coexisting in a temperate grassland of Argentina, either fertilized or not with nitrogen, and either cut intermittently or grazed continuously. Plasticity in response to nitrogen was substantial in most species, as indicated by positive correlations between A shoot and shoot nitrogen concentration. There was a notable interspecific difference: productive species with higher RPR, enhanced by fertilization and characterized by faster leaf turnover rate, allocated ~20% less of the assimilated carbon to shoot growth than species of lower productivity (and quality) characterized by longer leaf life spans and phyllochrons. These results imply that, opposite to the expected response, sustained nitrogen loading would change little the A shoot of grassland communities if increases at the species-level are offset by decreases associated with replacement of 'low RPR-high A shoot' species by 'high RPR-low A shoot' species.

  19. Using soil enzymes to explain observed differences in the response of soil decomposition to nitrogen fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, M.; Weiss, M.; Goodale, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Soil microbes produce extracellular enzymes that degrade a variety of carbon-rich polymers contained within soil organic matter (SOM). These enzymes are key regulators of the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, basic information about the kinetics of extracellular enzymes and key environmental variables that regulate their catalytic ability is lacking. This study aims to clarify the mechanisms by which microbial carbon-degrading enzymes drive different responses to nitrogen (N) fertilization in soil decomposition at two sites with long-term N fertilization experiments, the Bear Brook (BB) forest in Maine and Fernow Forest (FF) in West Virginia. We examined a suite of cellulolytic and lignolytic enzymes that break down common SOM constituents. We hypothesized that enzymes derived from the site with a higher mean annual temperature (FF) would be more heat-tolerant, and retain their catalytic efficiency (Km) as temperature rises, relative to enzymes from the colder environment (BB). We further hypothesized that cellulolytic enzyme activity would be unaffected by N, while oxidative enzyme activity would be suppressed in N-fertilized soils. To test these hypotheses and examine the interactive effects of temperature and N, we measured enzyme activity in unfertilized and N-fertilized soils under a range of laboratory temperature manipulations. Preliminary results show a significant decrease in cellulolytic enzyme efficiency with temperature at the colder site (BB), as well as a significant increase in efficiency due to N-fertilization for two cellulolytic enzymes. Oxidative enzyme activity shows a marginally significant reduction due to N-fertilization at BB. These results suggest that soil warming may produce a negative feedback on carbon turnover in certain climates, while N-fertilization may alter the relative decomposition rates of different soil organic matter constituents. FF activity will be analyzed in a similar manner and the two sites will be compared in order to

  20. [Effects of water levels and the additions of different nitrogen forms on soil net nitrogen transformation rate and N2O emission in subtropical forest soils].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fen; Ma, Hong-liang; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Hong-yu

    2015-02-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the additions of different nitrogen forms on nitrogen transformation in red soils of subtropical forest under soil moisture conditions with 40%, 70% and 110% of water holding capacity (WHC). The results showed that soil net mineralization and ammonification rates were maximum at 70% WHC and minimum at 40% WHC. Compared with the control, the addition of NO(3-)-N decreased the soil net mineralization and ammonification rates by 56.1% and 43.0% under 70% WHC condition, and decreased by 68.2% and 19.0% under 110% WHC, respectively. However, the proportion of ammonification to mineralization increased at 70% and 110% WHC, which suggested that nitrate addition inhibited the nitrification. With addition of NO(3-)-N at 110% WHC, the net nitrification rate was lowest while N20 emission was highest with the concomitant decrease of nitrate content, indicating that N2O emission was largely derived from denitrification. However, at 40% WHC and 70% WHC, the maximum N20 flux was found at the early stage of incubation. Even with addition of NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N, N2O flux did not change much at the latter stage of incubation, indicating that autotrophic nitrification was dominant for N20 production at the early stage of incubation. Under 40% WHC condition, soluble organic carbon increased more and it increased largely with NH(4+)-N addition, which meant NH(4+)-N addition could enhance the mineralization of soil organic matter. Under 40% and 110% WHC conditions, the addition of NH(4+)-N increased significantly the soil soluble organic nitrogen (SON) by 73.6% and 176.6% compared with the control, respectively. A significant increase of 78.7% for SON was only found at 40% WHC under addition of NO(3-)-N compared with the control. These results showed that high soil moisture condition and addition of NH(4+)-N were of benefit to SON formation.

  1. [Effects of different nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium fertilization modes on carbon- and nitrogen accumulation and allocation in rice plant].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Tong, Cheng-li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-shui; Chen, An-lei; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Based on a 20-year field site-specific fertilization experiment in Taoyuan Experimental Station of Agriculture Ecosystems under Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN), this paper studied the effects of different fertilization modes of N, P, and K on the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant. The fertilization mode N-only showed the highest C and N contents (433 g kg(-1) and 18.9 g kg(-1), respectively) in rice grain, whereas the modes balanced fertilization of chemical N, P and K (NPK) and its combination with organic mature recycling (NPKC) showed the highest storage of C and N in rice plant. In treatments NPK and NPKC, the C storage in rice grain and in stem and leaf was 1960 kg hm(-2) and 2015 kg hm(-2), and 2002 kg hm(-2) and 2048 kg hm(-2), and the N storage in rice grain was 80.5 kg hm(-2) and 80.6 kg hm(-2), respectively. Treatment NPK had the highest N storage (59.3 kg hm(-2)) in stem and leaf. Balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K combined with organic manure recycling increased the accumulation of C and N in rice plant significantly. Comparing with applying N only, balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K was more favorable to the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant during its growth period.

  2. Can Crops with Greater Rooting Systems Improve Nitrogen Retention and Mitigate Emissions of Nitrous Oxide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decock, Charlotte; Lee, Juhwan; Barthel, Matti; Mikita, Chris; Wilde, Benjamin; Verhoeven, Elizabeth; Hund, Andreas; Abiven, Samuel; Friedli, Cordula; Conen, Franz; Mohn, Joachim; Wolf, Benjamin; Six, Johan

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that crops with deeper root systems could improve agricultural sustainability, because scavenging of nitrogen (N) in the subsoil would increase overall N retention and use efficiency in the system. However, the effect of plant root depth and root architecture on N-leaching and emissions of the potent greenhouse N2O remains largely unknown. We aimed to assess the effect of plant rooting depth on N-cycling and N2O production and reduction within the plant-soil system and throughout the soil profile. We hypothesized that greater root depth and root biomass will (1) increase N use efficiency and decrease N losses in the form of N leaching and N2O emissions; (2) increase N retention by shifting the fate of NH4+ from more nitrification toward more plant uptake and microbial immobilization; and (3) increase the depth of maximum N2O production and decrease the ratio of N2O:(N2O+N2) in denitrification end-products. To test these hypotheses, 4 winter wheat cultivars were grown in lysimeters (1.5 m tall, 0.5 m diameter, 3 replications per cultivar) under greenhouse conditions. Each lysimeter was equipped with an automated flux chamber for the determination of N2O surface fluxes. At 7.5, 30, 60, 90 and 120 cm depth, sampling ports were installed for the determination of soil moisture contents, as well as the collection of soil pore air and soil pore water samples. We selected two older and two newer varieties from the Swiss winter wheat breeding program, spanning a 100-year breeding history. The selection was based on previous experiments indicating that the older varieties have deeper rooting systems than the newer varieties under well watered conditions. N2O fluxes were determined twice per day on a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer interfaced with the automated flux chambers. Once per week, we determined concentrations of mineral N in pore water and of CO2 and N2O in the pore air. For mineral N and N2O, also natural abundance isotope deltas

  3. Biochar lowers ammonia emission and improves nitrogen retention in poultry litter composting.

    PubMed

    Agyarko-Mintah, Eunice; Cowie, Annette; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Singh, Bhupinder Pal; Smillie, Robert; Harden, Steven; Fornasier, Flavio

    2017-03-01

    The poultry industry produces abundant quantities of nutrient-rich litter, much of which is composted before use as a soil amendment. However, a large proportion of nitrogen (N) in poultry litter is lost via volatilisation during composting, with negative environmental and economic consequences. This study examined the effect of incorporating biochar during composting of poultry litter on ammonia (NH3) volatilisation and N retention. Biochars produced at 550°C from greenwaste (GWB) and poultry litter (PLB) feedstocks were co-composted with a mixture of raw poultry litter and sugarcane straw [carbon (C):N ratio 10:1] in compost bins. Ammonia emissions accounted for 17% of the total N (TN) lost from the control and 12-14% from the biochar-amended compost. The TN emitted as NH3, as a percentage of initial TN, was significantly lower (P<0.05) i.e. by 60% and 55% in the compost amended with GWB and PLB, respectively, relative to the control. The proportion of N retained in the finished compost, as a percentage of initial TN, was 84%, 78% and 67% for the GWB, PLB and nil biochar control, respectively. Lower concentration of dissolved organic C (DOC) together with higher activity of beta-glucosidase and leucine-aminopeptidase were found in the GWB-amended compost (cf. control). It is hypothesized that lower NH3 emission in the GWB-amended compost was caused not just by the higher surface area of this biochar but could also be related to greater incorporation of ammonium (NH4(+)) in organic compounds during microbial utilisation of DOC. Furthermore, the GWB-amended compost retained more NH4(+) at the end of composting than the PLB-amended compost. Results showed that addition of biochar, especially GWB, generated multiple benefits in composting of poultry litter: decrease of NH3 volatilisation, decrease in NH3 toxicity towards microorganisms, and improved N retention, thus enhancing the fertiliser value of the composted litter. It is suggested that the latter benefit is

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

    2001-05-31

    Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures

  5. [Effects of Different Land Uses on Soil Active Organic Carbon and Nitrogen Fractions in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju; Li, Jian-lin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we take Jinyun Mountain where located in Beibei district of Chongqing as the research object and explore the effect of different ways of land use on soil active organic carbon, nitrogen components by collecting the soil samples from 0 to 60 cm depth in subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (hereinafter referred to as the forest), abandoned land, orchard, farmland and measuring the content of MBC, MBN, DOC and DON. The research results show that the contents of soil MBC, MBN, DOC, DON are reduced with the increase of soil depth in four types of land using soils. Variance analysis of the single factor shows that four kinds of land uses have no significant difference in the contents of MBC, MBN and DON, but the DOC content of the abandoned land is significantly higher than that of other three kinds. It shows that the different ways of land use have no obvious effects on soil MBC, MBN and DON but the abandonment of slope cropland can significantly increase the content of soil DOC. There is no significant difference among the distribution ratio of MBN, DOC, DON in forest, abandoned land, orchard and farmland within the soil from 0 to 60 cm, but the distribution ratio of slope MBC is significantly higher than that of other three kinds. It means farmland soil organic carbon has a higher biological activity, this could due to the application of green manure, farmland manure and other organic fertilizers. Under different land utilizations, DOC/DON is the highest, MBC/MBN is the second, and SOC/TN is the lowest. It means the biological solidification of dissolved organic matter is the strongest, and the mineralization of soil organic matter is the most obvious. Under the four kinds of land uses, there are the lowest ratios in SOC/TN, MBC/MBN and DOC/DON in the farmland. And all the ratios are less than 20, which suggest that the mineralization of farmland soil organic matter is stronger and it's easy to cause the loss of soil carbon.

  6. Integrating soil and weather information into canopy sensor algorithms for improved corn nitrogen rate recommendation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corn production can be often limited by the loss of nitrogen (N) due to leaching, volatilization and denitrification. The use of canopy sensors for making in-season N fertilizer applications has been proven effective in matching plant N requirements with periods of rapid N uptake (V7-V11), reducing ...

  7. Use of GIS-based Site-specific Nitrogen Management for Improving Energy Efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To our knowledge, geographical information system (GIS)-based site-specific nitrogen management (SSNM) techniques have not been used to assess agricultural energy costs and efficiency. This chapter uses SSNM case studies for corn (Zea mays L.) grown in Missouri and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) gro...

  8. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality amid population growth.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future scenarios were b...

  9. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality considering population growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future output is from s...

  10. Fusing corn nitrogen recommendation tools for an improved canopy reflectance sensor performance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen (N) rate recommendation tools are utilized to help producers maximize corn grain yield production. Many of these tools provide recommendations at field scales but often fail when corn N requirements are variable across the field. Canopy reflectance sensors are capable of capturing within-fi...

  11. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality considering population growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future output is from s...

  12. Public-private partnering for improving performance of corn nitrogen fertilization tools

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen fertilization for corn production is complicated by soil and weather variability, yet such has far-reaching economic and environmental implications. To address this challenge, alternative N management strategies have been explored extensively in recent years for determining the most consist...

  13. Future riverine nitrogen export to US coastal regions: Prospects for improving water quality amid population growth.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess nitrogen (N) in the environment degrades ecosystems and adversely affects human health. Here we examine predictions of contemporary (2000) and future (2030) coastal N loading in the continental US by the Nutrient Export from WaterSheds (NEWS) model. Future scenarios were b...

  14. [Effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes in Eucalyptus plantations with different soil organic carbon content].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Da; Zhang, Kai; Su, Dan; Lu, Fei; Wan, Wu-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ke; Zheng, Hua

    2014-10-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilization or nitrogen deposition on soil greenhouse gases fluxes has been well studied, while little has been piloted about the effects of nitrogen application on soil greenhouse gas fluxes and its discrepancy with different soil organic carbon content. In our study, we conducted field control experiment in a young Eucalyptus plantation in Southeast China. We compared the effects of 4 levels of nitrogen fertilization (Control: 0 kg · hm(-2); Low N: 84.2 kg · hm(-2); Medium N: 166.8 kg · hm(-2); High N: 333.7 kg · hm(-2)) on soil GHGs fluxes from 2 sites (LC and HC) with significantly different soil organic carbon (SOC) content (P < 0.05). The results showed: (1) Fertilization had significant priming effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes. One month after fertilization, both CO2 and N2O had the flux peak and decreased gradually, and the difference among the treatments disappeared at the end of the growing season. However, fertilization had no significant effect on CH4 oxidation between the 2 sites. (2) Fertilization and SOC were two crucial factors that had significant effects on CO2 and N2O emission. Fertilization had a significant positive effect on CO2 and N2O emission fluxes (P < 0.001). CH4 oxidation rates decreased with the increasing N addition, but there was no statistical difference (P > 0.05). The CO2 and N2O emission fluxes were significantly higher in HC than those in LC (P < 0.01). (3) Fertilization and SOC had great interactive effect on CO2 and N2O emission (P < 0.05). Compared with fluxes in LC, the fluxes in HC were much more sensitive to N input: low N could remarkably stimulate the CO2 and N2O emission. In conclusion, the effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil GHGs fluxes were not only in connection with the intensify of nitrogen, but also closely tied to the SOC content. When we assess the effects of nitrogen on soil GHGs fluxes, the difference induced by SOC should not be ignored.

  15. Impact of controlled release urea on maize yield and nitrogen use efficiency under different water conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanghao; Dong, Shuting; Zhang, Jiwang; Liu, Peng; J. Vyn, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Controlled release urea (CRU) has been widely adopted to increase nitrogen (N) use efficiency and maize production, but the impacts can range widely depending on water availability in the soil. In an experiment using Zhengdan 958 (a popular summer maize hybrid), three levels of water treatments (adequate water condition [W3], which maintained soil moisture at about 75% ± 5% of the soil’s field capacity; mild water stress [W2], which maintained moisture content at 55% ± 5% of field capacity; and severe water stress [W1], which had a moisture content of 35% ± 5% of field capacity) and four levels of controlled release urea fertilizer (N0, N1, N2 and N3 were 0, 105, 210 and 315 kg N ha–1, respectively) were compared in a rainout shelter system with soil. The results revealed that CRU had significant effects on maize yields and N use efficiencies under different water conditions. The mean yields increased with increasing water levels and showed significant differences. Under W1, the accumulation of dry matter and N were limited, and N internal efficiency (NIE) and the apparent recovery efficiency of applied N (REN) decreased with N increases; yields of N1, N2, and N3 were similar. Under W2, the dry matter and N accumulation, as well as the yield, showed an increasing trend with an increase in N application, and the NIE and REN of N3 showed no difference from N2. Under W3, yields of N2 and N3 were similar and they were significantly higher than that of N1, but the agronomic N use efficiency (ANUE), REN, and the physiological NUE (PNUE) of N2 were 54.2, 34.9, and 14.4% higher, respectively, than those of N3. N application beyond the optimal N rate did not consistently increase maize yield, and caused a decrease in N use efficiencies. Highest overall dry matter, N accumulation, and yields were observed with N3 under W2, and those showed no differences with N2 and N3 under W3. Under this experimental condition, the CRU of 210 kg ha–1 was optimized when soil

  16. Impact of controlled release urea on maize yield and nitrogen use efficiency under different water conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghao; Zhao, Bin; Dong, Shuting; Zhang, Jiwang; Liu, Peng; J Vyn, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Controlled release urea (CRU) has been widely adopted to increase nitrogen (N) use efficiency and maize production, but the impacts can range widely depending on water availability in the soil. In an experiment using Zhengdan 958 (a popular summer maize hybrid), three levels of water treatments (adequate water condition [W3], which maintained soil moisture at about 75% ± 5% of the soil's field capacity; mild water stress [W2], which maintained moisture content at 55% ± 5% of field capacity; and severe water stress [W1], which had a moisture content of 35% ± 5% of field capacity) and four levels of controlled release urea fertilizer (N0, N1, N2 and N3 were 0, 105, 210 and 315 kg N ha-1, respectively) were compared in a rainout shelter system with soil. The results revealed that CRU had significant effects on maize yields and N use efficiencies under different water conditions. The mean yields increased with increasing water levels and showed significant differences. Under W1, the accumulation of dry matter and N were limited, and N internal efficiency (NIE) and the apparent recovery efficiency of applied N (REN) decreased with N increases; yields of N1, N2, and N3 were similar. Under W2, the dry matter and N accumulation, as well as the yield, showed an increasing trend with an increase in N application, and the NIE and REN of N3 showed no difference from N2. Under W3, yields of N2 and N3 were similar and they were significantly higher than that of N1, but the agronomic N use efficiency (ANUE), REN, and the physiological NUE (PNUE) of N2 were 54.2, 34.9, and 14.4% higher, respectively, than those of N3. N application beyond the optimal N rate did not consistently increase maize yield, and caused a decrease in N use efficiencies. Highest overall dry matter, N accumulation, and yields were observed with N3 under W2, and those showed no differences with N2 and N3 under W3. Under this experimental condition, the CRU of 210 kg ha-1 was optimized when soil moisture

  17. Improvement in wear performance of surgical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by ion implantation of nitrogen or carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Buchanan, R.A.; Rigney, E.D. Jr.

    1985-06-01

    The effects of ion implantations of either nitrogen or carbon on the corrosive-wear performance of surgical Ti-6A1-4V alloy were investigated. In vitro tests made use of an apparatus which could produce certain chemical and mechanical aspects of a sliding interface such as that which occurs between alloy and polyethylene components of an artificial hip (or knee) joint. Cylindrical samples of the Ti alloy were rotated between loaded, conforming pads made of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) while these test components were immersed either in a saline solution or a saline solution with bovine serum added. During the tests open-circuit corrosion currents for the alloy were measured by the Tafel extrapolation technique. Profilometry studies were done before and after the tests. Alloy samples implanted with either nitrogen or carbon remained as-new for all test conditions. Unimplanted control samples were severely scored. Corrosion currents as measured under the mechanical action were reduced by a factor of approximately one hundred by the ion implantation treatments. It is concluded that nitrogen or carbon ion implantation produces a marked improvement in the corrosive wear performance of the alloy in these tests. It is inferred that abrasive wear is the dominant mechanism of material removal. In addition, apparently owing to reduction of wear debris in the sliding interface, ion treatment of the alloy greatly improves wear performance of the mating UHMWPE component. 11 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Agricultural practices to improve nitrogen use efficiency through the use of arbuscular mycorrhizae: Basic and agronomic aspects.

    PubMed

    Verzeaux, Julien; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric; Lea, Peter J; Tétu, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    Nitrogen cycling in agroecosystems is heavily dependent upon arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) present in the soil microbiome. These fungi develop obligate symbioses with various host plant species, thus increasing their ability to acquire nutrients. However, AMF are particularly sensitive to physical, chemical and biological disturbances caused by human actions that limit their establishment. For a more sustainable agriculture, it will be necessary to further investigate which agricultural practices could be favorable to maximize the benefits of AMF to improve crop nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), thus reducing nitrogen (N) fertilizer usage. Direct seeding, mulch-based cropping systems prevent soil mycelium disruption and increase AMF propagule abundance. Such cropping systems lead to more efficient root colonization by AMF and thus a better establishment of the plant/fungal symbiosis. In addition, the use of continuous cover cropping systems can also enhance the formation of more efficient interconnected hyphal networks between mycorrhizae colonized plants. Taking into account both fundamental and agronomic aspects of mineral nutrition by plant/AMF symbioses, we have critically described, how improving fungal colonization through the reduction of soil perturbation and maintenance of an ecological balance could be helpful for increasing crop NUE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies of Breakdowns in Liquid Nitrogen at Different Pressures Between Rogowski Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaz, Michael; Kurrat, Michael

    The usage of superconducting machines in the power grid or other high energy application makes it necessary that the machine can withstand all electrical stresses which can occur during normal operation and at transient overload. To guarantee a sufficient insulation, it is essential to know the properties of the insulating material. For HTS applications liquid nitrogen is a possible cooling and insulation liquid. In this paper the influence of pressurized liquid nitrogen on the discharge voltage is observed. Therefore, a cryostat was used, that can be pressurized and the discharge voltages at 3 barabs and 5 barabs were investigated. The investigations were performed between Rogowski electrodes to guarantee a homogeneous electric field without discharges at the electrode edges. Experiments were done with gap distances up to 7 mm. The liquid nitrogen was stressed with lightning surge voltage of both polarities and AC ramp with a rise of 2000 V/s

  20. Ammonia and greenhouse gas emissions from a subtropical wheat field under different nitrogen fertilization strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Wang, Jim J; Tian, Zhou; Wang, Xudong; Harrison, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Minimizing soil ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission factors (EFs) has significant implications in regional air quality and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions besides nitrogen (N) nutrient loss. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different N fertilizer treatments of conventional urea, polymer-coated urea, ammonia sulfate, urease inhibitor (NBPT, N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide)-treated urea, and nitrification inhibitor (DCD, dicyandiamide)-treated urea on emissions of NH3 and GHGs from subtropical wheat cultivation. A field study was established in a Cancienne silt loam soil. During growth season, NH3 emission following N fertilization was characterized using active chamber method whereas GHG emissions of N2O, carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were by passive chamber method. The results showed that coated urea exhibited the largest reduction (49%) in the EF of NH3-N followed by NBPT-treated urea (39%) and DCD-treated urea (24%) over conventional urea, whereas DCD-treated urea had the greatest suppression on N2O-N (87%) followed by coated urea (76%) and NBPT-treated urea (69%). Split fertilization of ammonium sulfate-urea significantly lowered both NH3-N and N2O-N EF values but split urea treatment had no impact over one-time application of urea. Both NBPT and DCD-treated urea treatments lowered CO2-C flux but had no effect on CH4-C flux. Overall, application of coated urea or urea with NPBT or DCD could be used as a mitigation strategy for reducing NH3 and N2O emissions in subtropical wheat production in Southern USA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Changes in soil nitrogen and phosphorus under different broiler production systems.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Sylvia; Rogasik, Jutta; Schnug, Ewald

    2004-01-01

    In a field study, soils of four conventional free-range and organic broiler runs were analyzed for N and P concentrations in the years 2000 and 2001. Zones of different use intensity by broilers were identified on the free runs and mean zonal nutrient contents were compared with each other. Intensity of use by birds and spatial distribution of soil nutrient concentrations were found to be related to each other. Fecal N input by broilers resulted in accumulation of soil mineral nitrogen (N(min)) contents down to a 90-cm sampling depth. In highly frequented "hot spots," plant requirement as defined by the German "N-Basis-Sollwert" (110 kg/ha N(min)) for grassland was exceeded in all four cases. This implies an increased environmental risk of ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching. Fecal P input by broilers resulted in accumulation of plant-available and thus mobile soil P (phosphorus extracted with calcium-acetate-lactate [P(CAL)] and phosphorus extracted with water [P(w)]) in the most intensely used zones. In these areas, soil P contents exceeded 90 mg/kg P(CAL) (upper limit of soil test P defined in Germany for optimum plant yield) by as much as 217 mg/kg, which indicates an enhanced risk of P loss from the soil via runoff or leaching. The conclusion might be drawn that, with regard to nutrient loss from free-run soils, intensive indoor production in a closed system may be more environmentally neutral than conventional free-range or organic production. However, to put this into perspective, the scope of the environmental risk connected with spatially limited point accumulation of nutrients should be considered. Furthermore, an environmental evaluation must also account for the fate and environmental effects of the broiler litter produced inside the broiler house.

  2. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  3. Two Salix Genotypes Differ in Productivity and Nitrogen Economy When Grown in Monoculture and Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Hoeber, Stefanie; Fransson, Petra; Prieto-Ruiz, Inés; Manzoni, Stefano; Weih, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Individual plant species or genotypes often differ in their demand for nutrients; to compete in a community they must be able to acquire more nutrients (i.e., uptake efficiency) and/or use them more efficiently for biomass production than their competitors. These two mechanisms are often complementary, as there are inherent trade-offs between them. In a mixed-stand, species with contrasting nutrient use patterns interact and may use their resources to increase productivity in different ways. Under contrasting nutrient availabilities, the competitive advantages conferred by either strategy may also shift, so that the interaction between resource use strategy and resource availability ultimately determines the performance of individual genotypes in mixtures. The aim was to investigate growth and nitrogen (N) use efficiency of two willow (Salix) genotypes grown in monoculture and mixture in a fertilizer contrast. We explored the hypotheses that (1) the biomass production of at least one of the involved genotypes should be greater when grown in mixture as compared to the corresponding monoculture when nutrients are the most growth-limiting factor; and (2) the N economy of individual genotypes differs when grown in mixture compared to the corresponding monoculture. The genotypes ‘Tora’ (Salix schwerinii ×S. viminalis) and ‘Loden’ (S. dasyclados), with contrasting phenology and functional traits, were grown from cuttings in a growth container experiment under two nutrient fertilization treatments (high and low) in mono- and mixed-culture for 17 weeks. Under low nutrient level, ‘Tora’ showed a higher biomass production (aboveground biomass, leaf area productivity) and N uptake efficiency in mixture than in monoculture, whereas ‘Loden’ showed the opposite pattern. In addition, ‘Loden’ showed higher leaf N productivity but lower N uptake efficiency than ‘Tora.’ The results demonstrated that the specific functional trait combinations of individual

  4. Different Land Use Intensities in Grassland Ecosystems Drive Ecology of Microbial Communities Involved in Nitrogen Turnover in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Annabel; Focks, Andreas; Radl, Viviane; Keil, Daniel; Welzl, Gerhard; Schöning, Ingo; Boch, Steffen; Marhan, Sven; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding factors driving the ecology of N cycling microbial communities is of central importance for sustainable land use. In this study we report changes of abundance of denitrifiers, nitrifiers and nitrogen-fixing microorganisms (based on qPCR data for selected functional genes) in response to different land use intensity levels and the consequences for potential turnover rates. We investigated selected grassland sites being comparable with respect to soil type and climatic conditions, which have been continuously treated for many years as intensely used meadows (IM), intensely used mown pastures (IP) and extensively used pastures (EP), respectively. The obtained data were linked to above ground biodiversity pattern as well as water extractable fractions of nitrogen and carbon in soil. Shifts in land use intensity changed plant community composition from systems dominated by s-strategists in extensive managed grasslands to c-strategist dominated communities in intensive managed grasslands. Along the different types of land use intensity, the availability of inorganic nitrogen regulated the abundance of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers. In contrast, the amount of dissolved organic nitrogen determined the abundance of denitrifiers (nirS and nirK). The high abundance of nifH carrying bacteria at intensive managed sites gave evidence that the amounts of substrates as energy source outcompete the high availability of inorganic nitrogen in these sites. Overall, we revealed that abundance and function of microorganisms involved in key processes of inorganic N cycling (nitrification, denitrification and N fixation) might be independently regulated by different abiotic and biotic factors in response to land use intensity. PMID:24039974

  5. Different land use intensities in grassland ecosystems drive ecology of microbial communities involved in nitrogen turnover in soil.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Annabel; Focks, Andreas; Radl, Viviane; Keil, Daniel; Welzl, Gerhard; Schöning, Ingo; Boch, Steffen; Marhan, Sven; Kandeler, Ellen; Schloter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding factors driving the ecology of N cycling microbial communities is of central importance for sustainable land use. In this study we report changes of abundance of denitrifiers, nitrifiers and nitrogen-fixing microorganisms (based on qPCR data for selected functional genes) in response to different land use intensity levels and the consequences for potential turnover rates. We investigated selected grassland sites being comparable with respect to soil type and climatic conditions, which have been continuously treated for many years as intensely used meadows (IM), intensely used mown pastures (IP) and extensively used pastures (EP), respectively. The obtained data were linked to above ground biodiversity pattern as well as water extractable fractions of nitrogen and carbon in soil. Shifts in land use intensity changed plant community composition from systems dominated by s-strategists in extensive managed grasslands to c-strategist dominated communities in intensive managed grasslands. Along the different types of land use intensity, the availability of inorganic nitrogen regulated the abundance of bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers. In contrast, the amount of dissolved organic nitrogen determined the abundance of denitrifiers (nirS and nirK). The high abundance of nifH carrying bacteria at intensive managed sites gave evidence that the amounts of substrates as energy source outcompete the high availability of inorganic nitrogen in these sites. Overall, we revealed that abundance and function of microorganisms involved in key processes of inorganic N cycling (nitrification, denitrification and N fixation) might be independently regulated by different abiotic and biotic factors in response to land use intensity.

  6. [Variation of soil nitrogen during in situ mineralization process under different grasslands in the mountainous area of southern Ningxia, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yue-Li; Zhao, Tong; Yan, Hao; Huang, Yi-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Variations in organic nitrogen, microbial biomass nitrogen, soluble organic nitrogen, NH4(+) -N, NO3(-) -N, NO2(-) -N and N mineralization were investigated under three different grasslands in the mountainous area of southern Ningxia, Northwest China (natural grassland, artificial turf and abandoned land) using the close-top tube incubation method. Microbial biomass nitrogen, soluble organic nitrogen, NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N, NO2(-)-N and N mineralization exhibited significant seasonal variations. The nitrogen levels remained essentially unchanged from April to June, significantly decreased in July-August, rebounded after August, and were lowest in August. The organic nitrogen content remained unchanged in the whole training process. The soil mineralization rates, nitrification and ammonification rate were lowest in June-August. The ratios of each N fraction to total N responded differently to seasonal changes. The ratios of organic N, NO2(-) -N to total N did not change, in contrast, the ratios of nitrate N, microbial biomass nitrogen and soluble organic nitrogen, to total soil N decreased from April to August, and increased from August to December. The soil organic matter, pH, and bulk density were closely related to soil N. There was a significant positive correlation among the six N fractions. The soil nitrogen content of the different grassland types followed the order of natural grassland > abandoned land > artificial turf.

  7. Effect of manure under different nitrogen application rates on winter wheat production and soil fertility in dryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. Q.; Yu, X. Y.; Zhai, B. N.; Jin, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    Exploring an effective fertilization practice is crucial for achieving a sustainable dryland winter wheat cropping system. Following a split-plot design, this study was conducted to investigate the combined effect of manure (-M or +M; main plot) and various rates of nitrogen (N) fertilizer (0, 75, 150, 225, and 300 kg N ha-1; sub plot) on grain yield, water and N use efficiencies of winter wheat, and soil nutrients. The results showed that the treatments with manure improved the grain yield by 8%, and WUE by 10% relative to that without manure throughout the study years. The highest winter wheat yield and WUE were both recorded in the M+N225 treatment, which were not significantly different from those for M+N75 and M+N150 treatment. In contrast, high levels of N fertilizer (> 150 kg N ha-1) combined with manure not only caused a reduction in the N use efficiency (NUE), but it also caused an increase in the soil residual nitrate-N (from 43.7 to 188.9 kg ha-1) relative to without manure. After three years of continuous cropping, the treatment combining manure with 150 kg N ha-1 fertilizer had the highest SOM, available P and available K, which was 24%, 379% and 102% higher than that for unfertilized treatment (CK), and 10%, 267%, and 55% higher than that for without manure, respectively. Thus, the combination of manure (17.5 t ha-1 poultry or 30 t ha-1 pig manure) with 75-150 kg N ha-1 N fertilizer is recommended for improving winter wheat yield, water and N use efficiencies, and reducing soil nitrate-N residue as well.

  8. The "Improvement Rate Difference" for Single-Case Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard I.; Vannest, Kimberly J.; Brown, Leanne

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and field-tests the improved rate difference (IRD), a new effect size for summarizing single-case research data. Termed "risk difference" in medical research, IRD expresses the difference in successful performance between baseline and intervention phases. IRD can be calculated from visual analysis of nonoverlapping data, and…

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions from a golf course fairway and rough following application of different nitrogen fertilizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas that destroys stratospheric ozone. There is limited research of golf course N2O emission and the effects of frequent fertilization and irrigation. Three enhanced efficiency nitrogen fertilizers (EENFs) were applied to a Colorado golf course fairway and ...

  10. Triple nitrate isotopes indicate differing nitrate source contributions to streams across a nitrogen saturation gradient

    Treesearch

    Lucy A. Rose; Emily M. Elliott; Mary Beth. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition affects forest biogeochemical cycles worldwide, often contributing to N saturation. Using long-term (>30-year) records of stream nitrate (NO3-) concentrations at Fernow Experimental Forest (West Virginia, USA), we classified four watersheds into N saturation stages ranging from Stage 0 (N-...

  11. Response of two wheat cultivars to supplemental nitrogen under different salinity stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effects of supplemental nitrogen (N), as either farmyard manure (FYM) or urea, on response of two wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars (a salt sensitive ‘Sakha 69’ and a salt tolerant ‘Sakha 93’) were investigated in a green house experiment under various salinity levels (control, 6, 9, or 12 dS m-1)...

  12. Functional groups show distinct differences in nitrogen cycling during early stand development: implications for forest management

    Treesearch

    Doug P. Aubrey; David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Nutrient acquisition of forest stands is controlled by soil resource availability and belowground production, but tree species are rarely compared in this regard. Here, we examine ecological and management implications of nitrogen (N) dynamics during early forest stand development in productive commercial tree species with narrow (Populus...

  13. Application of microbial inoculants as tools for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from different nitrogen fertilizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) are increasing due to several factors, including increased use of nitrogen fertilizers. New management tools are needed to reduce N2O emissions from production agriculture. One potential such tool is the use of microbial inoculants, which are increasingly being used ...

  14. Assessing indices for predicting potential nitrogen mineralization in soils under different management systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A reliable laboratory index of nitrogen availability would be useful for making N recommendations but no single approach has received broad acceptance across a wide range of soils. We compared several indices over a range of soil conditions to test the possibility of determining the best combination...

  15. Application of biofilm reactors to improve ammonia oxidation in low nitrogen loaded wastewater.

    PubMed

    Seca, I; Torres, R; Val del Río, A; Mosquera-Corral, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R

    2011-01-01

    An airlift reactor using zeolite particles as carrier material was used for the nitrification of effluents from the aquaculture industry. During the start-up the nitrogen concentration was kept around 100 mg NH4(+)-N/L to develop the nitrifying population. Later it was decreased down to around 3 mg NH4(+)-N/L and the dilution rate was increased up to 4.8 d(-1) in order to simulate the conditions in a an aquaculture waster treatment system. A nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 535 mg NH(+)-N/m2 d was fully oxidized to nitrate. Higher values of NLRs caused nitrite accumulation. A second biofilm reactor was fed with a synthetic medium containing 50 mg NH4(+)-N/L which simulated the effluents from anaerobic units treating domestic wastewater. A nitrogen loading rate of 400 mg NH4(+)-N/L d was oxidized into nitrate with an efficiency of 60% at a dilution rate of 8 d(-1). Both biofilm systems allowed the development of a nitrifying population to treat the studied types of wastewaters.

  16. Pre-breeding blood urea nitrogen concentration and reproductive performance of Bonsmara heifers within different management systems.

    PubMed

    Tshuma, Takula; Holm, Dietmar Erik; Fosgate, Geoffrey Theodore; Lourens, Dirk Cornelius

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the association between pre-breeding blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration and reproductive performance of beef heifers within different management systems in South Africa. Bonsmara heifers (n = 369) from five herds with different estimated levels of nitrogen intake during the month prior to the commencement of the breeding season were sampled in November and December 2010 to determine BUN concentrations. Body mass, age, body condition score (BCS) and reproductive tract score (RTS) were recorded at study enrolment. Trans-rectal ultrasound and/or palpation was performed 4-8 weeks after a 3-month breeding season to estimate the stage of pregnancy. Days to pregnancy (DTP) was defined as the number of days from the start of the breeding season until the estimated conception date. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards survival analysis were performed to estimate the association of pre-breeding BUN concentration with subsequent pregnancy and DTP, respectively. After stratifying for herd and adjusting for age, heifers with relatively higher pre-breeding BUN concentration took longer to become pregnant when compared to those with relatively lower BUN concentration (P = 0.011). In the herd with the highest estimated nitrogen intake (n = 143), heifers with relatively higher BUN were less likely to become pregnant (P = 0.013) and if they did, it was only later during the breeding season (P = 0.017), after adjusting for body mass. These associations were not present in the herd (n = 106) with the lowest estimated nitrogen intake (P > 0.500). It is concluded that Bonsmara heifers with relatively higher pre-breeding BUN concentration, might be at a disadvantage because of this negative impact on reproductive performance, particularly when the production system includes high levels of nitrogen intake.

  17. Improving Kindergarten Teachers' Differentiation Practices to Better Anticipate Student Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Elma M.; Walraven, Amber; Mooij, Ton; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a teacher intervention in Dutch kindergartens aimed at improving teachers' differentiation practices (DP) to better anticipate student differences. The intervention was designed to improve the match between student levels and curricular activities, in particular for high-ability students and consists of…

  18. Improving Kindergarten Teachers' Differentiation Practices to Better Anticipate Student Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Elma M.; Walraven, Amber; Mooij, Ton; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a teacher intervention in Dutch kindergartens aimed at improving teachers' differentiation practices (DP) to better anticipate student differences. The intervention was designed to improve the match between student levels and curricular activities, in particular for high-ability students and consists of…

  19. Effects of UV-B radiation and water stress on gas exchange of soybeans under two different nitrogen levels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, L.M.; Forseth, I.N. )

    1993-06-01

    Due to anthropogenic destruction of stratospheric ozone, UV-B radiation is projected to increase in the near future. Other potential global climate changes in temperature and precipitation patterns raise the need for research into plant responses to multiple environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to document UV-B and water stress effects on gas exchange of soybean (Glycine max Merr.) under two nitrogen levels. Two soybean cultivars differing in sensitivity to UV-B were tested at fluence rates of 19.1 or 8.5 kJ m[sub [minus]2]day[sub [minus]1] (enhance and natural levels of UV-B, respectively). Measurements of photosaturated CO[sub 2] uptake at ambient CO[sub 2] (A). stomatal conductance. photosaturated O[sub 2] evolution at saturating CO[sub 2] (A[sub max]), long term water use efficiency (using [delta][sup 13]C), and nitrogen fixation (using [sup 15]N) were performed. No significant treatment effects on A could be detected. However A[sub max] was significantly increased, and stomatal conductance reduced (p<0.01) by increased UV-B at all levels of water and nitrogen for both cultivars, suggesting a stronger stomal limitation of photosynthesis under UV-B. Water and nitrogen use efficiency also decreased under increased UV-B in both cultivars (p<0.01).

  20. Simulation studies of the separation of Kr-85 radionuclide gas from nitrogen and oxygen across nanoporous graphene membranes in different pore configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S. Mahmood; Sepehrian, Hamid; Arabieh, Masoud

    2016-05-01

    Separating molecular species is an important precursor for various applications. In this work, we have utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine how pore radius and structure affect the separation process. We show from MD simulations that 2-D graphene sheets with designed sub-nanometer pores can efficiently separate the Kr-85 radionuclide gas from an N2/O2 mixture. Three species of gases (Kr-85, N2 and O2 were considered in the simulation box in which different sizes and geometries of pores were modeled on the graphene sheet. The ( 30× 30× 80 Å^3 simulation box contains a nanoporous graphene membrane in the middle of the box and two fixed walls with equal distances on both sides of the nanoporous graphene. The results revealed that Kr-85 separation was improved by using an optimized pore structure. It was also found that the Kr-85 gas radionuclides could be completely separated from nitrogen and oxygen molecules in the pore-7 configuration. Restriction of the molecular orientation largely prohibited the permeation of nitrogen molecules. It was also found that nitrogen was more strongly adsorbed onto the membrane than oxygen, while krypton was not adsorbed.

  1. Influence of nitrogen sources on growth and fermentation performance of different wine yeast species during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Viana, Tiago; Ardö, Ylva; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the influence of twenty different single (i.e. 19 amino acids and ammonium sulphate) and two multiple nitrogen sources (N-sources) on growth and fermentation (i.e. glucose consumption and ethanol production) performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of four wine-related non-Saccharomyces yeast species (Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora uvarum and Torulaspora delbrueckii) was investigated during alcoholic fermentation. Briefly, the N-sources with beneficial effects on all performance parameters (or for the majority of them) for each yeast species were alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, isoleucine, ammonium sulphate, serine, valine and mixtures of 19 amino acids and of 19 amino acids plus ammonium sulphate (for S. cerevisiae), serine (for L. thermotolerans), alanine (for H. uvarum), alanine and asparagine (for M. pulcherrima), arginine, asparagine, glutamine, isoleucine and mixture of 19 amino acids (for T. delbrueckii). Furthermore, our results showed a clear positive effect of complex mixtures of N-sources on S. cerevisiae and on T. delbrueckii (although to a lesser extent) as to all performance parameters studied, whereas for L. thermotolerans, H. uvarum and M. pulcherrima, single amino acids affected growth and fermentation performance to the same extent as the mixtures. Moreover, we found groups of N-sources with similar effects on the growth and/or fermentation performance of two or more yeast species. Finally, the influences of N-sources observed for T. delbrueckii and H. uvarum resembled those of S. cerevisiae the most and the least, respectively. Overall, this work contributes to an improved understanding of how different N-sources affect growth, glucose consumption and ethanol production of wine-related yeast species under oxygen-limited conditions, which, in turn, may be used to, e.g. optimize growth and fermentation performance of the given yeast upon N-source supplementation during

  2. Improvement of growth and nitrogen utilization in sheep using sugar beet pulp treated with Trichoderma reesei or urea.

    PubMed

    Okab, Aly B; Ayoub, Mostafa A; Samara, Emad M; Abdoun, Khalid A; Al-Haidary, Ahmed A; Koriem, Ahmed A; Hassan, Ayman A

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-five intact Barki lambs with mean body weight of 24.81 ± 0.16 kg were used to investigate the effect of including in the diet sugar beet pulp (SBP) treated biologically with Trichoderma reesei or chemically with urea 4 % on nutrients digestibility, growth performance, nitrogen (N) utilization, and hematological and biochemical parameters. Two experiments were conducted. In the growth experiment, five lambs were randomly assigned to one of five dietary treatments. Lambs were offered isonitrogenous and isoenergetic concentrate feed mixture containing on dry matter basis 0 % SBP (D0), 50 % SBP (D1), 50 % SBP treated with 4 % urea (D2), 50 % SBP treated with T. reesei (D3), and 25 % SPB treated with 4 % urea plus 25 % SPB treated with T. reesei (D4). In the metabolism experiment, five rams were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square design and housed in metabolism crates for 21 days. The present study showed that inclusion of SBP at the level of 50 % (D1) negatively affected diet digestibility coefficients of crude protein, crude fiber, and ether extract, in addition to average daily gain, feed conversion, and N utilization. However, treatment of SBP with urea (D2), T. reesei (D3), or the combination (D4) of both had improved (P < 0.05) these parameters with superiority of D3. Despite the significant differences in the tested hematological and biochemical parameters of lambs fed on biologically or chemically treated SBP diets, their levels remained within the physiological ranges which could indicate that treated SBP did not have any adverse effect on lambs' health.

  3. Effect of different nitrogen sources on plant characteristics and yield of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luqueño, F; Reyes-Varela, V; Martínez-Suárez, C; Salomón-Hernández, G; Yáñez-Meneses, J; Ceballos-Ramírez, J M; Dendooven, L

    2010-01-01

    Wastewater sludge can be used to fertilize crops, especially after vermicomposting (composting with earthworms to reduce pathogens). How wastewater sludge or vermicompost affects bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) growth is still largely unknown. In this study the effect of different forms of N fertilizer on common bean plant characteristics and yield were investigated in a Typic Fragiudepts (sandy loam) soil under greenhouse conditions. Beans were fertilized with wastewater sludge, or wastewater sludge vermicompost, or urea, or grown in unamended soil, while plant characteristics and yield were monitored (the unamended soil had no fertilization). Yields of common bean plants cultivated in unamended soil or soil amended with urea were lower than those cultivated in wastewater sludge-amended soil. Application of vermicompost further improved plant development and increased yield compared with beans cultivated in wastewater amended soil. It was found that application of organic waste products improved growth and yield of bean plants compared to those amended with inorganic fertilizer.

  4. Controls on Nitrogen Fluxes from Agricultural Fields: Differing Conclusions Based on Choice of Sensitivity Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, T.; Matson, P.; Lobell, D.

    2006-12-01

    Sensitivity analyses (SA) of biogeochemical and agricultural models are often used to identify the importance of input variables for variance in model outputs, such as crop yield or nitrate leaching. Identification of these factors can aid in prioritizing efforts in research or decision support. Many types of sensitivity analyses are available, ranging from simple One-At-A-Time (OAT) screening exercises to more complex local and global variance-based methods (see Saltelli et al 2004). The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the type of SA on factor prioritization in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico using the Water and Nitrogen Management Model (WNMM; Chen et al 2005). WNMM, a coupled plant-growth - biogeochemistry simulation model, was calibrated to reproduce crop growth, soil moisture, and gaseous N emission dynamics in experimental plots of irrigated wheat in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico from 1994-1997. Three types of SA were carried out using 16 input variables, including parameters related to weather, soil properties and crop management. Methods used for SA were local OAT, Monte Carlo (MC), and a global variance-based method (orthogonal input; OI). Results of the SA were based on typical interpretations used for each test: maximum absolute ratio of variation (MAROV) for OAT analyses; first- and second-order regressions for MC analyses; and a total effects index for OI. The three most important factors identified by MC and OI methods were generally in agreement, although the order of importance was not always consistent and there was little agreement for variables of less importance. OAT over-estimated the importance of two factors (planting date and pH) for many outputs. The biggest differences between the OAT results and those from MC and OI were likely due to the inability of OAT methods to account for non-linearity (eg. pH and ammonia volatilization), interactions among variables (eg. pH and timing of fertilization) and an over-reliance on baseline

  5. Nitrogen mobilization, nitrogen uptake and growth of cuttings obtained from poplar stock plants grown in different N regimes and sprayed with urea in autumn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufu; Cheng, Lailiang; Scagel, Carolyn F; Fuchigami, Leslie H

    2004-03-01

    Nitrogen mobilization, nitrogen uptake and growth of cuttings obtained from poplar stock plants fertigated with different nitrogen (N) treatments and sprayed with urea in autumn were studied. Stock plants propagated from poplar cuttings were trained to a single shoot and fertigated with 0, 5, 10, 15 or 20 mmol l(-1) N during the first growing season. In October, a subset of stock plants from each N fertigation treatment was sprayed twice with either 3% urea or water, and overwintered outside. In March, total tree biomass and total N concentration and content of stems were estimated for stock plants in each treatment, and cuttings were taken from the middle of each stock plant and stored in plastic bags at 2 degrees C. In mid-April, cuttings were planted in 7.5-l pots containing N-free medium and grown outdoors with a weekly fertigation with nutrient solution containing 0 or 10 mmol l(-1) 15NH4 15NO3. In mid-July, cuttings were harvested, and new shoot (new stems and leaves), shank (old cutting stem) and roots were analyzed for new biomass growth and total N and 15N content. Growth of stock plants was positively related to N supply in the previous growing season. Foliar urea application in autumn had no effect on subsequent stock plant growth even though urea sprays increased both N concentration and content in stem tissues. Biomass growth of cuttings obtained from stock plants was closely related to their N content when the cuttings were grown in an N-free medium regardless of previous treatments applied to the stock plants. When N was supplied in the growth medium, the strength of the relationship between regrowth and N content of cuttings was significantly reduced. Cuttings from stock plants treated with foliar urea and grown in a N-free medium remobilized between 75 and 82% of their total N for new growth, whereas cuttings from plants receiving no urea spray remobilized only between 60 and 69% of their total N for new growth. Current N fertilization of the

  6. Projecting Future Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Agriculture: Importance of Ecological Feedbacks and the Environmental Benefits of Improved Nitrogen Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, D.; Zhang, X.; Shevliakova, E.; Malyshev, S.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) presents a triple threat to the global environment: it is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, the largest remaining anthropogenic contributor to stratospheric ozone depletion, and an important component of the nitrogen (N) cascade - where one atom of N can interconvert between a number of forms, each with a unique set of environmental impacts. Here we use a dynamic vegetation model (Princeton-Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL) LM3 - the interactive land component of the GFDL Earth System Model) to assess how changes in future climate, land-use, and global fertilizer and manure application are projected to affect global N2O emissions from agriculture by 2050. Agricultural land is defined in this study as the sum of cropland and pasture. In a baseline scenario assuming little improvement in global N use efficiency (NUE) by 2050, the model projects a 24-31% increase in global agricultural N2O emissions (with the uncertainty range stemming from differences in climate forcing, land-use and fertilizer and manure consumption between RCP2.6 and RCP8.5, the two climate scenarios used in this study) - rising from 2.9 Tg N2O-N yr-1 in 1990-2000 to 3.6-3.8 Tg N2O-N yr-1 in 2040-2050. This emission increase is considerably less than the projected increases in global fertilizer and manure consumption (42-44%) and previously published projections of global agricultural N2O emission increases (38-75% - again, the uncertainty range reflecting the differences between the climate scenarios used). This disparity appears to be a result of ecological feedbacks captured by the model, where a considerable portion of the increase in fertilizer and manure use is absorbed by agricultural plant biomass rather than lost to the environment. In addition to this dynamic, the model projects that improvements in global NUE of 20-50% could reduce global N2O emissions significantly, delivering important climate and stratospheric ozone benefits over the period

  7. The improvement of spinach growth by nano-anatase TiO2 treatment is related to nitrogen photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Chao; Gao, Fengqing; Su, Mingyu; Wu, Xiao; Zheng, Lei; Hong, Fashui; Yang, Ping

    2007-10-01

    The improvement of spinach growth is proved to relate to N2 fixation by nano-anatase TiO2 in this study. The results show that all spinach leaves kept green by nano-anatase TiO2 treatment and all old leaves of control turned yellow white under culture with N-deficient solution. And the fresh weight, dry weight, and contents of total nitrogen, NH4(+), chlorophyll, and protein of spinach by nano-anatase TiO2 treatment presented obvious enhancement compared with control. Whereas the improvements of yield of spinach were not as good as nano-anatase TiO2 treatment under N-deficient condition, confirming that nano-anatase TiO2 on exposure to sunlight could chemisorb N2 directly or reduce N2 to NH3 in the spinach leaves, transforming into organic nitrogen and improving the growth of spinach. Bulk TiO2 effect, however, was not as significant as nano-anatase TiO2. A possible metabolism of the function of nano-anatase TiO2 reducing N2 to NH3 was discussed.

  8. Pyruvate is synthesized by two pathways in pea bacteroids with different efficiencies for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Mulley, Geraldine; Lopez-Gomez, Miguel; Zhang, Ye; Terpolilli, Jason; Prell, Jurgen; Finan, Turlough; Poole, Philip

    2010-10-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legume bacteroids is energized by the metabolism of dicarboxylic acids, which requires their oxidation to both oxaloacetate and pyruvate. In alfalfa bacteroids, production of pyruvate requires NAD+ malic enzyme (Dme) but not NADP+ malic enzyme (Tme). However, we show that Rhizobium leguminosarum has two pathways for pyruvate formation from dicarboxylates catalyzed by Dme and by the combined activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase (PckA) and pyruvate kinase (PykA). Both pathways enable N2 fixation, but the PckA/PykA pathway supports N2 fixation at only 60% of that for Dme. Double mutants of dme and pckA/pykA did not fix N2. Furthermore, dme pykA double mutants did not grow on dicarboxylates, showing that they are the only pathways for the production of pyruvate from dicarboxylates normally expressed. PckA is not expressed in alfalfa bacteroids, resulting in an obligate requirement for Dme for pyruvate formation and N2 fixation. When PckA was expressed from a constitutive nptII promoter in alfalfa dme bacteroids, acetylene was reduced at 30% of the wild-type rate, although this level was insufficient to prevent nitrogen starvation. Dme has N-terminal, malic enzyme (Me), and C-terminal phosphotransacetylase (Pta) domains. Deleting the Pta domain increased the peak acetylene reduction rate in 4-week-old pea plants to 140 to 150% of the wild-type rate, and this was accompanied by increased nodule mass. Plants infected with Pta deletion mutants did not have increased dry weight, demonstrating that there is not a sustained change in nitrogen fixation throughout growth. This indicates a complex relationship between pyruvate synthesis in bacteroids, nitrogen fixation, and plant growth.

  9. Production and Rheological Properties of Welan Gum Produced by Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 31555 with Different Nitrogen Sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaopeng; Nie, Zuoming; Zheng, Zhiyong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of nitrogen sources on the production and rheological properties of welan gum produced by Sphingomonas sp. ATCC 31555. Six different nitrogen sources were used for ATCC 31555 fermentation, and 2 of these were further analyzed due to their more positive influence on welan gum production and bacterial biomass. Bacterial biomass, welan gum yield, welan viscosity, molecular weight, monosaccharide composition, acyl content, and welan structure were analyzed. Welan gum production and the biomass concentration of ATCC 31555 were higher in media containing NaNO3 and beef extract. Welan viscosity decreased at higher temperatures of 30-90°C, and it increased with a higher welan concentration. In the media containing NaNO3 (3 g·L-1), welan viscosity was higher at 30-70°C and a welan solution concentration of 6-10 g·L-1. With a reduced NaNO3 concentration, the molecular weight of welan gum and the molar ratio of mannose decreased, but the molar ratio of glucuronic acid increased. With different nitrogen sources, the acetyl content of welan gum differed but its structure was similar. NaNO3 and beef extract facilitated welan production. A reduced NaNO3 concentration promoted welan viscosity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Nitrogen removal performance in planted and unplanted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating different influent COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Yi; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Ambrose, Richard F; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xinshan; Zhao, Zhimiao

    2016-05-01

    Microcosm horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSFCWs) were used to examine the impacts of vegetation on nitrogen dynamics treating different influent COD/N ratios (1:1, 4:1, and 8:1). An increase in the COD/N ratio led to increased reductions in NO3 and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) in planted and unplanted wetlands, but diminished removal of NH4. The HSSFCW planted with Canna indica L. exhibited a significant reduction in NH4 compared to the unplanted system, particularly in the active root zone where NH4 removal performance increased by up to 26 % at the COD/N ratio of 8:1. There was no significant difference in NO3 removal between the planted and unplanted wetlands. TIN removal efficiency in the planted wetland increased with COD/N ratios, which was likely influenced by plant uptake. NH4 reductions were greater in planted wetland at the 20- and 40-cm depths while NO3 reductions were uniformly greater with depth in all cases, but no statistical difference was impacted by depth on TIN removal. These findings show that planting a HSSFCW can provide some benefit in reducing nitrogen loads in effluents, but only when a sufficient carbon source is present.

  11. Optimal plant nitrogen use improves model representation of vegetation response to elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Silvia; Kern, Melanie; Engel, Jan; Zaehle, Sönke

    2017-04-01

    Existing global vegetation models often cannot accurately represent observed ecosystem behaviour under transient conditions such as elevated atmospheric CO2, a problem that can be attributed to an inflexibility in model representation of plant responses. Plant optimality concepts have been proposed as a solution to this problem as they offer a way to represent plastic plant responses in complex models. Here we present a novel, next generation vegetation model which includes optimal nitrogen allocation to and within the canopy as well as optimal biomass allocation between above- and belowground components in response to nutrient and water availability. The underlying hypothesis is that plants adjust their use of nitrogen in response to environmental conditions and nutrient availability in order to maximise biomass growth. We show that for two FACE (Free Air CO2 enrichment) experiments, the Duke forest and Oak Ridge forest sites, the model can better predict vegetation responses over the duration of the experiment when optimal processes are included. Specifically, under elevated CO2 conditions, the model predicts a lower optimal leaf N concentration as well as increased biomass allocation to fine roots, which, combined with a redistribution of leaf N between the Rubisco and chlorophyll components, leads to a continued NPP response under high CO2, where models with a fixed canopy stoichiometry predict a quick onset of N limitation.Existing global vegetation models often cannot accurately represent observed ecosystem behaviour under transient conditions such as elevated atmospheric CO2, a problem that can be attributed to an inflexibility in model representation of plant responses. Plant optimality concepts have been proposed as a solution to this problem as they offer a way to represent plastic plant responses in complex models. Here we present a novel, next generation vegetation model which includes optimal nitrogen allocation to and within the canopy as well as

  12. Nitrogen removal performance of anaerobic ammonia oxidation co-culture immobilized in different gel carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang-Li; Hu, Yong-You; Wang, Qi-Rui

    2009-01-01

    Four materials were prepared as carriers for immobilizing anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing sludge. Nitrogen removal performance by these immobilized gel bead groups was evaluated. The removal ratios of ammonium and nitrite by CMC anammox-immobilized beads were 100% and 95.3% in 48 hours, respectively. The removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite by SA, PVA-SA and PVA anammox-immobilized beads were lower than the CMC beads. Subsequently, the physical properties of the beads were studied. PVA-SA was found to be the best support material among the four by comparing the case of the immobilization procedure, nitrogen removal efficiencies, and the costs of materials. PVA-SA gel entrapment was optimized by an orthogonal experiment. The SEM micrographs displayed that the surface structure of PVA-SA immobilized beads is loose and finely porous, which facilitates diffusion of the nitrogen. The SEM micrographs also clearly showed that anammox bacteria existed in the gel beads. All results clearly demonstrate that immobilizing anammox sludge in gel carriers is feasible and exhibit good performance. This research provided a new route to maintain sufficient amount of anammox sludge in a practical anammox reactor.

  13. Leaf chlorophyll, net gas exchange and chloroplast ultrastructure in citrus leaves of different nitrogen status.

    PubMed

    Bondada, Bhaskar R; Syvertsen, James P

    2003-06-01

    One-year-old 'Cleopatra mandarin' (Citrus reticulata Blanco) seedlings were raised in a greenhouse and fertilized with nitrogen (N) at four application frequencies. Nitrogen-deficient leaves (86 mmol N m-2) had less chlorophyll per unit area, but a greater chlorophyll a:b ratio than N-fertilized leaves (> 187 mmol N m-2). Leaf dry mass per area (DM area-1) and total chlorophyll concentration increased linearly with increasing leaf N, whereas chlorophyll a:b ratio declined. Net assimilation of CO2 (A(CO2)) and leaf water-use efficiency (WUE) reached maximum values in leaves with approximately 187 mmol N m-2. Nitrogen-deficient leaves exhibited small chloroplasts with no starch granules; grana and stroma lamellae that coincided with the accretion of numerous large plastoglobuli in the stroma disintegrated. High-N leaves had large chloroplasts with well-developed grana, stroma lamellae and starch granules that enlarged with increasing N concentration. The lack of an increase in A(CO2) capacity at leaf N concentrations above 187 mmol N m-2 appeared to be correlated with the presence of numerous large starch granules.

  14. Regional distribution of nitrogen fertilizer use and N-saving potential for improvement of food production and nitrogen use efficiency in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobin; Cai, Dianxiong; Hoogmoed, Willem B; Oenema, Oene

    2011-08-30

    An apparently large disparity still exists between developed and developing countries in historical trends of the amounts of nitrogen (N) fertilizers consumed, and the same situation holds true in China. The situation of either N overuse or underuse has become one of the major limiting factors in agricultural production and economic development in China. The issue of food security in N-poor regions has been given the greatest attention internationally. Balanced and appropriate use of N fertilizer for enriching soil fertility is an effective step in preventing soil degradation, ensuring food security, and further contributing to poverty alleviation and rural economic development in the N-poor regions. Based on the China Statistical Yearbook (2007), there could be scope for improvement of N use efficiency (NUE) in N-rich regions by reducing N fertilizer input to an optimal level (≤180 kg N ha(-1)), and also potential for increasing yield in the N-poor regions by further increasing N fertilizer supply (up to 116 kg N ha(-1)). For the N-rich regions, the average estimated potential of N saving and NUE increase could be about 15% and 23%, respectively, while for the N-poor regions the average estimated potential for yield increase could be 21% on a regional scale, when N input is increased by 13%. The study suggests that to achieve the goals of regional yield improvement, it is necessary to readjust and optimize regional distribution of N fertilizer use between the N-poor and N-rich regions in China, in combination with other nutrient management practices. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Spatiotemporal differences in nitrogen fate and transport with application of NCDC and WRF precipitation data in the SWAT watershed model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, M. C.; Knightes, C. D.; Cooter, E. J.; Dennis, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Watershed fate and transport models are widely used within the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Office of Research and Development (ORD) as tools to forecast ecosystem services and evaluate future scenarios associated with land use, climate change and emissions regulation. A critical step in applying fate and transport models is understanding model sensitivity and function, particularly as new and innovative methods become available to apply forcing function data, e.g. precipitation data. Currently, multiple precipitation data sources are available for use in watershed modeling, two of which include National Climactic Data Center (NCDC) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) data. As there are clear distinctions in how precipitation is determined for these precipitation sources (gauge vs. model simulated), there can also exist significant differences in precipitation frequency on a site-by-site basis. These differences may translate to large contrasts in nitrogen transport due to the sensitivity of surface biogeochemical processes to precipitation characteristics, namely those influenced by soil moisture content. The objective of this study is to investigate potential differences in the fate and transport of reactive nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse Basin, North Carolina, USA, after separately applying NCDC and WRF precipitation data sources into the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) watershed model. The spatiotemporal variation of several nitrogen transport processes will be compared, e.g. reactive nitrogen fixation, plant uptake, overland delivery to streams, denitrification. Results from this research will advance exposure science by providing a greater understanding of the operation and function of watershed fate and transport models, which are primary tools used to assess ecosystem exposure.

  16. Effect of elevated CO₂ on phosphorus nutrition of phosphate-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh under different nitrogen forms.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yaofang; Chai, Rushan; Dong, Huifen; Wang, Huan; Tang, Caixian; Zhang, Yongsong

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) nutrition is always a key issue regarding plants responses to elevated CO(2). Yet it is unclear of how elevated CO(2) affects P uptake under different nitrogen (N) forms. This study investigated the influence of elevated CO(2) (800 µl l(-1)) on P uptake and utilization by Arabidopsis grown in pH-buffered phosphate (P)-deficient (0.5 µM) hydroponic culture supplying with 2mM nitrate (NO(3)(-)) or ammonium (NH(4)(+)). After 7 d treatment, elevated CO(2) enhanced the biomass production of both NO(3)(-)- and NH(4) (+)-fed plants but decreased the P amount absorbed per weight of roots and the P concentration in the shoots of plants supplied with NH(4)(+). In comparison, elevated CO(2) increased the amount of P absorbed per weight of roots, as well as the P concentration in plants and alleviated P deficiency-induced symptoms of plants supplied with NO(3)(-). Elevated CO(2) also increased the root/shoot ratio, total root surface area, and acid phosphatase activity, and enhanced the expression of genes or transcriptional factors involving in P uptake, allocation and remobilization in P deficient plants. Furthermore, elevated CO(2) increased the nitric oxide (NO) level in roots of NO(3)(-)-fed plants but decreased it in NH(4)(+)-fed plants. NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) inhibited plant P acquisition by roots under elevated CO(2). Considering all of these findings, this study concluded that a combination of elevated CO(2) and NO(3)(-) nutrition can induce a set of plant adaptive strategies to improve P status from P-deficient soluble sources and that NO may be a signalling molecule that controls these processes.

  17. Effect of elevated CO2 on phosphorus nutrition of phosphate-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh under different nitrogen forms

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yaofang; Chai, Rushan; Zhang, Yongsong

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) nutrition is always a key issue regarding plants responses to elevated CO2. Yet it is unclear of how elevated CO2 affects P uptake under different nitrogen (N) forms. This study investigated the influence of elevated CO2 (800 µl l–1) on P uptake and utilization by Arabidopsis grown in pH-buffered phosphate (P)-deficient (0.5 µM) hydroponic culture supplying with 2mM nitrate (NO3 −) or ammonium (NH4 +). After 7 d treatment, elevated CO2 enhanced the biomass production of both NO3 −- and NH4 +-fed plants but decreased the P amount absorbed per weight of roots and the P concentration in the shoots of plants supplied with NH4 +. In comparison, elevated CO2 increased the amount of P absorbed per weight of roots, as well as the P concentration in plants and alleviated P deficiency-induced symptoms of plants supplied with NO3 −. Elevated CO2 also increased the root/shoot ratio, total root surface area, and acid phosphatase activity, and enhanced the expression of genes or transcriptional factors involving in P uptake, allocation and remobilization in P deficient plants. Furthermore, elevated CO2 increased the nitric oxide (NO) level in roots of NO3 −-fed plants but decreased it in NH4 +-fed plants. NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) inhibited plant P acquisition by roots under elevated CO2. Considering all of these findings, this study concluded that a combination of elevated CO2 and NO3 − nutrition can induce a set of plant adaptive strategies to improve P status from P-deficient soluble sources and that NO may be a signalling molecule that controls these processes. PMID:23183255

  18. A consortium of non-rhizobial endophytic microbes from Typha angustifolia functions as probiotic in rice and improves nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saha, C; Mukherjee, G; Agarwal-Banka, P; Seal, A

    2016-11-01

    Endophytic microbes isolated from plants growing in nutrient-deficient environments often possess properties that improve nutrition of agriculturally important plants. A consortium of non-rhizobial endophytic microbes isolated from a macrophyte Typha angustifolia growing in the marginal wetlands associated with a Uranium mine was characterized for their beneficial effect on rice and the mechanisms of growth promotion were investigated. The microbes were identified and characterized for their potential plant growth promoting (PGP) properties. Effect of these microbes on nitrogen (N)-metabolism of rice was tested as Typha endophytes were predominantly (N)-fixing. Relative N-use efficiency and expression of genes involved in N-uptake and assimilation were investigated in treated plants. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of dinitrogen reductase gene was observed within the consortium from a Pseudomonas stutzeri strain. The consortium behaved as plant probiotic and showed substantial growth benefits to Typha, their natural host as well as to rice. Typha endophytes colonized rice endosphere significantly increasing biomass, shoot length and chlorophyll content in rice plants both under N-sufficient and N-deficient conditions. N-uptake and assimilation genes were upregulated in plants treated with the endophytes even after three weeks post infection. Our results suggested, HGT of nitrogen-fixation trait to be highly prevalent among endophytes isolated from nutrient-poor habitats of the uranium mine. A long-term nitrogen deficiency response in the treated plants was elicited by the consortium improving N-uptake, assimilation and relative N-use efficiency of rice plants. This appeared to be at least one of the main strategies of plant growth promotion.

  19. Phosphorus applications improved the soil microbial responses under nitrogen additions in Chinese fir plantations of subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Li, Dandan; Yang, Yang; Tang, Yuqian; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Fusheng; Sun, Xiaomin

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition and low soil phosphorus (P) content aggravate the P limitation in subtropical forest soils. However, the responses of soil microbial communities, enzyme kinetics, and N cycling genes to P additions in subtropical plantations are still not clear. The hypothesis that P application can alleviate the limitation and improve the soil microbial properties was tested by long term field experiment in the Chinese fir plantations in subtropical China. Thirty 20m×20m plots were established in November 2011 and six different treatments were randomly distributed with five replicates. The treatments are control (CK, no N and P application), low N addition (N1: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1), high N addition (N2: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (P: 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1), low N and P addition (N1P: 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1) and high N and P addition (N2P: 100 kg N ha-1 yr-1 and 50 kg P ha-1 yr-1). A suite of responses of soil microorganism across four years (2012-2015) during three seasons (spring, summer and autumn) were measured. Following 4 years of N amendments, fertilized soils were more acidic and had lower soil microbial biomass carbon contents than CK. However, P alleviated the soil acidification and increased the soil microbial biomass carbon contents. Increases in microbial PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics in N fertilized plots were observed in the initial year (2013) but reduced since then (2014 and 2015). Whereas P amendments increased the soil PLFA biomarkers and exoenzyme kinetics through the four years except that the acid phosphatase activities declined after 3 years applications. P applications enhanced the soil N cycling by increases the abundances of nitrifiers (ammonia-oxidizing archea) and denitrifiers (nos Z, norG, and nirK). The bacterial and fungal residue carbons (calculated by amino sugar indicators) were higher under NP fertilizations than the other treatments. Our results suggest that P application could improve the soil

  20. COD and nitrogen removal and microbial communities in a novel waterfall biofilm reactor operated at different COD/TN ratios.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyao; Pu, Yuewu; Wei, Cheng

    2017-01-28

    The aim of this study was to characterize the pollutant removal efficiency and the microbial communities that arose in a newly designed waterfall biofilm reactor (WFBR) at different chemical oxygen demand/total nitrogen (COD/TN) ratios. The reactor was operated continuously for 28 days at different COD/TN ratios, and its efficiency was evaluated. Results showed that as the thickness of the biofilm increased, the structure of the biofilm encouraged anaerobic-aerobic, anoxic-anaerobic, and fully anaerobic conditions in one reactor. The COD/TN ratios used had a significant effect on the removal of COD and nitrogen components. At a COD/TN ratio of 14, the ammonium nitrogen removal efficiency reached its highest value (99%), but the COD removal efficiency remained at approximately 90%. High-throughput sequencing revealed that the highest community diversity and richness were seen at a COD/TN ratio of 18, and the major phyla were Proteobacteria (average abundance of 47%), Actinobacteria (24%), and Bacteroidetes (13%). As the COD/TN ratios increased from 7 to 18, the abundance of Proteobacteria gradually increased from 25% to 68%. These results could provide important guidance for the design of new wastewater treatment systems and also enrich our theoretical understanding of microbial ecology.

  1. Nitrogen and phosphorus additions alter nutrient dynamics but not resorption efficiencies of Chinese fir leaves and twigs differing in age.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Sheng; Niklas, Karl Joseph; Liu, Yu; Fang, Xiang-Min; Wan, Song-Ze; Wang, Huimin

    2015-10-01

    It is unclear how or even if phosphorus (P) input alters the influence of nitrogen (N) deposition in a forest. In theory, nutrients in leaves and twigs differing in age may show different responses to elevated nutrient input. To test this possibility, we selected Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) for a series of N and P addition experiments using treatments of +N1 - P (50 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), +N2 - P (100 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), -N + P (50 kg P ha(-1) year(-1)), +N1 + P, +N2 + P and -N - P (without N and P addition). Soil samples were analyzed for mineral N and available P concentrations. Leaves and twigs in summer and their litters in winter were classified as and sorted into young and old components to measure N and P concentrations. Soil mineral N and available P increased with N and P additions, respectively. Nitrogen addition increased leaf and twig N concentrations in the second year, but not in the first year; P addition increased leaf and twig P concentrations in both years and enhanced young but not old leaf and twig N accumulations. Nitrogen and P resorption proficiencies in litters increased in response to N and P additions, but N and P resorption efficiencies were not significantly altered. Nitrogen resorption efficiency was generally higher in leaves than in twigs and in young vs old leaves and twigs. Phosphorus resorption efficiency showed a minimal variation from 26.6 to 47.0%. Therefore, P input intensified leaf and twig N enrichment with N addition, leaf and twig nutrients were both gradually resorbed with aging, and organ and age effects depended on the extent of nutrient limitation.

  2. Modeling nitrogen uptake and potential nitrate leaching under different irrigation programs in nitrogen-fertilized tomato using the computer program NLEAP.

    PubMed

    Karaman, M Rüstü; Saltali, Kadir; Ersahin, Sabit; Güleç, Hikmet; Derici, M Rifat

    2005-02-01

    Readily available nitrogen (N) sources such as ammonium nitrate with excessive irrigation present a potential hazard for the environment. The computer program Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis Package (NLEAP) is a mechanistic model developed for rapid site-specific estimates of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) moving below the root zone in agricultural crops and potential impacts of NO3-N leaching into groundwater. In this study, the value of NLEAP was tested to simulate N uptake by crops and NO3-N leaching parameters in large lysimeters under the tomato crop. Three seedlings of tomato variety of H-2274 (Lycopersicum esculentum L.) were transplanted into each lysimeter. N fertilizer at the rate of 140 kg N ha(-1) was sidedressed in two split applications, the first half as ammonium sulphate and the second half as ammonium nitrate. The lysimeters were irrigated based on programs of C 0.75, 1.00, 1.25 and 1.50, C referring to class A-Pan evaporation coefficients. Parameters such as leaching index (LI), annual leaching risk potential (ALRP), N available for leaching (NAL), amount of NO3-N leached (NL) and amount of N taken up by the crops (NU) were estimated using the NLEAP computer model. To test the ability of model to simulate N uptake and NL, measured values were compared with simulated values. Significant correlations, R2 = 0.92 and P < 0.03 for the first year and R2 = 0.86 and P < 0.06 for the second year, were found between measured and simulated values for crop N consumption, indicating that the NLEAP model adequately described crop N uptake under the varied irrigation programs using an optimal N fertilization program for the experimental site. Significant correlations, R2 = 0.96 and P < 0.01 for the first year and R2 = 0.97 and P < 0.01 for the second year, were also found between measured and simulated values of NL, indicating that the NLEAP model also adequately predicted NL under the varied irrigation programs. Therefore, this computer model can be useful to

  3. Impact of the addition of different plant residues on carbon-nitrogen content and nitrogen mineralization-immobilization turnover in a soil incubated under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Tahir, M. M.; Sabir, N.; Khurshid, M.

    2014-10-01

    Application of plant residues as soil amendment may represent a valuable recycling strategy that affects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, soil properties improvement and plant growth promotion. The amount and rate of nutrient release from plant residues depend on their quality characteristics and biochemical composition. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted for 120 days under controlled conditions (25 °C and 58% water filled pore space (WFPS)) to quantify initial biochemical composition and N mineralization of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues i.e. the roots, shoots and leaves of Glycine max, Trifolium repens, Zea mays, Poplus euramericana, Rubinia pseudoacacia and Elagnus umbellate incorporated into the soil at the rate of 200 mg residue N kg-1 soil. The diverse plant residues showed wide variation in total N, carbon, lignin, polyphenols and C/N ratio with higher polyphenol content in the leaves and higher lignin content in the roots. The shoot of G. max and the shoot and root of T. repens displayed continuous mineralization by releasing a maximum of 109.8, 74.8 and 72.5 mg N kg-1 and representing a 55, 37 and 36% of added N being released from these resources. The roots of G. max and Z. mays and the shoot of Z. mays showed continuous negative values throughout the incubation showing net immobilization. After an initial immobilization, leaves of P. euramericana, R. pseudoacacia and E. umbellate exhibited net mineralization by releasing a maximum of 31.8, 63.1 and 65.1 mg N kg-1, respectively and representing a 16, 32 and 33% of added N being released. Nitrogen mineralization from all the treatments was positively correlated with the initial residue N contents (r = 0.89; p ≤ 0.01), and negatively correlated with lignin content (r = -0.84; p ≤ 0.01), C/N ratio (r = -0.69; p ≤ 0.05), lignin/N ratio (r = -0.68; p ≤ 0.05), polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.73; p ≤ 0.05) and ligin + polyphenol/N ratio (r = -0.70; p ≤ 0.05) indicating

  4. Improved online δ18O measurements of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing organic materials and a proposed analytical protocol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.; Coplen, T.B.; Wassenaar, L.I.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that N2 in the ion source of a mass spectrometer interferes with the CO background during the δ18O measurement of carbon monoxide. A similar problem arises with the high-temperature conversion (HTC) analysis of nitrogenous O-bearing samples (e.g. nitrates and keratins) to CO for δ18O measurement, where the sample introduces a significant N2 peak before the CO peak, making determination of accurate oxygen isotope ratios difficult. Although using a gas chromatography (GC) column longer than that commonly provided by manufacturers (0.6 m) can improve the efficiency of separation of CO and N2 and using a valve to divert nitrogen and prevent it from entering the ion source of a mass spectrometer improved measurement results, biased δ18O values could still be obtained. A careful evaluation of the performance of the GC separation column was carried out. With optimal GC columns, the δ18O reproducibility of human hair keratins and other keratin materials was better than ±0.15 ‰ (n = 5; for the internal analytical reproducibility), and better than ±0.10 ‰ (n = 4; for the external analytical reproducibility).

  5. Improved online δ18O measurements of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing organic materials and a proposed analytical protocol.

    PubMed

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2011-07-30

    It is well known that N(2) in the ion source of a mass spectrometer interferes with the CO background during the δ(18)O measurement of carbon monoxide. A similar problem arises with the high-temperature conversion (HTC) analysis of nitrogenous O-bearing samples (e.g. nitrates and keratins) to CO for δ(18)O measurement, where the sample introduces a significant N(2) peak before the CO peak, making determination of accurate oxygen isotope ratios difficult. Although using a gas chromatography (GC) column longer than that commonly provided by manufacturers (0.6 m) can improve the efficiency of separation of CO and N(2) and using a valve to divert nitrogen and prevent it from entering the ion source of a mass spectrometer improved measurement results, biased δ(18)O values could still be obtained. A careful evaluation of the performance of the GC separation column was carried out. With optimal GC columns, the δ(18)O reproducibility of human hair keratins and other keratin materials was better than ± 0.15 ‰ (n=5; for the internal analytical reproducibility), and better than ± 0.10 ‰ (n=4; for the external analytical reproducibility).

  6. Improved Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Crop Production at the Catchment Scale via a Process-Based Nitrogen Simulation Model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wenjie; van der Werf, Hayo M G; Salmon-Monviola, Jordy

    2015-09-15

    One of the major challenges in environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of crop production is the nonlinearity between nitrogen (N) fertilizer inputs and on-site N emissions resulting from complex biogeochemical processes. A few studies have addressed this nonlinearity by combining process-based N simulation models with LCA, but none accounted for nitrate (NO3(-)) flows across fields. In this study, we present a new method, TNT2-LCA, that couples the topography-based simulation of nitrogen transfer and transformation (TNT2) model with LCA, and compare the new method with a current LCA method based on a French life cycle inventory database. Application of the two methods to a case study of crop production in a catchment in France showed that, compared to the current method, TNT2-LCA allows delineation of more appropriate temporal limits when developing data for on-site N emissions associated with specific crops in this catchment. It also improves estimates of NO3(-) emissions by better consideration of agricultural practices, soil-climatic conditions, and spatial interactions of NO3(-) flows across fields, and by providing predicted crop yield. The new method presented in this study provides improved LCA of crop production at the catchment scale.

  7. [Soil enzyme activities under two forest types as affected by different levels of nitrogen deposition].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-tao; Li, Xue-feng; Han, Shi-jie; Hu, Yan-ling

    2008-12-01

    A simulation test was conducted to study the change trends of soil cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and sucrase activities under natural broadleaf-Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) and secondary poplar (Populus davidiana) -birch (Betula platyphylla) mixed forests as affected by 0, 25, and 50 kg x hm(-2) x a(-1) of N deposition. The results showed that the effects of elevated N deposition on test enzyme activities varied with forest type, and short-term nitrogen addition could significantly affect the test enzyme activities. High N deposition decreased soil polyphyneol oxidase activity, and correspondingly, soil cellulase and sucrase activities also had a trend of decrease.

  8. Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation and partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometry in late-season rice under different water and nitrogen managements.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yushi; Liang, Xinqiang; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Liang; Ji, Yuanjing; Zhu, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle) of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD) and four N managements (control, N0; conventional urea at 240 kg N ha(-1), UREA; controlled-release bulk blending fertilizer at 240 kg N ha(-1), BBF; polymer-coated urea at 240 kg N ha(-1), PCU). We found that water and N treatments had remarkable effects on the measured parameters in different plant tissues after transplanting, but the water and N interactions had insignificant effects. Tissue C:N, N:P and C:P ratios ranged from 14.6 to 52.1, 3.1 to 7.8, and 76.9 to 254.3 over the rice growing seasons, respectively. The root and stem-leaf C:N:P and panicle C:N ratios showed overall uptrends with a peak at harvest whereas the panicle N:P and C:P ratios decreased from filling to harvest. The AWD treatment did not affect the concentrations and accumulation of tissue C and N, but greatly decreased those of P, resulting in enhanced N:P and C:P ratios. N fertilization significantly increased tissue N concentration, slightly enhanced tissue P concentration, but did not affect tissue C concentration, leading to a significant increase in tissue N:P ratio but a decrease in C:N and C:P ratios. Our results suggested that the growth of rice in the Taihu Lake region was co-limited by N and P. These findings broadened our understanding of the responses of plant C:N:P stoichiometry to simultaneous water and N managements in subtropical high-yielding rice systems.

  9. Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Accumulation and Partitioning, and C:N:P Stoichiometry in Late-Season Rice under Different Water and Nitrogen Managements

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yushi; Liang, Xinqiang; Chen, Yingxu; Li, Liang; Ji, Yuanjing; Zhu, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Water and nitrogen availability plays an important role in the biogeochemical cycles of essential elements, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in agricultural ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the seasonal changes of C, N and P concentrations, accumulation, partitioning, and C:N:P stoichiometric ratios in different plant tissues (root, stem-leaf, and panicle) of late-season rice under two irrigation regimes (continuous flooding, CF; alternate wetting and drying, AWD) and four N managements (control, N0; conventional urea at 240 kg N ha−1, UREA; controlled-release bulk blending fertilizer at 240 kg N ha−1, BBF; polymer-coated urea at 240 kg N ha−1, PCU). We found that water and N treatments had remarkable effects on the measured parameters in different plant tissues after transplanting, but the water and N interactions had insignificant effects. Tissue C:N, N:P and C:P ratios ranged from 14.6 to 52.1, 3.1 to 7.8, and 76.9 to 254.3 over the rice growing seasons, respectively. The root and stem-leaf C:N:P and panicle C:N ratios showed overall uptrends with a peak at harvest whereas the panicle N:P and C:P ratios decreased from filling to harvest. The AWD treatment did not affect the concentrations and accumulation of tissue C and N, but greatly decreased those of P, resulting in enhanced N:P and C:P ratios. N fertilization significantly increased tissue N concentration, slightly enhanced tissue P concentration, but did not affect tissue C concentration, leading to a significant increase in tissue N:P ratio but a decrease in C:N and C:P ratios. Our results suggested that the growth of rice in the Taihu Lake region was co-limited by N and P. These findings broadened our understanding of the responses of plant C:N:P stoichiometry to simultaneous water and N managements in subtropical high-yielding rice systems. PMID:24992006

  10. Catalytic two-stage coal liquefaction process having improved nitrogen removal

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.

    1991-01-01

    A process for catalytic multi-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal to produce high yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquids containing low concentrations of nitogen compounds. First stage catalytic reaction conditions are 700.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1500-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure, with the space velocity maintained in a critical range of 10-40 lb coal/hr ft.sup.3 catalyst settled volume. The first stage catalyst has 0.3-1.2 cc/gm total pore volume with at least 25% of the pore volume in pores having diameters of 200-2000 Angstroms. Second stage reaction conditions are 760.degree.-870.degree. F. temperature with space velocity exceeding that in the first stage reactor, so as to achieve increased hydrogenation yield of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products having at least 75% removal of nitrogen compounds from the coal-derived liquid products.

  11. Conversion to No-Till Improves Maize Nitrogen Use Efficiency in a Continuous Cover Cropping System.

    PubMed

    Habbib, Hazzar; Verzeaux, Julien; Nivelle, Elodie; Roger, David; Lacoux, Jérôme; Catterou, Manuella; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric; Tétu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted in the field to measure the combined impact of tilling and N fertilization on various agronomic traits related to nitrogen (N) use efficiency and to grain yield in maize cultivated in the presence of a cover crop. Four years after conversion to no-till, a significant increase in N use efficiency N harvest index, N remobilization and N remobilization efficiency was observed both under no and high N fertilization conditions. Moreover, we observed that grain yield and grain N content were higher under no-till conditions only when N fertilizers were applied. Thus, agronomic practices based on continuous no-till appear to be a promising for increasing N use efficiency in maize.

  12. Conversion to No-Till Improves Maize Nitrogen Use Efficiency in a Continuous Cover Cropping System

    PubMed Central

    Habbib, Hazzar; Verzeaux, Julien; Nivelle, Elodie; Roger, David; Lacoux, Jérôme; Catterou, Manuella; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric; Tétu, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted in the field to measure the combined impact of tilling and N fertilization on various agronomic traits related to nitrogen (N) use efficiency and to grain yield in maize cultivated in the presence of a cover crop. Four years after conversion to no-till, a significant increase in N use efficiency N harvest index, N remobilization and N remobilization efficiency was observed both under no and high N fertilization conditions. Moreover, we observed that grain yield and grain N content were higher under no-till conditions only when N fertilizers were applied. Thus, agronomic practices based on continuous no-till appear to be a promising for increasing N use efficiency in maize. PMID:27711154

  13. Effect of fluorescence characteristics and different algorithms on the estimation of leaf nitrogen content based on laser-induced fluorescence lidar in paddy rice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Jia; Du, Lin; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Paddy rice is one of the most significant food sources and an important part of the ecosystem. Thus, accurate monitoring of paddy rice growth is highly necessary. Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) serves as a crucial indicator of growth status of paddy rice and determines the dose of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to be used. This study aims to compare the predictive ability of the fluorescence spectra excited by different excitation wavelengths (EWs) combined with traditional multivariate analysis algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and support vector machine (SVM), for estimating paddy rice LNC from the leaf level with three different fluorescence characteristics as input variables. Then, six estimation models were proposed. Compared with the five other models, PCA-BPNN was the most suitable model for the estimation of LNC by improving R2 and reducing RMSE and RE. For 355, 460 and 556 nm EWs, R2 was 0.89, 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the fluorescence spectra excited by 355 and 556 nm EWs were superior to those excited by 460 nm for the estimation of LNC with different models. BPNN algorithm combined with PCA may provide a helpful exploratory and predictive tool for fluorescence spectra excited by appropriate EW based on practical application requirements for monitoring the N status of crops.

  14. Influence of Residue and Nitrogen Fertilizer Additions on Carbon Mineralization in Soils with Different Texture and Cropping Histories

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianni; Wang, Xudong; Liebman, Matt; Cavigelli, Michel; Wander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    To improve our ability to predict SOC mineralization response to residue and N additions in soils with different inherent and dynamic organic matter properties, a 330-day incubation was conducted using samples from two long-term experiments (clay loam Mollisols in Iowa [IAsoil] and silt loam Ultisols in Maryland [MDsoil]) comparing conventional grain systems (Conv) amended with inorganic fertilizers with 3 yr (Med) and longer (Long), more diverse cropping systems amended with manure. A double exponential model was used to estimate the size (Ca, Cs) and decay rates (ka, ks) of active and slow C pools which we compared with total particulate organic matter (POM) and occluded-POM (OPOM). The high-SOC IAsoil containing highly active smectite clays maintained smaller labile pools and higher decay rates than the low-SOC MDsoil containing semi-active kaolinitic clays. Net SOC loss was greater (2.6 g kg−1; 8.6%) from the IAsoil than the MDsoil (0.9 g kg−1, 6.3%); fractions and coefficients suggest losses were principally from IAsoil’s resistant pool. Cropping history did not alter SOC pool size or decay rates in IAsoil where rotation-based differences in OPOM-C were small. In MDsoil, use of diversified rotations and manure increased ka by 32% and ks by 46% compared to Conv; differences mirrored in POM- and OPOM-C contents. Residue addition prompted greater increases in Ca (340% vs 230%) and Cs (38% vs 21%) and decreases in ka (58% vs 9%) in IAsoil than MDsoil. Reduced losses of SOC from residue-amended MDsoil were associated with increased OPOM-C. Nitrogen addition dampened CO2-C release. Clay type and C saturation dominated the IAsoil’s response to external inputs and made labile and stable fractions more vulnerable to decay. Trends in OPOM suggest aggregate protection influences C turnover in the low active MDsoil. Clay charge and OPOM-C contents were better predictors of soil C dynamics than clay or POM-C contents. PMID:25078458

  15. Relative efficacy of different distillery effluents on growth, nitrogen fixation and yield of groundnut.

    PubMed

    Ramana, S; Biswas, A K; Singh, A B; Yadava, R B R

    2002-01-01

    A field experiment with groundnut as test crop was conducted to evaluate the manurial potential of three distillery effluents: raw spent wash (RSW), biomethanated spent wash (BSW) and lagoon sludge (LS) vis-à-vis recommended fertilizers (NPK + farm yard manure (FYM)) and a control (no fertilizer or distillery effluent). It was found that all the three distillery effluents increased total chlorophyll content, crop growth rate (CGR), total dry matter, nutrient uptake (N, P and K) and finally seed yield compared to the control but inhibited nodulation and decreased nitrogen fixation. Among the three distillery effluents, BSW produced the highest seed yield (619 kg ha(-1)) twice that of control (3.10 kg ha(-1)), followed by RSW (557 kg ha(-1)) and LS (472 kg ha(-1)). However, the distillery effluents did not influence protein and oil contents. It was concluded that these distillery effluents because of their high manurial potential could supply nutrients, particularly potassium, nitrogen and sulphur, to the crops and thus reduce the fertilizer requirement of crops. Nevertheless, the crop performance and yield with three distillery effluents were overall less than that produced by recommended NPK + FYM probably on account of failure of the effluents to supply balanced nutrition to the plants for achieving their potential growth capacity.

  16. Studies on nitrogen modified TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst prepared in different conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bubacz, K.; Choina, J.; Dolat, D.; Borowiak-Palen, E.; Moszynski, D.; Morawski, A.W.

    2010-09-15

    Nitrogen modified titania photocatalysts (TiO{sub 2}/N) were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area method. The presence of nitrogen in modified photocatalysts has been studied using FT-IR and XPS analyses. The influence of the calcination temperature in the range of 100-350 {sup o}C on nanocrystallite as well as particle size of the samples and their photocatalytic activity was investigated. The calcination of TiO{sub 2}/N samples caused a growth of the particle size and an increase of their crystallinity. TEM studies present changes of the diameter and shape of TiO{sub 2} particles and nanocrystallites. The XRD and the Raman response of the samples confirmed an increase of the crystallinity of the samples when annealed at higher temperatures. The photocatalytic activity of the modified photocatalysts was determined using the reaction of phenol decomposition. It was shown that phenol decomposition rate was greatly influenced by pH of the solution. The highest phenol degradation using all the modified samples was observed for pH 7.1 which is close to the PZC point established for pristine TiO{sub 2} at pH 6.8.

  17. Roles for redox regulation in leaf senescence of pea plants grown on different sources of nitrogen nutrition.

    PubMed

    Vanacker, H; Sandalio, Lm; Jiménez, A; Palma, J M; Corpas, F J; Meseguer, V; Gómez, M; Sevilla, F; Leterrier, M; Foyer, C H; del Río, L A

    2006-01-01

    Leaf senescence and associated changes in redox components were monitored in commercial pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Phoenix) plants grown under different nitrogen regimes for 12 weeks until both nodules and leaves had fully senesced. One group of plants was inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum and grown with nutrient solution without nitrogen. A second group was not inoculated and these were grown on complete nutrient solution containing nitrogen. Leaf senescence was evident at 11 weeks in both sets of plants as determined by decreases in leaf chlorophyll and protein. However, a marked decrease in photosynthesis was observed in nodulated plants at 9 weeks. Losses in the leaf ascorbate pool preceded leaf senescence, but leaf glutathione decreased only during the senescence phase. Large decreases in dehydroascorbate reductase and catalase activities were observed after 9 weeks, but the activities of other antioxidant enzymes remained high even at 11 weeks. The extent of lipid peroxidation, the number of protein carbonyl groups and the level of H(2)O(2) in the leaves of both nitrate-fed and nodulated plants were highest at the later stages of senescence. At 12 weeks, the leaves of nodulated plants had more protein carbonyl groups and greater lipid peroxidation than the nitrate-fed controls. These results demonstrate that the leaves of nodulated plants undergo an earlier inhibition of photosynthesis and suffer enhanced oxidation during the senescence phase than those from nitrate-fed plants.

  18. Food contact surfaces coated with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide: effect on Listeria monocytogenes survival under different light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Teixeira, P.; Tavares, C. J.; Azeredo, J.

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of food safety is a very important issue, and is on the basis of production and application of new/modified food contact surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and, more recently, nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (N-TiO2) coatings are among the possible forms to enhance food contact surfaces performance in terms of higher hygiene and easier sanitation. In this context, the present work aimed at evaluating the bactericidal activity of an N-TiO2 coating on glass and stainless steel under two different sources of visible light - fluorescent and incandescent - and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Listeria monocytogenes was chosen as representative of major foodborne pathogens and its survival was tested on N-TiO2 coated coupons. In terms of survival percentage, good results were obtained after exposure of coated surfaces to all light types since, apart from the value obtained after exposing glass to fluorescent light (56.3%), survival rates were always below 50%. However, no effective disinfection was obtained, given that for a disinfectant or sanitizing agent to be claimed as effective it needs to be able to promote at least a 3-log reduction of the microbial load, which was not observed for any of the experimental conditions assessed. Even so, UV irradiation was the most successful on eliminating cells on coated surfaces, since the amount of bacteria was reduced to 1.49 × 106 CFU/ml on glass and 2.37 × 107 on stainless steel. In contrast, both visible light sources had only slightly decreased the amount of viable cells, which remained in the range of 8 log CFU/ml. Hence, although some bactericidal effect was accomplished under visible light, UV was the most effective light source on promoting photocatalytic reactions on N-TiO2 coated coupons and none of the experimental conditions have reached a satisfactory disinfection level. Thus, this surface coating needs further research and improvement in order to become truly effective against foodborne pathogens and

  19. Different irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer treatments on some agro-physiologic traits in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Mashallah; Sarvestani, Zeinalaabdine Tahmasebi; Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad Modarres

    2008-06-15

    In order to investigate the effect of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer on agronomical and physiological traits of two winter rapeseed varieties, an experiment was established in a randomized complete block design as split-plot factorial arrangement with four replications in 2005-2006 at Agricultural Research Station of Khorramabad, Iran. Irrigation as main-plot factor consisted of four levels (I60, I90, I120 and I150). Sub-plot factors included nitrogen in four levels (N0, N70, N140, and N210 kg N ha(-1)) and two varieties (Zarfam and SLM046). Thousand-seed weight (TSW) in all irrigation and nitrogen levels was lower in the 2006 than that of the 2005. Seed oil percentage (SOP) was decreased with increasing water use only in second year. As nitrogen rate increased, SOP decreased and seed oil yield (SOY) increased in the 2006 significantly (p < 0.05). With increasing water supply, SOY increased in first year. Zarfam variety had a higher TSW and SOP in both years. According to combined analysis results, seed and oil yield were not significantly affected by irrigation treatments and rapeseed varieties. Seed yield had not significant difference between 70 to 210 kg N ha(-1) treatments. Both Water Use Efficiency (WUE) and dry matter remobilization efficiency (DMRE) were increased by decreasing water supply in I90 to I150 treatments. But N0 and N210 resulted in the lowest WUE and DMRE, respectively. Considering all traits, the first year of experiment was better than second year. The irrigation x variety interaction had a significant (p < 0.01) effect on seed yield and WUE. Generally, I150N70V1 combination is recommended in the region of the study due to high performance in production of seed and oil yield.

  20. Nitrogen isotope variations in camphor (Cinnamomum Camphora) leaves of different ages in upper and lower canopies as an indicator of atmospheric nitrogen sources.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua-Yun; Wu, Liang-Hong; Zhu, Ren-Guo; Wang, Yan-Li; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2011-02-01

    Nitrogen isotopic composition of new, middle-aged and old camphor leaves in upper and lower canopies has been determined in a living area, near a motorway and near an industrial area (Jiangan Chemical Fertilizer Plant). We found that at sites near roads, more positive δ(15)N values were observed in the camphor leaves, especially in old leaves of upper canopies, and ∆δ(15)N=δ(15)N(upper)-δ(15)N(lower)>0, while those near the industrial area had more negative δ(15)N values and ∆δ(15)N<0. These could be explained by two isotopically different atmospheric N sources: greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of atmospheric NO(x) by old leaves in upper canopies at sites adjacent to roads, and greater uptake of (15)N-depleted NH(y) in atmospheric deposition by leaves at sites near the industrial area. This study presents novel evidence that (15)N natural abundance of camphor leaves can be used as a robust indicator of atmospheric N sources.

  1. Effect of different nitrogenous nutrients on the cadmium hyperaccumulation efficiency of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Ji, Dandan; Twardowska, Irena; Li, Yunmeng; Zhu, Jiangong

    2015-02-01

    This experiment was used to explore whether the 11 nitrogenous nutrients affect the hyperaccumulation of Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell. to Cd. Pot culture experiments using soil spiked with Cd as CdCl2·2.5H2O and 11 nitrogen-containing chemicals were conducted to determine the efficiency of the accumulation of Cd by R. globosa. Application of all 11 nitrogenous nutrients significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced Cd accumulation by R. globosa (Turcz.) Thell. Two major modes of Cd accumulation were observed: (i) through increase of biomass yield without reduction of Cd uptake and (ii) through increase of Cd uptake efficiency in parallel with increase of biomass yield. Bicarbonate > phosphate > chloride compounds of NH4 enhanced the biomass yield to the greatest extent, while oxalate > nitrate > chloride > and bicarbonate caused a significant increase of Cd uptake by R. globosa. Competition between N and Cd translocation caused either significant reduction of Cd translocation factor or decrease of biomass yield. Of studied nutrients, ammonium bicarbonate NH4HCO3 and ammonium chloride NH4Cl exerted the best joint effect of these two processes on the efficiency of R. globosa as a Cd hyperaccumulator. Application of these chemicals caused increase of Cd concentrations in roots of R. globosa by 35.1 and 41.1 %, and in shoots by 13.9 and 56.4 %, while biomasses of roots increased by 5.8- and 3.8-fold and in shoots by 7.4-fold, and 6.4-fold, respectively, compared to the control. As a result, accumulated load (μg pot(-1)) of Cd in roots increased by 8.2- and 5.8-fold and in shoots by 8.6- and 10.6-fold in both pots. Consequently, chemicals (NH4HCO3 and NH4Cl) that enhanced both Cd enrichment and biomass yield had the greatest effect on the bioaccumulation capacity of R. globosa.

  2. Modeling the carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: Mycorrhizal trade-offs and multipath resistance uptake improve predictions of retranslocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Phillips, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate projections of the future land carbon (C) sink by terrestrial biosphere models depend on how nutrient constraints on net primary production are represented. While nutrient limitation is nearly universal, current models do not have a C cost for plant nutrient acquisition. Also missing are symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, which can consume up to 20% of net primary production and supply up to 50% of a plant's nitrogen (N) uptake. Here we integrate simultaneous uptake and mycorrhizae into a cutting-edge plant N model—Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN)—that can be coupled into terrestrial biosphere models. The C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type, with plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae benefiting when N is relatively abundant and plants that support ectomycorrhizae benefiting when N is strongly limiting. Across six temperate forested sites (representing arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated stands and 176 site years), including multipath resistance improved the partitioning of N uptake between aboveground and belowground sources. Integrating mycorrhizae led to further improvements in predictions of N uptake from soil (R2 = 0.69 increased to R2 = 0.96) and from senescing leaves (R2 = 0.29 increased to R2 = 0.73) relative to the original model. On average, 5% and 9% of net primary production in arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests, respectively, was needed to support mycorrhizal-mediated acquisition of N. To the extent that resource constraints to net primary production are governed by similar trade-offs across all terrestrial ecosystems, integrating these improvements to FUN into terrestrial biosphere models should enhance predictions of the future land C sink.

  3. Improving municipal wastewater nitrogen and phosphorous removal by feeding sludge fermentation products to sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yue; Liu, Jinjin; Ma, Bin; Liu, Ye; Wang, Bo; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a novel strategy to improve the removal efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus from municipal wastewater by feeding sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with sludge alkaline fermentation products as carbon sources. The performances of two SBRs treating municipal wastewater (one was fed with sludge fermentation products; F-SBR, and the other without sludge fermentation products; B-SBR) were compared. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) and phosphorus (PO4(3-)-P) were found to be 82.9% and 96.0% in F-SBR, while the corresponding values in B-SBR were 55.9% (TN) and -6.1% (PO4(3-)-P). Illumina MiSeq sequencing indicated that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonadaceae and Nitrosomonas) and denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organisms (Dechloromonas) were enriched in F-SBR, which resulted in NO2(-)-N accumulation and denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite (DPRN). Moreover, feeding of sludge fermentation products reduced 862.1mg VSS/d of sludge in the F-SBR system (volume: 10L). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metagenomic Analysis of Some Potential Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria in Arable Soils at Different Formation Processes.

    PubMed

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Kuźniar, Agnieszka; Zielenkiewicz, Urszula; Banach, Artur; Izak, Dariusz; Stępniewska, Zofia; Błaszczyk, Mieczysław

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the study was to determine the diversity of the potential nitrogen-fixing (PNF) bacteria inhabiting agricultural (A) soils versus wastelands serving as controls (C). The soils were classified into three groups based on the formation process: autogenic soils (Albic Luvisols, Brunic Arenosols, Haplic Phaeozem) formed on loess material, hydrogenic soils (Mollic Gleysols, Eutric Fluvisol, Eutric Histosol) formed under the effect of stagnant water and lithogenic soils (Rendzina Leptosols) formed on limestone. In order to determine the preferable conditions for PNF bacteria, the relationships between the soil chemical features and bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were tested. Additionally, the nitrogen content and fertilisation requirement of the lithogenic (LG), autogenic (AG) and hydrogenic (HG) soils were discussed. The composition of the bacterial communities was analysed with the next-generation sequencing (NGS) by the Ion Torrent™ technology. The sequences were clustered into OTU based on a 99 % similarity threshold. The arable soils tested were distinctly dominated by β-Proteobacteria representatives of PNF bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia. Bacteria from the α-Proteobacteria class and Devosia genus were subdominants. A free-living Cyanobacteria population dominated in A rather than in C soils. We have found that both soil agricultural management and soil formation processes are the most conducive factors for PNF bacteria, as a majority of these microorganisms inhabit the AG group of soils, whilst the LG soils with the lowest abundance of PNF bacteria revealed the need for additional mineral fertilisation. Our studies have also indicated that there are close relationships between soil classification with respect to soil formation processes and PNF bacteria preference for occupation of soil niches.

  5. Ruminal fermentation characteristics and microbial nitrogen assimilation in sheep fed differently composed grass silages.

    PubMed

    Seip, Katharina; Breves, Gerhard; Isselstein, Johannes; Daş, Gürbüz; Abel, Hansjörg

    2012-06-01

    The investigation aimed at examining if the composition of grassland silage affects the microbial nitrogen assimilation in the rumen of sheep. The silages were made of vegetative summer re-growths consisting of 48% grasses, 28% legumes and 24% other forbs (GCF) or of pure grass (G). Silage GCF contained more intermediately degradable non-structural and less slowly degradable carbohydrates, more crude protein (CP), a narrower ratio between slow and very slow degradable nitrogen (N), and exhibited higher in situ degradability of organic matter and CP than Silage G. Four adult wethers equipped with rumen fistulae were used in a two factorial trial. Feed was offered either as silage alone or as a mixture of silage and barley (60:40). Microbial N was estimated using continuous intraruminal 15N infusion and measurement of 15N-enrichment in microbes isolated from rumen liquor samples. With the exception of trends for ruminal butyrate concentrations, no interactions were detected between silage and barley feeding. Sheep receiving Silage GCF exhibited larger diurnal fluctuations of ammonia, and produced more microbial N (p < 0.05) than sheep on Silage G. Feeding the silages with barley decreased ruminal pH and elevated the concentrations of butyrate (p < 0.05). The 15N incorporation into microbial N was reduced by barley feeding (p < 0.05) along with a trend to accelerated rumen fluid turnover, resulting in similar microbial N yields as found in sheep receiving silage without barley. It is concluded that the larger and better balanced amounts of intermediately degradable carbohydrate- and N-containing fractions favoured the ruminal microbial protein synthesis in sheep consuming Silage GCF instead of Silage G.

  6. Differences in wetland nitrogen cycling between the invasive grass Microstegium vimineum and a diverse plant community.

    PubMed

    DeMeester, Julie E; DeB Richter, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    Wetlands are valuable for buffering waterways from excess nitrogen, yet these habitats are often dominated by invasive plant species. There is little understanding as to how various invasive species alter ecosystem nitrogen cycling, especially if one invasive overtakes an entire community of plants. Microstegium vimineum is a nonnative annual grass from Asia that is dominating riparian wetlands in the southeastern United States. To evaluate M. vimineum impacts on the N cycle, we used six paired plots, one invaded by M. vimineum and the other carefully weeded of M. vimineum; removal allowed the establishment of a diverse plant community consisting of Polygonum, Juncus, and Carex species. In the paired plots, we estimated (1) N uptake and accumulation in vegetation biomass, (2) rates of decomposition and N release from plant detritus, (3) mineral soil N mineralization and nitrification, (4) root zone redox potential, and (5) soil water concentrations of inorganic N. The M. vimineum community accumulated approximately half the annual N biomass of the diverse community, 5.04 vs. 9.36 g N x m(-2) x yr(-1), respectively (P = 0.05). Decomposition and release of N from M. vimineum detritus was much less than in the diverse community, 1.19 vs. 5.24 g N x m(-2) x yr(-1). Significantly higher inorganic soil N persisted beneath M. vimineum during the dormant season, although rates of soil N mineralization estimated by in situ incubations were relatively similar in all plots. Microstegium vimineum invasion thus appears to greatly diminish within-ecosystem circulation of N through the understory plants of these wetlands, whereas invasion effects on ecosystem N losses may derive more from enhanced denitrification (due to lower redox potential under M. vimineum plots) than due to leaching. Microstegium vimineum's dominance and yet slower internal cycling of N are counterintuitive to conventional thinking that ecosystems with high N contain vegetation that quickly uptake and

  7. Planktonic and biofilm-grown nitrogen-cycling bacteria exhibit different susceptibilities to copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vincent C; Opot, Stephen O; Mahendra, Shaily

    2015-04-01

    Proper characterization of nanoparticle (NP) interactions with environmentally relevant bacteria under representative conditions is necessary to enable their sustainable manufacture, use, and disposal. Previous nanotoxicology research based on planktonic growth has not adequately explored biofilms, which serve as the predominant mode of bacterial growth in natural and engineered environments. Copper nanoparticle (Cu-NP) impacts on biofilms were compared with respective planktonic cultures of the ammonium-oxidizing Nitrosomonas europaea, nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter vinelandii, and denitrifying Paracoccus denitrificans using a suite of independent toxicity diagnostics. Median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for Cu-NPs were lower in N. europaea biofilms (19.6 ± 15.3 mg/L) than in planktonic cells (49.0 ± 8.0 mg/L). However, in absorbance-based growth assays, compared with unexposed controls, N. europaea growth rates in biofilms were twice as resilient to inhibition than those in planktonic cultures. Similarly, relative to unexposed controls, growth rates and yields of P. denitrificans in biofilms exposed to Cu-NPs were 40-fold to 50-fold less inhibited than those in planktonic cells. Physiological evaluation of ammonium oxidation and nitrate reduction suggested that biofilms were also less inhibited by Cu-NPs than planktonic cells. Furthermore, functional gene expression for ammonium oxidation (amoA) and nitrite reduction (nirK) showed lower inhibition by NPs in biofilms relative to planktonic-grown cells. These results suggest that biofilms mitigate NP impacts, and that nitrogen-cycling bacteria in wastewater, wetlands, and soils might be more resilient to NPs than planktonic-based assessments suggest.

  8. Enhanced expression of Rhizobium etli cbb₃ oxidase improves drought tolerance of common bean symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Talbi, C; Sánchez, C; Hidalgo-Garcia, A; González, E M; Arrese-Igor, C; Girard, L; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the involvement of Rhizobium etli cbb(3) oxidase in the response of Phaseolus vulgaris to drought, common bean plants were inoculated with the R. etli strain, CFNX713, overexpressing this oxidase in bacteroids (cbb(3)(+)) and subjected to drought conditions. The negative effect of drought on plant and nodule dryweight, nitrogen content, and nodule functionality was more pronounced in plants inoculated with the wild-type (WT) strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Regardless of the plant treatment, bacteroids produced by the cbb(3)(+) strain showed higher respiratory capacity than those produced by the WT strain. Inoculation of plants with the cbb(3)(+) strain alleviated the negative effect of a moderate drought on the respiratory capacity of bacteroids and the energy charge of the nodules. Expression of the FixP and FixO components of the cbb(3) oxidase was higher in bacteroids of the cbb(3)(+) strain than in those of the WT strain under all experimental conditions. The decline in sucrose synthase activity and the decrease in dicarboxylic acids provoked by moderate drought stress were more pronounced in nodules from plants inoculated with the WT strain than in those inoculated with the cbb(3)(+) strain. Taken together, these results suggest that inoculation of plants with a R. etli strain having enhanced expression of cbb(3) oxidase in bacteroids reduces the sensitivity of P. vulgaris-R. etli symbiosis to drought and can modulate carbon metabolism in nodules.

  9. Glutamine Supplementation of Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Improve Intestinal Permeability, Nitrogen Balance, or Outcome in Newborns and Infants Undergoing Digestive-Tract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Hazebroek, Frans W. J.; Mourik, Marjan; Borsboom, Gerard J. J. M.; Rietveld, Trinet; Huijmans, Jan G. M.; Tibboel, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of isocaloric isonitrogenous parenteral glutamine supplementation on intestinal permeability and nitrogen loss in newborns and infants after major digestive-tract surgery. Summary Background Data: Glutamine supplementation in critically ill and surgical adults may normalize intestinal permeability, attenuate nitrogen loss, improve survival, and lower the incidence of nosocomial infections. Previous studies in critically ill children were limited to very-low-birthweight infants and had equivocal results. Methods: Eighty newborns and infants were included in a double-blind, randomized trial comparing standard parenteral nutrition (sPN; n = 39) to glutamine-supplemented parenteral nutrition (GlnPN; glutamine target intake, 0.4 g kg−1 day−1; n = 41), starting on day 2 after major digestive-tract surgery. Primary endpoints were intestinal permeability, as assessed by the urinary excretion ratio of lactulose and rhamnose (weeks 1 through 4); nitrogen balance (days 4 through 6), and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion (day 5). Secondary endpoints were mortality, length of stay in the ICU and the hospital, number of septic episodes, and usage of antibiotics and ICU resources. Results: Glutamine intake plateaued at 90% of the target on day 4. No differences were found between patients assigned sPN and patients assigned GlnPN regarding any of the endpoints. Glutamine supplementation was not associated with adverse effects. Conclusions: In newborns and infants after major digestive-tract surgery, we did not identify beneficial effects of isonitrogenous, isocaloric glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Glutamine supplementation in these patients therefore is not warranted until further research proves otherwise. PMID:15798461

  10. Free amino acid concentrations and nitrogen isotope signatures in Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles of different ages for indicating atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Xiao, Huayun

    2017-02-01

    Free amino acid concentrations and nitrogen (N) isotopic composition in new current-year (new), mature current-year (middle-aged) and previous-year (old) Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.) needles were determined to indicate atmospheric N deposition in Guiyang (SW China). In different areas, free amino acids (especially arginine) concentrations in new and middle-aged needles were higher than in old needles, and the variation of free amino acids (especially arginine) concentrations in new and middle-aged needles was also greater than in old needles. This indicate that free amino acids in new and middle-aged needles may be more sensitive to N deposition compared to old needles. Moreover, concentrations of total free amino acids, arginine, histidine, γ-aminobutyric acid and alanine in middle-aged needles exhibited a strong relationship with N deposition (P < 0.05). Needle δ(15)N values showed a strong gradient from central Guiyang to the rural area, with more positive δ(15)N (especially in old needles) in the city center (0-5 km) and more negative δ(15)N (especially in old needles) in rural area (30-35 km). These suggest that N deposition in the urban center may be dominated by (15)N-enriched NOx-N from traffic exhausts, while it is dominated by isotopically light atmospheric NHx-N from agriculture in rural area. Soil δ(15)N decreased slightly with distance from the city center, and the difference in δ(15)N values between the soil and needles (especially for old needles) increased significantly with the distance gradient, indicating that atmospheric N deposition may be an important N source for needles. This study provides novel evidence that free amino acids in needles and age-dependent needle δ(15)N values are useful indicators of atmospheric N deposition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Researching ways to improve nitrogen-use efficiency on dairies through the use of condensed tannin-containing forages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A high proportion of protein in forages can be lost at two major points in the dairy farming nitrogen cycle: during the ensiling process and during rumen digestion. The formation of non-protein nitrogen (NPN) during these processes contributes to a reduction in nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), resulti...

  12. Propionate supplementation improves nitrogen use by reducing urea flux in sheep.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, U; Hu, Q; Bequette, B J

    2015-10-01

    experiments. In Exp. 1, glucose entry and gluconeogenesis were greater ( < 0.05) and plasma glucose tended ( < 0.1) to be greater with sodium propionate infusion than with sodium acetate infusion, but there was no difference in Cori cycling. In Exp. 2, glucose entry, gluconeogenesis, Cori cycling, and plasma glucose increased ( < 0.05) with dietary propionate. Our studies indicate that propionate inclusion in feed, but not continuous infusion in to the rumen, improves N utilization in growing sheep. The propionate effect is likely mediated by providing additional precursors for gluconeogenesis.

  13. Improved Flaw Detection and Characterization with Difference Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Howell, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites is often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, variations in fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These variations result in a noise floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. The paper investigates comparing thermographic responses taken before and after a change in state in a composite to improve the detection of subsurface flaws. A method is presented for registration of the responses before finding the difference. A significant improvement in the detectability is achieved by comparing the differences in response. Examples of changes in state due to application of a load and impact are presented.

  14. Elevated temperature differently affects foliar nitrogen partitioning in seedlings of diverse Douglas fir provenances.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoguo; Jansen, Kirstin; Junker, Laura Verena; Eiblmeier, Monika; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change causes an increase in ambient air temperature, a major environmental factor influencing plant physiology and growth that already has been perceived at the regional scale and is expected to become even more severe in the future. In the present study, we investigated the effect of elevated ambient air temperature on the nitrogen metabolism of two interior provenances of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) originating from contrasting habitats, namely the provenances Monte Creek (MC) from a drier environment and Pend Oreille (PO) from a more humid environment. Three- to four-year-old seedlings of the two provenances were grown for 3 months in controlled environments under either control temperature (day 20 °C, night 15 °C) or high temperature (HT, 30/25 °C) conditions. Total nitrogen (N), soluble protein, chlorophyll and total amino acid (TAA) contents as well as individual amino acid concentrations were determined in both current-year and previous-year needles. Our results show that the foliar total N contents of the two provenances were unaffected by HT. Arginine, lysine, proline, glutamate and glutamine were the most abundant amino acids, which together contributed ∼88% to the TAA pool of current- and previous-year needles. High temperature decreased the contents of most amino acids of the glutamate family (i.e., arginine, proline, ornithine and glutamine) in current-year needles. However, HT did not affect the concentrations of metabolites related to the photorespiratory pathway, such as [Formula: see text], glycine and serine. In general, current-year needles were considerably more sensitive to HT than previous-year needles. Moreover, provenance PO originating from a mesic environment showed stronger responses to HT than provenance MC. Our results indicate provenance-specific plasticity in the response of Douglas fir to growth temperature. Provenance-specific effects of elevated temperature on N-use efficiency suggest

  15. Feed ingredients differing in fermentable fibre and indigestible protein content affect fermentation metabolites and faecal nitrogen excretion in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Jha, R; Leterme, P

    2012-04-01

    To study the fermentation characteristics of different non-conventional dietary fibre (DF) sources with varying levels of indigestible CP content and their effects on the production of fermentation metabolites and on faecal nitrogen (N) excretion, an experiment was conducted with 40 growing pigs (initial BW 23 kg) using wheat bran (WB), pea hulls (PH), pea inner fibres (PIF), sugar beet pulp (SBP) or corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The diets also contained soya protein isolate, pea starch and sucrose, and were supplemented with vitamin-mineral premix. Faecal samples were collected for 3 consecutive days from day 10, fed with added indigestible marker (chromic oxide) for 3 days from day 13 and pigs were slaughtered on day 16 from the beginning of the experiment. Digesta from the ileum and colon were collected and analysed for short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and ammonia (NH3) content. The apparent total tract N digestibility was the lowest (P < 0.001) in diets based on DDGS (74%), medium in diets with WB and SBP (76% each) and highest in those with PIF and PH (79% and 81%, respectively). Expressed per kg fermented non-starch polysaccharides (NSP), faecal N excretion was higher with DDGS and WB diets (130 and 113 g/kg NSP fermented, respectively) and lower with PIF, PH and SBP diets (42, 52 and 55 g/kg NSP fermented, respectively). The PH-based diets had the highest (P < 0.05) SCFA concentrations, both in the ileum and the colon (27 and 122 mMol/kg digesta, respectively). The highest NH3 concentration was also found in the colon of pigs fed with PH (132 mMol/kg digesta). Loading plot of principle component analysis revealed that the CP : NSP ratio was positively related with faecal N excretion and NH3 concentration in colon contents, whereas negatively related with SCFA concentration in colon contents. In conclusion, pea fibres and SBP increased SCFA and reduced NH3 concentration in the pig's intestine and reduced faecal N excretion, which makes pea

  16. [Effects of different vegetation restoration patterns on the diversity of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes in Hulunbeier sandy land, Inner Mongolia of North China].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Li-Juan; Li, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Jiang; Zhang, Hai-Fang; Song, Xiao-Long; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-06-01

    By using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and sequence analysis, this paper studied the nifH gene diversity and community structure of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes in Hulunbeier sandy land of Inner Mongolia under four years management of five vegetation restoration modes, i. e., mixed-planting of Agropyron cristatum, Hedysarum fruticosum, Caragana korshinskii, and Elymus nutans (ACHE) and of Agropyron cristatum and Hedysarum fruticosum (AC), and mono-planting of Caragana korshinskii (UC), Agropyron cristatum (UA), and Hedysarum fruticosum (UH), taking the bare land as the control (CK). There existed significant differences in the community composition of nitrogen-fixing microbes among the five vegetation restoration patterns. The Shannon index of the nifH gene was the highest under ACHE, followed by under AC, UC, UA, and UH, and the lowest in CK. Except that UH and CK had less difference in the Shannon index, the other four vegetation restoration modes had a significantly higher Shannon index than CK (P < 0.05). The phylogenetic analysis showed that the soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under UA, UH, and UC were mainly of cyanobacteria, but the soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under AC and ACHE changed obviously, mainly of proteobacteria, and also of cyanobacteria. The canonical correlation analysis showed that the soil total phosphorus, available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen contents under the five vegetation restoration modes had significant effects on the nitrogen-fixing microbial communities, and there existed significant correlations among the soil total phosphorus, available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and nitrate nitrogen. It was suggested that the variations of the community composition of soil nitrogen-fixing microbes under the five vegetation restoration modes were resulted from the interactive and combined effects of the soil physical and chemical factors.

  17. Improvements in the profiles and distributions of nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide with the LIMS version 6 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, E.; Natarajan, M.; Marshall, T.; Gordley, L. L.; Thompson, R. E.; Lingenfelser, G.

    2010-02-01

    The quality of the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) nitric acid (HNO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) profiles and distributions of 1978/1979 is described after their processing with an updated, Version 6 (V6) algorithm and subsequent archival in 2002. Estimates of the precision and accuracy of both of those species are developed and provided herein. The character of the V6 HNO3 profiles is relatively unchanged from that of the earlier LIMS Version 5 (V5) profiles, except in the upper stratosphere where the interfering effects of CO2 are accounted for better with V6. The accuracy of the retrieved V6 NO2 is also significantly better in the middle and upper stratosphere, due to improvements in its spectral line parameters and in the reduced biases for the accompanying V6 temperature and water vapor profiles. As a result of these important updates, there is better agreement with theoretical calculations for profiles of the HNO3/NO2 ratio, day-to-night NO2 ratio, and with estimates of the production of NO2 in the mesosphere and its descent to the upper stratosphere during polar night. The improved precisions and more frequent retrievals of the profiles along the LIMS orbit tracks provide for better continuity and detail in map analyses of these two species on pressure surfaces. It is judged that the chemical effects of the oxides of nitrogen on ozone can be examined quantitatively throughout the stratosphere with the LIMS V6 data, and that the findings will be more compatible with those obtained from measurements of the same species from subsequent satellite sensors.

  18. Improvements in the profiles and distributions of nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide with the LIMS version 6 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, E.; Natarajan, M.; Marshall, B. T.; Gordley, L. L.; Thompson, R. E.; Lingenfelser, G.

    2010-05-01

    The quality of the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) nitric acid (HNO3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) profiles and distributions of 1978/1979 are described after their processing with an updated, Version 6 (V6) algorithm and subsequent archival in 2002. Estimates of the precision and accuracy of both of those species are developed and provided herein. The character of the V6 HNO3 profiles is relatively unchanged from that of the earlier LIMS Version 5 (V5) profiles, except in the upper stratosphere where the interfering effects of CO2 are accounted for better with V6. The accuracy of the retrieved V6 NO2 is also significantly better in the middle and upper stratosphere, due to improvements in its spectral line parameters and in the reduced biases for the accompanying V6 temperature and water vapor profiles. As a result of these important updates, there is better agreement with theoretical calculations for profiles of the HNO3/NO2 ratio, day-to-night NO2 ratio, and with estimates of the production of NO2 in the mesosphere and its descent to the upper stratosphere during polar night. In particular, the findings for middle and upper stratospheric NO2 should also be more compatible with those obtained from more recent satellite sensors because the effects of the spin-splitting of the NO2 lines are accounted for now with the LIMS V6 algorithm. The improved precisions and more frequent retrievals of the LIMS profiles along their orbit tracks provide for better continuity and detail in map analyses of these two species on pressure surfaces. It is judged that the chemical effects of the oxides of nitrogen on ozone can be studied quantitatively throughout the stratosphere with the LIMS V6 data.

  19. [Effect of different volume loading of aerobic/anaerobic zone on nitrogen and phosphorus removal by biofilm and granular sludge coupling process].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Liu, Chang; Gao, Hui; Gao, Da-Wen

    2014-05-01

    The effect of different aerobic/anaerobic zone volume loading on nitrogen and phosphorus removal by biological film and granular coupling process was investigated using a self-designed Biofilm/Granular sludge coupling reactor. Three operating modes were conducted in the experiment. In operating mode I ,the volume of aerobic zone was 9. 66 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 15. 34 L. In operating mode II , the volume of aerobic zone was 12. 56 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 12. 44 L. In operating mode III , the volume of aerobic zone was 15.42 L, and the volume of anaerobic zone was 9.58 L. Three operating modes expressed different volume loading of the reactor because of different aerobic/anaerobic zone. The results showed that the performance of ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus removal was a bit poor in operating mode I , the effluent nitrate nitrogen was higher in operating mode III compared with other modes, which brought the total nitrogen removal efficiency lower. The operating mode II was optimal for nitrogen and phosphorus removal. In operating mode II , the ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency was about 80. 63% , the volume loading rate of nitrogen removal was about 150. 27 g(m3 d)-1, and the COD removal efficiency was higher than 83.24%; the amounts of phosphorus release and uptake under anaerobic conditions were 7. 23 mg L-1 and 11. 93 mg L-1.

  20. Reducing nitrogen runoff from paddy fields with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi under different fertilizer regimes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Xue; Fu, Dafang

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) runoff from paddy fields serves as one of the main sources of water pollution. Our aim was to reduce N runoff from paddy fields by fertilizer management and inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). In northeast China, Shuangcheng city in Heilongjiang province, a field experiment was conducted, using rice provided with 0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of the local norm of fertilization (including N, phosphorus and potassium), with or without inoculation with Glomus mosseae. The volume, concentrations of total N (TN), dissolved N (DN) and particulate N (PN) of runoff water were measured. We found that the local norm of fertilization led to 18.9kg/ha of N runoff during rice growing season, with DN accounting for 60%-70%. We also found that reduction in fertilization by 20% cut down TN runoff by 8.2% while AMF inoculation decreased N runoff at each fertilizer level and this effect was inhibited by high fertilization. The combination of inoculation with AMF and 80% of the local norm of fertilization was observed to reduce N runoff by 27.2%. Conclusively, we suggested that the contribution of AMF inoculation combined with decreasing fertilization should get more attention to slow down water eutrophication by reducing N runoff from paddy fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Deposition of ammonium and nitrate in the roots of maize seedlings supplied with different nitrogen salts

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Arnold J.; Randall, Lesley; Taylor, Alison R.; Silk, Wendy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study measured total osmolarity and concentrations of NH4+, NO3–, K+, soluble carbohydrates, and organic acids in maize seminal roots as a function of distance from the apex, and NH4+ and NO3– in xylem sap for plants receiving NH4+ or NO3– as a sole N-source, NH4+ plus NO3–, or no nitrogen at all. The disparity between net deposition rates and net exogenous influx of NH4+ indicated that growing cells imported NH4+ from more mature tissue, whereas more mature root tissues assimilated or translocated a portion of the NH4+ absorbed. Net root NO3– influx under Ca(NO3)2 nutrition was adequate to account for pools found in the growth zone and provided twice as much as was deposited locally throughout the non-growing tissue. In contrast, net root NO3– influx under NH4NO3 was less than the local deposition rate in the growth zone, indicating that additional NO3– was imported or metabolically produced. The profile of NO3– deposition rate in the growth zone, however, was similar for the plants receiving Ca(NO3)2 or NH4NO3. These results suggest that NO3– may serve a major role as an osmoticant for supporting root elongation in the basal part of the growth zone and maintaining root function in the young mature tissues. PMID:22213811

  2. [Effects of Colletotrichum higginsianum infection on endogenous hormones in Brassica parachinensis leaves under different nitrogen nutrition].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xian; Chen, Xiaoyan

    2005-05-01

    This paper studied the effects of Colletotrichum higginsianum infection on the ethylene production and the contents of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in leaves of flowering Chinese cabbage (Brassica parachinensis) under six levels of nitrogen (N) nutrition, and their relations to disease-resistance. The results showed that the ethylene production in all N treatments had a mono-peak curve change, and reached the maximum 4-6 days after inoculation. In comparing with high N or non-N treatment, medium or low N treatment could inhibit ethylene production and ABA synthesis, and keep ethylene and ABA stable in Colletotrichum higginsianum-inoculated plants. The IAA content in medium or low N treatment increased gradually, while that in high N or non-N treatment had a mono-peak curve change, and reached the maximum 4-6 days after inoculation. The IAA content in medium or low N treatment increased more with inoculation time, indicating that there was a close relationship among N nutrition, endogenous hormones and anthracnose. It is important for plants' disease-resistance to keep the balance of endogenous hormones.

  3. Indoor-outdoor relationships of particulate matter and nitrogen oxides under different outdoor meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Andy T.

    Respirable suspended particulate matter and nitrogen oxides concentrations were measured inside and outside a student office in an urban location during a 9-month period. Direct reading tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) instruments and passive sampling techniques were used to provide indoor and outdoor hourly averages of the two pollutants during the sampling period. The variations and correlations of the pollutant concentrations and the indoor-outdoor (IO) ratio against various outdoor meteorological factors, namely temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed and solar irradiation were studied. Using a data-mining procedure, suitable sets of data were amassed and grouped together to study the effect of these individual weather parameters on t