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Sample records for improved temperature stability

  1. Thermoelectric refrigerator having improved temperature stabilization means

    DOEpatents

    Falco, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    A control system for thermoelectric refrigerators is disclosed. The thermoelectric refrigerator includes at least one thermoelectric element that undergoes a first order change at a predetermined critical temperature. The element functions as a thermoelectric refrigerator element above the critical temperature, but discontinuously ceases to function as a thermoelectric refrigerator element below the critical temperature. One example of such an arrangement includes thermoelectric refrigerator elements which are superconductors. The transition temperature of one of the superconductor elements is selected as the temperature control point of the refrigerator. When the refrigerator attempts to cool below the point, the metals become superconductors losing their ability to perform as a thermoelectric refrigerator. An extremely accurate, first-order control is realized.

  2. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of waveguide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  3. Improvements in X-band transmitter phase stability through Klystron body temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the techniques used and experimental results obtained in improving transmitter stability by control of the klystron body temperature. Related work in the measurement of klystron phase control parameters (pushing factors) is also discussed. The contribution of wave guide temperature excursions to uplink phase stability is presented. Suggestions are made as to the direction of future work in this area.

  4. Precision capacitor has improved temperature and operational stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookshier, W. K.; Lewis, R. N.

    1967-01-01

    Vacuum dielectric capacitor is fabricated from materials with very low temperature coefficients of expansion. This precision capacitor in the 1000-2000 picofarad range has a near-zero temperature coefficient of capacitance, eliminates ion chamber action caused by air ionization in the dielectric, and minimizes electromagnetic field charging effects.

  5. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  6. A facile approach to enhance the high temperature stability of magnetite nanoparticles with improved magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of Zn2+ doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties, blocking and Curie temperatures, and the high temperature phase stability of magnetite nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. The Zn2+ doped nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6) are prepared by simple co-precipitation technique and are characterized by high temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HTXRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. Our HTXRD studies show that the decomposition temperature of pure magnetite (Fe3O4) in vacuum is increased by 300 °C (from 700 to 1000 °C), with 0.2 fraction of Zn2+ doping. The DSC studies under air environment also show that the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature increases with the zinc fraction. The increase in transition temperature is attributed to the increase in the activation energy of the maghemite to hematite phase transition after the replacement of Fe3+ with larger diameter Zn2+ in the A site. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization increases from 61 to 69 emu/g upon 0.2 fraction of Zn2+, which augments the utility of the doped compound for practical applications. While the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping concentration, the blocking temperature shows an opposite trend. The blocking temperature values were found to be 262, 196, 144, and 153 K for 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 fraction of zinc, respectively. The reduction in TB is attributed to weak dipole-dipole interactions and local exchange coupling between nanoparticles. All the Zn2+ doped samples show superparamagnetic nature. These findings are extremely useful in producing superparamagnetic nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for high temperature applications.

  7. Bio-lubricants derived from waste cooking oil with improved oxidation stability and low-temperature properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Weimin; Wang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) was chemically modified via epoxidation using H2O2 followed by transesterification with methanol and branched alcohols (isooctanol, isotridecanol and isooctadecanol) to produce bio-lubricants with improved oxidative stability and low temperature properties. Physicochemical properties of synthesized bio-lubricants such as pour point (PP), cloud point (CP), viscosity, viscosity index (VI), oxidative stability, and corrosion resistant property were determined according to standard methods. The synthesized bio-lubricants showed improved low temperature flow performances compared with WCO, which can be attributing to the introduction of branched chains in their molecular structures. What's more, the oxidation stability of the WCO showed more than 10 folds improvement due to the elimination of -C=C-bonds in the WCO molecule. Tribological performances of these bio-lubricants were also investigated using four-ball friction and wear tester. Experimental results showed that derivatives of WCO exhibited favorable physicochemical properties and tribological performances which making them good candidates in formulating eco-friendly lubricants.

  8. "Thermal Stabilization Effect" of Al2O3 nano-dopants improves the high-temperature dielectric performance of polyimide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; He, Jinliang; Wu, Guangning; Hu, Jun

    2015-11-24

    Insulation performance of the dielectrics under extreme conditions always attracts widespread attention in electrical and electronic field. How to improve the high-temperature dielectric properties of insulation materials is one of the key issues in insulation system design of electrical devices. This paper studies the temperature-dependent corona resistance of polyimide (PI)/Al2O3 nanocomposite films under high-frequency square-wave pulse conditions. Extended corona resistant lifetime under high-temperature conditions is experimentally observed in the 2 wt% nanocomposite samples. The "thermal stabilization effect" is proposed to explain this phenomenon which attributes to a new kind of trap band caused by nanoparticles. This effect brings about superior space charge characteristics and corona resistance under high temperature with certain nano-doping concentration. The proposed theory is experimentally demonstrated by space charge analysis and thermally stimulated current (TSC) tests. This discovered effect is of profound significance on improving high-temperature dielectric properties of nanocomposites towards various applications.

  9. Logarithmic current measurement circuit with improved accuracy and temperature stability and associated method

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, M. Nance; Rochelle, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A logarithmic current measurement circuit for operating upon an input electric signal utilizes a quad, dielectrically isolated, well-matched, monolithic bipolar transistor array. One group of circuit components within the circuit cooperate with two transistors of the array to convert the input signal logarithmically to provide a first output signal which is temperature-dependant, and another group of circuit components cooperate with the other two transistors of the array to provide a second output signal which is temperature-dependant. A divider ratios the first and second output signals to provide a resultant output signal which is independent of temperature. The method of the invention includes the operating steps performed by the measurement circuit.

  10. Improving cyclic stability of lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode at elevated temperature by using dimethyl phenylphosphonite as electrolyte additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Shaowei; Xu, Mengqing; Liao, Xiaolin; Xing, Lidan; Li, Weishan

    2015-01-01

    A novel electrolyte additive, dimethyl phenylphosphonite (DMPP), is reported in this paper to be able to improve significantly the cyclic stability of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode of high voltage lithium ion battery at elevated temperature. When experiencing charge/discharge cycling at 50 °C with 1C (1C = 146.7 mAh g-1) rate in a standard (STD) electrolyte (1.0 M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC)/dimethyl carbonate (DMC), EC/DMC = 1/2 in volume), LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 suffers serious discharge capacity decaying, with a capacity retention of 42% after 100 cycles. With adding 0.5% DMPP into the STD electrolyte, the capacity retention is increased to 91%. This improvement can be ascribed to the preferential oxidation of DMPP to the STD electrolyte and the subsequent formation of a protective film on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, which suppresses the electrolyte decomposition and protects LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 from destruction. Theoretical calculations together with voltammetric analyses demonstrate the preferential oxidation of DMPP and the consequent suppression of electrolyte decomposition, while the observations from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirm the protection that DMPP provides for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4.

  11. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  12. Magnesia-stabilized calcium oxide absorbents with improved durability for high temperature CO{sub 2} capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.Y.; King, D.L.; Nie, Z.M.; Howard, C.

    2009-12-15

    Calcium oxide based materials are attractive regenerable absorbents for separating CO{sub 2} from hot gas streams because of their high reactivity, high CO{sub 2} capacity, and low material cost. Their high carbonation temperature makes it possible to recover and use high quality heat released during CO{sub 2} capture, which increases overall process efficiency. However, the performance of all reported CaO-based absorbents deteriorates as the number of carbonation-decarbonation cycles increases. This is caused by absorbent sintering during the highly exothermic carbonation process. We have found that sintering can be effectively mitigated by properly mixing with a modest amount of MgO. A class of CaO-based absorbents with improved durability and CO{sub 2} reactivity were prepared by physical mixing of Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} with small MgO particles followed by high temperature calcination. With 26 wt % MgO content, a CaO-MgO mixture prepared by this method gives as high as 53 wt % CO{sub 2} capacity after 50 carbonation-decarbonation cycles at 758{sup o}C. Without MgO addition, the CO{sub 2} capacity of pure CaO obtained from the same source decreases from 66 wt % for the first cycle to 26 wt % for the 50th cycle under the same test conditions.

  13. High temperature jet fuel stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E.M.; Selvaraj, L.; Stallman, J.B.

    1996-10-01

    We have previously discussed the rationale for development of jet fuels with enhanced thermal stability at temperatures above 400{degrees}C. At these temperatures we are encroaching into the so-called pyrolysis regime, where the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds into free radicals is facile and leads to the rapid degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Notwithstanding, we established that the formation of carbonaceous materials is significantly retarded in hydrocarbon mixtures containing molecules such as benzyl alcohol (BzOH). It was ascertained that BzOH acts as a hydrogen donor capping aliphatic radicals formed at temperatures > 400{degrees}C while transforming into relatively stable products. These results suggested is superior high temperature thermal stabilizers might be found among the more conventional hydrogen donors that find application in coal liquefaction and similar hydrogenation processes. Here we present the results of {open_quotes}screening{close_quotes} and kinetic studies of traditional hydrogen donors, such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline and the like, together with simple derivatives designed to test the importance of specific factors in the thermal stabilization of jet fuels.

  14. “Thermal Stabilization Effect” of Al2O3 nano-dopants improves the high-temperature dielectric performance of polyimide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; He, Jinliang; Wu, Guangning; Hu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Insulation performance of the dielectrics under extreme conditions always attracts widespread attention in electrical and electronic field. How to improve the high-temperature dielectric properties of insulation materials is one of the key issues in insulation system design of electrical devices. This paper studies the temperature-dependent corona resistance of polyimide (PI)/Al2O3 nanocomposite films under high-frequency square-wave pulse conditions. Extended corona resistant lifetime under high-temperature conditions is experimentally observed in the 2 wt% nanocomposite samples. The “thermal stabilization effect” is proposed to explain this phenomenon which attributes to a new kind of trap band caused by nanoparticles. This effect brings about superior space charge characteristics and corona resistance under high temperature with certain nano-doping concentration. The proposed theory is experimentally demonstrated by space charge analysis and thermally stimulated current (TSC) tests. This discovered effect is of profound significance on improving high-temperature dielectric properties of nanocomposites towards various applications. PMID:26597981

  15. “Thermal Stabilization Effect” of Al2O3 nano-dopants improves the high-temperature dielectric performance of polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; He, Jinliang; Wu, Guangning; Hu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Insulation performance of the dielectrics under extreme conditions always attracts widespread attention in electrical and electronic field. How to improve the high-temperature dielectric properties of insulation materials is one of the key issues in insulation system design of electrical devices. This paper studies the temperature-dependent corona resistance of polyimide (PI)/Al2O3 nanocomposite films under high-frequency square-wave pulse conditions. Extended corona resistant lifetime under high-temperature conditions is experimentally observed in the 2 wt% nanocomposite samples. The “thermal stabilization effect” is proposed to explain this phenomenon which attributes to a new kind of trap band caused by nanoparticles. This effect brings about superior space charge characteristics and corona resistance under high temperature with certain nano-doping concentration. The proposed theory is experimentally demonstrated by space charge analysis and thermally stimulated current (TSC) tests. This discovered effect is of profound significance on improving high-temperature dielectric properties of nanocomposites towards various applications.

  16. Improved High-Temperature Microstructural Stability and Creep Property of Novel Co-Base Single-Crystal Alloys Containing Ta and Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, F.; Zhou, H. J.; Feng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of Ta and Ti additions on microstructural stability and creep behavior in novel Co-Al-W base single-crystal alloys has been investigated. Compared to the ternary alloy, the γ' solvus temperature and γ' volume fraction were raised by individual additions of Ta and Ti, and increased further in the quinary alloy containing both alloying additions. In contrast to ternary and quaternary alloys, an improved microstructural stability with the stable γ- γ' two-phase microstructure and more than 60% γ' volume fraction existed in the quinary alloy after prolonged aging treatment at 1050°C for 1000 h. The creep behavior at 900°C revealed lower creep rates and longer rupture lives in the quaternary alloys compared to the ternary alloy, whereas the quinary alloy exhibited even better creep resistance. When the creep temperature was elevated to about 1000°C, the creep resistance of the quinary alloy exceeded the previously reported Co-Al-W-base alloys and first-generation Ni-base single-crystal superalloys. The improved creep resistance at approximately 1000°C was considered to be associated with high γ' volume fraction, γ' directional coarsening, and dislocation substructure, which included γ- γ' interfacial dislocation networks and the sheared γ' precipitates containing stacking faults and anti-phase boundaries.

  17. Improving Performance and Operational Stability of Porcine Interferon-α Production by Pichia pastoris with Combinational Induction Strategy of Low Temperature and Methanol/Sorbitol Co-feeding.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Jie; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Xu; Dong, Shi-Juan; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhong-Ping; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Various induction strategies were investigated for effective porcine interferon-α (pIFN-α) production by Pichia pastoris in a 10 L fermenter. We found that pIFN-α concentration could be significantly improved with the strategies of low-temperature induction or methanol/sorbitol co-feeding. On this basis, a combinational strategy of induction at lower temperature (20 °C) with methanol/sorbitol co-feeding has been proposed for improvement of pIFN-α production. The results reveal that maximal pIFN-α concentration and antiviral activity reach the highest level of 2.7 g/L and 1.8 × 10(7) IU/mg with the proposed induction strategy, about 1.3-2.1 folds higher than those obtained with other sub-optimal induction strategies. Metabolic analysis and online multi-variable measurement results indicate that energy metabolic enrichment is responsible for the performance enhancement of pIFN-α production, as a large amount of ATP could be simultaneously produced from both formaldehyde oxidation pathway in methanol metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in sorbitol metabolism. In addition, the proposed combinational induction strategy enables P. pastoris to be resistant to high methanol concentration (42 g/L), which conceivably occur associating with the error-prone methanol over-feeding. As a result, the proposed combinational induction strategy simultaneously increased the targeted protein concentration and operational stability leading to significant improvement of pIFN-α production.

  18. Improvement of the long term stability in the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell using functional layers

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, B.; Guenther, C.; Ruckdaeschel, R.

    1996-12-31

    In the planar Siemens design of the solid oxide fuel cell a metallic interconnector is used to seperate the ceramic single cells. A disadvantage of the metallic bipolar plate which consists of a chromium alloy is the formation of high volatile Cr-oxides and hydroxides at the surface at the cathode side. The reaction products evaporate and are reduced at the cathode/electrolyte interface to form new crystalline phases. This process gives rise to long term cell degradation. Protective coatings might be successful in preventing the chromium oxide evaporation. The required properties of the protective layers are (I) high electrical conductivity, (II) similar coefficients of thermal expansion to the bipolar plate (III), chemical compatibility to the bipolar plate and cathode material, (IV) a low diffusion coefficient of Cr and (V) chemical stability up to 1223K under oxygen atmosphere. Furthermore, during operation at 1223K an electrical contact between the metallic plate and the electrodes has to be maintained. This problem could be solved using ceramic layer between the metallic plate and the single cells.

  19. Addition of SiC Particles to Ag Die-Attach Paste to Improve High-Temperature Stability; Grain Growth Kinetics of Sintered Porous Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-10-01

    To improve the high-temperature reliability of sintered Ag joints, three types of silicon carbide particle (SiCp) of different size and morphology were added to Ag micron-flake paste. Quality sintered joints between Cu dummy chips and Cu substrate were obtained at a relatively low temperature (250°C), in air, under low load (0.4 MPa), and 35 MPa die-shear strength was achieved. High-temperature stability was investigated by means of aging tests at 150, 200, and 250°C for 500 h, and by thermal cycling between -50°C and 250°C for up to 170 cycles. The best distribution and compatibility with porous sintered Ag structures was observed for sub-micron SiC particles with an average diameter of 600 nm. After high-temperature storage for 500 h at 250°C, mean Ag grain size of the SiC-containing joints was unchanged whereas that for pure sintered Ag increased from 1.1 to 2.5 μm. Ag joints containing the optimum amount (2 wt.%) of SiCp retained their original strength (20 MPa) after storage at 250°C for 500 h. The shear strength of Ag joints without added SiCp decreased from 27 to 7 MPa after 500 h because of grain growth, which obeyed the classical parabolic law. Grain growth in pure Ag joints is discussed in terms of a temperature-dependent exponent n and activation energy Q. Our SiCp-containing joints resisted the grain growth that induces interfacial cracks during thermal cycling.

  20. Improvement in the Positive Bias Temperature Stability of SnOx-Based Thin Film Transistors by Hf and Zn Doping.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsuk; Park, Jaehyung; Kang, Minsoo; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Park, Jongwan

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the performance of tin oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) using DC magnetron sputtering. A remarkable improvement in the transfer characteristics was obtained for the Hf-doped tin oxide (HTO) TFT. We also developed amorphous hafnium-zinc-tin oxide (HZTO) thin film transistors and investigated the effects of hafnium doping on the electrical characteristics of the HTO TFTs. Doping with hafnium resulted in a reduced defect density in the tin oxide channel layer related to oxygen vacancies, which may result from increased field effect mobility. Zinc atoms have relatively higher oxidation potential compared to tin atoms, so more oxygen molecules can be absorbed and more electrons are trapped in the HZTO films. The HZTO TFTs exhibited good electrical characteristics with a field effect mobility of 10.98 cm2/Vs, and a high ION/IOFF ratio over 10(8). PMID:26726382

  1. Improvement in the Positive Bias Temperature Stability of SnOx-Based Thin Film Transistors by Hf and Zn Doping.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsuk; Park, Jaehyung; Kang, Minsoo; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Park, Jongwan

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the performance of tin oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) using DC magnetron sputtering. A remarkable improvement in the transfer characteristics was obtained for the Hf-doped tin oxide (HTO) TFT. We also developed amorphous hafnium-zinc-tin oxide (HZTO) thin film transistors and investigated the effects of hafnium doping on the electrical characteristics of the HTO TFTs. Doping with hafnium resulted in a reduced defect density in the tin oxide channel layer related to oxygen vacancies, which may result from increased field effect mobility. Zinc atoms have relatively higher oxidation potential compared to tin atoms, so more oxygen molecules can be absorbed and more electrons are trapped in the HZTO films. The HZTO TFTs exhibited good electrical characteristics with a field effect mobility of 10.98 cm2/Vs, and a high ION/IOFF ratio over 10(8).

  2. Temperature Stabilization Requirements for Unchopped Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, Marc C.

    2000-01-01

    The temperature stabilization requirements of unchopped thermistor bolometers and thermopile detectors are analyzed. The detector temperature, on which the bolometer output signal depends, is quite sensitive to changes in instrument temperature but relatively insensitive to changes in scene temperature. In contrast, the difference in temperature between detector and substrate (instrument), on which the thermopile signal depends, is equally sensitive to changes in instrument and scene temperature. Expressions for these dependencies are derived based on a simplified instrument model. It is shown that for a typical uncooled thermal imager, the temperature stabilization requirements for a bolometer are two orders of magnitude more stringent than those for a thermopile detector. Keywords: thermistor, bolometer, thermopile, detector, IR, thermal, temperature stabilization

  3. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  4. The physical mechanism on the threshold voltage temperature stability improvement for GaN HEMTs with pre-fluorination argon treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Hsiang; Liang, Yung C.; Samudra, Ganesh S.; Huang, Chih-Fang; Kuo, Wei-Hung; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a normally-off AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT with improved threshold voltage (VTH) thermal stability is reported with investigations on its physical mechanism. The normally-off operation of the device is achieved from novel short argon plasma treatment (APT) prior to the fluorine plasma treatment (FPT) on Al2O3 gate dielectrics. For the MIS-HEMT with FPT only, its VTH drops from 4.2 V at room temperature to 0.5 V at 200 °C. Alternatively, for the device with APT-then-FPT process, its VTH can retain at 2.5 V at 200 °C due to the increased amount of deep-level traps that do not emit electrons at 200 °C. This thermally stable VTH makes this device suitable for high power applications. The depth profile of the F atoms in Al2O3, measured by the secondary ion mass spectroscopy, reveals a significant increase in the F concentration when APT is conducted prior to FPT. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on the plasma-treated Al2O3 surfaces observes higher composition of Al-F bonds if APT was applied before FPT. The enhanced breaking of Al-O bonds due to Ar bombardment assisted in the increased incorporation of F radicals at the surface during the subsequent FPT process. The Schrödinger equation of Al2OxFy cells, with the same Al-F compositions as obtained from XPS, was solved by Gaussian 09 molecular simulations to extract electron state distribution as a function of energy. The simulation results show creation of the deeper trap states in the Al2O3 bandgap when APT is used before FPT. Finally, the trap distribution extracted from the simulations is verified by the gate-stress experimental characterization to confirm the physical mechanism described.

  5. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  6. Improving the Stability of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Nicholas; Stanko, Danielle; Campbell, Ian; Wittmershaus, Bruce

    The quantum mechanical nature of noble metal nanoparticles results in them having optical properties much different from the bulk metal. Silver nanoclusters (AgNC), groups of 4 to 20 atoms, are characterized by strong optical transitions in the visible part of the spectrum giving them an appearance like fluorescent organic dyes. These nanoclusters can also have fluorescence quantum yields over 90%. Following the analysis of published results of DNA templated nanoclusters, we created a procedure for synthesizing AgNC. The AgNC have a high fluorescence quantum yield but degrade with a lifetime of only a few days when in solution at room temperature. Our goal in this study was to increase the stability of the AgNC towards improving their value as a fluorescent material in various applications, such as luminescent solar concentrators. To increase their stability, we've chosen to modify our procedure by removing oxygen from the solution after the sample has reacted. Oxygen removal caused a significant increase in the stability of the clusters over a given period of time. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number NSF-ECCS-1306157.

  7. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  8. Temperature Stability of the Sky Quality Meter

    PubMed Central

    Schnitt, Sabrina; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of −15°C to 35°C, and during temperature changes of −33°C/h and +70°C/h. This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%, indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions. PMID:24030682

  9. Temperature stability of the sky quality meter.

    PubMed

    Schnitt, Sabrina; Ruhtz, Thomas; Fischer, Jürgen; Hölker, Franz; Kyba, Christopher C M

    2013-01-01

    The stability of radiance measurements taken by the Sky Quality Meter (SQM)was tested under rapidly changing temperature conditions during exposure to a stable light field in the laboratory. The reported radiance was found to be negatively correlated with temperature, but remained within 7% of the initial reported radiance over a temperature range of -15 °C to 35 °C, and during temperature changes of -33 °C/h and +70 °C/h.This is smaller than the manufacturer's quoted unit-to-unit systematic uncertainty of 10%,indicating that the temperature compensation of the SQM is adequate under expected outdoor operating conditions. PMID:24030682

  10. Temperature, stability, and the hydrophobic interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Schellman, J A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in free energy are normally used to track the effect of temperature on the stability of proteins and hydrophobic interactions. Use of this procedure on the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons, a standard representation of the hydrophobic effect, leads to the conclusion that the hydrophobic effect increases in strength as the temperature is raised to approximately 140 degrees C. Acceptance of this interpretation leads to a number of far-reaching conclusions that are at variance with the original conception of the hydrophobic effect and add considerably to the complexity of interpretation. There are two legitimate thermodynamic functions that can be used to look at stability as a function of temperature: the standard Gibbs free energy change, deltaG degrees, and deltaG degrees/T. The latter is proportional to the log of the equilibrium constant and is sometimes called the Massieu-Planck function. Arguments are presented for using deltaG degrees/T rather than deltaG degrees for variations in stability with temperature. This makes a considerable difference in the interpretation of the hydrophobic interaction, but makes little change in the stability profile of proteins. Protein unfolding and the aqueous solubility of benzene are given as examples. The contrast between protein unfolding and the hydration of nonpolar molecules provides a rough estimate of the contribution of other factors that stabilize and destabilize protein structure. PMID:9414210

  11. Dual role of boron in improving electrical performance and device stability of low temperature solution processed ZnO thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Gandla, Srinivas; Gollu, Sankara Rao; Sharma, Ramakant; Sarangi, Venkateshwarlu; Gupta, Dipti

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the dual role of boron doping in enhancing the device performance parameters as well as the device stability in low temperatures (200 °C) sol-gel processed ZnO thin film transistors (TFTs). Our studies suggest that boron is able to act as a carrier generator and oxygen vacancy suppressor simultaneously. Boron-doped ZnO TFTs with 8 mol. % of boron concentration demonstrated field-effect mobility value of 1.2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and threshold voltage of 6.2 V, respectively. Further, these devices showed lower shift in threshold voltage during the hysteresis and bias stress measurements as compared to undoped ZnO TFTs.

  12. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  13. Prop-fan with improved stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Edward A. (Inventor); Violette, John A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved prop-fan stability is achieved by providing each blade of the prop-fan with a leading edge which, outwardly, from a location thereon at the mid-span of the blade, occupy generally a single plane.

  14. Electrostatic precipitator performance: Improvement with frame stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Optimum electrostatic precipitator performance depends upon maintaining proper clearances between the high voltage components. Historically, the high voltage discharge electrode systems was either unstabilized and allowed to swing between the collection plate surfaces, or was stabilized with various mechanical methods. Free swinging electric fields will normally result in higher spark rates and reduced available power for collection of dust particles. Various mechanical stabilization methods have produced unsatisfactory results. The subject of this paper discusses an innovative mechanical stabilization method which will provide proper clearance for the high voltage components which will maintain maximum precipitator performance. The end of this report includes actual case studies where stabilization resulted in improved performance and reliability.

  15. Improved solubility and stability of 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin at different temperatures and pH values through complexation with sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Chen, Aiju; Wang, Yong; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Bingquan; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-02-01

    The inclusion complex of 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin (7H4MC) with sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) was investigated by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism and (1)H NMR spectroscopy in phosphate buffer solutions at different temperatures and pH values. The stoichiometric ratio of the complexation was found to be 1:1 and the stability constants (KC) were estimated from phase solubility analysis. The thermodynamic parameters of standard Gibbs free energy change, ΔG(o), enthalpy change, ΔH(o), and entropy change, ΔS(o), for the complexation process were obtained by using the van't Hoff equation and Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. The large negative ΔH(o) and the small negative or positive ΔS(o) (|ΔH(o)|>|TΔS(o)|) demonstrated that the inclusion interaction was an enthalpy-driven process. The positive signal of circular dichroism indicated that 7H4MC penetrated the cavity in such a way that the transition moment of the guest chromophore was parallel to the long axis of SBE-β-CD cavity. Moreover, the (1)H NMR spectrum showed that the entire 7H4MC molecule, except the hydroxyl group, was included in the SBE-β-CD cavity. PMID:25172710

  16. Multifunctional Composites for Improved Polyimide Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.

    2007-01-01

    The layered morphology of silicate clay provides an effective barrier to oxidative degradation of the matrix resin. However, as resin thermal stability continues to reach higher limits, development of an organic modification with comparable temperature capabilities becomes a challenge. Typically, phyllosilicates used in polymer nanocomposites are modified with an alkyl ammonium ion. Such organic modifiers are not suited for incorporation into high temperature polymers as they commonly degrade below 200oC. Therefore, the development of nanoparticle specifically suited for high temperature applications is necessary. Several nanoparticles were investigated in this study, including pre-exfoliated synthetic clay, an organically modified clay, and carbon nanofiber. Dispersion of the layered silicate increases the onset temperature of matrix degradation as well as slows oxidative degradation. The thermally stable carbon nanofibers are also observed to significantly increase the resin thermal stability.

  17. Improved low frequency stability of bolometric detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, T.; Devlin, M.; Lange, A.E. . Dept. of Physics); Sato, S. . Dept. of Physics); Beeman, J.W.; Haller, E.E. . Center for Advanced Materials)

    1990-04-01

    The authors have developed an AC bridge readout system that greatly improves the low-frequency stability of bolometric detectors. The readout can be implemented with a simple circuit appropriate for use in space applications. Using a matched pair of detectors in the readout, the authors have achieved system noise within a factor of two of the fundamental noise limit of the detectors at frequencies as low as 10 mHz. The low frequency stability of the readout system allows slower, more sensitive detectors to be used in many applications, and facilitates observing strategies that are well-suited to space-borne observations.

  18. Increasing Laser Stability with Improved Electronic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troxel, Daylin; Bennett, Aaron; Erickson, Christopher J.; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We present several electronic instruments developed to implement an ultra-stable laser lock. These instruments include a high speed, low noise homodyne photo-detector; an ultrahigh stability, low noise current driver with high modulation bandwidth and digital control; a high-speed, low noise PID controller; a low-noise piezo driver; and a laser diode temperature controller. We will present the theory of operation for these instruments, design and construction techniques, and essential characteristics for each device.

  19. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  20. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  1. High Temperature Stability of Potassium Beta Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Kisor, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    None. From Objectives section: Evaluate the stability of potassium beta alumina under potassium AMTEC operating conditions. Evaluate the stability regime in which potassium beta alumina can be fabricated.

  2. Bonding glass to metal with plastic for stability over temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Chris L.; Petrie, Stephen P.

    2001-11-01

    To enable the invention of higher power IRCM lasers, 3D LIDAR systems, Designator/Rangefinders and other Instruments subjected to a broad range of operating conditions, there is a need to develop improved technology to hold small mirrors, lenses, beamsplitters and other optical elements with repeatable and high dimensional stability over wide environmental temperature ranges, an do so with great economy. The intent of this effort was to begin identifying significant factors for bonding small mirrors for high stability. A screening experiment was performed in which half-inch diameter flat mirrors were face bonded to similar mirror mounts, then bolted to a reference test fixture and subjected to an environmental temperature range of -40 to +70 degrees C. Mount material, optic material, adhesive material, bond joint design, and bond thickness were varied. The resulting tilt errors in the mirror assemblies were measured. Steps were taken to isolate the bond joint stability as opposed to stability in the mounted mirror subassemblies. The effort required to minimize experimental noise was much greater than anticipated. This first experimental effort failed to identify main factors with statistical significance, however; some results are interesting. Perhaps also of interest is the progress made at characterizing the experimental setup and process, and lessons learned in control of noise factors in this kind of experiment.

  3. Chemical stability of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the available studies on the chemical stability of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) in various environments was made. The La(1.8)Ba(0.2)CuO4 HTS is unstable in the presence of H2O, CO2, and CO. The YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor is highly susceptible to degradation in different environments, especially water. The La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO4 and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O HTS are relatively less reactive than the YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Processing of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) HTS in purified oxygen, rather than in air, using high purity noncarbon containing starting materials is recommended. Exposure of this HTS to the ambient atmosphere should also be avoided at all stages during processing and storage. Devices and components made out of these oxide superconductors would have to be protected with an impermeable coating of a polymer, glass, or metal to avoid deterioration during use.

  4. Improving the stability of cardiac mechanical simulations.

    PubMed

    Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Lamata, Pablo; Smith, Nicolas P

    2015-03-01

    In the field of cardiac modeling, the mechanical action of the heart is often simulated using finite element methods. These simulations are becoming increasingly challenging as the computational domain is customized to a patient's anatomy, within which large heterogeneous tension gradients are generated via biophysical cell models which drive simulations of the cardiac pump cycle. The convergence of nonlinear solvers in simulations of large deformation mechanics depends on many factors. When extreme stress or irregular deformations are modeled, commonly used numerical methods can often fail to find a solution, which can prevent investigation of interesting parameter variations or use of models in a clinical context with high standards for robustness. This paper outlines a novel numerical method that is straightforward to implement and which significantly improves the stability of these simulations. The method involves adding a compressibility penalty to the standard incompressible formulation of large deformation mechanics. We compare the method's performance when used with both a direct discretization of the equations for incompressible solid mechanics, as well as the formulation based on an isochoric/deviatoric split of the deformation gradient. The addition of this penalty decreases the tendency for solutions to deviate from the incompressibility constraint, and significantly improves the ability of the Newton solver to find a solution. Additionally, our method maintains the expected order of convergence under mesh refinement, has nearly identical solutions for the pressure-volume relations, and stabilizes the solver to allow challenging simulations of both diastolic and systolic function on personalized patient geometries. PMID:25474804

  5. Effect of dialysate temperature on hemodynamic stability among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Azar, Ahmad Taher

    2009-07-01

    Cooling the dialysate below 36.5 degrees C is an important factor that contributes to hemodynamic stability in patients during hemodialysis (HD). In this study, the effect of dialysate temperature on hemodynamic stability, patients' perception of dialysis discomfort and post dialysis fatigue were assessed in a group of patients on HD. A total of 50 patients, all of whom were on 3-times-per-week dialysis regimen, were studied. Patients were assessed during six dialysis sessions; in three sessions, the dialysate temperature was normal (37 degrees C) and in three other sessions, the dialysate temperature was low (35 degrees C). Specific scale questionnaires were used in each dialysis session, to evaluate the symptoms during the dialysis procedure as well as post-dialysis fatigue, and respective scores were noted. The results showed that usage of low dialysate temperature was associated with the following: higher post dialysis systolic blood pressure (P< 0.05) and lower post dialysis heart rate (P< 0.01), with similar ultrafiltration rates, better intra-dialysis symptoms score and post-dialysis fatigue scores (P< 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively), shorter post-dialysis fatigue period (P< 0.001) as well as higher urea removal (P< 00001) and Kt/V (P< 0.0001). Patients' perceptions were measured by a questionnaire, which showed that 76% of them felt more energetic after dialysis with cool dialysate and requested to be always dialyzed with cool dialysate. Low temperature dialysate is particularly beneficial for highly symptomatic patients, improves tolerance to dialysis in hypotensive patients and helps increase ultrafiltration while maintaining hemodynamic stability during and after dialysis.

  6. A Physics-Based Temperature Stabilization Criterion for Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft testing specifications differ greatly in the criteria they specify for stability in thermal balance tests. Some specify a required temperature stabilization rate (the change in temperature per unit time, dT/dt), some specify that the final steady-state temperature be approached to within a specified difference, delta T , and some specify a combination of the two. The particular values for temperature stabilization rate and final temperature difference also vary greatly between specification documents. A one-size-fits-all temperature stabilization rate requirement does not yield consistent results for all test configurations because of differences in thermal mass and heat transfer to the environment. Applying a steady-state temperature difference requirement is problematic because the final test temperature is not accurately known a priori, especially for powered configurations. In the present work, a simplified, lumped-mass analysis has been used to explore the applicability of these criteria. A new, user-friendly, physics-based approach is developed that allows the thermal engineer to determine when an acceptable level of temperature stabilization has been achieved. The stabilization criterion can be predicted pre-test but must be refined during test to allow verification that the defined level of temperature stabilization has been achieved.

  7. Nanowire Lasers of Formamidinium Lead Halide Perovskites and Their Stabilized Alloys with Improved Stability.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongping; Zhu, Haiming; Schrader, Alex W; Liang, Dong; Ding, Qi; Joshi, Prakriti; Hwang, Leekyoung; Zhu, X-Y; Jin, Song

    2016-02-10

    The excellent intrinsic optoelectronic properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites (MAPbX3, X = Br, I), such as high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, long carrier lifetime, and high gain coupled with the facile solution growth of nanowires make them promising new materials for ultralow-threshold nanowire lasers. However, their photo and thermal stabilities need to be improved for practical applications. Herein, we report a low-temperature solution growth of single crystal nanowires of formamidinium lead halide perovskites (FAPbX3) that feature red-shifted emission and better thermal stability compared to MAPbX3. We demonstrate optically pumped room-temperature near-infrared (∼820 nm) and green lasing (∼560 nm) from FAPbI3 (and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3) and FAPbBr3 nanowires with low lasing thresholds of several microjoules per square centimeter and high quality factors of about 1500-2300. More remarkably, the FAPbI3 and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3 nanowires display durable room-temperature lasing under ∼10(8) shots of sustained illumination of 402 nm pulsed laser excitation (150 fs, 250 kHz), substantially exceeding the stability of MAPbI3 (∼10(7) laser shots). We further demonstrate tunable nanowire lasers in wider wavelength region from FA-based lead halide perovskite alloys (FA,MA)PbI3 and (FA,MA)Pb(I,Br)3 through cation and anion substitutions. The results suggest that formamidinium lead halide perovskite nanostructures could be more promising and stable materials for the development of light-emitting diodes and continuous-wave lasers.

  8. Stabilization of Aspergillus parasiticus cytosine deaminase by immobilization on calcium alginate beads improved enzyme operational stability.

    PubMed

    Zanna, H; Nok, A J; Ibrahim, S; Inuwa, H M

    2013-12-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) from Aspergillus parasiticus, which has half-life of 1.10 h at 37°C, was stabilized by immobilization on calcium alginate beads. The immobilized CD had pH and temperature optimum of 5 and 50°C respectively. The immobilized enzyme also stoichiometrically deaminated Cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) with the apparent K(M) values of 0.60 mM and 0.65 mM respectively, displaying activation energy of 10.72 KJ/mol. The immobilization of native CD on calcium alginate beads gave the highest yield of apparent enzymatic activity of 51.60% of the original activity and the enzymatic activity was lost exponentially at 37°C over 12 h with a half-life of 5.80 h. Hence, the operational stability of native CD can be improved by immobilization on calcium alginate beads.

  9. Storage Stability and Improvement of Intermediate Moisture Foods, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labuza, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Methods were determined for the improvement of shelf-life stability of intermediate moisture foods (IMF). Microbial challenge studies showed that protection against molds and Staphylococcus aureus could be achieved by a combination of antimicrobial agents, humectants and food acids. Potassium sorbate and propylene glycol gave the best results. It was also confirmed that the maximum in heat resistance shown by vegetative pathogens at intermediate water activities also occurred in a solid food. Glycols and sorbitol both achieve browning inhibition because of their action as a medium for reaction and effect on viscosity of the adsorbed phase. Chemical availability results showed rapid lysine loss before visual discoloration occurred. This is being confirmed with a biological test using Tetrahymena pyriformis W. Accelerated temperature tests show that effectiveness of food antioxidants against rancidity development can be predicted; however, the protection factor changes with temperature. BHA was found to be the best antioxidant for iron catalyzed oxidation.

  10. Temperature compensation via cooperative stability in protein degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuanyuan; Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Noman, Nasimul; Iba, Hitoshi

    2015-08-01

    Temperature compensation is a notable property of circadian oscillators that indicates the insensitivity of the oscillator system's period to temperature changes; the underlying mechanism, however, is still unclear. We investigated the influence of protein dimerization and cooperative stability in protein degradation on the temperature compensation ability of two oscillators. Here, cooperative stability means that high-order oligomers are more stable than their monomeric counterparts. The period of an oscillator is affected by the parameters of the dynamic system, which in turn are influenced by temperature. We adopted the Repressilator and the Atkinson oscillator to analyze the temperature sensitivity of their periods. Phase sensitivity analysis was employed to evaluate the period variations of different models induced by perturbations to the parameters. Furthermore, we used experimental data provided by other studies to determine the reasonable range of parameter temperature sensitivity. We then applied the linear programming method to the oscillatory systems to analyze the effects of protein dimerization and cooperative stability on the temperature sensitivity of their periods, which reflects the ability of temperature compensation in circadian rhythms. Our study explains the temperature compensation mechanism for circadian clocks. Compared with the no-dimer mathematical model and linear model for protein degradation, our theoretical results show that the nonlinear protein degradation caused by cooperative stability is more beneficial for realizing temperature compensation of the circadian clock.

  11. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, III, Raymond B.

    1984-01-01

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower.

  12. High temperature bias line stabilized current sources

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, R.B. III.

    1984-09-11

    A compensation device for the base of emitter follower configured bipolar transistors becoming operable at elevated temperatures including a bipolar transistor of a geometry of not more than half the geometry of the bipolar emitter follower having its collector connected to the base of the emitter follower and its base and emitter connected together and to the emitter of the emitter follower. 1 fig.

  13. Increasing crop diversity mitigates weather variations and improves yield stability.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Amélie C M; Tolhurst, Tor N; Ker, Alan P; Janovicek, Ken; Tortora, Cristina; Martin, Ralph C; Deen, William

    2015-01-01

    Cropping sequence diversification provides a systems approach to reduce yield variations and improve resilience to multiple environmental stresses. Yield advantages of more diverse crop rotations and their synergistic effects with reduced tillage are well documented, but few studies have quantified the impact of these management practices on yields and their stability when soil moisture is limiting or in excess. Using yield and weather data obtained from a 31-year long term rotation and tillage trial in Ontario, we tested whether crop rotation diversity is associated with greater yield stability when abnormal weather conditions occur. We used parametric and non-parametric approaches to quantify the impact of rotation diversity (monocrop, 2-crops, 3-crops without or with one or two legume cover crops) and tillage (conventional or reduced tillage) on yield probabilities and the benefits of crop diversity under different soil moisture and temperature scenarios. Although the magnitude of rotation benefits varied with crops, weather patterns and tillage, yield stability significantly increased when corn and soybean were integrated into more diverse rotations. Introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation was enough to provide substantial benefits on long-term soybean yields and their stability while the effects on corn were mostly associated with the temporal niche provided by small grains for underseeded red clover or alfalfa. Crop diversification strategies increased the probability of harnessing favorable growing conditions while decreasing the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yield by 7% and 22% for corn and soybean respectively. Given the additional advantages associated with cropping system diversification, such a strategy provides a more comprehensive approach to lowering yield variability and improving the resilience of cropping systems to multiple environmental

  14. Increasing Crop Diversity Mitigates Weather Variations and Improves Yield Stability

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Amélie C. M.; Tolhurst, Tor N.; Ker, Alan P.; Janovicek, Ken; Tortora, Cristina; Martin, Ralph C.; Deen, William

    2015-01-01

    Cropping sequence diversification provides a systems approach to reduce yield variations and improve resilience to multiple environmental stresses. Yield advantages of more diverse crop rotations and their synergistic effects with reduced tillage are well documented, but few studies have quantified the impact of these management practices on yields and their stability when soil moisture is limiting or in excess. Using yield and weather data obtained from a 31-year long term rotation and tillage trial in Ontario, we tested whether crop rotation diversity is associated with greater yield stability when abnormal weather conditions occur. We used parametric and non-parametric approaches to quantify the impact of rotation diversity (monocrop, 2-crops, 3-crops without or with one or two legume cover crops) and tillage (conventional or reduced tillage) on yield probabilities and the benefits of crop diversity under different soil moisture and temperature scenarios. Although the magnitude of rotation benefits varied with crops, weather patterns and tillage, yield stability significantly increased when corn and soybean were integrated into more diverse rotations. Introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation was enough to provide substantial benefits on long-term soybean yields and their stability while the effects on corn were mostly associated with the temporal niche provided by small grains for underseeded red clover or alfalfa. Crop diversification strategies increased the probability of harnessing favorable growing conditions while decreasing the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yield by 7% and 22% for corn and soybean respectively. Given the additional advantages associated with cropping system diversification, such a strategy provides a more comprehensive approach to lowering yield variability and improving the resilience of cropping systems to multiple environmental

  15. Increasing crop diversity mitigates weather variations and improves yield stability.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Amélie C M; Tolhurst, Tor N; Ker, Alan P; Janovicek, Ken; Tortora, Cristina; Martin, Ralph C; Deen, William

    2015-01-01

    Cropping sequence diversification provides a systems approach to reduce yield variations and improve resilience to multiple environmental stresses. Yield advantages of more diverse crop rotations and their synergistic effects with reduced tillage are well documented, but few studies have quantified the impact of these management practices on yields and their stability when soil moisture is limiting or in excess. Using yield and weather data obtained from a 31-year long term rotation and tillage trial in Ontario, we tested whether crop rotation diversity is associated with greater yield stability when abnormal weather conditions occur. We used parametric and non-parametric approaches to quantify the impact of rotation diversity (monocrop, 2-crops, 3-crops without or with one or two legume cover crops) and tillage (conventional or reduced tillage) on yield probabilities and the benefits of crop diversity under different soil moisture and temperature scenarios. Although the magnitude of rotation benefits varied with crops, weather patterns and tillage, yield stability significantly increased when corn and soybean were integrated into more diverse rotations. Introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation was enough to provide substantial benefits on long-term soybean yields and their stability while the effects on corn were mostly associated with the temporal niche provided by small grains for underseeded red clover or alfalfa. Crop diversification strategies increased the probability of harnessing favorable growing conditions while decreasing the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yield by 7% and 22% for corn and soybean respectively. Given the additional advantages associated with cropping system diversification, such a strategy provides a more comprehensive approach to lowering yield variability and improving the resilience of cropping systems to multiple environmental

  16. Stability of peptides in high-temperature aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-09-01

    Estimated standard molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous dipeptides and their constituent amino acids indicate that temperature increases correspond to increased stability of peptide bonds relative to hydrolysis reactions. Pressure increases cause slight decreases in peptide bond stability, which are generally offset by greater stability caused by temperature increases along geothermal gradients. These calculations suggest that peptides, polypeptides, and proteins may survive hydrothermal alteration of organic matter depending on the rates of the hydrolysis reactions. Extremely thermophilic organisms may be able to take advantage of the decreased energy required to form peptide bonds in order to maintain structural proteins and enzymes at elevated temperatures and pressures. As the rates of hydrolysis reactions increase with increasing temperature, formation of peptide bonds may become a facile process in hydrothermal systems and deep in sedimentary basins.

  17. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  18. Localized temperature stability in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC).

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Steven Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa.

    2012-04-01

    The base dielectrics of commercial low temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) systems have a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ({tau}{sub f}) in the range -50 {approx} -80 ppm/C. In this research we explored a method to realize zero or near zero {tau}{sub f} resonators by incorporating {tau}{sub f} compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC structure. To select composition for {tau}{sub f} adjustment, {tau}{sub f} compensating materials with different amount of titanates were formulated, synthesized, and characterized. Chemical interactions and physical compatibility between the {tau}{sub f} modifiers and the host LTCC dielectrics were investigated. Studies on stripline (SL) resonator panels with multiple compensating dielectrics revealed that: 1) compositions using SrTiO{sub 3} provide the largest {tau}{sub f} adjustment among titanates, 2) the {tau}{sub f} compensation is proportional to the amount of SrTiO{sub 3} in compensating materials, as well as the thickness of the compensating layer, and 3) the most effective {tau}{sub f} compensation is achieved when the compensating dielectric is integrated next to the SL. Using the effective dielectric constant of a heterogeneous layered dielectric structure, results from Method of Momentum (MoM) electromagnetic simulations are consistent with the experimental observations.

  19. Room temperature skyrmion ground state stabilized through interlayer exchange coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Gong Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; N'Diaye, Alpha T.

    2015-06-15

    Possible magnetic skyrmion device applications motivate the search for structures that extend the stability of skyrmion spin textures to ambient temperature. Here, we demonstrate an experimental approach to stabilize a room temperature skyrmion ground state in chiral magnetic films via exchange coupling across non-magnetic spacer layers. Using spin polarized low-energy electron microscopy to measure all three Cartesian components of the magnetization vector, we image the spin textures in Fe/Ni films. We show how tuning the thickness of a copper spacer layer between chiral Fe/Ni films and perpendicularly magnetized Ni layers permits stabilization of a chiral stripe phase, a skyrmion phase, and a single domain phase. This strategy to stabilize skyrmion ground states can be extended to other magnetic thin film systems and may be useful for designing skyrmion based spintronics devices.

  20. Improved Performance of a Temperature Compensated LN2 Cooled Sapphire Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, David G.; Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1995-01-01

    We report on improved stability in a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant WGHn11 microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77K. Several modifications during the past year have led to significant improvements in performance. Current tests with improved thermal stability provide Allan Deviation of frequency of 2.6 - 4 ? 10-13 for measurement times of 1#t#100 seconds. We project a frequency stability of 1014 for this resonator with stabilized housing temperature and with a mode Q of 107.!.

  1. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components.

    SciTech Connect

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-09-21

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than {+-} 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of {+-} 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented.

  2. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications including landers, rovers, penetrators, CEV, CLV, etc. This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. The Department of Energy (DoE) has identified a number of technical barriers associated with the development of Liion rechargeable batteries for PHEVs. For this reason, DoE has interest in the development of advanced electrolytes that will improve performance over a wide range of temperatures, and lead to long life characteristics (5,000 cycles over a 10-year life span). There is also interest in improving the high-voltage stability of these candidate electrolyte systems to enable the operation of up to 5 V with high specific energy cathode materials. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. In addition, the low-temperature performance typically deteriorates rapidly upon being exposed to high temperatures. A number of electrolyte formulations were developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl propionate (MP)-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalate borate) (LiBOB), which have previously been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. These MP-based electrolytes with additives have been shown to have improved performance in experiments with MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2 cells.

  3. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  4. Stability Curve Prediction of Homologous Proteins Using Temperature-Dependent Statistical Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Rooman, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    The unraveling and control of protein stability at different temperatures is a fundamental problem in biophysics that is substantially far from being quantitatively and accurately solved, as it requires a precise knowledge of the temperature dependence of amino acid interactions. In this paper we attempt to gain insight into the thermal stability of proteins by designing a tool to predict the full stability curve as a function of the temperature for a set of 45 proteins belonging to 11 homologous families, given their sequence and structure, as well as the melting temperature () and the change in heat capacity () of proteins belonging to the same family. Stability curves constitute a fundamental instrument to analyze in detail the thermal stability and its relation to the thermodynamic stability, and to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the folding free energy. In summary, our approach for predicting the protein stability curves relies on temperature-dependent statistical potentials derived from three datasets of protein structures with targeted thermal stability properties. Using these potentials, the folding free energies () at three different temperatures were computed for each protein. The Gibbs-Helmholtz equation was then used to predict the protein's stability curve as the curve that best fits these three points. The results are quite encouraging: the standard deviations between the experimental and predicted 's, 's and folding free energies at room temperature () are equal to 13 , 1.3 ) and 4.1 , respectively, in cross-validation. The main sources of error and some further improvements and perspectives are briefly discussed. PMID:25032839

  5. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  6. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  7. Design of DC-contact RF MEMS switch with temperature stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junfeng; Li, Zhiqun; Zhu, Jian; Yu, Yuanwei; Jiang, Lili

    2015-04-15

    In order to improve the temperature stability of DC-contact RF MEMS switch, a thermal buckle-beam structure is implemented. The stability of the switch pull-in voltage versus temperature is not only improved, but also the impact of stress and stress gradient on the drive voltage is suppressed. Test results show that the switch pull-in voltage is less sensitive to temperature between -20 °C and 100 °C. The variable rate of pull-in voltage to temperature is about -120 mV/°C. The RF performance of the switch is stable, and the isolation is almost independent of temperature. After being annealed at 280 °C for 12 hours, our switch samples, which are suitable for packaging, have less than 1.5% change in the rate of pull-in voltage.

  8. High-precision temperature control and stabilization using a cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Daiki; Murata, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Hiroya; Komine, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    We describe a method for precisely controlling temperature using a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler that involves inserting fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers into a conventional cryosystem. Temperature fluctuations in a GM cryocooler without a large heat bath or a stainless-steel damper at 4.2 K are typically of the order of 200 mK. It is particularly difficult to control the temperature of a GM cryocooler at low temperatures. The fiber-reinforced-plastic dampers enabled us to dramatically reduce temperature fluctuations at low temperatures. A standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations of 0.21 mK could be achieved when the temperature was controlled at 4.200 0 K using a feedback temperature control system with two heaters. Adding the dampers increased the minimum achievable temperature from 3.2 to 3.3 K. Precise temperature control between 4.200 0 and 300.000 K was attained using the GM cryocooler, and the standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations was less than 1.2 mK even at 300 K. This technique makes it possible to control and stabilize the temperature using a GM cryocooler.

  9. High temperature stability multilayers for EUV condenser optics

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S; Stearns, D G

    2005-05-03

    We investigate the thermal stability of Mo/SiC multilayer coatings at elevated temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies show that upon annealing a thermally-induced structural relaxation occurs that transforms the polycrystalline Mo and amorphous SiC layers in as-deposited multilayers into amorphous Mo-Si-C alloy and crystalline SiC, respectively. After this relaxation process is complete the multilayer is stable at temperatures up to 400 C.

  10. The stability of amino acids at submarine hydrothermal vent temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bada, Jeffrey L.; Miller, Stanley L.; Zhao, Meixun

    1995-01-01

    It has been postulated that amino acid stability at hydrothermal vent temperatures is controlled by a metastable thermodynamic equilibrium rather than by kinetics. Experiments reported here demonstrate that the amino acids are irreversibly destroyed by heating at 240 C and that quasi-equilibrium calculations give misleading descriptions of the experimental observations. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are not applicable to organic compounds under high-temperature submarine vent conditions.

  11. Improved high-temperature silicide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopp, W. D.; Stephens, J. R.; Stetson, A. R.; Wimber, R. T.

    1969-01-01

    Special technique for applying silicide coatings to refractory metal alloys improves their high-temperature protective capability. Refractory metal powders mixed with a baked-out organic binder and sintered in a vacuum produces a porous alloy layer on the surface. Exposing the layer to hot silicon converts it to a silicide.

  12. Improved performance of silicon nitride-based high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Recent progress in the production of Si3N4 based ceramics is reviewed: (1) high temperature strength and toughness of hot pressed Si3N4 were improved by using high purity powder and a stabilized ZrO2 additive, (2) impact resistance of hot pressed Si3N4 was increased by the use of a crushable energy absorbing layer, (3) the oxidation resistance and strength of reaction sintered Si3N4 were increased by impregnating reaction sintered silicon nitride with solutions that oxidize to Al2O3 or ZrO2, (4) beta prime SiA1ON compositions and sintering aids were developed for improved oxidation resistance or improved high temperature strength.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Protein stability and enzyme activity at extreme biological temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, Georges

    2010-08-01

    Psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in permanently cold environments, even at subzero temperatures. To maintain metabolic rates compatible with sustained life, they have improved the dynamics of their protein structures, thereby enabling appropriate molecular motions required for biological activity at low temperatures. As a consequence of this structural flexibility, psychrophilic proteins are unstable and heat-labile. In the upper range of biological temperatures, thermophiles and hyperthermophiles grow at temperatures > 100 °C and synthesize ultra-stable proteins. However, thermophilic enzymes are nearly inactive at room temperature as a result of their compactness and rigidity. At the molecular level, both types of extremophilic proteins have adapted the same structural factors, but in opposite directions, to address either activity at low temperatures or stability in hot environments. A model based on folding funnels is proposed accounting for the stability-activity relationships in extremophilic proteins.

  14. Improved Seals for High Temperature Airframe Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Current thermal barrier seals, such as those used on the Space Shuttle, are insufficient to fully meet the demands of future hypersonic vehicles and reentry spacecraft. Previous investigations have demonstrated limited usage temperatures, as evidenced by a decreased ability to maintain sealing effectiveness at high temperatures (i.e., inadequate resiliency). In order to improve resiliency at elevated temperatures, Rene 41 (Allvac) was substituted for Inconel X-750 (Special Metals Corp.) as the spring tube material in the existing seal design. A seal construction incorporating the Rene 41 spring tube was fabricated and tested against the baseline Inconel X-750 spring tube seal. Although resiliency improvements were not as dramatic as in previous tests with the spring tubes alone, seals incorporating the Rene 41 spring tube exhibited an average 20 percent resiliency enhancement up to 1750 F when compared to seals containing the Inconel spring tube. In addition, the seals with the Rene 41 spring tubes showed less reduction in resiliency as temperatures increased above 1200 F. Results also indicated the Saffil (Saffil Ltd.) insulation in the core of the seal contributed more to resiliency than previously thought. Leakage data did not demonstrate an improvement with the seal containing the Rene 41 spring tube. However, based upon resiliency results, one could reasonably expect the Rene 41 version of the seal to track gap openings over a wider range. Therefore it would exhibit lower leakage than the Inconel X-750 version as the seal gap opens during a typical mission.

  15. Improvement of bias stability for a micromachined gyroscope based on dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianbin; Xiao, Dingbang; Wu, Xuezhong; Hou, Zhanqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2013-07-01

    We present a dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness for improving the bias stability of micromachined gyroscopes, which embeds the coupling stiffness in a closed-loop system to make the micromachined gyroscope possess more robust bias stability by suppressing the variation of coupling stiffness. The effect of the dynamic electrical balancing control is theoretically analyzed and implemented using a silicon micromachined gyroscope as an example case. It has been experimentally shown that, comparing with open loop detection, the proposed method increased the stability of the amplitude of the mechanical quadrature signal by 38 times, and therefore improved the bias stability by 5.2 times from 89 to 17 deg/h, and the temperature stability of scale factor by 2.7 times from 622 to 231 ppm/°C. Experimental results effectively indicated the theoretical model of dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness.

  16. [Performance stability of CANON reactor and temperature impact].

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun-Ming; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Dong; Meng, Xue-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    In order to study long-term effect of completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) reactor, performance stability was investigated by using synthetic inorganic ammonia-rich wastewater as raw water with a continuous flow CANON reactor. Both performances of short-cut nitrification and ANAMMOX were stable for more than one year. Under the condition that inner temperature at 35 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C, pH 7.39 and 8.01, and hydraulic retention time 3.7-5.1 h, the average total nitrogen removal load was 1.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1), and the average and maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency were 65.09% and 81.65% respectively. Under sudden low temperature conditions, both ANAMMOX bacteria and AOB were inhibited, however, the ANAMMOX bacteria were inhibited more, which caused highly accumulated nitrite. When temperature increased to 35 degrees C as normal, the performance of CANON reactor recovered soon, which means low temperature impact will have no significant influence on stability. When the temperature reached more than 50 degrees C, the activity of ANAMMOX bacteria was completely destroyed, so high temperature must be avoided, though AOB can recovered to normal in one week.

  17. Stability Issues in Ambient-Temperature Passive Magnetic Bearing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.

    2000-02-17

    The ambient-temperature passive magnetic bearing system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory achieves rotor-dynamic stability by employing special combinations of levitating and stabilizing elements. These elements, energized by permanent magnet material, create the magnetic and electrodynamic forces that are required for the stable levitation of rotating systems, such as energy-storage flywheels. Stability criteria, derived from theory, describe the bearing element parameters, i.e., stiffnesses and damping coefficients, that are required both to assure stable levitation (''Earnshaw-stability''), and stability against whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. The work described in this report concerns experimental measurements and computer simulations that address some critical aspects of this overall stability problem. Experimentally, a test device was built to measure the damping coefficient of dampers that employ eddy currents induced in a metallic disc. Another test device was constructed for the purpose of measuring the displacement-dependent drag coefficient of annular permanent magnet bearing elements. In the theoretical developments a computer code was written for the purpose of simulating the rotor-dynamics of our passive bearing systems. This code is capable of investigating rotor-dynamic stability effects for both small-amplitude transient displacements (i.e., those within the linear regime), and for large-amplitude displacements, where non-linear effects can become dominant. Under the latter conditions a bearing system that is stable for small-amplitude displacements may undergo a rapidly growing rotor-dynamic instability once a critical displacement is exceeded. A new result of the study was to demonstrate that stiffness anisotropy of the bearing elements (which can be designed into our bearing system) is strongly stabilizing, not only in the linear regime, but also in the non-linear regime.

  18. Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

  19. [Research on Temperature Detection System Based on Improved Fiber Bragg Grating].

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-xia; Qin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Traditional temperature detection system based on Fiber Bragg Grating is suitable for large-scale, real-time multi-point temperature detection field. But its stability of temperature response is poor, shift amount of Bragg grating center wavelength is poor linearity with temperature variation. In order to improve the stability for system and temperature detection accuracy of the system, an improved temperature detection system based on Fiber Bragg Grating was designed. The method of dual fiber parallel acquisition for temperature data was used on the same point, and then center wavelength data was differentially processed. It was realized that the random errors of the system were effectively real-time eliminated in the process temperature. The function relationships of center wavelength shift amount of Fiber Bragg Grating and temperature variation was derived in this mode, and the new structure of the probes for Fiber Bragg Grating was designed. In the experiments, measurement data of Improved temperature detection system based on Fiber Bragg Grating was compared with the data of traditional system. Experimental results show that temperature measurement accuracy of improved system was up to 0.5 degrees C, and its accuracy has been improved compared to conventional systems. Meanwhile, the measurement error was significantly better than traditional systems. It proved that the design can improve the stability of temperature detection for the system. PMID:27228783

  20. Stability of Topological Quantum Phases at Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalakis, Spyridon; Pytel, Justyna

    2012-02-01

    We prove stability of the spectral gap for gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonians under general, quasi-local perturbations. We present a necessary and sufficient condition for stability, which we call Local Topological Quantum Order and show that this condition implies an area law for the entanglement entropy of the groundstate subspace. This result extends previous work by Bravyi et al, on the stability of topological quantum order for the groundstate subspace of Hamiltonians composed of commuting projections with a common zero-energy subspace. Moreover, our result implies that zero-temperature topological order is robust against quasi-local perturbations, for all topologically ordered subspaces that correspond to the groundstate space of a gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonian. Finally, even in the absence of topological order, we show that symmetry-protected sectors are also stable against perturbations respecting the same symmetries.

  1. Stability of the high-temperature G-16 primer composition

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, N.A.; Weinmaster, R.R.; Massis, T.A.; Fleming, W.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of the G-16 pyrotechnic primer mixture of antimony sulfide, calcium silicide, and potassium chlorate was studied at temperatures up to 200/sup 0/C in sealed and open environments. Data have shown that this mixture is stable in open environments at 200/sup 0/C for up to 48 hours. However, in sealed, limited volume environments, the mixture completely decomposes within 24 hours at 200/sup 0/C. In sealed environments, the mixture shows stability with copper present. Both functional testing and chemical analysis were used to evaluate the primer composition after temperature exposure. The degree of degradation of the mixture was determined from the concentration of final reaction products (sulfate and chloride ions), using ion chromatography. When copper was present, the intermediate reaction products were scavenged by the copper, and the degradation was reduced. The role of copper in the reaction was verified with differential scanning calorimetry and surface analysis. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved stability from protozeolitic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Junlin; Kong, Dejin; Yang, Weimin; Xie, Zaiku; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yuhan

    2007-02-01

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved hydrothermal stability have been prepared through S +X -I + route via self-assembly of protozeolitic nanoclusters with cetyltrimethylammonium bromides (CTAB) template micelles in HNO 3 solution. SEM observation confirmed that high-yield aluminosilicate ropes could be produced under proper HNO 3 concentration. NO 3- ions had strong binding strength to the CTA + ions and tended to form more elongated surfactant micelles, thus fibrous products were fabricated under the direction of these long rod micelles in shearing flow. At the same time, the NO 3- ions combining with CTA + ions generated more active (CTA +NO 3-) assembly, which effectively catalysed the polymerization of protozeolitic nanoclusters with large volume into highly ordered mesostructures. Compared with normal MCM-41 silica synthesized through S +X -I + route in acidic media, the hydrothermal stability was improved considerably. These protozeolitic nanoclusters survived strongly acidic media and entered into mesostructured framework, which contributed to the improvement of hydrothermal stability.

  3. Improved Estimation Model of Lunar Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Lunar surface temperature (LST) is of great scientific interest both uncovering the thermal properties and designing the lunar robotic or manned landing missions. In this paper, we proposed the improved LST estimation model based on the one-dimensional partial differential equation (PDE). The shadow and surface tilts effects were combined into the model. Using the Chang'E (CE-1) DEM data from the Laser Altimeter (LA), the topographic effect can be estimated with an improved effective solar irradiance (ESI) model. In Fig. 1, the highest LST of the global Moon has been estimated with the spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel, applying the solar albedo data derived from Clementine UV-750nm in solving the PDE function. The topographic effect is significant in the LST map. It can be identified clearly the maria, highland, and craters. The maximum daytime LST presents at the regions with low albedo, i.g. mare Procellarum, mare Serenitatis and mare Imbrium. The results are consistent with the Diviner's measurements of the LRO mission. Fig. 2 shows the temperature variations at the center of the disk in one year, assuming the Moon to be standard spherical. The seasonal variation of LST at the equator is about 10K. The highest LST occurs in early May. Fig.1. Estimated maximum surface temperatures of the global Moon in spatial resolution of 1 degree /pixel

  4. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  5. Improving the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations by substitution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huilong; Gu, Fenglou; Li, Min; Lin, Bencai; Si, Zhihong; Hou, Tingjun; Yan, Feng; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2014-10-01

    Imidazolium cations are promising candidates for preparing anion-exchange membranes because of their good alkaline stability. Substitution of imidazolium cations is an efficient way to improve their alkaline stability. By combining density functional theory calculations with experimental results, it is found that the LUMO energy correlates with the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations. The results indicate that alkyl groups are the most suitable substituents for the N3 position of imidazolium cations, and the LUMO energies of alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations depend on the electron-donating effect and the hyperconjugation effect. Comparing 1,2-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,2-DMIm+) and 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cations (1,3-DMIm+) with the same substituents reveals that the hyperconjugation effect is more significant in influencing the LUMO energy of 1,3-DMIms. This investigation reveals that LUMO energy is a helpful aid in predicting the alkaline stability of imidazolium cations.

  6. Stabilization of solar films against hi temperature deactivation

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, Clinton F.

    1984-03-20

    A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a solar absorptive film consisting essentially of copper oxide, cobalt oxide and manganese oxide; (2) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass or a stainless steel; and (3) an interlayer of platinum, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of platinum to obtain a stable conductor-dielectric tandem.

  7. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  8. Improving the Stability of Astaxanthin by Microencapsulation in Calcium Alginate Beads.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shen-Fu; Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ray-Neng; Chen, Ling-Chun; Ho, Hsiu-O; Tsung, Yu-Han; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Liu, Der-Zen

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the biological functions of astaxanthin and its potential applications in the nutraceutical, cosmetics, food, and feed industries in recent years. However, the unstable structure of astaxanthin considerably limits its application. Therefore, this study reports the encapsulation of astaxanthin in calcium alginate beads using the extrusion method to improve its stability. This study also evaluates the stability of the encapsulated astaxanthin under different storage conditions. The evaluation of astaxanthin stability under various environmental factors reveals that temperature is the most influential environmental factor in astaxanthin degradation. Stability analysis shows that, regardless of the formulation used, the content of astaxanthin encapsulated in alginate beads remains above 90% of the original amount after 21 days of storage at 25°C. These results suggest that the proposed technique is a promising way to enhance the stability of other sensitive compounds. PMID:27093175

  9. Improving the Stability of Astaxanthin by Microencapsulation in Calcium Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shen-Fu; Chen, Ying-Chen; Chen, Ray-Neng; Chen, Ling-Chun; Ho, Hsiu-O; Tsung, Yu-Han; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Liu, Der-Zen

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the biological functions of astaxanthin and its potential applications in the nutraceutical, cosmetics, food, and feed industries in recent years. However, the unstable structure of astaxanthin considerably limits its application. Therefore, this study reports the encapsulation of astaxanthin in calcium alginate beads using the extrusion method to improve its stability. This study also evaluates the stability of the encapsulated astaxanthin under different storage conditions. The evaluation of astaxanthin stability under various environmental factors reveals that temperature is the most influential environmental factor in astaxanthin degradation. Stability analysis shows that, regardless of the formulation used, the content of astaxanthin encapsulated in alginate beads remains above 90% of the original amount after 21 days of storage at 25°C. These results suggest that the proposed technique is a promising way to enhance the stability of other sensitive compounds. PMID:27093175

  10. Improved high operating temperature MCT MWIR modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Figgemeier, H.; Schallenberg, T.; Schirmacher, W.; Wollrab, R.

    2014-06-01

    High operating temperature (HOT) IR-detectors are a key factor to size, weight and power (SWaP) reduced IR-systems. Such systems are essential to provide infantrymen with low-weight handheld systems with increased battery lifetimes or most compact clip-on weapon sights in combination with high electro-optical performance offered by cooled IR-technology. AIM's MCT standard n-on-p technology with vacancy doping has been optimized over many years resulting in MWIR-detectors with excellent electro-optical performance up to operating temperatures of ~120K. In the last years the effort has been intensified to improve this standard technology by introducing extrinsic doping with Gold as an acceptor. As a consequence the dark current could considerably be suppressed and allows for operation at ~140K with good e/o performance. More detailed investigations showed that limitation for HOT > 140K is explained by consequences from rising dark current rather than from defective pixel level. Recently, several crucial parameters were identified showing great promise for further optimization of HOT-performance. Among those, p-type concentration could successfully be reduced from the mid 1016 / cm3 to the lower 1015/ cm3 range. Since AIM is one of the leading manufacturers of split linear cryocoolers, an increase in operating temperature will directly lead to IR-modules with improved SWaP characteristics by making use of the miniature members of its SX cooler family with single piston and balancer technology. The paper will present recent progress in the development of HOT MWIR-detector arrays at AIM and show electro-optical performance data in comparison to focal plane arrays produced in the standard technology.

  11. Improvement in storage stability of infrared dried rough rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop infrared drying (IRD) method to improve the stability of physicochemical properties of rough rice during storage. The effect of IRD on the physicochemical properties of stored rough rice was compared with that of hot air drying (HAD) and ambient air drying ...

  12. Rough surface improves stability of air- sounding balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability of balloons used for measuring the intensity and direction of atmospheric winds at various elevations is improved by incorporating a rough surface on the balloons. The rough-surfaced balloon is useful for collecting wind profiles and other meteorological data.

  13. Substituted silane-diol polymers have improved thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. D.; Curry, J. E.

    1966-01-01

    Organosilicon polymers were synthesized to produce improved physical and chemical properties, including high thermal stability. Of the polymers produced, poly/4, 4 prime-bisoxybi- phenylene/diphenylsilane, formed from bis/anilino/diphenylsilane and p, p prime-biphenol, was found to have the most desirable properties.

  14. Improved Stratospheric Temperature Retrievals for Climate Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokke, L.; Joiner, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Data Assimilation Office (DAO) is embarking on plans to generate a twenty year reanalysis data set of climatic atmospheric variables. One of the focus points will be in the evaluation of the dynamics of the stratosphere. The Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU), flown as part of the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), is one of the primary stratospheric temperature sensors flown consistently throughout the reanalysis period. Seven unique sensors made the measurements over time, with individual instrument characteristics that need to be addressed. The stratospheric temperatures being assimilated across satellite platforms will profoundly impact the reanalysis dynamical fields. To attempt to quantify aspects of instrument and retrieval bias we are carefully collecting and analyzing all available information on the sensors, their instrument anomalies, forward model errors and retrieval biases. For the retrieval of stratospheric temperatures, we adapted the minimum variance approach of Jazwinski (1970) and Rodgers (1976) and applied it to the SSU soundings. In our algorithm, the state vector contains an initial guess of temperature from a model six hour forecast provided by the Goddard EOS Data Assimilation System (GEOS/DAS). This is combined with an a priori covariance matrix, a forward model parameterization, and specifications of instrument noise characteristics. A quasi-Newtonian iteration is used to obtain convergence of the retrieved state to the measurement vector. This algorithm also enables us to analyze and address the systematic errors associated with the unique characteristics of the cell pressures on the individual SSU instruments and the resolving power of the instruments to vertical gradients in the stratosphere. The preliminary results of the improved retrievals and their assimilation as well as baseline calculations of bias and rms error between the NESDIS operational product and col-located ground measurements will be presented.

  15. Structure and Stability of Jarosite at High Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D. D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S. C.; Daemen, L. L.; Hartl, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Jarosite, KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6, and its related sulfates commonly occur in acid drainage environments as the weathering products of sulfide ore deposits. They can also precipitate from aqueous sulfates due to oxidation of H2S in epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activities. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and thus life) on Mars. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and thermodynamic stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 650 K and/or pressures up to 8 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  16. Chemical modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. for improved activity and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, N S; Kishore, Vijay; Manonmani, H K

    2014-01-01

    L-Asparaginase (ASNase), an antileukemia enzyme, is facing problems with antigenicity in the blood. Modification of L-asparaginase from Cladosporium sp. was tried to obtain improved stability and improved functionality. In our experiment, modification of the enzyme was tried with bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin by crosslinking using glutaraldehyde, N-bromosuccinimide, and mono-methoxy polyethylene glycol. Modified enzymes were studied for activity, temperature stability, rate constants (kd), and protection to proteolytic digestion. Modification with ovalbumin resulted in improved enzyme activity that was 10-fold higher compared to native enzyme, while modification with bovine serum albumin through glutaraldehyde cross-linking resulted in high stability of L-asparaginase that was 8.5- and 7.62-fold more compared to native enzyme at 28°C and 37°C by the end of 24 hr. These effects were dependent on the quantity of conjugate formed. Modification also markedly prolonged L-asparaginase half-life and serum stability. N-Bromosuccinimide-modified ASNase presented greater stability with prolonged in vitro half-life of 144 hr to proteolytic digestion relative to unmodified enzyme (93 h). The present work could be seen as producing a modified L-asparaginase with improved activity and stability and can be a potential source for developing therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  17. Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved stability from protozeolitic nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Junlin; Kong Dejin; Yang Weimin; Xie Zaiku; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan

    2007-02-15

    Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with improved hydrothermal stability have been prepared through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route via self-assembly of protozeolitic nanoclusters with cetyltrimethylammonium bromides (CTAB) template micelles in HNO{sub 3} solution. SEM observation confirmed that high-yield aluminosilicate ropes could be produced under proper HNO{sub 3} concentration. NO{sub 3} {sup -} ions had strong binding strength to the CTA{sup +} ions and tended to form more elongated surfactant micelles, thus fibrous products were fabricated under the direction of these long rod micelles in shearing flow. At the same time, the NO{sub 3} {sup -} ions combining with CTA{sup +} ions generated more active (CTA{sup +}NO{sub 3} {sup -}) assembly, which effectively catalysed the polymerization of protozeolitic nanoclusters with large volume into highly ordered mesostructures. Compared with normal MCM-41 silica synthesized through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route in acidic media, the hydrothermal stability was improved considerably. These protozeolitic nanoclusters survived strongly acidic media and entered into mesostructured framework, which contributed to the improvement of hydrothermal stability. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous aluminosilicate ropes with enhanced hydrothermal stability were fabricated from protozeolitic nanoclusters through S{sup +}X{sup -}I{sup +} route in HNO{sub 3} solution under the direction of CTAB templates.

  18. Stability evaluation and improvement of adaptive optics systems by using the Lyapunov stability approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Tao; Liu, Xin-yue; Lin, Xu-dong; Yang, Xiao-xia; Li, Hong-zhuang

    2016-02-01

    In this research, investigations on the closed-loop control stability of adaptive optics systems are conducted by using the Lyapunov approach. As an direct metric of the control stability, the error propagator includes the effects of both the integral gain and the influence matrix and is effective for control-stability evaluation. An experimental 97-element AO system is developed for the control-stability investigation, and the Southwell sensor-actuator configuration rather than the Fried geometry is adopted so as to suppress the potential waffle mode. Because filtering out small singular values of the influence matrix can be used to improve the control stability, the effect of the influence matrix and the effect of the integral gain are considered as a whole by using the error propagator. Then, the control stability of the AO system is evaluated for varying the integral gains and the number of filtered-out singular values. Afterwards, an analysis of the evaluations of the error propagator is made, and a conclusion can be drawn that the control stability can be improved by filtering out more singular values of the influence matrix when the integral gain is high. In other words, the error propagator is useful for trading off the bandwidth error and the fitting error of AO systems in a control-stability approach. Finally, a performance measurement of the experimental AO system is conducted when 13 smaller singular values of the influence matrix are filtered out, and the results show that filtering out a small fraction of the singular values has a minor influence on the performance of this AO system.

  19. Steric stabilization of modified nanoclays triggered by temperature.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana; Parisi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Halloysite clay nanotubes were modified through the adsorption of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-amine terminated (PNIPA-NH2) onto the external surface by exploiting electrostatic interactions at pH=6. In spite the amount of attached polymer is rather low (1 wt%), the properties of the nanotubes are deeply modified. The apparent specific volume and isentropic compressibilities of the hybrid nanomaterial dispersed in water evidenced the transferring of the termosensitive property from the polymer to halloysite. The hydrodynamic radius as well as the ζ-potential of the nanohybrid are consistent with the attachment of a positively charged polymer onto the negative surface of the nanotube. The colloidal stability was strongly enhanced in the temperature domain below the lower critical solution temperature. This methodology endowed to obtain hollow nanotubes with a stimuli-responsive corona. PMID:26409004

  20. [Stability of CaF2 at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Qi, Qingjie; Liu, Jianzhong; Cao, Xinyu; Zhou, Junhu; Zhang, Shuxin; Kefa, Cen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of CaF2 in atmosphere, dry and moist air at elevated temperatures were studied by gaseous fluorides direct absorption and fluoride ion-selective electrode (ISE) measurements technique supplemented by differential thermal analysis (DTA), chemical analysis (pyrohydrolysis-ISE method) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The principal reaction was shown to be hydrolysis of CaF2 at high temperature and CaF2 were actually hydrolyzed appreciably at about 830 +/- 10 degrees C in moist atmospheres. Kinetics calculation showed that hydrolysis reaction was first order and the activation energy for the hydrolysis was 115 +/- 2 kJ/mol, applicable over the range 850 degrees C-1350 degrees C. The research results will be of significance for fluoride pollution control during coal combustion and clay-brickmaking. PMID:12145925

  1. [Stability of CaF2 at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Qi, Qingjie; Liu, Jianzhong; Cao, Xinyu; Zhou, Junhu; Zhang, Shuxin; Kefa, Cen

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, the stabilities of CaF2 in atmosphere, dry and moist air at elevated temperatures were studied by gaseous fluorides direct absorption and fluoride ion-selective electrode (ISE) measurements technique supplemented by differential thermal analysis (DTA), chemical analysis (pyrohydrolysis-ISE method) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The principal reaction was shown to be hydrolysis of CaF2 at high temperature and CaF2 were actually hydrolyzed appreciably at about 830 +/- 10 degrees C in moist atmospheres. Kinetics calculation showed that hydrolysis reaction was first order and the activation energy for the hydrolysis was 115 +/- 2 kJ/mol, applicable over the range 850 degrees C-1350 degrees C. The research results will be of significance for fluoride pollution control during coal combustion and clay-brickmaking.

  2. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-08-09

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  3. An Efficient and Configurable Preprocessing Algorithm to Improve Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Ilaria; Cantoni, Elena; Cernigliaro, Alice; Signorile, Giovanna; Fantino, Gianluca; Tavella, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) is widely used to measure the stability of experimental time series. Specifically, AVAR is commonly used in space applications such as monitoring the clocks of the global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). In these applications, the experimental data present some peculiar aspects which are not generally encountered when the measurements are carried out in a laboratory. Space clocks' data can in fact present outliers, jumps, and missing values, which corrupt the clock characterization. Therefore, an efficient preprocessing is fundamental to ensure a proper data analysis and improve the stability estimation performed with the AVAR or other similar variances. In this work, we propose a preprocessing algorithm and its implementation in a robust software code (in MATLAB language) able to deal with time series of experimental data affected by nonstationarities and missing data; our method is properly detecting and removing anomalous behaviors, hence making the subsequent stability analysis more reliable. PMID:26540679

  4. An Efficient and Configurable Preprocessing Algorithm to Improve Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Ilaria; Cantoni, Elena; Cernigliaro, Alice; Signorile, Giovanna; Fantino, Gianluca; Tavella, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) is widely used to measure the stability of experimental time series. Specifically, AVAR is commonly used in space applications such as monitoring the clocks of the global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). In these applications, the experimental data present some peculiar aspects which are not generally encountered when the measurements are carried out in a laboratory. Space clocks' data can in fact present outliers, jumps, and missing values, which corrupt the clock characterization. Therefore, an efficient preprocessing is fundamental to ensure a proper data analysis and improve the stability estimation performed with the AVAR or other similar variances. In this work, we propose a preprocessing algorithm and its implementation in a robust software code (in MATLAB language) able to deal with time series of experimental data affected by nonstationarities and missing data; our method is properly detecting and removing anomalous behaviors, hence making the subsequent stability analysis more reliable.

  5. Stability of CdTe solar cells at elevated temperatures: Bias, temperature, and Cu dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltner, Jason F.; Sites, James R.

    1999-03-01

    A systematic study of the stability of CdTe solar cells fabricated by SCI and NREL has been made. Cells were stressed at elevated temperatures under various bias conditions, both with illumination (˜2 suns) and in the dark. An activation energy of approximately 1 eV is implied from cells stressed at various elevated temperatures. The stability of CdTe solar cells was found to be bias dependent and device-specific. Cells made with thick CdTe and no back-contact copper as well as by at least one SCI recipe were very stable. Extrapolation of effects assuming Arrhenius behavior yields estimated lifetime expectations for the cells stressed at elevated temperatures.

  6. Mast Cell Stabilization Improves Survival by Preventing Apoptosis in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laura; Peña, Geber; Cai, Bolin; Deitch, E. A.; Ulloa, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Inhibiting single cytokines produced modest effects in clinical trials, in part because the cytokines werenot specific for sepsis, and sepsis may require cellular strategies. Previous studies reported that mast cells (MCs) fight infections in early sepsis. In this study, we report that MC stabilizers restrain serum TNF levels and improve survival in wild-type but not in MC-deficient mice. Yet, MC depletion in knockout mice attenuates serum TNF but does not improve survival in sepsis. Serum HMGB1 was the only factor correlating with survival. MC stabilizers inhibit systemic HMGB1 levels and rescue mice from established peritonitis. MC stabilizers fail to inhibit HMGB1 secretion from macrophages, but they prevent apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in sepsis. These results suggest that MC stabilization provides therapeutic benefits in sepsis by inhibiting extracellular release of HMGB1 from apoptotic cells. Our study provides the first evidence that MCs have major immunological implications regulating cell death in sepsis and represent a pharmacological target for infectious disorders in a clinically realistic time frame. PMID:20519642

  7. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EcheverrÍa Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  8. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) <=10-16 , dominated by atom number fluctuation noise. We also provide updates on our cryogenic sapphire cavity with a reduced thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  9. Benzodiazepine stability in postmortem samples stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula; Bastos, M Lourdes; Teixeira, Helena M

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepine (lorazepam, estazolam, chlordiazepoxide, and ketazolam) stability was studied in postmortem blood, bile, and vitreous humor stored at different temperatures over six months. The influence of NaF, in blood and bile samples, was also investigated. A solid-phase extraction technique was used on all the studied samples, and benzodiazepine quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection. Benzodiazepine concentration remained almost stable in all samples stored at -20°C and -80°C. Estazolam appeared to be a stable benzodiazepine during the six-month study, and ketazolam proved to be the most unstable benzodiazepine. A 100% loss of ketazolam occurred in all samples stored over 1 or 2 weeks at room temperature and over 8 or 12 weeks at 4°C, with the simultaneous detection of diazepam. Chlordiazepoxide suffered complete degradation in all samples, except preserved bile samples, stored at room temperature. Samples stored at 4°C for 6 months had a 29-100% decrease in chlordiazepoxide concentration. The data obtained suggest that results from samples with these benzodiazepines stored long-term should be cautiously interpreted. Bile and vitreous humor proved to be the most advantageous samples in cases where degradation of benzodiazepines by microorganisms may occur.

  10. Stability of coronene at high temperature and pressure.

    PubMed

    Jennings, E; Montgomery, W; Lerch, Ph

    2010-12-01

    The infrared response of coronene (C(24)H(12)) under pressure and temperature conditions up to 10 GPa and 300 °C is examined in situ using a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron-source Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Coronene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon that is present in the interstellar medium and meteorites which may have contributed to the Earth's primordial carbon budget. It appears to undergo a reversible phase transition between 2 and 3.2 GPa at ambient temperature; new intramolecular bonds in the region 840-880 cm(-1) result from compression. We document the shift of spectral features to higher wavenumbers with increasing pressure but find this change suppressed by increased temperature. By investigating the stability of coronene over a range of naturally occurring conditions found in a range of environments, we assess the survival of the molecule through various terrestrial and extraterrestrial processes. Coronene has previously been shown to survive atmospheric entry during Earth accretion; this can now be extended to include survival through geological processes such as subduction and silicate melting of the rock cycle, opening the possibility of extraterrestrial coronene predating terrestrial accretion existing on Earth.

  11. Bonding glass to metal with plastic for stability over temperature: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Chris L.; Petrie, Stephen P.

    2002-09-01

    To enable the invention of new optical instruments subjected to a broad range of operating conditions, there is a need to develop improved technology to hold small mirrors and other optical elements with high dimensional stability and low cost. A previous paper described a screening experiment on small face bonded mirrors subjected to an environment of -41 to +70 degree(s)C with the intent of finding factors that influence the bond joint's contribution to angular stability. This paper describes part of the continuing experiment, specifically addressing BK-7 mirrors bonded to Aluminum mounts with a flexible adhesive. The resulting tilt errors in the mirror assemblies were measured, and showed a definite pattern with respect to bond thickness. Flexible bonds between these two CTE mismatched materials did not fail, and exhibited high stability over temperature at 0.002-inch bond thickness.

  12. Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeeswara Rao, Ch.; Venkatesan, K. A.; Tata, B. V. R.; Nagarajan, K.; Srinivasan, T. G.; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.

    2011-05-01

    Radiation stability of some room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) that find useful electrochemical applications in nuclear fuel cycle has been evaluated. The ionic liquids such as protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (HbetNTf 2), aliquat 336 (tri-n-octlymethylammonium chloride), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (bmimCl), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (hmimCl), N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMPyNTf 2) and N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (MPPiNTf 2) have been irradiated to various absorbed dose levels, up to 700 kGy. The effect of gamma radiation on these ionic liquids has been evaluated by determining the variations in the physical properties such as color, density, viscosity, refractive index and electrochemical window. The changes in density, viscosity and refractive index of these ionic liquids upon irradiation were insignificant; however, the color and electrochemical window varied significantly with increase of absorbed dose.

  13. High-Temperature Natural Antioxidant Improves Soy Oil for Frying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the frying stability of soybean oil (SBO) treated with a natural citric acid-based antioxidant, EPT-OILShield able to withstand high temperatures and to establish the oxidative stability of food fried in the treated oil. Soybean oil with 0.05% and 0.5%...

  14. The stability of tin silicon oxide thin-film transistors with different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen; Fu, Ruofan; Han, Yanbing; Meng, Ting; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The influence of annealing temperature on the electrical properties of tin silicon oxide (TSO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) and the corresponding bias stress stability have been investigated. With increasing annealing temperature, the TSO films present a structure which is closer to crystallization, and it is conducive to the improvement of the mobility of TSO TFTs. Meanwhile, the positive bias stress (PBS) stability of TSO TFTs is ameliorated due to the decreasing traps at the interface of dielectric layer and channel layer. The threshold voltage shifts in opposite direction after being stressed under negative bias stress (NBS), which is due to the competition between electrons captured by defects related to oxygen vacancies in the channel layer and water molecule adsorption on the back channel.

  15. Note: Improving long-term stability of hot-wire anemometer sensors by means of annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Lundström, H.

    2015-08-15

    Annealing procedures for hot-wire sensors of platinum and platinum-plated tungsten have been investigated experimentally. It was discovered that the two investigated sensor metals behave quite differently during the annealing process, but for both types annealing may improve long-term stability considerably. Measured drift of sensors both without and with prior annealing is presented. Suggestions for suitable annealing temperatures and times are given.

  16. Note: Improving long-term stability of hot-wire anemometer sensors by means of annealing.

    PubMed

    Lundström, H

    2015-08-01

    Annealing procedures for hot-wire sensors of platinum and platinum-plated tungsten have been investigated experimentally. It was discovered that the two investigated sensor metals behave quite differently during the annealing process, but for both types annealing may improve long-term stability considerably. Measured drift of sensors both without and with prior annealing is presented. Suggestions for suitable annealing temperatures and times are given.

  17. Application of SMES in wind farm to improve voltage stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Tang, Y. J.; Ren, L.; Li, J. D.; Chen, S. J.

    2008-09-01

    For the wind farms introducing doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs), voltage stability is an essential issue which influences their widely integration into the power grid. This paper proposes the application of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the power system integrated with wind farms. SMES can control the active and reactive power flow, realizing the operation in four quadrants independently. The introducing of SMES can smooth the output power flow of the wind farms, and supply dynamic voltage support. Using MATLAB/SIMULINK, the models of the DFIG, the power grid connected and the SMES are created. Simulation results show that the voltage stability of the power system integrated with wind farms can be improved considerably.

  18. Improved Intrinsic Stability of CdTe Polycrystalline Thin Film Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.; Berniard, T.; McMahon, T.; Noufi, R.; Demtsu, S.

    2005-01-01

    A systems-driven approach linking upstream solar cell device fabrication history with downstream performance and stability has been applied to CdS/CdTe small-area device research. The best resulting initial performance (using thinner CdS, thicker CdTe, no oxygen during VCC, and the use of NP etch) was shown to simultaneously correlate with poor stability. Increasing the CdS layer thickness significantly improved stability at only a slight decrease in overall performance. It was also determined that cell perimeter effects can accelerate degradation in these devices. A ''margined'' contact significantly reduces the contribution of edge shunting to degradation, and thus yields a more accurate determination of the intrinsic stability. Pspice discrete element models demonstrate how spatially localized defects can effectively dominate degradation. Mitigation of extrinsic shunting improved stabilized efficiency degradation levels (SEDL) to near 20% in 100 C tests. Further process optimization to reduce intrinsic effects improved SEDL to better than 10% at the same stress temperatures and times.

  19. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Glen A.; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-10-26

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (~500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko–Scheffler van der Waals corrections. Additionally, the embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ~0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Furthermore, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are

  20. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Glen A; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Nimlos, Mark R; Curtiss, Larry A; Beckham, Gregg T

    2015-11-19

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (∼500 °C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and Tkatchenko-Scheffler van der Waals corrections. The embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ∼0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Moreover, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are possible at

  1. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chun; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Chen, Yen-Chang; Siordia, Andrew; Martini, Ashlie; Tung, Vincent C.

    2015-04-15

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C{sub 60}s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C{sub 60}s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that “lock up” the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C{sub 60}s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C{sub 60}s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current–voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C{sub 60}:SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of solvent resistant, mechanically flexible and electrically addressable 2-D soft graphene nanoribbons facilitates the assembly of photoconductive carbon nano-p/n junctions for thermally stable and flexible photovoltaic cells.

  2. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chun; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Chen, Yen-Chang; Siordia, Andrew; Martini, Ashlie; Tung, Vincent C.

    2015-04-01

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C60s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C60s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that "lock up" the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C60s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C60s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current-voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C60:SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests.

  3. Tailless aircraft performance improvements with relaxed static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenas, Irving L.; Klyde, David H.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the tailless aircraft performance improvements gained from relaxed static stability, to quantify this potential in terms of range-payload improvements, and to identify other possible operational and handling benefits or problems. Two configurations were chosen for the study: a modern high aspect ratio, short-chord wing proposed as a high-altitude long endurance (HALE) remotely piloted vehicle; a wider, lower aspect ratio, high volume wing suitable for internal stowage of all fuel and payload required for a manned long-range reconnaissance mission. Flying at best cruise altitude, both unstable configurations were found to have a 14 percent improvement in range and a 7 to 9 percent improvement in maximum endurance compared to the stable configurations. The unstable manned configuration also shows a 15 percent improvement in the 50 ft takeoff obstacle distance and an improved height response to elevator control. However, it is generally more deficient in control power due to its larger adverse aileron yaw and its higher takeoff and landing lift coefficient C(sub L), both due to the downward trimmed (vs. upward trimmed for stable configurations) trailing edge surfaces.

  4. Improved physical stability of amorphous state through acid base interactions.

    PubMed

    Telang, Chitra; Mujumdar, Siddharthya; Mathew, Michael

    2009-06-01

    To investigate role of specific interactions in aiding formation and stabilization of amorphous state in ternary and binary dispersions of a weakly acidic drug. Indomethacin (IMC), meglumine (MU), and polyvinyl pyrollidone (PVP) were the model drug, base, and polymer, respectively. Dispersions were prepared using solvent evaporation. Physical mixtures were cryogenically coground. XRPD, PLM, DSC, TGA, and FTIR were used for characterization. MU has a high crystallization tendency and is characterized by a low T(g) (17 degrees C). IMC crystallization was inhibited in ternary dispersion with MU compared to IMC/PVP alone. An amorphous state formed readily even in coground mixtures. Spectroscopic data are indicative of an IMC-MU amorphous salt and supports solid-state proton transfer. IMC-MU salt displays a low T(g) approximately 50 degrees C, but is more physically stable than IMC, which in molecular mixtures with MU, resisted crystallization even when present in stoichiometric excess of base. This is likely due to a disrupted local structure of amorphous IMC due to specific interactions. IMC showed improved physical stability on incorporating MU in polymer, in spite of low T(g) of the base indicating that chemical interactions play a dominant role in physical stabilization. Salt formation could be induced thermally and mechanically.

  5. Robust enzyme design: bioinformatic tools for improved protein stability.

    PubMed

    Suplatov, Dmitry; Voevodin, Vladimir; Švedas, Vytas

    2015-03-01

    The ability of proteins and enzymes to maintain a functionally active conformation under adverse environmental conditions is an important feature of biocatalysts, vaccines, and biopharmaceutical proteins. From an evolutionary perspective, robust stability of proteins improves their biological fitness and allows for further optimization. Viewed from an industrial perspective, enzyme stability is crucial for the practical application of enzymes under the required reaction conditions. In this review, we analyze bioinformatic-driven strategies that are used to predict structural changes that can be applied to wild type proteins in order to produce more stable variants. The most commonly employed techniques can be classified into stochastic approaches, empirical or systematic rational design strategies, and design of chimeric proteins. We conclude that bioinformatic analysis can be efficiently used to study large protein superfamilies systematically as well as to predict particular structural changes which increase enzyme stability. Evolution has created a diversity of protein properties that are encoded in genomic sequences and structural data. Bioinformatics has the power to uncover this evolutionary code and provide a reproducible selection of hotspots - key residues to be mutated in order to produce more stable and functionally diverse proteins and enzymes. Further development of systematic bioinformatic procedures is needed to organize and analyze sequences and structures of proteins within large superfamilies and to link them to function, as well as to provide knowledge-based predictions for experimental evaluation.

  6. Thermal Design to Meet Stringent Temperature Gradient/Stability Requirements of SWIFT BAT Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is an instrument on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) SWIFT spacecraft. It is designed to detect gamma ray burst over a broad region of the sky and quickly align the telescopes on the spacecraft to the gamma ray source. The thermal requirements for the BAT detector arrays are very stringent. The maximum allowable temperature gradient of the 256 cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors is PC. Also, the maximum allowable rate of temperature change of the ASICs of the 256 Detector Modules (DMs) is PC on any time scale. The total power dissipation of the DMs and Block Command & Data Handling (BCDH) is 180 W. This paper presents a thermal design that uses constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) to minimize the temperature gradient of the DMs, and loop heat pipes (LHPs) to transport the waste heat to the radiator. The LHPs vary the effective thermal conductance from the DMs to the radiator to minimize heater power to meet the heater power budget, and to improve the temperature stability. The DMs are cold biased, and active heater control is used to meet the temperature gradient and stability requirements.

  7. Stability of a Crystal Oscillator, Type Si530, Inside and Beyond its Specified Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Data acquisition and control systems depend on timing signals for proper operation and required accuracy. These clocked signals are typically provided by some form of an oscillator set to produce a repetitive, defined signal at a given frequency. Crystal oscillators are commonly used because they are less expensive, smaller, and more reliable than other types of oscillators. Because of the inherent characteristics of the crystal, the oscillators exhibit excellent frequency stability within the specified range of operational temperature. In some cases, however, some compensation techniques are adopted to further improve the thermal stability of a crystal oscillator. Very limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) crystal oscillators at temperatures beyond the manufacturer's specified operating temperature range. This information is very crucial if any of these parts were to be used in circuits designed for use in space exploration missions where extreme temperature swings and thermal cycling are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the operation of Silicon Laboratories crystal oscillator, type Si530, under specified and extreme ambient temperatures.

  8. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  9. Comparison of Temperature and Additives Affecting the Stability of the Probiotic Weissella cibaria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Youn-Shin; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lim, Hoi-Soon

    2012-01-01

    Daily use of probiotic chewing gum might have a beneficial effect on oral health, and it is important that the viability of the probiotics be maintained in this food product. In this study, we examined the stability of probiotic chewing gum containing Weissella cibaria. We evaluated the effects of various factors, including temperature and additives, on the survival of freeze-dried probiotic W. cibaria powder. No changes in viability were detected during storage at 4℃ for 5 months, whereas the viability of bacteria stored at 20℃ decreased. The stability of probiotic chewing gum decreased steadily during storage at 20℃ for 4 weeks. The viability of the freeze-dried W. cibaria mixed with various additives, such as xylitol, sorbitol, menthol, sugar ester, magnesium stearate, and vitamin C, was determined over a 4-week storage period at 20℃. Most of the freeze-dried bacteria except for those mixed with menthol and vitamin C were generally stable during a 3-week storage period. Overall, our study showed that W. cibaria was more stable at 4℃ than that at 20℃. In addition, menthol and vitamin C had a detrimental effect on the storage stability of W. cibaria. This is the first study to examine the effects of various chewing gum additives on the stability of W. cibaria. Further studies will be needed to improve the stability of probiotic bacteria for developing a novel probiotic W. cibaria gum. PMID:23323221

  10. Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops

    PubMed Central

    Kaback, David B.; Angerer, Lynne M.; Davidson, Norman

    1979-01-01

    Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops for visualization in the electron microscope are presented. The two complementary strands of a duplex DNA are photochemically crosslinked once every 1 to 3 kb using 4, 5', 8 trimethylpsoralen. R-loops are then formed by incubation with RNA in 70% formamide at a temperature above the DNA melting temperature. Finally, the R-loops are stabilized by modifying the free single strand of DNA with glyoxal, thus minimizing the displacement of the hybridized RNA by branch migration. In this manner R-loops can be formed and visualized at a high frequency irrespective of the base composition of the nucleic acid of interest. Images PMID:379821

  11. Arthrobacter sp. lipase immobilization for improvement in stability and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Asha; Parshad, Rajinder; Koul, Surrinder; Taneja, Subhash C; Qazi, Ghulam N

    2006-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. lipase (ABL, MTCC no. 5125) is being recognized as an efficient enzyme for the resolution of drugs and their intermediates. The immobilization of ABL on various matrices for its enantioselectivity, stability, and reusability has been studied. Immobilization by covalent bonding on sepharose and silica afforded a maximum of 380 and 40 IU/g activity, respectively, whereas sol-gel entrapment provided a maximum of 150 IU/g activity in dry powder. The immobilized enzyme displayed excellent stability in the pH range of 4-10 and even at higher temperature, i.e., 50-60 degrees C, compared to free enzyme, which is unstable under extreme conditions. The resolution of racemic auxiliaries like 1-phenyl ethanol and an intermediate of antidepressant drug fluoxetine, i.e., ethyl 3-hydroxy-3-phenylpropanoate alkyl acylates, provided exclusively R-(+) products ( approximately 99% ee, E=646 and 473), compared to cell free extract/whole cells which gave a product with approximately 96% ee (E=106 and 150). The repeated use (ten times) of covalently immobilized and entrapped ABL resulted in no loss in activity, thus demonstrating its prospects for commercial applications. PMID:16896604

  12. Polyurethane adhesive with improved high temperature properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A polyurethane resin with paste activator, capable of providing useful bond strengths over the temperature range of -184 C to 149 C, is described. The adhesive system has a pot life of over one hour. Tensile shear strength ratings are given for various adhesive formulations.

  13. Magnetic-divertor stabilization of an axisymmetric plasma with anisotropic temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Sasagawa, Y.; Katanuma, I.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Cho, T.; Pastukhov, V. P.

    2006-12-15

    Magnetohydrodynamic stabilization of an axisymmetric mirror plasma with a magnetic divertor is studied. An equation is found for the flute modes, which includes the stabilizing influence of ion temperature anisotropy and nonparaxial magnetic fields, as well as a finite ion Larmor radius. It is shown that if the density profile is sufficiently gentle, then the nonparaxial configuration can stabilize all modes as long as ion temperature is radially uniform. This can be demonstrated even when the density vanishes on the separatrix and even for small ion Larmor radii. It is found, however, that the ion temperature gradient makes the unstable region wider; high ion temperature is required to stabilize the flute mode.

  14. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  15. Improved algorithm for solving nonlinear parabolized stability equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Cun-bo; Liu, Jian-xin; Luo, Ji-sheng

    2016-08-01

    Due to its high computational efficiency and ability to consider nonparallel and nonlinear effects, nonlinear parabolized stability equations (NPSE) approach has been widely used to study the stability and transition mechanisms. However, it often diverges in hypersonic boundary layers when the amplitude of disturbance reaches a certain level. In this study, an improved algorithm for solving NPSE is developed. In this algorithm, the mean flow distortion is included into the linear operator instead of into the nonlinear forcing terms in NPSE. An under-relaxation factor for computing the nonlinear terms is introduced during the iteration process to guarantee the robustness of the algorithm. Two case studies, the nonlinear development of stationary crossflow vortices and the fundamental resonance of the second mode disturbance in hypersonic boundary layers, are presented to validate the proposed algorithm for NPSE. Results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) are regarded as the baseline for comparison. Good agreement can be found between the proposed algorithm and DNS, which indicates the great potential of the proposed method on studying the crossflow and streamwise instability in hypersonic boundary layers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11332007 and 11402167).

  16. Improving Separation Assurance Stability Through Trajectory Flexibility Preservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idris, Husni; Shen, Ni; Wing, David J.

    2010-01-01

    New information and automation technologies are enabling the distribution of tasks and decisions from the service providers to the users of the air traffic system, with potential capacity and cost benefits. This distribution of tasks and decisions raises the concern that independent user actions will decrease the predictability and increase the complexity of the traffic system, hence inhibiting and possibly reversing any potential benefits. One such concern is the adverse impact of uncoordinated actions by individual aircraft on the stability of separation assurance. For example, individual aircraft performing self-separation may resolve predicted losses of separation or conflicts with some traffic, only to result in secondary conflicts with other traffic or with the same traffic later in time. In answer to this concern, this paper proposes metrics for preserving user trajectory flexibility to be used in self-separation along with other objectives. The hypothesis is that preserving trajectory flexibility will naturally reduce the creation of secondary conflicts by bringing about implicit coordination between aircraft. The impact of using these metrics on improving self-separation stability is investigated by measuring the impact on secondary conflicts. The scenarios analyzed include aircraft in en route airspace with each aircraft meeting a required time of arrival in a twenty minute time horizon while maintaining separation from the surrounding traffic and using trajectory flexibility metrics to mitigate the risk of secondary conflicts. Preliminary experiments showed promising results in that the trajectory flexibility preservation reduced the potential for secondary conflicts.

  17. Modifications to improve entrance slit thermal stability for grasshopper monochromators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Daniel J.; Rogers, Gregory C.; Crossley, Sherry L.

    1994-08-01

    As new monochromators are designed for high-flux storage rings, computer modeling and thermal engineering can be done to process increased heat loads and achieve mechanical stability. Several older monochromators, such as the Mark 2 and Mark 5 Grasshopper monochromators, which were designed in 1974, have thermal instabilities in their entrance slit mechanisms. The Grasshoppers operating with narrow slits experience closure of the entrance slit from thermal expansion. In extreme cases, the thermal expansion of the precision components has caused permanent mechanical damage, leaving the slit uncalibrated and/or inoperable. For the Mark 2 and Mark 5 Grasshopper monochromators at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, the original 440 stainless steel entrance slit jaws were retrofitted with an Invar (low expansion Fe, Ni alloy) slit jaw. To transfer the heat from the critical components, two flexible heat straps of Cu were attached. These changes allow safe operation with a 10 μm entrance slit width where the previous limit was 30 μm. After an initial 2 min equilibration, the slit remains stable to 10%, with 100 mA of beam current. Additional improvements in slit thermal stability are planned for a third Grasshopper.

  18. Improved algorithm for solving nonlinear parabolized stability equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Cun-bo; Liu, Jian-xin; Luo, Ji-sheng

    2016-08-01

    Due to its high computational efficiency and ability to consider nonparallel and nonlinear effects, nonlinear parabolized stability equations (NPSE) approach has been widely used to study the stability and transition mechanisms. However, it often diverges in hypersonic boundary layers when the amplitude of disturbance reaches a certain level. In this study, an improved algorithm for solving NPSE is developed. In this algorithm, the mean flow distortion is included into the linear operator instead of into the nonlinear forcing terms in NPSE. An under-relaxation factor for computing the nonlinear terms is introduced during the iteration process to guarantee the robustness of the algorithm. Two case studies, the nonlinear development of stationary crossflow vortices and the fundamental resonance of the second mode disturbance in hypersonic boundary layers, are presented to validate the proposed algorithm for NPSE. Results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) are regarded as the baseline for comparison. Good agreement can be found between the proposed algorithm and DNS, which indicates the great potential of the proposed method on studying the crossflow and streamwise instability in hypersonic boundary layers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11332007 and 11402167).

  19. Improvement of vehicle roll stability by varying suspension properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Taehyun; Velusamy, Pradheep C.

    2011-02-01

    Vehicle roll dynamics are strongly influenced by suspension properties such as roll centre height, roll steer, and roll camber. In this paper, the effects of suspension properties on vehicle roll response have been investigated using a multi-body vehicle dynamics programme. Roll dynamics of a vehicle model with MacPherson (front) and multilink (rear) suspensions were evaluated for the fishhook manoeuvre and variations of its roll response due to changes in the suspension properties were assessed by quantitatively analysing the vehicle response through simulation. Critical suspension design parameters for vehicle roll dynamics were identified and adjusted to improve roll stability of the vehicle model with passive suspension. Design of experiments has been used for identifying critical hardpoints affecting the suspension parameters, and optimisation techniques were employed for parameter optimisation. This approach provides a viable alternative to costlier active control systems for economy-class vehicles.

  20. Storage stability and improvement of intermediate moisture foods, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labuza, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for improvement of shelf-life stability of intermediate moisture foods are considered. It was found that vitamin C is the most limiting vitamin from a nutritional standpoint with its rate of destruction increasing with a sub w. Techniques for microbial challenge studies were developed. It was shown that organisms have a higher growth a sub w limit if the IMF is prepared by the adsorption process and long times are needed for challenge studies. Several alternative antimycotic systems were found. It was also found that the vegetative cells of pathogens have a maximum heat resistance in the IMF a sub w range. If glycols are in the formula, the IMF should have as high an a sub w as possible. The reverse is true if lipid oxidation occurs. In addition, to prevent rancidity, antioxidants and a low O2 atmosphere are necessary. The package also must be a good moisture barrier.

  1. Improved efficiency and stability of secnidazole - An ideal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman; Haseeb, Mohd; Baig, Mohd Hassan; Bagga, Paramdeep Singh; Siddiqui, H H; Kamal, M A; Khan, Mohd Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Secnidazole (α,2-Dimethyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazole-1-ethanol) is a highly effective drug against a variety of G(+)/G(-) bacteria but with significant side effects because it is being used in very high concentration. In this study, gold nanoparticles (GNPS) were selected as a vehicle to deliver secnidazole drug at the specific site with more accuracy which made the drug highly effective at substantially low concentrations. The as-synthesized GNPs were capped with Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and subsequently bioconjugated with secnidazole because HSA provides the stability and improves the solubility of the bioconjugated drug, secnidazole. The quantification of covalently bioconjugated secnidazole with HSA encapsulated on enzymatically synthesized GNPs was done with RP-HPLC having SPD-20 A UV/VIS detector by using the C-18 column. The bioconjugation of GNPs with secnidazole was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The bioconjugated GNPs were characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, TEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and DLS. Zeta potential confirmed the stability and uniform distribution of particles in the emulsion of GNPs. The separation of bioconjugated GNPs, unused GNPs and unused drug was done by gel filtration chromatography. The minimal inhibitory concentration of secnidazole-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Au-HSA-Snd) against Klebsiella pneumonia (NCIM No. 2957) and Bacillus cereus (NCIM No. 2156) got improved by 12.2 times and 14.11 times, respectively, in comparison to pure secnidazole. Precisely, the MIC of Au-HSA-Snd against K. pneumonia (NCIM No. 2957) and B. cereus (NCIM No. 2156) were found to be 0.35 and 0.43 μg/ml, respectively whereas MIC of the pure secnidazole drug against the same bacteria were found to be 4.3 and 6.07 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:25561882

  2. Highly conductive carbon nanotube buckypapers with improved doping stability via conjugational cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Wen Peter; Liang, Richard; Zhao, Haibo; Wang, Ben; Zhang, Chuck

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets or buckypapers have demonstrated promising electrical conductivity and mechanical performance. However, their electrical conductivity is still far below the requirements for engineering applications, such as using as a substitute for copper mesh, which is currently used in composite aircraft structures for lightning strike protection. In this study, different CNT buckypapers were stretched to increase their alignment, and then subjected to conjugational cross-linking via chemical functionalization. The conjugationally cross-linked buckypapers (CCL-BPs) demonstrated higher electrical conductivity of up to 6200 S cm - 1, which is more than one order increase compared to the pristine buckypapers. The CCL-BPs also showed excellent doping stability in over 300 h in atmosphere and were resistant to degradation at elevated temperatures. The tensile strength of the stretched CCL-BPs reached 220 MPa, which is about three times that of pristine buckypapers. We attribute these property improvements to the effective and stable conjugational cross-links of CNTs, which can simultaneously improve the electrical conductivity, doping stability and mechanical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity increase resulted from improving the CNT alignment and inter-tube electron transport capability. The conjugational cross-links provide effective 3D conductive paths to increase the mobility of electrons among individual nanotubes. The stable covalent bonding also enhances the thermal stability and load transfer. The significant electrical and mechanical property improvement renders buckypaper a multifunctional material for various applications, such as conducting composites, battery electrodes, capacitors, etc.

  3. Improved Refractometer for Measuring Temperatures of Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqwi, Amir A.

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Rainbow refractometer is an enhanced version of the Rainbow refractometer, which is added to, and extends the capabilities of, a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A PDPA utilizes pairs of laser beams to measure individual components of velocity and sizes of drops in a spray. The Rainbow-refractometer addition measures the temperatures of individual drops. The designs of prior versions of the Rainbow refractometer have required substantial modifications of PDPA transmitting optics, plus dedicated lasers as sources of illumination separate from, and in addition to, those needed for PDPA measurements. The enhancement embodied in the Dual Rainbow refractometer eliminates the need for a dedicated laser and confers other advantages as described below. A dedicated laser is no longer needed because the Dual Rainbow refractometer utilizes one of the pairs of laser beams already present in a PDPA. Hence, the design of the Dual Rainbow refractometer simplifies the task of upgrading PDPA hardware to enable measurement of temperature. Furthermore, in a PDPA/Dual Rainbow refractometer system, a single argon-ion laser with three main wavelengths can be used to measure the temperatures, sizes, and all three components of velocity (in contradistinction to only two components of velocity in a prior PDPA/Rainbow refractometer system). In order to enable the Dual Rainbow refractometer to utilize a pair of PDPA laser beams, it was necessary to (1) find a location for the refractometer receiver, such that the combined rainbow patterns of two laser beams amount to a pattern identical to that of a single beam, (2) adjust the polarization of the two beams to obtain the strongest rainbow pattern, and (3) find a location for the PDPA receiver to obtain a linear relationship between the measured phase shift and drop size.

  4. Improving Kinetic or Thermodynamic Stability of an Azoreductase by Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Brissos, Vânia; Gonçalves, Nádia; Melo, Eduardo P.; Martins, Lígia O.

    2014-01-01

    Protein stability arises from a combination of factors which are often difficult to rationalise. Therefore its improvement is better addressed through directed evolution than by rational design approaches. In this study, five rounds of mutagenesis/recombination followed by high-throughput screening (≈10,000 clones) yielded the hit 1B6 showing a 300-fold higher half life at 50°C than that exhibited by the homodimeric wild type PpAzoR azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94. The characterization using fluorescence, calorimetry and light scattering shows that 1B6 has a folded state slightly less stable than the wild type (with lower melting and optimal temperatures) but in contrast is more resistant to irreversible denaturation. The superior kinetic stability of 1B6 variant was therefore related to an increased resistance of the unfolded monomers to aggregation through the introduction of mutations that disturbed hydrophobic patches and increased the surface net charge of the protein. Variants 2A1 and 2A1-Y179H with increased thermodynamic stability (10 to 20°C higher melting temperature than wild type) were also examined showing the distinctive nature of mutations that lead to improved structural robustness: these occur in residues that are mostly involved in strengthening the solvent-exposed loops or the inter-dimer interactions of the folded state. PMID:24475252

  5. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  6. Stability improvement of immobilized lactoperoxidase using polyaniline polymer.

    PubMed

    Jafary, Fariba; Kashanian, Soheila; Sharieat, Ziadin Samsam; Jafary, Farzaneh; Omidfar, Kobra; Paknejad, Maliheh

    2012-12-01

    Enzyme engineering via immobilization techniques is perfectly compatible against the other chemical or biological approximate to improve enzyme functions and stability. In this study lactoperoxidase was immobilized onto polyaniline polymer activated with glutaraldehyde as a bifunctional agent, to improve enzyme properties. Polyaniline polymer was used due its unique physical and chemical properties to immobilize lactoperoxidase (LPO). The optimum activity of immobilized LPO was observed at pH 6 and 55 °C, which has been increased about 10 °C for the immobilized enzyme. The immobilized enzyme maintained absolutely active for 60 days whereas the native enzyme lost 80 % of its initial activity within this period of time. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme can be reused for several times without loss of activity. The kinetic parameter studies showed slight differences between free and immobilized enzymes. The K(m) and K(m.app) were calculated to be 0.6 and 0.4; also V(max) and V(max.app) were 1.3 and 0.9 respectively.

  7. Improved Reflectance and Stability of Mo/Si Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Bajt, S.; Almeda, J.; Naree, T.; Clift, M.; Folta, A.; Kauffman, B.; Spiller, E.

    2001-10-22

    Commercial EUV lithographic systems require multilayers with higher reflectance and better stability then that published to date. Interface-engineered Mo/Si multilayers with 70% reflectance at 13.5 nm wavelength (peak width of 0.545 nm) and 71% at 12.7 nm wavelength (peak width of 0.49 nm) were developed. These results were achieved with 50 bilayers. These new multilayers consist of Mo and Si layers separated by thin boron carbide layers. Depositing boron carbide on interfaces leads to reduction in silicide formation on the Mo-on-Si interfaces. Bilayer contraction is reduced by 30% implying that there is less intermixing of Mo and Si to form silicide. As a result the Mo-on-Si interfaces are sharper in interface-engineered multilayers than in standard Mo/Si multilayers. The optimum boron carbide thicknesses have been determined and appear to be different for Mo-on-Si and Si-on-Mo interfaces. The best results were obtained with 0.4 nm thick boron carbide layer on the Mo-on-Si interface and 0.25 nm thick boron carbide layer on the Si-on-Mo interface. Increase in reflectance is consistent with multilayers with sharper and smoother interfaces. A significant improvement in oxidation resistance of EUV multilayers has been achieved with ruthenium terminated Mo/Si multilayers. The best capping layer design consists of a Ru layer separated from the last Si layer by a boron carbide layer. This design achieves high reflectance and the best oxidation resistance in a water vapor (i.e. oxidation) environment. Electron beam exposures of 4.5 hours in the presence of 5x10{sup -7} torr water vapor partial pressure show no measurable reflectance loss and no increase in the oxide thickness of Ru terminated multilayers. Longer exposures in different environments are necessary to test lifetime stability of many years.

  8. Live-attenuated strains of improved genetic stability.

    PubMed

    Macadam, A J; Ferguson, G; Stone, D M; Meredith, J; Almond, J W; Minor, P D

    2001-01-01

    The current live-attenuated vaccine strains of poliovirus are genetically unstable and capable of rapid evolution in human hosts, resulting in reversion to neurovirulence and, occasionally, disease. They can also be shed by recipients for a considerable time after vaccination. This raises questions about how and when to stop vaccination after wild-type viruses have been eliminated. Persistence of vaccine revertant viruses in the population would present a risk to new cohorts of unvaccinated children and threaten the success of the eradication programme. A number of Sabin vaccine strain derivatives have been described that are, in theory, genetically more stable than the present vaccines and therefore less likely to revert to virulence. The approaches used in their derivation are outlined here and data presented for two strains showing a significant improvement in genetic stability. These strains were designed according to our understanding of the molecular basis of attenuation and incorporate changes in the sequence of an RNA structural domain that plays a key role in attenuation. They may also be less transmissible than the current type 3 vaccine strain and are potentially useful in the strategically difficult final stages of poliomyelitis eradication.

  9. High temperature stability of lanthanum silicate dielectric on Si (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Jur, J. S.; Lichtenwalner, D. J.; Kingon, A. I.

    2007-03-05

    Integration of a high-{kappa} dielectric into complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices requires thermal stability of the amorphous dielectric phase and chemical compatibility with silicon. The stability of amorphous lanthanum silicate on Si (001) is investigated by means of metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor measurements, back side secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) after a 1000 deg. C, 10 s anneal in nitrogen ambient. Back side SIMS depth profiling of the TaN/LaSiO{sub x}/Si gate stack reveals no detectable lanthanum in the silicon substrate, and HRTEM shows stability of the amorphous LaSiO{sub x}. An effective work function near 4.0 eV is obtained for these gate stacks, making the stack design ideal for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication.

  10. Aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate: effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH and complexation with β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mobedi, Hamid; Behnamghader, Aliasghar

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the aqueous stability of leuprolide acetate (LA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium was studied (pH = 2.0-7.4). For this purpose, the effect of temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH on the stability of LA during 35 days was investigated. Results showed that the aqueous stability of LA was higher at low temperatures. Degassing of the PBS medium partially increased the stability of LA at 4 °C, while did not change at 37 °C. The degradation of LA was accelerated at lower pH values. In addition, complexes of LA with different portions of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) were prepared through freeze-drying procedure and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses. Studying their aqueous stability at various pH values (2.0-7.4) showed LA/β-CD complexes exhibited higher stability when compared with LA at all pH values. The stability of complexes was also improved by increasing the portion of LA/β-CD up to 1/10.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan/TiO2 composite beads for improving stability of porcine pancreatic lipase.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Ilyas; Doğaç, Yasemin Ispirli; Teke, Mustafa; Mercimek, Bedrettin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is improving stability properties of porcine pancreatic lipase (triacylglycerol lipase, E.C.3.1.1.3) by immobilization on chitosan/TiO2 composite beads. The immobilization parameters were initial enzyme concentration (0.5-2 mg/ml), adsorption time (5-25 min), and glutaraldehyde concentration (1-4 % v/v). The optimum temperature (20-60 °C), optimum pH (3.0-10.0), kinetic parameters, thermal stability (4-70 °C), pH stability (4.0-9.0), and reusability (9 times) were investigated for characterization of immobilized lipase system. The optimum temperatures of free and immobilized lipase were 30 °C. The temperature profile of the immobilized lipase was spread over a large area. The optimum pH values for the free lipase and immobilized lipase were found to be 6.5 and 7.5, respectively. The thermal stability of immobilized lipase was evaluated, and it maintained 45 % activity at 70 °C. But, at this temperature, soluble lipase protected only 15 % activity. Also, the structural characterization of chitosan/TiO2 composite beads was analyzed with scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (ATR-FTIR). The significance of this study is improving of stability properties of lipase for the industrial usage especially production of biodiesel and dairy products. PMID:25359676

  12. Improved Delay-Dependent Stability Conditions for MIMO Networked Control Systems with Nonlinear Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides improved time delay-dependent stability criteria for multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) network control systems (NCSs) with nonlinear perturbations. Without the stability assumption on the neutral operator after the descriptor approach, the new proposed stability theory is less conservative than the existing stability condition. Theoretical proof is given in this paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed stability condition. PMID:24744679

  13. Improved delay-dependent stability conditions for MIMO networked control systems with nonlinear perturbations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiuwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides improved time delay-dependent stability criteria for multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) network control systems (NCSs) with nonlinear perturbations. Without the stability assumption on the neutral operator after the descriptor approach, the new proposed stability theory is less conservative than the existing stability condition. Theoretical proof is given in this paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed stability condition.

  14. Hot melt extrusion for amorphous solid dispersions: temperature and moisture activated drug-polymer interactions for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ashish L; Sandhu, Harpreet; Shah, Navnit; Malick, Waseem; Zia, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Hot melt extrudates (HMEs) of indomethacin (IND) with Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64 and those of itraconazole (ITZ) with HPMCAS-LF and Kollidon VA 64 were manufactured using a Leistritz twin screw extruder. The milled HMEs were stored at controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were collected after specified time periods for 3 months. The stability of amorphous HMEs was assessed using moisture analysis, thermal evaluation, powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, HPLC, and dissolution study. In general, the moisture content increased with time, temperature, and humidity levels. Amorphous ITZ was physically unstable at very high temperature and humidity levels, and its recrystallization was detected in the HMEs manufactured using Kollidon VA 64. Although physical stability of IND was better sustained by both Eudragit EPO and Kollidon VA 64, chemical degradation of the drug was identified in the stability samples of HMEs with Eudragit EPO stored at 50 °C. The dissolution rates and the supersaturation levels were significantly decreased for the stability samples in which crystallization was detected. Interestingly, the supersaturation was improved for the stability samples of IND:Eudragit EPO and ITZ:HPMCAS-LF, in which no physical or chemical instability was observed. This enhancement in supersaturation was attributed to the temperature and moisture activated electrostatic interactions between the drugs and their counterionic polymers. PMID:23961978

  15. Modeling Physical Stability of Amorphous Solids Based on Temperature and Moisture Stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua Alan; Zografi, George; Gao, Ping; Gong, Yuchuan; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry was utilized to monitor the crystallization process of amorphous ritonavir (RTV) and its hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate-based amorphous solid dispersion under various stressed conditions. An empirical model was developed: ln(τ)=ln(A)+EaRT-b⋅wc, where τ is the crystallization induction period, A is a pre-exponential factor, Ea is the apparent activation energy, b is the moisture sensitivity parameter, and wc is water content. To minimize the propagation of errors associated with the estimates, a nonlinear approach was used to calculate mean estimates and confidence intervals. The physical stability of neat amorphous RTV and RTV in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate solid dispersions was found to be mainly governed by the nucleation kinetic process. The impact of polymers and moisture on the crystallization process can be quantitatively described by Ea and b in this Arrhenius-type model. The good agreement between the measured values under some less stressful test conditions and those predicted, reflected by the slope and R(2) of the correlation plot of these 2 sets of data on a natural logarithm scale, indicates its predictability of long-term physical stability of amorphous RTV in solid dispersions. To further improve the model, more understanding of the impact of temperature and moisture on the amorphous physical stability and fundamentals regarding nucleation and crystallization is needed.

  16. Modeling Physical Stability of Amorphous Solids Based on Temperature and Moisture Stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donghua Alan; Zografi, George; Gao, Ping; Gong, Yuchuan; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry was utilized to monitor the crystallization process of amorphous ritonavir (RTV) and its hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate-based amorphous solid dispersion under various stressed conditions. An empirical model was developed: ln(τ)=ln(A)+EaRT-b⋅wc, where τ is the crystallization induction period, A is a pre-exponential factor, Ea is the apparent activation energy, b is the moisture sensitivity parameter, and wc is water content. To minimize the propagation of errors associated with the estimates, a nonlinear approach was used to calculate mean estimates and confidence intervals. The physical stability of neat amorphous RTV and RTV in hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate solid dispersions was found to be mainly governed by the nucleation kinetic process. The impact of polymers and moisture on the crystallization process can be quantitatively described by Ea and b in this Arrhenius-type model. The good agreement between the measured values under some less stressful test conditions and those predicted, reflected by the slope and R(2) of the correlation plot of these 2 sets of data on a natural logarithm scale, indicates its predictability of long-term physical stability of amorphous RTV in solid dispersions. To further improve the model, more understanding of the impact of temperature and moisture on the amorphous physical stability and fundamentals regarding nucleation and crystallization is needed. PMID:27185539

  17. Thermal and Chemical Stability of Baseline and Improved Crystalline Silicotitanate

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    2002-01-23

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been evaluating technologies for removing radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from the supernate solutions stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) sorbent (IONSIV IE-911{reg_sign}, UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL), which is very effective at removing cesium from high-salt solutions, was one of three technologies that were tested. Because of the extremely high inventory of {sup 137}Cs expected for the large columns of CST that would be used for treating the SRS supernate, any loss of flow or cooling to the columns could result in high temperatures from radiolytic heating. Also, even under normal operating conditions, the CST would be exposed to the supernates for up to a year before being removed. Small-scale batch and column tests conducted last year using samples of production batches of CST showed potential problems with CST clumping and loss of cesium capacity after extended contact with the simulant solutions. Similar tests-using samples of a baseline and improved granular CST and the CST powder used to make both granular samples-were performed this year to compare the performance of the improved CST. The column tests, which used recirculating supernate simulant, showed that the baseline CST generated more precipitates of sodium aluminosilicate than the improved CST. The precipitates were particularly evident in the tubing that carried the simulant solution to and from the column, but the baseline CST also showed higher concentrations of aluminum on the CST than were observed for the improved CST. Recirculating the simulant through just a section of the tubing (no contact with CST) also produced small amounts of precipitate, similar to the amounts seen for the improved CST column. The sodium aluminosilicate formed bridges between the CST granules, causing clumps of CST to form in the column. Clumps were visible in the baseline CST column after 1 month of operation and in the improved CST column

  18. Exercise of mechanisms of dynamic stability improves the stability state after an unexpected gait perturbation in elderly.

    PubMed

    Bierbaum, Stefanie; Peper, Andreas; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2013-10-01

    Unexpected changes during gait challenge elderly individuals to a greater degree than young adults. However, the adaptive potential of elderly seems to be retained, and therefore, the training of the mechanisms of dynamic stability as well as muscle strength training may improve the dynamic stability after unexpected perturbations. Thirty-eight subjects (65-75 years) participated in the study, divided into two experimental groups (stability training group, ST, n = 14 and mixed training group, MT, n = 14) and a control group (CG, n = 10). Both experimental groups performed exercises which focused on the mechanisms of dynamic stability. Additionally, the MT group executed a training to improve muscle strength. Session volume and duration were equal for both groups (14 weeks, twice a week, ~1.5 h per session). Pre- and post-intervention, subjects performed a gait protocol with an induced unexpected perturbation. Post-intervention, the margin of stability was significantly increased after the unexpected perturbation in the ST group, indicating an improvement in stability state (pre, -30.3 ± 5.9 cm; post, -24.1 ± 5.2 cm). Further, both intervention groups increased their base of support after the intervention to regain balance after gait perturbation, whereas only the ST group showed a statistically significant improvement (STpre, 90.9 ± 6.6 cm, STpost, 98.2 ± 8.5 cm; MTpre, 91.4 ± 6.2 cm; MTpost, 97.9 ± 12.7 cm). The CG showed no differences between pre- and post-measurements. The exercise of the mechanisms of dynamic stability led to a better application of these mechanisms after an unexpected perturbation during gait. We suggest that the repeated exercise of the mechanisms of dynamic stability contributes to significant improvements in postural stability. Additional strength training for healthy elderly individuals, however, shows no further effect on the ability to recover balance after unexpected perturbations during gait.

  19. Stability of whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions during chilled storage and temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, Sotirios; Reiffers-Magnani, Christel K; Bot, Arjen

    2004-06-16

    The stability of heat-treated and/or acidified, partly-crystalline-fat-based, whey-protein-stabilized oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions against partial coalescence was investigated during chilled storage (at 5 degrees C) and repeated temperature cycling (three times between 5 and 25 degrees C). Experiments focused on the evolution of firmness and droplet size (using pulsed field gradient NMR and scanning electron microscopy). Besides the effects of denaturation and/or acidification, the influence of the droplet size of the dispersed phase on emulsion stability was investigated also. It was found that heat treatment or acidification before emulsification led to unstable emulsions during temperature cycling, whereas heat treatment after acidification resulted in stable emulsions. PMID:15186103

  20. Investigating the Stability of eLiposomes at Elevated Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G; Javadi, Marjan

    2015-08-01

    eLiposomes encapsulate a perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion droplet inside a liposome. Ultrasound is then used as a trigger mechanism to vaporize the perfluorocarbon, break the liposome, and release the desired drug to the tumor tissue. The purpose of this research is to show that eLiposomes synthesized using perfluoropentane are stable above the normal boiling point of the perfluoropentane and at body temperature and thus has potential for use in vivo. Experiments involving the release of fluorescent calcein molecules were performed on eLiposomes to measure the release of calcein at various temperatures in the absence of ultrasound. Results showed that eLiposomes are stable at body temperatures and that as the temperature increases above 40°C, calcein release from these novel nanocarriers increases.

  1. Improved temperature regulation of process water systems for the APS storage ring.

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, C.; Dortwegt, R.

    2002-10-10

    Beam stability and operational reliability of critical mechanical systems are key performance issues for synchrotron accelerators such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Stability is influenced by temperature fluctuations of the process water (PW) used for cooling and/or temperature conditioning storage ring (SR) components such as vacuum chambers, magnets, absorbers, etc. Operational reliability is crucial in maintaining facility beam operations and remaining within downtime ''budgets.'' Water systems for the APS storage ring were originally provided with a distributive control system (DCS) capable of regulation to {+-}1.0 F, as specified by facility design requirements. After several years of operation, a particular mode of component mortality indicated a need for upgrade of the temperature control system. The upgrade that was implemented was chosen for both improved component reliability and temperature stability (now on the order of {+-}0.2 F for copper components and {+-}0.05 F for aluminum components). The design employs a network of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) for temperature control that functions under supervision of the existing DCS. The human-machine interface (HMI) of the PLC system employs RSView32 software. The PLC system also interfaces with the EPICS accelerator control system to provide monitoring of temperature control parameters. Eventual supervision of the PLC system by EPICS is possible with this design.

  2. Soil Stabilization and Revegetation at the INEEL Recommendations for Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Blew, R.D.; Jackson, M.R.; Forman, A.D.

    2003-03-24

    Soil stabilization for the INEEL Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) has mostly been by revegetation, but has experienced only limited success. The purpose of this report is to discuss issues associated with revegetation failures and to explore possible remedies.

  3. Novel approaches for stability improvement in natural medicines

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Lovely; Ghodasra, Umang; Patel, Nilesh; Dabhi, Mahesh

    2011-01-01

    Natural product market has seen tremendous growth in the last few years. It results in the formulation of a number of proprietary herbal products, majority of them being multi-component formulations. With the advancement of herbal drug treatments, it has now been observed that many of the constituents present in the drug may react with each other, raising the serious concern about the stability of such formulations which is an important issue in the field of phytochemistry and natural medicines. Natural products are often prone to deterioration, especially during storage, leading to loss of active component, production of metabolites with no activity and, in extreme cases, production of toxic metabolites. This area needs to be addressed in order to determine the efficacy of the formulation. Understanding the problems related to natural product stability can give the idea of dealing with the stability issues. Modifications of the conventional herbal formulations can deal with the stability problems to a large extent. This article deals with the stability problems and is aimed to provide some tools and techniques to increase stability of natural medicines and herbal formulations. PMID:22096318

  4. Improvement of thermal stability of polypropylene using DOPO-immobilized silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Quanxiao; Ding, Yanfen; Wen, Bin; Wang, Feng; Dong, Huicong; Zhang, Shimin

    2014-01-01

    After the surface silylation with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, silica nanoparticles were further modified by 9,10-dihydro-9-oxa-10-phosphaphenanthrene-10-oxide (DOPO). The immobilization of DOPO on silica nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis. By incorporating the DOPO-immobilized silica nanoparticles (5 wt%) into polypropylene matrix, the thermal oxidative stability exhibited an improvement of 62 °C for the half weight loss temperature, while that was only 26 °C increment with incorporation of virgin silica nanoparticles (5 wt%). Apparent activation energies of the polymer nanocomposites were estimated via Flynn–Wall–Ozawa method. It was found that the incorporation of DOPO-immobilized silica nanoparticles improved activation energies of the degradation reaction. Based on the results, it was speculated that DOPO-immobilized silica nanoparticles could inhibit the degradation of polypropylene and catalyze the formation of carbonaceous char on the surface. Thus, thermal stability was significantly improved. PMID:24729654

  5. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life.

    PubMed

    Romero-Romero, M Luisa; Risso, Valeria A; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm's, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm's are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV's but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm's for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  6. Selection for Protein Kinetic Stability Connects Denaturation Temperatures to Organismal Temperatures and Provides Clues to Archaean Life

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Romero, M. Luisa; Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the denaturation temperatures of proteins (Tm values) and the living temperatures of their host organisms (environmental temperatures: TENV values) is poorly understood. Since different proteins in the same organism may show widely different Tm’s, no simple universal relationship between Tm and TENV should hold, other than Tm≥TENV. Yet, when analyzing a set of homologous proteins from different hosts, Tm’s are oftentimes found to correlate with TENV’s but this correlation is shifted upward on the Tm axis. Supporting this trend, we recently reported Tm’s for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins that mirror a proposed environmental cooling over long geological time, while remaining a shocking ~50°C above the proposed ancestral ocean temperatures. Here, we show that natural selection for protein kinetic stability (denaturation rate) can produce a Tm↔TENV correlation with a large upward shift in Tm. A model for protein stability evolution suggests a link between the Tm shift and the in vivo lifetime of a protein and, more specifically, allows us to estimate ancestral environmental temperatures from experimental denaturation rates for resurrected Precambrian thioredoxins. The TENV values thus obtained match the proposed ancestral ocean cooling, support comparatively high Archaean temperatures, and are consistent with a recent proposal for the environmental temperature (above 75°C) that hosted the last universal common ancestor. More generally, this work provides a framework for understanding how features of protein stability reflect the environmental temperatures of the host organisms. PMID:27253436

  7. Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil-based lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation and low temperature stability of polymerized soybean oil (PSO)-based lubricants have been investigated by the pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) method. It was found that PSO samples have lower oxidative stability than their precursor, soybean oil. The main reason for the...

  8. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Wu; Belieres, Jean-Philippe; Yoshizawa, Masahiro

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  9. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  10. Slope stability improvement using low intensity field electrosmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armillotta, Pasquale

    2014-05-01

    The electrosmosis technique has been introduced in the past for slope stabilization. However, its application to real cases has been scarce due to several drawbacks mostly related to the high intensity electric field needed (1.0 V/cm or higher): the rapid degradation of the electrodes, the high system management cost, the heating and cracking of the soil and the reduction of its colloidal fraction. Thanks to the introduction of new materials, the technique is currently applied to decrease the consolidation time of saturated clay soils (forcing the elimination of water), consequently improving its mechanical strength. In clay soils, the volume variation is influenced by the presence of smectites. The clay compressibility decreases with the increasing of electrolytes concentration. Soil containing smectites that have interacted with calcium showed a reduction or the absence of swelling during hydration with distilled water and a positive increase of their shear strength. The different values of pH between the anode (acid) and the cathode (basic), induced by the electrosmosis create the conditions for the precipitation of CaCO3 near the cathode. The injection of solutions containing calcium in soils and their diffusion induced by the electrosmosis, lead to calcium precipitation and consequential increase of the shear strength. The material technological advances and the laboratory experiences described in this paper, demonstrate that the use low electric field (0.1 V/cm or lower) intensity electrosmosis (LEFE in acronym) can be effective for soil dewatering and shear strength increase while reducing its adverse effect. The LEFE can be used to: reduce the potential for swelling of active clay minerals through the introduction of ions and the precipitation of hardening substances; induce the "dewatering" in cohesive soils. Several Lab activities were carried out, using custom made electrosmosis equipment. These activities can be divided in two phases: Phase 1

  11. Improved sugar beet pectin-stabilized emulsions through complexation with sodium caseinate.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Phillips, Glyn O; Al-Assaf, Saphwan

    2013-02-13

    The study investigates the complexes formed between sodium caseinate (SC) and sugar beet pectin (SBP) and to harness them to stabilize SBP emulsions. We find that both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions are involved in the complexation. In SC/SBP mixed solution, soluble SC/SBP complexes first form on acidification and then aggregate into insoluble complexes, which disassociate into soluble polymers upon further decreasing pH. The critical pH's for the formation of soluble and insoluble complexes and disappearance of insoluble complexes are designated as pH(c), pH(φ), and pH(d), respectively. These critical pH values define four regions in the phase diagram of complexation, and SC/SBP emulsions were prepared in these regions. The results show that the stability of SBP-stabilized emulsion is greatly improved at low SC/SBP ratios and acidic pH's. This enhancement can be attributed to an increase in the amount of adsorbed SBP as a result of cooperative adsorption to sodium caseinate. Using a low ratio of SC/SBP ensured that all caseinate molecules are completely covered by adsorbed SBP chains, which eliminates possible instability induced by thermal aggregation of caseinate molecules resulting from stress acceleration at elevated temperatures. A mechanistic model for the behavior is proposed.

  12. Alkyl Caffeates Improve the Antioxidant Activity, Antitumor Property and Oxidation Stability of Edible Oil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Shuang-Shuang; Pang, Na; Wang, Fang-Qin; Pang, Fei; Cui, Hong-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Fu-An

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is distributed widely in nature and possesses strong antioxidant activity. However, CA has lower solubility in non-polar media, which limits its application in fat-soluble food. To increase the lipophilicity of natural antioxidant CA, a series of alkyl caffeates were synthesized and their antioxidant and antitumor activities were investigated. The antioxidant parameters, including the induction period, acid value and unsaturated fatty acid content, of the alkyl caffeates in edible oil were firstly investigated. The results indicated that alkyl caffeates had a lower DPPH IC50 (14–23 µM) compared to CA, dibutyl hydroxy toluene (BHT) and Vitamin C (24–51 µM), and significantly inhibited four human cancer cells (SW620, SW480, SGC7901 and HepG2) with inhibition ratio of 71.4–78.0% by a MTT assay. With regard to the induction period and acid value assays, methyl and butyl caffeates had higher abilities than BHT to restrain the oxidation process and improve the stability of edible oil. The addition of ethyl caffeate to oil allowed maintenance of a higher unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester content (68.53%) at high temperatures. Overall, the alkyl caffeats with short chain length (n<5) assessed better oxidative stability than those with long chain length. To date, this is the first report to the correlations among the antioxidant activity, anticancer activity and oxidative stability of alkyl caffeates. PMID:24760050

  13. Improvement of the stability and activity of immobilized glucose oxidase on modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Mahboube; Amiri, Razieh; Bordbar, Abdol-Kalegh; Ranjbakhsh, Elnaz; Khosropour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-02-01

    Immobilized proteins and enzymes are widely investigated in the medical field as well as the food and environmental fields. In this study, glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently immobilized on the surface of modified iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MIMNs) to produce a bioconjugate complex. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to the size, shape and structure characterization of the MIMNs. Binding of GOX to these MIMNs was confirmed by using FT-IR spectroscopy. The stability of the immobilized and free enzyme at different temperature and pH values was investigated by measuring the enzymatic activity. These studies reveal that the enzyme's stability is enhanced by immobilization. Further experiments showed that the storage stability of the enzyme is improved upon binding to the MIMNs. The results of kinetic measurements suggest that the effect of the immobilization process on substrate and product diffusion is small. Such bioconjugates can be considered as a catalytic nanodevice for accelerating the glucose oxidation reaction for biotechnological purposes.

  14. Alkyl caffeates improve the antioxidant activity, antitumor property and oxidation stability of edible oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Gu, Shuang-Shuang; Pang, Na; Wang, Fang-Qin; Pang, Fei; Cui, Hong-Sheng; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Wu, Fu-An

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is distributed widely in nature and possesses strong antioxidant activity. However, CA has lower solubility in non-polar media, which limits its application in fat-soluble food. To increase the lipophilicity of natural antioxidant CA, a series of alkyl caffeates were synthesized and their antioxidant and antitumor activities were investigated. The antioxidant parameters, including the induction period, acid value and unsaturated fatty acid content, of the alkyl caffeates in edible oil were firstly investigated. The results indicated that alkyl caffeates had a lower DPPH IC₅₀ (14-23 µM) compared to CA, dibutyl hydroxy toluene (BHT) and Vitamin C (24-51 µM), and significantly inhibited four human cancer cells (SW620, SW480, SGC7901 and HepG2) with inhibition ratio of 71.4-78.0% by a MTT assay. With regard to the induction period and acid value assays, methyl and butyl caffeates had higher abilities than BHT to restrain the oxidation process and improve the stability of edible oil. The addition of ethyl caffeate to oil allowed maintenance of a higher unsaturated fatty acid methyl ester content (68.53%) at high temperatures. Overall, the alkyl caffeats with short chain length (n<5) assessed better oxidative stability than those with long chain length. To date, this is the first report to the correlations among the antioxidant activity, anticancer activity and oxidative stability of alkyl caffeates. PMID:24760050

  15. Improvement of thermal stability of amorphous CoFeSiB thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, M. Shimizu, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The excellent soft magnetic properties of amorphous (a-) CoFeSiB films make it suited for use in the yoke of granular-in-gap sensors, but only if their thermal stability can be improved. To this end, this study investigated the effects of adding small amounts of other metals on the magnetic and structural properties of a-CoFeSiB films. It was found that adding metals with relatively large atomic radii is an effective way to increase thermal stability, with both Ta and Hf showing good thermal stability after annealing at temperatures of 473 to 573 K. Indeed, a -(CoFeSiB){sub 96.2}Hf{sub 3.8} film was found to maintain its initial coercivity of 0.2 Oe without very little decrease in magnetization after annealing at 623 K. Furthermore, even after annealing at 673 K a -(CoFeSiB){sub 93.0}Hf{sub 7.0} film still had a relatively low coercivity of approximately 0.5 Oe.

  16. Stability of blood gases in ice and at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liss, H P; Payne, C P

    1993-04-01

    Arterial blood samples from 75 patients were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH at 0, 15, and 30 min. After the baseline analysis, 60 samples were kept in ice while 59 samples were left at room temperature. There was a statistically significant increase in the PO2 at 15 min and again at 30 min in both groups. There was a statistically significant decrease in the PCO2 at 15 min in both groups. There were no further changes in the PCO2 at 30 min in either group. There was a statistically significant decrease in the pH at 15 min in both groups. There was a further statistically significant decrease in the pH at 30 min in the group of blood samples left at room temperature but not in those in ice. There is no reason to keep arterial blood in ice if blood gas analysis is done within 30 min. PMID:8131450

  17. Improved stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon photosensitivity by ultraviolet illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Howard M.; Xu, Yueqin; Heck, Stephan; Gao, Wei

    2002-10-01

    Postdeposition ultraviolet (UV) illumination, followed by etching, improves the stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon thin films against subsequent light-induced degradation of photosensitivity. The etch removes a heavily damaged layer extending about 100 nm below the surface, but beneath the damage, the UV has improved the stability of 200 to 300 nm of bulk film. The open-circuit voltage of Schottky solar cells is also stabilized by UV-etch treatment. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Improving thermal stability of KSrPO4:Tb3+ phosphors prepared by microwave assisted sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Ming; Su, Yan-Kuin; Yang, Ru-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, KSr0.94PO4:Tb0.063+ phosphor was synthesized successfully by microwave assisted sintering method at 1200 °C for 1 h under an air atmosphere. Photoluminescence results show KSr0.94PO4:Tb0.063+ phosphor prepared by microwave assisted sintering method presents an observable improved effect on the enhancement of thermal stability. The emission intensity reduces slowly and marginally by approximately 7% for the maximum emission peak with the temperature increasing from 30 °C to 200 °C indicating great thermal stability KSrPO4:Tb3+ phosphors are. Additionally, the activation energy (ΔE) of thermal quenching of KSrPO4:Tb3+ phosphor was calculated to be 0.2 eV. Moreover, the chromaticity (x, y) located at (0.30, 0.52) was kept without variation when the temperature increased from 30 °C to 200 °C.

  19. Creative Opportunities to Improve Young Children's Balance, Strength & Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mally, Kristi

    2008-01-01

    Strength, balance, and stability are important factors in performing movement skills, but are often overlooked by elementary schools when planning a quality physical education program for young children. These three interrelated structural characteristics are involved in all human movements. Movement is created by continually changing postures in…

  20. Oryzanol as natural antioxidant for improving sunflower oil stability.

    PubMed

    Sunil, L; Srinivas, P; Prasanth Kumar, P K; Gopala Krishna, A G

    2015-06-01

    Sunflower oil is being made shelf stable by the incorporation of synthetic antioxidants such as tertiary butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), while natural antioxidants like oryzanol and tocopherols can also be used. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of natural oryzanol (Oz) concentrate (15.5 % oryzanol) and purified Oz (80 % oryzanol) on oxidative and thermal stability of sunflower oil. Sunflower oil was incorporated with Oz concentrate to provide 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.50, 0.84, 1.0, 1.60, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.20 % oryzanol in the oil, stored for 5 weeks at 37 °C and oxidative stability was evaluated. It was found that the oryzanol concentrate showed good antioxidant effect with increase in concentration of oryzanol. In another set of experiments, sunflower oil containing purified Oz at 1 % level individually and in combination with 0.1 % α- tocopherol (α-T) was heated at 120 °C for 24 h to evaluate thermal stability. Sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz (80 % purity) showed 98.40 % and sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz and 0.1 % α-T showed 108.75 % antioxidant effect compared to TBHQ taken as 100 %. The study indicated that sunflower oil containing 1 % Oz (80 % purity) and 0.1 % α-T combination provides a synergistic effect in inhibiting primary and secondary products and showed highest thermal stability. SFO containing 1 % Oz added as concentrate also showed good antioxidant effect during storage. Hence, instead of using synthetic antioxidants like TBHQ, we can add natural oryzanol (purified or as concentrate) to sunflower oil to increase its oxidative and thermal stability.

  1. Miniature High Stability High Temperature Space Rated Blackbody Radiance Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. A.; Beswick, A. G.

    1987-09-01

    This paper presents the design and test performance of a conical cavity type blackbody radiance source that will meet the requirements of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite program (UARS). Since a radiance source meeting the requirements of this experiment was unavailable in the commercial market, a development effort was undertaken by the HALOE Project. The blackbody radiance source operates in vacuum at 1300 K + 0.5 K over any 15-minute interval, uses less than 7.5 watts of power, maintains a 49°C outer case temperature, and fits within the 2.5 x 2.5 x 3.0 inch envelope allocated inside the HALOE instrument. Also, the unit operates in air, during ground testing of the HALOE instrument, where it uses 17 watts of power with an outer case temperature of 66°C. The thrust of this design effort was to minimize the heat losses, in order to keep the power usage under 7.5 watts, and to minimize the amount of silica in the materials. Silica in the presence of the platinum heater winding used in this design would cause the platinum to erode, changing the operating temperature set-point. The design required the development of fabrication techniques which would provide very small, close tolerance parts from extremely difficult-to-machine materials. Also, a space rated ceramic core and unique, low thermal conductance, ceramic-to-metal joint was developed, tested and incorporated in this design. The completed flight qualification hardware has undergone performance, environmental and life testing. The design configuration and test results are discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Improvement in stability of SPring-8 X-ray monochromators with cryogenic-cooled silicon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Senba, Yasunori; Takeuchi, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Yasuhisa; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Miura, Takanori; Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Motohiro; Tajiri, Hiroo; Goto, Shunji; Yamamoto, Masaki; Takata, Masaki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    SPring-8 standard double-crystal monochromators cooled with liquid nitrogen are being improved for providing a stable supply of intense nanometer-focused X-ray beams. The instability originates from the vibration and thermal deformations of the various stages of the monochromators: the former is caused by turbulent flow of the liquid nitrogen, and the latter is mainly due to unwanted cooling from the liquid nitrogen. A low-vibration flexible tube was devised to stabilize the coolant flow by covering the corrugations of the flexible tube with an alumina fiber textile. To achieve thermal insulation, we inserted a machinable ceramic block and a copper plate between the cooled crystal holder and the stages; the temperature of the copper plate was controlled to within ±0.01 °C using a sheet heater and a proportional-integral-derivative current controller. As a result, the vibration was reduced from 1" to 0.15" in terms of the misalignment angle between the two crystals, and a vertical focus size of 230 nm was achieved by demagnification projection of the real light source onto the focal plane. The angular instability due to the thermal deformation was suppressed to a rate of less than 0.2"/h. Furthermore, we discuss ongoing improvements for further stabilization.

  3. Surface functionalized LSMO nanoparticles with improved colloidal stability for hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorat, N. D.; Khot, V. M.; Salunkhe, A. B.; Prasad, A. I.; Ningthoujam, R. S.; Pawar, S. H.

    2013-03-01

    LSMO (La0.7Sr0.3MnO3) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with double layer oleic acid (OA) surfactant are prepared to make a water based magnetic nanofluid for hyperthermia application. Various experimental techniques are used for bilayer coating analysis. The effect of the bilayer coating on magnetic properties is studied by superconducting quantum interface device (SQUID). Colloidal behaviour of coated MNPs in aqueous medium is studied by the zeta potential and dynamic light scattering. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the colloidal stability of the MNPs are studied in detail. For the bilayer-coated LSMO MNPs aggregation is not observed even in high ionic strength and at physiological pH (7.4). For making the nanofluid of the bilayer-coated MNPs the colloidal stability is studied in physiological media like phosphate buffer solution. Under induction heating experiment, hyperthermia temperature (42-43 °C) could be achieved by the bilayer-coated sample at a magnetic field of 168-335 Oe and frequency of 267 kHz. The bilayer OA coating can hinder the agglomeration of MNPs significantly and produce stable suspension with improved hyperthermia properties. The bilayer OA coating also improves the specific absorption rate (SAR) of LSMO MNPs from 25 to 40 W g-1.

  4. Sensing disks for slug-type calorimeters have higher temperature stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Graphite sensing disk for slug-type radiation calorimeters exhibits better performance at high temperatures than copper and nickel disks. The graphite is heat-soaked to stabilize its emittance and the thermocouple is protected from the graphite so repeated temperature cycling does not change its sensitivity.

  5. Long-term colloidal stability and metal leaching of single wall carbon nanotubes: effect of temperature and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-02-01

    Long term (90 day) stability, aggregation kinetics in the presence and absence of natural organic materials (NOM), and metal leaching of five commercial single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in waters (e.g. freshwater, seawater, stormwater, wastewater, and groundwater) were studied, as well as the effect of temperature on SWCNT stability and metal leaching. Zeta (ζ) potential of SWCNT decreased in magnitude with increase in temperature. In wastewater, SWCNT sedimented from the water column to below detectable levels after 30 days when kept at 40 °C, but at 20 °C 19% suspension was still observed after the same exposure time. Addition of 0.1 mg-C L(-1) EPS shifted the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of SRNOM-stabilized SWCNT from 15 mM to 54 mM NaCl via additional electrostatic and possibly steric stabilization. Attachment efficiencies (α) of SWCNT in waters ranged from ∼0.001 in DI with 10 mg L(-1) SRNOM to 1 in seawater. However, sedimentation of SWCNT in seawater (and other high ionic strength conditions) was not as fast as expected due to improved buoyancy and/or drag. Purified forms of SWCNTs exhibited better dispersibility and stability in most waters, but as expected, the total metal leached out was higher in the raw variants. Metal leaching from CNT in these studies was controlled by metal and water chemistries, CNT pretreatment, leachable metal fraction, exposure time, and presence of NOM.

  6. Atmospheric Stability & Turbulence from Temperature Profiles over Sicily During Summer 2002 & 2003 HASI Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombatti, G.; Ferri, F.; Angrilli, F.; Fulchignoni, M.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental results and interpretation of the temperature measurements data retrieved during the balloon campaigns (in 2002 and in 2003) for testing HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument), launched from the Italian Space Agency Base in Trapani (Sicily), are presented. Both ascending and descending phases are analysed; data reveal interesting features near the tropopause (present in the region between 11km-14km), where temperature cooling can be related to layers with strong winds (2002 flight); in the troposphere a multistratified structure of the temperature field is observed and discussed (particularly in the 2003 flight) Finally, stability and turbulence of the atmosphere are analysed; the buoyancy N2 parameters for both the flights show lowers value respect to standard tropospheric values corresponding to a lower stability of the atmosphere; still there is a higher stability above the tropopause. The energy spectrum of temperature data is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory: the characteristic k(sup -5/3) behaviour is reproduced.

  7. Supported lipid monolayer with improved nanomechanical stability: effect of polymerization.

    PubMed

    El Zein, Racha; Dallaporta, Hervé; Charrier, Anne M

    2012-06-21

    We study the effect of polymerization on the nanomechanical stability of supported lipid monolayers consisting of 1,2-di-(10Z,12Z-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine by means of force mapping using an atomic force microscope. For both nonpolymerized and polymerized lipid monolayers, we investigate the break-through forces required to rupture the monolayers for a whole range of loading velocities. We show that the average break-through force exerted by the tip and required to penetrate the monolayer has a logarithmic dependence on the loading rate. Both Young moduli and intrinsic Gibbs energies have been determined for the nonpolymerized and polymerized lipid monolayers, and we show a drastic effect of polymerization on the nanomechanical stability of the monolayer with an increase by a factor of ∼100 for the young modulus and ∼3 for the intrinsic Gibbs activation energy.

  8. Improved in vivo stability of actinium-225 macrocyclic complexes.

    PubMed

    Deal, K A; Davis, I A; Mirzadeh, S; Kennel, S J; Brechbiel, M W

    1999-07-29

    The favorable nuclear properties of actinium-225 ((225)Ac) have led to proposal of this isotope for use in radioimmunotherapy. In an effort to reduce the toxicity of free (225)Ac, a series of ligands were evaluated for stability in vivo. Loss of (225)Ac from acyclic chelating agents resulted in high liver uptake and poor whole body clearance. The macrocyclic ligands c-DOTA, PEPA, and HEHA were evaluated, and (225)Ac-HEHA showed exceptional stability in vivo. (225)Ac chelated with EDTA, DTPA, DOTA, or PEPA permitted substantial accumulation of the radionuclide to the liver, while the (225)Ac-HEHA complex was essentially excreted within minutes of administration. The preparation of the ligands and radiolabeled complexes and the biodistribution results will be discussed.

  9. Improving Small Signal Stability through Operating Point Adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chen, Yousu; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mittelstadt, William; Hauer, John F.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2010-09-30

    ModeMeter techniques for real-time small signal stability monitoring continue to mature, and more and more phasor measurements are available in power systems. It has come to the stage to bring modal information into real-time power system operation. This paper proposes to establish a procedure for Modal Analysis for Grid Operations (MANGO). Complementary to PSS’s and other traditional modulation-based control, MANGO aims to provide suggestions such as increasing generation or decreasing load for operators to mitigate low-frequency oscillations. Different from modulation-based control, the MANGO procedure proactively maintains adequate damping for all time, instead of reacting to disturbances when they occur. Effect of operating points on small signal stability is presented in this paper. Implementation with existing operating procedures is discussed. Several approaches for modal sensitivity estimation are investigated to associate modal damping and operating parameters. The effectiveness of the MANGO procedure is confirmed through simulation studies of several test systems.

  10. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems. PMID:24648277

  11. Improving electrokinetic microdevice stability by controlling electrolysis bubbles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwi Yong; Barber, Cedrick; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    The voltage-operating window for many electrokinetic microdevices is limited by electrolysis gas bubbles that destabilize microfluidic system causing noise and irreproducible responses above ∼3 V DC and less than ∼1 kHz AC at 3 Vpp. Surfactant additives, SDS and Triton X-100, and an integrated semipermeable SnakeSkin® membrane were employed to control and assess electrolysis bubbles from platinum electrodes in a 180 by 70 μm, 10 mm long microchannel. Stabilized current responses at 100 V DC were observed with surfactant additives or SnakeSkin® barriers. Electrolysis bubble behaviors, visualized via video microscopy at the electrode surface and in the microchannels, were found to be influenced by surfactant function and SnakeSkin® barriers. Both SDS and Triton X-100 surfactants promoted smaller bubble diameters and faster bubble detachment from electrode surfaces via increasing gas solubility. In contrast, SnakeSkin® membranes enhanced natural convection and blocked bubbles from entering the microchannels and thus reduced current disturbances in the electric field. This data illustrated that electrode surface behaviors had substantially greater impacts on current stability than microbubbles within microchannels. Thus, physically blocking bubbles from microchannels is less effective than electrode functionalization approaches to stabilize electrokinetic microfluidic systems.

  12. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  13. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  14. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  15. Improving the phase stability and oxidation resistance of β-NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, Travis

    2011-01-01

    replacing Ni based superalloys. Modifications to NiAl were explored to increase the phase stability and oxidation resistance which would allow these alloys to be used at even higher temperatures yielding greater efficiencies. The extended Miedema model was an effective tool that screened all of the potential phase space for ternary substitutions to NiAl and found the few potential systems worth further investigation. After production of the alloys it was determined that Ir, Rh, and Pd were the top candidates for substitution on Ni site up to 12 at%. The melting temperature of NiAl could be increased as much as 150 C with 12 at% Ir and 130 C with 12 at% Rh substitution. Pall adium on the other hand decreased the melting temperature by 50 C at the 12 at% substitution level. The grain size was found to have a profound influence on the oxidation resistance. Both Ir and Rh substitutions resulted in finer grain sizes compared to Pd substitutions or base NiAl. The grain size increased drastically during high temperature annealing with the PGM substitutions hindering grain growth only slightly. However, the addition of 0.05 at% Hf limited the grain growth dramatically during high temperature annealing. NiAl inherently has respectable oxidation resistance up to 1100 C. It was found through experimental testing that both Ir and Rh substitutions improve the oxidation resistance of NiAl at ultra-high temperatures with Ir performing the best. Both PGM substitutions decreased the growth rate as well as forming a more adherent oxide scale. Pd substitutions appeared to have a negligible effect to the oxidation resistance of NiAl. Hafnium addition of 0.05 at% was found to decrease the oxidation rate as well as increase the scale adherence. The combination of both Ir substitution (6-9 at%) and Hf addition (0.05 at%) produced the alloy with the best oxidation resistance. Although improvements in phase stability and oxidation resistance have been made to the NiAl system, more development and

  16. Carbon--silicon coating alloys for improved irradiation stability

    DOEpatents

    Bokros, J.C.

    1973-10-01

    For ceramic nuclear fuel particles, a fission product-retaining carbon-- silicon alloy coating is described that exhibits low shrinkage after exposure to fast neutron fluences of 1.4 to 4.8 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E = 0.18 MeV) at irradiation temperatures from 950 to 1250 deg C. Isotropic pyrolytic carbon containing from 18 to 34 wt% silicon is co-deposited from a gaseous mixiure of propane, helium, and silane at a temperature of 1350 to 1450 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  17. High temperature phase stabilities and electrochemical properties of InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Young Nam, Kim; Bi, Zhonghe; Manthiram, Arumugam; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Huq, Ashfia

    2011-01-01

    InBaCo4-xZnxO7 oxides have been synthesized and characterized as cathode materials for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFC). The effect of Zn substitution for Co on the structure, phase stability, thermal expansion, and electrochemical properties of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 has been investigated. The increase in the Zn content from x = 1 to 1.5 improves the high temperature phase stability at 600 oC and 700 oC for 100 h, and chemical stability against a Gd0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (GDC) electrolyte. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) values of the InBaCo4-xZnxO7 (x = 1, 1.5, 2) specimens were determined to be 8.6 10-6 9.6 10-6 /oC in the range of 80 900 oC, which provides good thermal expansion compatibility with the standard SOFC electrolyte materials. The InBaCo4-xZnxO7 + GDC (50:50 wt. %) composite cathodes exhibit improved cathode performances compared to those obtained from the simple InBaCo4-xZnxO7 cathodes due to the extended triple-phase boundary (TPB) and enhanced oxide-ion conductivity through the GDC portion in the composites.

  18. Optimal placement of unified power flow controllers to improve dynamic voltage stability using power system variable based voltage stability indices.

    PubMed

    Albatsh, Fadi M; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches.

  19. Optimal placement of unified power flow controllers to improve dynamic voltage stability using power system variable based voltage stability indices.

    PubMed

    Albatsh, Fadi M; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  20. Optimal Placement of Unified Power Flow Controllers to Improve Dynamic Voltage Stability Using Power System Variable Based Voltage Stability Indices

    PubMed Central

    Albatsh, Fadi M.; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  1. [Effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal in the ANAMMOX reactor].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Zheng, Yu-Hui; Yuan, Yi; Li, Da-Peng; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Chun-Lei

    2012-04-01

    The effect of temperature on stability of nitrogen removal efficiency was investigated in an ANANMMOX reactor by measuring the nitrogen removal rate. The results showed that the nitrogen removal rate changed between 1.51 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) and 1.84 kg x (m3 x d)(-1) when the temperature was between 26 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Compared with gradually degrading temperature (nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude 9.03%), the ladder degrading temperature was more advantageous on the stability of nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrogen removal rate variation of amplitude was 4.35%. The nitrogen removal rate dropped quickly, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Moreover, a large number of NO2(-) -N accumulated in the ANAMMOX process, when temperature is below 15 degrees C in the reactor. A strong relationship between temperature and nitrogen removal rate was found, when the temperature was below 20 degrees C. Based on the effect of temperature on nitrogen removal rate, the strategy about temperature control was proposed to achieve the fast start-up and high efficiency of nitrogen removal under low temperature for the ANANMMOX reactors.

  2. On the stability of nonisothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres. II. The effect of gas temperature on the stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, O.; Harju, J.; Juvela, M.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the stability of nonisothermal Bonnor-Ebert spheres in the context of a model that includes a self-consistent calculation of the gas temperature. In this way, we can discard the assumption of equality between the dust and gas temperatures and study the stability as the gas temperature changes with the chemical evolution of the cooling species. Methods: We use a gas-grain chemical model to calculate the chemical evolution. The model includes a time-dependent treatment of depletion onto grain surfaces, which strongly influences the gas temperature as the main coolant molecule CO depletes from the gas. The dust and gas temperatures are solved with radiative transfer calculations. For consistent comparison with previous work, we assume that the cores are deeply embedded in a larger external structure, corresponding to visual extinction AVext = 10 mag at the core edge. We also study the effect of lower values of AVext. Results: We find that the critical nondimensional radius ξ1 derived here, which determines the maximum density contrast between the core center and the outer boundary, is similar to our previous work where we assumed Tdust = Tgas. Here, the ξ1 values lie below the isothermal critical value ξ0 ~ 6.45, but the difference is less than 10 %. We find that chemical evolution does not notably affect the stability condition of low-mass cores (< 0.75 M⊙), which have high average densities and a strong gas-grain thermal coupling. In contrast, for higher masses the decrease in cooling due to CO depletion causes substantial temporal changes in the temperature and in the density profiles of the cores. In the mass range 1-2 M⊙, ξ1 decreases with chemical evolution, whereas above 3 M⊙, ξ1 instead increases with chemical evolution. We also find that decreasing AVext strongly increases the gas temperature, especially when the gas is chemically old, and this causes ξ 1 to increase with respect to models with higher AVext. However, the

  3. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Desheng Meng, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA.

  4. Improved stability and stabilization design for networked control systems using new quadruple-integral functionals.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhichen; Bai, Yan; Li, Tianqi

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates stability analysis and stabilization for networked control systems. By a refined delay decomposition approach, slightly different Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals (LKFs) with quadruple-integral terms and augmented vectors containing triple-integral forms of state are constructed. New integral inequalities are proposed to estimate the cross terms from derivatives of the LKFs, which can be proved to offer tighter bounds than what the Jensen one produces theoretically. Moreover, the non-strictly proper rational functions in deriving process are fully handled via reciprocally convex approach. A state feedback controller design approach is also developed. Numerical examples and applications to practical power and oscillator systems demonstrate the superiority of the proposed criteria in conservatism reduction compared to some existing ones. PMID:27087136

  5. Improved performance of silicon nitride-based high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashbrook, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented regarding experiments intended for improving the strength and toughness of hot-pressed Si3N4 (HPSN), improving the strength and oxidation resistance of reaction-sintered Si3N4 (RSSN), and improving the strength and oxidation resistance of sinterable Si-Al-O-N compositions. It is shown that the use of ZrO2 instead of MgO as a sintering aid improved the room-temperature and high-temperature flexural strength of HPSN, in addition to enhancing the rupture strength and Charpy impact resistance. The use of crushable energy absorbing layers increased the impact resistance of HPSN. Impregnation of RSSN with solutions that oxidize to Al2O3 or ZrO2 resulted in increased bending strength at room temperature. Beta-prime Si-Al-O-N sintered to full density by means of the sintering aids CeO2, Y2O3, and ZrO2 yielded the greatest strength with Y2O3 and the greatest oxidation resistance with ZrO2.

  6. Improved operational stability of peroxidases by coimmobilization with glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    van de Velde, F; Lourenço, N D; Bakker, M; van Rantwijk, F; Sheldon, R A

    2000-08-01

    The operational stability of peroxidases was considerably enhanced by generating hydrogen peroxide in situ from glucose and oxygen. For example, the total turnover number of microperoxidase-11 in the oxidation of thioanisole was increased sevenfold compared with that obtained with continuous addition of H(2)O(2). Coimmobilization of peroxidases with glucose oxidase into polyurethane foams afforded heterogeneous biocatalysts in which the hydrogen peroxide is formed inside the polymeric matrix from glucose and oxygen. The total turnover number of chloroperoxidase in the oxidation of thioanisole and cis-2-heptene was increased to new maxima of 250. 10(3) and 10. 10(3), respectively, upon coimmobilization with glucose oxidase. Soybean peroxidase, which normally shows only classical peroxidase activity, was transformed into an oxygen-transfer catalyst when coimmobilized with glucose oxidase. The combination catalyst mediated the enantioselective oxidation of thioanisole [50% ee (S)] with 210 catalyst turnovers. PMID:10861408

  7. Nanocrystalline CuNi alloys: improvement of mechanical properties and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogues, Josep; Varea, A.; Pellicer, E.; Sivaraman, K. M.; Pane, S.; Nelson, B. J.; Surinach, S.; Baro, M. D.; Sort, J.

    2014-03-01

    Nanocrystalline metallic films are known to benefit from novel and enhanced physical and chemical properties. In spite of these outstanding properties, nanocrystalline metals typically show relatively poor thermal stability which leads to deterioration of the properties due to grain coarsening. We have studied nanocrystalline Cu1-xNix (0.56 < x < 1) thin films (3 μm-thick) electrodeposited galvanostatically onto Cu/Ti/Si (100) substrates. CuNi thin films exhibit large values of hardness (6.15 < H < 7.21 GPa), which can be tailored by varying the composition. However, pure Ni films (x = 1) suffer deterioration of their mechanical and magnetic properties after annealing during 3 h at relatively low temperatures (TANN > 475 K) due to significant grain growth. Interestingly, alloying Ni with Cu clearly improves the thermal stability of the material because grain coarsening is delayed due to segregation of a Cu-rich phase at grain boundaries, thus preserving both the mechanical and magnetic properties up to higher TANN.

  8. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers.

    PubMed

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang Michael; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiO(x) and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiO(x)/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  9. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang (Michael); Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiOx and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiOx/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  10. Storage Stability and Improvement of Intermediate Moisture Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labuza, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Shelf life tests are used to estimate the rate of nonenzymatic browning; however, controlling the reducing sugar levels below 23:1 molar ratio to amines, slows the rate. In addition, liquid glycols surpress browning. The protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis W can be used to estimate nutrition losses during browning. At high temperatures (80 to 120 C) used in processing intermediate moisture foods (IMF), vitamin C destruction shifts to a zero order mechanism. BHA and BHT are the most effective antioxidants against rancidity. In shelf life testing however, 45 C should be the maximum temperature used. Water binding agents are studied. The five isotherms of thirteen humectants were determined. The results show that neither the method of addition nor sequence of addition affects the a sub u lowering ability of these humectants. Results were used to formulate shelf stable IMF processed cheese foods with at least four months shelf life.

  11. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Developed for Improved Strength and Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi G.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, polymer-silicate nanocomposites have been attracting considerable attention as a method of enhancing polymer properties. The nanometer dimensions of the dispersed silicate reinforcement can greatly improve the mechanical, thermal, and gas barrier properties of a polymer matrix. In a study at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the dispersion of small amounts (less than 5 wt%) of an organically modified layered silicate (OLS) into the polymer matrix of a carbon-fiber-reinforced composite has improved the thermal stability of the composite. The enhanced barrier properties of the polymer-clay hybrid are believed to slow the diffusion of oxygen into the bulk polymer, thereby slowing oxidative degradation of the polymer. Electron-backscattering images show cracking of a nanocomposite matrix composite in comparison to a neat resin matrix composite. The images show that dispersion of an OLS into the matrix resin reduces polymer oxidation during aging and reduces the amount of cracking in the matrix significantly. Improvements in composite flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength were also obtained with the addition of OLS. An increase of up to 15 percent in these mechanical properties was observed in composites tested at room temperature and 288 C. The best properties were seen with low silicate levels, 1 to 3 wt%, because of the better dispersion of the silicate in the polymer matrix.

  12. Improving the electrochemical performance of lithium vanadium fluorophosphate cathode material: Focus on interfacial stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiexi; Liu, Zhaomeng; Yan, Guochun; Li, Hangkong; Peng, Wenjie; Li, Xinhai; Song, Liubin; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-10-01

    To improve the stability of LiVPO4F electrode/electrolyte interface, Li3PO4 is used to modify LiVPO4F composite (P-LVPF) for the first time. Morphological characterization shows that LiVPO4F particles are wrapped by amorphous carbon and lithium ionic conductor Li3PO4 as the interlayer and outer layer, respectively. Compared to the pristine sample, the resultant P-LVPF exhibits greatly improved rate capability and elevated-temperature cycle performance when applied as the cathode material for lithium ion batteries. Specifically, the Li3PO4 modified sample specific capacity maintains 77.6% at 1 C after 100 cycles under 55 °C. Such improvement is attributed to the fact that the Li3PO4 coating layer not only acts as a good ionic conductor for LiVPO4F, but also serves as a physical barrier between electrode and electrolyte which can build a stable interface.

  13. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  14. Improved Measurement of the Rotor Temperature in Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Metger, Howard; Clary, Robert; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity is a classical method for measuring the hydrodynamic, translational friction coefficient of biological macromolecules. In a recent study, comparing various analytical ultracentrifuges, we have shown that external calibration of the scan time, radial magnification, and temperature are critically important for accurate measurements (Anal. Biochem., 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.ab.2013.05.011). To achieve accurate temperature calibration, we have introduced the use of an autonomous miniature temperature logging integrated circuit (Maxim Thermochron iButton ™) that can be inserted in an ultracentrifugation cell assembly and spun at low rotor speeds. In the present work, we developed an improved holder for the temperature sensor located in the rotor handle. This has the advantage of not reducing the rotor capacity and allows for a direct temperature measurement of the spinning rotor during high-speed sedimentation velocity experiments up to 60,000 rpm. We demonstrate the sensitivity of this approach by monitoring the adiabatic cooling due to rotor stretching during rotor acceleration, and the reverse process upon rotor deceleration. Based on this, we developed a procedure to approximate isothermal rotor acceleration for better temperature control. PMID:24530285

  15. Effect of spatial inlet temperature and pressure distortion on turbofan engine stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, circumferential pressure distortion, and combined temperature and pressure distortion on the stability of an advanced turbofan engine were investigated experimentally at simulated altitude conditions. With circumferential and radial inlet temperature distortion, a flow instability generated by the fan operating near stall caused the high-pressure compressor to surge at, or near, the same time as the fan. The effect of combined distortion was dependent on the relative location of the high-temperature and low-pressure regions; high-pressure compressor stalls occurred when the regions coincided, and fan stalls occurred with the regions separated.

  16. Improved mechanical stability of HKUST-1 in confined nanospace.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Fernández-Catalá, J; Martínez-Escandell, M; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2015-09-28

    One of the main concerns in the technological application of several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) relates to their structural instability under pressure (after a conforming step). Here we report for the first time that mechanical instability can be highly improved via nucleation and growth of MOF nanocrystals in the confined nanospace of activated carbons.

  17. Improved mechanical stability of HKUST-1 in confined nanospace.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Fernández-Catalá, J; Martínez-Escandell, M; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2015-09-28

    One of the main concerns in the technological application of several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) relates to their structural instability under pressure (after a conforming step). Here we report for the first time that mechanical instability can be highly improved via nucleation and growth of MOF nanocrystals in the confined nanospace of activated carbons. PMID:26256926

  18. Modeling the effect of water activity and storage temperature on chemical stability of coffee brews.

    PubMed

    Manzocco, Lara; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2007-08-01

    This work was addressed to study the chemical stability of coffee brew derivatives as a function of water activity (aw) and storage temperature. To this purpose, coffee brew was freeze-dried, equilibrated at increasing aw values, and stored for up to 10 months at different temperatures from -30 to 60 degrees C. The chemical stability of the samples was assessed by measuring H3O+ formation during storage. Independently of storage temperature, the rate of H3O+ formation was considerably low only when aw was reduced below 0.5 (94% w/w). Beyond this critical boundary, the rate increased, reaching a maximum value at ca. 0.8 aw (78% w/w). Further hydration up to the aw of the freshly prepared beverage significantly increased chemical stability. It was suggested that mechanisms other than lactones' hydrolysis, probably related to nonenzymatic browning pathways, could contribute to the observed increase in acidity during coffee staling. The temperature dependence of H3O+ formation was well-described by the Arrhenius equation in the entire aw range considered. However, aw affected the apparent activation energy and frequency factor. These effects were described by simple equations that were used to set up a modified Arrhenius equation. This model was validated by comparing experimental values, not used to generate the model, with those estimated by the model itself. The model allowed efficient prediction of the chemical stability of coffee derivatives on the basis of only the aw value and storage temperature. PMID:17658750

  19. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, Claudette G.; Liu, Chain T.

    1990-01-01

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO.sub.3 type that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy corrosion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26-30 at. % aluminum, 0.5-10 at. % chromium, 0.02-0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron.

  20. Iron aluminide alloys with improved properties for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    McKamey, C.G.; Liu, C.T.

    1990-10-09

    An improved iron aluminide alloy of the DO[sub 3] type is described that has increased room temperature ductility and improved high elevated temperature strength. The alloy system further is resistant to corrosive attack in the environments of advanced energy conversion systems such as those using fossil fuels. The resultant alloy is relatively inexpensive as contrasted to nickel based and high nickel steels currently utilized for structural components. The alloy system consists essentially of 26--30 at. % aluminum, 0.5--10 at. % chromium, 0.02--0.3 at. % boron plus carbon, up to 2 at. % molybdenum, up to 1 at. % niobium, up to 0.5 at. % zirconium, up to 0.1 at. % yttrium, up to 0.5 at. % vanadium and the balance iron. 3 figs.

  1. Stability improvement of an operational two-way satellite time and frequency transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jiun; Fujieda, Miho; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Tseng, Wen-Hung; Tsao, Hen-Wai

    2016-04-01

    To keep national time accurately coherent with coordinated universal time, many national metrology institutes (NMIs) use two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) to continuously measure the time difference with other NMIs over an international baseline. Some NMIs have ultra-stable clocks with stability better than 10-16. However, current operational TWSTFT can only provide frequency uncertainty of 10-15 and time uncertainty of 1 ns, which is inadequate. The uncertainty is dominated by the short-term stability and the diurnals, i.e. the measurement variation with a period of one day. The aim of this work is to improve the stability of operational TWSTFT systems without additional transmission, bandwidth or increase in signal power. A software-defined receiver (SDR) comprising a high-resolution correlator and successive interference cancellation associated with open-loop configuration as the TWSTFT receiver reduces the time deviation from 140 ps to 73 ps at averaging time of 1 h, and occasionally suppresses diurnals. To study the source of the diurnals, TWSTFT is performed using a 2  ×  2 earth station (ES) array. Consequently, some ESs sensitive to temperature variation are identified, and the diurnals are significantly reduced by employing insensitive ESs. Hence, the operational TWSTFT using the proposed SDR with insensitive ESs achieves time deviation to 41 ps at 1 h, and 80 ps for averaging times from 1 h to 20 h.

  2. An improved stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, U.; Abdelkefi, A.; Akhtar, I.

    2016-07-01

    An enhanced stability characterization for aeroelastic energy harvesters is introduced by using both the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method. Considering a triangular cylinder subjected to transverse galloping oscillations and a piezoelectric transducer to convert mechanical vibrations to electrical power, it is demonstrated that the nonlinear normal form is very beneficial to characterize the type of instability near bifurcation and determine the influence of structural and/or aerodynamic nonlinearities on the performance of the harvester. It is also shown that this tool is strong in terms of designing reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters. The results show that this technique can accurately predict the harvester's response only near bifurcation, however, cannot predict the stable solutions of the harvester when subcritical Hopf bifurcation takes place. To cover these drawbacks, the shooting method is employed. It turns out that this approach is beneficial in determining the stable and unstable solutions of the system and associated turning points. The results also show that the Floquet multipliers, obtained as the by-product of this method, can be used to characterize the response's type of the harvester. Thus, the normal form of the Hopf bifurcation and shooting method predictions can supplement each other to design stable and reliable aeroelastic energy harvesters.

  3. Improving the stability of organosiloxane smectic A liquid crystal random lasers using redox dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ammar A.; Morris, Stephen M.; Gardiner, Damian J.; Qasim, Malik M.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Coles, Harry J.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we focus on the development of liquid crystal (LC) visible-light scattering devices for random lasers. These light-scattering devices are based upon binary mixtures that consist of an organosiloxane smectic A LC and a wide temperature range nematogen LC. Both the temperature range of the smectic A phase and the dielectric anisotropy of the binary mixture are increased compared with that of the neat organosiloxane compound. In the latter case, the increase in the dielectric anisotropy results in a reduction of the magnitude of the electric field required to induce a clear state. Furthermore, it is found that the electric field threshold continues to decrease with increasing concentration of the nematic compound. For the random laser devices, the Pyrromethene 597 laser dye was added to a mixture that was optimized for scattering and it was found that the absorption properties of the dye becomes unstable in the presence of the electro-hydrodynamic instabilities that are required to generate scattering in the LC cells. This is believed to be due to electro-chemical reactions that occur at the electrodes. To avoid dye degradation and ensure repeatable electro-optic behaviour, a reduction-oxidation (redox) couple is dispersed within the dye-doped binary mixture. It is shown that the addition of redox dopants helps to stabilize the dye in the scattering mixtures, and also increases the long-term repeatability of the scattering behaviour. Finally, we conclude by characterizing the random laser emission of the dye-doped binary mixture and demonstrate improved stability.

  4. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. PMID:26593560

  5. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical.

  6. High-temperature natural antioxidant improves soy oil for frying.

    PubMed

    Warner, Kathleen; Gehring, Marta Meta

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the frying stability of soybean oil (SBO) treated with a natural citric acid-based antioxidant, EPT-OILShield able to withstand high temperatures and to establish the oxidative stability of food fried in the treated oil. Soybean oil with 0.05% and 0.5% EPT-OILShield and an untreated control SBO were used for intermittent batch frying of tortilla chips at 180 degrees C for up to 65 h. Oil frying stability was measured by free fatty acids (FFA) and total polar compounds (TPC). Chips were aged for up to 4 mo at 25 degrees C and evaluated for rancid flavor by a 15-member, trained, experienced analytical sensory panel and for hexanal content as an indicator of oxidation. Oil with 0.05% EPT-OILShield had significantly less FFA and TPC than the control. The effect of EPT-OILShield was apparently retained in aged chips because hexanal levels were significantly lower in chips fried in oil with 0.05% EPT-OILShield than in chips fried in the control. Tortilla chips fried in the control were rancid after 2 mo at 25 degrees C at sampling times evaluated from 25 to 65 h; however, chips fried in oil with 0.05% EPT-OILShield and used for 65 h were described as only slightly rancid after 4 mo. Gamma tocopherol levels were significantly higher in the chips fried in the oil with 0.05% EPT-OILShield than in the control, helping to inhibit oxidation in the tortilla chips during storage.

  7. Micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS)-based fiber optic grating sensor for improving weapon stabilization and fire control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sean Z.; Xu, Guoda; Qui, Wei; Lin, Freddie S.; Testa, Robert C.; Mattice, Michael S.

    2000-06-01

    A MEMS-based fiber optic grating sensor (FOGS) for improving weapon stabilization and fire control has been investigated and developed. The technique overwrites two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) onto a polarization-preserving optical fiber core. A MEMS diaphragm is fabricated and integrated with the overlaid FBGs to enhance the performance and reliability of the sensor. A simulation model for the MEMS-FOGS was derived, and simulation results concerning load, angle, strain, and temperature were obtained. The fabricated MEMS diaphragm and the overlaid FBGs are packaged together and mounted on a specially designed cantilever beam system. User-friendly software for sensing system design and data analysis has been developed and can be used to control other sensing systems. The combined multifunctional sensitive. The fully developed sensing system is expected to find applications in fire control, weapon stabilization, and other areas where accurately sensing strain and temperature is critical.

  8. Evaluating Marie Byrd Land stability using an improved basal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holschuh, N.; Pollard, D.; Alley, R. B.; Anandakrishnan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Prior understanding of the ice-sheet setting in Marie Byrd Land (MBL) was derived primarily from geologic and geochemical studies of the current nunataks, with very few geophysical surveys imaging the ice covered regions. The geologic context suggested that the ice rests on a broad regional high, in contrast to the deep basins and trenches that characterize the majority of West Antarctica. This assumed topography would favor long-term stability for the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in MBL. Airborne geophysical data collected in 2009 reveal a much deeper bed than previously estimated, including a significant trough underlying DeVicq Glacier and evidence for extensive glacial erosion. Using these data, we produce a new map of subglacial topography, with which we model the sensitivity of WAIS to a warming ocean using the ice-sheet model of Pollard and DeConto (2012b). We compare the results to estimates of ice loss during WAIS collapse using the previously defined subglacial topography, to determine the impact of the newly discovered subglacial features. Our results indicate that the topographic changes are not sufficient to destabilize the northern margin of MBL currently feeding the Getz Ice Shelf; the majority of ice loss occurs from flow toward the Siple Coast. However, despite only slight dynamic differences, using the new bed as a boundary condition results in an additional 8 cm of sea-level rise during major glacial retreat, an increase of just over 2%. Precise estimation of past and future ice retreat, as well as a complete understanding of the geologic history of the region, will require a higher resolution picture of the bed topography around the Executive Committee mountains.

  9. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of AIRS Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU-A are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm, is now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC in the routine generation of geophysical parameters derived from AIRS/AMSU data. A major innovation in Version 5 is the ability to generate case-by-case level-by-level error estimates delta T(p) for retrieved quantities and the use of these error estimates for Quality Control. We conducted a number of data assimilation experiments using the NASA GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System as a step toward finding an optimum balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy with regard to improving forecast skill. The model was run at a horizontal resolution of 0.5 deg. latitude X 0.67 deg longitude with 72 vertical levels. These experiments were run during four different seasons, each using a different year. The AIRS temperature profiles were presented to the GEOS-5 analysis as rawinsonde profiles, and the profile error estimates delta (p) were used as the uncertainty for each measurement in the data assimilation process. We compared forecasts analyses generated from the analyses done by assimilation of AIRS temperature profiles with three different sets of thresholds; Standard, Medium, and Tight. Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature profiles significantly improve 5-7 day forecast skill compared to that obtained without the benefit of AIRS data in all of the cases studied. In addition, assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS temperature soundings performs better than assimilation of AIRS observed radiances. Based on the experiments shown, Tight Quality Control of AIRS temperature profile performs best

  10. EFFECT OF STORAGE TEMPERATURE ON THE STABILITY OF TOTAL PARENTERAL NUTRITION ADMIXTURES PREPARED FOR INFANTS.

    PubMed

    Turmezei, Judit; Jávorszky, Eszter; Szabó, Eszter; Dredán, Judit; Kállai-Szabó, Barnabás; Zelkó, Romána

    2015-01-01

    Physical, chemical and microbiological stability of total parenteral nutrient (TPN) admixtures was studied as a function of storage time and temperature. Particle size analysis and zeta potential measurements were carried out to evaluate the possible changes in the kinetic stability of the emulsions as a function of storage time and temperature. The concentration changes of the applied additives, those of the ascorbic acid and L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were also determined under different storage conditions. Our results indicate that there were no significant differences in the particle size and zeta potential values of admixtures stored at the three examined temperatures. The best results were obtained in the case of admixtures stored at 30°C temperature. Rapid decomposition of vitamin C was found while the glutamine showed adequate stability as a function of storage time and temperature. According to the results of the physicochemical examinations 10-day storage period of this type of TPN admixtures can be accepted at room temperature. Their storage does not require refrigeration (2-8°C) thus they can be administered without special preheating ensuring better physiological tolerance. Ascorbic acid can be added to the system preceding the administration to the patient because of its rapid decomposition.

  11. Ab Initio Simulations of Temperature Dependent Phase Stability and Martensitic Transitions in NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Thompson, Alexander E.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    For NiTi based alloys, the shape memory effect is governed by a transition from a low-temperature martensite phase to a high-temperature austenite phase. Despite considerable experimental and computational work, basic questions regarding the stability of the phases and the martensitic phase transition remain unclear even for the simple case of binary, equiatomic NiTi. We perform ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to describe the temperature-dependent behavior of NiTi and resolve several of these outstanding issues. Structural correlation functions and finite temperature phonon spectra are evaluated to determine phase stability. In particular, we show that finite temperature, entropic effects stabilize the experimentally observed martensite (B19') and austenite (B2) phases while destabilizing the theoretically predicted (B33) phase. Free energy computations based on ab initio thermodynamic integration confirm these results and permit estimates of the transition temperature between the phases. In addition to the martensitic phase transition, we predict a new transition between the B33 and B19' phases. The role of defects in suppressing these phase transformations is discussed.

  12. Room-temperature charge stability modulated by quantum effects in a nanoscale silicon island.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Lee, J J; Kang, H J; Choi, J B; Yang, S-R Eric; Takahashi, Y; Hasko, D G

    2011-04-13

    We report on transport measurement performed on a room-temperature-operating ultrasmall Coulomb blockade devices with a silicon island of sub5 nm. The charge stability at 300K exhibits a substantial change in slopes and diagonal size of each successive Coulomb diamond, but remarkably its main feature persists even at low temperature down to 5.3K except for additional Coulomb peak splitting. This key feature of charge stability with additional fine structures of Coulomb peaks are successfully modeled by including the interplay between Coulomb interaction, valley splitting, and strong quantum confinement, which leads to several low-energy many-body excited states for each dot occupancy. These excited states become enhanced in the sub5 nm ultrasmall scale and persist even at 300K in the form of cluster, leading to the substantial modulation of charge stability.

  13. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films. PMID:21828794

  14. Effects of crosslinking temperature and time on microstructure and stability of cassava starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Puncha-Arnon, Santhanee; Jiranuntakul, Wittawat; Uttapap, Dudsadee

    2015-12-10

    Starch microspheres (SMs) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion-crosslinking technique at 4 °C and 30 °C for 1, 6, 12 and 24h; the SMs obtained were analyzed for crosslinking density, morphology, crystalline structure, and stability against temperature, pH, and α-amylase hydrolysis. The crosslinking degree at 30 °C was considerably higher than that at 4 °C. SMs prepared at 4 °C for less than 12h incubation had larger size and more porous structure as compared with those prepared at 30 °C, but the morphology became comparable (spherical shape with smooth surface and dense structure) after 24h incubation. All SMs samples displayed amorphous structure. Stability tests revealed that the SMs were very stable under acidic and mild basic pH; however, stability against α-amylase hydrolysis varied depending on incubation temperature and time. PMID:26428134

  15. Effects of crosslinking temperature and time on microstructure and stability of cassava starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Puncha-Arnon, Santhanee; Jiranuntakul, Wittawat; Uttapap, Dudsadee

    2015-12-10

    Starch microspheres (SMs) were prepared by a water-in-water emulsion-crosslinking technique at 4 °C and 30 °C for 1, 6, 12 and 24h; the SMs obtained were analyzed for crosslinking density, morphology, crystalline structure, and stability against temperature, pH, and α-amylase hydrolysis. The crosslinking degree at 30 °C was considerably higher than that at 4 °C. SMs prepared at 4 °C for less than 12h incubation had larger size and more porous structure as compared with those prepared at 30 °C, but the morphology became comparable (spherical shape with smooth surface and dense structure) after 24h incubation. All SMs samples displayed amorphous structure. Stability tests revealed that the SMs were very stable under acidic and mild basic pH; however, stability against α-amylase hydrolysis varied depending on incubation temperature and time.

  16. Effect of surface morphology and temperature on the structural stability of nanoscale wavy films.

    PubMed

    Adnan, A; Sun, C T

    2008-08-01

    The atomic scale structural stability of freestanding wavy gold (Au) nanofilms was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The waviness in the Au film was formed by cleaving sinusoidal surfaces from a [Formula: see text] bulk crystal. The degree of waviness was varied by changing the wavelength of the sinusoidal surface profile. Films were then equilibrated at different temperatures (between 10 and 1080 K) and their structural stability was monitored. The MD simulation results revealed that the stability of films depends on temperature as well as the waviness of the film surface. It was shown that the size-dependent melting point depression of Au plays the dominant role in causing the structural instability of wavy films.

  17. Structure, electrical characteristics, and high-temperature stability of aerosol jet printed silver nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; McCloy, John; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2016-08-01

    Printed electronics has emerged as a versatile eco-friendly fabrication technique to create sintered nanoparticle (NP) films on arbitrary surfaces with an excellent control over the film microstructure. While applicability of such films for high-temperature applications is not explored previously, herein we report the high-temperature electrical stability of silver (Ag) metal NP films fabricated using an Aerosol Jet based printing technique and demonstrate that this behavior is dictated by changes in the film microstructure. In-situ high temperature (24-500 °C) impedance spectroscopy measurements show that the real part of the impedance increases with increasing temperature up to 150 °C, at which point a decreasing trend prevails until 300 °C, followed again by an increase in impedance. The electrical behavior is correlated with the in-situ grain growth of the Ag NP films, as observed afterwards by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and could be tailored by controlling the initial microstructure through sintering conditions. Using combined diffraction and spectroscopic analytical methods, it is demonstrated the Aerosol Jet printed Ag NP films exhibit enhanced thermal stability and oxidation resistance. In addition to establishing the conditions for stability of Ag NP films, the results provide a fundamental understanding of the effect of grain growth and reduction in grain boundary area on the electrical stability of sintered NP films.

  18. High-temperature stabilization by air of a pyrophoric catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Krylova, A.V.; Ustimenko, G.A.

    1982-12-01

    The reaction of a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia with air at 480 to 520/sup 0/C leads to the formation on the surface of a thin protective oxide structure that eliminates its pyrophoric character. High-temperature stabilization by air is a considerably faster process than passivation and leads to the production of catalysts with increased resistance to oxidation.

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF SIMILARITY THEORY STABILITY CORRECTION TERMS FOR MOMENTUM AND TEMPERATURE, OVER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AND FORESTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many observations of temperature and wind speed profiles have been taken over "ideal" terrain and analyzed to develop the stability correction terms which are commonly used in the application of similarity theory. Fewer observations have been taken and analyzed in this manner ov...

  20. The role of temperature variability in stabilizing the mountain pine beetle-fungus mutualism.

    PubMed

    Addison, A L; Powell, J A; Six, D L; Moore, M; Bentz, B J

    2013-10-21

    As global climate patterns continue to change and extreme weather events become increasingly common, it is likely that many ecological interactions will be affected. One such interaction is the multipartite symbiosis that exists between the mountain pine beetle and two species of fungi, Grosmannia clavigera and Ophiostoma montium. In this mutualism, the fungi provide nutrition to the beetle, while the fungi benefit by being dispersed to new host trees. Multi-partite mutualisms are predicted to be unstable due to strong direct competition among symbionts or natural selection for superior over inferior mutualists. However, this mutualism has remained stable over long periods of evolutionary time. In this paper, we developed a temperature-based model for the spread of fungi within a tree and connected it to an existing model for mountain pine beetle development. Using this integrated model for fungal growth, we explored the possibility that temperature variability is a stabilizing mechanism for the mountain pine beetle-fungi mutualism. Of the three types of temperature variability we tested: intra-year, inter-year and variability due to transitioning between different thermal habitats (thermal migration), we found that thermal migration was the most robust stabilizing mechanism. Additionally, we found that the MPB attack density or spacing between fungal lesions also had a significant effect on the stability of the system. High attack densities or close lesion spacings also tended to stabilize the system, regardless of temperature.

  1. Torque vectoring for improving stability of small electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegożek, W.; Weigel-Milleret, K.

    2016-09-01

    The electric vehicles solutions based on the individually controlled electric motors propel a single wheel allow to improve the dynamic properties of the vehicle by varying the distribution of the driving torque. Most of the literature refer to the vehicles with a track typical for passenger cars. This paper examines whether the narrow vehicle (with a very small track) torque vectoring bring a noticeable change of the understeer characteristics and whether torque vectoring is possible to use in securing a narrow vehicle from roll over (roll mitigation). The paper contains road tests of the steering characteristics (steady state understeer characteristic quasi-static acceleration with a fixed steering wheel (SH = const) and on the constant radius track (R = const)) of the narrow vehicle. The vehicle understeer characteristic as a function of a power distribution is presented.

  2. Thin-Film Reliability Trends Toward Improved Stability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-07-01

    Long-term, stable performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules will be increasingly important to their successful penetration of the power grid. This paper summarizes more than 150 thin-film and more than 1700 silicon PV degradation rates (Rd) quoted in publications for locations worldwide. Partitioning the literature results by technology and date of installation statistical analysis shows an improvement in degradation rate especially for thin-film technologies in the last decade. A CIGS array deployed at NREL for more than 5 years that appears to be stable supports the literature trends. Indoor and outdoor data indicate undetectable change in performance (0.2+/-0.2 %/yr). One module shows signs of slight degradation from what appears to be an initial manufacturing defect, however it has not affected the overall system performance.

  3. The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. This report covers testing an iron catalyst. During the last quarter, a new precipitated iron catalyst was prepared and tested in the slurry autoclave reactor at various conditions. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1250 hours of testing. This quarter, the test was extended to include performance evaluations at different conversion levels ranging from 35 to 88% at 265 and 275{degree}C. The conversion levels were varied by changing the feed rate. The catalytic performance at different conversion intervals was then integrated to approximately predict performance in a bubble column reactor. The run was shut down at the end of 1996 hours because of a 24-hour-power outage. When the power was back on, the run was restarted from room temperature. Catalytic performance during the first 300 hours after the restart-up was monitored. Overall product distributions are being tabulated as analytical laboratory data are obtained. 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Enriching membrane cholesterol improves stability and cryosurvival of buffalo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Rajoriya, J S; Prasad, J K; Ramteke, S S; Perumal, P; Ghosh, S K; Singh, M; Pande, Megha; Srivastava, N

    2016-01-01

    Buffalo spermatozoa are comparatively more susceptible to freezing hazards than cattle spermatozoa. In recent times incubation of spermatozoa with cholesterol-loaded-cyclodextrins (CLC) has shown improvements in semen quality in several species. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the incubation level of CLC at which maximum benefit is derived for the buffalo spermatozoa. For the study, 120 million spermatozoa were incubated in 2, 3 and 4 mg/mL of CLC (Gr II, III and IV, respectively) and cholesterol and phospholipids content, their ratio, flow cytometric evaluation of plasma membrane integrity (PMI), plasma membrane fluidity and extent of cryoinjury (Chlortetracycline, CTC assay) were compared with an untreated control (Gr I). Additionally the ability of cholesterol-loaded-spermatozoa to undergo induced acrosome reaction (IAR) using ionophore calcium (A23187) was evaluated in frozen-thaw samples. Data show a significant and linear increase (CV=0.88) in cholesterol content of spermatozoa in Gr II, III and IV and a significant decrease in phospholipids content at frozen-thaw stage in Gr IV than Gr III spermatozoa. The study revealed a significant improvement in PMI and significant reduction in plasma membrane fluidity and cryoinjury of CLC treated spermatozoa at progressive stages in three groups compared to control. Nevertheless, spermatozoa of Gr II, III and IV were significantly less responsive to ionophore calcium (A23187) than Gr I. This study shows for the first time that incubation of buffalo bull spermatozoa with CLC (3mg/120×10(6)) prior to processing permits greater numbers of sperm to survive cryopreservation while allowing spermatozoa to capacitate and the acrosome to react to AR inducer ionophore calcium (A23187).

  5. Encapsulation of catechin and epicatechin on BSA NPS improved their stability and antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ramdhan; Kumar, Dharmesh; Kumari, Avnesh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of antioxidant molecules on protein nanoparticles (NPs) could be an advanced approach for providing stable, better food nutraceuticals and anticancer drugs. The bioavailability and stability of catechin (CAT) and epicatechin (ECAT) were very poor. In the present study, the CAT and ECAT were loaded on bovine serum albumin (BSA) NPs following desolvation method. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) recorded size of CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs were 45 ± 5 nm and 48 ± 5 nm respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of CAT and ECAT on BSA NPs was found to be 60.5 and 54.5 % respectively. CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs show slow and sustained in vitro release. The CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs were stable in solution at various temperatures 37 °C, 47 °C and 57 °C. DPPH assay revealed that CAT and ECAT maintained their functional activity even after encapsulation on BSA NPs. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs determined against A549 cell lines was found to be improved. CAT and ECAT aptly encapsulated in BSA NPs, showed satisfactory sustained release, maintained antioxidant potential and found improved efficacy. This has thus suggested their more effective use in food and nutraceuticals as well as in medical field.

  6. Encapsulation of catechin and epicatechin on BSA NPS improved their stability and antioxidant potential

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ramdhan; Kumar, Dharmesh; Kumari, Avnesh; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of antioxidant molecules on protein nanoparticles (NPs) could be an advanced approach for providing stable, better food nutraceuticals and anticancer drugs. The bioavailability and stability of catechin (CAT) and epicatechin (ECAT) were very poor. In the present study, the CAT and ECAT were loaded on bovine serum albumin (BSA) NPs following desolvation method. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) recorded size of CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs were 45 ± 5 nm and 48 ± 5 nm respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of CAT and ECAT on BSA NPs was found to be 60.5 and 54.5 % respectively. CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs show slow and sustained in vitro release. The CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs were stable in solution at various temperatures 37 °C, 47 °C and 57 °C. DPPH assay revealed that CAT and ECAT maintained their functional activity even after encapsulation on BSA NPs. Furthermore, the efficacy of CAT-BSA NPs and ECAT-BSA NPs determined against A549 cell lines was found to be improved. CAT and ECAT aptly encapsulated in BSA NPs, showed satisfactory sustained release, maintained antioxidant potential and found improved efficacy. This has thus suggested their more effective use in food and nutraceuticals as well as in medical field. PMID:26417264

  7. Effect of high-temperature on high-performance liquid chromatography column stability and performance under temperature-programmed conditions.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stephanie J; Jones, Brian A; Felix, W Dale; Clark, Jody

    2004-03-19

    Six commercially available analytical (4.1 or 4.6 mm i.d.) columns were evaluated under temperature-programmed high-temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) conditions to access their stability and performance at extreme temperatures. Seven components consisting of acidic, basic and neutral compounds were analyzed under temperature-programmed conditions and solvent gradient conditions using three different mobile phase compositions (acidic, basic and neutral). Each column was checked with a two-component test mix at various stages of the evaluation to look for signs of stationary phase collapse. Three zirconia based stationary phases studied exhibited column bleed under temperature-programmed conditions. The other three columns, a polydentate silica column, a polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) polymeric column, and a graphitic carbon column performed well with no evidence of stationary phase degradation. The R.S.D. for the retention times and efficiencies were less than 10% for most conditions, and not more than 15% during the course of the evaluation for each column. The polydentate silica stationary phase was temperature programmed to 100 degrees C, the PS-DVB stationary phase was temperature programmed up to 150 degrees C, and the graphitic carbon column was used with temperature programming up to 200 degrees C. Comparable peak capacities and similar retention behaviors were observed under solvent gradient and temperature-programmed conditions. Temperature programming with dynamic mobile phase preheating can replace solvent gradient analysis without a loss of peak capacity when used with 4.1 or 4.6 mm columns. PMID:15043277

  8. High-Temperature, Thin-Film Strain Gages Improved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Conventional resistance strain gage technology uses "bonded" strain gages. These foil or wire gages are bonded onto the surface of the test article with glue, ceramic cements, or flame-sprayed ceramics. These bonding agents can, in some instances, limit both the degree of strain transmission from the test structure to the gage and the maximum working temperature of the gage. Also, the bulky, bonded gage normally disrupts aerodynamic gas flow on the surface of the test structure because of its intrusive character. To respond to the urgent needs in aeronautic and aerospace research where stress and temperature gradients are high, aerodynamic effects need to be minimized, and higher operational temperatures are required, the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a thin film strain gage. This gage, a vacuum-deposited thin film formed directly on the surface of a test structure, operates at much higher temperatures than commercially available gages do and with minimal disruption of the aerodynamic flow. The gage uses an alloy, palladium-13 wt % chromium (hereafter, PdCr), which was developed by United Technologies Research Center under a NASA contract. PdCr is structurally stable and oxidation resistant up to at least 1100 C (2000 F); its temperature-induced resistance change is linear, repeatable, and not sensitive to the rates of heating and cooling. An early strain gage, which was made of 25-micrometer-diameter PdCr wire and demonstrated to be useable to 800 C, won an R&D 100 award in 1991. By further improving the purity of the material and by developing gage fabrication techniques that use sputter-deposition, photolithography patterning, and chemical etching, we have made an 8- to 10-m PdCr thin-film strain gage that can measure dynamic and static strain to at least 1100 C. For static strain measurements, a 5-m-thick Pt element serves as a temperature compensator to further minimize the temperature effect of the gage. These thin-film gages provide the advantage of

  9. [Investigation of apomyoglobin stability depending on urea and temperature at two different pH values].

    PubMed

    Baryshnikova, E N; Sharanov, M G; Kashparov, I A; Il'ina, N B; Bychkova, V E

    2005-01-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of apomyoglobin by urea was investigated in the temperature range from 5 to 25 degrees C at two pH values. The thermodynamic parameters of the apomyoglobin native-unfolded state transition were determined. Conformational changes in the protein structure were monitored by tryptophan fluorescence and far UV circular dichroism. Apomyoglobin preserves its native conformation at pH 5.7 and 6.2 in the temperature range used. It was shown that the apomyoglobin stability and its unfolding cooperativity are substantially lower at 5 degrees C than at other temperatures. This fact should be taken in account at the investigation of apomyoglobin.

  10. Effect of the thermal stabilization temperature on the change in the texture of polyacrylonitrile fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlitdinova, A. G.; Tyumentsev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of temperature of isothermal treatment on the change in sizes L 010 of coherent scattering regions and texture of a polyacrylonitrile fiber during its transition to the structure of a thermally stabilized fiber is analyzed using X-ray structure analysis. An increase in the thermostabilization temperature at a constant stretching load stimulates simultaneously a more active increase in size L 010 and texturing of polyacrylonitrile fibers at the initial stage. Active evolution of the phase transformation at temperatures 275-290°C during further thermostabilization is accompanied by a substantial decrease in the texture of the polymer that has not experienced the phase transformation by this instant.

  11. Process for stabilizing dimensions of duplex stainless steels for service at elevated temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Frederick C.; Tobin, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel materials containing austenite plus delta ferrite, are dimensionally stabilized by heating the material to a reaction temperature between about 1050.degree.-1450.degree. F. (566.degree.-788.degree. C.), holding it at this temperature during transformation of delta ferrite to austenite plus sigma phase, and subsequently heating to a reversion temperature between about 1625.degree.-1750.degree. F. (885.degree.-954.degree. C.), whereby the sigma phase transforms back to ferrite, but the austenite remains dispersed in the ferrite phase. Final controlled cooling permits transformation of ferrite to austenite plus sigma and, later, precipitation of carbides.

  12. The effects of wilting and storage temperatures on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinghua; Zhang, Jianguo; Shi, Shangli; Sun, Qizhong

    2011-08-01

    In order to clarify the ensiling characteristics of stylo (Stylosanthes guianensis Swartz), the effects of wilting (no wilting, light wilting and heavy wilting) and storage temperatures (10°C, 20°C, 30°C and 40°C) on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability of stylo silage were investigated. Wilting had no significant influence on the contents of crude protein, ether extract and acid detergent fiber, and numbers of lactic acid bacteria, aerobic bacteria, yeasts and mold (P > 0.05). Heavy wilted material, wilted for 12 h, had higher neutral detergent fiber content and lower water-soluble carbohydrate content than unwilted and light wilted materials (P < 0.05). Wilting and storage temperatures had significant effects on pH value, acetic acid, butyric acid and NH(3) -N contents of stylo silage (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Wilting tended to reduce acetic acid and NH(3) -N contents and improve the fermentation quality of stylo silage. In all the silages, no wilting silage ensiled at 30°C had the highest butyric acid content (P < 0.05). High temperature of 40°C markedly restricted the growth of lactic acid bacteria and aerobic bacteria in silage, irrespective of wilting. The wilted silage or silage stored at low temperature had poor aerobic stability. PMID:21794013

  13. High Temperature Irradiation-Resistant Thermocouple Performance Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Joshua Daw; Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; John Crepeau; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-04-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 ºC. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed and evaluated the performance of a high temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouple (HTIR-TC) that contains alloys of molybdenum and niobium. Data from high temperature (up to 1500 ºC) long duration (up to 4000 hours) tests and on-going irradiations at INL’s Advanced Test Reactor demonstrate the superiority of these sensors to commercially-available thermocouples. However, several options have been identified that could further enhance their reliability, reduce their production costs, and allow their use in a wider range of operating conditions. This paper presents results from on-going Idaho National Laboratory (INL)/University of Idaho (UI) efforts to investigate options to improve HTIR-TC ductility, reliability, and resolution by investigating specially-formulated alloys of molybdenum and niobium and alternate diameter thermoelements (wires). In addition, on-going efforts to evaluate alternate fabrication approaches, such as drawn and loose assembly techniques will be discussed. Efforts to reduce HTIR-TC fabrication costs, such as the use of less expensive extension cable will also be presented. Finally, customized HTIR-TC designs developed for specific customer needs will be summarized to emphasize the varied conditions under which these sensors may be used.

  14. Improved granular activated carbon for the stabilization of wastewater PH

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, R.W.; Dussert, B.W.; Kovacic, S.L.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory studies have identified the cause of the pH rise, which occurs during water treatment with activated carbon, as an interaction between the naturally occurring anions and protons in the water and the carbon surface. The interaction can be described as an ion exchange type of phenomenon, in which the carbon surface sorbs the anions and corresponding hydronium ions from the water. These studies have shown that the anion sorption and resulting pH increase is independent of the raw material used for the activated carbon production, e.g. bituminous or subbituminous coal, peat, wood or coconut. Also, the pH excursions occur with virgin, reactivated, and acid washed granular carbons. Current pH control technologies focus on adjustment of the wastewater pH prior to discharge or recycle of the initial effluent water until the pH increase abates. However, improved water pH control options have been realized by altering the carbon surface through controlled oxidation rather than the water chemistry or extended preprocessing at the treatment site.

  15. Improvement of the stability of hydroxyapatite through glass ceramic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Ha, Na Ra; Yang, Zheng Xun; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Kim, Tae Suk; Lee, Jong Kook

    2010-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite has achieved significant application in orthopedic and dental implants due to its excellent biocompatibility. Sintered hydroxyapatites showed significant dissolution, however, after their immersion in water or simulated body fluid (SBF). This grain boundary dissolution, even in pure hydroxyapatites, resulted in grain separation at the surfaces, and finally, in fracture. In this study, hydroxyapatite ceramics containing apatite-wollastonite (AW) or calcium silicate (SG) glass ceramics as additives were prepared to prevent the dissolution. AW and SG glass ceramics were added at 0-7 wt% and powder-compacted uniaxially followed by firing at moisture conditions. The glass phase was incorporated into the hydroxyapatite to act as a sintering aid, followed by crystallization, to improve the mechanical properties without reducing the biocompatibility. As seen in the results of the dissolution test, a significant amount of damage was reduced even after more than 14 days. TEM and SEM showed no decomposition of HA to the secondary phase, and the fracture toughness increased, becoming even higher than that of the commercial hydroxyapatite.

  16. The improvement of phycocyanin stability extracted from Spirulina sp using extrusion encapsulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzery, Meiny; Hadiyanto, Sutanto, Heri; Soetrisnanto, Danny; Majid, Dian; Setyawan, Deny; Azizah, Nur

    2015-12-01

    The stability of phycocyanin extracted from microalgae Spirulina has been evaluated and it showed that the stability of this antioxidant was affected by temperature and pH changes. The encapsulation technique was of the alternatives to overcome this stability changes. The objective of this paper was to investigate the effects of coating materials (alginate and chitosan) during encapsulation by using extrusion technique. The experiments were conducted with variation of alginate as coating materials. The size of each microcapsules was evaluated by using SEM/XRD for its size and homogeneity.

  17. Chemical stability of glass seal interfaces in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeff W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective, oxidation-resistant, high-temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  18. Stability threshold of ion temperature gradient driven mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S. C.

    2008-12-15

    For the first time in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration, the stability threshold of the ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) mode is studied by linear gyrokinetic theory. In comparison with tokamaks, the RFP configuration has a shorter connection length and stronger magnetic curvature drift. These effects result in a stronger instability driving mechanism and a larger growth rate in the fluid limit. However, the kinetic theory shows that the temperature slopes required for the excitation of ITG instability are much steeper than the tokamak ones. This is because the effect of Landau damping also becomes stronger due to the shorter connection length, which is dominant and ultimately determines the stability threshold. The required temperature slope for the instability may only be found in the very edge of the plasma and/or near the border of the dominant magnetic island during the quasi-single helicity state of discharge.

  19. Stabilized composite membranes and membrane electrode assemblies for high temperature/low relative humidity polymer electrolyte fuel cell operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Vijay Krishna

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have a variety of applications in the stationary power, mobile power and automotive power sectors. Existing membrane technology presently permits fuel cell operation at temperatures less than 100°C under fully saturated conditions. However, several advantages such as easier heat rejection rates and improved impurities tolerance by the anode electrocatalyst result by operating a PEMFC at elevated temperatures (above 100°C) and lower relative humidities. In an attempt to extend the operating range of the polymer electrolyte membrane, perfluorosulfonic acid (NafionRTM) based organic/inorganic (heteropolyacid) composite membranes were investigated in terms of thermal and electrochemical stability, additive stability and conductivity. Tungsten based heteropolyacids (HPAs) were found to be electrochemically stable as opposed to molybdenum based additives. The stability of the inorganic heteropolyacid additive in aqueous environments was enhanced by ion exchanging the protons of the HPAs with larger counter ions. An additional stabilization technique developed involved improving the interaction of HPA with NafionRTM by linking the particles to the sulfonic acid clusters via a sol-gel induced metal oxide linkage. The proton conductivity of the composite membranes was found to depend on the particle size of the HPA additive. A two order of magnitude change in additive particle size was attained by modification of the membrane preparation technique. This modification resulted in a nearly 50% increase in conductivity. The membranes prepared were characterized by thermal analysis, spectroscopy and microscopy. A technique was developed to incorporate existing MEA preparation and HPA stabilization techniques to the composite membranes with small HPA particles. All MEAs prepared were evaluated at high temperatures (120°C) and low relative humidities (35%) in an operating fuel cell, with membrane resistance and hence conductivity

  20. Reliability and stability of three cryogenic temperature sensor models subjected to accelerated thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Krause, John

    2012-06-01

    Reliability of a cryogenic temperature sensor is important for any experimental application, but even more so for aerospace applications where there is virtually no opportunity to replace a failed sensor. Many factors affect the stability and longevity of a cryogenic temperature sensor, but one of the most detrimental factors is thermal cycling over an extended temperature range. Strains and stresses caused by thermal contraction can affect both the sensing material and its interface with electrical contacts leading to either calibration shift and/or catastrophic failure of the sensor. Depending upon the aerospace application, a temperature sensor may cycle from cryogenic temperature to near room temperature hundreds of times or more during the lifetime of the mission. Sample groups of three sensors types, the Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. models CX-1050-SD (23 samples), DT-670-SD (12 samples), and DT-470-SD (11 samples), were subjected to accelerated thermal shocking from room temperature to 77 K one thousand times. Recalibrations of each group were performed from 1.2 K to 325 K after 20, 40, 60, 100, 250, 500 and 1,000 thermal shocks. The resulting reliability and stability data are presented.

  1. Basin-Wide Temperature Constraints On Gas Hydrate Stability In The Gulf Of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Reagan, M. T.; Guinasso, N. L.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.

    2012-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits commonly occur at the seafloor-water interface on marine margins. They are especially prevalent in the Gulf of Mexico where they are associated with natural oil seeps. The stability of these deposits is potentially challenged by fluctuations in bottom water temperature, on an annual time-scale, and under the long-term influence of climate change. We mapped the locations of natural oil seeps where shallow gas hydrate deposits are known to occur across the entire Gulf of Mexico basin based on a comprehensive review of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data (~200 images). We prepared a bottom water temperature map based on the archive of CTD casts from the Gulf (~6000 records). Comparing the distribution of gas hydrate deposits with predicted bottom water temperature, we find that a broad area of the upper slope lies above the theoretical stability horizon for structure 1 gas hydrate, while all sites where gas hydrate deposits occur are within the stability horizon for structure 2 gas hydrate. This is consistent with analytical results that structure 2 gas hydrates predominate on the upper slope (Klapp et al., 2010), where bottom water temperatures fluctuate over a 7 to 10 C range (approx. 600 m depth), while pure structure 1 hydrates are found at greater depths (approx. 3000 m). Where higher hydrocarbon gases are available, formation of structure 2 gas hydrate should significantly increase the resistance of shallow gas hydrate deposits to destabilizing effects variable or increasing bottom water temperature. Klapp, S.A., Bohrmann, G., Kuhs, W.F., Murshed, M.M., Pape, T., Klein, H., Techmer, K.S., Heeschen, K.U., and Abegg, F., 2010, Microstructures of structure I and II gas hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v. 27, p. 116-125.Bottom temperature and pressure for Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate outcrops and stability horizons for sI and sII hydrate.

  2. Improved Thermal-Insulation Systems for Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D.

    2003-01-01

    Improved thermal-insulation materials and structures and the techniques for manufacturing them are undergoing development for use in low-temperature applications. Examples of low-temperature equipment for which these thermal insulation systems could provide improved energy efficiency include storage tanks for cryogens, superconducting electric-power-transmission equipment, containers for transport of food and other perishable commodities, and cold boxes for low-temperature industrial processes. These systems could also be used to insulate piping used to transfer cryogens and other fluids, such as liquefied natural gas, refrigerants, chilled water, crude oil, or low-pressure steam. The present thermal-insulation systems are layer composites based partly on the older class of thermal-insulation systems denoted generally as multilayer insulation (MLI). A typical MLI structure includes an evacuated jacket, within which many layers of radiation shields are stacked or wrapped close together. Low-thermal-conductivity spacers are typically placed between the reflection layers to keep them from touching. MLI can work very well when a high vacuum level (less than 10(exp-4) torr) is maintained and utmost care is taken during installation, but its thermal performance deteriorates sharply as the pressure in the evacuated space rises into the soft vacuum range [pressures greater than 0.1 torr (greater than 13 Pa)]. In addition, the thermal performance of MLI is extremely sensitive to mechanical compression and edge effects and can easily decrease from one to two orders of magnitude from its ideal value even when the MLI is kept under high vacuum condition. The present thermal-insulation systems are designed to perform well under soft vacuum level, in particular the range of 1 to 10 torr. They are also designed with larger interlayer spacings to reduce vulnerability to compression (and consequent heat leak) caused by installation and use. The superiority of these systems is the

  3. Wavemeter measurements of frequency stability of an injection seeded alexandrite laser for pressure and temperature lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. R.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Korb, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The GSFC pressure-temperature lidar is a differential absorption lidar operating in the oxygen A band absorption region (760 to 770 nm), and utilizes two tunable pulsed alexandrite lasers. For obtaining temperature measurements with an accuracy of less than or = 1 K, it has been determined that the stability of the online laser frequency over a period of time corresponding to a set of measurements, 0.1 to 30 min, has to be better than +/- 0.002/cm. In addition, the requirements on laser spectral bandwidth and spectral purity are less than or = 0.02/cm and greater than or = 99.9 percent, respectively. Injection seeding with a stabilized AlGaAs diode laser was used to achieve the required frequency stability and spectral bandwidth. A high resolution Fizeau wavemeter was employed to determine the frequency stability of the pulsed alexandrite laser and determine its bandwidth, mode structure. We present the results of measurements of the frequency stability and the spectrum of the injection seeded alexandrite laser.

  4. Improved photoluminescence and sensing stability of porous silicon nanowires by surface passivation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; He, Haiping; Sun, Luwei; Ye, Zhizhen

    2014-01-21

    Core-shell structured silicon nanowires (Si NWs) were obtained by coating Si NWs with an HfO2 layer. Enhanced photoluminescence (PL) and a slightly decreased PL lifetime are achieved by HfO2 coating. Furthermore, the sensing stability is strongly improved. The improvement of PL properties is interpreted in terms of surface passivation and the Purcell effect.

  5. Improvements of COMS Land Surface Temperature Retrieval Algorithm by considering diurnal variations of boundary layer temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. Y.; Suh, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    National Meteorological Satellite Centre in Republic of Korea retrieves operationally land surface temperature (LST) by applying the split-window LST algorithm (CSW_v1.0) from Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) data. In order to improve COMS LST accuracy, Cho et al. (2015) developed six types of LST retrieval equations (CSW_v2.0) by considering temperature lapse rate and water vapor/aerosol effect. Similar to CSW_v1.0, the LST retrieved by CSW_v2.0 had a correlation coefficient of 0.99 with the prescribed LST and the root mean square error (RMSE) improved from 1.41 K to 1.39 K. However, CSW_v2.0 showed relatively poor performance, in particular, the temperature lapse rate is certainly large (superadiabatic cases during daytime or strong inversion cases during early morning). In this study, we upgraded the CSW_v2.0 by considering diurnal variations of boundary layer temperature to reduce the relatively large errors under the large lapse rate conditions. To achieve the goals, the diurnal variations of air temperature along with the land surface temperature are included during radiative transfer simulations for the generation of the pseudo-match-up database. The preliminary analysis results showed that RMSE and bias are reduced from 1.39K to 1.14K and from -0.03K to -0.01K. In this presentation, we will show the detailed results of LST retrieval using new algorithms according to the viewing geometry, temperature lapse rate condition, and water vapour amount along with the intercomparison results with MODIS LST data.

  6. Electrical conductivity and electron-spin resonance in oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile subjected to elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and electron spin resonance measurements are presented for oxidatively stabilized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers subjected to heat treatment at temperatures ranging from 700 to 950 K. Conductivity measurements made at temperatures between 77 and 523 K reveal that PAN fibers heat treated in vacuum behave as semiconductors, with a room-temperature conductivity dominated by the contributions of impurity states, with an activation energy of 88 kcal/mole. A decrease in conductivity is observed upon air which is attributed to a decrease in the electron-phonon scattering time. ESR spectra indicate that conducting pathways having metallic properties are formed at temperatures as low as 715 K, although the contribution of these pathways to the room-temperature conductivity is extremely small next to the contribution of localized spin centers.

  7. Long-term stability testing of optical fibre Fabry-Perot temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Applications of fibre optic sensors at high temperatures have gained a huge interest recently, as they appeared to be suitable for temperature recording in harsh environments. In this paper, we are demonstrating two intrinsic Fabry-Perot (F-P) fibre optic sensors for high temperature monitoring. The sensors are consisting of a 125μm diameter single mode fibre (SMF28) and a 125μm diameter PCF ESM-12B pure fused silica fibre spliced to a SMF28, respectively. The result was a low finesse optical SMF-Cr-SMF, and SMF-Cr-PCF, sensor with cavity lengths varying from 50μm to 100μm. Both types of Fabry-Perot sensors were tested in a tube furnace over a temperature range from room temperature up to 1100°C. Following a number of annealing cycles, between the above mentioned temperatures range, very good repeatability of the phase response was achieved. During the cycling process, thermal stress relief takes place which makes the sensors suitable for temperature testing at temperatures just in excess of 1000°C. After initial cycling the sensors are subjected to long term stability tests. The phase response is stable, less than 4°C, over a period of 5 days at a temperature of 1050°C for both sensors. The temperature resolution is around 3°C.

  8. Fast wave stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves in a tokamak plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2015-11-01

    A kinetic description is developed for the stabilization/destabilization of ion temperature gradient drift waves by a large amplitude whistler wave. Parametric coupling of a whistler wave with the low frequency drift waves can yields whistler sidebands of their sum and difference frequencies. The whistler pump and sidebands can exert a ponderomotive force on electrons and modify the eigen-frequency of drift waves. This coupling process can lead to the stabilization/destabilization of drift waves, depending on the wave numbers of the interacting waves as well as the whistler pump power. The effectiveness of obliquely propagating whistler pump is also examined.

  9. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5–9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50°C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5–7.0 and temperatures of up to 40°C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases. PMID:26790148

  10. Improvements in Glucose Sensitivity and Stability of Trichoderma reesei β-Glucosidase Using Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Boyang; Amano, Yoshihiko; Nozaki, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Glucose sensitivity and pH and thermal stabilities of Trichoderma reesei Cel1A (Bgl II) were improved by site-directed mutagenesis of only two amino acid residues (L167W or P172L) at the entrance of the active site. The Cel1A mutant showed high glucose tolerance (50% of inhibitory concentration = 650 mM), glucose stimulation (2.0 fold at 50 mM glucose), and enhanced specific activity (2.4-fold) compared with those of the wild-type Cel1A. Furthermore, the mutant enzyme showed stability at a wide pH range of 4.5-9.0 and possessed high thermal stability up to 50 °C with 80% of the residual activities compared with the stability seen at the pH range of 6.5-7.0 and temperatures of up to 40 °C in the wild-type Cel1A. Kinetic studies for hydrolysis revealed that the Cel1A mutant was competitively inhibited by glucose at similar levels as the wild-type enzyme. Additionally, the mutant enzyme exhibited substrate inhibition, which gradually disappeared with an increasing glucose concentration. These data suggest that the glucose stimulation was caused by relieve the substrate inhibition in the presence of glucose. To conclude, all the properties improved by the mutagenesis would be great advantages in degradation of cellulosic biomass together with cellulases.

  11. Minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRT): procedure improvements and dynamic MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Halford, Carl

    2002-02-01

    Minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRT or MRTD) is the primary performance test for tactical military infrared (IR) sensors. It is a lab measurement that may be related to discrimination task performance in the field. Also, a theoretical model exists for deriving the MRT of a particular sensor, where the model is used in sensor design evaluation and trades. The model includes both the human and the sensor/display in the overall system performance and can be considered a visual acuity test of a human looking through the IR imager. Both the model and test are validated for first and second generation forward looking IR sensors. The test procedure has been incorrectly applied to undersampled staring array imagers that are becoming more common today. Additionally, it lacks stringent controllability in the procedures, which hampers test repeatability. As a result, multiple measurements are typically performed and the results averaged. This is usually without regard to statistical requirements for estimating values from distributed data. Improvements to the MRT testing procedure are investigated in this research. Data is reported that supports the use of improved techniques. The first improvement is to standardize the sensor and display configuration procedures. A process for standardization is presented and applied to a mid-wave IR imaging sensor. The currently accepted procedure for the static MRT test is accompanied by errors for undersampled staring array imagers. Thus, the second improvement suggested is to utilize dynamic MRT (DMRT) testing for undersampled IR imaging systems. Two motivations for the study presented here are to minimize the uncertainty associated with MRT testing and to improve the characterization of undersampled imagers. These two goals are achieved by the suggested improvements. The resulting DMRTs are compared with modeled MRTs and static MRTs.

  12. Freeze-thaw stability of rice starch modified by Improved Extrusion Cooking Technology.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiangping; Hu, Xiuting; Zhang, Fang; Fang, Chong; Liu, Chengmei; Luo, Shunjing

    2016-10-20

    This study aimed to explore freeze-thaw (FT) stability of rice starch modified by Improved Extrusion Cooking Technology (IECT). FT stability of IECT-modified rice starch was investigated and compared with native one. Syneresis and SEM analysis showed that IECT-modified rice starch had better FT stability than native starch. Furthermore, IECT-modified rice starch had less significant changes in the rheological parameters during the FT cycles than the native starch. XRD and iodine binding analysis demonstrated that IECT treatment inhibited the association of rice starch, especially amylose retrogradation. Additionally, the peak at around 20° was detected in XRD patterns of IECT-modified rice starch, which confirmed the formation of amylose-lipid complex during the IECT treatment. These results suggested that the IECT treatment could improve FT stability of rice starch, which was ascribed to inhibition of starch retrogradation by IECT. PMID:27474549

  13. Heparin nanomodification improves biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of decellularized vascular scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yunming; Hu, Tiehui; Wu, Zhongshi; Tang, Hao; Hu, Yerong; Tan, Qi; Wu, Chunlin

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatibility and biomechanical stability are two of the main obstacles limiting the effectiveness of vascular scaffolds. To improve the biomechanical stability and biocompatibility of these scaffolds, we created a heparin-nanomodified acellular bovine jugular vein scaffold by alternating linkage of heparin and dihydroxy-iron via self-assembly. Features of the scaffold were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Heparin was firmly linked to and formed nanoscale coatings around the fibers of the scaffold, and the amount of heparin linked was about 808 ± 86 μg/cm2 (101 ± 11 USP/cm2) per assembly cycle. The scaffolds showed significantly strengthened biomechanical stability with sustained release of heparin for several weeks in vitro. Importantly, the modified scaffolds showed significantly reduced platelet adhesion, stimulated proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro, and reduced calcification in a subcutaneous implantation rat model in vivo. Heparin nanomodification improves the biocompatibility and biomechanical stability of vascular scaffolds. PMID:23226016

  14. High temperature stability of the dielectric and insulating properties of Ca(Ti, Zr)SiO5 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Junichi; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Iijima, Takashi; Shimizu, Takao; Yasui, Shintaro; Itoh, Mitsuru; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Useful dielectric properties for high-temperature ceramic capacitors are demonstrated in a non-perovskite oxide, Ca(Ti0.85 Zr0.15)SiO5, which is mainly composed of one-dimensional chains of oxygen octahedra that are mutually linked by SiO4 tetrahedra. Its dielectric constant and low temperature coefficient of capacitance were found to be 43 and -102 ppm/K, respectively, over the wide temperature range of 300-780 K. The high insulating performance was also indicated by the high resistivity, exceeding 1011 Ω cm up to 523 K. The systematic dielectric measurements for Ca(Ti1-x Zrx)SiO5 as functions of the composition and temperature indicate that the suppression of the anti-ferroelectric phase transition of CaTiSiO5 by Zr4+-substitution is a key to improve the temperature-stability and the high-resistivity in Ca(Ti1-x Zrx)SiO5. The present results shed light on the development of a designing principle for ceramic capacitors for the high-temperature use.

  15. How to improve the storage stability of aqueous polymeric film coatings.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, F; Muschert, S; Leclercq, B; Carlin, B; Siepmann, J

    2008-02-18

    The major aim of this study was to identify an easy tool to improve the long term stability of polymeric film coatings applied from aqueous dispersions. Drug release profiles from ethylcellulose-coated theophylline pellets were monitored during 6 months open storage under ambient and stress conditions ["room temperature/ambient relative humidity (RH)" and "40 degrees C/75%RH"]. The pellets were cured for 1 or 2 d at 60 degrees C or for 1 or 2 d at 60 degrees C/75%RH (followed by 1 d at 60 degrees C for drying). Drug release was measured in 0.1 M HCl and in phosphate buffer pH 7.4. Interestingly, the addition of only small amounts of poly(vinyl alcohol)-poly(ethylene glycol) graft copolymer provided stable drug release profiles under all the investigated conditions, irrespective of the type of release medium, coating level, polymer blend ratio and curing conditions. The addition of small amounts of propylene glycol alginate resulted in unaltered drug release kinetics during open storage under ambient conditions, but decreasing theophylline release rates during open storage under stress conditions, due to further gradual polymer particle coalescence. When adding small amounts of carrageenan to the ethylcellulose coatings, essentially stable theophylline release patterns (with slight variations) were obtained. As coating conditions were not optimized for each system, further work is necessary to distinguish polymer from process effects. The observed stabilizing effects of the investigated added polymers might be attributable to their hydrophilic nature, trapping water within the coatings during film formation and, thus, facilitating polymer particle coalescence. This new concept can be used to overcome one of the major practical obstacles associated with aqueous polymeric film coatings today: storage instability.

  16. Stability study of propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine stored at varying temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Ramagiri, Suma; Kosanam, Hari; Sai Prakash, P K

    2006-06-01

    A stability study has been initiated for propoxur (Baygon) in whole blood and urine samples stored over a period of 60 days at four different temperature conditions (room temperature, 4 degrees C, -20 degrees C, and -80 degrees C). Stability data was established on day 0, 1, 7, 14, 28, 42, and 60. Sample purification was done by solid-phase extraction using a weak cation exchange cartridge (Isolute CBA), and quantitation was carried out by a validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method with a photodiode-array UV detector. Propoxur was spiked at two different concentration levels in both blood and urine samples [low concentration (10 microg/L) and high concentration (100 microg/L)]. Isopropoxy phenol was observed as the major degradation product in blood and urine samples and confirmed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. At room temperature, a substantial decrease in concentration of about 95% was observed at the end of the stability study in both blood and urine samples. However, at 4 degrees C, the concentration of propoxur observed after 60 days was around 60% in both samples. A decrease in temperature reduced the degradation, and finally propoxur was found to be stable at -80 degrees C and -20 degrees C for the whole observation period (60 days). The data collected suggests that knowledge about time-dependent decrease of propoxur in urine and blood samples is of considerable significance in forensic toxicology, and, therefore, forensic cases should be interpreted with caution.

  17. A visual physiological temperature sensor developed with gelatin-stabilized luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing; Zou, Hongyan; Liu, Zexi; Gao, Mingxuan; Chen, Binbin; Li, Yuanfang; Huang, Chengzhi

    2015-10-01

    A visual physiological temperature sensor was successfully developed with newly hydrothermally prepared fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) at room temperature using gelatin as the protective and reducing agent. The as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs was water-soluble, uniform and exhibited a narrow distribution with an average size of 1.16 nm, showing a maximum emission band at 552 nm (2.45 eV) when excited at 445 nm (2.79 eV). The large Stokes shift of 110 nm of the gelatin-stabilized AgNCs makes it actually applicable with very low background and light scattering interferences. It was found that the as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs is temperature-sensitive over the range from 5°C to 45°C, and thus a visual physiological temperature sensor could be developed with the gelatin-AgNCs as under the irradiation of visible light. PMID:26078186

  18. A visual physiological temperature sensor developed with gelatin-stabilized luminescent silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing; Zou, Hongyan; Liu, Zexi; Gao, Mingxuan; Chen, Binbin; Li, Yuanfang; Huang, Chengzhi

    2015-10-01

    A visual physiological temperature sensor was successfully developed with newly hydrothermally prepared fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) at room temperature using gelatin as the protective and reducing agent. The as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs was water-soluble, uniform and exhibited a narrow distribution with an average size of 1.16 nm, showing a maximum emission band at 552 nm (2.45 eV) when excited at 445 nm (2.79 eV). The large Stokes shift of 110 nm of the gelatin-stabilized AgNCs makes it actually applicable with very low background and light scattering interferences. It was found that the as-prepared gelatin-stabilized AgNCs is temperature-sensitive over the range from 5°C to 45°C, and thus a visual physiological temperature sensor could be developed with the gelatin-AgNCs as under the irradiation of visible light.

  19. Mechanical stability analysis on spherical sandwich sheet at low temperature loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshuai; Li, Shuhui; Li, Zhimin

    2013-12-01

    The spherical sandwich sheet (S-S-S) is generally used in the aerospace industry, for example, the airplane, the rocket's fairing, the spacecraft and the satellite for the purpose of heat-insulation, weight-saving and dimension-reducing. The stability of the S-S-S is of general concern because of its particularly thin but large size. For some S-S-S used in fuel tank storing liquid oxygen of the rocket, it must be facing low temperature down to about -183 °C. Low temperature condition affects the stability of the S-S-S and then causes buckling of the structure. In this paper, a finite element (FE) model is established for evaluating the stability of the S-S-S via the sequential coupling mode. The material mechanical properties related to temperature are concerned in the FE model. The buckling modes and critical buckling loading are predicted accurately, since the FE model includes heat transfer simulating, thermal stress computing, buckling and post buckling process. It is found that the thermal stress generated from the low temperature loading reduces the critical buckling loading and changes the buckling modes of the S-S-S.

  20. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes.

  1. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Stability of Protein Microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Rovers, Tijs A M; Sala, Guido; van der Linden, Erik; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2016-01-13

    Protein microbubbles are air bubbles with a network of interacting proteins at the air-water interface. Protein microbubbles are commonly used in medical diagnostic and therapeutic research. They have also recently gained interest in the research area of food as they can be used as structural elements to control texture, allowing for the manufacture of healthier foods with increased consumer perception. For the application of microbubbles in the food industry, it is important to gain insights into their stability under food processing conditions. In this study, we tested the stability of protein microbubbles against heating and pressurization. Microbubbles could be heated to 50 °C for 2 min or pressurized to 100 kPa overpressure for 15 s without significantly affecting their stability. At higher pressures and temperatures, the microbubbles became unstable and buckled. Buckling was observed above a critical pressure and was influenced by the shell modulus. The addition of cross-linkers like glutaraldehyde and tannic acid resulted in microbubbles that were stable against all tested temperatures and overpressures, more specifically, up to 120 °C and 470 kPa, respectively. We found a relation between the storage temperatures of microbubble dispersions (4, 10, 15, and 21 °C) and a decrease in the number of microbubbles with the highest decrease at the highest storage temperature. The average rupture time of microbubbles stored at different storage temperatures followed an Arrhenius relation with an activation energy for rupture of the shell of approximately 27 kT. This strength ensures applicability of microbubbles in food processes only at moderate temperatures and storage for a moderate period of time. After the proteins in the shell are cross-linked, the microbubbles can withstand pressures and temperatures that are representative of food processes. PMID:26619225

  2. Stability of cobalt-carbon high temperature fixed points doped with iron and platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kňazovická, L.; Lowe, D.; Machin, G.; Davies, H.; Rani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High temperature fixed points (HTFPs) are stable and repeatable and make comparison of temperature scales possible at a level of uncertainty not previously possible. However, they potentially lack objectivity if the fixed-point temperature is known. Five HTFPs were constructed, one pure Co-C, two Co-C doped with Fe and two Co-C doped with Pt of differing concentrations. The candidate dopants were identified through thermochemical modelling as likely to give maximum temperature shift with minimum increase in melting range. The temperature differences of the doped systems from the pure system were determined and it was found that the addition of Fe depressed the melting temperature and the addition of Pt elevated the melting temperature, qualitatively in line with the thermochemical modelling. The higher concentration doped HTFPs were then aged for approximately 100 h with continuous melting-freezing cycles and the difference to the undoped Co-C HTFP remeasured. These differences were found to agree with those of the unaged results within the measurement uncertainties, confirming artefact stability. It is clear that the doping of HTFPs is a powerful way of constructing stable and reliable high temperature scale comparison artefacts of unknown temperature.

  3. Improved Blackbody Temperature Sensors for a Vacuum Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jeff; Coppens, Chris; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Schofield, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Some improvements have been made in the design and fabrication of blackbody sensors (BBSs) used to measure the temperature of a heater core in a vacuum furnace. Each BBS consists of a ring of thermally conductive, high-melting-temperature material with two tantalum-sheathed thermocouples attached at diametrically opposite points. The name "blackbody sensor" reflects the basic principle of operation. Heat is transferred between the ring and the furnace heater core primarily by blackbody radiation, heat is conducted through the ring to the thermocouples, and the temperature of the ring (and, hence, the temperature of the heater core) is measured by use of the thermocouples. Two main requirements have guided the development of these BBSs: (1) The rings should have as high an emissivity as possible in order to maximize the heat-transfer rate and thereby maximize temperature-monitoring performance and (2) the thermocouples must be joined to the rings in such a way as to ensure long-term, reliable intimate thermal contact. The problem of fabricating a BBS to satisfy these requirements is complicated by an application-specific prohibition against overheating and thereby damaging nearby instrumentation leads through the use of conventional furnace brazing or any other technique that involves heating the entire BBS and its surroundings. The problem is further complicated by another application-specific prohibition against damaging the thin tantalum thermocouple sheaths through the use of conventional welding to join the thermocouples to the ring. The first BBS rings were made of graphite. The tantalum-sheathed thermocouples were attached to the graphite rings by use of high-temperature graphite cements. The ring/thermocouple bonds thus formed were found to be weak and unreliable, and so graphite rings and graphite cements were abandoned. Now, each BBS ring is made from one of two materials: either tantalum or a molybdenum/titanium/zirconium alloy. The tantalum

  4. High temperature stability testing of Ge-doped and F-doped Fabry-Perot fibre optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyzos, Dimitrios; Mathew, Jinesh; MacPherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R...

    2016-05-01

    We present high temperature (~1100°C) stability tests of, Ge-doped and F-doped, optical fibre sensors. Our analysis includes the variation in their behaviours within high temperature environments and how the dopant diffusion affects their long term stability.

  5. Effects of Temperature on the Performance and Stability of Recent COTS Silicon Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Silicon oscillators have lately emerged to serve as potential replacement for crystal and ceramic resonators to provide timing and clock signals in electronic systems. These semiconductor-based devices, including those that are based on MEMS technology, are reported to be resistant to vibration and shock (an important criteria for systems to be deployed in space), immune to EMI, consume very low current, require few or no external components, and cover a wide range of frequency for analog and digital circuits. In this work, the performance of five recently-developed COTS silicon oscillator chips from different manufacturers was determined within a temperature range that extended beyond the individual specified range of operation. In addition, restart capability at extreme temperatures, i.e. power switched on while the device was soaking at extreme (hot or cold) temperature, and the effects of thermal cycling under a wide temperature range on the operation of these silicon oscillators were also investigated. Performance characterization of each oscillator was obtained in terms of its output frequency, duty cycle, rise and fall times, and supply current at specific test temperatures. The five different oscillators tested operated beyond their specified temperature region, with some displaying excellent stability throughout the whole test temperature range. Others experienced some instability at certain temperature test points as evidenced by fluctuation in the output frequency. Recovery from temperature-induced changes took place when excessive temperatures were removed. It should also be pointed out that all oscillators were able to restart at the extreme test temperatures and to withstand the limited thermal cycling without undergoing any significant changes in their characteristics. In addition, no physical damage was observed in the packaging material of any of these silicon oscillators due to extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling. It is recommended

  6. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep

    1997-01-01

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH).sub.4 to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set.

  7. Method for stabilizing low-level mixed wastes at room temperature

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.

    1997-07-08

    A method to stabilize solid and liquid waste at room temperature is provided comprising combining solid waste with a starter oxide to obtain a powder, contacting the powder with an acid solution to create a slurry, said acid solution containing the liquid waste, shaping the now-mixed slurry into a predetermined form, and allowing the now-formed slurry to set. The invention also provides for a method to encapsulate and stabilize waste containing cesium comprising combining the waste with Zr(OH){sub 4} to create a solid-phase mixture, mixing phosphoric acid with the solid-phase mixture to create a slurry, subjecting the slurry to pressure; and allowing the now pressurized slurry to set. Lastly, the invention provides for a method to stabilize liquid waste, comprising supplying a powder containing magnesium, sodium and phosphate in predetermined proportions, mixing said powder with the liquid waste, such as tritium, and allowing the resulting slurry to set. 4 figs.

  8. STABILITY CONSTANTS OF NP(V) COMPLEXES WITH FLOURIDE AND SULFATE AT VARIABLE TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A. Moore; L. Rao

    2005-07-11

    A solvent extraction method was used to determine the stability constants of Np(V) complexes with fluoride and sulfate in 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4} from 25 C to 60 C. The distribution ratio of Np(V) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride and sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 Np(V)-fluoride complexes and the 1:1 Np(V)-sulfate and 1:2 Np(V)-sulfate complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of [F{sup -}] and [SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van't Hoff equation.

  9. Improved thermal stability of polylactic acid (PLA) composite film via PLA-β-cyclodextrin-inclusion complex systems.

    PubMed

    Byun, Youngjae; Rodriguez, Katia; Han, Jung H; Kim, Young Teck

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the incorporation of PLA-β-cyclodextrin-inclusion complex (IC) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on biopolyester PLA films were investigated. Thermal stability, surface morphology, barrier, and mechanical properties of the films were measured at varying IC (1, 3, 5, and 7%) and β-CD (1 and 5%) concentrations. The PLA-IC-composite films (IC-PLA-CFs) showed uniform morphological structure, while samples containing β-CD (β-CD-PLA-CFs) showed high agglomeration of β-CD due to poor interfacial interaction between β-CD and PLA moieties. According to the thermal property analysis, the 5% IC-PLA-CFs showed 6.6 times lower dimensional changes (6.5%) at the temperature range of 20-80°C than that of pure PLA film (43.0%). The increase of IC or β-CD content in the PLA-composite films shifted the glass transition and crystallization temperature to higher temperature regions. The crystallinity of both composite films improved by increasing IC or β-CD content. Both composite films had higher oxygen and water vapor permeability as IC or β-CD content increased in comparison to pure PLA film. All the composite films had less flexibility and lower tensile strength than the pure PLA film. In conclusion, this study shows that the IC technique is valuable to improve the thermal expansion stability of PLA-based films.

  10. Improved thermal stability of polylactic acid (PLA) composite film via PLA-β-cyclodextrin-inclusion complex systems.

    PubMed

    Byun, Youngjae; Rodriguez, Katia; Han, Jung H; Kim, Young Teck

    2015-11-01

    The effects of the incorporation of PLA-β-cyclodextrin-inclusion complex (IC) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on biopolyester PLA films were investigated. Thermal stability, surface morphology, barrier, and mechanical properties of the films were measured at varying IC (1, 3, 5, and 7%) and β-CD (1 and 5%) concentrations. The PLA-IC-composite films (IC-PLA-CFs) showed uniform morphological structure, while samples containing β-CD (β-CD-PLA-CFs) showed high agglomeration of β-CD due to poor interfacial interaction between β-CD and PLA moieties. According to the thermal property analysis, the 5% IC-PLA-CFs showed 6.6 times lower dimensional changes (6.5%) at the temperature range of 20-80°C than that of pure PLA film (43.0%). The increase of IC or β-CD content in the PLA-composite films shifted the glass transition and crystallization temperature to higher temperature regions. The crystallinity of both composite films improved by increasing IC or β-CD content. Both composite films had higher oxygen and water vapor permeability as IC or β-CD content increased in comparison to pure PLA film. All the composite films had less flexibility and lower tensile strength than the pure PLA film. In conclusion, this study shows that the IC technique is valuable to improve the thermal expansion stability of PLA-based films. PMID:26299710

  11. Engineering of isoamylase: improvement of protein stability and catalytic efficiency through semi-rational design.

    PubMed

    Li, Youran; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Gu, Zhenghua; Shi, Guiyang

    2016-01-01

    Isoamylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,6-glycosidic linkages in glycogen, amylopectin and α/β-limit dextrins. A semi-rational design strategy was performed to improve catalytic properties of isoamylase from Bacillus lentus. Three residues in vicinity of the essential residues, Arg505, Asn513, and Gly608, were chosen as the mutation sites and were substituted by Ala, Pro, Glu, and Lys, respectively. Thermal stability of the mutant R505P and acidic stability of the mutant R505E were enhanced. The k cat /K m values of the mutant G608V have been promoted by 49%, and the specific activity increased by 33%. This work provides an effective strategy for improving the catalytic activity and stability of isoamylase, and the results obtained here may be useful for the improvement of catalytic properties of other α/β barrel enzymes.

  12. Laser safety and hazard analysis for the temperature stabilized BSLT ARES laser system.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2003-08-01

    A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the temperature stabilized Big Sky Laser Technology (BSLT) laser central to the ARES system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. As a result of temperature stabilization of the BSLT laser the operating parameters of the laser had changed requiring a hazard analysis based on the new operating conditions. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.

  13. Low-temperature electrochemical characterization of sputtered yttria-stabilized zirconia thin film on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ching-Han; Chou, Chen-Chia

    2016-08-01

    The microstructure and electrical conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films with Pt electrodes were evaluated through three configurations in the temperature range from 25 to 500 °C. Using ac-impedance spectra, the contribution of the Si substrate to resistance was separated by an equivalent-circuit analysis. The colossal ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films at temperatures higher than 125 °C was observed parallel to the interface. The total ionic conductivity of YSZ thin films increased significantly in comparison w the bulk YSZ electrolyte. An alternative conductive pathway ascribed to the homogeneous and heterogeneous interfaces with high strain and charge-containing defects was proposed.

  14. Analysis of a passive heat sink for temperature stabilization of high-power LED bulbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvís, Eduardo; Bendaña, Ricardo; Michinel, Humberto; Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro; Paredes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present a numerical analysis and experimental measurements of the temperature stabilization of high-power LED chips that we have obtained by employing an aluminum passive heat sink, designed to be used in a compact light bulb configuration. We demonstrate that our system keeps the temperature of the LED chip well-below 70° C yielding long-term operation of the device. Our simulations have been performed for a low-cost device ready to install in public streetlights. The experimental measurements performed in different configurations show a nice agreement with the numerical calculations.

  15. A negative feedback mechanism for the long-term stabilization of the earth's surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. C. G.; Hays, P. B.; Kasting, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is suggested that the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is buffered, over geological time scales, by a negative feedback mechanism, in which the rate of weathering of silicate minerals (followed by deposition of carbonate minerals) depends on surface temperature, which in turn depends on the carbon dioxide partial pressure through the greenhouse effect. Although the quantitative details of this mechanism are speculative, it appears able to partially stabilize the earth's surface temperature against the steady increase of solar luminosity, believed to have occurred since the origin of the solar system.

  16. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  17. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements.

    PubMed

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys. PMID:27475604

  18. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland

    2016-07-01

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  19. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  20. Improved stability of free-standing lipid bilayers based on nanoporous alumina films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Taira, Tasuku; Oshima, Azusa; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2010-05-01

    In this study, we propose a method for improving the stability of free-standing bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) by preparing BLMs across nanoporous alumina films. The use of porous alumina reduced individual membrane size to improve the BLM stability. The BLMs were stable under an applied voltage of ±1 V. The lifetime of the BLMs was 16-30 h with and without incorporated gramicidin channels. Electric properties of the BLMs as a platform for channel-current recordings are also discussed. Since the total area of the BLMs is still large to facilitate protein incorporation, our approach is useful for designing highly sensitive biosensors based on channel proteins.

  1. DNA melting temperature assay for assessing the stability of DNA polyplexes intended for nonviral gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Schallon, Anja; Synatschke, Christopher V; Pergushov, Dmitry V; Jérôme, Valérie; Müller, Axel H E; Freitag, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    Many synthetic polycations have the ability to form complexes with the polyanion DNA, yet only a few, most notably poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), are efficient gene-delivery vehicles. Although a common explanation of this observation relies on the buffering capacity of the polycation, the intracellular stability of the complex may also play a role and should not be neglected. Assays typically used to follow complex formation, however, often do not provide the required information on stability. In this article, we propose the change in the DNA melting temperature observable after complex formation to be a significant indicator of complex stability. For a given DNA/polycation ratio, changes in the melting temperature are shown to depend on the polycation chemistry but not on the DNA topology or the polycation architecture. Effects of changes in the DNA/polycation ratio as well as the effect of polycation quaternization can be interpreted using the melting temperature assay. Finally, the assay was used to follow the displacement of DNA from the complexes by poly(methacrylic acid) or short single-stranded DNA sequences as competing polyanions.

  2. Thermal stabilization of chromium slag by sewage sludge: effects of sludge quantity and temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changlin; Zhang, Hua; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of detoxifying chromium slag by sewage sludge, synthetic chromium slag containing 3% of Cr(VI) was mixed with sewage sludge followed by thermal treatment in nitrogen gas for stabilizing chromium. The effects of slag to sludge ratio (0.5, 1 and 2) and temperature (200, 300, 500, 700 and 900 degrees C) on treatment efficiency were investigated. During the mixing process before thermal treatment, 59.8%-99.7% of Cr(VI) was reduced, but Cr could be easily leached from the reduction product. Increasing heating temperature and decreasing slag to sludge ratio strengthened the reduction and stabilization of Cr(VI). When the slag to sludge ratio was 0.5 and thermal treatment temperature was 300 degrees C, the total leached Cr and Cr(VI) declined to 0.55 mg/L and 0.17 mg/L respectively, and 45.5% of Cr in the thermally treated residue existed as residual fraction. A two-stage mechanism was proposed for the reduction and stabilization of Cr.

  3. High Temperature Magnetic Stabilization of Cobalt Nanoparticles by an Antiferromagnetic Proximity Effect.

    PubMed

    De Toro, José A; Marques, Daniel P; Muñiz, Pablo; Skumryev, Vassil; Sort, Jordi; Givord, Dominique; Nogués, Josep

    2015-07-31

    Thermal activation tends to destroy the magnetic stability of small magnetic nanoparticles, with crucial implications for ultrahigh density recording among other applications. Here we demonstrate that low-blocking-temperature ferromagnetic (FM) Co nanoparticles (T(B)<70  K) become magnetically stable above 400 K when embedded in a high-Néel-temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) NiO matrix. The origin of this remarkable T(B) enhancement is due to a magnetic proximity effect between a thin CoO shell (with low Néel temperature, T(N), and high anisotropy, K(AFM)) surrounding the Co nanoparticles and the NiO matrix (with high T(N) but low K(AFM)). This proximity effect yields an effective antiferromagnet with an apparent T(N) beyond that of bulk CoO, and an enhanced anisotropy compared to NiO. In turn, the Co core FM moment is stabilized against thermal fluctuations via core-shell exchange-bias coupling, leading to the observed T(B) increase. Mean-field calculations provide a semiquantitative understanding of this magnetic-proximity stabilization mechanism. PMID:26274435

  4. Transient Stability Improvement of Multi-machine Power System Using Fuzzy Controlled TCSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gundala Srinivasa

    2012-07-01

    Power system is subjected to sudden changes in load levels. Stability is an important concept which determines the stable operation of power system. In general rotor angle stability is taken as index, but the concept of transient stability, which is the function of operating condition and disturbances deals with the ability of the system to remain intact after being subjected to abnormal deviations. A system is said to be synchronously stable (i.e., retain synchronism) for a given fault if the system variables settle down to some steady-state values with time, after the fault is removed.For the improvement of transient stability the general methods adopted are fast acting exciters, circuit breakers and reduction in system transfer reactance. The modern trend is to employ FACTS devices in the existing system for effective utilization of existing transmission resources. These FACTS devices contribute to power flow improvement besides they extend their services in transient stability improvement as well.In this paper, the studies had been carried out in order to improve the Transient Stability of WSCC 9 Bus System with Fixed Compensation on Various Lines and Optimal Location has been investigated using trajectory sensitivity analysis for better results.In this paper, in order to improve the Transient Stability margin further series FACTS device has been implemented. A fuzzy controlled Thyristor Controlled Series Compensation (TCSC) device has been used here and the results highlight the effectiveness of the application of a TCSC in improving the transient stability of a power system.In this paper, Trajectory sensitivity analysis (TSA) has been used to measure the transient stability condition of the system. The TCSC is modeled by a variable capacitor, the value of which changes with the firing angle. It is shown that TSA can be used in the design of the controller. The optimal locations of the TCSC-controller for different fault conditions can also be identified with

  5. Structure and stability of pyrophyllite edge surfaces: Effect of temperature and water chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Newton, Aric G.

    2016-10-01

    The surfaces of clay minerals, which are abundant in atmospheric mineral dust, serve as an important medium to catalyze ice nucleation. The lateral edge surface of 2:1 clay minerals is postulated to be a potential site for ice nucleation. However, experimental investigations of the edge surface structure itself have been limited compared to the basal planes of clay minerals. Density functional theory (DFT) computational studies have provided insights into the pyrophyllite edge surface. Pyrophyllite is an ideal surrogate mineral for the edge surfaces of 2:1 clay minerals as it possesses no or little structural charge. Of the two most-common hydrated edge surfaces, the AC edge, (1 1 0) surface in the monoclinic polytype notation, is predicted to be more stable than the B edge, (0 1 0) surface. These stabilities, however, were determined based on the total energies calculated at 0 K and did not consider environmental effects such as temperature and humidity. In this study, atomistic thermodynamics based on periodic DFT electronic calculations was applied to examine the effects of environmental variables on the structure and thermodynamic stability of the common edge surfaces in equilibrium with bulk pyrophyllite and water vapor. We demonstrate that the temperature-dependent vibrational energy of sorbed water molecules at the edge surface is a significant component of the surface free energy and cannot be neglected when determining the surface stability of pyrophyllite. The surface free energies were calculated as a function of temperature from 240 to 600 K and water chemical potential corresponding to conditions from ultrahigh vacuum to the saturation vapor pressure of water. We show that at lower water chemical potentials (dry conditions), the AC and B edge surfaces possessed similar stabilities; at higher chemical potentials (humid conditions) the AC edge surface was more stable than the B edge surface. At high temperatures, both surfaces showed similar stabilities

  6. Improved stability conditions for uncertain neutral-type systems with time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yu; Feng, Zhiguang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the robust stability problem for a class of uncertain neutral-type delayed systems. The systems under consideration contain parameter uncertainties and time-varying delays. We aim at designing less conservative robust stability criteria for such systems. A new second-order reciprocally convex inequality is first proposed in order to deal with double integral terms. Then, by constructing a new Lyapunov- Krasovskii functional and employing the improved Wirtinger-based integral inequality and the reciprocally convex combination approaches, novel stability criteria are obtained. Moreover, the stability conditions for standard time-delay system are obtained as by-product results. Comparisons in three numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of our results.

  7. Silicone oil emulsions: strategies to improve their stability and applications in hair care products.

    PubMed

    Nazir, H; Zhang, W; Liu, Y; Chen, X; Wang, L; Naseer, M M; Ma, G

    2014-04-01

    Silicone oils have wide range of applications in personal care products due to their unique properties of high lubricity, non-toxicity, excessive spreading and film formation. They are usually employed in the form of emulsions due to their inert nature. Until now, different conventional emulsification techniques have been developed and applied to prepare silicone oil emulsions. The size and uniformity of emulsions showed important influence on stability of droplets, which further affect the application performance. Therefore, various strategies were developed to improve the stability as well as application performance of silicone oil emulsions. In this review, we highlight different factors influencing the stability of silicone oil emulsions and explain various strategies to overcome the stability problems. In addition, the silicone deposition on the surface of hair substrates and different approaches to increase their deposition are also discussed in detail.

  8. Reduced Crystallization Temperature Methodology for Polymer Selection in Amorphous Solid Dispersions: Stability Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhugra, Chandan; Telang, Chitra; Schwabe, Robert; Zhong, Li

    2016-09-01

    API-polymer interactions, used to select the right polymeric matrix with an aim to stabilize an amorphous dispersion, are routinely studied using spectroscopic and/or calorimetric techniques (i.e., melting point depression). An alternate selection tool has been explored to rank order polymers for formation of stable amorphous dispersions as a pragmatic method for polymer selection. Reduced crystallization temperature of API, a parameter introduced by Zhou et al.,1 was utilized in this study for rank ordering interactions in API-polymeric systems. The trends in reduced crystallization temperature monitored over polymer concentration range of up to 20% polymer loading were utilized to calculate "crystallization parameter" or CP for two model systems (nifedipine and BI ABC). The rank order of CP, i.e., a measure of API-polymer interaction, for nifedipine followed the order PVP > PVP-VA > Soluplus > HPMCAS > PV Ac > PAA. This rank ordering was correlated to published results of molecular interactions and physical stability for nifedipine. A different rank ordering was observed for BI ABC: PAA > PVP > HPMCAS > Soluplus > PVPV-VA > PVAc. Interactions for BI ABC were not as differentiated when compared to nifedipine based on CP trends. BI ABC dispersions at drug loadings between 40 and 60% were physically stable for prolonged periods under ICH conditions as well as accelerated stress. We propose that large CP differences among polymers could be predictive of stability outcomes. Acceptable stability at pharmaceutically relevant drug loadings would suggest that the relative influence of downstream processes, such as polymer solubility in various solvents, process suitability and selection, and more importantly supersaturation potential, should be higher compared to stability considerations while developing compounds like BI ABC. PMID:27414755

  9. Preliminary evidence of improved gaze stability following exercise in two children with vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Braswell, Jennifer; Rine, Rose Marie

    2006-11-01

    Despite impaired gaze stability and reading in children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and vestibular hypofunction (VH), there are no reports of intervention. We examined the effect of visual-vestibular exercises in two children on dynamic visual acuity (DVA), critical print size (CPS) and reading acuity (RA) using an ABA design. Improvement in CPS and RA was seen in both subjects. DVA improved only in the subject with acquired versus congenital VH. These results suggest that although exercise improves reading acuity, age at the time of lesion affects the improvement of DVA in children with SNHL and BVH.

  10. Halide-stabilized LiBH4, a room-temperature lithium fast-ion conductor.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hideki; Matsuo, Motoaki; Takamura, Hitoshi; Ando, Mariko; Noda, Yasuto; Karahashi, Taiki; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-28

    Solid state lithium conductors are attracting much attention for their potential applications to solid-state batteries and supercapacitors of high energy density to overcome safety issues and irreversible capacity loss of the currently commercialized ones. Recently, we discovered a new class of lithium super ionic conductors based on lithium borohydride (LiBH(4)). LiBH(4) was found to have conductivity as high as 10(-2) Scm(-1) accompanied by orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition above 115 degrees C. Polarization to the lithium metal electrode was shown to be extremely low, providing a versatile anode interface for the battery application. However, the high transition temperature of the superionic phase has limited its applications. Here we show that a chemical modification of LiBH(4) can stabilize the superionic phase even below room temperature. By doping of lithium halides, high conductivity can be obtained at room temperature. Both XRD and NMR confirmed room-temperature stabilization of superionic phase for LiI-doped LiBH(4). The electrochemical measurements showed a great advantage of this material as an extremely lightweight lithium electrolyte for batteries of high energy density. This material will open alternative opportunities for the development of solid ionic conductors other than previously known lithium conductors. PMID:19119813

  11. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Yu, Xinzhi; Song, Chao; Pang, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Biochar produced by biomass pyrolysis has the advantage of carbon sequestration. However, some of the carbon atoms in biochar are not very stable. In this study, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar was investigated using the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) oxidation spectrophotometric method. The results show that the carbon yield and ratios of H/C and O/C decreased from 71.72%, 0.71, and 0.32 to 38.48%, 0.22, and 0.06, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 300°C to 700°C. Moreover, the main oxygen-containing functional groups gradually decreased, while the degree of aromatization increased accordingly. The biochar showed a better stability at a higher pyrolysis temperature. The proportion of carbon loss, i.e., the amount of oxidized carbon with respect to the total carbon of the biochar, decreased from 16.52% to 6.69% with increasing temperature.

  12. Direct laser initiation and improved thermal stability of nitrocellulose/graphene oxide nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Hikal, Walid M.; Zhang, Yue; Bhattacharia, Sanjoy K.; Li, Li; Panditrao, Siddharth; Wang, Shiren; Weeks, Brandon L.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the enhancement and possible control of both laser ignition and burn rates of Nitrocellulose (NC) microfilms when doped with graphene oxide (GO). A Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 20 ns) laser is used to ignite GO-doped NC films at low temperatures. The effect of GO on the doping concentration of the activation energies of laser ignition and thermal stability of the NC films is studied. The activation energy of laser ignition decreases with increasing GO/NC weight ratio and attains a constant value with higher concentrations. This behavior is accompanied by an increase in the thermal stability.

  13. PMR-15/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites For Improved Thermal Stability And Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel; Faile, Michael; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified by co-exchange of an aromatic diamine and a primary alkyl amine. The clay was dispersed into a PMR (Polymerization of Monomer Reactants)-15 matrix and the glass transition temperature and thermal oxidative stability of the resulting nanocomposites were evaluated. PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposites were also investigated as a matrix material for carbon fabric reinforced composites. Dispersion of the organically modified silicate into the PMR-15 matrix enhanced the thermal oxidative stability, the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength of the polymer matrix composite.

  14. Reducing lipid peroxidation for improving colour stability of beef and lamb: on-farm considerations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfei; Liu, Shimin

    2012-03-15

    Meat colour and lipid stability are important sensory properties. Myoglobin oxidation is correlated with lipid oxidation, and one can exacerbate the occurrence of the other. Approaches to reduce both oxidative processes could focus on minimising oxidising agents in meat. In on-farm practices, dietary supplementation of antioxidants is a useful approach for improving lipid stability and then meat colour stability, and further improvement could be a combination of using hydrophobic and hydrophilic antioxidants. Genetic variations in the endogenous antioxidant systems could be identified for the development of a breeding strategy to bring a long-term benefit to the meat industry. To have a better understanding of oxidative stress and oxidation of long chain unsaturated fatty acids in live animals, the isoprostanes could be measured as an effective marker in vivo.

  15. The electronic image stabilization technology research based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Ji, Ming; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Wentao; Lu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jiaoying; Yang, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The electronic image stabilization technology based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation technique can effectively improve the non normal shift, such as jitter, rotation and so on. Firstly, the ORB features are extracted from the image, a set of regions are built on these features; Secondly, the optical-flow vector is computed in the feature regions, in order to reduce the computational complexity, the multi resolution strategy of Pyramid is used to calculate the motion vector of the frame; Finally, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the effect of the algorithm is carried out. The results show that the proposed algorithm has better stability compared with image stabilization based on the traditional optical-flow motion vector estimation method.

  16. Improving the Serum Stability of Site-Specific Antibody Conjugates with Sulfone Linkers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Current routes for synthesizing antibody–drug conjugates commonly rely on maleimide linkers to react with cysteine thiols. However, thioether exchange with metabolites and serum proteins can compromise conjugate stability and diminish in vivo efficacy. We report the application of a phenyloxadiazole sulfone linker for the preparation of trastuzumab conjugates. This sulfone linker site-specifically labeled engineered cysteine residues in THIOMABs and improved antibody conjugate stability in human plasma at sites previously shown to be labile for maleimide conjugates. Similarly, sulfone conjugation with selenocysteine in an anti-ROR1 scFv-Fc improved human plasma stability relative to maleimide conjugation. Kinetically controlled labeling of a THIOMAB containing two cysteine substitutions was also achieved, offering a strategy for producing antibody conjugates with expanded valency. PMID:25099687

  17. School Stability: Improving Academic Achievement for NJ Foster Children. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard-Rance, Kourtney; Parello, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Children in New Jersey's foster care system are more likely to remain in their home school when they enter foster care, thanks to a law passed in 2010, giving these fragile children improved educational stability. The law allows children to remain in their "school of origin" when they are placed in foster care, even if the foster…

  18. Improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Norman D.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate covering the period from Nov. 1986 to Dec. 1993 is presented. A paper on the history, principles, and applications of helicopter individual-blade-control is included.

  19. Cellulase variants with improved expression, activity and stability, and use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Aehle, Wolfgang; Bott, Richard R; Bower, Benjamin; Caspi, Jonathan; Estell, David A; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus W.J.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Kralj, Slavko; Van Lieshout, Johan; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Stigt Thans, Sander; Wallace, Louise; Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-03-25

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having improved expression, activity and/or stability. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase variants, compositions comprising the cellulase variants, and methods of use thereof.

  20. Postural Stability in Parkinson's Disease Patients Is Improved after Stochastic Resonance Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kaut, Oliver; Brenig, Daniel; Marek, Milena; Allert, Niels; Wüllner, Ullrich

    2016-01-01

    Background. Postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) increases the risk of falls and is not improved by pharmacological therapy. Objective. We performed a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled study to test the effects of stochastic resonance (whole body vibration) therapy on postural stability in PD. Methods. Fifty-six PD participants were allocated to either experimental or sham groups. The experimental group received four series of vibration over eight days, with each series consisting of six stimulus trains of 60-second duration using a randomized whole body vibration. Participants allocated to the control group received a sham treatment. Results. Within-group analysis revealed that postural stability in the experimental group improved by 17.5% (p = 0.005) comparing experimental and sham groups. The between-group analysis of change after treatment comparing both groups also showed a significant improvement of postural stability (p = 0.03). Only in the within-group analysis several items were improved after Bonferroni correction, too, rigor 41.6% (p = 0.001), bradykinesia 23.7% (p = 0.001), tremor 30.8% (p = 0.006), and UPDRSIII sum score 23.9% (p = 0.000), but did not reach the level of significance in the between-group analysis. Conclusions. Stochastic resonance therapy significantly enhanced postural stability even in individuals with increased risk of falling. Thus it offers a potential supplementation to canonical treatments of PD.

  1. An investigation on actuation behavior of polyacrylonitrile gel fibers as a function of microstructure and stabilization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbaha, Hamideh; Arbab, Shahram; Zeinolebadi, Ahmad; Nourpanah, Parviz

    2013-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel fibers show great potential to be used as actuators due to their mechanical response to chemical stimuli. In this work the response of PAN gel fibers to pH variation is studied. Three commercial grade PAN fibers with different chemical composition are investigated. Fibers are stabilized at temperatures varying from 100 to 275 °C. The stabilized fibers are hydrolyzed in an alkaline solution to obtain gel fibers. Gel fibers are stepwise immersed in solutions with pH varying between 0 and 14. Length/diameter variations are measured by optical microscopy. Results suggest that there is an optimum stabilization temperature at which a maximum response to pH change is obtained. This temperature corresponds to the onset of cyclization reactions, and is determined by the chemical composition of starting material. Thus at low stabilization temperatures (T ≤ 200 °C) only a gel-like shell is formed on the surface of fibers. Fibers stabilized above 200 °C show significant length/diameter variations (up to 325%). Increasing the stabilization temperature above the optimum temperature weakens the response of fibers to pH change. The results also show that the actuation behavior of PAN fibers containing itaconic acid starts at lower stabilization temperatures. This is attributed to the effect of acidic groups in lowering the onset of cyclization reactions.

  2. Distortions and stabilization of simple-cubic calcium at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Wendy L.; Wang, Lin; Ding, Yang; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Wenjun; Kim, Duck Young; Luo, Wei; Ahuja, R.; Meng, Yue; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Shu, Jinfu; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2010-06-01

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  3. Chemical Stability of Glass Seal Interfaces in Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2004-06-01

    In intermediate temperature planar SOFC stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective oxidation resistant high temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain ther structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys (and the YSZ electrolyte) was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  4. Temperature dependence of hardness in yttria-stabilized zirconia single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pirouz, Pirouz; Heuer, Arthur H.

    1991-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hardness and microcracking in single-crystal 9.5-mol pct-Y2O3-fully-stabilized cubic-ZrO2 was studied as a function of orientation. Crack lengths increased with increased temperature up to 500 C; above 800 C, no cracks were found, indicating an indentation brittle-to-ductile transition of about 800 C. The temperature dependence of hardness was reduced around 500 C. Etching studies to delineate the plastic zone around and below indents identified the operative slip systems. The role of dislocations and their interactions within the plastic zone on the hardness and indentation fracture behavior of cubic-ZrO2 are discussed.

  5. Distortions and Stabilization of Simple Cubic Calcium at High Pressure and Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Alison A.

    2012-04-18

    Ca-III, the first superconducting calcium phase under pressure, was identified as simple-cubic (sc) by previous X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. In contrast, all previous theoretical calculations showed that sc had a higher enthalpy than many proposed structures and had an imaginary (unstable) phonon branch. By using our newly developed submicrometer high-pressure single-crystal XRD, cryogenic high-pressure XRD, and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that Ca-III is neither exactly sc nor any of the lower-enthalpy phases, but sustains the sc-like, primitive unit by a rhombohedral distortion at 300 K and a monoclinic distortion below 30 K. This surprising discovery reveals a scenario that the high-pressure structure of calcium does not go to the zero-temperature global enthalpy minimum but is dictated by high-temperature anharmonicity and low-temperature metastability fine-tuned with phonon stability at the local minimum.

  6. Microstructural stability of wrought, laser and electron beam glazed NARloy-Z alloy at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.; Jerman, G.; Bhat, B.; Poorman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Microstructure of wrought, laser, and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z(Cu-3 wt.% Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr) was investigated for thermal stability at elevated temperatures (539 to 760 C (1,100 to 1,400 F)) up to 94 h. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis were employed for studying microstructural evolution and kinetics of precipitation. Grain boundary precipitation and precipitate free zones (PFZ's) were observed in the wrought alloy after exposing to temperatures above 605 C (1,120 F). The fine-grained microstructure observed in the laser and electron-beam glazed NARloy-Z was much more stable at elevated temperatures. Microstructural changes correlated well with hardness measurements.

  7. Low temperature superplasticity and thermal stability of a nanostructured low-carbon microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J.; Du, L.-X.; Sun, G.-S.; Xie, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here for the first time the low temperature superplasticity of nanostructured low carbon steel (microalloyed with V, N, Mn, Al, Si, and Ni). Low carbon nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) bulk steel was processed using a combination of cold-rolling and annealing of martensite. The complex microstructure of NG/UFG ferrite and 50–80 nm cementite exhibited high thermal stability at 500 °C with low temperature elongation exceeding 100% (at less than 0.5 of the absolute melting point) as compared to the conventional fine-grained (FG) counterpart. The low temperature superplasticity is adequate to form complex components. Moreover, the low strength during hot processing is favorable for decreasing the spring back and minimize die loss. PMID:26687012

  8. Roles of subcutaneous fat and thermoregulatory reflexes in determining ability to stabilize body temperature in water.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M G; Keatinge, W R

    1981-11-01

    1. The lowest water temperature in which different young adults could stabilize body temperature was found to vary from 32 degrees C to less than 12 degrees C, because of large differences in both total body insulation and metabolic heat production. 2. Total body insulation per unit surface area, in the coldest water allowing stability, was quite closely determined by mean subcutaneous fat thickness measured ultrasonically (r = 0.92), regardless of differences in distribution of this fat between men and women. 3. Reactive individuals developed high metabolic rates, and often rather high insulations in relation to fat thickness, which enabled them to stabilize their body temperatures in water more than 10 degrees C colder than was possible for less reactive individuals of similar fat thickness. 4. Measurements of heat flux, after stabilization in the coldest water possible, showed that the trunk was the main site of heat loss and that over half of the internal insulation there could be accounted for by subcutaneous fat; by contrast, fat could account for less than a third of higher insulations found in muscular parts of the limbs, and for less than 3% of very high insulations in the hands and feet. 5. After stabilization of body temperature at rest in the coldest possible water, exercise reduced internal insulation only in muscular parts of the limbs. Exercise also increased heat loss elsewhere by exposing skin of protected regions such as flexural surfaces of joints. During exercise total heat production increased rather more than heat loss in unreactive subjects, but less than loss in subjects whose heat production had already risen to a high level when they were at rest in cold water. 6. In warm (37 degrees C) water, tissue insulations were lower and much more uniform between subjects and between different body regions than in the cold. Even in the warm, however, insulations remained rather higher in fat than thin subjects, higher at rest than during exercise

  9. Stability of cable thermocouples at the upper temperature limit of their working range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanovskiy, A. A.; Zemba, E. S.; Belenkiy, A. M.; Chibizova, S. I.; Bursin, A. N.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental results of EMF stability research are presented for MIMS thermocouples of types K and N of external diameters 1.5; 3.0 and 5.0 mm. All thermocouples had heat resistant sheath and were not used before the tests. They were subjected to every-day cyclic heating and cooling. During each cycle there was 6 h annealing in air at the temperature 1200 °C Results shows, that stability of a cable thermocouple in air at the temperature 1200 °C depends, mainly, on its diameter, instead of on thermocouple type or metal sheath material. Acceptable time of operation in a thermal cycling mode for 1.5 mm cable thermocouples is limited by (15, 16) h, and for 3 mm thermocouples it is equal to (40, 45) h. Besides, the effect of signal shunting is shown in the work for a thermocouple under heating of its average part to the temperature 1200 °C Experiment has shown that use of long cable thermocouple of 1.5 mm diameter at the temperatures above 1000°C can lead to serious errors in temperature measurement. Heating of 400 mm thermocouple length to 1100 °C causes positive EMF in the 1.5 mm cable thermocouple equivalent to +3.4 °C and +18 °C at 1200°C. For 3 mm cable thermocouple EMF at 1200 °C reaches the value equivalent to +2.3 °C, but double increase in heating length makes the value greater to +13.5 °C. The given facts are necessary to consider while using of thin (1, 3) mm cable thermocouples at the temperatures (1100, 1200) °C.

  10. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.

  11. Improved high temperature solar absorbers for use in Concentrating Solar Power central receiver applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Ambrosini, Andrea; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Lambert, Timothy L.; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Bencomo, Marlene

    2010-09-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar absorbers to convert the heat from sunlight to electric power. Increased operating temperatures are necessary to lower the cost of solar-generated electricity by improving efficiencies and reducing thermal energy storage costs. Durable new materials are needed to cope with operating temperatures >600 C. The current coating technology (Pyromark High Temperature paint) has a solar absorptance in excess of 0.95 but a thermal emittance greater than 0.8, which results in large thermal losses at high temperatures. In addition, because solar receivers operate in air, these coatings have long term stability issues that add to the operating costs of CSP facilities. Ideal absorbers must have high solar absorptance (>0.95) and low thermal emittance (<0.05) in the IR region, be stable in air, and be low-cost and readily manufacturable. We propose to utilize solution-based synthesis techniques to prepare intrinsic absorbers for use in central receiver applications.

  12. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-30

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  13. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying material requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  14. Differential stability of photosynthetic membranes and fatty acid composition at elevated temperature in Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Almeyda, E.; Thomé, P. E.; El Hafidi, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing surface seawater temperatures resulting from climate change. Reef-building corals symbiotic with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium experience dramatic reductions in algal densities when exposed to temperatures above the long-term local summer average, leading to a phenomenon called coral bleaching. Although the temperature-dependent loss in photosynthetic function of the algal symbionts has been widely recognized as one of the early events leading to coral bleaching, there is considerable debate regarding the actual damage site. We have tested the relative thermal stability and composition of membranes in Symbiodinium exposed to high temperature. Our results show that melting curves of photosynthetic membranes from different symbiotic dinoflagellates substantiate a species-specific sensitivity to high temperature, while variations in fatty acid composition under high temperature rather suggest a complex process in which various modifications in lipid composition may be involved. Our results do not support the role of unsaturation of fatty acids of the thylakoid membrane as being mechanistically involved in bleaching nor as being a dependable tool for the diagnosis of thermal susceptibility of symbiotic reef corals.

  15. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability

    PubMed Central

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Kofman, Igor S.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T.; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0–1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  16. Using low levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation to improve locomotor stability.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Kofman, Igor S; De Dios, Yiri E; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian T; Goel, Rahul; Galvan-Garza, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2015-01-01

    Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) have been shown to improve stability during balance tasks in normal, healthy subjects by facilitating enhanced information transfer using stochastic resonance (SR) principles. We hypothesize that detection of time-critical sub-threshold sensory signals using low levels of bipolar binaural SVS based on SR principles will help improve stability of walking during support surface perturbations. In the current study 13 healthy subjects were exposed to short continuous support surface perturbations for 60 s while walking on a treadmill and simultaneously viewing perceptually matched linear optic flow. Low levels of bipolar binaural white noise based SVS were applied to the vestibular organs. Multiple trials of the treadmill locomotion test were performed with stimulation current levels varying in the range of 0-1500 μA, randomized across trials. The results show that subjects significantly improved their walking stability during support surface perturbations at stimulation levels with peak amplitude predominantly in the range of 100-500 μA consistent with the SR phenomenon. Additionally, objective perceptual motion thresholds were measured separately as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and received 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli. The optimal improvement in walking stability was achieved on average with peak stimulation amplitudes of approximately 35% of perceptual motion threshold. This study shows the effectiveness of using low imperceptible levels of SVS to improve dynamic stability during walking on a laterally oscillating treadmill via the SR phenomenon. PMID:26347619

  17. Preparation of lutein-loaded particles for improving solubility and stability by Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as an emulsion-stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changdong; Cheng, Hui; Jiang, Pengfei; Yao, Yijing; Han, Jing

    2014-08-01

    Lutein, a non-provitamin A carotenoid, possesses multiple valuable physiological functions. Unfortunately, its application is limited due to its poor water solubility and instability under adverse conditions. To expand the applied range of lutein, we developed lutein-loaded particles and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and investigated the encapsulation efficiency, aqueous saturation solubility and stability. The results showed that the lutein-loaded particles possessed high encapsulation efficiency (93.8±0.35%) and good water solubility (158μg/ml). Compared with free lutein, the stability of the lutein-loaded particles against heat, light and oxygen was improved by 1.7 times, 3.3 times and 4.0 times, respectively. The results also indicated that lutein was embedded in PVP matrix in an amorphous state, and intermolecular hydrogen bonding was in existence between PVP, lutein and Tween 80, forming the main force assembling the lutein-loaded particles.

  18. High-pressure and high-temperature stability field of hydrous phase delta-AlOOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, A.; Ohtani, E.; Kondo, T.; Hirao, N.; Sone, T.; Kikegawa, T.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Stability field of hydrous phases is a key for understanding water concentration in the earth's mantle. δ-AlOOH is a high-pressure polymorph of diaspore (α-AlOOH) and boehmite (γ-AlOOH). The space group of this phase is Pnn2 and it is similar to CaCl2-type SiO2 which is a high-pressure polymorph of stishovite; edge-sharing Al-O octahedra make single-chain along c-axis. Although it has a large stability field in pressure range from 18 GPa to 32 GPa and temperature of up to 1473 K, the high-pressure stability limits has not yet clarified. In this study, we investigated the stability field of δ-AlOOH up to 130 GPa. The high-pressure experiments were performed using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Starting material was gibbsite (Al(OH)3) powder mixed with platinum black as a laser absorber. The sample was sandwiched by pure gibbsite layers and loaded into a rhenium gasket. Pressures were measured with ruby-fluorescence technique before and after heating. The sample was heated from both sides by a Nd:YAG laser operated in multimode. After experiment, stable phase in each condition was determined using the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy method. We also conducted in-situ X-ray diffraction experiments under high-pressure and temperature conditions together with the X-ray diffraction of the recovered samples both at BL10XU in SPring-8 and BL-13A in Photon Factory. In these runs, pressures were also calculated using the equation of state of platinum. The experimental conditions were in the pressures between 50-130 GPa and temperatures to 1800 K. X-ray analysis shows the sample recovered from the pressure and temperature range from 40 GPa and 1577 K to 130 GPa and 1800 K consists of δ-AlOOH. In the in-situ experiments, crystallization of δ-AlOOH was observed at 65 GPa and 1300 K and it was stable up to 1700 K. δ-AlOOH is stable in the large pressure range with a dehydration temperature around 1800K. It can be a water reservoir in subducting slabs in the

  19. Poster — Thur Eve — 15: Improvements in the stability of the tomotherapy imaging beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belec, J

    2014-08-15

    Use of helical TomoTherapy based MVCT imaging for adaptive planning requires the image values (HU) to remain stable over the course of treatment. In the past, the image value stability was suboptimal, which required frequent change to the image value to density calibration curve to avoid dose errors on the order of 2–4%. The stability of the image values at our center was recently improved by stabilizing the dose rate of the machine (dose control servo) and performing daily MVCT calibration corrections. In this work, we quantify the stability of the image values over treatment time by comparing patient treatment image density derived using MVCT and KVCT. The analysis includes 1) MVCT - KVCT density difference histogram, 2) MVCT vs KVCT density spectrum, 3) multiple average profile density comparison and 4) density difference in homogeneous locations. Over two months, the imaging beam stability was compromised several times due to a combination of target wobbling, spectral calibration, target change and magnetron issues. The stability of the image values were analyzed over the same period. Results show that the impact on the patient dose calculation is 0.7% +− 0.6%.

  20. Engineering of protease-resistant phytase from Penicillium sp.: high thermal stability, low optimal temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianqian; Liu, Honglei; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Yuzhen

    2010-12-01

    Phytase is widely used as a feed additive in industry. It is important to investigate the thermal stability, optimal pH and temperature and protease resistance of phytases in application. We introduced random mutations in a protease-resistance phytase gene of Penicillium sp. using Mn²+-dITP random mutation method, and identified two mutants 2-28 (T11A, G56E, L65F, Q144H and L151S) and 2-249 (T11A, H37Y, G56E, L65F, Q144H, L151S and N354D) with improved thermal stability and optimal temperature and pH. The mutants retained their high resistance to pepsin. The catalytic activity at 37 °C was up to 133.3 U and 136.6 U per mg protein with broad optimal temperature ranges of 37-55 °C and 37-50 °C, respectively. After a heat treatment at 100 °C for 5 min, the two mutant proteins retained about 72.81% and 92.43% of the initial activity, respectively. In addition, the optimal pH of mutant 2-249 was reduced to 4.8. All these improved properties made them more suitable to be used as feed additive in the feed industry than the present commercial phytases. Structure analysis suggested that the replacements of G56E, L65F, Q144H, and L151S improved the thermal stability of the protein by increasing new hydrogen bonds among the adjacent secondary structures. Moreover, the mutation of L151S enhanced the activity in the range of 37-70 °C and pH 2.5-7.0 by facilitating the interaction between the substrate and the catalytic centre. The substitution of N354D influenced the pH profile by weakening the bondage with the side chain of D353, which caused a pKa shift of the catalytic centre. PMID:20826112

  1. Ceramic stabilization of hazardous wastes: a high performance room temperature process

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    ANL has developed a room-temperature process for converting hazardous materials to a ceramic structure. It is similar to vitrification but is achieved at low cost, similar to conventional cement stabilization. The waste constituents are both chemically stabilized and physically encapsulated, producing very low leaching levels and the potential for delisting. The process, which is pH-insensitive, is ideal for inorganic sludges and liquids, as well as mixed chemical-radioactive wastes, but can also handle significant percentages of salts and even halogenated organics. High waste loadings are possible and densification occurs,so that volumes are only slightly increased and in some cases (eg, incinerator ash) are reduced. The ceramic product has strength and weathering properties far superior to cement products.

  2. Some like it hot, some like it cold: Temperature dependent biotechnological applications and improvements in extremophilic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-12-01

    The full biotechnological exploitation of enzymes is still hampered by their low activity, low stability and high cost. Temperature-dependent catalytic properties of enzymes are a key to efficient and cost-effective translation to commercial applications. Organisms adapted to temperature extremes are a rich source of enzymes with broad ranging thermal properties which, if isolated, characterized and their structure-function-stability relationship elucidated, could underpin a variety of technologies. Enzymes from thermally-adapted organisms such as psychrophiles (low-temperature) and thermophiles (high-temperature) are a vast natural resource that is already under scrutiny for their biotechnological potential. However, psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes show an activity-stability trade-off that necessitates the use of various genetic and chemical modifications to further improve their properties to suit various industrial applications. This review describes in detail the properties and biotechnological applications of both cold-adapted and thermophilic enzymes. Furthermore, the review critically examines ways to improve their value for biotechnology, concluding by proposing an integrated approach involving thermally-adapted, genetically and magnetically modified enzymes to make biocatalysis more efficient and cost-effective.

  3. Improving the Oxidative Stability of a High Redox Potential Fungal Peroxidase by Rational Design

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Acebes, Sandra; Guallar, Victor; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic peroxidases are enzymes of biotechnological interest due to their ability to oxidize high redox potential aromatic compounds, including the recalcitrant lignin polymer. However, different obstacles prevent their use in industrial and environmental applications, including low stability towards their natural oxidizing-substrate H2O2. In this work, versatile peroxidase was taken as a model ligninolytic peroxidase, its oxidative inactivation by H2O2 was studied and different strategies were evaluated with the aim of improving H2O2 stability. Oxidation of the methionine residues was produced during enzyme inactivation by H2O2 excess. Substitution of these residues, located near the heme cofactor and the catalytic tryptophan, rendered a variant with a 7.8-fold decreased oxidative inactivation rate. A second strategy consisted in mutating two residues (Thr45 and Ile103) near the catalytic distal histidine with the aim of modifying the reactivity of the enzyme with H2O2. The T45A/I103T variant showed a 2.9-fold slower reaction rate with H2O2 and 2.8-fold enhanced oxidative stability. Finally, both strategies were combined in the T45A/I103T/M152F/M262F/M265L variant, whose stability in the presence of H2O2 was improved 11.7-fold. This variant showed an increased half-life, over 30 min compared with 3.4 min of the native enzyme, under an excess of 2000 equivalents of H2O2. Interestingly, the stability improvement achieved was related with slower formation, subsequent stabilization and slower bleaching of the enzyme Compound III, a peroxidase intermediate that is not part of the catalytic cycle and leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. PMID:25923713

  4. Sensory stability of ultra-high temperature milk in polyethylene bottle.

    PubMed

    Petrus, R R; Walter, E H M; Faria, J A F; Abreu, L F

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensory stability of ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk subjected to different heat treatments and stored at room temperature in white high density polyethylene bottles (HDPE) pigmented with titanium dioxide. Two lots of 300 units each were processed, respectively, at 135 and 141 degrees C/10 s using indirect heating and subsequently aseptically filled in an ISO class 7 clean room. These experimental lots were evaluated for appearance, aroma, flavor, and overall appreciation and compared to samples of commercial UHT milk purchased from local commercial stores. The time-temperature combinations investigated did not affect either the acceptability or the shelf life of the milk. Despite the limited light barrier properties of HDPE bottles, the product contained in the package tested exhibited good stability, with a shelf life ranging from 4 to 11 wk. Within this time period, the acceptability of the experimental lots was similar to that of the commercial products. The results achieved in this study contribute to turn the low-cost UHT system investigated into a technically viable option for small-size dairy processing plants. PMID:19200121

  5. Stability of the rate, state and temperature dependent friction model and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arun K.; Singh, Trilok N.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study stability of the rate, state and temperature friction (RSTF) model. The Segall and Rice approach is used to model heat transfer at the sliding interface with its surroundings. The effect of pore pressure is not considered in the model to avoid the complex expression for critical stiffness. Linear stability analysis of the spring-mass sliding system is carried out with the ageing law under the quasistatic conditions in order to determine the critical stiffness above which sliding behaviour changes from unstable to stable or vice versa. Our numerical simulations establish that critical stiffness of the heated surface may increase or decrease from corresponding to the critical stiffness of the unheated surface depending on the relative values of two contradictory parameters related with velocity effect and temperature effect. Parametric studies are also carried out to understand shear velocity and temperature of the sliding surface dependence of steady friction. The RSTF model is also used to study the gravity induced failure of a creeping rock slope and the results are justified.

  6. Ab initio phase stability at high temperatures and pressures in the V-Cr system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Alexander; Soderlind, Per; Yang, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Vanadium metal has seen a surge in research, experimental and theoretical, driven mainly by its importance in applications but also because of its surprising destabilization of the body-centered cubic (bcc) ground-state phase close to 60 GPa. The phase stability of vanadium metal and vanadium-chromium alloys at high temperatures and pressures is explored by means of first-principles electronic-structure calculations. Utilizing the self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamics approach in conjunction with density-functional theory, we show that pressure-induced mechanical instability of body-centered cubic vanadium metal, which results in formation of a rhombohedral phase at around 60 GPa at room temperatures, will prevail significant heating and compression. Furthermore, alloying with chromium decreases the temperature at which stabilization of the body-centered cubic phase occurs at elevated pressure. Computing support for this work came from the LLNL Computing Grand Challenge program. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 11-ER-033.

  7. Designing Nanoscale Precipitates in Novel Cobalt-based Superalloys to Improve Creep Resistance and Operating Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dunand, David C.; Seidman, David N.; Wolverton, Christopher; Saal, James E.; Bocchini, Peter J.; Sauza, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature structural alloys for aerospace and energy applications have long been dominated by Ni-base superalloys, whose strength and creep resistance can be attributed to microstructures consisting of a large volume fraction of ordered (L12) γ'-precipitates embedded in a disordered’(f.c.c.) γ-matrix. These alloys exhibit excellent mechanical behavior and thermal stability, but after decades of incremental improvement are nearing the theoretical limit of their operating temperatures. Conventional Co-base superalloys are solid-solution or carbide strengthened; although they see industrial use, these alloys are restricted to lower-stress applications because the absence of an ordered intermetallic phase places an upper limit on their mechanical performance. In 2006, a γ+γ' microstructure with ordered precipitates analogous to (L12) Ni3Al was first identified in the Co-Al-W ternary system, allowing, for the first time, the development of Co-base alloys with the potential to meet or even exceed the elevated-temperature performance of their Ni-base counterparts. The potential design space for these alloys is complex: the most advanced Ni-base superalloys may contain as many as 8-10 minor alloying additions, each with a specified purpose such as raising the γ' solvus temperature or improving creep strength. Our work has focused on assessing the effects of alloying additions on microstructure and mechanical behavior of γ'-strengthened Co-base alloys in an effort to lay the foundations for understanding this emerging alloy system. Investigation of the size, morphology, and composition of γ' and other relevant phases is investigated utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 3-D picosecond ultraviolet local electrode atom probe tomography (APT). Microhardness, compressive yield stress at ambient and elevated temperatures, and compressive high-temperature creep measurements are employed to extract mechanical behavior

  8. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence TimeS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2011-01-01

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37°C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37°C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21890748

  9. Subunit Stabilization and Polyethylene Glycolation of Cocaine Esterase Improves In Vivo Residence Time

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T.; Nance, Mark R.; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H.; Tesmer, John J.G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2012-03-15

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37 C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37 C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Improvement of stability of sinusoidally driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet using auxiliary bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Duck-Sik; Park, Choon-Sang; Park, Hyung Dal; Shin, Bhum Jae; Tae, Heung-Sik

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we have proposed the auxiliary bias pulse scheme to improve the stability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets driven by an AC sinusoidal waveform excitation source. The stability of discharges can be significantly improved by the compensation of irregular variation in memory voltage due to the effect of auxiliary bias pulse. From the parametric study, such as the width, voltage, and onset time of auxiliary bias pulse, it has been demonstrated that the auxiliary bias pulse plays a significant role in suppressing the irregular discharges caused by the irregular variation in memory voltage and stable discharge can be initiated with the termination of the auxiliary bias pulse. As a result of further investigating the effects of the auxiliary pulse scheme on the jet stability under various process conditions such as the distance between the jet head and the counter electrode, and carrier gas flow, the jet stability can be improved by adjusting the amplitude and number of the bias pulse depending on the variations in the process conditions.

  11. Subunit stabilization and polyethylene glycolation of cocaine esterase improves in vivo residence time.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Diwahar; Collins, Gregory T; Nance, Mark R; Nichols, Joseph; Edwald, Elin; Chan, Jimmy; Ko, Mei-Chuan; Woods, James H; Tesmer, John J G; Sunahara, Roger K

    2011-12-01

    No small-molecule therapeutic is available to treat cocaine addiction, but enzyme-based therapy to accelerate cocaine hydrolysis in serum has gained momentum. Bacterial cocaine esterase (CocE) is the fastest known native enzyme that hydrolyzes cocaine. However, its lability at 37°C has limited its therapeutic potential. Cross-linking subunits through disulfide bridging is commonly used to stabilize multimeric enzymes. Herein we use structural methods to guide the introduction of two cysteine residues within dimer interface of CocE to facilitate intermolecular disulfide bond formation. The disulfide-crosslinked enzyme displays improved thermostability, particularly when combined with previously described mutations that enhance stability (T172R-G173Q). The newly modified enzyme yielded an extremely stable form of CocE (CCRQ-CocE) that retained greater than 90% of its activity after 41 days at 37°C, representing an improvement of more than 4700-fold over the wild-type enzyme. CCRQ-CocE could also be modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, which improved its in vivo residence time from 24 to 72 h, as measured by a cocaine lethality assay, by self-administration in rodents, and by measurement of inhibition of cocaine-induced cardiovascular effects in rhesus monkeys. PEG-CCRQ elicited negligible immune response in rodents. Subunit stabilization and PEGylation has thus produced a potential protein therapeutic with markedly higher stability both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21890748

  12. Immobilization-stabilization of proteases as a tool to improve the industrial design of peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Blanco, R M; Bastida, A; Cuesta, C; Alvaro, G; Fernandez-Lafuente, R; Rosell, C M; Guisan, J M

    1991-01-01

    Synthesis of dipeptides benzoyl Arginine leucinamide and kyotorphin catalyzed by highly stabilized derivatives of trypsin and chymotrypsin have been performed. Extreme experimental conditions could be tested and parameters of industrial interest could be improved provided the high activity and stability of the derivatives in these unfavourable environments. Thermodynamically controlled synthesis catalyzed by trypsin could be optimized and 97% conversion was obtained in 90% organic cosolvents. 100% yields were achieved in kinetically controlled synthesis catalyzed by trypsin in aqueous medium in the presence of IM Ammonium Sulphate. Higher starting concentrations of poorly soluble substrates of chymotrypsin could be used in a reaction medium containing 50% DMF and 95% yield were obtained.

  13. Development of improved high temperature coatings for IN-792 + HF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Profant, D. D.; Naik, S. K.

    1981-01-01

    The development for t-55 l712 engine of high temperature for integral turbine nozzles with improved thermal fatigue resistance without sacrificing oxidation/corrosion protection is discussed. The program evaluated to coating systems which comprised one baseline plasma spray coating (12% Al-NiCoCrALY), three aluminide coatings including the baseline aluminide (701), two CoNiCrAly (6% Al) + aluminide systems and four NiCoCrY + aluminide coating were evaluated. The two-step coating processes were investigated since it offered the advantage of tailoring the composition as well as properly coating surfaces of an integral or segmented nozzle. Cyclic burner rig thermal fatigue and oxidation/corrosion tests were used to evaluate the candidate coating systems. The plasma sprayed 12% Al-NiCoCrAlY was rated the best coating in thermal fatigue resistance and outperformed all coatings by a factor between 1.4 to 2.5 in cycles to crack initiation. However, this coatings is not applicable to integral or segmented nozzles due to the line of sight limitation of the plasma spray process. The 6% Al-CoNiCrAlY + Mod. 701 aluminide (32 w/o Al) was rated the best coating in oxidation/corrosion resistance and was rated the second best in thermal fatigue resistance.

  14. Development of urethane coating and potting material with improved hydrolytic and oxidative stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of saturated hydrocarbon based urethanes was prepared and characterized for hydrolytic and oxidative stability. A series of ether based urethanes was used as a basis for comparison. The alkane base urethanes were found to be hydrolytically and oxidatively stable and had excellent electrical properties. The alkane based materials absorbed little or no water and were reversion resistant. There was little loss in hardness or weight when exposed to high temperature and humidity. Dielectric properties were excellent and suffered little adverse effects from the high temperature/humidity conditions. The alkane based urethanes were not degraded by ozone exposure.

  15. Magnetite solubility and phase stability in alkaline media at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, is the dominant oxide constituent of the indigenous corrosion layers that form on iron base alloys in high purity, high temperature water. The apparent simultaneous stability of two distinct oxidation states of iron in this metal oxide is responsible for its unique solubility behavior. The present work was undertaken to extend the experimental and theoretical bases for estimating solubilities of an iron corrosion product (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/Fe(OH){sub 2}) over a broader temperature range and in the presence of complexing, pH-controlling reagents. These results indicate that a surface layer of ferrous hydroxide controls magnetite solubility behavior at low temperatures in much the same manner as a surface layer of nickel(II) hydroxide was previously reported to control the low temperature solubility behavior of NiO. The importance of Fe(III) ion complexes implies not only that most previously-derived thermodynamic properties of the Fe(OH){sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion are incorrect, but that magnetite phase stability probably shifts to favor a sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate compound in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures. The test methodology involved pumping alkaline solutions of known composition through a bed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} granules and analyzing the emerging solution for Fe. Two pH-controlling reagents were tested: sodium phosphate and ammonia. Equilibria for the following reactions were described in thermodynamic terms: (a) Fe(OH){sub 2}/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} dissolution and transformation, (b) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion hydroxocomplex formation (hydrolysis), (c) Fe(II) ion amminocomplex formation, and (d) Fe(II) and Fe(III) ion phosphatocomplex formation. 36 refs.

  16. Insights into the functionality and stability of designer cellulosomes at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulou, Anastasia P; Moraïs, Sarah; Georgoulis, Anastasios; Morag, Ely; Bayer, Edward A; Hatzinikolaou, Dimitris G

    2016-10-01

    Enzymatic breakdown of lignocellulose is a major limiting step in second generation biorefineries. Assembly of the necessary activities into designer cellulosomes increases the productivity of this step by enhancing enzyme synergy through the proximity effect. However, most cellulosomal components are obtained from mesophilic microorganisms, limiting the applications to temperatures up to 50 °C. We hypothesized that a scaffoldin, comprising modular components of mainly mesophilic origin, can function at higher temperatures when combined with thermophilic enzymes, and the resulting designer cellulosomes could be employed in higher temperature reactions. For this purpose, we used a tetravalent scaffoldin constituted of three cohesins of mesophilic origin as well as a cohesin and cellulose-binding module derived from the thermophilic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum. The scaffoldin was combined with four thermophilic enzymes from Geobacillus and Caldicellulosiruptor species, each fused with a dockerin whose specificity matched one of the cohesins. We initially verified that the biochemical properties and thermal stability of the resulting chimeric enzymes were not affected by the presence of the mesophilic dockerins. Then we examined the stability of the individual single-enzyme-scaffoldin complexes and the full tetravalent cellulosome showing that all complexes are stable and functional for at least 6 h at 60 °C. Finally, within this time frame and conditions, the full complex appeared over 50 % more efficient in the hydrolysis of corn stover compared to the free enzymes. Overall, the results support the utilization of scaffoldin components of mesophilic origin at relatively high temperatures and provide a framework for the production of designer cellulosomes suitable for high temperature biorefinery applications. PMID:27207145

  17. Immobilization of carboxypeptidase from Sulfolobus solfataricus on magnetic nanoparticles improves enzyme stability and functionality in organic media

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNP) offer several advantages for applications in biomedical and biotechnological research. In particular, MNP-based immobilization of enzymes allows high surface-to-volume ratio, good dispersibility, easy separation of enzymes from the reaction mixture, and reuse by applying an external magnetic field. In a biotechnological perspective, extremophilic enzymes hold great promise as they often can be used under non-conventional harsh conditions, which may result in substrate transformations that are not achievable with normal enzymes. This prompted us to investigate the effect of MNP bioconjugation on the catalytic properties of a thermostable carboxypeptidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus (CPSso), which exhibits catalytic properties that are useful in synthetic processes. Results CPSso was immobilized onto silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via NiNTA-His tag site-directed conjugation. Following the immobilization, CPSso acquired distinctly higher long-term stability at room temperature compared to the free native enzyme, which, in contrast, underwent extensive inactivation after 72 h incubation, thus suggesting a potential utilization of this enzyme under low energy consumption. Moreover, CPSso conjugation also resulted in a significantly higher stability in organic solvents at 40°C, which made it possible to synthesize N-blocked amino acids in remarkably higher yields compared to those of free enzyme. Conclusions The nanobioconjugate of CPSso immobilized on silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles exhibited enhanced stability in aqueous media at room temperature as well as in different organic solvents. The improved stability in ethanol paves the way to possible applications of immobilized CPSso, in particular as a biocatalyst for the synthesis of N-blocked amino acids. Another potential application might be amino acid racemate resolution, a critical and expensive step in

  18. Energy transfer induced improvement of luminescent efficiency and thermal stability in phosphate phosphor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Lin, Chun Che; Wei, Yi; Chan, Ting-Shan; Li, Guogang

    2016-02-22

    Ce3+ and Eu2+/Tb3+/Mn2+ ions codoped Ca6BaP4O17 (CBPO) phosphors have been prepared via a high-temperature solid state reaction. The structural refinement indicates that the as-prepared phosphors crystallize in monoclinic phase (C2/m) and there are two Ca sites and one Ba site in host lattice. The doping ions are determined to occupy Ca sites and the emission of Ce3+ and Eu2+ ions at different Ca sites were identified and discussed. Since bright blue and yellow emissions were observed from Ce3+and Eu2+ ions monodoped CBPO under n-UV excitation, respectively. They were codoped into the CBPO for designing energy transfer from Ce3+ to Eu2+ to improve the luminescence efficiency of Eu2+. In addition, Tb3+ ions were added into the CBPO:Ce3+ system for realizing highly efficient green emission. The energy transfer mechanisms from Ce3+ to Eu2+/Tb3+ ions were discussed. Interestingly, the incorporation of Mn2+ ions into the CBPO:Ce3+ system enhanced the blue emission of Ce3+ ions due to the modification of crystal lattice. Finally, the thermal stability of CBPO:Ce3+, Eu2+/Tb3+/Mn2+ phosphors were investigated systematically and corresponding mechanisms were proposed. Based on these results, the as-prepared CBPO:Ce3+, Eu2+/Tb3+/Mn2+ phosphors can act as potential blue, yellow, green, and emission-tunable phosphors for n-UV based white LEDs. PMID:26907078

  19. Structures and relative stabilities of ammonia clusters at different temperatures: DFT vs. ab initio.

    PubMed

    Malloum, Alhadji; Fifen, Jean Jules; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Engo, Serge Guy Nana; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2015-11-21

    A hydrogen bond network in ammonia clusters plays a key role in understanding the properties of species embedded in ammonia. This network is dictated by the structures of neutral ammonia clusters. In this work, structures of neutral ammonia clusters (NH3)n(=2-10) have been studied at M06-2X/6-31++G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++g(d,p) levels of theory. The analysis of the relative stabilities of various hydrogen bond types has also been studied and vibrational spectroscopy of the ammonia pentamer and decamer is investigated. We noted that M06-2X provides lower electronic energies, greater binding energies and higher structural resolution than MP2. We also noted that at the M06-2X level of theory, the binding energy converges to the experimental vaporization enthalpy faster than that at the MP2 level of theory. As a result, it is found that the M06-2X functional could be more suitable than the MP2 ab initio method in the description of structures and energies of ammonia clusters. However, we found that the electronic energy differences obtained at both levels of computation follow a linear relation with n (number of ammonia molecules in a cluster). As far as the structures of ammonia clusters are concerned, we proposed new "significant" isomers that have not been reported previously. The most remarkable is the global minimum electronic energy structure of the ammonia hexamer, which has an inversion centre and confirms experimental observation. Moreover, we reported the relative stabilities of neutral ammonia clusters for temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 K. The stability of isomers changes with the increase of the temperature. As a result, the branched and less bonded isomers are the most favored at high temperatures and disfavored at low temperatures, while compact and symmetric isomers dominate the population of clusters at low temperatures. In fine, from this work, the global minimum energy structures of ammonia clusters are known for the first time at a given temperature

  20. Vapor-modulated heat pipe for improved temperature control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Ludeke, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Dryout induced by vapor throttling makes control of equipment temperature less dependent on variations in sink environment. Mechanism controls flow of vapor in heat pipe by using valve in return path to build difference in pressure and also difference in saturation temperature of the vapor. In steady state, valve closes just enough to produce partial dryout that achieves required temperature drop.

  1. Stability of feline caliciviruses in marine water maintained at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, K; Kadoi, B K

    2001-01-01

    Since human caliciviruses are responsible for viral gastroenteritis transmitted by contaminated foods and the viruses barely propagate in cell culture, feline caliciviruses were employed as a model for the measurement of their stability in marine water. Survival of four strains of feline calicivirus in marine water was measured when the seed viruses were diluted 1/10 with marine water and maintained at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C, and 20 degrees C respectively. Among the virus strains studied, a considerable amount of infective viruses remained at 10 degrees C or lower temperature conditions even for a period of 30 days. PMID:11209839

  2. Stability and partial oligomerization of naphthalene under high pressure at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Mimura, Koichi; Nishida, Tamihito; Inoue, Toru; Nakano, Satoshi; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The stability and pressure-induced chemical reactions of naphthalene were investigated at room temperature at pressures up to 23 GPa. In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that naphthalene retained its crystal structure up to ∼20 GPa, whereas a solid amorphous phase was observed in the recovered samples. Based on microanalysis of the recovered samples using Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS), naphthalene dimer and trimer isomers were observed at pressures exceeding 15 GPa. The dimers were classified as products of simple dimerization, naphthylation, and condensation, similar to the case of the pressure-induced dimerization of benzene, indicating a similar dimerization mechanism for naphthalene.

  3. Moduli stabilization in type II Calabi-Yau compactifications at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Partouche, Hervé

    2012-11-01

    We consider the type II superstring compactified on Calabi-Yau threefolds, at finite temperature. The latter is implemented at the string level by a free action on the Euclidean time circle. We show that all Kähler and complex structure moduli involved in the gauge theories geometrically engineered in the vicinity of singular loci are lifted by the stringy thermal effective potential. The analysis is based on the effective gauged super-gravity at low energy, without integrating out the non-perturbative BPS states becoming massless at the singular loci. The universal form of the action in the weak coupling regime and at low enough temperature is determined in two cases. Namely, the conifold locus, as well as a locus where the internal space develops a genus- g curve of A N -1 singularities, thus realizing an SU( N ) gauge theory coupled to g hypermultiplets in the adjoint. In general, we argue that the favored points of stabilization sit at the intersection of several such loci. As a result, the entire vector multiplet moduli space is expected to be lifted, together with hypermultiplet moduli. The scalars are dynamically stabilized during the cosmological evolution induced by the back-reaction of the thermal effective potential on the originally static background. When the universe expands and the temperature T drops, the scalars converge to minima, with damped oscillations. Moreover, they store an energy density that scales as T 4, which never dominates over radiation. The reason for this is that the mass they acquire at one-loop is of order the temperature scale, which is time-dependent rather than constant. As an example, we analyze the type IIA compactification on a hy-persurface {P}_{{( {1,1,2,2,6} )}}^4 [12], with Hodge numbers h 11 = 2 and h 12 = 128. In this case, both Kähler moduli are stabilized at a point, where the internal space develops a node and an enhanced SU(2) gauge theory coupled to 2 adjoint hypermultiplets. This shows that in the dual thermal

  4. Activity-stability relationships revisited in blue oxidases catalyzing electron transfer at extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Roulling, Frédéric; Godin, Amandine; Cipolla, Alexandre; Collins, Tony; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Feller, Georges

    2016-09-01

    Cuproxidases are a subset of the blue multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of toxic Cu(I) ions into less harmful Cu(II) in the bacterial periplasm. Cuproxidases from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic bacteria display the canonical features of temperature adaptation, such as increases in structural stability and apparent optimal temperature for activity with environmental temperature as well as increases in the binding affinity for catalytic and substrate copper ions. In contrast, the oxidative activities at 25 °C for both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are similar, suggesting that the nearly temperature-independent electron transfer rate does not require peculiar adjustments. Furthermore, the structural flexibilities of both the psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes are also similar, indicating that the firm and precise bindings of the four catalytic copper ions are essential for the oxidase function. These results show that the requirements for enzymatic electron transfer, in the absence of the selective pressure of temperature on electron transfer rates, produce a specific adaptive pattern, which is distinct from that observed in enzymes possessing a well-defined active site and relying on conformational changes such as for the induced fit mechanism. PMID:27315165

  5. Experimental Study of the Stability of Aircraft Fuels at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranos, A.; Marteney, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of fuel stability was conducted in an apparatus which simulated an aircraft gas turbine fuel system. Two fuels were tested: Jet A and Number 2 Home Heating oil. Jet A is an aircraft gas turbine fuel currently in wide use. No. 2HH was selected to represent the properties of future turbine fuels, particularly experimental Reference Broad Specification, which, under NASA sponsorship, was considered as a possible next-generation fuel. Tests were conducted with varying fuel flow rates, delivery pressures and fuel pretreatments (including preheating and deoxygenation). Simulator wall temperatures were varied between 422K and 672K at fuel flows of 0.022 to 0.22 Kg/sec. Coking rate was determined at four equally-spaced locations along the length of the simulator. Fuel samples were collected for infrared analysis. The dependence of coking rate in Jet A may be correlated with surface temperature via an activation energy of 9 to 10 kcal/mole, although the results indicate that both bulk fluid and surface temperature affect the rate of decomposition. As a consequence, flow rate, which controls bulk temperature, must also be considered. Taken together, these results suggest that the decomposition reactions are initiated on the surface and continue in the bulk fluid. The coking rate data for No. 2 HH oil are very highly temperature dependent above approximately 533K. This suggests that bulk phase reactions can become controlling in the formation of coke.

  6. PMN-PT based quaternary piezoceramics with enhanced piezoelectricity and temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Nengneng; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; He, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiling; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The phase structure, piezoelectric, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of (0.80 - x)PMN-0.10PFN-0.10PZ-xPT were investigated systematically. The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) was confirmed to be 0.30 < x < 0.34. Both MPB compositions of x = 0.32 and x = 0.33 exhibit high piezoelectric coefficients d33 = 640 pC/N and 580 pC/N, electromechanical couplings kp of 0.53 and 0.52, respectively. Of particular importance is that the composition with x = 0.33 was found to process high field-induced piezoelectric strain coefficient d33* of 680 pm/V, exhibiting a minimal temperature-dependent behavior, being less than 8% in the temperature range of 25-165 °C, which can be further confirmed by d31, with a variation of less than 9%. The temperature-insensitive d33* values can be explained by the counterbalance of the ascending dielectric permittivity and descending polarization with increasing temperature. These features make the PMN-PT based quaternary MPB compositions promising for actuator applications demanding high temperature stability.

  7. Improvement of the operation rate of medical temperature measuring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotra, O.; Boyko, O.; Zyska, T.

    2014-08-01

    A method of reducing measuring time of temperature measurements of biological objects based on preheating the resistance temperature detector (RTD) up to the temperature close to the temperature to be measured, is proposed. It has been found that at the same measuring time, the preheating allows to decrease the measurement error by a factor of 5 to 45 over the temperature range of 35-41°С. The measurement time is reduced by 1.6-4 times over this range, keeping the same value of the measurement error.

  8. Long-Term Stability of Residual Stress Improvement by Water Jet Peening Considering Working Processes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Osawa, Yusuke; Itoh, Shinsuke; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2013-06-01

    To prevent primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), water jet peening (WJP) has been used on the welds of Ni-based alloys in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Before WJP, the welds are machined and buffed in order to conduct a penetrant test (PT) to verify the weld qualities to access, and microstructure evolution takes place in the target area due to the severe plastic deformation. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP might be unstable under elevated temperatures because of the high dislocation density in the compressive stress layer. Therefore, the stability of the compressive residual stresses caused by WJP was investigated during long-term operation by considering the microstructure evolution due to the working processes. The following conclusions were made: The compressive residual stresses were slightly relaxed in the surface layers of the thermally aged specimens. There were no differences in the magnitude of the relaxation based on temperature or time. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP were confirmed to remain stable under elevated temperatures. The stress relaxation at the surface followed the Johnson-Mehl equation, which states that stress relaxation can occur due to the recovery of severe plastic strain, since the estimated activation energy agrees very well with the self-diffusion energy for Ni. By utilizing the additivity rule, it was indicated that stress relaxation due to recovery is completed during the startup process. It was proposed that the long-term stability of WJP under elevated temperatures must be assessed based on compressive stresses with respect to the yield stress. Thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis was performed to predict the effect of creep strain. After 100 yr of simulated continuous operation at 80% capacity, there was little change in the WJP compressive stresses under an actual operating temperature of 623 K. Therefore, the long-term stability of WJP during actual operation was

  9. Structural and mechanical property changes in toughened magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, D.B.; James, M.R.; Porter, J.R.

    1989-02-01

    The mechanical properties of high-toughness magnesia-partially-stabilized zirconia were found to be dramatically altered by a single cooling cycle between room temperature and - 196/sup 0/C. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to correlate the changes in mechanical properties with structural changes that occur at temperatures below -- 100/sup 0/C. Most of the the tetragonal precipitates that are responsible for toughening transformed to an orthorhombic phase with unit-cell volume intermediate between those of the tetragonal and monoclinic phases. The orthorhombic phase was stable with heating to 300/sup 0/C, but it transformed back to the tetragonal structure when heated to 400/sup 0/C.

  10. Stability at comminution chopping temperatures of model chicken breast muscle emulsions.

    PubMed

    Perchonok, M H; Regenstein, J M

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of vegetable oil and protein solutions extracted from chicken breast muscle were heated to 10°C, 20°C and 30°C before or after the Omni-mixer step of timed emulsification. Emulsion stability (ES) was determined by placing the extracted cream layer between layers of filter paper and polyester mesh and measuring the weight loss after 96 h at 0-1°C. All natural actomyosin and exhaustively washed chicken breast muscle emulsions lost no more than 50% of their original weight after heating and were defined as being stable. Even excessive chopping temperatures (30°C) failed to effect timed emulsification or ES. This study suggests that any instability of finished commercial sausage-type products is not due to changes in the protein caused by excessively high chopping temperatures generated during comminution.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical stability of ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing atmospheres at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical stability of several ceramic materials in hydrogen-containing environments was analyzed with thermodynamic considerations in mind. Equilibrium calculations were made as a function of temperature, moisture content, and total system pressure. The following ceramic materials were considered in this study: SiC, Si3N4, SiO2, Al2O3, mullite, ZrO2, Y2O3, CaO, MgO, BeO, TiB2, TiC, HfC, and ZrC. On the basis of purely thermodynamic arguments, upper temperature limits are suggested for each material for long-term use in H2-containing atmospheres.

  12. Tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy; Prospects for low temperature applications to superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, J.; Rice, P. , Boulder, CO . Electromagnetic Technology Div.)

    1991-03-01

    The authors of this paper demonstrate an imaging technique referred to as tunneling stabilized magnetic force microscopy or TSMFM. TSMFM is performed using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a flexible magnetic, tunneling tip in place of the usual rigid tunneling tip. TSMFM images are therefore combinations of topography and the magnetic forces between the tip and the sample. Room temperature TSMFM images of magnetic bit tracks on a hard disk have 100 nm resolution and are comparable to Bitter patterns made using a ferrofluid. We have built a low temperature STM with the hope of getting TSMFM images of the flux lattice in superconductors. Preliminary TSMFM images of a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub c}O{sub x} (YBCO) film (T{sub c} {minus} 88 K) in a 5Q mT field show that relatively large magnetic forces are acting on the flexible tip while scanning at 48 K.

  13. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  14. Low-temperature performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Ho Keun; Kim, Jun Woo; Bae, Kiho; Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Park, Suk Won; Prestat, Michel; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on the performance of thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at temperatures of 50-525 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for conductivity measurements. Relatively high conductivity values were observed in the low-temperature region when compared to reference values of YSZ synthesized by other methods. To investigate the conduction mechanism, various experimental variables were modified during the electrical measurements, including the ratio of yttria to zirconia in the ALD YSZ films and the atmospheric conditions. To relate the electrical properties to the structural characteristics, the crystallinity and microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the suitability of an ALD YSZ membrane as the electrolyte of micro solid oxide fuel cells was evaluated. An open circuit voltage of almost 1 V and decent power output were successfully measured below 100 °C.

  15. Phase Stability of Epsilon and Gamma HNIW (CL-20) at High-Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gump, Jared

    2007-06-01

    Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is one of the few ingredients developed since World War II to be considered for transition to military use. Five polymorphs have been identified for CL-20 by FTIR measurements (α, β, γ, ɛ, and ζ). As CL-20 is transitioned into munitions it will become necessary to predict its response under conditions of detonation, for performance evaluation. Such predictive modeling requires a phase diagram and basic thermodynamic properties of the various phases at high pressure and temperature. Theoretical calculations have been performed for a variety of explosive ingredients including CL-20, but it was noted that no experimental measurements existed for comparison with the theoretical bulk modulus calculated for CL-20. Therefore, the phase stabilities of epsilon and gamma CL-20 at static high-pressure and temperature were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments. The samples were compressed and heated using diamond anvil cells (DAC). Pressures and temperatures achieved were around 5GPa and 175^oC, respectively. No phase change (from the starting epsilon phase) was observed under hydrostatic compression up to 6.3 GPa at ambient temperature. Under ambient pressure the epsilon phase was determined to be stable to a temperature of 120^oC. When heating above 125^oC the gamma phase appeared and it remained stable until thermal decomposition occurred above 150^oC. The gamma phase exhibits a phase change upon compression at both ambient temperature and 140^oC. Pressure -- volume data for the epsilon and gamma phase at ambient temperature and the epsilon phase at 75^oC were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan formalism to obtain isothermal equations of state.

  16. Improving Streamflow Forecasts Using Predefined Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing evidence of climate variability, water resources managers in the western United States are faced with greater challenges of developing long range streamflow forecast. This is further aggravated by the increases in climate extremes such as floods and drought caused by climate variability. Over the years, climatologists have identified several modes of climatic variability and their relationship with streamflow. These climate modes have the potential of being used as predictor in models for improving the streamflow lead time. With this as the motivation, the current research focuses on increasing the streamflow lead time using predefine climate indices. A data driven model i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM) based on the statistical learning theory is used to predict annual streamflow volume 3-year in advance. The SVM model is a learning system that uses a hypothesis space of linear functions in a Kernel induced higher dimensional feature space, and is trained with a learning algorithm from the optimization theory. Annual oceanic-atmospheric indices, comprising of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), El Niño-Southern Oscillations (ENSO), and a new Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set of "Hondo" Region for a period of 1906-2005 are used to generate annual streamflow volumes. The SVM model is applied to three gages i.e. Cisco, Green River, and Lees Ferry in the Upper Colorado River Basin in the western United States. Based on the performance measures the model shows very good forecasts, and the forecast are in good agreement with measured streamflow volumes. Previous research has identified NAO and ENSO as main drivers for extending streamflow forecast lead-time in the UCRB. Inclusion of "Hondo Region" SST information further improve the model's forecasting ability. The overall results of this study revealed that the annual streamflow of the UCRB is significantly influenced by

  17. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectinase enzyme from guava (Psidium guajava) peel: Enzyme recovery, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability.

    PubMed

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Murshid, Fara Syazana; Manap, Mohd Yazid; Islam Sarker, Zaidul

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions on the yield, specific activity, temperature, and storage stability of the pectinase enzyme from guava peel. The ultrasound variables studied were sonication time (10-30 min), ultrasound temperature (30-50 °C), pH (2.0-8.0), and solvent-to-sample ratio (2:1 mL/g to 6:1 mL/g). The main goal was to optimize the ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions to maximize the recovery of pectinase from guava peel with the most desirable enzyme-specific activity and stability. Under the optimum conditions, a high yield (96.2%), good specific activity (18.2 U/mg), temperature stability (88.3%), and storage stability (90.3%) of the extracted enzyme were achieved. The optimal conditions were 20 min sonication time, 40 °C temperature, at pH 5.0, using a 4:1 mL/g solvent-to-sample ratio. The study demonstrated that optimization of ultrasound-assisted process conditions for the enzyme extraction could improve the enzymatic characteristics and yield of the enzyme.

  18. Design of an activity and stability improved carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Jakoblinnert, Andre; van den Wittenboer, Anne; Shivange, Amol V; Bocola, Marco; Heffele, Lora; Ansorge-Schumacher, Marion; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    The carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR2) is an industrially attractive biocatalyst for producing chiral alcohols from ketones. The homodimeric enzyme has a broad substrate spectrum and an excellent stereoselectivity, but is rapidly inactivated at aqueous-organic interfaces. The latter limits CPCR2's application in biphasic reaction media. Reengineering the protein surface of CPCR2 yielded a variant CPCR2-(A275N, L276Q) with 1.5-fold increased activity, 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability (cyclohexane/buffer system), and increased thermal resistance (ΔT50=+2.7 °C). Site-directed and site-saturation mutagenesis studies discovered that position 275 mainly influences stability and position 276 governs activity. After single site-saturation of position 275, amino acid exchanges to asparagine and threonine were discovered to be stabilizing. Interestingly, both positions are located at the dimer interface and close to the active site and computational analysis identified an inter-subunit hydrogen bond formation at position 275 to be responsible for stabilization. Finally, the variant CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) was found by simultaneous site-saturation of positions 275 and 276. CPCR2-(A275S, L276Q) has compared to wtCPCR2 a 1.4-fold increased activity, a 1.5-fold higher interfacial stability, and improved thermal resistance (ΔT50=+5.2 °C). PMID:23471075

  19. Stability Improvement of Two Wheel Driven Mobile Manipulator Using Nonlinear PD Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K. W.; Murakami, Toshiyuki

    This paper proposes the stability improvement of two wheeled mobile manipulator using nonlinear Proportional Derivative (PD) controller. Nonlinear PD controller is a controller which automatically adjusts its gains according to the stability conditions on running. Lyapunov function based on kinetic energy of the system and position error are used to re-schedule the gains of the nonlinear PD controller. This method will expand the stability margin of the two wheeled mobile manipulator. Further advantages of this method are reducing the parameter uncertainty and difficulty of adjusting gains due to nonlinear nature of system. In the proposed approach, virtual double inverted pendulum is introduced for the control of the two wheeled mobile manipulator. The model based on the double inverted pendulum, makes it easy to design the controller. Here, wheel control and manipulator control are designed separately and unified by using two nonlinear PD controllers. Two nonlinear PD controllers are implemented for better stability. The method proposed in this paper has used nonlinear PD controller in work space of the manipulator controller together with null space control. Here the null space control increases the control stability of manipulator configuration. The effectiveness of the proposed method was confirmed by the experiment of two wheel mobile manipulator.

  20. Room Temperature Stabilization of Oral, Live Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi-Vectored Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ohtake, Satoshi; Martin, Russell; Saxena, Atul; Pham, Binh; Chiueh, Gary; Osorio, Manuel; Kopecko, Dennis; Xu, DeQi; Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Truong-Le, Vu

    2011-01-01

    Foam drying, a modified freeze drying process, was utilized to produce a heat-stable, live attenuated Salmonella Typhi ‘Ty21a’ bacterial vaccine. Ty21a vaccine was formulated with pharmaceutically approved stabilizers, including sugars, plasticizers, amino acids, and proteins. Growth media and harvesting conditions of the bacteria were also studied to enhance resistance to desiccation stress encountered during processing as well as subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. The optimized Ty21a vaccine, formulated with trehalose, methionine, and gelatin, demonstrated stability for approximately 12 weeks at 37°C (i.e., time required for the vaccine to decrease in potency by 1log10 CFU) and no loss in titer at 4 and 25°C following storage for the same duration. Furthermore, the foam dried Ty21a elicited a similar immunogenic response in mice as well as protection in challenge studies compared to Vivotif™, the commercial Ty21a vaccine. The enhanced heat stability of the Ty21a oral vaccine, or Ty21a derivatives expressing foreign antigens (e.g. anthrax), could mitigate risks of vaccine potency loss during long term storage, shipping, delivery to geographical areas with warmer climates or during emergency distribution following a bioterrorist attack. Because the foam drying process is conducted using conventional freeze dryers and can be readily implemented at any freeze drying manufacturing facility, this technology appears ready and appropriate for large scale processing of foam dried vaccines. PMID:21300096

  1. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  2. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ericka L; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J Craig; Nelson, Karen E; Jones, Marcus B

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  3. Influence of temperature and preserving agents on the stability of cornelian cherries anthocyanins.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Bianca; David, Luminiţa

    2014-01-01

    Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) fruits are known for their significant amounts of anthocyanins which can be used as natural food colorants. The storage stability of anthocyanins from these fruit extracts, at different temperatures (2 °C, 25 °C and 75 °C), pH 3.02, in the presence of two of the most widely employed food preserving agents (sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate) was investigated. The highest stability was exhibited by the anthocyanin extract stored at 2 °C without any added preservative, with half-life and constant rate values of 1443.8 h and 0.48 × 10(-3) h(-1), respectively. The highest value of the degradation rate constant (82.76 × 10(-3)/h) was obtained in the case of anthocyanin extract stored at 75 °C without any added preservative. Experimental results indicate that the storage degradation of anthocyanins followed first-order reaction kinetics under each of the investigated conditions. In aqueous solution, the food preservatives used were found to have a slight influence on the anthocyanins' stability. PMID:24941341

  4. A robust ambient temperature collection and stabilization strategy: Enabling worldwide functional studies of the human microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ericka L.; Li, Weizhong; Klitgord, Niels; Highlander, Sarah K.; Dayrit, Mark; Seguritan, Victor; Yooseph, Shibu; Biggs, William; Venter, J. Craig; Nelson, Karen E.; Jones, Marcus B.

    2016-01-01

    As reports on possible associations between microbes and the host increase in number, more meaningful interpretations of this information require an ability to compare data sets across studies. This is dependent upon standardization of workflows to ensure comparability both within and between studies. Here we propose the standard use of an alternate collection and stabilization method that would facilitate such comparisons. The DNA Genotek OMNIgene∙Gut Stool Microbiome Kit was compared to the currently accepted community standard of freezing to store human stool samples prior to whole genome sequencing (WGS) for microbiome studies. This stabilization and collection device allows for ambient temperature storage, automation, and ease of shipping/transfer of samples. The device permitted the same data reproducibility as with frozen samples, and yielded higher recovery of nucleic acids. Collection and stabilization of stool microbiome samples with the DNA Genotek collection device, combined with our extraction and WGS, provides a robust, reproducible workflow that enables standardized global collection, storage, and analysis of stool for microbiome studies. PMID:27558918

  5. Improvement of enalapril maleate chemical stability by high shear melting granulation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula Montandon; Cunha, Talita Amorim; Serpa, Raphael Caixeta; Taveira, Stephânia Fleury; Lima, Eliana Martins; Almeida Diniz, Danielle Guimarães; de Freitas, Luis Alexandre Pedro; Marreto, Ricardo Neves

    2014-09-18

    Abstract Enalapril maleate is a widely used drug, which is chemically unstable when mixed with excipients resulting in enalaprilat and diketopiperazine as the main degradation products. The preparation of enalapril sodium salt has been used to improve drug stability in solid dosage forms; however, product rejection is observed when the chemical reaction for obtaining the sodium salt is not completely finished before packaging. In this study, granules were prepared by melting granulation using stearic acid or glyceryl monostearate, with a view to developing more stable enalapril maleate solid dosage forms. The granules were prepared in a laboratory-scale high shear mixer and compressed in a rotary machine. Size distribution, flow properties, in vitro drug release and enalapril maleate chemical stability were evaluated and compared with data obtained from tablets prepared without hydrophobic binders. All formulations showed good physical properties and immediate drug release. The greatest improvement in the enalapril maleate stability was observed in formulations containing stearic acid. This study showed that hot melting granulation could be successfully used to prepare enalapril maleate granules which could substitute the in situ formation of enalapril sodium salt, since they provided better enalapril stability in solid dosage forms. PMID:25231642

  6. Gait Adaptability Training Improves Both Postural Stability and Dual-Tasking Ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Batson, Crystal D.; Peters, Brian T.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    After spaceflight, the process of readapting to Earth's gravity commonly presents crewmembers with a variety of locomotor challenges. Our recent work has shown that the ability to adapt to a novel discordant sensorimotor environment can be increased through preflight training, so one focus of our laboratory has been the development of a gait training countermeasure to expedite the return of normal locomotor function after spaceflight. We used a training system comprising a treadmill mounted on a motion base facing a virtual visual scene that provided a variety of sensory challenges. As part of their participation in a larger retention study, 10 healthy adults completed 3 training sessions during which they walked on a treadmill at 1.1 m/s while receiving discordant support-surface and visual manipulations. After a single training session, subjects stride frequencies improved, and after 2 training sessions their auditory reaction times improved, where improvement was indicated by a return toward baseline values. Interestingly, improvements in reaction time came after stride frequency improvements plateaued. This finding suggests that postural stability was given a higher priority than a competing cognitive task. Further, it demonstrates that improvement in both postural stability and dual-tasking can be achieved with multiple training exposures. We conclude that, with training, individuals become more proficient at walking in discordant sensorimotor conditions and are able to devote more attention to competing tasks.

  7. Validated HPLC method and temperature stabilities for oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in garlic macerated oil.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miyoung; Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Shin, Dongbin

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the utilization of garlic macerated oil as functional foods, oil-soluble organosulfur compounds were investigated using normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method. For analysis of compounds, it was simply extracted with 98% n-hexane in 2-propanol followed by sensitive and selective determination of all compounds. These method exhibited excellent linearity for oil-soluble organosulfur compounds with good coefficient (r > 0.999). Average recoveries were in the range of 80.23-106.18%. The limits of quantitation of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds ranged from 0.32 to 9.56 μg mL(-1) and the limits of detection were from 0.11 to 3.16 μg mL(-1). Overall, the precision of the results, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranged from 0.55 to 11.67%. The proposed method was applied to determining the contents of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in commercial garlic macerated oils. Also, the stability of oil-soluble organosulfur compounds in garlic macerated oil were evaluated during 3 months of storage at four difference temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 35°C). The results showed the studied oil-soluble compounds in garlic macerated oil were stable at 4°C and relatively unstable at 35°C with varied extents degradation. Therefore, these validation data and temperature stability may be useful for quality evaluation of garlic macerated oils.

  8. Breadth versus depth: Interactions that stabilize particle assemblies to changes in density or temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-02-01

    We use inverse methods of statistical mechanics to explore trade-offs associated with designing interactions to stabilize self-assembled structures against changes in density or temperature. Specifically, we find isotropic, convex-repulsive pair potentials that maximize the density range for which a two-dimensional square lattice is the stable ground state subject to a constraint on the chemical potential advantage it exhibits over competing structures (i.e., "depth" of the associated minimum on the chemical potential hypersurface). We formulate the design problem as a nonlinear program, which we solve numerically. This allows us to efficiently find optimized interactions for a wide range of possible chemical potential constraints. We find that assemblies designed to exhibit a large chemical potential advantage at a specified density have a smaller overall range of densities for which they are stable. This trend can be understood by considering the separation-dependent features of the pair potential and its gradient required to enhance the stability of the target structure relative to competitors. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we further show that potentials designed with larger chemical potential advantages exhibit higher melting temperatures.

  9. Temperature Stability and Bioadhesive Properties of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Incorporated Hydroxypropylcellulose Polymer Matrix Systems

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael A.; Munjal, Manish; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Ross, Samir A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the bioadhesive profiles of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) polymer matrices as a function of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. In addition, the effect of processing temperature on the stability of THC and its extent of degradation to cannabinol (CBN) was investigated. A hot-melt cast molding method was used to prepare HPC polymer matrix systems incorporated with THC at 0, 4, 8, and 16 percent. Bioadhesive measurements including peak adhesive force, area under the curve, and elongation at adhesive failure were recorded utilizing the TA.XT2i Texture Analyzer™. Data obtained from these tests at various contact time intervals suggested that the incorporation of THC led to an increase in the bioadhesive strength of the HPC polymer matrices. To determine the stability of THC and the resulting CBN content in the matrices, three different processing temperatures were utilized (120, 160, and 200°C). Post-production High Performance Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) analysis revealed that the processed systems contained at least 94% of THC and the relative percent formation of CBN was 0.5% at 120°C and 0.4% at 160°C compared to 1.6% at 200°C. These findings indicate that the cannabinoid may be a plausible candidate for incorporation into systems utilizing hot-melt extrusion techniques for the development of an effective mucoadhesive transmucosal matrix system for delivery of THC. PMID:16455601

  10. High temperature stability limit of phase egg, AlSiO3(OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shigeaki

    The stability relations of phase egg, AlSiO3(OH), have been investigated at pressures from 7 to 20GPa, and temperatures from 900 to 1700°C in a multi-anvil apparatus. At the lower pressures phase egg breaks down according to the univariant reaction, phase egg=stishovite+topaz-OH, which extends from 1100°C at 11GPa to 1400°C at 13GPa where it terminates at an invariant point involving corundum. At pressures above the invariant point, the stability of phase egg is limited by the breakdown reaction, phase egg=stishovite+corundum+fluid, which extends from the invariant point to 1700°C at 20GPa. Stishovite crystallized in the Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system contains Al2O3, and the amount of Al2O3 increases with increasing temperature. It is inferred that the Al2O3 content is controlled by the charge-balanced substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ and H+. Aluminum-bearing stishovite coexisting with an H2O-rich fluid may contain a certain amount of water. Therefore, phase egg and stishovite in a subducting slab could transport some H2O into the deep Earth.

  11. Improved reactivation of immobilized-stabilized lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus by its coating with highly hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Rafael C; Bolivar, Juan M; Volpato, Giandra; Filice, Marco; Godoy, Cesar; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisan, Jose M

    2009-10-26

    Immobilized-stabilized aminated lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TLL-A) is not easily reactivated after inactivation by incubation in the presence of organic solvents or chaotropic reagents. To improve the recovered activity of this biocatalyst, immobilized TLL-A has been submitted to different modifications. The best results were obtained when the enzyme was coated with a very hydrophilic and inert polymer: dextran modified with glycine (Dx-Gly). This modification did not reduce enzymatic activity while it increased the stability of this already very stable preparation, in thermal and organic solvent induced inactivation (by a 4-fold factor). Simple incubation in aqueous medium at pH 7 and 25 degrees C permitted to fully recover the activity of the immobilized and modified TLL-A enzyme inactivated by incubation in organic solvents or saturated guanidine during 3 cycles, while the non-modified enzyme only recover some activity. When the inactivation was caused by exposition at high temperatures, the reactivation was higher using the modified biocatalyst, but was far for complete (40% after 3 inactivation-reactivation cycles). The determination of the TLL-A activity in the presence of detergents (that helps the opening of active site of the lipase) allowed, in this case, to significantly improve the results, now near to 90% of the initial activity was recovered (using the non-modified enzyme the recovered activity was around 60%). This very hydrophilic and inert polymer, coating the enzyme surface, seems to help the correct positioning of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups of the enzyme, and that way improve both the stability and possibility of reactivation of the enzyme.

  12. Quinone-rich polydopamine functionalization of yttria stabilized zirconia for apatite biomineralization: The effects of coating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, Norhidayu Muhamad; Hussain, Rafaqat; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq

    2015-08-01

    The use of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as biomedical implants is often offset by its bioinert nature that prevents its osseointegration to occur. Therefore, the functionalization of YSZ surface by polydopamine to facilitate the biomineralization of apatite layer on top of the coated film has incessantly been studied. In this study YSZ discs were first immersed in 2 mg/mL of stirred dopamine solution at coating temperatures between 25 and 80 °C. The specimens were then incubated for 7d in 1.5 SBF. The effect of coating temperature on the properties (chemical compositions and wettability) and the apatite mineralization on top of the generated films was investigated. It was found that at 50 °C, the specimen displayed the highest intensity of Ca 2p peak (1.55 ± 0.42 cps) with Ca/P ratio of 1.67 due to the presence of abundant quinone groups (Cdbnd O). However, the hydrophilicity (40.9 ± 01.7°) was greatly improved at 60 °C accompanied by the highest film thickness of 306 nm. Therefore, it was concluded that the presence of high intensity of quinone groups (Cdbnd O) in polydopamine film at elevated temperature affects the chelation of Ca2+ ions and thus enhance the growth of apatite layer on top of the functionalized YSZ surface.

  13. An A-site-deficient perovskite offers high activity and stability for low-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinlong; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Shanshan; Zou, Jin; Shao, Zongping

    2013-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) directly convert fossil and/or renewable fuels into electricity and/or high-quality heat in an environmentally friendly way. However, high operating temperatures result in high cost and material issues, which have limited the commercialization of SOFCs. To lower their operating temperatures, highly active and stable cathodes are required to maintain a reasonable power output. Here, we report a layer-structured A-site deficient perovskite Sr0.95 Nb0.1 Co0.9 O3-δ (SNC0.95) prepared by solid-state reactions that shows not only high activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at operating temperatures below 600 °C, but also offers excellent structural stability and compatibility, and improved CO2 resistivity. An anode-supported fuel cell with SNC0.95 cathode delivers a peak power density as high as 1016 mW cm(-2) with an electrode-area-specific resistance of 0.052 Ω cm(2) at 500 °C.

  14. Requisite temperatures for the stabilization of atomic H in solid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1978-01-01

    If an atomic hydrogen/molecular hydrogen propellant containing at least 15% free H atoms by weight may be used, values for the theoretical specific impulse near and above 750 s may be predicted. The tritium-impregnation concept has been applied to manufacturing such an H/H2 propellant, and a phenomenological rate process theory has been derived for the matrix-isolation storage and equilibrium stability of atomic H produced at such ultralow temperatures in tritium-impregnated H2. It is suggested that an energy storage efficiency greater than 0.30 may be obtained at temperatures below 100 mK. So that the storage of atomic H is stable with respect to arbitrary small perturbations, the surface temperature must be less than a critical value dependent on sample volume, tritium weight fraction, and energy storage efficiency. A derivation of the formula for this critical surface temperature is presented, noting that the energy storage efficiency is to be fixed by experiment.

  15. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  16. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  17. Clustering behavior of yttrium and scandium dopant ions in cubic stabilized zirconia electrolytes at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Steven Paul

    This work investigates the role that dopant clustering plays in the aging phenomena observed in scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes. Molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted on supercells containing compositions of xSc2O3 + (11 - x)Y 2O3 + 89ZrO2 for x = {0, 1, 2, 11} and also on the composition 8Y2O3 + 92ZrO2 . It was discovered that individual dopant-dopant barriers have a relatively small effect on bulk ionic conductivity when the dopants are arranged in small clusters, as the vacancies rarely migration through the small clusters. However, larger clustering of ions can have a significant impact on ionic conductivity, mostly due to localized destabilization of the high-conductivity cubic phase, which forces oxygen ions to migrate through the remaining dopant-rich cubic matrix. Part of the destabilization occurs due to vacancies becoming trapped within the dopant clusters, which forces the Zr ions in the zirconia-rich regions to assume a higher coordinated state with oxygen. However, the zirconium ions are known to abhor eight-fold coordinated states, and these regions form precipitates of low-conductivity phases. These phases have been identified as tetragonal, and their formation coincides with the simultaneous reduction in ionic conductivity. The tetragonal precipitates are found to be energetically favorable at temperatures of 1073 K, indicating that colloidal stratification of the mixture is inevitable due to cationic migration during long term annealing. However, clustering of dopants appears to reach a limiting point as the dopants exhibit a repulsive interaction that limits the thermodynamic stability of the zirconia precipitates. Therefore, the dopant clusters will reach a certain maximum size at which point clustering is expected to terminate at an equilibrium state. Scandia stabilized zirconia was observed to provide better conductivity, lower zirconium coordination and superior

  18. Improved thermal stability of oxide-supported naked gold nanoparticles by ligand-assisted pinning

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, C; Divins, N. J.; Gazquez, Jaume; Varela, Maria; Angurell, I; Llorca, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a method to improve the thermal stability, up to 900 C, of bare-metal (naked) gold nanoparticles supported on top of SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates via ligand-assisted pinning. This approach leads to monodisperse naked gold nanoparticles without significant sintering after thermal annealing in air at 900 C. The ligand-assisted pinning mechanism is described.

  19. Improving folate (vitamin B9) stability in biofortified rice through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Dieter; Van Daele, Jeroen; Strobbe, Simon; Kiekens, Filip; Storozhenko, Sergei; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Lambert, Willy; Stove, Christophe; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Biofortification of staple crops could help to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies in humans. We show that folates in stored rice grains are unstable, which reduces the potential benefits of folate biofortification. We obtain folate concentrations that are up to 150 fold higher than those of wild-type rice by complexing folate to folate-binding proteins to improve folate stability, thereby enabling long-term storage of biofortified high-folate rice grains. PMID:26389575

  20. Improving folate (vitamin B9) stability in biofortified rice through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Blancquaert, Dieter; Van Daele, Jeroen; Strobbe, Simon; Kiekens, Filip; Storozhenko, Sergei; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Lambert, Willy; Stove, Christophe; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Biofortification of staple crops could help to alleviate micronutrient deficiencies in humans. We show that folates in stored rice grains are unstable, which reduces the potential benefits of folate biofortification. We obtain folate concentrations that are up to 150 fold higher than those of wild-type rice by complexing folate to folate-binding proteins to improve folate stability, thereby enabling long-term storage of biofortified high-folate rice grains.

  1. Hypoxia inducible factor stabilization leads to lasting improvement of hippocampal memory in healthy mice.

    PubMed

    Adamcio, Bartosz; Sperling, Swetlana; Hagemeyer, Nora; Walkinshaw, Gail; Ehrenreich, Hannelore

    2010-03-17

    We have previously shown that high-dose erythropoietin (EPO) treatment improves hippocampal plasticity and cognitive performance in rodents and in patients suffering from neuropsychiatric diseases. It was therefore of interest to explore whether upregulation of endogenous EPO in brain by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) stabilization would increase hippocampal memory similar to exogenous EPO. HIFs are transcription factors involved in the cellular response to low oxygen, including upregulation of transcripts like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and EPO. Under normal oxygen, prolylhydroxylases decrease HIF-alpha stability. This is banned by prolylhydroxylase inhibitors, which prevent oxygen dependent degradation and thus prolong HIF-alpha half life. In an experimental set-up identical to the one yielding strong cognitive effects with EPO, healthy male 28-day-old mice received FG-4497, a HIF prolylhydroxylase inhibitor, or placebo intraperitoneally every other day for 3 weeks. Behavioral testing and hematocrit determinations were conducted in independent cohorts at 1, 3, or 4 weeks after treatment completion. Increased EPO and VEGF mRNA expression in hippocampus or primary hippocampal neurons 6h after the application of FG-4497 confirmed its ability to stabilize HIF and upregulate HIF dependent transcription in brain. At 3 and 4 weeks after the last injection, respectively, FG-4497 treated mice compared to placebo mice had improved hippocampal memory in fear conditioning without change in hematocrit. In contrast, no improvement in memory was detected at 1 week, when the hematocrit was increased, indicating that cognitive improvement and hematocrit are not directly related. FG-4497 application for 3 weeks leads to delayed but lasting enhancement of hippocampal memory, making HIF stabilization an attractive target for pharmacological manipulation of cognition.

  2. High Temperature Stability of Onion-Like Carbon vs Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    PubMed Central

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765–1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of by the ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K−1) and HOPG (8 Pa K−1) where and are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, and values are 95.8 kJ mol−1 and 104.1 JK−1 mol−1, respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  3. Thermal Stability Study from Room Temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C) in Magnesium Silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanaki, Eleni-Chrysanthi; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides; Vourlias, George; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Kitis, George; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.; Polymeris, George S.

    2016-10-01

    Doped magnesium silicide has been identified as a promising and environmentally friendly advanced thermoelectric material in the temperature range between 500 K and 800 K (227 °C and 527 °C). Besides the plethora of magnesium silicide thermoelectric advantages, it is well known for its high sensitivity to oxidation. Oxidation is one of the primary instability mechanisms of degradation of high-temperature Mg2Si thermoelectric devices, as in the presence of O2, Mg2Si decomposes to form MgO and Si. In this work, commercial magnesium silicide in bulk form was used for thermal stability study from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Various techniques such as DTA-TG, PXRD, and FTIR have been applied. Moreover, the application of thermoluminescence (TL) as an effective and alternative probe for the study of oxidation and decomposition has been exploited. The latter provides qualitative but very helpful hints toward oxidation studies. The low-detection threshold of thermoluminescence, in conjunction with the chemical composition of the oxidation byproducts, consisting of MgO, Mg2SiO4, and SiO2, constitute two powerful motivations for further investigating its viable use as proxy for instability/decomposition studies of magnesium silicide. The partial oxidation reaction has been adopted due to the experimental fact that magnesium silicide is monitored throughout the heating temperature range of the present study. Finally, the role of silicon dioxide to the decomposition procedure, being in amorphous state and gradually crystallizing, has been highlighted for the first time in the literature. Mg2Si oxidation takes place in two steps, including a mild oxidation process with temperature threshold of 573 K (300 °C) and an abrupt one after 773 K (500 °C). Implications on the optimum operational temperature range for practical thermoelectric (TE) applications have also been briefly discussed.

  4. High Temperature Stability of Dissimilar Metal Joints in Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Nesbitt, James A.; Ritzert, Frank J.; Bowman, Cheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Future generations of power systems for spacecraft and lunar surface systems will likely require a strong dependence on nuclear power. The design of a space nuclear power plant involves integrating together major subsystems with varying materia1 requirements. Refractory alloys are repeatedly considered for major structural components in space power reactor designs because refractory alloys retain their strength at higher temperatures than other classes of metals. The relatively higher mass and lower ductility of the refractory alloys make them less attractive for lower temperature subsystems in the power plant such as the power conversion system. The power conversion system would consist more likely of intermediate temperature Ni-based superalloys. One of many unanswered questions about the use of refractory alloys in a space power plant is how to transition from the use of the structural refractory alloy to more traditional structural alloys. Because deleterious phases can form when complex alloys are joined and operated at elevated temperatures, dissimilar material diffusion analyses of refractory alloys and superalloys are needed to inform designers about options of joint temperature and operational lifetime. Combinations of four superalloys and six refractory alloys were bonded and annealed at 1150 K and 1300 K to examine diffusional interactions in this study. Joints formed through hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing were compared. Results on newer alloys compared favorably to historical data. Diffusional stability is promising for some combinations of Mo-Re alloys and superalloys at 1150 K, but it appears that lower joint temperatures would be required for other refractory alloy couples.

  5. An improved kinetics approach to describe the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiao; Grey, Kristin; Doney, John

    2010-01-15

    The recrystallization of amorphous solid dispersions may lead to a loss in the dissolution rate, and consequently reduce bioavailability. The purpose of this work is to understand factors governing the recrystallization of amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersions, and develop a kinetics model capable of accurately predicting their physical stability. Recrystallization kinetics was measured using differential scanning calorimetry for initially amorphous efavirenz-polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersions stored at controlled temperature and relative humidity. The experimental measurements were fitted by a new kinetic model to estimate the recrystallization rate constant and microscopic geometry of crystal growth. The new kinetics model was used to illustrate the governing factors of amorphous solid dispersions stability. Temperature was found to affect efavirenz recrystallization in an Arrhenius manner, while recrystallization rate constant was shown to increase linearly with relative humidity. Polymer content tremendously inhibited the recrystallization process by increasing the crystallization activation energy and decreasing the equilibrium crystallinity. The new kinetic model was validated by the good agreement between model fits and experiment measurements. A small increase in polyvinylpyrrolidone resulted in substantial stability enhancements of efavirenz amorphous solid dispersion. The new established kinetics model provided more accurate predictions than the Avrami equation.

  6. An improved kinetics approach to describe the physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiao; Grey, Kristin; Doney, John

    2010-01-15

    The recrystallization of amorphous solid dispersions may lead to a loss in the dissolution rate, and consequently reduce bioavailability. The purpose of this work is to understand factors governing the recrystallization of amorphous drug-polymer solid dispersions, and develop a kinetics model capable of accurately predicting their physical stability. Recrystallization kinetics was measured using differential scanning calorimetry for initially amorphous efavirenz-polyvinylpyrrolidone solid dispersions stored at controlled temperature and relative humidity. The experimental measurements were fitted by a new kinetic model to estimate the recrystallization rate constant and microscopic geometry of crystal growth. The new kinetics model was used to illustrate the governing factors of amorphous solid dispersions stability. Temperature was found to affect efavirenz recrystallization in an Arrhenius manner, while recrystallization rate constant was shown to increase linearly with relative humidity. Polymer content tremendously inhibited the recrystallization process by increasing the crystallization activation energy and decreasing the equilibrium crystallinity. The new kinetic model was validated by the good agreement between model fits and experiment measurements. A small increase in polyvinylpyrrolidone resulted in substantial stability enhancements of efavirenz amorphous solid dispersion. The new established kinetics model provided more accurate predictions than the Avrami equation. PMID:19786081

  7. Improved Materials for High-Temperature Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Hemrick, J.G.; Gorog, J.P.; Leary, R.

    2006-06-29

    The laboratory immersion test system built and operated at ORNL was found to successfully screen samples from numerous refractory suppliers, including both commercially available and experimental materials. This system was found to provide an accurate prediction of how these materials would perform in the actual gasifier environment. Test materials included mullites, alumino-silicate bricks, fusion-cast aluminas, alumina-based and chrome-containing mortars, phosphate-bonded mortars, coated samples provided under an MPLUS-funded project, bonded spinels, different fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinels with magnesia content ranging from 2.5% to about 60%, high-MgO castable and brick materials, spinel castables, and alkali-aluminate materials. This testing identified several candidate material systems that perform well in the New Bern gasifier. Fusion-cast aluminas were found to survive for nearly one year, and magnesia-alumina spinels have operated successfully for 18 months and are expected to survive for two years. Alkali-aluminates and high-MgO-content materials have also been identified for backup lining applications. No other material with a similar structure and chemical composition to that of the fusion-cast magnesium-aluminum spinel brick currently being used for the hot-face lining is commercially available. Other materials used for this application have been found to have inferior service lives, as previously discussed. Further, over 100 laboratory immersion tests have been performed on other materials (both commercial and experimental), but none to date has performed as well as the material currently being used for the hot-face lining. Operating experience accumulated with the high-temperature gasifier at New Bern, North Carolina, has confirmed that the molten alkali salts degrade many types of refractories. Fusion-cast alumina materials were shown to provide a great improvement in lifetime over materials used previously. Further improvement was realized

  8. Stability of Pure Hydrous Silica at Geotherm Temperatures up to 70 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisr, C.; Shim, S. H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Hervig, R. L.; Prakapenka, V.; Meng, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Stishovite, in the rutile structure with octahedrally coordinated silicon, is expected to exist in silica rich parts of subducted oceanic slabs and crustal fragments in the Earth's mantle, and has been considered for a long time to be essentially anhydrous. However, Spektor et al., (2011) have shown that ~1.3 wt% can be incorporated into pure Al-free stishovite at 10 GPa and 723 K. Yet, the stability and physical properties of hydrous silica at mantle related pressures and temperatures are unknown. We have synthesized hydrous silica samples in the multi anvil press at 9-20 GPa and 700-900 K, and in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at 17-70 GPa and 1400-2100 K. Three different sample setups have been used: dry silica gel in an H2O medium, anhydrous stishovite in an H2O medium, and hydrous silica gel in a Ne or Ar medium. The presence of percent level of water was found by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, and Raman and Infrared spectroscopy measurements. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the unit-cell volumes of the recovered stishovite samples are greater by 0.2-3.9 % compared with anhydrous stishovite at 1 bar. The unit-cell volumes show strong linear correlation with their c/a ratio suggesting that the same OH substitution mechanism persists for a wide range of water content. Based on unit-cell volumes vs water content calibration by Spektor et al., (2011), our samples contain 0.3-7.9 wt% H2O. We found that pure silica is capable of containing as much as 4.9 wt% of H2O at temperatures close to those of the mantle geotherm (e.g., sample synthesized at ~1997 K and ~67 GPa). The highest water contents were found at the highest pressures, suggesting that the pressure stabilizes OH in dense silica. X-ray diffraction patterns have also shown several new diffraction lines upon compression and heating which appear from 45 GPa (1500-2100 K) and are observed up to 100 GPa. The peaks appear to belong to a new hydrous silica phase stable at higher pressures and

  9. Program for an improved hypersonic temperature-sensing probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Dryden-sponsored contract in the mid 1960s, temperatures of up to 2200 C were successfully measured using a fluid oscillator. The current program, although limited in scope, explores the problem areas which must be solved if this technique is to be extended to 10,000 R. The potential for measuring extremely high temperatures, using fluid oscillator techniques, stems from the fact that the measuring element is the fluid itself. The containing structure of the oscillator need not be brought to equilibrium temperature with with the fluid for temperature measurement, provided that a suitable calibration can be arranged. This program concentrated on review of high-temperature material developments since the original program was completed. Other areas of limited study included related pressure instrumentation requirements, dissociation, rarefied gas effects, and analysis of sensor time response.

  10. The NASA Monographs on Shell Stability Design Recommendations: A Review and Suggested Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the existing NASA design criteria monographs for the design of buckling-resistant thin-shell structures is presented. Subsequent improvements in the analysis for nonlinear shell response are reviewed, and current issues in shell stability analysis are discussed. Examples of nonlinear shell responses that are not included in the existing shell design monographs are presented, and an approach for including reliability-based analysis procedures in the shell design process is discussed. Suggestions for conducting future shell experiments are presented, and proposed improvements to the NASA shell design criteria monographs are discussed.

  11. Alternative procedure to improve the stability of mandibular complete dentures: a modified neutral zone technique.

    PubMed

    Rehmann, Peter; Zenginel, Martha; Wostmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe an alternative technique to record the neutral zone. An acrylic resin base with posterior occlusal rims was applied using a thermoplastic denture adhesive. After being worn for 2 days, the base was transferred into an acrylic resin complete denture. Most patients reported an improvement in denture stability and a reduction of pressure sores. This procedure seems to be helpful to improve denture function, especially in the mandible, in patients who cannot be treated with implants. However, because of its complexity, this neutral zone technique cannot be recommended for routine clinical use.

  12. Polymer/Silicate Nanocomposites Developed for Improved Thermal Stability and Barrier Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi G.

    2001-01-01

    The nanoscale reinforcement of polymers is becoming an attractive means of improving the properties and stability of polymers. Polymer-silicate nanocomposites are a relatively new class of materials with phase dimensions typically on the order of a few nanometers. Because of their nanometer-size features, nanocomposites possess unique properties typically not shared by more conventional composites. Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites can attain a certain degree of stiffness, strength, and barrier properties with far less ceramic content than comparable glass- or mineral-reinforced polymers. Reinforcement of existing and new polyimides by this method offers an opportunity to greatly improve existing polymer properties without altering current synthetic or processing procedures.

  13. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiena, C.; Coviello, V.; Arattano, M.; Chiarle, M.; Morra di Cella, U.; Pirulli, M.; Pogliotti, P.; Scavia, C.

    2012-07-01

    The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps). In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007-2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs. In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence. The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  14. High temperature stability of a 316 austenitic stainless steel coated with cerium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Del Angel, Humberto

    Cerium oxide (CeO2-x) nanoparticles were used for coating protection on a 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel (Aust. SS) to enhance the thermal stability of the oxide films formed at high temperatures. Three simple coating methods were used, dipping, spraying and spinning in order to explore the coating film morphology, nanoparticle distribution and its effect on thermal stability of the steel substrates. Experimentally, the selected steel was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. The cerium oxide nanoparticles used on the three methods were synthesized in the laboratory obtaining nanoparticles in the range of 3.5 to 6.2 nanometers. It was found that cerium oxide particle size is affected by temperature. In this case, the activation energy for particle growth was estimated to be around 21,1 kJ/mol. Characterization of the film morphologies before and after oxidation were carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Surface Profilometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). A comparison of the three coating methods was carried out for the particular case of the 316 Aust. SS coupons. In addition, the oxidation kinetics was experimentally investigated for the coated samples. For this purpose thermal gravimetric determinations were made at 800°C, 900°C, and 1000°C and oxidation rate constants were calculated at each temperature.

  15. Improved stability of TMS derivatives for the robust quantification of plant polar metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Quéro, Anthony; Jousse, Cyril; Lequart-Pillon, Michelle; Gontier, Eric; Guillot, Xavier; Courtois, Bernard; Courtois, Josiane; Pau-Roblot, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Plant metabolite profiling is commonly carried out by GC-MS of methoximated trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. This technique is robust and enables a library search for spectra produced by electron ionization. However, recent articles have described problems associated with the low stability of some TMS derivatives. This limits the use of GC-MS for metabolomic studies that need large sets of qualitative and quantitative analyses. The aim of this work is to determine the experimental conditions in which the stability of TMS derivatives could be improved. This would facilitate the analysis of the large-scale experimental designs needed in the metabolomics approach. For good repeatability, the sampling conditions and the storage temperature of samples during analysis were investigated. Multiple injections of one sample from one vial led to high variations while injection of one sample from different vials improved the analysis. However, before injection, some amino acid TMS derivatives were degraded during the storage of vials in the autosampler. Only 10% of the initial quantity of glutamine 3 TMS and glutamate 3 TMS and 66% of α-alanine 2 TMS was detected 48 h after derivatization. When stored at 4 °C until injection, all TMS derivatives remained stable for 12 h; at -20 °C, they remained stable for 72 h. From the integration of all these results, a detailed analytical procedure is thus proposed. It enables a robust quantification of polar metabolites, useful for further plant metabolomics studies using GC-MS.

  16. Improving thermal and detergent stability of Bacillus stearothermophilus neopullulanase by rational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Ece, Selin; Evran, Serap; Janda, Jan-Oliver; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-06-01

    Neopullulanase, a glycosyl hydrolase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (bsNpl), is a potentially valuable enzyme for starch and detergent industries. However, as the protein is not active at elevated temperatures and high surfactant concentrations, we aimed to increase its stability by rational enzyme design. Nine potentially destabilizing cavities were identified in the crystal structure of the enzyme. Based on computational predictions, these cavities were filled by residues with bulkier side chains. The five Asp46Glu, Val239Leu, Val404Leu, Ser407Thr and Ala566Leu exchanges resulted in a drastic stabilization of bsNpl against inactivation by heat and detergents. The catalytic activity of the variants was identical to the wild-type enzyme.

  17. Effect of Sn implantation on thermal stability improvement of NiSiGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Meng, X.; Ping, Y.; Yu, W.; Xue, Z.; Wei, X.; Di, Z.; Zhang, M.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    We study the formation of nickel-germanosilicide (NiSiGe) on Sn ion pre-implanted Si0.8Ge0.2 layers. The Sn influences on NiSiGe morphology and sheet resistance are investigated at different annealing temperature. The NiSiGe films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), cross-section transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) techniques. It is shown that the presence of Sn atoms increases the thermal stability of NiSiGe about 150 °C. We demonstrate that the Sn atoms retard the Ni germanosilicidation rate, stabilize the NiSiGe phase, and smooth the NiSiGe/SiGe interface.

  18. Improving thermal and detergent stability of Bacillus stearothermophilus neopullulanase by rational enzyme design.

    PubMed

    Ece, Selin; Evran, Serap; Janda, Jan-Oliver; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2015-06-01

    Neopullulanase, a glycosyl hydrolase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (bsNpl), is a potentially valuable enzyme for starch and detergent industries. However, as the protein is not active at elevated temperatures and high surfactant concentrations, we aimed to increase its stability by rational enzyme design. Nine potentially destabilizing cavities were identified in the crystal structure of the enzyme. Based on computational predictions, these cavities were filled by residues with bulkier side chains. The five Asp46Glu, Val239Leu, Val404Leu, Ser407Thr and Ala566Leu exchanges resulted in a drastic stabilization of bsNpl against inactivation by heat and detergents. The catalytic activity of the variants was identical to the wild-type enzyme. PMID:25680359

  19. Improved performance and stability in quantum dot solar cells through band alignment engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chia-Hao M.; Brown, Patrick R.; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2014-08-01

    Solution processing is a promising route for the realization of low-cost, large-area, flexible and lightweight photovoltaic devices with short energy payback time and high specific power. However, solar cells based on solution-processed organic, inorganic and hybrid materials reported thus far generally suffer from poor air stability, require an inert-atmosphere processing environment or necessitate high-temperature processing, all of which increase manufacturing complexities and costs. Simultaneously fulfilling the goals of high efficiency, low-temperature fabrication conditions and good atmospheric stability remains a major technical challenge, which may be addressed, as we demonstrate here, with the development of room-temperature solution-processed ZnO/PbS quantum dot solar cells. By engineering the band alignment of the quantum dot layers through the use of different ligand treatments, a certified efficiency of 8.55% has been reached. Furthermore, the performance of unencapsulated devices remains unchanged for over 150 days of storage in air. This material system introduces a new approach towards the goal of high-performance air-stable solar cells compatible with simple solution processes and deposition on flexible substrates.

  20. Improved performance and stability in quantum dot solar cells through band alignment engineering.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chia-Hao M; Brown, Patrick R; Bulović, Vladimir; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2014-08-01

    Solution processing is a promising route for the realization of low-cost, large-area, flexible and lightweight photovoltaic devices with short energy payback time and high specific power. However, solar cells based on solution-processed organic, inorganic and hybrid materials reported thus far generally suffer from poor air stability, require an inert-atmosphere processing environment or necessitate high-temperature processing, all of which increase manufacturing complexities and costs. Simultaneously fulfilling the goals of high efficiency, low-temperature fabrication conditions and good atmospheric stability remains a major technical challenge, which may be addressed, as we demonstrate here, with the development of room-temperature solution-processed ZnO/PbS quantum dot solar cells. By engineering the band alignment of the quantum dot layers through the use of different ligand treatments, a certified efficiency of 8.55% has been reached. Furthermore, the performance of unencapsulated devices remains unchanged for over 150 days of storage in air. This material system introduces a new approach towards the goal of high-performance air-stable solar cells compatible with simple solution processes and deposition on flexible substrates.

  1. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  2. Cosolvent and Crowding Effects on the Temperature and Pressure Dependent Conformational Dynamics and Stability of Globular Actin.

    PubMed

    Schummel, Paul Hendrik; Haag, Andreas; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert; Winter, Roland

    2016-07-14

    Actin can be found in nearly all eukaryotic cells and is responsible for many different cellular functions. The polymerization process of actin has been found to be among the most pressure sensitive processes in vivo. In this study, we explored the effects of chaotropic and kosmotropic cosolvents, such as urea and the compatible osmolyte trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), and, to mimic a more cell-like environment, crowding agents on the pressure and temperature stability of globular actin (G-actin). The temperature and pressure of unfolding as well as thermodynamic parameters upon unfolding, such as enthalpy and volume changes, have been determined by fluorescence spectroscopy over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, ranging from 10 to 80 °C and from 1 to 3000 bar, respectively. Complementary high-pressure NMR studies revealed additional information on the existence of native-like conformational substates of G-actin as well as a molten-globule-like state preceding the complete pressure denaturation. Different from the chaotropic agent urea, TMAO increases both the temperature and pressure stability for the protein most effectively. The Gibbs free energy differences of most of the native substates detected are not influenced significantly by TMAO. In mixtures of these osmolytes, urea counteracts the stabilizing effect of TMAO to some extent. Addition of the crowding agent Ficoll increases the temperature and pressure stability even further, thereby allowing sufficient stability of the protein at temperature and pressure conditions encountered under extreme environmental conditions on Earth. PMID:27314563

  3. Icosahedral AlCuFe quasicrystal at high pressure and temperature and its implications for the stability of icosahedrite.

    PubMed

    Stagno, Vincenzo; Bindi, Luca; Shibazaki, Yuki; Tange, Yoshinori; Higo, Yuji; Mao, H-K; Steinhardt, Paul J; Fei, Yingwei

    2014-01-01

    The first natural-occurring quasicrystal, icosahedrite, was recently discovered in the Khatyrka meteorite, a new CV3 carbonaceous chondrite. Its finding raised fundamental questions regarding the effects of pressure and temperature on the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the quasicrystal structure relative to possible isochemical crystalline or amorphous phases. Although several studies showed the stability at ambient temperature of synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe up to ~35 GPa, the simultaneous effect of temperature and pressure relevant for the formation of icosahedrite has been never investigated so far. Here we present in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on synthetic icosahedral AlCuFe using multianvil device to explore possible temperature-induced phase transformations at pressures of 5 GPa and temperature up to 1773 K. Results show the structural stability of i-AlCuFe phase with a negligible effect of pressure on the volumetric thermal expansion properties. In addition, the structural analysis of the recovered sample excludes the transformation of AlCuFe quasicrystalline phase to possible approximant phases, which is in contrast with previous predictions at ambient pressure. Results from this study extend our knowledge on the stability of icosahedral AlCuFe at higher temperature and pressure than previously examined, and provide a new constraint on the stability of icosahedrite. PMID:25070248

  4. Improving stability of a novel dextran-degrading enzyme from marine Arthrobacter oxydans KQ11.

    PubMed

    Wang, Delong; Lu, Mingsheng; Wang, Xiaobei; Jiao, Yuliang; Fang, Yaowei; Liu, Zhaopu; Wang, Shujun

    2014-03-15

    Dextranases can hydrolyze dextran, so they are used in the sugar industry to mitigate the milling problems associated with dextran contamination. Few studies have been carried out on the storage stability of dextranase, let alone the dextranase of Arthrobacter oxydans KQ11 isolated from sea mud samples. This study improved the storage stability of dextranase from marine A. oxydans KQ11 by adding enzymatic protective reagents (stabilizer and antiseptic). Initially, the conditions (55 °C and 30 min) for maintaining 50% dextranase activity were obtained. Then, the best stabilizers of dextranase were obtained, namely, glycerol (16%), sodium acetate (18%) and sodium citrate (20%). Results showed that p-hydroxybenzoic acid compound sodium acetate (0.05%), D-sodium isoascorbiate (0.03%), and potassium sorbate (0.05%) were the best antiseptics. Subsequent validation experiment showed that dextranase with enzymatic protective reagents maintained 70.8% and 28.96% activities at the 13th week at 25 and 37 °C, respectively. PMID:24528732

  5. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-07-13

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  6. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2–10 nmkPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cmH2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k=10.7 pmK, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  7. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes. PMID:26184331

  8. The effects of time, temperature, and pH on the stability of PDU bacterial microcompartments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are subcellular organelles that are composed of a protein shell and encapsulated metabolic enzymes. It has been suggested that MCPs can be engineered to encapsulate protein cargo for use as in vivo nanobioreactors or carriers for drug delivery. Understanding the stability of the MCP shell is critical for such applications. Here, we investigate the integrity of the propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP shell of Salmonella enterica over time, in buffers with various pH, and at elevated temperatures. The results show that MCPs are remarkably stable. When stored at 4°C or at room temperature, Pdu MCPs retain their structure for several days, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, Pdu MCPs can tolerate temperatures up to 60°C without apparent structural degradation. MCPs are, however, sensitive to pH and require conditions between pH 6 and pH 10. In nonoptimal conditions, MCPs form aggregates. However, within the aggregated protein mass, MCPs often retain their polyhedral outlines. These results show that MCPs are highly robust, making them suitable for a wide range of applications. PMID:25053115

  9. Weldability, strength, and high temperature stability of chemically vapor deposited tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Three types of CVD tungsten (fluoride-produced, chloride-produced and the combination of the two which is termed duplex) were evaluated to determine their weldability, high temperature strength and structural stability during 5000 hour exposure to temperatures of 1540 C and 1700 C. Each type of CVD tungsten could be successfully electron beam welded but the results for the chloride product were not as satisfactory as those of the other two materials. The high temperature strength behavior of the three materials did not differ greatly. However a large difference was noted for the grain growth behavior of the two basic CVD tungsten materials. Fluoride tungsten was found to be relatively stable while for the most part the grain size of chloride tungsten increased appreciably. The examination of freshly fractured surfaces with a scanning electron microscope revealed numerous bubbles in the fluoride material following its exposure to 1700 C for 5000 hours. Less severe thermal treatments produced relatively few bubbles in this material. Only at certain locations within the chloride material associated with the interruption of tungsten were bubbles noted.

  10. Pronounced multiferroicity in oleic acid stabilized BiFeO3 nanocrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Dabbugalla; Mandal, Swapan K; Mahato, Bipul K; Rana, Bivas; Barman, Anjan

    2013-06-01

    We report on the experimental observation of pronounced multiferroicity in BiFeO3 nanocrystals (size approximately 40 nm) at room temperature. Large scale BiFeO3 nanocrystals are synthesized using a low temperature chemical route and further stabilized with oleic acid. The nanocrystals exhibit a significant distortion in lattice parameter c compared to the bulk. Oleic acid plays an important role in reducing oxygen vacancies and Fe2+ ions at the nanocrystal surface giving rise to a high resistivity (approximately 10(10) omega-cm at 300 K) of the sample. The direct band gap of nanocrystals is measured to be approximately 4.2 eV (about 1.5 times the bulk value) suggesting a strong quantum confinement effect. The nanocrystals show a remarkably high spontaneous saturation magnetization approximately 4.39 emu/g along with a prominent ferroelectric hysteresis loop at room temperature. Particle size effect leading to the appearance of large number of uncompensated spins and suppression of modulated spin structure have resulted a strong spontaneous magnetization in such nanoscale multiferroic materials. PMID:23862453

  11. Temperature-dependent stability of stacking faults in Al, Cu and Ni: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhogra, Meha; Ramamurty, U; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2014-09-24

    We present comparative analysis of microscopic mechanisms relevant to plastic deformation of the face-centered cubic (FCC) metals Al, Cu, and Ni, through determination of the temperature-dependent free energies of intrinsic and unstable stacking faults along [1 1̄ 0] and [1 2̄ 1] on the (1 1 1) plane using first-principles density-functional-theory-based calculations. We show that vibrational contribution results in significant decrease in the free energy of barriers and intrinsic stacking faults (ISFs) of Al, Cu, and Ni with temperature, confirming an important role of thermal fluctuations in the stability of stacking faults (SFs) and deformation at elevated temperatures. In contrast to Al and Ni, the vibrational spectrum of the unstable stacking fault (USF[1 2̄ 1]) in Cu reveals structural instabilities, indicating that the energy barrier (γusf) along the (1 1 1)[1 2̄ 1] slip system in Cu, determined by typical first-principles calculations, is an overestimate, and its commonly used interpretation as the energy release rate needed for dislocation nucleation, as proposed by Rice (1992 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 40 239), should be taken with caution. PMID:25185834

  12. Chain and conformation stability of solid-state DNA: implications for room temperature storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Jacques; Colotte, Marthe; Coudy, Delphine; Couallier, Vincent; Portier, Joseph; Morin, Bénédicte; Tuffet, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    There is currently wide interest in room temperature storage of dehydrated DNA. However, there is insufficient knowledge about its chemical and structural stability. Here, we show that solid-state DNA degradation is greatly affected by atmospheric water and oxygen at room temperature. In these conditions DNA can even be lost by aggregation. These are major concerns since laboratory plastic ware is not airtight. Chain-breaking rates measured between 70°C and 140°C seemed to follow Arrhenius’ law. Extrapolation to 25°C gave a degradation rate of about 1–40 cuts/105 nucleotides/century. However, these figures are to be taken as very tentative since they depend on the validity of the extrapolation and the positive or negative effect of contaminants, buffers or additives. Regarding the secondary structure, denaturation experiments showed that DNA secondary structure could be preserved or fully restored upon rehydration, except possibly for small fragments. Indeed, below about 500 bp, DNA fragments underwent a very slow evolution (almost suppressed in the presence of trehalose) which could end in an irreversible denaturation. Thus, this work validates using room temperature for storage of DNA if completely protected from water and oxygen. PMID:19969539

  13. Chain and conformation stability of solid-state DNA: implications for room temperature storage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Jacques; Colotte, Marthe; Coudy, Delphine; Couallier, Vincent; Portier, Joseph; Morin, Bénédicte; Tuffet, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    There is currently wide interest in room temperature storage of dehydrated DNA. However, there is insufficient knowledge about its chemical and structural stability. Here, we show that solid-state DNA degradation is greatly affected by atmospheric water and oxygen at room temperature. In these conditions DNA can even be lost by aggregation. These are major concerns since laboratory plastic ware is not airtight. Chain-breaking rates measured between 70 degrees C and 140 degrees C seemed to follow Arrhenius' law. Extrapolation to 25 degrees C gave a degradation rate of about 1-40 cuts/10(5) nucleotides/century. However, these figures are to be taken as very tentative since they depend on the validity of the extrapolation and the positive or negative effect of contaminants, buffers or additives. Regarding the secondary structure, denaturation experiments showed that DNA secondary structure could be preserved or fully restored upon rehydration, except possibly for small fragments. Indeed, below about 500 bp, DNA fragments underwent a very slow evolution (almost suppressed in the presence of trehalose) which could end in an irreversible denaturation. Thus, this work validates using room temperature for storage of DNA if completely protected from water and oxygen. PMID:19969539

  14. Evaluation of non-volatile metabolites in beer stored at high temperature and utility as an accelerated method to predict flavour stability.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Sedin, Dana; Holbrook, Christian; Barr, Lindsay; Kirkpatrick, Kaylyn; Prenni, Jessica E

    2016-06-01

    Flavour stability is vital to the brewing industry as beer is often stored for an extended time under variable conditions. Developing an accelerated model to evaluate brewing techniques that affect flavour stability is an important area of research. Here, we performed metabolomics on non-volatile compounds in beer stored at 37 °C between 1 and 14 days for two beer types: an amber ale and an India pale ale. The experiment determined high temperature to influence non-volatile metabolites, including the purine 5-methylthioadenosine (5-MTA). In a second experiment, three brewing techniques were evaluated for improved flavour stability: use of antioxidant crowns, chelation of pro-oxidants, and varying plant content in hops. Sensory analysis determined the hop method was associated with improved flavour stability, and this was consistent with reduced 5-MTA at both regular and high temperature storage. Future studies are warranted to understand the influence of 5-MTA on flavour and aging within different beer types. PMID:26830592

  15. Evaluation of non-volatile metabolites in beer stored at high temperature and utility as an accelerated method to predict flavour stability.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Adam L; Broeckling, Corey D; Sedin, Dana; Holbrook, Christian; Barr, Lindsay; Kirkpatrick, Kaylyn; Prenni, Jessica E

    2016-06-01

    Flavour stability is vital to the brewing industry as beer is often stored for an extended time under variable conditions. Developing an accelerated model to evaluate brewing techniques that affect flavour stability is an important area of research. Here, we performed metabolomics on non-volatile compounds in beer stored at 37 °C between 1 and 14 days for two beer types: an amber ale and an India pale ale. The experiment determined high temperature to influence non-volatile metabolites, including the purine 5-methylthioadenosine (5-MTA). In a second experiment, three brewing techniques were evaluated for improved flavour stability: use of antioxidant crowns, chelation of pro-oxidants, and varying plant content in hops. Sensory analysis determined the hop method was associated with improved flavour stability, and this was consistent with reduced 5-MTA at both regular and high temperature storage. Future studies are warranted to understand the influence of 5-MTA on flavour and aging within different beer types.

  16. Nanoindentation study of irradiation and temperature effects in yttria-stabilized zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurpaska, L.; Jagielski, J.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the detailed evaluation of nanomechanical properties in terms of hardness and Young's modulus of irradiated polycrystalline YSZ pellets were studied using the nanoindentation technique. The samples were irradiated at room temperature with 150 keV Ar-ions to a fluences of 1 × 1014 and 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 (i.e. before bubble formation), which correspond to a peak damage of 0.12 and 1.2 dpa respectively. Substantial improvement of mechanical properties related to the creation of both radiation defects and residual stress in the implanted surface layer were observed. Additionally, in-situ high temperature nanomechanical investigation of pristine YSZ pellet was conducted. A significant decrease of nanomechanical properties was observed with increasing temperature.

  17. Improvement of stability and efficiency of combustion for low rank anthracite

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.; Qiu, J.; Zhang, Z.; Li, F.; Sun, X.

    1994-12-31

    A new kind of burner, bluff-body with cavity burner, which is based on the bluff-body burner is developed in this paper. The three dimension mean velocity and turbulent characteristics have been measured in the burner`s recirculation zone by using three dimension laser dynamics analysis. For a low rank anthracite, combustion test shows this burner is better than bluff-body in ignition and flame stability. 50 MW(220T/H) boiler operation show that the temperature in the flame zone is high, combustion is very stable and the efficiency is increased when this burner is used.

  18. Improving the phase stability of the SLAC rf driveline network for SLC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, J.N.; Hogg, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    Successful operation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will require greater phase stability from the two-mile long rf drive network than previous linac operation did. This paper discusses four proposed modifications of the present system that should help achieve the general objective to reduce all long term temperature and atmospheric pressure induced phase variations to less than 20/sup 0/ at 2856 MHz, so that the phase/amplitude detector subsystems, which will control the network output phases relative to a beam reference, will operate within their most accurate ranges.

  19. Bioceramic fabrics improve quiet standing posture and handstand stability in expert gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Cian, C; Gianocca, V; Barraud, P A; Guerraz, M; Bresciani, J P

    2015-10-01

    Bioceramic fabrics have been claimed to improve blood circulation, thermoregulation and muscle relaxation, thereby also improving muscular activity. Here we tested whether bioceramic fabrics have an effect on postural control and contribute to improve postural stability. In Experiment 1, we tested whether bioceramic fabrics contribute to reduce body-sway when maintaining standard standing posture. In Experiment 2, we measured the effect of bioceramic fabrics on body-sway when maintaining a more instable posture, namely a handstand hold. For both experiments, postural oscillations were measured using a force platform with four strain gauges that recorded the displacements of the center of pressure (CoP) in the horizontal plane. In half of the trials, the participants wore a full-body second skin suit containing a bioceramic layer. In the other half of the trials, they wore a 'placebo' second skin suit that had the same cut, appearance and elasticity as the bioceramic suit but did not contain the bioceramic layer. In both experiments, the surface of displacement of the CoP was significantly smaller when participants were wearing the bioceramic suit than when they were wearing the placebo suit. The results suggest that bioceramic fabrics do have an effect on postural control and improve postural stability. PMID:26234473

  20. Isoprene improves photochemical efficiency and enhances heat dissipation in plants at physiological temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Susanna; Tsonev, Tsonko; Loreto, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Isoprene-emitting plants are better protected against thermal and oxidative stresses. Isoprene may strengthen membranes avoiding their denaturation and may quench reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, achieving a similar protective effect. The physiological role of isoprene in unstressed plants, up to now, is not understood. It is shown here, by monitoring the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence of leaves with chemically or genetically altered isoprene biosynthesis, that chloroplasts of isoprene-emitting leaves dissipate less energy as heat than chloroplasts of non-emitting leaves, when exposed to physiologically high temperatures (28-37 °C) that do not impair the photosynthetic apparatus. The effect was especially remarkable at foliar temperatures between 30 °C and 35 °C, at which isoprene emission is maximized and NPQ is quenched by about 20%. Isoprene may also allow better stability of photosynthetic membranes and a more efficient electron transfer through PSII at physiological temperatures, explaining most of the NPQ reduction and the slightly higher photochemical quenching that was also observed in isoprene-emitting leaves. The possibility that isoprene emission helps in removing thermal energy at the thylakoid level is also put forward, although such an effect was calculated to be minimal. These experiments expand current evidence that isoprene is an important trait against thermal and oxidative stresses and also explains why plants invest resources in isoprene under unstressed conditions. By improving PSII efficiency and reducing the need for heat dissipation in photosynthetic membranes, isoprene emitters are best fitted to physiologically high temperatures and will have an evolutionary advantage when adapting to a warming climate. PMID:24676032

  1. Improving the Accuracy of Satellite Sea Surface Temperature Measurements by Explicitly Accounting for the Bulk-Skin Temperature Difference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Sandra L.; Emery, William J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this research was to determine whether the accuracy of satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) could be improved by explicitly accounting for the complex temperature gradients at the surface of the ocean associated with the cool skin and diurnal warm layers. To achieve this goal, work centered on the development and deployment of low-cost infrared radiometers to enable the direct validation of satellite measurements of skin temperature. During this one year grant, design and construction of an improved infrared radiometer was completed and testing was initiated. In addition, development of an improved parametric model for the bulk-skin temperature difference was completed using data from the previous version of the radiometer. This model will comprise a key component of an improved procedure for estimating the bulk SST from satellites. The results comprised a significant portion of the Ph.D. thesis completed by one graduate student and they are currently being converted into a journal publication.

  2. Eugenol improves physical and chemical stabilities of nanoemulsions loaded with β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongguang; Wu, Jine; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-03-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are potential vehicles of labile lipophilic compounds such as β-carotene, but much work is needed to improve physical and chemical stabilities. The objective of this work was to study impacts of eugenol on physical and chemical stabilities of β-carotene-loaded nanoemulsions prepared with whey protein and lecithin. The combination of whey protein and lecithin resulted in stable nanoemulsions with eugenol added at 10% mass of soybean oil. Nanoemulsions, especially with eugenol, drastically reduced the degradation of β-carotene during ambient storage, heating at 60 and 80°C, and UV radiation at 254, 302, and 365nm. The droplet diameter of the nanoemulsion without eugenol increased from 153.6 to 227.3nm after 30-day ambient storage, contrasting with no significant changes of nanoemulsions with eugenol. Heating or UV radiation up to 8h did not significantly change the droplet diameter. Therefore, eugenol can be used to improve the stability of nanoemulsion delivery systems. PMID:26471619

  3. Eugenol improves physical and chemical stabilities of nanoemulsions loaded with β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yongguang; Wu, Jine; Zhong, Qixin

    2016-03-01

    Food-grade nanoemulsions are potential vehicles of labile lipophilic compounds such as β-carotene, but much work is needed to improve physical and chemical stabilities. The objective of this work was to study impacts of eugenol on physical and chemical stabilities of β-carotene-loaded nanoemulsions prepared with whey protein and lecithin. The combination of whey protein and lecithin resulted in stable nanoemulsions with eugenol added at 10% mass of soybean oil. Nanoemulsions, especially with eugenol, drastically reduced the degradation of β-carotene during ambient storage, heating at 60 and 80°C, and UV radiation at 254, 302, and 365nm. The droplet diameter of the nanoemulsion without eugenol increased from 153.6 to 227.3nm after 30-day ambient storage, contrasting with no significant changes of nanoemulsions with eugenol. Heating or UV radiation up to 8h did not significantly change the droplet diameter. Therefore, eugenol can be used to improve the stability of nanoemulsion delivery systems.

  4. Significant improvement of thermal stability for CeZrPrNd oxides simply by supercritical CO(2) drying.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunzhao; Wang, Zizi; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yingxia

    2014-01-01

    Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN) were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO(2) drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd) is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO(2) drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface.

  5. Significant Improvement of Thermal Stability for CeZrPrNd Oxides Simply by Supercritical CO2 Drying

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunzhao; Wang, Zizi; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yingxia

    2014-01-01

    Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN) were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO2 drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd) is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO2 drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface. PMID:24516618

  6. Significant improvement of thermal stability for CeZrPrNd oxides simply by supercritical CO(2) drying.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yunzhao; Wang, Zizi; Xin, Ying; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yingxia

    2014-01-01

    Pr and Nd co-doped Ce-Zr oxide solid solutions (CZPN) were prepared using co-precipitation and microemulsion methods. It is found that only using supercritical CO(2) drying can result in a significant improvement of specific surface area and oxygen storage capacity at lower temperatures for CZPN after aging at 1000°C for 12 h in comparison with those using conventional air drying and even supercritical ethanol drying. Furthermore, the cubic structure was obtained in spite of the fact that the atomic ratio of Ce/(Ce+Zr+Pr+Nd) is as low as 29%. The high thermal stability can be attributed to the loosely aggregated morphology and the resultant Ce enrichment on the nanoparticle surface, which are caused by supercritical CO(2) drying due to the elimination of surface tension effects on the gas-liquid interface. PMID:24516618

  7. Stabilized Alumina/Ethanol Colloidal Dispersion for Seeding High Temperature Air Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Judith H.; Wernet, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Seeding air flows with particles to enable measurements of gas velocities via laser anemometry and/or particle image velocimetry techniques can be quite exasperating. The seeding requirements are compounded when high temperature environments are encountered and special care must be used in selecting a refractory seed material. The pH stabilization techniques commonly employed in ceramic processing are used to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. The technique is not limited to alumina/ethanol and is also demonstrated with an alumina/H2O system. Other ceramic powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(sub pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined.

  8. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  9. Effect of surfactant on temperature stability of solid lipid nanoparticles studied by dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sacheen; Kaur, Jaspreet

    2013-06-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles are new paradigm of drug delivery system of water insoluble active pharmaceutical ingredient. Paliperidone, an antipsychotic used in treatment of schizophrenia is a water insoluble molecule with low bioavailability was studied. Macrogol glyceride surfactant, bile salt based surfactant and sodium dodecyl sulphate were used to stabilize the solid lipid as dispersed nanoparticles form by adsorbing on the surface of the nanoparticles. Anionic surfactants bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate were found to stabilize forming a monomolecular layer of surfactants on the surface of nanoparticles; whereas macrogol glyceride based surfactant have intrusion in the matrix of lipid nanoparticles. So intrusion of macrogol glyceride in matrix was observed by studying the change in size of nanoparticles with respect to temperature with the help of dynamic light scattering. In case of macrogol glyceride size decrease start form 50°C, for bile salt and sodium dodecyl sulphate size deacrease start at 60°C. So that structural disturbance of nanoparticles by the macrogol glyceride on the surface was found maximum as compared to anionic surfactant.

  10. Migration-induced field-stabilized polar phase in strontium titanate single crystals at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzig, Juliane; Zschornak, Matthias; Hanzig, Florian; Mehner, Erik; Stöcker, Hartmut; Abendroth, Barbara; Röder, Christian; Talkenberger, Andreas; Schreiber, Gerhard; Rafaja, David; Gemming, Sibylle; Meyer, Dirk C.

    2013-07-01

    Local reversible structural changes in SrTiO3 single crystals in an external electric field are induced by oxygen redistribution. We present in situ x-ray diffraction measurements during and immediately after electroformation. Several reflections are monitored and show an elongation of the cubic unit cell of strontium titanate. Raman investigations verify that the expansion of the unit cell involves a transition from the centrosymmetric to a lower symmetry phase. During a complete formation cycle, including the hold time of the electric field and relaxation time without field, two different dynamics are observed for the reversible transitions from cubic symmetry to tetragonal distortion: a slow one during the increase of the lattice constant in field direction and a fast one after switching off the electric field. Based on the experimental data, we propose the formation of a polar strontium titanate unit cell at room temperature stabilized by the electric field, which is referred to as migration-induced field-stabilized polar phase.

  11. Mesoporous aluminosilicates with ordered hexagonal structure, strong acidity, and extraordinary hydrothermal stability at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Han, Y; Xiao, F S; Qiu, S; Zhu, L; Wang, R; Yu, Y; Zhang, Z; Zou, B; Wang, Y; Sun, H; Zhao, D; Wei, Y

    2001-05-30

    Highly ordered hexagonal mesoporous aluminosilicates (MAS-5) with uniform pore sizes have been successfully synthesized from assembly of preformed aluminosilcate precursors with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant. The aluminosilicate precursors were obtained by heating, at 100--140 degrees C for 2--10 h, aluminasilica gels at the Al(2)O(3)/SiO(2)/TEAOH/H(2)O molar ratios of 1.0/7.0--350/10.0--33.0/500--2000. Mesoporous MAS-5 shows extraordinary stability both in boiling water (over 300 h) and in steam (800 degrees C for 2 h). Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia shows that the acidic strength of MAS-5 is much higher than that of MCM-41 and is comparable to that of microporous Beta zeolite. In catalytic cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene and alkylation of isobutane with butene, MAS-5 exhibits greater catalytic activity and selectivity, as compared with MCM-41 and HZSM-5. The MAS-5 samples were characterized with infrared, UV--Raman, and NMR spectroscopy and numerous other techniques. The results suggest that MAS-5 consists of both mesopores and micropores and that the pore walls of MAS-5 contain primary and secondary structural building units, similar to those of microporous zeolites. Such unique structural features might be responsible for the observed strong acidity and high thermal stability of the mesoporous aluminosilicates with well-ordered hexagonal symmetry.

  12. Effects of sodium benzoate on storage stability of previously improved beverage from tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.).

    PubMed

    Adeola, Abiodun A; Aworh, Ogugua C

    2014-01-01

    The effect of sodium benzoate on the quality attributes of improved tamarind beverage during storage was investigated. Tamarind beverages were produced according to a previously reported improved method, with or without chemical preservatives (100 mg/100 mL sodium benzoate). Tamarind beverage produced according to traditional processing method served as the control. The tamarind beverages were stored for 4 months at room (29 ± 2°C) and refrigerated (4-10°C) temperatures. Samples were analyzed, at regular intervals, for chemical, sensory, and microbiological qualities. Appearance of coliforms or overall acceptability score of 5.9 was used as deterioration index. The control beverages deteriorated by 2nd and 10th days at room and refrigerated temperatures, respectively. Improved tamarind beverage produced without the inclusion of sodium benzoate was stable for 3 and 5 weeks at room and refrigerated temperatures, respectively. Sodium benzoate extended the shelf life of the improved tamarind beverage to 6 and 13 weeks, respectively, at room and refrigerated temperatures.

  13. Improvement in medium long-term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cheng, Huadong; Meng, Yanling; Wan, Jinyin; Xiao, Ling; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2016-07-01

    The medium-long term frequency stability of the integrating sphere cold atom clock was improved.During the clock operation, Rb atoms were cooled and manipulated using cooling light diffusely reflected by the inner surface of a microwave cavity in the clock. This light heated the cavity and caused a frequency drift from the resonant frequency of the cavity. Power fluctuations of the cooling light led to atomic density variations in the cavity's central area, which increased the clock frequency instability through a cavity pulling effect. We overcame these limitations with appropriate solutions. A frequency stability of 3.5E-15 was achieved when the integrating time ? increased to 2E4 s.

  14. Improving Heterogeneous Catalyst Stability for Liquid-phase Biomass Conversion and Reforming.

    PubMed

    Héroguel, Florent; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Luterbacher, Jeremy S

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a possible renewable alternative to fossil carbon sources. Today, many bio-resources can be converted to direct substitutes or suitable alternatives to fossil-based fuels and chemicals. However, catalyst deactivation under the harsh, often liquid-phase reaction conditions required for biomass treatment is a major obstacle to developing processes that can compete with the petrochemical industry. This review presents recently developed strategies to limit reversible and irreversible catalyst deactivation such as metal sintering and leaching, metal poisoning and support collapse. Methods aiming to increase catalyst lifetime include passivation of low-stability atoms by overcoating, creation of microenvironments hostile to poisons, improvement of metal stability, or reduction of deactivation by process engineering. PMID:26598401

  15. Improving positive and negative bias illumination stress stability in parylene passivated IGZO transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiazadeh, Asal; Gomes, Henrique L.; Barquinha, Pedro; Martins, Jorge; Rovisco, Ana; Pinto, Joana V.; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-08-01

    The impact of a parylene top-coating layer on the illumination and bias stress instabilities of indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) is presented and discussed. The parylene coating substantially reduces the threshold voltage shift caused by continuous application of a gate bias and light exposure. The operational stability improves by 75%, and the light induced instability is reduced by 35%. The operational stability is quantified by fitting the threshold voltage shift with a stretched exponential model. Storage time as long as 7 months does not cause any measurable degradation on the electrical performance. It is proposed that parylene plays not only the role of an encapsulation layer but also of a defect passivation on the top semiconductor surface. It is also reported that depletion-mode TFTs are less sensitive to light induced instabilities. This is attributed to a defect neutralization process in the presence of free electrons.

  16. Improved multiple-shot gun for use as a combustion stability rating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop and experimentally evaluate an improved version of a modified machine gun for use as a device for rating the relative combustion stability of various rocket combustors. Following the results of a previous study involving a caliber .30 machine gun, a caliber .50 machine gun was modified in order to extend the charge-size range of the device. Nitrocellulose charge sizes ranging from 1.004 to 9.720 grams were fired at rates up to four shots per second. Shock pressures up to 25,512 kN/sq m were measured near the end of a shortened gun barrel. A minimal resistance type of check valve permitted the gun to fire into pressurized regions; back pressures up to 3448 kN/sq m abs were tested. The final modified assembly was evaluated during combustion stability tests on rocket combustors burning a FLOX-methane propellant combination.

  17. Dielectric Coating Thermal Stabilization During GaAs-Based Laser Fabrication for Improved Device Yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Michael K.; Millsapp, Jamal E.; Turner, George W.

    2016-06-01

    The quality and yield of GaAs-based ridge waveguide devices fabricated at MIT Lincoln Laboratory were negatively impacted by the random lot-to-lot appearance of blisters in the front-side contact metal. The blisters signaled compromised adhesion between the front-side contact metal, underlying SiO2 dielectric coating, and semiconductor surface. A thermal-anneal procedure developed for the fabrication of GaAs slab coupled optical waveguide (SCOW) ridge waveguide devices stabilizes the SiO2 dielectric coating by means of outgassing and stress reduction. This process eliminates a primary source of adhesion loss, as well as blister generation, and thereby significantly improves device yield. Stoney's equation was used to analyze stress-induced bow in device wafers fabricated using this stabilization procedure. This analysis suggests that changes in wafer bow contribute to the incidence of metal blisters in SCOW devices.

  18. Improving Heterogeneous Catalyst Stability for Liquid-phase Biomass Conversion and Reforming.

    PubMed

    Héroguel, Florent; Rozmysłowicz, Bartosz; Luterbacher, Jeremy S

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a possible renewable alternative to fossil carbon sources. Today, many bio-resources can be converted to direct substitutes or suitable alternatives to fossil-based fuels and chemicals. However, catalyst deactivation under the harsh, often liquid-phase reaction conditions required for biomass treatment is a major obstacle to developing processes that can compete with the petrochemical industry. This review presents recently developed strategies to limit reversible and irreversible catalyst deactivation such as metal sintering and leaching, metal poisoning and support collapse. Methods aiming to increase catalyst lifetime include passivation of low-stability atoms by overcoating, creation of microenvironments hostile to poisons, improvement of metal stability, or reduction of deactivation by process engineering.

  19. Phosphorus-assisted biomass thermal conversion: reducing carbon loss and improving biochar stability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Cao, Xinde; Zheng, Wei; Kan, Yue

    2014-01-01

    There is often over 50% carbon loss during the thermal conversion of biomass into biochar, leading to it controversy for the biochar formation as a carbon sequestration strategy. Sometimes the biochar also seems not to be stable enough due to physical, chemical, and biological reactions in soils. In this study, three phosphorus-bearing materials, H3PO4, phosphate rock tailing (PRT), and triple superphosphate (TSP), were used as additives to wheat straw with a ratio of 1: 0.4-0.8 for biochar production at 500°C, aiming to alleviate carbon loss during pyrolysis and to increase biochar-C stabilization. All these additives remarkably increased the biochar yield from 31.7% (unmodified biochar) to 46.9%-56.9% (modified biochars). Carbon loss during pyrolysis was reduced from 51.7% to 35.5%-47.7%. Thermogravimetric analysis curves showed that the additives had no effect on thermal stability of biochar but did enhance its oxidative stability. Microbial mineralization was obviously reduced in the modified biochar, especially in the TSP-BC, in which the total CO2 emission during 60-d incubation was reduced by 67.8%, compared to the unmodified biochar. Enhancement of carbon retention and biochar stability was probably due to the formation of meta-phosphate or C-O-PO3, which could either form a physical layer to hinder the contact of C with O2 and bacteria, or occupy the active sites of the C band. Our results indicate that pre-treating biomass with phosphors-bearing materials is effective for reducing carbon loss during pyrolysis and for increasing biochar stabilization, which provides a novel method by which biochar can be designed to improve the carbon sequestration capacity. PMID:25531111

  20. Phosphorus-Assisted Biomass Thermal Conversion: Reducing Carbon Loss and Improving Biochar Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling; Cao, Xinde; Zheng, Wei; Kan, Yue

    2014-01-01

    There is often over 50% carbon loss during the thermal conversion of biomass into biochar, leading to it controversy for the biochar formation as a carbon sequestration strategy. Sometimes the biochar also seems not to be stable enough due to physical, chemical, and biological reactions in soils. In this study, three phosphorus-bearing materials, H3PO4, phosphate rock tailing (PRT), and triple superphosphate (TSP), were used as additives to wheat straw with a ratio of 1: 0.4–0.8 for biochar production at 500°C, aiming to alleviate carbon loss during pyrolysis and to increase biochar-C stabilization. All these additives remarkably increased the biochar yield from 31.7% (unmodified biochar) to 46.9%–56.9% (modified biochars). Carbon loss during pyrolysis was reduced from 51.7% to 35.5%–47.7%. Thermogravimetric analysis curves showed that the additives had no effect on thermal stability of biochar but did enhance its oxidative stability. Microbial mineralization was obviously reduced in the modified biochar, especially in the TSP-BC, in which the total CO2 emission during 60-d incubation was reduced by 67.8%, compared to the unmodified biochar. Enhancement of carbon retention and biochar stability was probably due to the formation of meta-phosphate or C-O-PO3, which could either form a physical layer to hinder the contact of C with O2 and bacteria, or occupy the active sites of the C band. Our results indicate that pre-treating biomass with phosphors-bearing materials is effective for reducing carbon loss during pyrolysis and for increasing biochar stabilization, which provides a novel method by which biochar can be designed to improve the carbon sequestration capacity. PMID:25531111

  1. Improving Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Stability, and Solubility of Polyaniline-Polypyrrole Nanocomposite by Doping with Anionic Spherical Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Na

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which anionic spherical polyelectrolyte brushes (ASPB) as dopant improved the performance of polyaniline-polypyrrole (PANI-PPy) nanocomposite was investigated. Different characterization and analytical methods including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that ASPB serving as dopant could improve the comprehensive properties of PANI-PPy nanocomposite. It was different from dopants such as SiO2, poly(sodium- p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS), and canonic spherical polyelectrolyte brushes (CSPB) which only enhanced the performance of PANI-PPy nanocomposite on one or two sides. The electrical conductivity of (PANI-PPy)/ASPB nanocomposite at room temperature was 8.3 S/cm, which was higher than that of PANI-PPy (2.1 S/cm), (PANI-PPy)/PSS (6.8 S/cm), (PANI-PPy)/SiO2 (7.2 S/cm), and (PANI-PPy)/CSPB (2.2 S/cm). Meanwhile, (PANI-PPy)/ASPB nanocomposite possessed enhanced thermal stability and good solubility. In addition, the effects of polymerization temperature, the molecular weight of grafted polyelectrolyte brushes, and storage time on electrical conductivity were discussed.

  2. Using plant canopy temperature to improve irrigated crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed plant canopy temperature has long been recognized as having potential as a tool for irrigation management. However, a number of barriers have prevented its routine use in practice, such as the spatial and temporal resolution of remote sensing platforms, limitations in computing capac...

  3. Marshall Convergent Spray Formulation Improvement for High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Jack; Patterson,Chat

    2011-01-01

    The Marshall Convergent Coating-1 (MCC-1) formulation was produced in the 1990s, and uses a standard bisphenol A epoxy resin system with a triamine accelerator. With the increasing heat rates forecast for the next generation of vehicles, higher-temperature sprayable coatings are needed. This work substitutes the low-temperature epoxy resins used in the MCC-1 coating with epoxy phenolic, epoxy novalac, or resorcinolinic resins (higher carbon content), which will produce a higher char yield upon exposure to high heat and increased glass transition temperature. High-temperature filler materials, such as granular cork and glass ecospheres, are also incorporated as part of the convergent spray process, but other sacrificial (ablative) materials are possible. In addition, the use of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) nanoparticle hybrids will increase both reinforcement aspects and contribute to creating a tougher silacious char, which will reduce recession at higher heat rates. Use of expanding epoxy resin (lightweight MCC) systems are also useful in that they reduce system weight, have greater insulative properties, and a decrease in application times can be realized.

  4. Medial column stabilization improves the early result of calcaneal lengthening in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Nan; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Huang, Shier-Chieg; Kuo, Ken N; Wang, Ting-Ming

    2013-05-01

    Calcaneal lengthening is a popular surgical treatment for pronated foot deformity. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of medial column stabilization in improving the results of calcaneal lengthening for pronated foot deformity in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Twenty-one consecutive (37 feet) children with cerebral palsy with pronated foot deformity who received calcaneal lengthening from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. Talonavicular stabilizations were performed by either stapling alone or fusion depending on the children's age and correctability of midfoot deformity. Satisfaction rates were assessed using Mosca's radiographic, Mosca's clinical, and Yoo's clinical criteria. Talonavicular coverage angle was also measured. Results between groups with and without stabilization of the talonavicular joint were compared. Group 1 included 11 children (19 feet) who had no talonavicular stabilization. Group 2 included 10 children (18 feet) who had talonavicular fixation. Groups were further divided into subgroups A [Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS)≤II] and B (GMFCS≥III). Factors including demography, geographical classification, functional status, and preoperative degree of deformity were similar between the two groups. After the operation, all four radiographic parameters improved significantly. The talonavicular coverage angle was better in group 2 than in group 1. Mosca's radiographic results were satisfactory in 73.68% of cases in group 1 and 100% in group 2; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.027). As for Mosca's clinical results, 63.16% in group 1 and 83.33% in group 2 achieved satisfactory results (P=0.156). On the basis of Yoo's criteria, the results were satisfactory in 57.89% of cases in group 1 and in 94.44% of cases in group 2 (P=0.012). Further analysis on the satisfaction rates between the subgroups showed similar results between the patients in subgroup 1A and 2A, and significantly better results

  5. Improving the Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries at Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Trung H. Nguyen; Peter Marren; Kevin Gering

    2007-04-20

    The ability for Li-ion batteries to operate at low temperatures is extremely critical for the development of energy storage for electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Currently, Li-ion cells have limited success in operating at temperature below –10 deg C. Electrolyte conductivity at low temperature is not the main cause of the poor performance of Li-ion cells. Rather the formation of a tight interfacial film between the electrolyte and the electrodes has often been an issue that resulted in a progressive capacity fading and limited discharge rate capability. The objective of our Phase I work is to develop novel electrolytes that can form low interfacial resistance solid electrolyte interface (SEI) films on carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes. From the results of our Phase I work, we found that the interfacial impedance of Fluoro Ethylene Carbonate (FEC) electrolyte at the low temperature of –20degC is astonishingly low, compared to the baseline 1.2M LiPFEMC:EC:PC:DMC (10:20:10:60) electrolyte. We found that electrolyte formulations with fluorinated carbonate co-solvent have excellent film forming properties and better de-solvation characteristics to decrease the interfacial SEI film resistance and facilitate the Li-ion diffusion across the SEI film. The very overwhelming low interfacial impedance for FEC electrolytes will translate into Li-ion cells with much higher power for cold cranking and high Regen/charge at the low temperature. Further, since the SEI film resistance is low, Li interaction kinetics into the electrode will remain very fast and thus Li plating during Regen/charge period be will less likely to happen.

  6. Overcoats for the Improved Performance of PdCr High Temperature Thin Film Strain Gages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto J.; Dyer, S. E.; Cooke, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Overcoat protection schemes for thin film devices have typically focused on inhibiting the growth of native oxides formed on the sensor surface, rather than on improving the passivating nature of these native oxides. Here, thin sputtered Cr overcoats and heat treatments in varying oxygen partial pressures enhanced the passivating nature of native Cr203 films formed on PdCr thin film strain gages. Results of strain tests using sensors protected using this approach are presented and the implications are discussed. PdCr gages with sputtered Cr overcoats withstood 12,000 dynamic strain cycles of 1100 micro-epsilon during 100 hours of testing at a temperature of 1000 C in air. Gage factors of 1.3 with drift rates as low as 0.1 Omega/hr were achieved for devices having a nominal resistance of approximately 100 Omega's. TCR's ranging from +550 ppm/C to +798 ppm/C were realized depending on the overcoat and thermal history. Possible mechanisms for an anomaly in the electrical characteristics of these films at 800 C and improvements in stability due to the use of overcoats are presented.

  7. Improvements in tissue blood flow and lumbopelvic stability after lumbopelvic core stabilization training in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Paungmali, Aatit; Henry, Leonard Joseph; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of lumbopelvic stabilization training on tissue blood flow changes in the lumbopelvic region and lumbopelvic stability compared to placebo treatment and controlled intervention among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 25 participants (7 males, 18 females; mean age, 33.3 ± 14.4 years) participated in this within-subject, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison trial. The participants randomly underwent three types of interventions that included lumbopelvic stabilization training, placebo treatment, and controlled intervention with 48 hours between sessions. Lumbopelvic stability and tissue blood flow were measured using a pressure biofeedback device and a laser Doppler flow meter before and after the interventions. [Results] The repeated-measures analysis of variance results demonstrated a significant increase in tissue blood flow over the lumbopelvic region tissues for post- versus pre-lumbopelvic stabilization training and compared to placebo and control interventions. A significant increase in lumbopelvic stability before and after lumbopelvic stabilization training was noted, as well as upon comparison to placebo and control interventions. [Conclusion] The current study supports an increase in tissue blood flow in the lumbopelvic region and improved lumbopelvic stability after core training among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

  8. Improvements in tissue blood flow and lumbopelvic stability after lumbopelvic core stabilization training in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Paungmali, Aatit; Henry, Leonard Joseph; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of lumbopelvic stabilization training on tissue blood flow changes in the lumbopelvic region and lumbopelvic stability compared to placebo treatment and controlled intervention among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 25 participants (7 males, 18 females; mean age, 33.3 ± 14.4 years) participated in this within-subject, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison trial. The participants randomly underwent three types of interventions that included lumbopelvic stabilization training, placebo treatment, and controlled intervention with 48 hours between sessions. Lumbopelvic stability and tissue blood flow were measured using a pressure biofeedback device and a laser Doppler flow meter before and after the interventions. [Results] The repeated-measures analysis of variance results demonstrated a significant increase in tissue blood flow over the lumbopelvic region tissues for post- versus pre-lumbopelvic stabilization training and compared to placebo and control interventions. A significant increase in lumbopelvic stability before and after lumbopelvic stabilization training was noted, as well as upon comparison to placebo and control interventions. [Conclusion] The current study supports an increase in tissue blood flow in the lumbopelvic region and improved lumbopelvic stability after core training among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. PMID:27064327

  9. Improvements in tissue blood flow and lumbopelvic stability after lumbopelvic core stabilization training in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Paungmali, Aatit; Henry, Leonard Joseph; Sitilertpisan, Patraporn; Pirunsan, Ubon; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of lumbopelvic stabilization training on tissue blood flow changes in the lumbopelvic region and lumbopelvic stability compared to placebo treatment and controlled intervention among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 25 participants (7 males, 18 females; mean age, 33.3 ± 14.4 years) participated in this within-subject, repeated-measures, double-blind, placebo-controlled comparison trial. The participants randomly underwent three types of interventions that included lumbopelvic stabilization training, placebo treatment, and controlled intervention with 48 hours between sessions. Lumbopelvic stability and tissue blood flow were measured using a pressure biofeedback device and a laser Doppler flow meter before and after the interventions. [Results] The repeated-measures analysis of variance results demonstrated a significant increase in tissue blood flow over the lumbopelvic region tissues for post- versus pre-lumbopelvic stabilization training and compared to placebo and control interventions. A significant increase in lumbopelvic stability before and after lumbopelvic stabilization training was noted, as well as upon comparison to placebo and control interventions. [Conclusion] The current study supports an increase in tissue blood flow in the lumbopelvic region and improved lumbopelvic stability after core training among patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. PMID:27064327

  10. High temperature stability of onion-like carbon vs highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    PubMed

    Latini, Alessandro; Tomellini, Massimo; Lazzarini, Laura; Bertoni, Giovanni; Gazzoli, Delia; Bossa, Luigi; Gozzi, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of onion-like carbon (OLC) nanostructures with respect to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was determined in the interval 765-1030 K by the electromotive force (emf) measurements of solid electrolyte galvanic cell: (Low) Pt|Cr3C2,CrF2,OLC|CaF2s.c.|Cr3C2,CrF2,HOPG|Pt (High). The free energy change of transformation HOPG = OLC was found positive below 920.6 K crossing the zero value at this temperature. Its trend with temperature was well described by a 3rd degree polynomial. The unexpected too high values of [Formula: see text] jointly to the HR-TEM, STEM and EELS evidences that showed OLC completely embedded in rigid cages made of a Cr3C2/CrF2 matrix, suggested that carbon in the electrodes experienced different internal pressures. This was confirmed by the evaluation under constant volume of [dP/dT by the α/κ ratio for OLC (0.5 MPa K(-1)) and HOPG (8 Pa K(-1)) where α and κ are the isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compressibility coefficients, respectively. The temperature dependency of the pressure was derived and utilized to calculate the enthalpy and entropy changes as function of temperature and pressure. The highest value of the internal pressure experienced by OLC was calculated to be about 7 GPa at the highest temperature. At 920.6 K, ΔrH and ΔrS values are 95.8 kJ mol(-1) and 104.1 JK(-1) mol(-1), respectively. The surface contributions to the energetic of the system were evaluated and they were found negligible compared with the bulk terms. As a consequence of the high internal pressure, the values of the enthalpy and entropy changes were mainly attributed to the formation of carbon defects in OLC considered as multishell fullerenes. The change of the carbon defect fraction is reported as a function of temperature. PMID:25153181

  11. Improving the Performance of Temperature Index Snowmelt Model of SWAT by Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Onishi, Takeo; Hiramatsu, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results of the widely used temperature index snowmelt model are greatly influenced by input air temperature data. Spatially sparse air temperature data remain the main factor inducing uncertainties and errors in that model, which limits its applications. Thus, to solve this problem, we created new air temperature data using linear regression relationships that can be formulated based on MODIS land surface temperature data. The Soil Water Assessment Tool model, which includes an improved temperature index snowmelt module, was chosen to test the newly created data. By evaluating simulation performance for daily snowmelt in three test basins of the Amur River, performance of the newly created data was assessed. The coefficient of determination (R2) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) were used for evaluation. The results indicate that MODIS land surface temperature data can be used as a new source for air temperature data creation. This will improve snow simulation using the temperature index model in an area with sparse air temperature observations. PMID:25165746

  12. Improving the performance of temperature index snowmelt model of SWAT by using MODIS land surface temperature data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Onishi, Takeo; Hiramatsu, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results of the widely used temperature index snowmelt model are greatly influenced by input air temperature data. Spatially sparse air temperature data remain the main factor inducing uncertainties and errors in that model, which limits its applications. Thus, to solve this problem, we created new air temperature data using linear regression relationships that can be formulated based on MODIS land surface temperature data. The Soil Water Assessment Tool model, which includes an improved temperature index snowmelt module, was chosen to test the newly created data. By evaluating simulation performance for daily snowmelt in three test basins of the Amur River, performance of the newly created data was assessed. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) were used for evaluation. The results indicate that MODIS land surface temperature data can be used as a new source for air temperature data creation. This will improve snow simulation using the temperature index model in an area with sparse air temperature observations. PMID:25165746

  13. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Diffuser Hub Injection to Improve Centrifugal Compressor Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to investigate whether centrifugal compressor stability could be improved by injecting air through the diffuser hub surface are reported. The research was conducted in a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor configured with a vane-island diffuser. Injector nozzles were located just upstream of the leading edge of the diffuser vanes. Nozzle orientations were set to produce injected streams angled at 8, 0 and +8 degrees relative to the vane mean camber line. Several injection flow rates were tested using both an external air supply and recirculation from the diffuser exit. Compressor flow range did not improve at any injection flow rate that was tested. Compressor flow range did improve slightly at zero injection due to the flow resistance created by injector openings on the hub surface. Leading edge loading and semi-vaneless space diffusion showed trends similar to those reported earlier from shroud surface experiments that did improve compressor flow range. Opposite trends are seen for hub injection cases where compressor flow range decreased. The hub injection data further explain the range improvement provided by shroud-side injection and suggest that different hub-side techniques may produce range improvement in centrifugal compressors.

  15. Enhanced performance and stability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell by incorporating zirconium hydrogen phosphate in catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Olivia; Su, Huaneng; Linkov, Vladimir; Pollet, Bruno G.; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-03-01

    Zirconium hydrogen phosphate (ZHP) together with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) polymer binder is incorporated into the catalyst layers (CLs) of ABPBI (poly(2,5-benzimidazole))-based high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFCs) to improve its performance and durability. The influence of ZHP content (normalised with respect to dry PTFE) on the CL properties are structurally characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Electrochemical analyses of the resultant membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) are performed by recording polarisation curves and impedance spectra at 160 °C, ambient pressure and humidity. The result show that a 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE content in the CL is optimum for improving fuel cell performance, the resultant MEA delivers a peak power of 592 mW cm-2 at a cell voltage of 380 mV. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) indicate that 30% ZHP in the CL can increase the proton conductivity compared to the pristine PTFE-gas diffusion electrode (GDE). A short term stability test (∼500 h) on the 30 wt.% ZHP/PTFE-GDE shows a remarkable high durability with a degradation rate as low as ∼19 μV h-1 at 0.2 A cm-2, while 195 μV h-1 was obtained for the pristine GDE.

  16. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3–Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT–BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT–BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT–BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT–BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  17. High-temperature microstructural stability in iron- and nickel-base alloys from rapid solidification processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E. ); Bae, J.C.; Kelly, T.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The properties and performance of metallic alloys for heat resistant applications depend on the fineness, homogeneity, and stability of their microstructures, particularly after high temperature exposures. Potential advantages of rapid solidification processing (RSP) of alloys for such applications are the homogeneity in composition and fine microstructural features derived from the nature of the RSP process. The main RSP product form is powder, is which obtained by atomizing a narrow melt stream into fine molten droplets. Rapid cooling of the droplets is typically achieved through convective cooling with noble gases such as argon or helium. Consolidation of RSP powder, either using near-net-shape methods or into forms that can be converted to final product shapes, requires exposures to fairly high temperatures, usually 900 to 1200{degrees}C for iron- and nickel-base alloys. Full consolidation, i.e., complete densification with accompanying particle bonding, usually requires pressure or stress assistance. Consolidation, as well as any subsequent thermal-mechanical processing, may affect the chemical homogeneity and fine microstructures. A study has been performed on a series of RSP iron- and nickel-base alloys. The results of microstructure examinations and mechanical properties tests of the consolidated powders, and their correlation, will be covered in this paper. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  19. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  20. Adhesion Stabilizes Robust Lipid Heterogeneity in Supercritical Membranes at Physiological Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Jing; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Regions of contact between cells are frequently enriched in or depleted of certain protein or lipid species. Here, we explore a possible physical basis that could contribute to this membrane heterogeneity using a model system of a giant vesicle tethered to a planar supported bilayer. Vesicles contain coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases at low temperatures and are tethered using trace quantities of adhesion molecules that preferentially partition into one liquid phase. We find that the Ld marker DiI-C12 is enriched or depleted in the adhered region when adhesion molecules partition into Ld or Lo phases, respectively. Remarkably, adhesion stabilizes an extended zone enriched or depleted of DiI-C12 even at temperatures >15°C above the miscibility phase transition when membranes have compositions that are in close proximity to a critical point. A stable adhesion zone is also observed in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from living RBL-2H3 cells, and probe partitioning at 37°C is diminished in vesicles isolated from cells with altered cholesterol levels. Probe partitioning is in good quantitative agreement with predictions of the two-dimensional Ising model with a weak applied field for both types of model membranes. These studies experimentally demonstrate that large and stable domain structure can be mediated by lipids in single-phase membranes with supercritical fluctuations. PMID:23442961

  1. Phase diagram, thermal stability, and high temperature oxidation of the ternary copper-nickel-iron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella

    Due to the aluminum industry demands, a large effort has recently been devoted to the development of special alloys to be used as inert anodes for a newly designed aluminum reduction cell. The implementation of this new technology aims at the replacement of the graphite anodes that have been used for over 100 years in aluminum smelting, which would reduce fossil carbon consumption, and eliminate the emission of carbon dioxide and of perfluorocarbons. Ternary alloys containing copper, nickel, and iron have been the subject of the research activities. The present research focused on the stability of the Cu-Ni-Fe alloys at high temperatures in oxidizing and fluoridating environments. The experimental methods included thermodynamic calculations of the phase diagram (Thermocalc), optical microscopy and microprobe microstructural and chemical investigations (EMPA), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and air-oxidation studies. The results have led to the optimization of the Cu-Ni-Fe ternary phase diagram and to an extensive study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the spinodal decomposition and discontinuous reactions occurring during ageing as a function of alloy composition. The oxidizing reactions occurring in air at high temperatures at the surface of the alloys have been also discussed in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic laws. The phase formation in a fluorine containing environment as encountered in an aluminum electrolytic cell is predicted using principles of physical chemistry.

  2. Interface stability of electrode/Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide for high-temperature operational capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Takahiro; Kumaragurubaran, Somu; Tsunekawa, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Ueda, Shigenori; Takahashi, Kenichiro; Ri, Sung-Gi; Suzuki, Setsu; Oh, Seungjun; Chikyow, Toyohiro

    2016-06-01

    The interface stability between electrodes (Pt, TaC, TiC, and RuO2) and a Bi-containing relaxor ferroelectric oxide, BaTiO3-Bi(Mg2/3Nb1/3)O3 (BT-BMN), applied to a high-temperature operational capacitor was investigated by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. All the electrodes showed electron filling at the Fermi level after annealing at 400 °C. However, Pt and TaC indicated electrical property degradations due to the thick intermediate layer formation and defect formation of the BT-BMN layer relating to the Bi diffusion into the electrodes. In contrast, TiC inhibited the Bi diffusion and did not show any change in the band alignment after annealing. Furthermore, RuO2 eliminated the defect formation in BT-BMN and showed no change in the band alignment although the Bi diffusion was also observed. These results suggest that the TiC/RuO2/BT-BMN stack structure is a potential candidate for the high-temperature operational capacitor.

  3. Temperature stability of ultra-thin mixed BaSr-oxide layers and their transformation.

    PubMed

    Müller-Sajak, D; Islam, S; Pfnür, H; Hofmann, K R

    2012-08-01

    In the context of investigations of physical, chemical and electrical properties of ultra-thin layers of epitaxial and monocrystalline Sr(0.3)Ba(0.7)O on Si(100), we also investigated their thermal stability with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). At temperatures above 400 °C, transformation into silicate layers sets in. The stoichiometry after complete transformation was determined to be close to (Ba(0.8)Sr(0.2))(2)SiO(4) except for layers of only a few monolayers, where the silicate is not stoichiometric. There are strong indications that this silicate is stable until it desorbs at temperatures above 750 °C. Crystallinity, as seen with LEED, is lost during this transformation. Although transformation into silicate is coupled with metal desorption and compactification of the layers, they seem to remain closed. In addition, traces of Ba silicide at the Si interface were detected after layer desorption. This silicide cannot be desorbed thermally. The silicate layer has a bandgap of 5.9 ± 0.2 eV already for 3 ML thickness. Upon exposure to air, carbon and oxygen containing species, but no hydroxide, are formed irreversibly.

  4. Near-Surface Temperatures on Mercury and the Moon and the Stability of Polar Ice Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Paige, David A.; Wood, Stephen E.

    1999-10-01

    In order to assess the thermal stability of polar ice deposits, we present model calculated temperatures of flat surfaces and surfaces within bowl-shaped and flat-floored polar impact craters on Mercury and the Moon. Our model includes appropriate insolation cycles, realistic crater shapes, multiple scattering of sunlight and infrared radiation, and depth- and temperature-dependent regolith thermophysical properties. Unshaded water ice deposits on the surface of either body are rapidly lost to thermal sublimation. A subsurface water ice deposit is stable within 2° latitude of the Moon's poles. Meter-thick water ice deposits require billions of years to sublime if located in the permanently shaded portions of flat-floored craters within 10° latitude of the poles of Mercury and 13° latitude of the poles of the Moon. Results for craters associated with radar features on Mercury are consistent with the presence of stable water ice deposits if a thin regolith layer thermally insulates deposits at lower latitudes and within smaller craters. A regolith cover would also reduce losses from diffusion, ion sputtering, impact vaporization, and H Lyα and is implied independently by the radar observations. Permanently shaded areas near the Moon's poles are generally colder than those near Mercury's poles, but the Moon's obliquity history, its orbit through Earth's magnetospheric tail, and its radar-opaque regolith may limit the volume and radar detectability of ice deposits there.

  5. Polypyrrole-Coated Zinc Ferrite Hollow Spheres with Improved Cycling Stability for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoran; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Xiaodan; Yu, Chengzhong

    2016-07-01

    Here, ZnFe2 O4 double-shell hollow microspheres are designed to accommodate the large volume expansion during lithiation. A facile and efficient vapor-phase polymerization method has been developed to coat the ZnFe2 O4 hollow spheres with polypyrrole (PPY). The thin PPY coating improves not only the electronic conductivity but also the structural integrity, and thus the cycling stability of the ZnFe2 O4 hollow spheres. Our work sheds light on how to enhance the electrochemical performance of transition metal oxide-based anode materials by designing delicate nanostructures. PMID:27259158

  6. Coassembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Proteins into Nanotubes with Uniform Length and Improved Physical Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Eiben, Sabine; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Using tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins (TMVcp) from both sources of the plant and bacterial expression systems as building blocks, we demonstrate here a coassembly strategy of TMV nanotubes in the presence of RNA. Specifically, plant-expressed cp (cpp) efficiently dominates the genomic RNA encapsidation to determine the length of assembled TMV nanotubes, whereas the incorporated Escherichia coli-expressed cp (cpec) improves the physical stability of TMV nanotubes by introducing disulfide bonds between the interfaces of subunits. We expect this coassembly strategy can be expanded to other virus nanomaterials to obtain desired properties based on rationally designed protein-RNA and protein-protein interfacial interactions. PMID:27188634

  7. Solid inclusion complexes of vanillin with cyclodextrins: their formation, characterization, and high-temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    This study reports the formation of solid vanillin/cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (vanillin/CD ICs) with the aim to enhance the thermal stability and sustained release of vanillin by inclusion complexation. The solid vanillin/CD ICs with three types of CDs (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD) were prepared using the freeze-drying method; in addition, a coprecipitation method was also used in the case of γ-CD. The presence of vanillin in CD ICs was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies. Moreover, (1)H NMR study elucidated that the complexation stoichiometry for both vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC was a 1:1 molar ratio, whereas it was 0.625:1 for vanillin/α-CD IC. XRD studies have shown channel-type arrangement for CD molecules, and no diffraction peak for free vanillin was observed for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC, indicating that complete inclusion complexation was successfully achieved for these CD ICs. In the case of vanillin/α-CD IC, the sample was mostly amorphous and some uncomplexed vanillin was present, suggesting that α-CD was not very effective for complexation with vanillin compared to β-CD and γ-CD. Furthermore, DSC studies for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC have shown no melting point for vanillin, elucidating the true complex formation, whereas a melting point for vanillin was recorded for vanillin/α-CD IC, confirming the presence of some uncomplexed vanillin in this sample. TGA thermograms indicated that thermal evaporation/degradation of vanillin occurred over a much higher temperature range (150-300 °C) for vanillin/CD ICs samples when compared to pure vanillin (80-200 °C) or vanillin/CD physical mixtures, signifying that the thermal stability of vanillin was increased due to the inclusion complexation with CDs. Moreover, headspace GC-MS analyses indicated that the release of vanillin was sustained at higher temperatures in the case of vanillin/CD ICs due to the inclusion complexation when compared to vanillin

  8. [Effect of heat transfer in the packages on the stability of thiamine nitrate under uncontrolled temperature conditions].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toru; Yamaji, Takayuki; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-01-01

    To accurately predict the stability of thiamine nitrate as a model drug in pharmaceutical products under uncontrolled temperature conditions, the average reaction rate constant was determined, taking into account the heat transfer from the atmosphere to the product. The stability tests of thiamine nitrate in the three packages with different heat transfers were performed under non-isothermal conditions. The stability data observed were compared with the predictions based on a newly developed method, showing that the stability was well predicted by the method involving the heat transfer. By contrast, there were some deviations observed from the predicted data, without considering heat transfer in the packages with low heat transfer. The above-mentioned result clearly shows that heat transfer should be considered to ensure accurate prediction of the stability of commercial pharmaceutical products under non-isothermal atmospheres.

  9. Improved Lower Bounds on the Price of Stability of Undirected Network Design Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilò, Vittorio; Caragiannis, Ioannis; Fanelli, Angelo; Monaco, Gianpiero

    Bounding the price of stability of undirected network design games with fair cost allocation is a challenging open problem in the Algorithmic Game Theory research agenda. Even though the generalization of such games in directed networks is well understood in terms of the price of stability (it is exactly H n , the n-th harmonic number, for games with n players), far less is known for network design games in undirected networks. The upper bound carries over to this case as well while the best known lower bound is 42/23 ≈ 1.826. For more restricted but interesting variants of such games such as broadcast and multicast games, sublogarithmic upper bounds are known while the best known lower bound is 12/7 ≈ 1.714. In the current paper, we improve the lower bounds as follows. We break the psychological barrier of 2 by showing that the price of stability of undirected network design games is at least 348/155 ≈ 2.245. Our proof uses a recursive construction of a network design game with a simple gadget as the main building block. For broadcast and multicast games, we present new lower bounds of 20/11 ≈ 1.818 and 1.862, respectively.

  10. Improvement in the physiological function and standing stability based on kinect multimedia for older people

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The increase in the Taiwanese older population is associated with age-related inconveniences. Finding adequate and simple physical activities to help the older people maintaining their physiological function and preventing them from falls has become an urgent social issue. [Subjects and Methods] This study aimed to design a virtual exercise training game suitable for Taiwanese older people. This system will allow for the maintenance of the physiological function and standing stability through physical exercise, while using a virtual reality game. The participants can easily exercise in a carefree, interactive environment. This study will use Kinect for Windows for physical movement detection and Unity software for virtual world development. [Results] Group A and B subjects were involved in the exercise training method of Kinect interactive multimedia for 12 weeks. The results showed that the functional reach test and the unipedal stance test improved significantly. [Conclusion] The physiological function and standing stability of the group A subjects were examined at six weeks post training. The results showed that these parameters remained constant. This proved that the proposed system provide substantial support toward the preservation of the Taiwanese older people’ physiological function and standing stability. PMID:27190480

  11. Improving the durability of a drag-reducing nanocoating by enhancing its mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengjiao; Zhang, Songsong; Dong, Hongyu; Han, Shihui; Wei, Hao; Shi, Feng

    2015-02-25

    The durability of superhydrophobic surface is a major problem to restrict industrial application of superhydrophobic materials from laboratory research, which can be attributed to a more general issue of mechanical stability for superhydrophobic coatings. Therefore, in order to handle this issue, we have fabricated a mechanically stable drag-reducing coating composed of elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and hydrophobic copper particles on model ships, which can resist mechanical abrasion and has displayed a durable drag-reducing effect. In comparison with normal Au superhydrophobic coatings, the as-prepared PDMS/copper coatings showed durable drag reduction performance with a similar drag-reducing rate before (26%) and after (24%) mechanical abrasion. The mechanism for the enhanced mechanical stability and maintained drag reduction of the superhydrophobic surfaces was investigated through characterizations of surface morphology, surface wettability, and water adhesive force evaluation before and after abrasion. This is the first demonstration to realize the application of durable drag reduction by improving the mechanical stability of superhydrophobic coatings. We do believe that superhydrophobic surfaces with good resistance to mechanical abrasion or scratching may draw wide attention and gain significant applications with durable drag-reducing properties.

  12. PEGylation of lysine residues improves the proteolytic stability of fibronectin while retaining biological activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Desai, Raj; Perez-Luna, Victor; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    Excessive proteolysis of fibronectin (FN) impairs tissue repair in chronic wounds. Since FN is essential in wound healing, our goal is to improve its proteolytic stability and at the same time preserve its biological activity. We have previously shown that reduced FN conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) at cysteine residues is more proteolytically stable than native FN. Cysteine-PEGylated FN supported cell adhesion and migration to the same extent as native FN. However, unlike native FN, cysteine-PEGylated FN was not assembled into an extracellular matrix (ECM) when immobilized. Here, we present an alternative approach in which FN is preferentially PEGylated at lysine residues using different molecular weight PEGs. We show that lysine PEGylation does not perturb FN secondary structure. PEG molecular weight, from 2 to 10 kDa, positively correlates with FN-PEG proteolytic stability. Cell adhesion, cell spreading, and gelatin binding decrease with increasing molecular weight of PEG. The 2-kDa FN-PEG conjugate shows comparable cell adhesion to native FN and binds gelatin. Moreover, immobilized FN-PEG is assembled into ECM fibrils. In summary, lysine PEGylation of FN can be used to stabilize FN against proteolytic degradation with minimal perturbation to FN structure and retained biological activity.

  13. 1,2,3-Triazole Stabilized Neurotensin-Based Radiopeptidomimetics for Improved Tumor Targeting.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Alba; Valverde, Ibai E; Vomstein, Sandra; Mindt, Thomas L

    2015-10-21

    Neurotensin (NT) is a regulatory peptide with nanomolar affinity toward NT receptors, which are overexpressed by different clinically relevant tumors. Its binding sequence, NT(8-13), represents a promising vector for the development of peptidic radiotracers for tumor imaging and therapy. The main drawback of the peptide is its short biological half-life due to rapid proteolysis in vivo. Herein, we present an innovative strategy for the stabilization of peptides using nonhydrolizable 1,4-disubstituted, 1,2,3-triazoles as amide bond surrogates. A "triazole scan" of the peptide sequence yielded novel NT(8-13) analogues with enhanced stability, retained receptor affinity, and improved tumor targeting properties in vivo. The synthesis of libraries of triazole-based peptidomimetics was achieved efficiently on solid support by a combination of Fmoc-peptide chemistry, diazo transfer reactions, and the Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) employing methods that are fully compatible with standard solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) chemistry. Thus, the amide-to-triazole substitution strategy may represent a general methodology for the metabolic stabilization of biologically active peptides. PMID:26347939

  14. Tailoring Graphene Nanosheets for Highly Improved Dispersion Stability and Quantitative Assessment in Nonaqueous Solvent.

    PubMed

    Park, Minju; Song, Kyonghwa; Lee, Taemin; Cha, JinHyeok; Lyo, InWoong; Kim, Byeong-Su

    2016-08-24

    Aggregation is a critical limitation for the practical application of graphene-based materials. Herein, we report that graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets chemically modified with ethanolamine (EA), ethylene glycol (EG), and sulfanilic acid (SA) demonstrate superior dispersion stability in organic solvents, specifically EG, based on the differences in their covalent chemistries. Functionalized GO was successfully dispersed in EG at a concentration of 9.0 mg mL(-1) (0.50 vol %), the highest dispersion concentration reported to date. Moreover, our study introduces a unique analytical method for the assessment of dispersion stability and successfully quantifies the instability index based on transmission profiles under centrifugation cycles. Interestingly, GO-EG and GO-EA exhibited highly improved dispersion stabilities approximately 96 and 48 times greater than that of GO in EG solvent, respectively. This finding highlights the critical role of surface functional groups in the enhancement of chemical affinity and miscibility in the surrounding media. We anticipate that the novel structural designs and unique tools presented in this study will further the understanding and application of chemically functionalized carbon materials.

  15. Improved Mo-Re VPS Alloys for High-Temperature Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, Robert; Martin, James; McKechnie, Timothy; O'Dell, John Scott

    2011-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened molybdenum- rhenium alloys for vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) fabrication of high-temperature-resistant components are undergoing development. In comparison with otherwise equivalent non-dispersion-strengthened Mo-Re alloys, these alloys have improved high-temperature properties. Examples of VPS-fabricated high-temperature-resistant components for which these alloys are expected to be suitable include parts of aircraft and spacecraft engines, furnaces, and nuclear power plants; wear coatings; sputtering targets; x-ray targets; heat pipes in which liquid metals are used as working fluids; and heat exchangers in general. These alloys could also be useful as coating materials in some biomedical applications. The alloys consist of 60 weight percent Mo with 40 weight percent Re made from (1) blends of elemental Mo and Re powders or (2) Re-coated Mo particles that have been subjected to a proprietary powder-alloying-and-spheroidization process. For most of the dispersion- strengthening experiments performed thus far in this development effort, 0.4 volume percent of transition-metal ceramic dispersoids were mixed into the feedstock powders. For one experiment, the proportion of dispersoid was 1 volume percent. In each case, the dispersoid consisted of either ZrN particles having sizes <45 m, ZrO2 particles having sizes of about 1 m, HfO2 particles having sizes <45 m, or HfN particles having sizes <1 m. These materials were chosen for evaluation on the basis of previously published thermodynamic stability data. For comparison, Mo-Re feedstock powders without dispersoids were also prepared.

  16. Using protein-fatty acid complexes to improve vitamin D stability.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jannik Nedergaard; Frislev, Henriette Søster; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-10-01

    Liprotides are complexes between lipids and partially denatured proteins in which the protein forms a stabilizing shell around a fatty acid micelle core. We have previously shown that liprotides stabilize small aliphatic molecules such as retinal and tocopherol by sequestering these molecules in the fatty acid core. This opens up the use of liprotides to formulate food additives. Here, we expand our investigations to the large and bulky molecule vitamin D3 (vitD), motivated by the population-wide occurrence of vitD deficiency. We prepared liprotides using different proteins and fatty acids and evaluated their ability to protect vitD upon exposure to heating or intense UV light. Additionally, we determined the stability of liprotides toward pH, Ca(2+), and BSA. The best results were obtained with liprotides made from α-lactalbumin and oleate. These liprotides were able to completely solubilize vitD, increase the stability toward UV light 9-fold, and increase the long-term stability at 37°C up to 1,000-fold. Native α-lactalbumin binds Ca(2+), making Ca(2+) potentially disruptive toward liprotides. However, liprotides prepared by incubation at 80°C were stable toward Ca(2+), in contrast to those made at 20°C. Nevertheless, the fatty acid binding protein BSA reduced the ability of both liprotides to protect vitD; the amount of vitD remianing after 20d at 20°C decreased from 79±3% in the absence of BSA to 49±4 and 23±3% in the presence of BSA for liprotides made at 80 and 20°C, respectively. Both classes of liprotides were able to release their vitD content, as demonstrated by the transfer of vitD encapsulated in liprotides to phospholipid vesicles. Importantly, liprotides were not stable at pH 6 and below, limiting the useful pH range of the liprotides to >pH 6. Our results indicate that vitD may be encapsulated and stabilized for enrichment of clear beverages at neutral pH to improve the intake and bioavailability of vitD. PMID:27474981

  17. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  18. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi X.; Wu, Q.; Chen, Xiang R.; Geng, Hua Y.

    2016-09-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium.

  19. Stability of rhombohedral phases in vanadium at high-pressure and high-temperature: first-principles investigations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi X; Wu, Q; Chen, Xiang R; Geng, Hua Y

    2016-01-01

    The pressure-induced transition of vanadium from BCC to rhombohedral structures is unique and intriguing among transition metals. In this work, the stability of these phases is revisited by using density functional theory. At finite temperatures, a novel transition of rhombohedral phases back to BCC phase induced by thermal electrons is discovered. This reentrant transition is found not driven by phonons, instead it is the electronic entropy that stabilizes the latter phase, which is totally out of expectation. Parallel to this transition, we find a peculiar and strong increase of the shear modulus C44 with increasing temperature. It is counter-intuitive in the sense that it suggests an unusual harding mechanism of vanadium by temperature. With these stability analyses, the high-pressure and finite-temperature phase diagram of vanadium is proposed. Furthermore, the dependence of the stability of RH phases on the Fermi energy and chemical environment is investigated. The results demonstrate that the position of the Fermi level has a significant impact on the phase stability, and follows the band-filling argument. Besides the Fermi surface nesting, we find that the localization/delocalization of the d orbitals also contributes to the instability of rhombohedral distortions in vanadium. PMID:27581551

  20. Feature-based multiple models improve classification of mutation-induced stability changes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reliable prediction of stability changes in protein variants is an important aspect of computational protein design. A number of machine learning methods that allow a classification of stability changes knowing only the sequence of the protein emerged. However, their performance on amino acid substitutions of previously unseen non-homologous proteins is rather limited. Moreover, the performance varies for different types of mutations based on the secondary structure or accessible surface area of the mutation site. Results We proposed feature-based multiple models with each model designed for a specific type of mutations. The new method is composed of five models trained for mutations in exposed, buried, helical, sheet, and coil residues. The classification of a mutation as stabilising or destabilising is made as a consensus of two models, one selected based on the predicted accessible surface area and the other based on the predicted secondary structure of the mutation site. We refer to our new method as Evolutionary, Amino acid, and Structural Encodings with Multiple Models (EASE-MM). Cross-validation results show that EASE-MM provides a notable improvement to our previous work reaching a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.44. EASE-MM was able to correctly classify 73% and 75% of stabilising and destabilising protein variants, respectively. Using an independent test set of 238 mutations, we confirmed our results in a comparison with related work. Conclusions EASE-MM not only outperformed other related methods but achieved more balanced results for different types of mutations based on the accessible surface area, secondary structure, or magnitude of stability changes. This can be attributed to using multiple models with the most relevant features selected for the given type of mutations. Therefore, our results support the presumption that different interactions govern stability changes in the exposed and buried residues or in residues with a