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Sample records for improved tumor imaging

  1. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  2. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  3. Improved contrast optoacoustic imaging of deep breast tumors using displacement-compensated averaging: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Preisser, Stefan; Kitz, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    For real-time optoacoustic imaging of the human body, a linear array transducer and reflection mode optical irradiation is usually preferred. Such a setup, however, results in significant image background, which prevents imaging structures at the ultimate depth limited only by the signal noise level. Therefore we previously proposed a method for image background reduction, based on displacement-compensated averaging (DCA) of image series obtained when the tissue sample under investigation is gradually deformed. Optoacoustic signals and background signals are differently affected by the deformation and can thus be distinguished. The proposed method has now been applied to imaging artificial tumors embedded inside breast phantoms. Optoacoustic images are acquired alternately with pulse-echo images using a combined optoacoustic/ echo-ultrasound device. Tissue deformation is accessed via speckle tracking in pulse echo images, and optoacoustic images are compensated for the local tissue displacement. In that way optoacoustic sources are highly correlated between subsequent images, while background is decorrelated and can therefore be reduced by averaging. We show that breast image contrast is strongly improved and detectability of embedded tumors significantly increased, using the DCA method.

  4. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  5. Improved Hyperthermia Treatment of Tumors Under Consideration of Magnetic Nanoparticle Distribution Using Micro-CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dähring, H; Grandke, J; Teichgräber, U; Hilger, I

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) distributions within tumors can cause regions of temperature under dosage and reduce the therapeutic efficiency. Here, micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging was used as a tool to determine the MNP distribution in vivo. The therapeutic success was evaluated based on tumor volume and temperature distribution. Tumor-bearing mice were intratumorally injected with iron oxide particles. MNP distribution was assessed by micro-CT with a low radiation dose protocol. MNPs were clearly visible, and the exact distribution to nontumor structures was detected by micro-CT. Knowledge of the intratumoral MNP distribution allowed the generation of higher temperatures within the tumor and led to higher temperature values after exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Consequently, the tumor size after 28 days was reduced to 14 and 73 % of the initial tumor volume for the MNP/AMF/CT and MNP/AMF groups, respectively. The MNP distribution pattern mainly governed the generated temperature spots in the tumor. Knowing the MNP distribution enabled individualized hyperthermia treatment and improved the overall therapeutic efficiency.

  6. Interrogating Tumor Metabolism and Tumor Microenvironments Using Molecular Positron Emission Tomography Imaging. Theranostic Approaches to Improve Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[18F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:24064460

  7. Near Infrared Fluorescent Nanoparticles Derived from Hyaluronic Acid Improve Tumor Contrast for Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Wojtynek, Nicholas E.; Souchek, Joshua J.; Payne, William M.; Stumpf, Kristina; Marini, Frank C.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor tissue that remains undetected at the primary surgical site can cause tumor recurrence, repeat surgery, and treatment strategy alterations that impose a significant patient and healthcare burden. Intraoperative near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is one potential method to identify remaining tumor by visualization of NIR fluorophores that are preferentially localized to the tumor. This requires development of fluorophores that consistently identify tumor tissue in different patients and tumor types. In this study we examined a panel of NIRF contrast agents consisting of polymeric nanoparticle (NP) formulations derived from hyaluronic acid (HA), with either physically entrapped indocyanine green (ICG) or covalently conjugated Cy7.5. Using orthotopic human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice we identified two lead formulations. One, NanoICGPBA, with physicochemically entrapped ICG, showed 2.3-fold greater tumor contrast than ICG alone at 24 h (p < 0.01), and another, NanoCy7.5100-H, with covalently conjugated Cy7.5, showed 74-fold greater tumor contrast than Cy7.5 alone at 24 h (p < 0.0001). These two lead formulations were then tested in immune competent BALB/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer tumors. NanoICGPBA showed 2.2-fold greater contrast than ICG alone (p < 0.0001), and NanoCy7.5100-H showed 14.8-fold greater contrast than Cy7.5 alone (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, both NanoICGPBA and NanoCy7.5100-H provided strong tumor enhancement using image-guided surgery in mice bearing 4T1 tumors. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of a panel of HA-derived NPs in delineating tumors in vivo, and identifies promising formulations that can be used for future in vivo tumor removal efficacy studies. PMID:27877237

  8. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using dictionary learning based patch processing and unsharp filtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Yu, Fei; Luo, Limin; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Reducing patient radiation dose, while maintaining a high-quality image, is a major challenge in Computed Tomography (CT). The purpose of this work is to improve abdomen tumor low-dose CT (LDCT) image quality by using a two-step strategy: a first patch-wise non linear processing is first applied to suppress the noise and artifacts, that is based on a sparsity prior in term of a learned dictionary, then an unsharp filtering aiming to enhance the contrast of tissues and compensate the contrast loss caused by the DL processing. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is effective in suppressing mottled noise as well as improving tumor detectability.

  9. Imaging of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chourmouzi, Danai; Papadopoulou, Elissabet; Marias, Kostantinos; Drevelegas, Antonios

    2014-10-01

    Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in diagnosis of brain tumors and in the decision-making process for therapy. Functional imaging techniques can reflect cellular density (diffusion imaging), capillary density (perfusion techniques), and tissue biochemistry (magnetic resonance [MR] spectroscopy). In addition, cortical activation imaging (functional MR imaging) can identify various loci of eloquent cerebral cortical function. Combining these new tools can increase diagnostic specificity and confidence. Familiarity with conventional and advanced imaging findings facilitates accurate diagnosis, differentiation from other processes, and optimal patient treatment. This article is a practical synopsis of pathologic, clinical, and imaging spectra of most common brain tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetic Modeling and Constrained Reconstruction of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate Offers Improved Metabolic Imaging of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bankson, James A.; Walker, Christopher M.; Ramirez, Marc S.; Stefan, Wolfgang; Fuentes, David; Merritt, Matthew E.; Lee, Jaehyuk; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Chen, Yunyun; Phan, Liem; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Rao, Arvind; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Lee, Mong-Hong; Schellingerhout, Dawid; Conrad, Charles A.; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Lai, Stephen Y.; Hazle, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate has shown tremendous promise as an agent for imaging tumor metabolism with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Imaging hyperpolarized substrates by magnetic resonance is unlike traditional MRI because signals are highly transient and their spatial distribution varies continuously over their observable lifetime. Therefore, new imaging approaches are needed to ensure optimal measurement under these circumstances. Constrained reconstruction algorithms can integrate prior information, including biophysical models of the substrate/target interaction, to reduce the amount of data that is required for image analysis and reconstruction. In this study, we show that metabolic MRI with hyperpolarized pyruvate is biased by tumor perfusion, and present a new pharmacokinetic model for hyperpolarized substrates that accounts for these effects. The suitability of this model is confirmed by statistical comparison to alternates using data from 55 dynamic spectroscopic measurements in normal animals and murine models of anaplastic thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, and triple-negative breast cancer. The kinetic model was then integrated into a constrained reconstruction algorithm and feasibility was tested using significantly under-sampled imaging data from tumor-bearing animals. Compared to naïve image reconstruction, this approach requires far fewer signal-depleting excitations and focuses analysis and reconstruction on new information that is uniquely available from hyperpolarized pyruvate and its metabolites, thus improving the reproducibility and accuracy of metabolic imaging measurements. PMID:26420214

  11. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.

  12. Improving the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumors: utilizing new advances in biomarker and molecular imaging science.

    PubMed

    Giandomenico, Valeria; Modlin, Irvin M; Pontén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Mats; Landegren, Ulf; Bergqvist, Jonas; Khan, Mohid S; Millar, Robert P; Långström, Bengt; Borlak, Jürgen; Eriksson, Barbro; Nielsen, Bengt; Baltzer, Lars; Waterton, John C; Ahlström, Håkan; Öberg, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are malignant solid tumors that arise in hormone-secreting tissue of the diffuse neuroendocrine system or endocrine glands. Although traditionally understood to be a rare disease, the incidence and prevalence of NET have increased greatly in the past 3 decades. However, during this time, progress in diagnosis and outcome of NET has generally been modest. In order to achieve improved outcome in NET, a better understanding of NET biology combined with more reliable serum markers and better techniques to identify tumor localization and small lesions are needed. Although some NET biomarkers exist, sensitive and specific markers that predict tumor growth and behavior are generally lacking. In addition, the integration of new molecular imaging technologies in patient diagnosis and follow-up has the potential to enhance care. To discuss developments and issues required to improve diagnostics and management of NET patients, with specific focus on the latest advances in molecular imaging and biomarker science, 17 global leaders in the fields of NET, molecular imaging and biomarker technology gathered to participate in a 2-day meeting hosted by Prof. Kjell Öberg at the University of Uppsala in Sweden. During this time, findings were presented regarding methods with potential prognostic and treatment applications in NET or other types of cancers. This paper describes the symposium presentations and resulting discussions.

  13. Brain Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Kevin M; Izquierdo-García, José L; Lewis, David Y; Mair, Richard J; Wright, Alan J

    2017-07-20

    Modern imaging techniques, particularly functional imaging techniques that interrogate some specific aspect of underlying tumor biology, have enormous potential in neuro-oncology for disease detection, grading, and tumor delineation to guide biopsy and resection; monitoring treatment response; and targeting radiotherapy. This brief review considers the role of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography in these areas and discusses the factors that limit translation of new techniques to the clinic, in particular, the cost and difficulties associated with validation in multicenter clinical trials.

  14. Temporal change analysis for improved tumor detection in dedicated CT breast imaging using affine and free-form deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Joyoni; O'Connor, J. Michael; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J.

    2008-03-01

    Preliminary evidence has suggested that computerized tomographic (CT) imaging of the breast using a cone-beam, flat-panel detector system dedicated solely to breast imaging has potential for improving detection and diagnosis of early-stage breast cancer. Hypothetically, a powerful mechanism for assisting in early stage breast cancer detection from annual screening breast CT studies would be to examine temporal changes in the breast from year-to-year. We hypothesize that 3D image registration could be used to automatically register breast CT volumes scanned at different times (e.g., yearly screening exams). This would allow radiologists to quickly visualize small changes in the breast that have developed during the period since the last screening CT scan, and use this information to improve the diagnostic accuracy of early-stage breast cancer detection. To test our hypothesis, fresh mastectomy specimens were imaged with a flat-panel CT system at different time points, after moving the specimen to emulate the re-positioning motion of the breast between yearly screening exams. Synthetic tumors were then digitally inserted into the second CT scan at a clinically realistic location (to emulate tumor growth from year-to-year). An affine and a spline-based 3D image registration algorithm was implemented and applied to the CT reconstructions of the specimens acquired at different times. Subtraction of registered image volumes was then performed to better analyze temporal change. Results from this study suggests that temporal change analysis in 3D breast CT can potentially be a powerful tool in improving the visualization of small lesion growth.

  15. Improved Modeling of In Vivo Kinetics of Slowly Diffusing Radiotracers for Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Moses Q.; Knowles, Scott M.; Wu, Anna M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Large-molecule tracers, such as labeled antibodies, have shown success in immuno-PET for imaging of specific cell surface biomarkers. However, previous work has shown that localization of such tracers shows high levels of heterogeneity in target tissues, due to both the slow diffusion and the high affinity of these compounds. In this work, we investigate the effects of subvoxel spatial heterogeneity on measured time–activity curves in PET imaging and the effects of ignoring diffusion limitation on parameter estimates from kinetic modeling. Methods Partial differential equations (PDE) were built to model a radially symmetric reaction-diffusion equation describing the activity of immuno-PET tracers. The effects of slower diffusion on measured time–activity curves and parameter estimates were measured in silico, and a modified Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm with Bayesian priors was developed to accurately estimate parameters from diffusion-limited data. This algorithm was applied to immuno-PET data of mice implanted with prostate stem cell antigen–overexpressing tumors and injected with 124I-labeled A11 anti–prostate stem cell antigen minibody. Results Slow diffusion of tracers in linear binding models resulted in heterogeneous localization in silico but no measurable differences in time–activity curves. For more realistic saturable binding models, measured time–activity curves were strongly dependent on diffusion rates of the tracers. Fitting diffusion-limited data with regular compartmental models led to parameter estimate bias in an excess of 1,000% of true values, while the new model and fitting protocol could accurately measure kinetics in silico. In vivo imaging data were also fit well by the new PDE model, with estimates of the dissociation constant (Kd) and receptor density close to in vitro measurements and with order of magnitude differences from a regular compartmental model ignoring tracer diffusion limitation. Conclusion Heterogeneous

  16. Optical imaging of tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yihan; Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Jinbo; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays important roles in tumor development and metastasis. Features of the tumor microenvironment that are significantly different from normal tissues include acidity, hypoxia, overexpressed proteases and so on. Therefore, these features can serve as not only biomarkers for tumor diagnosis but also theraputic targets for tumor treatment. Imaging modalities such as optical, positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been intensively applied to investigate tumor microenvironment. Various imaging probes targeting pH, hypoxia and proteases in tumor microenvironment were thus well developed. In this review, we will focus on recent examples on fluorescent probes for optical imaging of tumor microenvironment. Construction of these fluorescent probes were based on characteristic feature of pH, hypoxia and proteases in tumor microenvironment. Strategies for development of these fluorescent probes and applications of these probes in optical imaging of tumor cells or tissues will be discussed in this review paper. PMID:23342297

  17. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies.

  18. Spectral contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography for improved detection of tumor microvasculature and functional imaging of lymphatic drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; Sen, Debasish; de la Zerda, Adam

    2017-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well-suited to study in vivo dynamics of blood circulation and lymphatic flow because of the technique's combination of rapid image acquisition, micron spatial resolution, and penetration depth in turbid tissues. However, OCT has been historically constrained by a dearth of contrast agents that are readily distinguished from the strong scattering intrinsic to biological tissues. In this study, we demonstrate large gold nanorods (LGNRs) as optimized contrast agents for OCT. LGNRs produce 32-fold greater backscattering than GNRs previously tested for contrast-enhanced OCT. Furthermore, LGNRs exhibit 110-fold stronger spectral signal than conventional GNRs when coupled with custom spectral detection algorithms. This signal enhancement enables picomolar OCT detection sensitivity in vivo and single-particle detection against optically-clear backgrounds. Moreover, the ability to synthesize LGNRs with tunable spectral peaks provides a viable platform for multiplexed imaging studies. To explore the advantages of LGNRs as OCT contrast agents, we implemented them for noninvasive 3D imaging of tumor blood supply and active lymphatic drainage in mice. Spectral detection of LGNRs enabled 100% improvement in imaging depth for detecting microvasculature (vessels 20 μm in diameter) in U87MG glioblastoma xenografts in mice pinnae. We also demonstrated our approach's ability to map the spatial dependence of lymph drainage and flow directionality within lymphatic capillaries. Using LGNRs with distinct spectra, we further identified the functional states of individual lymphatic valves in vivo. Thus, this approach provides a powerful new platform for functional imaging that may be extended for future molecular imaging studies with OCT.

  19. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Stephanie A; Tuite, Michael J; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-21

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [(18)F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  20. Molecular image-directed biopsies: improving clinical biopsy selection in patients with multiple tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Stephanie A.; Tuite, Michael J.; Jeraj, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Site selection for image-guided biopsies in patients with multiple lesions is typically based on clinical feasibility and physician preference. This study outlines the development of a selection algorithm that, in addition to clinical requirements, incorporates quantitative imaging data for automatic identification of candidate lesions for biopsy. The algorithm is designed to rank potential targets by maximizing a lesion-specific score, incorporating various criteria separated into two categories: (1) physician-feasibility category including physician-preferred lesion location and absolute volume scores, and (2) imaging-based category including various modality and application-specific metrics. This platform was benchmarked in two clinical scenarios, a pre-treatment setting and response-based setting using imaging from metastatic prostate cancer patients with high disease burden (multiple lesions) undergoing conventional treatment and receiving whole-body [18F]NaF PET/CT scans pre- and mid-treatment. Targeting of metastatic lesions was robust to different weighting ratios and candidacy for biopsy was physician confirmed. Lesion ranked as top targets for biopsy remained so for all patients in pre-treatment and post-treatment biopsy selection after sensitivity testing was completed for physician-biased or imaging-biased scenarios. After identifying candidates, biopsy feasibility was evaluated by a physician and confirmed for 90% (32/36) of high-ranking lesions, of which all top choices were confirmed. The remaining cases represented lesions with high anatomical difficulty for targeting, such as proximity to sciatic nerve. This newly developed selection method was successfully used to quantitatively identify candidate lesions for biopsies in patients with multiple lesions. In a prospective study, we were able to successfully plan, develop, and implement this technique for the selection of a pre-treatment biopsy location.

  1. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging improves geometric performance for image-guided radiation therapy of pelvic tumors.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Warren D; Porter, David A; Simeonov, Anna; Aleong, Amanda; Jaffray, David; Chung, Peter; Han, Kathy; Ménard, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) is prone to geometric inaccuracy, which may limit application to image-guided radiation therapy planning, as well as for voxel-based quantitative multi-parametric or multi-modal approaches. This research investigates pelvic applications at 3 T of a standard single-shot (ssEPI) and a prototype readout-segmented (rsEPI) technique. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy and geometric performance of rsEPI and ssEPI were compared using phantoms, and in vivo, involving 8 patients prior to MR-guided brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer, and 19 patients with prostate cancer planned for tumor-targeted radiotherapy. Global and local deviations in geometric performance were tested using Dice Similarity Coefficients (DC) and Hausdorff Distances (HD). In cervix patients, DC increased from 0.76±0.14 to 0.91±0.05 for the high risk clinical target volume, and 0.62±0.26 to 0.85±0.08 for the gross tumor target volume. Tumors in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland were partly projected erroneously outside of the posterior anatomic boundary of the gland by 3.1±1.6 mm in 11 of 19 patients using ADC-ssEPI but not with ADC-rsEPI. Both cervix and prostate ssEPI are prone to clinically relevant geometric distortions at 3T. rsEPI provides improved geometric performance without post-processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation and Immunohistochemical Qualification of Carbogen-Induced ΔR{sub 2}* as a Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Improved Tumor Oxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Lauren C.J.; Boult, Jessica K.R.; Jamin, Yann; Gilmour, Lesley D.; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Burrell, Jake S.; Ashcroft, Margaret; Howe, Franklyn A.; Griffiths, John R.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Robinson, Simon P.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and histologically qualify carbogen-induced ΔR{sub 2}* as a noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging biomarker of improved tumor oxygenation using a double 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker approach. Methods and Materials: Multigradient echo images were acquired from mice bearing GH3 prolactinomas, preadministered with the hypoxia marker CCI-103F, to quantify tumor R{sub 2}* during air breathing. With the mouse remaining positioned within the magnet bore, the gas supply was switched to carbogen (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}), during which a second hypoxia marker, pimonidazole, was administered via an intraperitoneal line, and an additional set of identical multigradient echo images acquired to quantify any changes in tumor R{sub 2}*. Hypoxic fraction was quantified histologically using immunofluorescence detection of CCI-103F and pimonidazole adduct formation from the same whole tumor section. Carbogen-induced changes in tumor pO{sub 2} were further validated using the Oxylite fiberoptic probe. Results: Carbogen challenge significantly reduced mean tumor R{sub 2}* from 116 ± 13 s{sup −1} to 97 ± 9 s{sup −1} (P<.05). This was associated with a significantly lower pimonidazole adduct area (2.3 ± 1%), compared with CCI-103F (6.3 ± 2%) (P<.05). A significant correlation was observed between ΔR{sub 2}* and Δhypoxic fraction (r=0.55, P<.01). Mean tumor pO{sub 2} during carbogen breathing significantly increased from 6.3 ± 2.2 mm Hg to 36.0 ± 7.5 mm Hg (P<.01). Conclusions: The combined use of intrinsic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging with a double hypoxia marker approach corroborates carbogen-induced ΔR{sub 2}* as a noninvasive imaging biomarker of increased tumor oxygenation.

  3. Improved tumor imaging and therapy via i.v. IgG-mediated time-sequential modulation of neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Jaspreet Singh; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Seshan, Surya V; Zanzonico, Pat; Henke, Erik; Nagel, Andrew; Schwartz, Jazmin; Beattie, Brad; Kappel, Barry J; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; Xiao, Jing; Sgouros, George; Larson, Steven M; Scheinberg, David A

    2007-09-01

    The long plasma half-life of IgG, while allowing for enhanced tumor uptake of tumor-targeted IgG conjugates, also results in increased background activity and normal-tissue toxicity. Therefore, successful therapeutic uses of conjugated antibodies have been limited to the highly sensitive and readily accessible hematopoietic tumors. We report a therapeutic strategy to beneficially alter the pharmacokinetics of IgG antibodies via pharmacological inhibition of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) using high-dose IgG therapy. IgG-treated mice displayed enhanced blood and whole-body clearance of radioactivity, resulting in better tumor-to-blood image contrast and protection of normal tissue from radiation. Tumor uptake and the resultant therapeutic response was unaltered. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of this approach for imaging of tumors in humans and discuss its potential applications in cancer imaging and therapy. The ability to reduce the serum persistence of conjugated IgG antibodies after their infusion can enhance their therapeutic index, resulting in improved therapeutic and diagnostic efficacy.

  4. Improved tumor imaging and therapy via i.v. IgG–mediated time-sequential modulation of neonatal Fc receptor

    PubMed Central

    Singh Jaggi, Jaspreet; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Seshan, Surya V.; Zanzonico, Pat; Henke, Erik; Nagel, Andrew; Schwartz, Jazmin; Beattie, Brad; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; Xiao, Jing; Sgouros, George; Larson, Steven M.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The long plasma half-life of IgG, while allowing for enhanced tumor uptake of tumor-targeted IgG conjugates, also results in increased background activity and normal-tissue toxicity. Therefore, successful therapeutic uses of conjugated antibodies have been limited to the highly sensitive and readily accessible hematopoietic tumors. We report a therapeutic strategy to beneficially alter the pharmacokinetics of IgG antibodies via pharmacological inhibition of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) using high-dose IgG therapy. IgG-treated mice displayed enhanced blood and whole-body clearance of radioactivity, resulting in better tumor-to-blood image contrast and protection of normal tissue from radiation. Tumor uptake and the resultant therapeutic response was unaltered. Furthermore, we demonstrated the use of this approach for imaging of tumors in humans and discuss its potential applications in cancer imaging and therapy. The ability to reduce the serum persistence of conjugated IgG antibodies after their infusion can enhance their therapeutic index, resulting in improved therapeutic and diagnostic efficacy. PMID:17717602

  5. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  6. Imaging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eik Hock; Tan, Cher Heng

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors can be broadly divided into anatomic and functional techniques. Anatomic imaging determines the local extent of the primary lesion, providing crucial information required for surgical planning. Functional imaging, not only determines the extent of metastatic disease spread, but also provides important information with regard to the biologic behavior of the tumor, allowing clinicians to decide on the most appropriate forms of treatment. We review the current literature on this subject, with emphasis on the strengths of each imaging modality. PMID:21603312

  7. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  8. Recent advances in activatable fluorescence imaging probes for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Jin, Guorui; Weng, Guojun; Li, Jianjun; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Junwu

    2017-04-20

    Fluorescence imaging is superior in sensitivity and resolution compared with other imaging modalities; however, its application is hindered by high background noise. Tissue-selective strategies, such as passive, active, and activatable targeting, hold great promise in accelerating clinical translation by significantly improving the tumor:background ratio (TBR) and, in turn, the sensitivity and contrast of fluorescence imaging. Compared with the 'always on' contrast agents, activatable probes, which remain nonfluorescent until being activated by tumor-specific molecular targets, further enhance TBR and at the same time provide additional molecular information that can be related to tumor staging and therapy response. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the development of activatable fluorescence probes and provide insights into their advantages and limitations when used for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Interleukin 16- (IL-16-) Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Agent Improves Detection of Ovarian Tumors in Laying Hens, a Preclinical Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Barua, Animesh; Yellapa, Aparna; Bahr, Janice M; Adur, Malavika K; Utterback, Chet W; Bitterman, Pincas; Basu, Sanjib; Sharma, Sameer; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-01-01

    Limited resolution of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) scanning is a significant barrier to early detection of ovarian cancer (OVCA). Contrast agents have been suggested to improve the resolution of TVUS scanning. Emerging evidence suggests that expression of interleukin 16 (IL-16) by the tumor epithelium and microvessels increases in association with OVCA development and offers a potential target for early OVCA detection. The goal of this study was to examine the feasibility of IL-16-targeted contrast agents in enhancing the intensity of ultrasound imaging from ovarian tumors in hens, a model of spontaneous OVCA. Contrast agents were developed by conjugating biotinylated anti-IL-16 antibodies with streptavidin coated microbubbles. Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity was determined before and after injection of contrast agents. Following scanning, ovarian tissues were processed for the detection of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. Compared with precontrast, contrast imaging enhanced ultrasound signal intensity significantly in OVCA hens at early (P < 0.05) and late stages (P < 0.001). Higher intensities of ultrasound signals in OVCA hens were associated with increased frequencies of IL-16 expressing cells and microvessels. These results suggest that IL-16-targeted contrast agents improve the visualization of ovarian tumors. The laying hen may be a suitable model to test new imaging agents and develop targeted anti-OVCA therapeutics.

  10. Pancreatic tumors imaging: An update.

    PubMed

    Scialpi, Michele; Reginelli, Alfonso; D'Andrea, Alfredo; Gravante, Sabrina; Falcone, Giuseppe; Baccari, Paolo; Manganaro, Lucia; Palumbo, Barbara; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) represent the mainstay in the evaluation of pancreatic solid and cystic tumors affecting pancreas in 80-85% and 10-15% of the cases respectively. Integration of US, CT or MR imaging is essential for an accurate assessment of pancreatic parenchyma, ducts and adjacent soft tissues in order to detect and to stage the tumor, to differentiate solid from cystic lesions and to establish an appropriate treatment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of pancreatic tumors and the role of imaging in their diagnosis and management. In order to a prompt and accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of pancreatic lesions, it is crucial for radiologists to know the key findings of the most frequent tumors of the pancreas and the current role of imaging modalities. A multimodality approach is often helpful. If multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the preferred initial imaging modality in patients with clinical suspicion for pancreatic cancer, multiparametric MRI provides essential information for the detection and characterization of a wide variety of pancreatic lesions and can be used as a problem-solving tool at diagnosis and during follow-up. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Radionuclide imaging of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Boerman, Otto C

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process regulated by pro- and antiangiogenic factors. In order to grow and metastasize, tumors need a constant supply of oxygen and nutrients. For growth beyond 1-2 mm in size, tumors are dependent on angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis is a new cancer treatment strategy that is now widely investigated clinically. Researchers have begun to search for objective measures that indicate pharmacologic responses to antiangiogenic drugs. Therefore, there is a great interest in techniques to visualize angiogenesis in growing tumors noninvasively. Several markers have been described that are preferentially expressed on newly formed blood vessels in tumors (alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and its receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen) and in the extracellular matrix surrounding newly formed blood vessels (extra domain B of fibronectin, Tenascin-C, matrix metalloproteinases, and Robo-4). Several ligands targeting these markers have been tested as a radiotracer for imaging angiogenesis in tumors. The potential of some of these tracers, such as radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides and radiolabeled anti-PSMA antibodies, has already been tested in cancer patients, while for markers such as Robo-4, the ligand has not yet been identified. In this review, an overview on the currently used nuclear imaging probes for noninvasive visualization of tumor angiogenesis is given.

  12. Scintigraphic imaging of carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.; Kamanabroo, D.

    1985-05-01

    131-1-metaiodobenzylguanidine (131-1-MIBG) is used for scintigraphic localization and treatment of pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma. Several other tumors, deriving from neuroectoderm (APUD tumors) may also produce catecholamines. 4 patients with surgically proven carcinoid tumors were studied by 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy. Scintigraphic images were performed with a computer assisted gamma camera 2.24, 48 and 72 hours after IV injection of 26 MBq 131-I-MIBG. In one patient single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 185 Mgq 123-I-MIBG was performed additionally. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hours-urinary samples by HPLC. Serotonine was determined in plasma. Catecholamine excretion was normal in all patients, whereas serotonine was elevated in all of them. In 2 of 4 patients slight tracer uptake was observed in some of liver metastases, whereas other metastases in the liver and the primary tumor did not show 131-1-MIBG uptake. In one patient with a carcinoid tumor of the pancreas 131-1-MIBG scintigraphy and SPECT with 123-1-MIBG was positive. In one patient scintigraphy was false negative. MIBG scintigraphy is not only suitable for imaging pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma, but may also localize carcinoid tumors and their metastases.

  13. Integrin Targeting for Tumor Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yunpeng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Optical imaging has emerged as a powerful modality for studying molecular recognitions and molecular imaging in a noninvasive, sensitive, and real-time way. Some advantages of optical imaging include cost-effectiveness, convenience, and non-ionization safety as well as complementation with other imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Over the past decade, considerable advances have been made in tumor optical imaging by targeting integrin receptors in preclinical studies. This review has emphasized the construction and evaluation of diverse integrin targeting agents for optical imaging of tumors in mouse models. They mainly include some near-infrared fluorescent dye-RGD peptide conjugates, their multivalent analogs, and nanoparticle conjugates for targeting integrin αvβ3. Some compounds targeting other integrin subtypes such as α4β1 and α3 for tumor optical imaging have also been included. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have revealed some promising integrin-targeting optical agents which have further enhanced our understanding of integrin expression and targeting in cancer biology as well as related anticancer drug discovery. Especially, some integrin-targeted multifunctional optical agents including nanoparticle-based optical agents can multiplex optical imaging with other imaging modalities and targeted therapy, serving as an attractive type of theranostics for simultaneous imaging and targeted therapy. Continued efforts to discover and develop novel, innovative integrin-based optical agents with improved targeting specificity and imaging sensitivity hold great promises for improving cancer early detection, diagnosis, and targeted therapy in clinic. PMID:21546996

  14. Improved targeting accuracy of lung tumor biopsies with scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis image guidance.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Geoff; Wu, Meng; Hinkel, Cameron; Krishna, Ganesh; Funk, Tobias; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) provides improved targeting accuracy during transbronchial biopsies of suspicious nodules. The greatest weakness of ENB-based guidance is the registration divergence that exists between the planning CT, acquired days or weeks before the intervention, and the patient on the table on the day of the intervention. Augmenting ENB guidance with real-time tomosynthesis imaging during the intervention could mitigate the divergence and further improve the yield of ENB-guided transbronchial biopsies. The real-time tomosynthesis prototype, the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system, does not currently display images reconstructed by the iterative algorithm that was developed for this lung imaging application. A protocol using fiducial markers was therefore implemented to permit evaluation of potential improvements that would be provided by the SBDX system in a clinical setting. Ten 7 mm lesions (5 per side) were injected into the periphery of each of four preserved pig lungs. The lungs were then placed in a vacuum chamber that permitted simulation of realistic motion and deformation due to breathing. Standard clinical CT scans of the pig lung phantoms were acquired and reconstructed with isotropic resolution of 0.625 mm. Standard ENB-guided biopsy procedures including target identification, path planning, CT-to-lung registration and navigation to the lesion were carried out, and a fiducial marker was placed at the location at which a biopsy would have been acquired. The channel-to-target distance provided by the ENB system prior to fiducial placement was noted. The lung phantoms were then imaged using the SBDX system, and using high-resolution conebeam CT. The distance between the fiducial marker tip and the lesion was measured in SBDX images and in the gold-standard conebeam-CT images. The channel-to-target divergence predicted by the ENB system and measured in the SBDX images was compared to the gold standard to determine if

  15. Radiolabeled Nanoparticles for Multimodality Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Zhao, Jinhua; Conti, Peter S.; Chen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Each imaging modality has its own unique strengths. Multimodality imaging, taking advantages of strengths from two or more imaging modalities, can provide overall structural, functional, and molecular information, offering the prospect of improved diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring abilities. The devices of molecular imaging with multimodality and multifunction are of great value for cancer diagnosis and treatment, and greatly accelerate the development of radionuclide-based multimodal molecular imaging. Radiolabeled nanoparticles bearing intrinsic properties have gained great interest in multimodality tumor imaging over the past decade. Significant breakthrough has been made toward the development of various radiolabeled nanoparticles, which can be used as novel cancer diagnostic tools in multimodality imaging systems. It is expected that quantitative multimodality imaging with multifunctional radiolabeled nanoparticles will afford accurate and precise assessment of biological signatures in cancer in a real-time manner and thus, pave the path towards personalized cancer medicine. This review addresses advantages and challenges in developing multimodality imaging probes by using different types of nanoparticles, and summarizes the recent advances in the applications of radiolabeled nanoparticles for multimodal imaging of tumor. The key issues involved in the translation of radiolabeled nanoparticles to the clinic are also discussed. PMID:24505237

  16. Imaging of CNS Tumors in Children: Advances and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Vézina, Louis-Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    MR technology is constantly improving. Functional imaging techniques such as MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, diffusion imaging and diffusion tensor imaging are increasingly utilized in the pediatric patient with a brain tumor. However estimate of tumor size remains the primary imaging endpoint in the evaluation of response to treatment; validation across institutions and vendor platforms of MRI functional parameters is necessary given the relative uncommon occurrence of brain tumors in children. Pediatric neuroimaging can be challenging, and the optimal way to image children with CNS tumors is not uniformly applied across all centers. Application of proper scanning techniques and validation of functional imaging techniques should lead to improved care of children with CNS tumors PMID:18952579

  17. Tumor detection in gamma-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Robin N.

    1992-12-01

    We describe a nonlinear detector which uses student's t-test to locate tumors occurring in anatomic background. The detector computes the significance of any observed difference between the mean of features extracted from a small, circular search window and the mean of features belonging to an outer, concentric background window. The t-test is applied to search windows at every pixel location in the image. The t-statistic computed from the sample means and variances of the inner and outer regions is thresholded at a chosen significance level to give a positive detection. The response of the detector peaks when the inner window coincides with a bright spot of the same size. Nonuniform anatomic background activity is effectively suppressed, except for structure of the same size and shape as the tumors being sought. Because the t-statistic is a true measure of significance, it can be applied to any set of features which are likely to distinguish tumors. We apply the test to two features, one related to object intensity and the other to object shape. A final determination on the presence and location of tumors is made by a simple combination of the significance levels generated from each feature. Tests are performed using simulated tumors superimposed on clinical images. Performance curves resembling standard receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) plots show a slight improvement over the prewhitening matched filter. Unlike the matched filter, however, the t-test detector assumes nothing specific about the tumor apart from its size.

  18. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-01-01

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment. PMID:27566585

  19. Optimization of the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Shi, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Wang, Lanting; Mei, Heng; Lu, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2016-09-20

    Effective delivery of nanomedicines to tumor tissues depends on both the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties. Accordingly, tumor microenvironment modification or advanced design of nanomedicine was emerging to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. However, few studies have emphasized the necessity to optimize the tumor microenvironment and nanomedicine properties simultaneously to improve tumor treatment. In the present study, imatinib mesylate (IMA) was used to normalize the tumor microenvironment including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression inhibition, tumor vessel normalization, and tumor perfusion improvement as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of tumor microenvironment normalization on tumor delivery of nanomedicines with different sizes was carefully investigated. It was shown that IMA treatment significantly reduced the accumulation of nanoparticles (NPs) around 110 nm but enhanced the accumulation of micelles around 23 nm by in vivo fluorescence imaging experiment. Furthermore, IMA treatment limited the distribution of NPs inside tumors but increased that of micelles with a more homogeneous pattern. Finally, the anti-tumor efficacy study displayed that IMA pretreatment could significantly increase the therapeutic effects of paclitaxel-loaded micelles. All-together, a new strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumor was provided by optimizing both nanomedicine size and the tumor microenvironment simultaneously, and it will have great potential in clinics for tumor treatment.

  20. New approach to optical imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-07-01

    Site specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as phototherapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carriers such as antibiodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in long blood clearance times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmacokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near infrared absorbing dye to several bioactive peptides that specifically target overexpressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit from this approach.

  1. Musculoskeletal tumor imaging, biopsy, and therapies: self-assessment module.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Catherine C; Liu, Patrick T; Wenger, Doris E

    2009-12-01

    The educational objectives for this self-assessment module are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her understanding of musculoskeletal tumor imaging, biopsy, and therapies. The solutions in this activity review the imaging characteristics of musculoskeletal tumors, biopsy approaches, and therapies.

  2. Advanced MR Imaging in Pediatric Brain Tumors, Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Maarten; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques, such as spectroscopy, perfusion, diffusion, and functional imaging, have improved the diagnosis of brain tumors in children and also play an important role in defining surgical as well as therapeutic responses in these patients. In addition to the anatomic or structural information gained with conventional MR imaging sequences, advanced MR imaging techniques also provide physiologic information about tumor morphology, metabolism, and hemodynamics. This article reviews the physiology, techniques, and clinical applications of diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, perfusion MR imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and functional MR imaging in the setting of neuro-oncology.

  3. [Diagnostic imaging of thyroid tumor].

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Megumi

    2012-11-01

    Recently, thyroid nodules are found frequently when other imaging test was performed, and selection of diagnostic methods and its handling have become a problem clinically. Although it is possible to differentiate the malignant tumor from benign one using B-mode ultrasound, it can be obtained more detailed information in combination of other modalities such as color Doppler and tissue elasticity imaging (elastography). The malignant B-mode findings are irregular shape, indistinct border, hypoechoic and inhomogeneous internal echo, and fine calcification. CT/MRI is useful to evaluate the extention of thyroid cancer to adjacent organs beyond the thyroid capsule. It is also useful to evaluate distant metastases to lung or brain of thyroid cancer. In nuclear medicine, 125I scintigraphy is used to measure thyroid uptake rate, 131I scintigraphy is used to investigate the distant metastasis of thyroid cancer. It is necessary to be careful that some false-positive cases exist in 18FDG-PET.

  4. Applications of nanotechnology to imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Aaron M; Provenzale, James M

    2010-08-01

    In the past decade, numerous advances in the understanding of brain tumor physiology, tumor imaging, and tumor therapy have been attained. In some cases, these advances have resulted from refinements of pre-existing technologies (eg, improvements of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging). In other instances, advances have resulted from development of novel technologies. The development of nanomedicine (ie, applications of nanotechnology to the field of medicine) is an example of the latter. In this review, the authors explain the principles that underlay nanoparticle design and function as well as the means by which nanoparticles can be used for imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

  5. Improved differentiation of benign and malignant breast tumors with multiparametric 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pinker, Katja; Bogner, Wolfgang; Baltzer, Pascal; Karanikas, Georgios; Magometschnigg, Heinrich; Brader, Peter; Gruber, Stephan; Bickel, Hubert; Dubsky, Peter; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bartsch, Rupert; Weber, Michael; Trattnig, Siegfried; Helbich, Thomas H

    2014-07-01

    To assess whether multiparametric (18)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (MP (18)FDG PET-MRI) using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopic imaging (3D (1)H-MRSI), and (18)FDG-PET enables an improved differentiation of benign and malignant breast tumors. Seventy-six female patients (mean age, 55.7 years; range, 25-86 years) with an imaging abnormality (BI-RADS 0, 4-5) were included in this Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved study. Patients underwent fused PET-MRI of the breast with (18)FDG-PET/CT and MP MRI at 3T. The likelihood of malignancy was assessed for all single parameters, for MP MRI with two/three parameters, and for MP (18)FDG PET-MRI. Histopathology was used as the standard of reference. Appropriate statistical tests were used to assess sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy for each assessment combination. There were 53 malignant and 23 benign breast lesions. MP (18)FDG PET-MRI yielded a significantly higher area under the cure (AUC) of 0.935 than DCE-MRI (AUC, 0.86; P = 0.044) and the combination of DCE-MRI and another parameter (AUC, 0.761-0.826; P = 0.013-0.020). MP (18)FDG PET-MRI showed slight further improvement to MP MRI with three parameters (AUC, 0.925; P = 0.317). Using MP (18)FDG PET-MRI there would have been a reduction of the unnecessary breast biopsies recommended by MP imaging with one or two parameters (P = 0.002-0.011). This feasibility study shows that MP (18)FDG PET-MRI enables an improved differentiation of benign and malignant breast tumors when several MRI and PET parameters are combined. MP (18)FDG PET-MRI may lead to a reduction in unnecessary breast biopsies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Tongue Tumor Detection in Medical Hyperspectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hongjun; Li, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system to measure and analyze the reflectance spectra of the human tongue with high spatial resolution is proposed for tongue tumor detection. To achieve fast and accurate performance for detecting tongue tumors, reflectance data were collected using spectral acousto-optic tunable filters and a spectral adapter, and sparse representation was used for the data analysis algorithm. Based on the tumor image database, a recognition rate of 96.5% was achieved. The experimental results show that hyperspectral imaging for tongue tumor diagnosis, together with the spectroscopic classification method provide a new approach for the noninvasive computer-aided diagnosis of tongue tumors. PMID:22368462

  7. Phyllodes tumor: review of key imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Michael Jonathan; Swintelski, Cara; Yaziji, Hadi; Torres-Salichs, Manuel; Esserman, Lisa E

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is rare and often resembles the more commonly seen fibroadenoma at imaging and histologically. As core biopsy cannot always distinguish the two, assessing radiologic-pathologic concordance is essential to guide appropriate clinical management. We review the imaging characteristics of phyllodes tumor at mammography, ultrasound, and MRI to help the interpreting radiologist be aware of key imaging features that should alert him to the possibility of a phyllodes tumor even if not verified by initial core biopsy.

  8. Shaping Tumor Microenvironment for Improving Nanoparticle Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is so complex that involves in many factors of tumor. Although enhanced permeability and retention effect is a main driving force of tumor targeted nanoparticles, the tumor microenvironment greatly affects the delivery efficiency of nanoparticles. A careful search of the scientific database was performed to find the tumor microenvironment related papers. Then the papers were concluded and reviewed. In tumor, elevated interstitial fluid pressure, abnormal tumor vasculature, dense tumor extracellular matrix and elevated solid stress considerably hinder the extravasation and intratumor penetration of nanoparticles. Therefore, shaping the tumor microenvironment could improve nanoparticle delivery, including vascular normalization, vasculature promotion therapy, lymph normalization, reducing tumor stroma components, elevating blood pressure, elevating receptor expression, cell cycle arrest and priming by cytotoxic therapy. Shaping the tumor microenvironment could considerably enhance the nanoparticles delivery.

  9. Brain tumor resection guided by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fontaine, Kathryn M.; Valdes, Pablo; Ji, Songbai; Pogue, Brian W.; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    We present the methods that are being used in the scope of an on-going clinical trial designed to assess the usefulness of ALA-PpIX fluorescence imaging when used in conjunction with pre-operative MRI. The overall objective is to develop imaging-based neuronavigation approaches to aid in maximizing the completeness of brain tumor resection, thereby improving patient survival rate. In this paper we present the imaging methods that are used, emphasizing technical aspects relating to the fluorescence optical microscope, including initial validation approaches based on phantom and small-animal experiments. The surgical workflow is then described in detail based on a high-grade glioma resection we performed.

  10. MR imaging in staging of bone tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    For staging of bone tumors, TNM and Enneking’s systems are used with some differences. Magnetic resonance imaging is particularly useful for defining the extent of high-grade tumors, including transcortical and intertrabecular infiltration and periosteal extension. The concepts of compartment and curative surgical margins are important for bone tumor staging. PMID:17098647

  11. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  12. Image Analysis of the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Mark C; Johnson, Joseph O; Kasprzak, Agnieszka; Bui, Marilyn M

    2016-01-01

    In the field of pathology it is clear that molecular genomics and digital imaging represent two promising future directions, and both are as relevant to the tumor microenvironment as they are to the tumor itself (Beck AH et al. Sci Transl Med 3(108):108ra113-08ra113, 2011). Digital imaging, or whole slide imaging (WSI), of glass histology slides facilitates a number of value-added competencies which were not previously possible with the traditional analog review of these slides under a microscope by a pathologist. As an important tool for investigational research, digital pathology can leverage the quantification and reproducibility offered by image analysis to add value to the pathology field. This chapter will focus on the application of image analysis to investigate the tumor microenvironment and how quantitative investigation can provide deeper insight into our understanding of the tumor to tumor microenvironment relationship.

  13. Improved brain tumor segmentation by utilizing tumor growth model in longitudinal brain MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Linmin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Li, Wei; Davatzikos, Christos; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose a novel method to improve texture based tumor segmentation by fusing cell density patterns that are generated from tumor growth modeling. To model tumor growth, we solve the reaction-diffusion equation by using Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). Computational tumor growth modeling obtains the cell density distribution that potentially indicates the predicted tissue locations in the brain over time. The density patterns is then considered as novel features along with other texture (such as fractal, and multifractal Brownian motion (mBm)), and intensity features in MRI for improved brain tumor segmentation. We evaluate the proposed method with about one hundred longitudinal MRI scans from five patients obtained from public BRATS 2015 data set, validated by the ground truth. The result shows significant improvement of complete tumor segmentation using ANOVA analysis for five patients in longitudinal MR images.

  14. Pitfalls in MR imaging of musculoskeletal tumors.

    PubMed

    Arkun, Remide; Argin, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    A wide range of musculoskeletal tumors and tumor-like conditions may be encountered when patients undergo radiologic examinations. Although MR imaging is a powerful medical imaging method that has been used extensively in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors, nontumoral or tumorlike lesions may have similar imaging findings. The imaging features of certain normal, reactive, benign neoplastic, inflammatory, traumatic, or degenerative processes in the musculoskeletal system may mimic malignant tumors. Misinterpretation of the imaging findings can lead to inappropriate clinical management of the patient. We review and describe the MR imaging characteristics of nontumoral bone lesions that are located in the marrow cavity, cortical bone, or in both, and soft tissue lesions that may be misinterpreted as sarcoma. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Emerging techniques and technologies in brain tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Bendszus, Martin; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Pope, Whitney B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the state of imaging techniques and technologies for detecting response of brain tumors to treatment in the setting of multicenter clinical trials. Within currently used technologies, implementation of standardized image acquisition and the use of volumetric estimates and subtraction maps are likely to help to improve tumor visualization, delineation, and quantification. Upon further development, refinement, and standardization, imaging technologies such as diffusion and perfusion MRI and amino acid PET may contribute to the detection of tumor response to treatment, particularly in specific treatment settings. Over the next few years, new technologies such as 23Na MRI and CEST imaging technologies will be explored for their use in expanding the ability to quantitatively image tumor response to therapies in a clinical trial setting. PMID:25313234

  16. Tumor detection in vivo NIRF images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Yang, Lin; Kamalakar, Ganti; Bleyle, Derek J.; Sunkara, Sudhir K.; Wang, Yufei; Prudich, Philip; Huang, Yuangcui; Zhou, Qiang

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in the field of biotechnology and imaging systems have enabled real-time in vivo imaging at both the cellular and molecular level. This paper focuses on a technique that has been designed to detect tumor cells in vivo when using NIRF (near-infrared 705-715 nm range fluorescence) images. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm offers reasonably accurate estimates of the tumor parameters in the presence of white noise and varying background.

  17. Infrared spectroscopic imaging of renal tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šablinskas, Valdas; Urbonienė, Vidita; Ceponkus, Justinas; Laurinavicius, Arvydas; Dasevicius, Darius; Jankevičius, Feliksas; Hendrixson, Vaiva; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2011-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging has been used to probe the biochemical composition of human renal tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue. Freshly resected renal tumor tissue from surgery was prepared as a thin cryosection and examined by FTIR spectroscopic imaging. Tissue types could be discriminated by utilizing a combination of fuzzy k-means cluster analysis and a supervised classification algorithm based on a linear discriminant analysis. The spectral classification is compared and contrasted with the histological stained image. It is further shown that renal tumor cells have spread in adjacent normal tissue. This study demonstrates that FTIR spectroscopic imaging can potentially serve as a fast and objective approach for discrimination of renal tumor tissue from normal tissue and even in the detection of tumor infiltration in adjacent tissue.

  18. Toward real-time tumor margin identification in image-guided robotic brain tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danying; Jiang, Yang; Belykh, Evgenii; Gong, Yuanzheng; Preul, Mark C.; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    For patients with malignant brain tumors (glioblastomas), a safe maximal resection of tumor is critical for an increased survival rate. However, complete resection of the cancer is hard to achieve due to the invasive nature of these tumors, where the margins of the tumors become blurred from frank tumor to more normal brain tissue, but in which single cells or clusters of malignant cells may have invaded. Recent developments in fluorescence imaging techniques have shown great potential for improved surgical outcomes by providing surgeons intraoperative contrast-enhanced visual information of tumor in neurosurgery. The current near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores, such as indocyanine green (ICG), cyanine5.5 (Cy5.5), 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), are showing clinical potential to be useful in targeting and guiding resections of such tumors. Real-time tumor margin identification in NIR imaging could be helpful to both surgeons and patients by reducing the operation time and space required by other imaging modalities such as intraoperative MRI, and has the potential to integrate with robotically assisted surgery. In this paper, a segmentation method based on the Chan-Vese model was developed for identifying the tumor boundaries in an ex-vivo mouse brain from relatively noisy fluorescence images acquired by a multimodal scanning fiber endoscope (mmSFE). Tumor contours were achieved iteratively by minimizing an energy function formed by a level set function and the segmentation model. Quantitative segmentation metrics based on tumor-to-background (T/B) ratio were evaluated. Results demonstrated feasibility in detecting the brain tumor margins at quasi-real-time and has the potential to yield improved precision brain tumor resection techniques or even robotic interventions in the future.

  19. Improving drug delivery to solid tumors: priming the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Khawar, Iftikhar Ali; Kim, Jung Ho; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-03-10

    Malignant transformation and growth of the tumor mass tend to induce changes in the surrounding microenvironment. Abnormality of the tumor microenvironment provides a driving force leading not only to tumor progression, including invasion and metastasis, but also to acquisition of drug resistance, including pharmacokinetic (drug delivery-related) and pharmacodynamic (sensitivity-related) resistance. Drug delivery systems exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and active targeting moieties were expected to be able to cope with delivery-related drug resistance. However, recent evidence supports a considerable barrier role of tumors via various mechanisms, which results in imperfect or inefficient EPR and/or targeting effect. The components of the tumor microenvironment such as abnormal tumor vascular system, deregulated composition of the extracellular matrix, and interstitial hypertension (elevated interstitial fluid pressure) collectively or cooperatively hinder the drug distribution, which is prerequisite to the efficacy of nanoparticles and small-molecule drugs used in cancer medicine. Hence, the abnormal tumor microenvironment has recently been suggested to be a promising target for the improvement of drug delivery to improve therapeutic efficacy. Strategies to modulate the abnormal tumor microenvironment, referred to here as "solid tumor priming" (vascular normalization and/or solid stress alleviation leading to improvement in blood perfusion and convective molecular movement), have shown promising results in the enhancement of drug delivery and anticancer efficacy. These strategies may provide a novel avenue for the development of new chemotherapeutics and combination chemotherapeutic regimens as well as reassessment of previously ineffective agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. It is different from normal tissue in the extracellular matrix, vascular and lymphatic networks, as well as physiologic conditions. Molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment provides a better understanding of its function in cancer biology, and thus allowing for the design of new diagnostics and therapeutics for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. The clinical translation of cancer molecular imaging is often hampered by the high cost of commercialization of targeted imaging agents as well as the limited clinical applications and small market size of some of the agents. Because many different cancer types share similar tumor microenvironment features, the ability to target these biomarkers has the potential to provide clinically translatable molecular imaging technologies for a spectrum of cancers and broad clinical applications. There has been significant progress in targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer molecular imaging. In this review, we summarize the principles and strategies of recent advances made in molecular imaging of the tumor microenvironment, using various imaging modalities for early detection and diagnosis of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-03-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  2. Terahertz Imaging of Three-Dimensional Dehydrated Breast Cancer Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; Wu, Yuhao; Gauch, John; Campbell, Lucas K.; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the application of terahertz imaging to three-dimensional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast cancer tumors. The results demonstrate the capability of terahertz for in-depth scanning to produce cross section images without the need to slice the tumor. Samples of tumors excised from women diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma are investigated using a pulsed terahertz time domain imaging system. A time of flight estimation is used to obtain vertical and horizontal cross section images of tumor tissues embedded in paraffin block. Strong agreement is shown comparing the terahertz images obtained by electronically scanning the tumor in-depth in comparison with histopathology images. The detection of cancer tissue inside the block is found to be accurate to depths over 1 mm. Image processing techniques are applied to provide improved contrast and automation of the obtained terahertz images. In particular, unsharp masking and edge detection methods are found to be most effective for three-dimensional block imaging.

  3. Site Specific Discrete PEGylation of 124I-Labeled mCC49 Fab′ Fragments Improves Tumor MicroPET/CT Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M.; Povoski, Stephen P.; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H.; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D.; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W.; Tweedle, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2–4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab′ (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab′ (Fab′-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 (124I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab′ with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab′-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab′ by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab′-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab′-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab′-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID

  4. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A.

  5. MONODISPERSED PEG-DOTA CONJUGATED ANTI-TAG-72 DIABODY HAS LOW KIDNEY UPTAKE AND HIGH TUMOR TO BLOOD RATIOS RESULTING IN IMPROVED 64Cu PET IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Turatti, Fabio; Crow, Desiree; Bading, James R.; Anderson, Anne-Line; Poku, Erasmus; Yazaki, Paul J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Tamvakis, Debra; Sanders, Paul; Leong, David; Raubitschek, Andrew; Hudson, Peter J.; Colcher, David; Shively, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Diabodies are non-covalent dimers of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that retain the avidity of intact IgG but have more favorable blood clearance than intact IgGs. Radiometals offer a wide range of half lives and emissions for matching imaging and therapy requirements and provide facile labeling of chelate-antibody conjugates. However, due to their high retention and metabolism in the kidney, use of radiometal labeled diabodies can be problematic for both imaging and therapy. Methods Having previously shown that 111In-DOTA-PEG3400-anti-CEA-diabody has similarly high tumor uptake and retention and less than 50% as much kidney uptake and retention as non-PEGylated diabody, we synthesized a similar derivative for an anti-TAG-72-diabody. We also reduced the molecular size of the polydispersed PEG3400 to monodispersed PEG27 and PEG12 (nominal masses of 1188 and 528, respectively). We performed biodistributions of their DOTA conjugates radiolabeled with 125I, 111In, or 64Cu in tumor bearing athymic mice. Results Addition of PEG3400 to the diabody reduced kidney uptake to a level (≈10 %ID/g) comparable to that obtained with radiometal labeled intact IgG. The PEG27 and PEG12 diabody conjugates also demonstrated low kidney uptake without reduction of tumor uptake or tumor to blood ratios. When radiolabeled with 64Cu, the DOTA-PEG12- and PEG27-diabody conjugates gave high contrast PET images of colon cancer xenografts in athymic mice. Conclusion PEGylated diabodies may be a valuable platform for delivery of radionuclides and other agents to tumors. PMID:20554731

  6. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  7. Radiation-induced tumor neoantigens: imaging and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Corso, Christopher D; Ali, Arif N; Diaz, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of tumor cells to ionizing radiation (IR) is widely known to induce a number of cellular changes. One way that IR can affect tumor cells is through the development of neoantigens which are new molecules that tumor cells express at the cell membrane following some insult or change to the cell. There have been numerous reports in the literature of changes in both tumor and tumor vasculature cell surface molecule expression following treatment with IR. The usefulness of neoantigens for imaging and therapeutic applications lies in the fact that they are differentially expressed on the surface of irradiated tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. This differential expression provides a mechanism by which tumor cells can be “marked” by radiation for further targeting. Drug delivery vehicles or imaging agents conjugated to ligands that recognize and interact with the neoantigens can help to improve tumor-specific targeting and reduce systemic toxicity with cancer drugs. This article provides a review of the molecules that have been reported to be expressed on the surface of tumor cells in response to IR either in vivo or in vitro. Additionally, we provide a discussion of some of the methods used in the identification of these antigens and applications for their use in drug delivery and imaging. PMID:21969260

  8. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  9. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  10. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  11. A pretargeting system for tumor PET imaging and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Rousseau, Caroline; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Frampas, Eric; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Rauscher, Aurore; Sharkey, Robert M.; Goldenberg, David M.; Chatal, Jean-François; Barbet, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Labeled antibodies, as well as their fragments and antibody-derived recombinant constructs, have long been proposed as general vectors to target radionuclides to tumor lesions for imaging and therapy. They have indeed shown promise in both imaging and therapeutic applications, but they have not fulfilled the original expectations of achieving sufficient image contrast for tumor detection or sufficient radiation dose delivered to tumors for therapy. Pretargeting was originally developed for tumor immunoscintigraphy. It was assumed that directly-radiolabled antibodies could be replaced by an unlabeled immunoconjugate capable of binding both a tumor-specific antigen and a small molecular weight molecule. The small molecular weight molecule would carry the radioactive payload and would be injected after the bispecific immunoconjugate. It has been demonstrated that this approach does allow for both antibody-specific recognition and fast clearance of the radioactive molecule, thus resulting in improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios. It was subsequently shown that pretargeting also held promise for tumor therapy, translating improved tumor-to-normal tissue contrast ratios into more specific delivery of absorbed radiation doses. Many technical approaches have been proposed to implement pretargeting, and two have been extensively documented. One is based on the avidin-biotin system, and the other on bispecific antibodies binding a tumor-specific antigen and a hapten. Both have been studied in preclinical models, as well as in several clinical studies, and have shown improved targeting efficiency. This article reviews the historical and recent preclinical and clinical advances in the use of bispecific-antibody-based pretargeting for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of cancer. The results of recent evaluation of pretargeting in PET imaging also are discussed. PMID:25873896

  12. Site-specific conjugation of monodispersed DOTA-PEGn to a thiolated diabody reveals the effect of increasing peg size on kidney clearance and tumor uptake with improved 64-copper PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Crow, Desiree; Turatti, Fabio; Bading, James R; Anderson, Anne-Line; Poku, Erasmus; Yazaki, Paul J; Carmichael, Jenny; Leong, David; Wheatcroft, David; Wheatcroft, Michael P; Raubitschek, Andrew A; Hudson, Peter J; Colcher, David; Shively, John E

    2011-04-20

    (64)Cu in PET imaging in an animal model. Tumor uptake was significantly improved from the 50% ID/g at 24 h observed with diabodies that were pegylated on surface lysine residues. Importantly, there was no loss of immunoreactivity of the site-specific Cys-conjugated diabody to its antigen (TAG-72) compared to the parent, unconjugated diabody. We propose that thiolated diabodies conjugated to DOTAylated monodisperse PEGs have the potential for superior SPECT and PET imaging in a clinical setting.

  13. Imaging of brain tumor proliferative activity with iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Tjuvajev, J.G.; Macapinlac, H.A.; Daghighian, F.

    1994-09-01

    Iodine-131-iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged with SPECT at 2 and 24 hr after administering a 10-mCi dose to six patients with primary brain tumors. The SPECT images were directly compared to gadolinium contrast-enhanced MR images as well as to ({sup 18}F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET scans and {sup 201}Tl SPECT scans. Localized uptake and retention of IUdR-derived radioactivity was observed in five of six patients. The plasma half-life of ({sup 131}I) IUdR was short (1.5 min) in comparison to the half-life of total plasma radioactivity (6.4 hr). The pattern of ({sup 131}I)IUdR-derived radioactivity was markedly different in the 2-hr compared to 24-hr images. Radioactivity was localized along the periphery of the tumor and extended beyond the margin of tumor identified by contrast enhancement on MRI. The estimated levels of tumor radioactivity at 24 hr, based on semiquantitative phantom studies, ranged between <0.1 and 0.2 {mu}Ci/cc (<0.001% and 0.002% dose/cc); brain levels were not measurable. Iodine-131-IUdR SPECT imaging of brain tumor proliferation has low (marginal) sensitivity due to low count rates and can detect only the most active regions of tumor growth. Imaging at 24 hr represents a washout strategy to reduce {sup 131}I-labeled metabolites contributing to background activity in the tumors, and is more likely to show the pattern of ({sup 131}I)IUdR-DNA incorporation and thereby increase image specificity. Iodine-123-IUdR SPECT imaging at 12 hr and the use of ({sup 124}I)IUdR and PET will improve count acquisitions and image quality. 74 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Functional imaging in tumor-associated lymphatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-03-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in cancer cell dissemination; however whether lymphatic drainage pathways and function change during tumor progression and metastasis remains to be elucidated. In this report, we employed a non-invasive, dynamic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging technique for functional lymphatic imaging. Indocyanine green (ICG) was intradermally injected into tumor-free mice and mice bearing C6/LacZ rat glioma tumors in the tail or hindlimb. Our imaging data showed abnormal lymphatic drainage pathways and reduction/loss of lymphatic contractile function in mice with lymph node (LN) metastasis, indicating that cancer metastasis to the draining LNs is accompanied by transient changes of the lymphatic architectural network and its function. Therefore, functional lymphatic imaging may provide a role in the clinical staging of cancer.

  15. Pediatric Cerebellar Tumors: Emerging Imaging Techniques and Advances in Understanding of Genetic Features.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar tumors are the most common group of solid tumors in children. MR imaging provides an important role in characterization of these lesions, surgical planning, and postsurgical surveillance. Preoperative imaging can help predict the histologic subtype of tumors, which can provide guidance for surgical planning. Beyond histology, pediatric brain tumors are undergoing new classification schemes based on genetic features. Intraoperative MR imaging has emerged as an important tool in the surgical management of pediatric brain tumors. Effective understanding of the imaging features of pediatric cerebellar tumors can benefit communication with neurosurgeons and neuro-oncologists and can improve patient management.

  16. Preoperative imaging diagnosis of carotid body tumors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Ojeda, Luis A; Martínez-Viteri, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    Carotid body tumors (CBTs) are relatively frequent lesions encountered at high altitudes, such in as the Andean Mountains. A correct preoperative diagnosis is essential for surgical planning and performance. For this reason, we have reviewed the evolution of our experience in the imaging diagnosis of these tumors. Between 1980 and June 2008, 160 CBTs were diagnosed. A total of 138 tumors were operated on, 4 are waiting for surgery, and 18 were not operated on because of age, medical conditions, or patient refusal. We have reviewed retrospectively the modalities of imaging diagnosis in our patients who underwent operation. Among the 138 tumors operated on, a correct preoperative diagnosis was done in 127 cases (92%). The preoperative diagnosis of the remaining 11 patients was unspecified benign tumor for 6 patients and neck lymph node for 5 patients. The imaging methods performed by different radiologists were conventional ultrasound, color Doppler ultrasound, carotid conventional angiography (CA), axial tomography, magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance angiography, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Most patients had more than one image study. Review of radiologist reports revealed a correct diagnosis in all carotid CA, magnetic resonance studies, and CTA. Additionally, CTA appeared to be a valuable method to predict the Shamblin group. Clinical suspicion and current image techniques permit a correct diagnosis in practically all cases of CBT.

  17. I-131 MIBG imaging of carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Blinder, R.A.; Feldman, J.M.; Coleman, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    The potential of I-131 MIBG to image carcinoid tumors was evaluated in nine patients with pathologically proven carcinoid. Three patients with foregut carcinoid tumors (2 bronchial and one pancreatic), had abnormal urinary 5-HIAA, and one had the carcinoid syndrome. Six patients had midgut carcinoid tumors (5 ileal and 1 cecal), 5 had abnormal urinary 5-HIAA, and 4 had the carcinoid syndrome. All of the patients with midgut carcinoids had metestatic disease to the liver and/or mesentery. Two hundred microcuries of I-131 MIBG were injected intravenously and the patients were studied at 24 and 48 hours. In all patients except those with bronchial carcinoids Tc-99m sulfur colloid liver exams with computer subtraction were performed during the study. The patients with bronchial carcinoids showed no uptake in the tumors. The patient with a pancreatic carcinoid who had carcinoid syndrome demonstrated tumor uptake in hepatic metastases. Of the six patients with midgut carcinoids, 4 demonstrated MIBG uptake in tumors. One patient with mesenteric disease did not have definitive tumor uptake. A second patient with liver involvement at surgery was negative on the MIBG study. Hepatic CT and scintigraphy were negative and the patient's 5-HIAA was normal. The 4 patients with carcinoid syndrome had abnormal MIBG scans. I-131 MIBG demonstrated tumor in 4 of six patients with midgut carcinoids. MIBG was not concentrated in two carcinoids of bronchial origin. The five patients with carcinoid syndrome had positive scans. MIBG has potential as a diagnostic agent in carcinoid tumors.

  18. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferda, Jirí; Kastner, Jan; Mukensnabl, Petr; Choc, Milan; Horemuzová, Jana; Ferdová, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the combination of the contrast enhancement pattern

  19. Lung tumor segmentation in PET images using graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Fulham, Michael; Eberl, Stefan; Feng, David Dagan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of segmentation of tumor regions in positron emission tomography (PET) is to provide more accurate measurements of tumor size and extension into adjacent structures, than is possible with visual assessment alone and hence improve patient management decisions. We propose a segmentation energy function for the graph cuts technique to improve lung tumor segmentation with PET. Our segmentation energy is based on an analysis of the tumor voxels in PET images combined with a standardized uptake value (SUV) cost function and a monotonic downhill SUV feature. The monotonic downhill feature avoids segmentation leakage into surrounding tissues with similar or higher PET tracer uptake than the tumor and the SUV cost function improves the boundary definition and also addresses situations where the lung tumor is heterogeneous. We evaluated the method in 42 clinical PET volumes from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our method improves segmentation and performs better than region growing approaches, the watershed technique, fuzzy-c-means, region-based active contour and tumor customized downhill.

  20. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD)-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5%) PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung pseudometastatic model after a 24 hours

  1. [124I]-iododeoxyuridine imaging tumor proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Blasberg, R.; Roelcke, U.; Weinreich, R.

    1996-05-01

    Quantitative imaging of tissue proliferation could identify the regions of tumor that are most rapidly dividing, provide spatial information for radiation treatment planning and stereotactic biopsies, and provide an earlier measure of treatment response than CT or MR, or FDG PET. Carrier-free [124I]-labeled sodium iodide was produced at Essen Univ., and [124I]-IUdR was synthesized at PSI by a reaction with 2-deoxyuridine in an iodogen coated reaction vial; radiochemical yield varied from 51-71%. [124I]-IUdR was injected i.v. in 10 patients with primary brain tumors and sequential scans were obtained 0-60 min and at 24 hrs (1 hr scan) with a Siemens ECAT 933/04-16 tomograph. The PET and MR images were registered to each other using the Pellizzari algorithm. The IUdR-DNA incorporation constant (Ki) was calculated from ROI time-activity data and the metabolite corrected blood curve. Tumor proliferation was independently assessed by BUdR immunohistochemistry (labeling index) on tissue samples obtained at surgery. Mean tumor activity 24 hrs after [124I]-IUdR administration ranged from 1.9 - 22.1 nCi/cc and Ki ranged from 3.4 - 28.6 {mu}l/min/g. Normal brain activity ranged from 0.74 - 2.2 nCi/cc and Ki was 2.0 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}l/min/g, respectively. The expected relationship between Ki and tumor grade was observed, and a good correlation was observed between Ki and tumor grade was observed, and a good correlation was observed between Ki and labeling index of random surgical tumor specimens in 7 evaluable patients (r=0.86). In higher grade tumors there was marked variation in IUdR activity and Ki, suggesting a wide range of proliferative activity within the tumor. Ki in low grade tumors was low and more uniform. The potential for [124I]-IUdR PET imaging of tumor proliferation was shown to be feasible, despite low injection doses (0.75-1.6 mCi), rapid clearance of [124I]-IUdR from blood, and a low fraction of detectable emission (only 23% of decay is {beta}{sup +}).

  2. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  3. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors. PMID:27786240

  4. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  5. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images.

    PubMed

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-27

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  6. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  7. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2-9.9 mm, which was 0.4-2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT.

  8. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2–9.9 mm, which was 0.4–2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT. PMID:26583772

  9. Phyllodes tumor: diagnostic imaging and histopathology findings.

    PubMed

    Venter, Alina Cristiana; Roşca, Elena; Daina, Lucia Georgeta; Muţiu, Gabriela; Pirte, Adriana Nicoleta; Rahotă, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all primary tumors of the breast. Histologically, phyllodes tumors can be divided into benign (60%), borderline (20%) and malignant (20%). The mammography examination was performed by means of a digital mammography system Giotto 3D Images; the ultrasound examination was performed through a GE Logiq P6 device and histological confirmation was possible after surgery or following the histological biopsy. We grouped the nine patients who presented clinically palpable nodules into two groups, namely: the six patients presenting histological benign results into Group I, and Group II where we included those with borderline and malignant histological results. Mammography performed in 77.7% revealed a well-circumscribed round or oval opacity or with contour lobules. Ultrasound examination was performed in all patients. Mammography and ultrasound have limitation in differentiating between benign lesion and phyllodes tumor. In the nine analyzed cases, mammographic and ultrasound examinations did not allow the differentiation into the three groups of phyllodes tumor. Histopathological examination is considered the golden standard for their diagnosis. Correlations between mammographic and microscopic aspects were inconclusive for determining the degree of differentiation, ultrasound changes could be correlated with the histopathological aspects.

  10. Imaging Review of Skeletal Tumors of the Pelvis Malignant Tumors and Tumor Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Gandikota; Finlay, Karen; Fessell, David; Pai, Deepa; Dong, Qian; Jamadar, David

    2012-01-01

    Malignant lesions of the pelvis are not uncommon and need to be differentiated from benign lesions and tumor mimics. Appearances are sometimes nonspecific leading to consideration of a broad differential diagnosis. Clinical history, anatomic location, and imaging characterization can help narrow the differential diagnosis. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate the imaging features and the role of plain films, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting and characterizing malignant osseous pelvic lesions and their common mimics. PMID:22593667

  11. Imaging and treating tumor vasculature with targeted radiolabeled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Villa, Carlos H; Holland, Jason P; Sprinkle, Shanna R; May, Chad; Lewis, Jason S; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2010-10-05

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) constructs were covalently appended with radiometal-ion chelates (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [DOTA] or desferrioxamine B [DFO]) and the tumor neovascular-targeting antibody E4G10. The E4G10 antibody specifically targeted the monomeric vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad) epitope expressed in the tumor angiogenic vessels. The construct specific activity and blood compartment clearance kinetics were significantly improved relative to corresponding antibodyalone constructs. We performed targeted radioimmunotherapy with a SWCNT-([(225)Ac]DOTA) (E4G10) construct directed at the tumor vasculature in a murine xenograft model of human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T). The specific construct reduced tumor volume and improved median survival relative to controls. We also performed positron emission tomographic (PET) radioimmunoimaging of the tumor vessels with a SWCNT-([(89)Zr]DFO)(E4G10) construct in the same murine LS174T xenograft model and compared the results to appropriate controls. Dynamic and longitudinal PET imaging of LS174T tumor-bearing mice demonstrated rapid blood clearance (<1 hour) and specific tumor accumulation of the specific construct. Incorporation of the SWCNT scaffold into the construct design permitted us to amplify the specific activity to improve the signal-to-noise ratio without detrimentally impacting the immunoreactivity of the targeting antibody moiety. Furthermore, we were able to exploit the SWCNT pharmacokinetic (PK) profile to favorably alter the blood clearance and provide an advantage for rapid imaging. Near-infrared three-dimensional fluorescent-mediated tomography was used to image the LS174T tumor model, collect antibody-alone PK data, and calculate the number of copies of VE-cad epitope per cell. All of these studies were performed as a single administration of construct and were found to be safe and well tolerated by the murine model. These data have implications that

  12. Imaging and treating tumor vasculature with targeted radiolabeled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Villa, Carlos H; Holland, Jason P; Sprinkle, Shanna R; May, Chad; Lewis, Jason S; Scheinberg, David A; McDevitt, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) constructs were covalently appended with radiometal-ion chelates (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [DOTA] or desferrioxamine B [DFO]) and the tumor neovascular-targeting antibody E4G10. The E4G10 antibody specifically targeted the monomeric vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad) epitope expressed in the tumor angiogenic vessels. The construct specific activity and blood compartment clearance kinetics were significantly improved relative to corresponding antibodyalone constructs. We performed targeted radioimmunotherapy with a SWCNT-([225Ac]DOTA) (E4G10) construct directed at the tumor vasculature in a murine xenograft model of human colon adenocarcinoma (LS174T). The specific construct reduced tumor volume and improved median survival relative to controls. We also performed positron emission tomographic (PET) radioimmunoimaging of the tumor vessels with a SWCNT-([89Zr]DFO)(E4G10) construct in the same murine LS174T xenograft model and compared the results to appropriate controls. Dynamic and longitudinal PET imaging of LS174T tumor-bearing mice demonstrated rapid blood clearance (<1 hour) and specific tumor accumulation of the specific construct. Incorporation of the SWCNT scaffold into the construct design permitted us to amplify the specific activity to improve the signal-to-noise ratio without detrimentally impacting the immunoreactivity of the targeting antibody moiety. Furthermore, we were able to exploit the SWCNT pharmacokinetic (PK) profile to favorably alter the blood clearance and provide an advantage for rapid imaging. Near-infrared three-dimensional fluorescent-mediated tomography was used to image the LS174T tumor model, collect antibody-alone PK data, and calculate the number of copies of VE-cad epitope per cell. All of these studies were performed as a single administration of construct and were found to be safe and well tolerated by the murine model. These data have implications that

  13. Modeling Tumor-Associated Edema in Gliomas during Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Its Impact on Imageable Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor, is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR. Additionally, by evaluating virtual tumors with varying growth kinetics, we see tumors

  14. Modeling Tumor-Associated Edema in Gliomas during Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Its Impact on Imageable Tumor.

    PubMed

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Rockne, Russell C; Anderson, Alexander R A; Swanson, Kristin R

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor, is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR. Additionally, by evaluating virtual tumors with varying growth kinetics, we see tumors

  15. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  16. Neuromorphometry of primary brain tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hevia-Montiel, Nidiyare; Rodriguez-Perez, Pedro I.; Lamothe-Molina, Paul J.; Arellano-Reynoso, Alfonso; Bribiesca, Ernesto; Alegria-Loyola, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Magnetic resonance imaging is a technique for the diagnosis and classification of brain tumors. Discrete compactness is a morphological feature of two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects. This measure determines the compactness of a discretized object depending on the sum of the areas of the connected voxels and has been used for understanding the morphology of nonbrain tumors. We hypothesized that regarding brain tumors, we may improve the malignancy grade classification. We analyzed the values in 20 patients with different subtypes of primary brain tumors: astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and glioblastoma multiforme subdivided into the contrast-enhanced and the necrotic tumor regions. The preliminary results show an inverse relationship between the compactness value and the malignancy grade of gliomas. Astrocytomas exhibit a mean of 973±14, whereas oligodendrogliomas exhibit a mean of 942±21. In contrast, the contrast-enhanced region of the glioblastoma presented a mean of 919±43, and the necrotic region presented a mean of 869±66. However, the volume and area of the enclosing surface did not show a relationship with the malignancy grade of the gliomas. Discrete compactness appears to be a stable characteristic between primary brain tumors of different malignancy grades, because similar values were obtained from different patients with the same type of tumor. PMID:26158107

  17. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors.

  18. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N.; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors. PMID

  19. Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for Tumor Imaging and Treatment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Palpation is an established screening procedure for the detection of several superficial cancers including breast, thyroid, prostate, and liver tumors through both self and clinical examinations. This is because solid masses typically have distinct stiffnesses compared to the surrounding normal tissue. In this paper, the application of Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) for tumor detection based on its stiffness as well as its relevance in thermal treatment is reviewed. HMI uses a focused ultrasound (FUS) beam to generate an oscillatory acoustic radiation force for an internal, non-contact palpation to internally estimate relative tissue hardness. HMI studies have dealt with the measurement of the tissue dynamic motion in response to an oscillatory acoustic force at the same frequency, and have been shown feasible in simulations, phantoms, ex vivo human and bovine tissues as well as animals in vivo. Using an FUS beam, HMI can also be used in an ideal integration setting with thermal ablation using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which also leads to an alteration in the tumor stiffness. In this paper, a short review of HMI is provided that encompasses the findings in all the aforementioned areas. The findings presented herein demonstrate that the HMI displacement can accurately depict the underlying tissue stiffness, and the HMI image of the relative stiffness could accurately detect and characterize the tumor or thermal lesion based on its distinct properties. HMI may thus constitute a non-ionizing, cost-efficient and reliable complementary method for noninvasive tumor detection, localization, diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  20. iRGD-decorated red shift emissive carbon nanodots for tumor targeting fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xuefeng; Liao, Guochao; Liu, Xiqiang; Chen, Qiling; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Ling; Zhao, Peng; Yu, Zhiqiang

    2017-09-06

    Carbon nanodots (CDs) have been exhibiting increasing applications owing to their luminescence properties and biocompatibility as imaging probes in diagnosis. However, poor tumor targeting and penetration of CDs is still the biggest challenge limiting their tumor imaging efficacy. To improve the tumor targeting and penetration efficiency of CDs, we developed an active tumor targeting imaging system by simply fabricating a tumor-homing penetration peptide iRGD (CRGDKGPDC) to red shift emissive CDs (iRGD-CDs) with a physical method. Particularly, iRGD-CDs showed a small size and red shift fluorescence signals as CDs, which made iRGD-CDs suitable for in vivo fluorescence imaging. iRGD-CDs showed higher cellular uptake in vitro, while presented higher penetration and accumulation in tumor tissue in vivo, leading to better tumor imaging efficacy. In conclusion, decoration with iRGD could significantly increase the permeability of CDs in tumor vessels and tumor tissue, generating more CDs leaking out from tumor vasculature, consequently improving the sensitivity of tumor imaging. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K.; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P.; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:28243517

  2. Development of novel murine mammary imaging windows to examine wound healing effects on leukocyte trafficking in mammary tumors with intravital imaging.

    PubMed

    Sobolik, Tammy; Su, Ying-Jun; Ashby, Will; Schaffer, David K; Wells, Sam; Wikswo, John P; Zijlstra, Andries; Richmond, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We developed mammary imaging windows (MIWs) to evaluate leukocyte infiltration and cancer cell dissemination in mouse mammary tumors imaged by confocal microscopy. Previous techniques relied on surgical resection of a skin flap to image the tumor microenvironment restricting imaging time to a few hours. Utilization of mammary imaging windows offers extension of intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment. We have characterized strengths and identified some previously undescribed potential weaknesses of MIW techniques. Through iterative enhancements of a transdermal portal we defined conditions for improved quality and extended confocal imaging time for imaging key cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

  3. Intraoperative Molecular Imaging of Lung Adenocarcinoma Can Identify Residual Tumor Cells at the Surgical Margins.

    PubMed

    Keating, Jane J; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; De Jesus, Elizabeth; Judy, Ryan; Jiang, Jack; Deshpande, Charuhas; Nie, Shuming; Low, Philip; Singhal, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    During lung surgery, identification of surgical margins is challenging. We hypothesized that molecular imaging with a fluorescent probe to pulmonary adenocarcinomas could enhance residual tumor during resection. Mice with flank tumors received a contrast agent targeting folate receptor alpha. Optimal dose and time of injection was established. Margin detection was compared using traditional methods versus molecular imaging. A pilot study was then performed in three humans with lung adenocarcinoma. The peak tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) of murine tumors was 3.9. Fluorescence peaked at 2 h and was not improved beyond 0.1 mg/kg. Traditional inspection identified 30% of mice with positive margins. Molecular imaging identified an additional 50% of residual tumor deposits (p < 0.05). The fluorescent probe visually enhanced all human tumors with a mean TBR of 3.5. Molecular imaging is an important adjunct to traditional inspection to identify surgical margins after tumor resection.

  4. Imaging features of primary tumors of the spine: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Sujata; Jyotsnarani, Y; Uppin, Shantiveer G; Susarla, Rammurti

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumors of spine are rare accounting for less than 5% of new bone tumors diagnosed every year. These tumors may exhibit characteristic imaging features that can help in early diagnosis and improved prognosis. Plasmacytoma/multiple myeloma and lymphoproliferative tumors are the most common malignant primary spinal tumors. Hemangioma is the most common benign tumor of the spine. Computed tomography is useful to assess tumor matrix and osseous change. Magnetic resonance is useful to study associated soft tissue extension, marrow infiltration, and intraspinal extension. Confusing one tumor with the other based on only imaging findings is not uncommon. However, radiologic manifestations of these tumors need to be correlated with the age, sex, location, and presentation to arrive at a close clinical diagnosis. PMID:27413280

  5. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS).

    PubMed

    Menze, Bjoern H; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José Antonió; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M S; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J; Thomas, Owen M; Tustison, Nicholas J; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients-manually annotated by up to four raters-and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%-85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource.

  6. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS)

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B.; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D. Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J.; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R.; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M.; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José António; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J.; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M. S.; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A.; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K.; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J.; Thomas, Owen M.; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients—manually annotated by up to four raters—and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%–85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource. PMID:25494501

  7. Quantitative Monitoring of Murine Lung Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupnick, Alexander Sasha; Tidwell, Vanessa K.; Engelbach, John A.; Alli, Vamsi V.; Nehorai, Arye; You, Ming; Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Garbow, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world and the lung is a common site for recurrence of extra-thoracic malignancies. Small-animal (rodent) models of cancer can play a very valuable role in the development of improved therapeutic strategies. However, detection of murine pulmonary tumors and their subsequent response to therapy, in situ, is challenging. We have recently described magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reliable, reproducible, and non-destructive modality for the detection and serial monitoring of pulmonary tumors. Combining respiratory-gated data acquisition methods with manual and automated segmentation algorithms described by our laboratory, pulmonary tumor burden can be quantitatively measured in approximately one hour (data acquisition plus analysis) per mouse. Quantitative, analytic methods are described for measuring tumor burden in both primary (discrete tumors) and metastatic (diffuse tumors) disease. Thus, small-animal MRI represents a novel and unique research tool for preclinical investigation of therapeutic strategies for treatment of pulmonary malignancies and may be valuable in evaluating new compounds targeting lung cancer in vivo. PMID:22222788

  8. Unsupervised measurement of brain tumor volume on MR images.

    PubMed

    Velthuizen, R P; Clarke, L P; Phuphanich, S; Hall, L O; Bensaid, A M; Arrington, J A; Greenberg, H M; Silbiger, M L

    1995-01-01

    We examined unsupervised methods of segmentation of MR images of the brain for measuring tumor volume in response to treatment. Two clustering methods were used: fuzzy c-means and a nonfuzzy clustering algorithm. Results were compared with volume segmentations by two supervised methods, k-nearest neighbors and region growing, and all results were compared with manual labelings. Results of individual segmentations are presented as well as comparisons on the application of the different methods with 10 data sets of patients with brain tumors. Unsupervised segmentation is preferred for measuring tumor volumes in response to treatment, as it eliminates operator dependency and may be adequate for delineation of the target volume in radiation therapy. Some obstacles need to be overcome, in particular regarding the detection of anatomically relevant tissue classes. This study shows that these improvements are possible.

  9. Peptides homing to tumor vasculature: imaging and therapeutics for cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wu, Kaichun

    2008-11-01

    A major obstacle to advances in anti-vascular therapy is the lack of molecule candidates that are effective in selectively targeting cancer tissues while sparing normal ones. Phage display peptide library greatly eases the discovery of peptides with specific homing capacity. Many novel peptides homing to angiogenic vessels were isolated recently. Notably, many such peptides showed relatively specific affinity with particular tumor types. These peptides appear to be able to accumulate in the target vascular site of tumor, making them particularly efficient to deliver drugs or other therapeutic and imaging agents. Some homing peptides could not only target to the desired location, but also be internalized into targeted cells, or even induce destruction in desired cells all by the same peptide sequence itself. Accumulating evidence has shown that by tumor specific targeting delivery, improved local effect can be achieved with well tolerated side effects. In the current review, recent literatures and patents in this field have been summarized.

  10. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  11. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-08-04

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of 'image registration paths' to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10(-9)).

  12. Enhancing magnetic resonance imaging tumor detection with fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, Ahmet; Hall, David; Hoh, Carl; Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Esener, Sadik; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael; Chen, James; Kesari, Santosh; Makale, Milan

    2010-11-01

    Early detection is important for many solid cancers but the images provided by ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography applied alone or together, are often not sufficient for decisive early screening/diagnosis. We demonstrate that MRI augmented with fluorescence intensity (FI) substantially improves detection. Early stage murine pancreatic tumors that could not be identified by blinded, skilled observers using MRI alone, were easily identified with MRI along with FI images acquired with photomultiplier tube detection and offset laser scanning. Moreover, we show that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging enables positive identification of the labeling fluorophore and discriminates it from surrounding tissue autofluorescence. Our data suggest combined-modality imaging with MRI, FI, and FLT can be used to screen and diagnose early tumors.

  13. Phthalocyanine-labeled LDL for tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Marotta, Diane; Kim, Soungkyoo; Chance, Britton; Glickson, Jerry D.; Busch, Theresa M.; Zheng, Gang

    2005-01-01

    Current limitation of both near-infrared (NIR) tumor imaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT) is their lack of sufficient tumor-to-tissue contrast due to the relatively non-specific nature of delivering dye to the tumor, which has led to false negatives for NIR imaging and inadequate therapeutic ratio for PDT. Hence, agents targeting "cancer signatures", i.e. molecules that accumulate selectively in cancer cells, are particular attractive. One of these signatures is low-density-lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), which is overexpressed in many tumors. We have developed pyropheophorbide cholesterol oleate reconstituted LDL as a LDLR-targeting photosensitizer (PS) and demonstrated its LDLR-mediated uptake in vitro and in vivo. To improve the labeling efficiency for achieving high probe/protein ratio, tetra-t-butyl silicon phthalocyanine bearing two oleate moieties at its axial positions, (tBu)4SiPcBOA, was designed and synthesized. This compound was designed to 1) prevent the PS aggregation; 2) improve the PS solubility in non-polar solvent; and 3) maximize the PS binding to LDL phospholipid monolayer. Using this novel strategy, (tBu)4SiPcBOA was reconstituted into LDL (r-SiPcBOA-LDL) with a very high payload (500:1 molar ratio). In addition, (tBu)4SiPcBOA reconstituted acetylated LDL (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL with similar payload was also prepared. Since Ac-LDL cannot bind to LDLR, (r-SiPcBOA)-AcLDL can serve as the negative control to evaluate LDLR targeting specificity. For biological evaluation of these new agents, confocal microscopy and in vitro PDT protocols were performed using LDLR-overexpressing human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2) tumor model. These studies suggest that LDL serves as a delivery vehicle to bring large amount of the NIR/PDT agents selectively to tumor cells overexpressing LDLR.

  14. Viral Nanoparticles for In vivo Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Amy M.; Lee, Karin L.; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Bruckman, Michael A.; Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2012-01-01

    proteinaceous nanoparticles while enhancing their pharmacokinetics 8,11. We demonstrate tumor homing of PEGylated VNPs using a mouse xenograft tumor model. A combination of fluorescence imaging of tissues ex vivo using Maestro Imaging System, fluorescence quantification in homogenized tissues, and confocal microscopy is used to study biodistribution. VNPs are cleared via the reticuloendothelial system (RES); tumor homing is achieved passively via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect12. The VNP nanotechnology is a powerful plug-and-play technology to image and treat sites of disease in vivo. We are further developing VNPs to carry drug cargos and clinically-relevant imaging moieties, as well as tissue-specific ligands to target molecular receptors overexpressed in cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23183850

  15. Cystic tumors of the pancreas: imaging and management.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Catherine E; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2012-05-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are a subset of rare pancreatic tumors that vary from benign to malignant. Many have specific imaging findings that allow them to be differentiated from each other. This article (1) reviews the imaging features of the common cystic pancreatic lesions, including serous microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic tumor, intraductal papillary mucinous tumor, and solid pseudopapillary tumor, and including the less common lesions such as cystic endocrine tumors, cystic metastases, cystic teratomas, and lymphangiomas; and (2) provides comprehensive algorithms on how to manage the individual lesions, with recommendations on when to reimage patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-05-01

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 3 ×3 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0.88, 0.83, 0.77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0.78, 0.65, and 0.75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  17. Brain Tumor Segmentation using Convolutional Neural Networks in MRI Images.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sergio; Pinto, Adriano; Alves, Victor; Silva, Carlos A

    2016-03-04

    Among brain tumors, gliomas are the most common and aggressive, leading to a very short life expectancy in their highest grade. Thus, treatment planning is a key stage to improve the quality of life of oncological patients. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a widely used imaging technique to assess these tumors, but the large amount of data produced by MRI prevents manual segmentation in a reasonable time, limiting the use of precise quantitative measurements in the clinical practice. So, automatic and reliable segmentation methods are required; however, the large spatial and structural variability among brain tumors make automatic segmentation a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose an automatic segmentation method based on Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), exploring small 33 kernels. The use of small kernels allows designing a deeper architecture, besides having a positive effect against overfitting, given the fewer number of weights in the network. We also investigated the use of intensity normalization as a pre-processing step, which though not common in CNN-based segmentation methods, proved together with data augmentation to be very effective for brain tumor segmentation in MRI images. Our proposal was validated in the Brain Tumor Segmentation Challenge 2013 database (BRATS 2013), obtaining simultaneously the first position for the complete, core, and enhancing regions in Dice Similarity Coefficient metric (0:88, 0:83, 0:77) for the Challenge data set. Also, it obtained the overall first position by the online evaluation platform. We also participated in the on-site BRATS 2015 Challenge using the same model, obtaining the second place, with Dice Similarity Coefficient metric of 0:78, 0:65, and 0:75 for the complete, core, and enhancing regions, respectively.

  18. Improvement of CAT scanned images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Digital enhancement procedure improves definition of images. Tomogram is generated from large number of X-ray beams. Beams are collimated and small in diameter. Scanning device passes beams sequentially through human subject at many different angles. Battery of transducers opposite subject senses attenuated signals. Signals are transmitted to computer where they are used in construction of image on transverse plane through body.

  19. Improvement of CAT scanned images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Digital enhancement procedure improves definition of images. Tomogram is generated from large number of X-ray beams. Beams are collimated and small in diameter. Scanning device passes beams sequentially through human subject at many different angles. Battery of transducers opposite subject senses attenuated signals. Signals are transmitted to computer where they are used in construction of image on transverse plane through body.

  20. SU-E-J-29: Audiovisual Biofeedback Improves Tumor Motion Consistency for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D; Pollock, S; Makhija, K; Keall, P; Greer, P; Arm, J; Hunter, P; Kim, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the breathing-guidance system: audiovisual (AV) biofeedback improves tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. This will minimize respiratory-induced tumor motion variations across cancer imaging and radiotherapy procedues. This is the first study to investigate the impact of respiratory guidance on tumor motion. Methods: Tumor motion consistency was investigated with five lung cancer patients (age: 55 to 64), who underwent a training session to get familiarized with AV biofeedback, followed by two MRI sessions across different dates (pre and mid treatment). During the training session in a CT room, two patient specific breathing patterns were obtained before (Breathing-Pattern-1) and after (Breathing-Pattern-2) training with AV biofeedback. In each MRI session, four MRI scans were performed to obtain 2D coronal and sagittal image datasets in free breathing (FB), and with AV biofeedback utilizing Breathing-Pattern-2. Image pixel values of 2D images after the normalization of 2D images per dataset and Gaussian filter per image were used to extract tumor motion using image pixel values. The tumor motion consistency of the superior-inferior (SI) direction was evaluated in terms of an average tumor motion range and period. Results: Audiovisual biofeedback improved tumor motion consistency by 60% (p value = 0.019) from 1.0±0.6 mm (FB) to 0.4±0.4 mm (AV) in SI motion range, and by 86% (p value < 0.001) from 0.7±0.6 s (FB) to 0.1±0.2 s (AV) in period. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves both breathing pattern and tumor motion consistency for lung cancer patients. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential for facilitating reproducible tumor motion towards achieving more accurate medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  1. Detection of circulating tumor cells via an X-ray imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Yong; Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-03-01

    Detailed information on the location and the size of tumor cells circulating through lymphatic and blood vessels is useful to cancer diagnosis. Metastasis of cancers to other non-adjacent organs is reported to cause 90% of deaths not from the primary tumors. Therefore, effective detection of circulating tumors cells (CTCs) related to metastasis is emphasized in cancer treatments. With the use of synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging techniques, high-resolution images of individual flowing tumor cells were obtained. Positively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) which were inappropriate for incorporation into human red blood cells were selectively incorporated into tumor cells to enhance the image contrast. This approach enables images of individual cancer cells and temporal movements of CTCs to be captured by the high X-ray absorption efficiency of selectively incorporated AuNPs. This new technology for in vivo imaging of CTCs would contribute to improve cancer diagnosis and cancer therapy prognosis.

  2. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H

    2016-03-24

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research.

  3. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2016-03-01

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research.

  4. Reproducibility of radiomics for deciphering tumor phenotype with imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Binsheng; Tan, Yongqiang; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Qi, Jing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Lu, Lin; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2016-01-01

    Radiomics (radiogenomics) characterizes tumor phenotypes based on quantitative image features derived from routine radiologic imaging to improve cancer diagnosis, prognosis, prediction and response to therapy. Although radiomic features must be reproducible to qualify as biomarkers for clinical care, little is known about how routine imaging acquisition techniques/parameters affect reproducibility. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, we assessed the reproducibility of a comprehensive, commonly-used set of radiomic features using a unique, same-day repeat computed tomography data set from lung cancer patients. Each scan was reconstructed at 6 imaging settings, varying slice thicknesses (1.25 mm, 2.5 mm and 5 mm) and reconstruction algorithms (sharp, smooth). Reproducibility was assessed using the repeat scans reconstructed at identical imaging setting (6 settings in total). In separate analyses, we explored differences in radiomic features due to different imaging parameters by assessing the agreement of these radiomic features extracted from the repeat scans reconstructed at the same slice thickness but different algorithms (3 settings in total). Our data suggest that radiomic features are reproducible over a wide range of imaging settings. However, smooth and sharp reconstruction algorithms should not be used interchangeably. These findings will raise awareness of the importance of properly setting imaging acquisition parameters in radiomics/radiogenomics research. PMID:27009765

  5. Correlation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tumor Volume with Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Wood, Bradford J.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. Materials and Methods We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm3) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. Results There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p=0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r2=0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm3 at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p=0.001) and 0.627 (p=0

  6. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p <0.0001), but a weak correlation between prostate specific antigen and histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p <0.00001). On ROC analysis AUC values for magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age in estimating tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) at histopathology were 0.949 (p <0.0000001), 0.685 (p = 0.001) and 0.627 (p = 0.02), respectively. Similar

  7. Pharmacokinetic imaging of pediatric solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Wang, Sihong; Kaste, Sue C.

    1998-07-01

    Previously developed empirical analyses of dynamic contrast- enhanced MR imaging (DEMRI) studies have provided a more quantitative and accurate measure of solid tumor response. However, empirically based methods do not generalize easily to other solid tumors, and changes in the parameters during therapy are hard to relate to physiological mechanisms. This study compares the kinetic parameters from a two-compartment pharmacokinetic (PK) model of MR contrast agent accumulation with disease free survival rates after surgery and investigates the serial changes in these parameters over the course of therapy in thirty-five patients with osteosarcoma. The PK model allowed us to directly determine the relationship between the first-order permeability rate constant (k21) of the model and histologic assessment of response. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the average k21 immediately prior to surgery and was determined to be significantly related to disease free survival. A linear regression analysis between the average k21 at presentation and the resulting change in average k21 during therapy revealed a statistically significant relationship corresponding to greater delivery of contrast agent. Larger regional access at presentation corresponded to larger decreases in access during therapy, which is consistent with the hypothesis that greater regional access at presentation should correspond to greater response to the chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of breast tumor imaging properties with compact, discrete gamma cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, G.J.; Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    The authors describe Monte Carlo simulation results for breast tumor imaging using a compact, discrete gamma camera. The simulations were designed to analyze and optimize camera design, particularly collimator configuration and detector pixel size. Simulated planar images of 5--15 mm diameter tumors in a phantom patient (including a breast, torso, and heart) were generated for imaging distances of 5--55 mm, pixel sizes of 2 x 2--4 x 4 mm{sup 2}, and hexagonal and square hole collimators with sensitivities from 4,000 to 16,000 counts/mCi/sec. Other factors considered included T/B (tumor-to-background tissue uptake ratio) and detector energy resolution. Image properties were quantified by computing the observed tumor fwhm (full-width at half-maximum) and S/N (sum of detected tumor events divided by the statistical noise). Results suggest that hexagonal and square hole collimators perform comparably, that higher sensitivity collimators provide higher tumor S/N with little increase in the observed tumor fwhm, that smaller pixels only slightly improve tumor fwhm and S/N, and that improved detector energy resolution has little impact on either the observed tumor fwhm or the observed tumor S/N.

  10. LCP nanoparticle for tumor and lymph node metastasis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-Cheng

    A lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle formulation (particle diameter ˜25 nm) has previously been developed to delivery siRNA with superior efficiency. In this work, 111In was formulated into LCP nanoparticles to form 111In-LCP for SPECT/CT imaging. With necessary modifications and improvements of the LCP core-washing and surface-coating methods, 111In-LCP grafted with polyethylene glycol exhibited reduced uptake by the mononuclear phagocytic system. SPECT/CT imaging supported performed biodistribution studies, showing clear tumor images with accumulation of 8% or higher injected dose per gram tissue (ID/g) in subcutaneous, human-H460, lung-cancer xenograft and mouse-4T1, breast cancer metastasis models. Both the liver and the spleen accumulated ˜20% ID/g. Accumulation in the tumor was limited by the enhanced permeation and retention effect and was independent of the presence of a targeting ligand. A surprisingly high accumulation in the lymph nodes (˜70% ID/g) was observed. In the 4T1 lymph node metastasis model, the capability of intravenously injected 111In-LCP to visualize the size-enlarged and tumor-loaded sentinel lymph node was demonstrated. By analyzing the SPECT/CT images taken at different time points, the PK profiles of 111In-LCP in the blood and major organs were determined. The results indicated that the decrement of 111In-LCP blood concentration was not due to excretion, but to tissue penetration, leading to lymphatic accumulation. Larger LCP (diameter ˜65 nm) nanoparticles were also prepared for the purpose of comparison. Results indicated that larger LCP achieved slightly lower accumulation in the tumor and lymph nodes, but much higher accumulation in the liver and spleen; thus, larger nanoparticles might not be favorable for imaging purposes. We also demonstrated that LCP with a diameter of ˜25 nm were better able to penetrate into tissues, travel in the lymphatic system and preferentially accumulate in the lymph nodes due to 1) small

  11. Tumor Microvasculature and Microenvironment: Novel Insights Through Intravital Imaging in Pre-Clinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Fukumura, Dai; Duda, Dan G.; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intravital imaging techniques have provided unprecedented insight into tumor microcirculation and microenvironment. For example, these techniques allowed quantitative evaluations of tumor blood vasculature to uncover its abnormal organization, structure and function (e.g., hyper-permeability, heterogeneous and compromised blood flow). Similarly, imaging of functional lymphatics has documented their absence inside tumors. These abnormalities result in elevated interstitial fluid pressure and hinder the delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. In addition, they induce a hostile microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and acidosis, as documented by intravital imaging. The abnormal microenvironment further lowers the effectiveness of anti-tumor treatments such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In addition to these mechanistic insights, intravital imaging may also offer new opportunities to improve therapy. For example, tumor angiogenesis results in immature, dysfunctional vessels—primarily caused by an imbalance in production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors by the tumors. Restoring the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling in tumors can “normalize” tumor vasculature and thus, improve its function, as demonstrated by intravital imaging studies in preclinical models and in cancer patients. Administration of cytotoxic therapy during periods of vascular normalization has the potential to enhance treatment efficacy. PMID:20374484

  12. Imaging in neuroendocrine tumors: an update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E; Howe, James R

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that are best worked up and managed using a variety of clinical and imaging studies. They are often diagnosed after they have already metastasized, though this does not necessarily preclude an attempt at curative surgical treatment or surgical debulking. Tumor burden assessment often requires use of multiple imaging modalities including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. Somatostatin receptor-based imaging is also of great utility in looking for primaries and determining the extent of metastatic disease. This paper will review the most common imaging modalities used in the diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26257863

  13. Improved Digital Image Correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2016-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a powerful technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. A correlation image is formed which gives a peak known as correlation peak. If the two image segments are identical the peak is known as auto-correlation peak otherwise it is known as cross correlation peak. The location of the peak in a correlation image gives the relative displacement between the two image segments. Use of DIC for in-plane displacement and deformation measurements in Electronic Speckle Photography (ESP) is well known. In ESP two speckle images are correlated using DIC and relative displacement is measured. We are presenting background review of ESP and disclosing a technique based on DIC for improved relative measurements which we regard as the improved DIC method. Simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed improved-DIC method is superior to the conventional DIC method in two aspects, in resolution and in the availability of reference position in displacement measurements.

  14. Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Thoriya, Prashant J; Watal, Pankaj; Bahri, Nandini U; Rathod, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    Neoplasms in the region of filum terminale are not uncommon. Myxopapillary ependymoma is the commonest tumor at this location. The differentials reported for this entity are nerve sheath tumor, meningioma, paraganglioma, intradural metastases, lymphoma, other varieties of ependymoma, subependymoma, astrocytoma, ganglioglioma, hemangioblastoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). PNET may very rarely present as an intradural thoracolumbar mass. We present pre- and post-therapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a patient with proven primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PSPNET) of peripheral subtype.

  15. EPR oxygen images predict tumor control by a 50 percent tumor control radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Elas, Martyna; Magwood, Jessica M.; Butler, Brandi; Li, Chanel; Wardak, Rona; Barth, Eugene D.; Epel, Boris; Rubinstein, Samuel; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Halpern, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials to ameliorate hypoxia as a strategy to relieve the radiation resistance it causes have prompted a need to assay the precise extent and location of hypoxia in tumors. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance oxygen imaging (EPR O2 imaging) provides a non-invasive means to address this need. To obtain a preclinical proof of principle that EPR O2 images could predict radiation control, we treated mouse tumors at or near doses required to achieve 50 percent control (TCD50). Mice with FSa fibrosarcoma or MCa4 carcinoma were subjected to EPR O2 imaging and immediately radiated to a TCD50 or TCD50 ±10 Gy.. Statistical analysis was permitted by collection of ~ 1300 tumor pO2 image voxels, including the fraction of tumor voxels with pO2 less than 10 mm Hg (HF10). Tumors were followed for 90 days (FSa) or 120 days (MCa4) to determine local control or failure. HF10 obtained from EPR images showed statistically significant differences between tumors that were controlled by the TCD50 and those that were not controlled for both FSa and MCa4. Kaplan-Meier analysis of both types of tumors showed ~90% of mildly hypoxic tumors were controlled (HF10<10%), and only 37% (FSA) and 23% (MCa4) tumors controlled if hypoxic. EPR pO2 image voxel distributions in these ~0.5 ml tumors provide a prediction of radiation curability independent of radiation dose. These data confirm the significance of EPR pO2 hypoxic fractions. The ~90% control of low HF10 tumors argue that ½ ml subvolumes of tumors may be more sensitive to radiation and may need less radiation for high tumor control rates. PMID:23861469

  16. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ardern-Holmes, Simone L.; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G.; Connor, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Fisher, Michael J.; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J.; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Korf, Bruce R.; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R.; Poussaint, Tina Y.; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Methods: Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. Results: MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. Conclusions: The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors. PMID:24249804

  17. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  18. Functional imaging of tumor vascular network in small animal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Madar-Balakirski, Noa; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2011-07-01

    In current report we present synchronized in vivo imaging of tumor vascular network and tumor microenvironment obtained by combined use of Dynamic Light Scattering Imaging, Spectrally Enhanced Microscopy, and Fluorescence Intravital Microscopy. Dynamic Light Scattering Imaging is used for functional imaging of the vascular network and blood microcirculation. Spectrally Enhanced Microscopy provides information regarding blood vessel topography. Fluorescence Intravital Microscopy is used for imaging of tumor microvasculature and tumor microenvironment. These well known modalities have been comprehensively validated in the past and are widely used in various bio-medical applications. As shown here, their combined application has great potential for studies of vascular biology. This multi-modal non-invasive diagnostic technique expands our current capacity to investigate blood microcirculation and tumor angiogenesis in vivo, thereby contributing to the development of cancer research and treatment.

  19. 362 Priming of the Brain Tumor Microenvironment Enables Improved Nanomedicine Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanxin; Jiang, Wen; Qie, Yaqing; Liu, Xiujie; von Roemeling, Christina; Shih, Kevin; Wharen, Robert E; Kim, Betty Y S

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in cancer nanotechnology is the efficient delivery of nanomedicines into solid tumors. Nanomedicine relies on a functional vascular network and minimal tissue resistance to achieve homogeneous transport and distribution in solid tumor via convection- and diffusion-based mechanisms. This is especially true for brain tumors, where the presence of specialized blood-brain barrier further impedes transport of nanomedicine from the systemic circulation into the central nervous system. Unlike blood vessels within healthy tissues, tumor vessels are often morphologically pathological and functionally impaired, due to an imbalance of pro- and antiangiogenic growth factor production within the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, within the tumor stroma, excessive and heterogeneous productions of collagen and other matrix proteins further restrict nanomedicine distribution. We characterized in real-time, perfusion and diffusion parameters of luminescent nanoparticles using syngeneic GL261 and the spontaneous RCAS-hPDGFb-HA/nestin Tv-a; Ink4a/Arf-/- brain tumor model with multiphoton imaging in vivo. We demonstrate that tumor vasculature exhibits increased permeability and decreased perfusion capacity compared with normal vessels. As a result, transport of nanomedicine across the vessel wall into the tumor stroma is strongly dependent on particle size and surface polarity. Intratumoral mapping of nanomedicine distribution reveals that once gaining entry into tumors, nanoparticles often experience perivascular clumping and are unable to reach tumor tissue beyond 20 µm from the nearest vessels. Finally, with therapeutic modulation of the tumor microenvironment using anti-VEGFr or anti-TGFβ1 antibody treatments to remodel the tumor vasculature and collagen matrix, respectively, we show that tumors begin to exhibit improved tissue perfusion with improved delivery and distribution with nanomedicine into the tumor interstitium. The successful implementation of

  20. In vivo localized harmonic motion imaging of VX2 tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of localized harmonic motion (LHM) imaging for tumor detection in vivo. LHM was induced using a single-element focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer (80 mm focal, 100 mm diameter, 1.54 MHz) and a separate transducer (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion by cross-correlating RF signals. A scan was performed with the transducers assembly and LHM was induced 5 times per location. Images were formed averaging the calculated LHM amplitudes. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs. Tumors were located using Magnetic resonance images and LHM images were obtained. Eight out of ten tumors were visualized on LHM images as a region with lower amplitude (5.7±1.3μm in tumors and 19.5±5.8μm in muscle). All tumors had an elongated shape running along the muscle fibers. It was possible to detect tumors larger than 4mm in width (short axis of the tumor). We performed a FUS ablation of one tumor and the ablated region was detected as well on LHM images as a reduced LHM amplitude region.

  1. Improved kit formulation for preparation of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC: results of preliminary clinical evaluation in imaging patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Korde, Aruna; Mallia, Madhava; Shinto, Ajit; Sarma, H D; Samuel, Grace; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2014-11-01

    (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC is a cost-effective and logistically viable agent for scintigraphy of neuroendocrine tumors overexpressing somatostatin receptors as compared with [(111)In-DTPA-D-Phe(1)] Octreotide (Octreoscan(®)). Several studies have been reported, wherein the efficacy of this agent is demonstrated. In the present article, the authors report the preparation of a single-vial HYNIC-TOC kit suitable for the preparation of 4-5 patient doses (15 mCi/patient) of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC. The kits were tested for sterility and bacterial endotoxins to assure safety of the product. A significant modification in this kit is the inclusion of buffer in the kit itself, unlike in commercially available kits where the buffer solution has to be added during preparation. (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC was prepared by adding 20-80 mCi (740-2960 MBq) of freshly eluted Na(99m)TcO4 in 1-3 mL of sterile saline directly into the kit vial and heating the vial in a water bath at 100°C for 20 minutes. The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, prepared using the lyophilized cold kit, were consistently >90%. The kits were evaluated over a period of 9 months and found to be stable when stored at -20°C. Limited clinical studies performed with the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, formulated using the kit, showed adequate sensitivity and specificity for the detection of gasteroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  2. Parallel optimization of tumor model parameters for fast registration of brain tumor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I.; Hogea, Cosmina S.; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2008-03-01

    The motivation of this work is to register MR brain tumor images with a brain atlas. Such a registration method can make possible the pooling of data from different brain tumor patients into a common stereotaxic space, thereby enabling the construction of statistical brain tumor atlases. Moreover, it allows the mapping of neuroanatomical brain atlases into the patient's space, for segmenting brains and thus facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the methods developed for registration of normal brain images are not directly applicable to the registration of a normal atlas with a tumor-bearing image, due to substantial dissimilarity and lack of equivalent image content between the two images, as well as severe deformation or shift of anatomical structures around the tumor. Accordingly, a model that can simulate brain tissue death and deformation induced by the tumor is considered to facilitate the registration. Such tumor growth simulation models are usually initialized by placing a small seed in the normal atlas. The shape, size and location of the initial seed are critical for achieving topological equivalence between the atlas and patient's images. In this study, we focus on the automatic estimation of these parameters, pertaining to tumor simulation. In particular, we propose an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy and optimize it with APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search), for achieving significant reduction of the computational cost. The results indicate that the registration accuracy is high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain.

  3. Intraoperative targeted optical imaging: a guide towards tumor-free margins in cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Orbay, Hakan; Bean, Jero; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, development of various imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography greatly facilitated the early detection of cancer. Another important aspect that is closely related to the survival of cancer patients is complete tumor removal during surgical resection. The major obstacle in achieving this goal is to distinguish between tumor tissue and normal tissue during surgery. Currently, tumor margins are typically assessed by visual assessment and palpation of the tumor intraoperatively. However, the possibility of microinvasion to the surrounding tissues makes it difficult to determine an adequate tumor-free excision margin, often forcing the surgeons to perform wide excisions including the healthy tissue that may contain vital structures. It would be ideal to remove the tumor completely, with minimal safety margins, if surgeons could see precise tumor margins during the operation. Molecular imaging with optical techniques can visualize the tumors via fluorophore conjugated probes targeting tumor markers such as proteins and enzymes that are upregulated during malignant transformation. Intraoperative use of this technique may facilitate complete excision of the tumor and tumor micromasses located beyond the visual capacity of the naked eye, ultimately improving the clinical outcome and survival rates of cancer patients.

  4. Improving delivery and efficacy of nanomedicines in solid tumors: Role of tumor priming

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Lu, Ze; Gao, Yue; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.-S.

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of nanomedicines in cancer therapy is limited in part by inadequate delivery and transport in tumor interstitium. This report reviews the experimental approaches to improve nanomedicines delivery and transport in solid tumors. These approaches include tumor vasculature normalization, interstitial fluid pressure modulation, enzymatic extracellular matrix degradation, and apoptosis-inducing tumor priming technology. We advocate the latter approach due to its ease and practicality (accomplished with standard-of-care chemotherapy such as paclitaxel) and tumor selectivity. Examples of applying tumor priming to deliver nanomedicines and to design drug/RNAi-loaded carriers are discussed. PMID:22077464

  5. Image-guidance technology and the surgical resection of spinal column tumors.

    PubMed

    Desai, Bhargav; Hobbs, Jonathan; Hartung, Grant; Xu, Guoren; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Linninger, Andreas; Mehta, Ankit I

    2017-02-01

    Precision imaging is paramount to achieving success in surgical resection of many spinal tumors, whether the goal involves guiding a surgical cure for primary tumors or improving neurological decompression for metastatic lesions. Pre-operatively, image visualization is intimately involved with defining a clear target and surgical planning. Intra-operatively, image-guidance technology allows for surgeons to maximize the probability for gross total resection of spinal cord tumors and minimize damage to adjacent structures. Through this review, it is evident that spinal surgery has undergone significant advancements with the continued technological progression of different modalities of imaging guided technologies. Sophisticated imaging techniques compliment the surgeon's knowledge by providing an intraoperative reference to spinal column anatomy. This review discusses research efforts focusing on immersive imaging guided interactions with subject specific medical images that could enhance a surgeon's ability to plan and perform complex spinal oncology procedures with safety and efficiency.

  6. Round Randomized Learning Vector Quantization for Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification into normal and abnormal is a critical and challenging task. Owing to that, several medical imaging classification techniques have been devised in which Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) is amongst the potential. The main goal of this paper is to enhance the performance of LVQ technique in order to gain higher accuracy detection for brain tumor in MRIs. The classical way of selecting the winner code vector in LVQ is to measure the distance between the input vector and the codebook vectors using Euclidean distance function. In order to improve the winner selection technique, round off function is employed along with the Euclidean distance function. Moreover, in competitive learning classifiers, the fitting model is highly dependent on the class distribution. Therefore this paper proposed a multiresampling technique for which better class distribution can be achieved. This multiresampling is executed by using random selection via preclassification. The test data sample used are the brain tumor magnetic resonance images collected from Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center and UCI benchmark data sets. Comparative studies showed that the proposed methods with promising results are LVQ1, Multipass LVQ, Hierarchical LVQ, Multilayer Perceptron, and Radial Basis Function. PMID:27516807

  7. Improved Tumor Uptake by Optimizing Liposome Based RES Blockade Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Yan, Xuefeng; Jacobson, Orit; Sun, Wenjing; Wang, Zhantong; Tong, Xiao; Xia, Yuqiong; Ling, Daishun; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing the sequestration of nanomaterials (NMs) by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) can enhance the circulation time of NMs, and thus increase their tumor-specific accumulation. Liposomes are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) agents that can block the RES reversibly and temporarily. With the help of positron emission tomography (PET), we monitored the in vivo tissue distribution of 64Cu-labeled 40 × 10 nm gold nanorods (Au NRs) after pretreatment with liposomes. We systematically studied the effectiveness of liposome administration by comparing (1) differently charged liposomes; (2) different liposome doses; and (3) varying time intervals between liposome dose and NR dose. By pre-injecting 400 μmol/kg positively charged liposomes into mice 5 h before the Au NRs, the liver and spleen uptakes of Au NRs decreased by 30% and 53%, respectively. Significantly, U87MG tumor uptake of Au NRs increased from 11.5 ± 1.1 %ID/g to 16.1 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 27 h post-injection. Quantitative PET imaging is a valuable tool to understand the fate of NMs in vivo and cationic liposomal pretreatment is a viable approach to reduce RES clearance, prolong circulation, and improve tumor uptake. PMID:28042337

  8. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  9. Functionalized Gold Nanorods for Tumor Imaging and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chen; Cui, Da-xiang

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanorods, as an emerging noble metal nanomaterial with unique properties, have become the new exciting focus of theoretical and experimental studies in the past few years. The structure and function of gold nanorods, especially their biocompatibility, optical property, and photothermal effects, have been attracting more and more attention. Gold nanorods exhibit great potential in applications such as tumor molecular imaging and photothermal therapy. In this article, we review some of the main advances made over the past few years in the application of gold nanorods in surface functionalization, molecular imaging, and photothermal therapy. We also explore other prospective applications and discuss the corresponding concepts, issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating broader interest in gold nanorod-based nanotechnology and improving its practical application. PMID:23691482

  10. Feasibility Study of Dual Energy Radiographic Imaging for Target Localization in Radiotherapy for Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jie; Zhu, Xianfeng; Dong, Yang; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Gang; Hu, Xin-Hua; Feng, Yuanming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Dual-energy (DE) radiographic imaging improves tissue discrimination by separating soft from hard tissues in the acquired images. This study was to establish a mathematic model of DE imaging based on intrinsic properties of tissues and quantitatively evaluate the feasibility of applying the DE imaging technique to tumor localization in radiotherapy. Methods We investigated the dependence of DE image quality on the radiological equivalent path length (EPL) of tissues with two phantoms using a stereoscopic x-ray imaging unit. 10 lung cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy each with gold markers implanted in the tumor were enrolled in the study approved by the hospital's Ethics Committee. The displacements of the centroids of the delineated gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) and in the bone-canceled DE image were compared with the averaged displacements of the centroids of gold markers to evaluate the feasibility of using DE imaging for tumor localization. Results The results of the phantom study indicated that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was linearly dependent on the difference of EPL and a mathematical model was established. The objects and backgrounds corresponding to ΔEPL less than 0.08 are visually indistinguishable in the bone-canceled DE image. The analysis of patient data showed that the tumor contrast in the bone-canceled images was improved significantly as compared with that in the original radiographic images and the accuracy of tumor localization using the DE imaging technique was comparable with that of using fiducial makers. Conclusion It is feasible to apply the technique for tumor localization in radiotherapy. PMID:25268643

  11. PET Radiotracers for Imaging the Proliferative Status of Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Robert H.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Wheeler, Kenneth T.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Two different strategies have been developed for imaging the proliferative status of solid tumors with the functional imaging technique, Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The first strategy uses carbon-11 labeled thymidine and/or, more recently, fluorine-18 labeled thymidine analogs. These agents are a substrate for the enzyme thymidine kinase-1 (TK-1) and provide a pulse label of the number of cells in S phase. The second method for imaging the proliferative status of a tumor uses radiolabeled ligands that bind to the sigma-2 receptor which has a 10-fold higher density in proliferating (P) tumor cells versus quiescent (Q) tumor cells. This article compares and contrasts the two different strategies for imaging the proliferative status of solid tumors, and describes the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. PMID:20046891

  12. Visualizing implanted tumors in mice with magnetic resonance imaging using magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Michael R; Mayer, Dirk; Barak, Yoram; Chen, Ian Y; Hu, Wei; Cheng, Zhen; Wang, Shan X; Spielman, Daniel M; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Matin, A

    2009-08-15

    To determine if magnetotactic bacteria can target tumors in mice and provide positive contrast for visualization using magnetic resonance imaging. The ability of the magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (referred to from here as AMB-1), to confer positive magnetic resonance imaging contrast was determined in vitro and in vivo. For the latter studies, AMB-1 were injected either i.t. or i.v. Bacterial growth conditions were manipulated to produce small (approximately 25-nm diameter) magnetite particles, which were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Tumor targeting was confirmed using 64Cu-labeled bacteria and positron emission tomography and by determination of viable cell counts recovered from different organs and the tumor. We show that AMB-1 bacteria with small magnetite particles generate T1-weighted positive contrast, enhancing in vivo visualization by magnetic resonance imaging. Following i.v. injection of 64Cu-labeled AMB-1, positron emission tomography imaging revealed increasing colonization of tumors and decreasing infection of organs after 4 hours. Viable cell counts showed that, by day 6, the bacteria had colonized tumors but were cleared completely from other organs. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.22-fold (P = 0.003) increased positive contrast in tumors on day 2 and a 1.39-fold increase (P = 0.0007) on day 6. Magnetotactic bacteria can produce positive magnetic resonance imaging contrast and colonize mouse tumor xenografts, providing a potential tool for improved magnetic resonance imaging visualization in preclinical and translational studies to track cancer.

  13. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M Yashar S; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F; Feuerstein, Burt G; Preul, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor.

  14. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  15. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  16. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  17. Segmentation of brain tumors in 4D MR images using the hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Jeffrey; Butman, John A; Sood, Arun

    2006-12-01

    Tumor size is an objective measure that is used to evaluate the effectiveness of anticancer agents. Responses to therapy are categorized as complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive disease. Implicit in this scheme is the change in the tumor over time; however, most tumor segmentation algorithms do not use temporal information. Here we introduce an automated method using probabilistic reasoning over both space and time to segment brain tumors from 4D spatio-temporal MRI data. The 3D expectation-maximization method is extended using the hidden Markov model to infer tumor classification based on previous and subsequent segmentation results. Spatial coherence via a Markov Random Field was included in the 3D spatial model. Simulated images as well as patient images from three independent sources were used to validate this method. The sensitivity and specificity of tumor segmentation using this spatio-temporal model is improved over commonly used spatial or temporal models alone.

  18. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G.; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ˜16. Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2, P<0.001). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15, and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  19. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in wounds.

    PubMed

    Holt, David; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B; Okusanya, Olugbenga; Keating, Jane; Venegas, Ollin; Deshpande, Charuhas; Karakousis, Giorgos; Madajewski, Brian; Durham, Amy; Nie, Shuming; Yodh, Arjun G; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is the most effective method to cure patients with solid tumors, and 50% of all cancer patients undergo resection. Local recurrences are due to tumor cells remaining in the wound, thus we explore near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to identify residual cancer cells after surgery. Fifteen canines and two human patients with spontaneously occurring sarcomas underwent intraoperative imaging. During the operation, the wounds were interrogated with NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. NIR monitoring identified the presence or absence of residual tumor cells after surgery in 14/15 canines with a mean fluorescence signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of ∼16 . Ten animals showed no residual tumor cells in the wound bed (mean SBR<2 , P<0.001 ). None had a local recurrence at >1-year follow-up. In five animals, the mean SBR of the wound was >15 , and histopathology confirmed tumor cells in the postsurgical wound in four/five canines. In the human pilot study, neither patient had residual tumor cells in the wound bed, and both remain disease free at >1.5-year follow up. Intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy identifies residual tumor cells in surgical wounds. These observations suggest that NIR imaging techniques may improve tumor resection during cancer operations.

  20. Polyoxazoline multivalently conjugated with indocyanine green for sensitive in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, which enables high-resolution imaging in deep tissues, has lately attracted considerable attention. For tumor imaging, photoacoustic probes have been proposed to enhance the photoacoustic effect to improve detection sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, polyoxazoline, conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a tumor-targeted photoacoustic probe via enhanced permeability and retention effect. ICG molecules were multivalently conjugated to partially hydrolyzed polyoxazoline, thereby serving as highly sensitive photoacoustic probes. Interestingly, loading multiple ICG molecules to polyoxazoline significantly enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity under the same ICG concentration. In vivo biodistribution studies using tumor bearing mice demonstrated that 5% hydrolyzed polyoxazoline (50 kDa) conjugated with ICG (ICG/polyoxazoline = 7.8), P14-ICG7.8, showed relatively high tumor accumulation (9.4%ID/g), resulting in delivery of the highest dose of ICG among the probes tested. P14-ICG7.8 enabled clear visualization of the tumor regions by photoacoustic imaging 24 h after administration; the photoacoustic signal increased in proportion with the injected dose. In addition, the signal intensity in blood vessels in the photoacoustic images did not show much change, which was attributed to the high tumor-to-blood ratios of P14-ICG7.8. These results suggest that polyoxazoline-ICG would serve as a robust probe for sensitive photoacoustic tumor imaging. PMID:27667374

  1. Polyoxazoline multivalently conjugated with indocyanine green for sensitive in vivo photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Homma, Tsutomu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2016-09-26

    Photoacoustic imaging, which enables high-resolution imaging in deep tissues, has lately attracted considerable attention. For tumor imaging, photoacoustic probes have been proposed to enhance the photoacoustic effect to improve detection sensitivity. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of using a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer, polyoxazoline, conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a tumor-targeted photoacoustic probe via enhanced permeability and retention effect. ICG molecules were multivalently conjugated to partially hydrolyzed polyoxazoline, thereby serving as highly sensitive photoacoustic probes. Interestingly, loading multiple ICG molecules to polyoxazoline significantly enhanced photoacoustic signal intensity under the same ICG concentration. In vivo biodistribution studies using tumor bearing mice demonstrated that 5% hydrolyzed polyoxazoline (50 kDa) conjugated with ICG (ICG/polyoxazoline = 7.8), P14-ICG7.8, showed relatively high tumor accumulation (9.4%ID/g), resulting in delivery of the highest dose of ICG among the probes tested. P14-ICG7.8 enabled clear visualization of the tumor regions by photoacoustic imaging 24 h after administration; the photoacoustic signal increased in proportion with the injected dose. In addition, the signal intensity in blood vessels in the photoacoustic images did not show much change, which was attributed to the high tumor-to-blood ratios of P14-ICG7.8. These results suggest that polyoxazoline-ICG would serve as a robust probe for sensitive photoacoustic tumor imaging.

  2. Abdominal Tumor Characterization and Recognition Using Superior-Order Cooccurrence Matrices, Based on Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Mitrea, Delia; Mitrea, Paulina; Nedevschi, Sergiu; Badea, Radu; Lupsor, Monica; Socaciu, Mihai; Golea, Adela; Hagiu, Claudia; Ciobanu, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of the malignant tumors is an important issue in research nowadays. Our purpose is to elaborate computerized, texture-based methods for performing computer-aided characterization and automatic diagnosis of these tumors, using only the information from ultrasound images. In this paper, we considered some of the most frequent abdominal malignant tumors: the hepatocellular carcinoma and the colonic tumors. We compared these structures with the benign tumors and with other visually similar diseases. Besides the textural features that proved in our previous research to be useful in the characterization and recognition of the malignant tumors, we improved our method by using the grey level cooccurrence matrix and the edge orientation cooccurrence matrix of superior order. As resulted from our experiments, the new textural features increased the malignant tumor classification performance, also revealing visual and physical properties of these structures that emphasized the complex, chaotic structure of the corresponding tissue. PMID:22312411

  3. Tumor homing indocyanine green encapsulated micelles for near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Uthaman, Saji; Bom, Joon-suk; Kim, Hyeon Sik; John, Johnson V; Bom, Hee-Seung; Kim, Seon-Jong; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Il; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging analytical modality that is under intense preclinical development for the early diagnosis of various medical conditions, including cancer. However, the lack of specific tumor targeting by various contrast agents used in PAI obstructs its clinical applications. In this study, we developed indocyanine green (ICG)-encapsulated micelles specific for the CD 44 receptor and used in near infrared and photoacoustic imaging of tumors. ICG was hydrophobically modified prior to loading into hyaluronic acid (HA)-based micelles utilized for CD 44 based-targeting. We investigated the physicochemical characteristics of prepared HA only and ICG-encapsulated HA micelles (HA-ICG micelles). After intravenous injection of tumor-bearing mice, the bio-distribution and in vivo photoacoustic images of ICG-encapsulated HA micelles accumulating in tumors were also investigated. Our study further encourages the application of this HA-ICG-based nano-platform as a tumor-specific contrast agent for PAI.

  4. Bioluminescence Imaging of Adoptively Transferred Lymphocytes During Allogeneic Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Juršėnaitė, Jurgita; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Mauricas, Mykolas; Eidukevičius, Rimantas; Šiaurys, Almantas; Characiejus, Dainius

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the survival, spatial distribution and proliferation of adoptively transferred lymphocytes in allogeneic tumor rejection. Transgenic β-actin-luc mice that express luciferase were sensitized against SL2 tumors and were used as lymphocyte donors to study the anti-tumor effect in SL2 tumor-bearing lymphocyte-deficient RAG(-/-) mice. Whole-body bioluminescence images of recipient mice were obtained to track the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. Proliferation of lymphocytes was estimated by quantification of photon emission. T lymphocytes sensitized against allogeneic SL2 tumors cured the majority of SL2 tumor-bearing RAG(-/-) mice. Bioluminescence imaging showed that transferred T lymphocytes survived in the spleen and lymph nodes. Tumor rejection was associated with lymphocyte proliferation and migration to the tumor site. Sensitized T lymphocytes from transgenic β-actin-luc mice reject allogeneic SL2 tumors in RAG(-/-) mice and can be tracked in vivo using bioluminescence imaging. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging tumor hypoxia by near-infrared fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Aguirre, Andres; Xu, Yan; Zanganeh, Saeid; Kuhn, Liisa T.; Claffey, Kevin P.; Zhu, Quing

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a novel nitroimidazole indocyanine dye conjugate for tumor-targeted hypoxia fluorescence tomography. The hypoxia probe has been evaluated in vitro using tumor cell lines and in vivo with tumor targeting in mice. The in vitro cell studies were performed to assess fluorescence labeling differences between hypoxia and normoxia conditions. When treated with the hypoxia probe, a fluorescence emission ratio of 2.5-fold was found between the cells incubated under hypoxia compared to the cells in normoxia condition. Hypoxia specificity was also confirmed by comparing the cells treated with indocyanine dye alone. In vivo tumor targeting in mice showed that the fluorescence signals measured at the tumor site were twice those at the normal site after 150 min post-injection of the hypoxia probe. On the other hand, the fluorescence signals measured after injection of indocyanine dye were the same at tumor and normal sites. In vivo fluorescence tomography images of mice injected with the hypoxia probe showed that the probe remained for more than 5 to 7 h in the tumors, however, the images of mice injected with indocyanine only dye confirmed that the unbound dye washed out in less than 3 h. These findings are supported with fluorescence images of histological sections of tumor samples using a Li-COR scanner and immunohistochemistry technique for tumor hypoxia.

  6. New functional imaging modalities for chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Ioannis; Shulkin, Barry; Pacak, Karel

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear medicine modalities use radiolabeled ligands that either follow metabolic pathways or act on cellular receptors. Thus, they permit functional imaging of physiological processes and help to localize sites such as tumors that harbor pathological events. The application of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands to the specific pathways of synthesis, metabolism and inactivation of catecholamines found in chromaffin tumors, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas can be used to provide a more thorough localization of these types of tumor. Recent advances have been made in functional imaging to localize pheochromocytomas, paragangliomas, neuroblastomas and ganglioneuromas, including approaches based on PET with [(18)F]fluorodopamine, [(18)F]fluorohydroxyphenylalanine, [(11)C]epinephrine or [(11)C]hydroxyephedrine. Such functional imaging can complement computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and other scintigraphic techniques to localize these tumors before surgical or medical therapeutic approaches are considered.

  7. CARS and non-linear microscopy imaging of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Geiger, Kathrin; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Koch, Edmund; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy offers a series of techniques that have the potential to be applied in vivo, for intraoperative identification of tumor border and in situ pathology. By addressing the different content of lipids that characterize the tumors with respect to the normal brain tissue, CARS microscopy enables to discern primary and secondary brain tumors from healthy tissue. A study performed in mouse models shows that the reduction of the CARS signal is a reliable quantity to identify brain tumors, irrespective from the tumor type. Moreover it enables to identify tumor borders and infiltrations at a cellular resolution. Integration of CARS with autogenous TPEF and SHG adds morphological and compositional details about the tissue. Examples of multimodal CARS imaging of different human tumor biopsies demonstrate the ability of the technique to retrieve information useful for histopathological diagnosis.

  8. Multistage Nanoparticles for Improved Delivery into Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Wong, Cliff; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect has been a key rationale for the development of nanoscale carriers to solid tumors. As a consequence of EPR, nanotherapeutics are expected to improve drug and detection probe delivery, have less adverse effects than conventional chemotherapy, and thus result in improved detection and treatment of tumors. Physiological barriers posed by the abnormal tumor microenvironment, however, can hinder the homogeneous delivery of nanomedicine in amounts sufficient to eradicate cancer. To effectively enhance the therapeutic outcome of cancer patients by nanotherapeutics, we have to find ways to overcome these barriers. One possibility is to exploit the abnormal tumor microenvironment for selective and improved delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. Recently, we proposed a multistage nanoparticle delivery system as a potential means to enable uniform delivery throughout the tumor and improve the efficacy of anticancer therapy. Here, we describe the synthesis of a novel multistage nanoparticle formulation that shrinks in size once it enters the tumor interstitial space to optimize the delivery to tumors as well as within tumors. Finally, we provide detailed experimental methods for the characterization of such nanoparticles. PMID:22449923

  9. Self-assembled peptide nanoparticles as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for tumor targeting and imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Hai; Li, Suping; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-03-10

    Design of specific and sensitive imaging probes for targeting tumor microenvironment holds great promise to achieve precise detection and rapid responsiveness to neoplastic tissues. Dysregulated pH, one of the most remarkable hallmarks of tumor microenvironment, can be considered as a good specific trigger for the design of broad-spectrum and local-environment responsive imaging probes. However, the current existing design strategies for pH-responsive systems are insufficient to meet the needs for a rapid and tumor-specific diagnosis. Here we reported a novel biomimetic nanostructure based on oligopeptide self-assembly that can quickly switch into dissociated stage with active fluorescence property from self-assembled stage with quenched fluorescence activity when encountering a subtle pH-change in tumor microenvironment (pH 6.8 vs. 7.4). This oligopeptide-assembly is examined as tumor microenvironment activatable probes for both intratumoral and intravenous in vivo tumor imaging. Through the distinct fluorescent intensities, it is validated that the acidic tumor microenvironment can activate stronger fluorescence signals. The tailor-made self-assembled oligopeptide nanomaterials have the potential for efficient and specific in situ diagnosis of various solid tumors with a weakly acidic microenvironment, which is expected to be of crucial importance for clinical tumor diagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Current and Future Lymphatic Imaging Modalities for Tumor Staging

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kuo; Liu, Tiegang; Tariq, Imran; Sajjad, Ashif; Niu, Meiying; Liu, Guokai; Mehmood, Zahid; Tian, Guihua

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is supported by the lymphatic system which should be scanned efficiently for tumor staging as well as the enhanced therapeutic outcomes. Poor resolution and low sensitivity is a limitation of traditional lymphatic imaging modalities; thus new noninvasive approaches like nanocarriers, magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, and quantum dots are advantageous. Some newer modalities, which are under development, and their potential uses will also be discussed in this review. PMID:24757671

  11. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term “functional imaging” is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive “one-step” morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  12. Image-guided tumor motion modeling and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.; Liu, W.; Christensen, J.; Tai, A.; Li, A. X.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important procedure in the treatment of cancer in the thorax and abdomen. However, its efficacy can be severely limited by breathing induced tumor motion. Tumor motion causes uncertainty in the tumor's location and consequently limits the radiation dosage (for fear of damaging normal tissue). This paper describes a novel signal model for tumor motion tracking/prediction that can potentially improve RT results. Using CT and breathing sensor data, it provides a more accurate characterization of the breathing and tumor motion than previous work and is non-invasive. The efficacy of our model is demonstrated on patient data.

  13. Optical Imaging and Magnetic Field Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Susan P.; Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Steven T.; Dimitrijevic, Sanja; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    To address efficacy issues of cancer diagnosis and chemotherapy, we have developed a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) formulation with combined drug delivery and imaging properties that can potentially be used in image-guided drug therapy. Our MNP consists of an iron-oxide magnetic core coated with oleic acid (OA) and stabilized with an amphiphilic block copolymer. Previously, we reported that our MNP formulation can provide prolonged contrast for tumor magnetic resonance imaging and can be loaded with hydrophobic anticancer agents for sustained drug delivery. In this study, we developed MNPs with optical imaging properties using new near-infrared dyes to quantitatively determine their long-term biodistribution and tumor localization with and without an external magnetic field in mice with xenograft breast tumors. MNPs localized slowly in the tumor, reaching a peak 48 h post injection before slowly declining over the next 11 days. One-hour exposure of the tumor to a magnetic field further enhanced MNP localization to tumors. Our MNPs can be developed with combined drug delivery and multimodal imaging properties to improve cancer diagnosis, provide sustained treatment, and monitor therapeutic effects in tumors over time. PMID:20731413

  14. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  15. Primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor on MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thoriya, Prashant J; Watal, Pankaj; Bahri, Nandini U; Rathod, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    Neoplasms in the region of filum terminale are not uncommon. Myxopapillary ependymoma is the commonest tumor at this location. The differentials reported for this entity are nerve sheath tumor, meningioma, paraganglioma, intradural metastases, lymphoma, other varieties of ependymoma, subependymoma, astrocytoma, ganglioglioma, hemangioblastoma, and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). PNET may very rarely present as an intradural thoracolumbar mass. We present pre- and post-therapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a patient with proven primary spinal primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PSPNET) of peripheral subtype. PMID:26752826

  16. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J.; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  17. Fast and robust brain tumor segmentation using level set method with multiple image information.

    PubMed

    Lok, Ka Hei; Shi, Lin; Zhu, Xianlun; Wang, Defeng

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a challenging task for its variation in intensity. The phenomenon is caused by the inhomogeneous content of tumor tissue and the choice of imaging modality. In 2010 Zhang developed the Selective Binary Gaussian Filtering Regularizing Level Set (SBGFRLS) model that combined the merits of edge-based and region-based segmentation. To improve the SBGFRLS method by modifying the singed pressure force (SPF) term with multiple image information and demonstrate effectiveness of proposed method on clinical images. In original SBGFRLS model, the contour evolution direction mainly depends on the SPF. By introducing a directional term in SPF, the metric could control the evolution direction. The SPF is altered by statistic values enclosed by the contour. This concept can be extended to jointly incorporate multiple image information. The new SPF term is expected to bring a solution for blur edge problem in brain tumor segmentation. The proposed method is validated with clinical images including pre- and post-contrast magnetic resonance images. The accuracy and robustness is compared with sensitivity, specificity, DICE similarity coefficient and Jaccard similarity index. Experimental results show improvement, in particular the increase of sensitivity at the same specificity, in segmenting all types of tumors except for the diffused tumor. The novel brain tumor segmentation method is clinical-oriented with fast, robust and accurate implementation and a minimal user interaction. The method effectively segmented homogeneously enhanced, non-enhanced, heterogeneously-enhanced, and ring-enhanced tumor under MR imaging. Though the method is limited by identifying edema and diffuse tumor, several possible solutions are suggested to turn the curve evolution into a fully functional clinical diagnosis tool.

  18. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  19. Neuroendocrine tumors and somatostatin: imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    de Herder, W W; Kwekkeboom, D J; Valkema, R; Feelders, R A; van Aken, M O; Lamberts, S W J; van der Lely, A J; Krenning, E P

    2005-01-01

    Tumors and metastases bearing the somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 (SSTR2) or SSTR5 can be visualized in vivo after injection of radiolabeled octapeptide somatostatin analogs like 111In-pentetreotide. The sensitivity of 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy for the detection of carcinoid tumors is 86-95%. The sensitivity of 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy for the detection of gastrinomas, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-secreting tumors, and glucagonomas as well as clinically non-functioning lesions is 75-100%. However, for insulinoma this is 50-60%. 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy generally has a lower detection rate for benign pheochromocytomas than 123I-MIBG scintigraphy, but it can have a complementary role for the staging of malignant pheochromocytomas. It can also be used for the detection of extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. Most GH- and TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas can be visualized using 111In-pentetreotide. 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy is negative in microprolactinomas and ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenomas. 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy has been successful for the localization of extra-pituitary ACTH-secreting tumors and their metastases, and especially for occult tumors. A large variety of lesions in and around the pituitary region express somatostatin receptors and, therefore, can be visualized by 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy.

  20. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  1. Improving Technology for Vascular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Raman

    Neuro-endovascular image guided interventions (Neuro-EIGIs) is a minimally invasive procedure that require micro catheters and endovascular devices be inserted into the vasculature via an incision near the femoral artery and guided under low dose fluoroscopy to the vasculature of the head and neck. However, the endovascular devices used for the purpose are of very small size (stents are of the order of 50mum to 100mum) and the success of these EIGIs depends a lot on the accurate placement of these devices. In order to accurately place these devices inside the patient, the interventionalist should be able to see them clearly. Hence, high resolution capabilities are of immense importance in neuro-EIGIs. The high-resolution detectors, MAF-CCD and MAF-CMOS, at the Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center at the University at Buffalo are capable of presenting improved images for better patient care. Focal spot of an x-ray tube plays an important role in performance of these high resolution detectors. The finite size of the focal spot results into the blurriness around the edges of the image of the object resulting in reduced spatial resolution. Hence, knowledge of accurate size of the focal spot of the x-ray tube is very essential for the evaluation of the total system performance. Importance of magnification and image detector blur deconvolution was demonstrated to carry out the more accurate measurement of x-ray focal spot using a pinhole camera. A 30 micron pinhole was used to obtain the focal spot images using flat panel detector (FPD) and different source to image distances (SIDs) were used to achieve different magnifications (3.16, 2.66 and 2.16). These focal spot images were deconvolved with a 2-D modulation transfer function (MTF), obtained using noise response (NR) method, to remove the detector blur present in the images. Using these corrected images, the accurate size of all the three focal spots were obtained and it was also established that effect of

  2. Tracking tumor boundary in MV-EPID images without implanted markers: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyong Homma, Noriyasu; Ichiji, Kei; Takai, Yoshihiro; Yoshizawa, Makoto

    2015-05-15

    tumor boundary in EPID images by using a LSM-based algorithm. Experimental results conducted on phantom and clinical EPID images demonstrated the effectiveness of the tracking algorithm for visible tumor target. Compared with previous tracking methods, the authors’ algorithm has the potential to improve the tracking accuracy in radiation therapy. In addition, real-time tumor boundary information within the irradiation field will be potentially useful for further applications, such as adaptive beam delivery, dose evaluation.

  3. Luminol-based bioluminescence imaging of mouse mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alshetaiwi, Hamad S; Balivada, Sivasai; Shrestha, Tej B; Pyle, Marla; Basel, Matthew T; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2013-10-05

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant circulating blood leukocytes. They are part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense by migrating toward areas of inflammation in response to chemical signals released from the site. Some solid tumors, such as breast cancer, also cause recruitment and activation of PMNs and release of myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that administration of luminol to mice that have been transplanted with 4T1 mammary tumor cells permits the detection of myeloperoxidase activity, and consequently, the location of the tumor. Luminol allowed detection of activated PMNs only two days after cancer cell transplantation, even though tumors were not yet palpable. In conclusion, luminol-bioluminescence imaging (BLI) can provide a pathway towards detection of solid tumors at an early stage in preclinical tumor models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  5. Application of an enhanced fuzzy algorithm for MR brain tumor image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemanth, D. Jude; Vijila, C. Kezi Selva; Anitha, J.

    2010-02-01

    Image segmentation is one of the significant digital image processing techniques commonly used in the medical field. One of the specific applications is tumor detection in abnormal Magnetic Resonance (MR) brain images. Fuzzy approaches are widely preferred for tumor segmentation which generally yields superior results in terms of accuracy. But most of the fuzzy algorithms suffer from the drawback of slow convergence rate which makes the system practically non-feasible. In this work, the application of modified Fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm to tackle the convergence problem is explored in the context of brain image segmentation. This modified FCM algorithm employs the concept of quantization to improve the convergence rate besides yielding excellent segmentation efficiency. This algorithm is experimented on real time abnormal MR brain images collected from the radiologists. A comprehensive feature vector is extracted from these images and used for the segmentation technique. An extensive feature selection process is performed which reduces the convergence time period and improve the segmentation efficiency. After segmentation, the tumor portion is extracted from the segmented image. Comparative analysis in terms of segmentation efficiency and convergence rate is performed between the conventional FCM and the modified FCM. Experimental results show superior results for the modified FCM algorithm in terms of the performance measures. Thus, this work highlights the application of the modified algorithm for brain tumor detection in abnormal MR brain images.

  6. Evaluating pH in the Extracellular Tumor Microenvironment Using CEST MRI and Other Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liu Qi; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor acidosis is a consequence of altered metabolism, which can lead to chemoresistance and can be a target of alkalinizing therapies. Noninvasive measurements of the extracellular pH (pHe) of the tumor microenvironment can improve diagnoses and treatment decisions. A variety of noninvasive imaging methods have been developed for measuring tumor pHe. This review provides a detailed description of the advantages and limitations of each method, providing many examples from previous research reports. A substantial emphasis is placed on methods that use MR spectroscopy and MR imaging, including recently developed methods that use chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI that combines some advantages of MR spectroscopy and imaging. Together, this review provides a comprehensive overview of methods for measuring tumor pHe, which may facilitate additional creative approaches in this research field. PMID:27761517

  7. Radiolabeled peptides in diagnosis and tumor imaging: clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Warner, Richard R P; O'dorisio, Thomas M

    2002-04-01

    The authors briefly review radiopeptides currently approved for use in the United States. They present a short review of the peptide somatostatin's actions and also note the five somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) to which the peptide and its synthetic analogs octreotide, lanreotide, and vapreotide bind. The many conditions besides neuroendocrine tumors having SSTRs are listed. Labeled octreotide and the other two analogues have a strong affinity for SSTR2 and SSTR5, which thereby produce positive imaging. The various neuroendocrine tumors best imaged by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) are discussed, and the exceptions (insulinoma and medullary thyroid carcinoma) are noted to be seen better with labeled VIP and (99m)Tc-dimethylsuccinic acid (DMSA), respectively. SRS and VIP receptor scintigraphy are also noted to image many nonneuroendocrine tumors, which often have appropriate receptors. Several of the currently emerging and very effective new imaging techniques are described. These include (99m)Tc-DMSA for medullary thyroid carcinoma, (18)F dihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography, and C(11) 5-hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography scanning for all neuroendocrine tumor, but especially carcinoid tumor, metastases. The special role of SRS in identifying gastric carcinoid tumors in hypergastrinemic patients is reviewed. Various pitfalls in interpreting SRS are presented and receptor-enhancing techniques described. Besides use of SRS (mainly Octreoscan, Mallinckrodt Medical, St. Louis, MO) only for detecting and localizing primary tumors and metastases for staging, there are many additional special uses for clinical management of SRS-positive tumors. These include the intraoperative use of the handheld gamma-detecting probe. A brief enumeration is given of the most promising of other non-SST G-protein-coupled receptors and ligands currently under development. Finally, we have posed a number of questions for which answers are needed in the

  8. Modification of Cyclic NGR Tumor Neovasculature-Homing Motif Sequence to Human Plasminogen Kringle 5 Improves Inhibition of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Weiwei; Jin, Guanghui; Ma, Dingyuan; Wang, Feng; Fu, Tong; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiwen; Jia, Kunzhi; Marikar, Faiz M. M. T.; Hua, Zichun

    2012-01-01

    Background Blood vessels in tumors express higher level of aminopeptidase N (APN) than normal tissues. Evidence suggests that the CNGRC motif is an APN ligand which targets tumor vasculature. Increased expression of APN in tumor vascular endothelium, therefore, offers an opportunity for targeted delivery of NGR peptide-linked drugs to tumors. Methods/Principal Findings To determine whether an additional cyclic CNGRC sequence could improve endothelial cell homing and antitumor effect, human plasminogen kringle 5 (hPK5) was modified genetically to introduce a CNGRC motif (NGR-hPK5) and was subsequently expressed in yeast. The biological activity of NGR-hPK5 was assessed and compared with that of wild-type hPK5, in vitro and in vivo. NGR-hPK5 showed more potent antiangiogenic activity than wild-type hPK5: the former had a stronger inhibitory effect on proliferation, migration and cord formation of vascular endothelial cells, and produced a stronger antiangiogenic response in the CAM assay. To evaluate the tumor-targeting ability, both wild-type hPK5 and NGR-hPK5 were 99 mTc-labeled, for tracking biodistribution in the in vivo tumor model. By planar imaging and biodistribution analyses of major organs, NGR-hPK5 was found localized to tumor tissues at a higher level than wild-type hPK5 (approximately 3-fold). Finally, the effects of wild-type hPK5 and NGR-modified hPK5 on tumor growth were investigated in two tumor model systems. NGR modification improved tumor localization and, as a consequence, effectively inhibited the growth of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and human colorectal adenocarcinoma (Colo 205) cells in tumor-bearing mice. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicated that the addition of an APN targeting peptide NGR sequence could improve the ability of hPK5 to inhibit angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:22590653

  9. Infrared spectroscopic imaging of kidney tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablinskas, V.; Steiner, G.; Koch, E.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Strazdaite, S.; Urboniene, V.; Jankevicius, F.

    2011-02-01

    Infrared spectroscopic imaging of cancerous kidney tissue was performed by means of FTIR microscopy. The spectra of thin tissue cryosections were collected with 64x64 MCT FPA detector and imaging area was increased up to 5.4×5.4 mm by mapping by means of PC controlled x,y stage. Chemical images of the samples were constructed using statistical treatment of the raw spectra. Several unsupervised and supervised statistical methods were used. The imaging results are compared with results of the standard histopathological analysis. It was concluded that application of method of cluster analysis ensures the best contrast of the images. It was found that border between cancerous and normal tissues visible in the infrared spectroscopic image corresponds with the border visible in histopathological image. Closer examination of the infrared spectroscopic image reveals that small domains of cancerous cells are found beyond the border in areas distant from the border up to 3 mm. Such domains are not visible in the histopathological images. The smallest domains found in the infrared images are approx. 60 μm.

  10. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of breast tumors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  11. Percutaneous Image-Guided Ablation of Breast Tumors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Alan A.; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research. PMID:25049447

  12. Autophagy Inhibition Improves Chemosensitivity in BRAFV600E Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Jean M. Mulcahy; Thompson, Joshua C.; Griesinger, Andrea M.; Amani, Vladimir; Donson, Andrew M.; Birks, Diane K.; Morgan, Michael J.; Mirsky, David M.; Handler, Michael H.; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy inhibition is a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer, but it is unknown which tumors will benefit. The BRAFV600E mutation has been identified as important in pediatric CNS tumors and is known to affect autophagy in other tumor types. We evaluated CNS tumor cells with BRAFV600E and found that mutant cells (but not wild type) display high rates of induced autophagy, are sensitive to pharmacologic and genetic autophagy inhibition, and display synergy when the clinically used autophagy inhibitor chloroquine was combined with the Raf inhibitor vemurafenib or standard chemotherapeutics. Importantly we also demonstrate chloroquine can improve vemurafenib sensitivity in a resistant ex vivo primary culture and provide the first demonstration in a patient harboring the V600E mutation treated with vemurafenib that addition of chloroquine can improve clinical outcomes. These findings suggest CNS tumors with BRAFV600E are autophagy-dependent and should be targeted with autophagy inhibition in combination with other therapeutic strategies. PMID:24823863

  13. Cystic meningioma: unusual imaging appearance of a common intracranial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Kennith F.; Finn, S. Sam; Snipes, George J.; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system that account for approximately 15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common extra-axial neoplasm. Most meningiomas are benign, although atypical and malignant meningiomas also exist. Typical imaging characteristics include a well-circumscribed, homogeneously enhancing, extra-axial mass on both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of an associated cyst is an uncommon imaging feature that may make it difficult to distinguish the tumor from a primary intra-axial glial neoplasm. The presence of peritumoral edema can also be a misleading finding. We present a case of a woman who presented with a history of multiple recent falls, decreased energy, and increased somnolence and was found to have a “cystic meningioma.” Typical imaging characteristics, histologic subtypes, treatment, and prognosis are also discussed. PMID:21240328

  14. Tumor-Targeted Multimodal Optical Imaging with Versatile Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B.; Zhong, Haizheng; Hall, David J.; Han, Wenlong; Qin, Mingde; Zhao, Chuanzhen; Wang, Meina; She, Zhi-Gang; Cao, Chuanbao; Sailor, Michael J.; Stallcup, William B.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of fluorescence imaging technologies requires concurrent improvements in the performance of fluorescent probes. Quantum dots have been extensively used as an imaging probe in various research areas because of their inherent advantages based on unique optical and electronic properties. However, their clinical translation has been limited by the potential toxicity especially from cadmium. Here, a versatile bioimaging probe is developed by using highly luminescent cadmium-free CuInSe2/ZnS core/shell quantum dots conjugated with CGKRK (Cys–Gly–Lys–Arg–Lys) tumor-targeting peptides. This probe exhibits excellent photostability, reasonably long circulation time, minimal toxicity, and strong tumor-specific homing property. The most important feature of this probe is that it shows distinctive versatility in tumor-targeted multimodal imaging including near-infrared, time-gated, and two-photon imaging in different tumor models. In a glioblastoma mouse model, the targeted probe clearly denotes tumor boundaries and positively labels a population of diffusely infiltrating tumor cells, suggesting its utility in precise tumor detection during surgery. This work lays a foundation for potential clinical translation of the probe. PMID:27441036

  15. Automated Tumor Volumetry Using Computer-Aided Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, Michel; Sadaghiani, Mohammed Salehi; Akbari, Hamed; Atthiah, Mark A.; Ali, Zarina S.; Da, Xiao; Zhan, Yiqang; O'Rourke, Donald; Grady, Sean M.; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accurate segmentation of brain tumors, and quantification of tumor volume, is important for diagnosis, monitoring, and planning therapeutic intervention. Manual segmentation is not widely used because of time constraints. Previous efforts have mainly produced methods that are tailored to a particular type of tumor or acquisition protocol and have mostly failed to produce a method that functions on different tumor types and is robust to changes in scanning parameters, resolution, and image quality, thereby limiting their clinical value. Herein, we present a semiautomatic method for tumor segmentation that is fast, accurate, and robust to a wide variation in image quality and resolution. Materials and Methods A semiautomatic segmentation method based on the geodesic distance transform was developed and validated by using it to segment 54 brain tumors. Glioblastomas, meningiomas, and brain metastases were segmented. Qualitative validation was based on physician ratings provided by three clinical experts. Quantitative validation was based on comparing semiautomatic and manual segmentations. Results Tumor segmentations obtained using manual and automatic methods were compared quantitatively using the Dice measure of overlap. Subjective evaluation was performed by having human experts rate the computerized segmentations on a 0–5 rating scale where 5 indicated perfect segmentation. Conclusions The proposed method addresses a significant, unmet need in the field of neuro-oncology. Specifically, this method enables clinicians to obtain accurate and reproducible tumor volumes without the need for manual segmentation. PMID:25770633

  16. Automated tumor volumetry using computer-aided image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Macyszyn, Luke; Bilello, Michel; Sadaghiani, Mohammed Salehi; Akbari, Hamed; Atthiah, Mark A; Ali, Zarina S; Da, Xiao; Zhan, Yiqang; O'Rourke, Donald; Grady, Sean M; Davatzikos, Christos

    2015-05-01

    Accurate segmentation of brain tumors, and quantification of tumor volume, is important for diagnosis, monitoring, and planning therapeutic intervention. Manual segmentation is not widely used because of time constraints. Previous efforts have mainly produced methods that are tailored to a particular type of tumor or acquisition protocol and have mostly failed to produce a method that functions on different tumor types and is robust to changes in scanning parameters, resolution, and image quality, thereby limiting their clinical value. Herein, we present a semiautomatic method for tumor segmentation that is fast, accurate, and robust to a wide variation in image quality and resolution. A semiautomatic segmentation method based on the geodesic distance transform was developed and validated by using it to segment 54 brain tumors. Glioblastomas, meningiomas, and brain metastases were segmented. Qualitative validation was based on physician ratings provided by three clinical experts. Quantitative validation was based on comparing semiautomatic and manual segmentations. Tumor segmentations obtained using manual and automatic methods were compared quantitatively using the Dice measure of overlap. Subjective evaluation was performed by having human experts rate the computerized segmentations on a 0-5 rating scale where 5 indicated perfect segmentation. The proposed method addresses a significant, unmet need in the field of neuro-oncology. Specifically, this method enables clinicians to obtain accurate and reproducible tumor volumes without the need for manual segmentation. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cathepsin B-Specific Metabolic Precursor for In Vivo Tumor-Specific Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shim, Man Kyu; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Ryu, Ju Hee; Koo, Heebeom; Lee, Sangmin; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Seulki; Pomper, Martin G; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-11-14

    Recently, metabolic glycoengineering with bioorthogonal click reactions has focused on improving the tumor targeting efficiency of nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for anticancer drugs or imaging agents. It is the key technique for developing tumor-specific metabolic precursors that can generate unnatural glycans on the tumor-cell surface. A cathepsin B-specific cleavable substrate (KGRR) conjugated with triacetylated N-azidoacetyl-d-mannosamine (RR-S-Ac3 ManNAz) was developed to enable tumor cells to generate unnatural glycans that contain azide groups. The generation of azide groups on the tumor cell surface was exogenously and specifically controlled by the amount of RR-S-Ac3 ManNAz that was fed to target tumor cells. Moreover, unnatural glycans on the tumor cell surface were conjugated with near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye-labeled molecules by a bioorthogonal click reaction in cell cultures and in tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, our RR-S-Ac3 ManNAz is promising for research in tumor-specific imaging or drug delivery.

  18. Somatostatin Receptor-Based Molecular Imaging and Therapy for Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Tang, Kun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Huanbin; Wen, Zhengwei; Zhang, Hongzheng; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are tumors originated from neuroendocrine cells in the body. The localization and the detection of the extent of NETs are important for diagnosis and treatment, which should be individualized according to the tumor type, burden, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of NETs with high sensitivity and specificity is achieved by nuclear medicine method using single photon-emitting and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) using SPECT or PET as a whole-body imaging technique has become a crucial part of the management of NETs. The radiotherapy with somatostatin analogues labeled with therapeutic beta emitters, such as lutetium-177 or yttrium-90, has been proved to be an option of therapy for patients with unresectable and metastasized NETs. Molecular imaging can deliver an important message to improve the outcome for patients with NETs by earlier diagnosis, better choice of the therapeutic method, and evaluation of the therapeutic response. PMID:24106690

  19. Research results on biomagnetic imaging of the lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Popa, Sorin G.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Sheltraw, Daniel; Kuethe, Dean; Adolphi, Natalie

    2005-04-01

    Recent results on the development and implementation of a novel technology for lung tumor detection and imaging is presented. This technology offers high-sensitivity imaging of magnetic nanoparticles to provide specific diagnostic images of early lung tumors and potential distant metastases. Recent developments in giant magnetostrictive (GMS) or magnetic shape memory (MSM) materials have led to the possibility of developing small, low-cost, room-temperature, portable, high-sensitivity, fiber-optic sensors capable of robustly detecting magnetic nanoparticles, without direct contact with the skin. Magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with antibodies, which target them to lung tumors. A prototype fiber-optic biomagnetic sensor, based on giant magnetostrictive or magnetic shape memory materials, with the requisite sensitivity to image the magnetic signals generated by antibody-labeled magnetic nanoparticles in lung tumors has been built and calibrated. The uniqueness of the biomagnetic sensor lies in the fact that it offers high sensitivity at room temperature, and is not a SQUID-based system. The results obtained during the process of choosing the right magnetostrictive materials are presented. Then, for the construction of an accurate image of the lung tumor, the optimum spatial distribution of one-channel sensors and nanoparticle polarization has been analyzed.

  20. MR imaging of tumor microcirculation: promise for the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J S; Tofts, P S; Port, R; Evelhoch, J L; Knopp, M; Reddick, W E; Runge, V M; Mayr, N

    1999-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) is a method of imaging the physiology of the microcirculation. A series of recent clinical studies have shown that DCE MRI can measure and predict tumor response to therapy. Recent advances in MR technology provide the enhanced spatial and temporal resolution that allow the application of this methodology in the management of cancer patients. The September issue of this journal provided a microcirculation section to update readers on this exciting and challenging topic. Evidence is mounting that DCE MRI-based measures correlate well with tumor angiogenesis. DCE MRI has already been shown in several types of tumors to correlate well with traditional outcome measures, such as histopathologic studies, and with survival. These new measures are sensitive to tumor physiology and to the pharmacokinetics of the contrast agent in individual tumors. Moreover, they can present anatomical images of tumor microcirculation at excellent spatial resolution. Several issues have emerged from recent international workshops that must be addressed to move this methodology into routine clinical practice. First, is complex modeling of DCE MRI really necessary to answer clinical questions reliably? Clinical research has shown that, for tumors such as bone sarcomas, reliable outcome measures of tumor response to chemotherapy can be extracted from DCE MRI by methods ranging from simple measures of enhancement to pharmacokinetic models. However, the use of similar methods to answer a different question-the differentiation of malignant from benign breast tumors-has yielded contradictory results. Thus, no simple, one-size-fits-all-tumors solution has yet been identified. Second, what is the most rational and reliable data collection procedure for the DCE MRI evaluation? Several groups have addressed population variations in some key variables, such as tumor T(1)0 (T(1) prior to contrast administration) and the arterial input

  1. Improving the distribution of Doxil® in the tumor matrix by depletion of tumor hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Aditya G.; Kivimäe, Saul; Tiffany, Matthew R.; Szoka, Francis C.

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes improve the pharmacokinetics and safety of rapidly cleared drugs, but have not yet improved the clinical efficacy compared to the non-encapsulated drug. This inability to improve efficacy may be partially due to the non-uniform distribution of liposomes in solid tumors. The tumor extra-cellular matrix is a barrier to distribution and includes the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA). Strategies to remove HA or block its synthesis may improve drug delivery into solid tumors. Orally administered methylumbelliferone (MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis, but it is limited by low potency and limited solubility. In this study, we encapsulate a water-soluble phosphorylated prodrug of MU (MU-P) in a liposome (L-MU-P). We demonstrate that L-MU-P is a more potent inhibitor of HA synthesis than oral MU in the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model using both a quantitative ELISA and histochemistry. We show that HA depletion improves the tumor distribution of liposomes computed using Mander’s colocalization analysis of liposomes with the tumor vasculature. Hyaluronan depletion also increases the fraction of the tumor area positive for liposomes. This improved distribution extends the overall survival of mice treated with Doxil®. PMID:24852095

  2. Improving the distribution of Doxil® in the tumor matrix by depletion of tumor hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Aditya G; Kivimäe, Saul; Tiffany, Matthew R; Szoka, Francis C

    2014-10-10

    Liposomes improve the pharmacokinetics and safety of rapidly cleared drugs, but have not yet improved the clinical efficacy compared to the non-encapsulated drug. This inability to improve efficacy may be partially due to the non-uniform distribution of liposomes in solid tumors. The tumor extra-cellular matrix is a barrier to distribution and includes the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan, hyaluronan (HA). Strategies to remove HA or block its synthesis may improve drug delivery into solid tumors. Orally administered methylumbelliferone (MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis, but it is limited by low potency and limited solubility. In this study, we encapsulate a water-soluble phosphorylated prodrug of MU (MU-P) in a liposome (L-MU-P). We demonstrate that L-MU-P is a more potent inhibitor of HA synthesis than oral MU in the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model using both a quantitative ELISA and histochemistry. We show that HA depletion improves the tumor distribution of liposomes computed using Mander's colocalization analysis of liposomes with the tumor vasculature. Hyaluronan depletion also increases the fraction of the tumor area positive for liposomes. This improved distribution extends the overall survival of mice treated with Doxil®.

  3. Modulation of the Tumor Vasculature and Oxygenation to Improve Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Siemann, Dietmar W.; Horsman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is increasingly recognized as a major factor influencing the success of therapeutic treatments and has become a key focus for cancer research. The progressive growth of a tumor results in an inability of normal tissue blood vessels to oxygenate and provide sufficient nutritional support to tumor cells. As a consequence the expanding neoplastic cell population initiates its own vascular network which is both structurally and functionally abnormal. This aberrant vasculature impacts all aspects of the tumor microenvironment including the cells, extracellular matrix, and extracellular molecules which together are essential for the initiation, progression and spread of tumor cells. The physical conditions that arise are imposing and manifold, and include elevated interstitial pressure, localized extracellular acidity, and regions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation. No less important are the functional consequences experienced by the tumor cells residing in such environments: adaptation to hypoxia, cell quiescence, modulation of transporters and critical signaling molecules, immune escape, and enhanced metastatic potential. Together these factors lead to therapeutic barriers that create a significant hindrance to the control of cancers by conventional anticancer therapies. However, the aberrant nature of the tumor microenvironments also offers unique therapeutic opportunities. Particularly interventions that seek to improve tumor physiology and alleviate tumor hypoxia will selectively impair the neoplastic cell populations residing in these environments. Ultimately, by combining such therapeutic strategies with conventional anticancer treatments it may be possible to bring cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis to a halt. PMID:26073310

  4. Breast tumor classification via single-frequency microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Cuong M.; Bansal, Rajeev

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel method for the classification of breast tumors (malignant versus benign) based on principal component analysis (PCA) following single-frequency microwave imaging. For initial evaluation, a simplified model of the biological tissue was developed in a frequency-domain finite-element framework. The model incorporated various combinations of dielectric constant and conductivity. A double-level classification scheme allows classifying a tumor with high accuracy.

  5. Parametric imaging of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    A new image processing strategy is detailed for the simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. A technique for locally mapping tumor perfusion parameters using skeletonized neovascular data is also introduced. Simulated images were used to test the neovascular skeletonization technique and variance (error) of relevant parametric estimates. Preliminary DCE-US image datasets were collected in 6 female patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 MHz transducer and Definity contrast agent. Simulation data demonstrates that neovascular morphology parametric estimation is reproducible albeit measurement error can occur at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Experimental results indicate the feasibility of our approach to performing both tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology measurements from DCE-US images. Future work will expand on our initial clinical findings and also extent our image processing strategy to 3-dimensional space to allow whole tumor characterization.

  6. Tumor Microenvironment Targeting and Responsive Peptide-Based Nanoformulations for Improved Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hao; Ding, Yanping; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-09-01

    The tumor microenvironment participates in all stages of tumor progression and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Rapid progress in the field of molecular self-assembly using various biologic molecules has resulted in the fabrication of nanoformulations that specifically target and regulate microenvironment components to inhibit tumor growth. This inhibition process is based on differentiating between biophysicochemical cues guiding tumor and normal tissue microenvironments. Peptides and peptide derivatives, owing to their biocompatibility, chemical versatility, bioactivity, environmental sensitivity, and biologic recognition abilities, have been widely used as building blocks to construct multifunctional nanostructures for targeted drug delivery and controlled release. Several groups of peptides have been identified as having the ability to penetrate plasma membranes, regulate the essential signaling pathways of angiogenesis and immune reactions, and recognize key components in the tumor microenvironment (such as vascular systems, stromal cells, and abnormal tumor biophysicochemical features). Thus, using different modules, various functional peptides, and their derivatives can be integrated into nanoformulations specifically targeting the tumor microenvironment with increased selectivity, on-demand response, elevated cellular uptake, and improved tumor therapy. In this review, we introduce several groups of functional peptides and highlight peptide-based nanoformulations that specifically target the tumor microenvironment. We also provide our perspective on the development of smart drug-delivery systems with enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Enhancing in vivo tumor boundary delineation with structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging and spatial gradient mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jessica; Miller, Jessica P.; Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Achilefu, Samuel; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence imaging, in combination with tumor-avid near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent molecular probes, provides high specificity and sensitivity for cancer detection in preclinical animal models, and more recently, assistance during oncologic surgery. However, conventional camera-based fluorescence imaging techniques are heavily surface-weighted such that surface reflection from skin or other nontumor tissue and nonspecific fluorescence signals dominate, obscuring true cancer-specific signals and blurring tumor boundaries. To address this challenge, we applied structured illumination fluorescence molecular imaging (SIFMI) in live animals for automated subtraction of nonspecific surface signals to better delineate accumulation of an NIR fluorescent probe targeting α4β1 integrin in mice bearing subcutaneous plasma cell xenografts. SIFMI demonstrated a fivefold improvement in tumor-to-background contrast when compared with other full-field fluorescence imaging methods and required significantly reduced scanning time compared with diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging. Furthermore, the spatial gradient mapping enhanced highlighting of tumor boundaries. Through the relatively simple hardware and software modifications described, SIFMI can be integrated with clinical fluorescence imaging systems, enhancing intraoperative tumor boundary delineation from the uninvolved tissue.

  8. Design of a novel pulsed laser diode induced photoacoustic imaging system for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Zeng, Lvming; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    The tumors are one of most dangerous diseases in lots of diseases Expect for the actively treating of antitumor, the early detection of tumors is a key important step in the course of tumor treatment. Since some drawbacks existed in the traditional methods of tumor detection, such as ultrasound imaging, X radiography, CT imaging, OCT and MRI, etc, a novel hybrid and promising imaging method, that is, photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology, is used to the tumors diagnosis(TD) in this work. This novel method has higher resolution, contrast and penetration depth due to the merits combination of ultrasonic with optics. And the detected photoacoustic signal not only reflects the structural characteristic of tissue but also the metabolic and pathological changes. So, the novel TD based on the PAI is proposed in this paper. Meanwhile, a novel single pulsed laser diode with 905nm wavelength is used as the light source, and a focused ultrasonic transducer with the forward-mode is used to acquire the photoacoustic signal. Finally, PA images were reconstructed with the improved filtered back projection algorithm. Experimental results show the signal acquisition time is less than 0.2 s in each scan of 128 averages. And it is proved that the photoacoustic imaging system for TD with a high-power pulsed laser diode is available. Therefore, this system has the potential value in the biomedical research fields.

  9. Design of a novel pulsed laser diode induced photoacoustic imaging system for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Zeng, Lvming; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen

    2011-11-01

    The tumors are one of most dangerous diseases in lots of diseases Expect for the actively treating of antitumor, the early detection of tumors is a key important step in the course of tumor treatment. Since some drawbacks existed in the traditional methods of tumor detection, such as ultrasound imaging, X radiography, CT imaging, OCT and MRI, etc, a novel hybrid and promising imaging method, that is, photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology, is used to the tumors diagnosis(TD) in this work. This novel method has higher resolution, contrast and penetration depth due to the merits combination of ultrasonic with optics. And the detected photoacoustic signal not only reflects the structural characteristic of tissue but also the metabolic and pathological changes. So, the novel TD based on the PAI is proposed in this paper. Meanwhile, a novel single pulsed laser diode with 905nm wavelength is used as the light source, and a focused ultrasonic transducer with the forward-mode is used to acquire the photoacoustic signal. Finally, PA images were reconstructed with the improved filtered back projection algorithm. Experimental results show the signal acquisition time is less than 0.2 s in each scan of 128 averages. And it is proved that the photoacoustic imaging system for TD with a high-power pulsed laser diode is available. Therefore, this system has the potential value in the biomedical research fields.

  10. Radioiodinated agents for imaging multidrug resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Augustine, Ann M; Nearman, Jessica; McGarry, Jonathon; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic agents enabling characterization of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors can aid in the selection of chemotherapy regimens. We report here synthesis and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals based on the second-generation MDR-reversing drug MS-209. 5-[3-{4-(2-Phenyl-2-(4'-[(125)I]iodo-phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl}-2-hydroxypropoxy]quino-line (17) was prepared from the 4'-tributylstannyl precursor (16) in >95% radiochemical yield. (16) was synthesized in a six-step process with the overall yield of 25%. In vitro studies were conducted in MES-SA (drug-sensitive) and MES-SA/Dx5 (MDR) human uterine sarcoma cell lines. In vivo studies were performed in athymic mice bearing MES-SA and MES-SA/Dx5 xenografts. The uptake of (17) is higher in MES-SA than MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The uptake and efflux of (17) depend on temperature and concentration, and indicate active transport mechanism(s). Incubation of drug sensitive MES-SA cells with verapamil or (15), a nonradioactive analog of (17), alters the cellular retention of radioactivity only marginally. However, MES-SA/Dx5 cells retain approximately 12% more of (17) when incubated with 10 muM verapamil. The addition of (15) or high concentrations of (17) also increase the uptake of (17) in MES-SA/Dx5 up to 200%, depending on the concentration and temperature. The dependence of (17) uptake on the MDR status is also evident in the ex vivo binding studies. In vivo tests in mice xenografted simultaneously with both tumor cell lines indicate distinct pharmacokinetics for each tumor. The absorption half-life in MES-SA/Dx5 xenograft is approximately 10x shorter and the mean residence time approximately 50% shorter compared to MES-SA xenograft in the same mouse. Radioiodinated derivatives of MS-209 appear to be good indicators of multidrug resistance.

  11. Improved monoclonal antibody tumor/background ratios with exchange transfusions.

    PubMed

    Henry, C A; Clavo, A C; Wahl, R L

    1991-01-01

    Blood exchange transfusions were performed in nude rats with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts in an attempt to improve specific monoclonal antibody (MoAb) tumor/non-tumor uptake ratios. Animals were injected intravenously with both 131I-5G6.4 specific and 125I-UPC-10 non-specific MoAb. Twenty-four hours later 65-80% of the original blood was exchanged with normal heparinized rat blood and then these rodents were sacrificed. Exchange transfusion significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased normal tissue activities of 131I (except for muscle) by 63-85%, while tumor activity decreased only 5%. Tumor to background ratios increased from 0.1-0.8 to 2.3-6.3. Exchange transfusions substantially enhance tumor/normal tissue antibody uptake ratios and, along with plasmapheresis, may be useful in enhancing antibody localization in vivo, particularly for therapy.

  12. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  13. Longitudinal optical imaging of tumor metabolism and hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Melissa C.; Fontanella, Andrew; Lan, Lan; Izatt, Joseph A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    An important feature of tumor hypoxia is its temporal instability, or ``cycling hypoxia.'' The primary consequence of cycling hypoxia is increased tumor aggressiveness and treatment resistance beyond that of chronic hypoxia. Longitudinal imaging of tumor metabolic demand, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood flow would provide valuable insight into the mechanisms and distribution of cycling hypoxia in tumors. Fluorescence imaging of metabolic demand via the optical redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH), absorption microscopy of hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and Doppler optical coherence tomography of vessel morphology and blood flow are combined to noninvasively monitor changes in oxygen supply and demand in the mouse dorsal skin fold window chamber tumor model (human squamous cell carcinoma) every 6 h for 36 h. Biomarkers for metabolic demand, blood oxygenation, and blood flow are all found to significantly change with time (p<0.05). These variations in oxygen supply and demand are superimposed on a significant (p<0.05) decline in metabolic demand with distance from the nearest vessel in tumors (this gradient was not observed in normal tissues). Significant (p<0.05), but weak (r<=0.5) correlations are found between the hemoglobin oxygen saturation, blood flow, and redox ratio. These results indicate that cycling hypoxia depends on both oxygen supply and demand, and that noninvasive optical imaging could be a valuable tool to study therapeutic strategies to mitigate cycling hypoxia, thus increasing the effectiveness of radiation and chemotherapy.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging features of intraocular tumors: Retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Özkurt, Zeynep Gürsel; Slimani, Naziha; Hu, Zizhong; Wang, Xueding; Xia, Kewen; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Demirci, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the capability of photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) in assessing the unique molecular and architectural features in ocular tumors. A real-time PA and ultrasonography (US) parallel imaging system based on a research US platform was developed to examine retinoblastoma in mice in vivo and human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma ex vivo. PA signals were generated by optical illumination at 720, 750, 800, 850, 900 and 950 nm delivered through a fiber optical bundle. The optical absorption spectra of the tumors were derived from the PA images. The optical absorption spectrum of each tumor was quantified by fitting to a polynomial model. The microscopic architectures of the tumors were quantified by frequency domain analysis of the PA signals. Both the optical spectral and architectural features agree with the histological findings of the tumors. The mouse and human retinoblastoma showed comparable total optical absorption spectra at a correlation of 0.95 (p<0.005). The quantitative PAI features of human retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma have shown statistically significant difference in two tailed t-tests (p<0.05). Fully compatible with the concurrent procedures, PAI could be a potential tool complementary to other diagnostic modalities for characterizing intraocular tumors. PMID:28231293

  15. Improved visibility of brain tumors in synthetic MP-RAGE anatomies with pure T1 weighting.

    PubMed

    Nöth, Ulrike; Hattingen, Elke; Bähr, Oliver; Tichy, Julia; Deichmann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Conventional MRI for brain tumor diagnosis employs T2 -weighted and contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted sequences. Non-enhanced T1 -weighted images provide improved anatomical details for precise tumor location, but reduced tumor-to-background contrast as elevated T1 and proton density (PD) values in tumor tissue affect the signal inversely. Radiofrequency (RF) coil inhomogeneities may further mask tumor and edema outlines. To overcome this problem, the aims of this work were to employ quantitative MRI techniques to create purely T1 -weighted synthetic anatomies which can be expected to yield improved tissue and tumor-to-background contrasts, to compare the quality of conventional and synthetic anatomies, and to investigate optical contrast and visibility of brain tumors and edema in synthetic anatomies. Conventional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echoes (MP-RAGE) anatomies and maps of T1 , PD and RF coil profiles were acquired in comparable and clinically feasible times. Three synthetic MP-RAGE anatomies (PD T1 weighting both with and without RF bias; pure T1 weighting) were calculated for healthy subjects and 32 patients with brain tumors. In healthy subjects, the PD T1 -weighted synthetic anatomies with RF bias precisely matched the conventional anatomies, yielding high signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Pure T1 weighting yielded lower SNR, but high CNR, because of increased optical contrasts. In patients with brain tumors, synthetic anatomies with pure T1 weighting yielded significant increases in optical contrast and improved visibility of tumor and edema in comparison with anatomies reflecting conventional T1 contrasts. In summary, the optimized purely T1 -weighted synthetic anatomy with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm, as proposed in this work, considerably enhances optical contrast and visibility of brain tumors and edema. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. [Functional imaging for brain tumors (perfusion, DTI and MR spectroscopy)].

    PubMed

    Essig, M; Giesel, F; Stieltjes, B; Weber, M A

    2007-06-01

    This contribution considers the possibilities involved with using functional methods in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics for brain tumors. Of the functional methods available, we discuss perfusion MRI (PWI), diffusion MRI (DWI and DTI) and MR spectroscopy (H-MRS). In cases of brain tumor, PWI aids in grading and better differentiation in diagnostics as well as for pre-therapeutic planning. In addition, the course of treatment, both after chemo- as well as radiotherapy in combination with surgical treatment, can be optimized. PWI allows better estimates of biological activity and aggressiveness in low grade brain tumors, and in the case of WHO grade II astrocytoma showing anaplasically transformed tumor areas, allows more rapid visu-alization and a better prediction of the course of the disease than conventional MRI diagnostics. Diffusion MRI, due to the directional dependence of the diffusion, can illustrate the course and direction of the nerve fibers, as well as reconstructing the nerve tracts in the cerebrum, pons and cerebellum 3-dimensionally. Diffusion imaging can be used for describing brain tumors, for evaluating contralateral involvement and the course of the nerve fibers near the tumor. Due to its operator dependence, DTI based fiber tracking for defining risk structures is controversial. DWI can also not differentiate accurately between cystic and necrotic brain tumors, or between metastases and brain abscesses. H-MRS provides information on cell membrane metabolism, neuronal integrity and the function of neuronal structures, energy metabolism and the formation of tumors and brain tissue necroses. Diagnostic problems such as the differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions, grading cerebral glioma and distinguishing between primary brain tumors and metastases can be resolved. An additional contribution will discuss the control of the course of glial tumors after radiotherapy.

  17. The radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuren; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2005-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) represent a large group of neoplasms deriving from pluripotent stem cells or from differentiated neuroendocrine cells that are characterized by the expression of different peptides and biogenic amines. These rare tumors tend to grow slowly and are notoriously difficult to localize, at least in the early stages. Diagnostics involve blood, urine and biochemical examination as well as imaging modalities. Imaging is achieved by a variety of techniques such as radiological morphological imaging methods, for example, sonography, computerized tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and finally, nuclear functional imaging methods such as metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS), vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor scintigraphy (VIPRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using (18)F labeled deoxyglucose (FDG) and fluorinated dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) as a radioisotopic marker. (131)I-labeled MIBG is a well-established radiopharmaceutical for localization and therapy of phechromocytoma and paraganglioma. The majority of neuroendocrine tumors possess a high density of somatostatin receptors. This observation provided the basis for the development of various radiolabeled somatostatin peptide analogs as imaging agents and therapeutics in nuclear medicine. FDG-PET is now performed in a wide variety of tumors and indications, including diagnosis, staging, re-staging and evaluation of the response to treatment. (18)F-DOPA-PET may be useful if (18)F-FDG-PET scan result is negative. (99m)Tc-pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid ((99m)Tc-DMSA-V) or (99m)Tc sestamibi ((99m)Tc-MIBI) or (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin is used only for diagnosis of certain NETs such as medullary thyroid cancer. The expiences with other nuclear medicinie imaging and therapy modalities such as cholecystokinin (CCK)-B/gastrin-receptors, bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide receptor scintigraphy are still limited, and further

  18. Overhauser enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for tumor oximetry: Coregistration of tumor anatomy and tissue oxygen concentration

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Murali C.; English, Sean; Yamada, Kenichi; Yoo, John; Murugesan, Ramachandran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Cook, John A.; Golman, Klaes; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Subramanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient noninvasive method for in vivo imaging of tumor oxygenation by using a low-field magnetic resonance scanner and a paramagnetic contrast agent is described. The methodology is based on Overhauser enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI), a functional imaging technique. OMRI experiments were performed on tumor-bearing mice (squamous cell carcinoma) by i.v. administration of the contrast agent Oxo63 (a highly derivatized triarylmethyl radical) at nontoxic doses in the range of 2–7 mmol/kg either as a bolus or as a continuous infusion. Spatially resolved pO2 (oxygen concentration) images from OMRI experiments of tumor-bearing mice exhibited heterogeneous oxygenation profiles and revealed regions of hypoxia in tumors (<10 mmHg; 1 mmHg = 133 Pa). Oxygenation of tumors was enhanced on carbogen (95% O2/5% CO2) inhalation. The pO2 measurements from OMRI were found to be in agreement with those obtained by independent polarographic measurements using a pO2 Eppendorf electrode. This work illustrates that anatomically coregistered pO2 maps of tumors can be readily obtained by combining the good anatomical resolution of water proton-based MRI, and the superior pO2 sensitivity of EPR. OMRI affords the opportunity to perform noninvasive and repeated pO2 measurements of the same animal with useful spatial (≈1 mm) and temporal (2 min) resolution, making this method a powerful imaging modality for small animal research to understand tumor physiology and potentially for human applications. PMID:11854518

  19. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology

    PubMed Central

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W.; Xie, X. Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  20. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W; Sunney Xie, X; Orringer, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors.

  1. Molecular Cancer Imaging with Polymeric Nanoassemblies: From Tumor Detection to Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Mi, Peng; Wang, Fang; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Cabral, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Several imaging modalities have been widely applied for the detection of cancer and its pathological activity in combination with probes capable of improving the contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues. Biocompatible polymeric nanoassemblies have been developed for precise detection of malignant tumors by enhancing the selectivity and sensitivity of the imaging. Exploiting the compartmentalized structure of the nanoassemblies advantageously allows delivering both imaging and therapeutic agents for cancer multifunctional imaging and theranostics, i.e., the combination of therapy and diagnosis tool on a single platform. Thus, nanoassemblies have high potential not only for cancer molecular imaging but also for tracing nanoparticles in biological systems, studying their biological pathways, gathering pathological information, monitoring therapeutic effects, and guiding pinpoint therapies. In this review, polymeric nanoassemblies for optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, multifunctional imaging, and image-guided therapy, emphasizing their role in cancer diagnosis and theranostics are highlighted.

  2. Feasibility of multi-spectral imaging system to provide enhanced demarcation for skin tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Roode, Rowland; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2007-02-01

    Invading tumors like basal cell carcinoma have usually no distinct demarcation for the human eye. Therefore, during resection, an additional rim around the tumor is removed. However, extending sprouts can be missed since most lesions are not uniform. To improve the visualization of the tumor demarcation, we developed a multi-spectral imaging system especially adapted for dermatological applications based on tunable liquid crystal spectral tunable filter technology and LED illumination. Enhanced visualization of skin tumor demarcation was achieved using three strategies. The first strategy is based on creating false color images by combining narrow band spectral filtered images by placing them into the red, green and blue image components of a color image at three specific wavelengths. These specific wavelengths were determined using a trial on error tool to achieve the highest contrast between malignant and healthy tissue. The second strategy is to make ratio images of narrow band spectral filtered images at specific wavelengths. A trail on error tool was created which enables the user to try multiple wavelengths to obtain optimal contrast. This method could be applied in realtime. For the third strategy, on pixel spectral segmentation is applied by selecting the pixel spectra in the center of a tumor, surrounding tissue and healthy tissue far away from the tumor. The correlation between these specific spectra and all image pixels is calculated using a fast algorithm. The degree is correlation is graded by color coding and presented in a false color images showing a detailed demarcation of suspicious regions in the tissue. Although this strategy is expected to provide a higher specificity, it takes more time to calculate than the first strategy.

  3. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  4. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-09-15

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  5. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shoup, Timothy

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is ›.sup.18 F!-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an .alpha.-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of .alpha.-aminoisobutyric acid.

  6. Amino acid analogs for tumor imaging

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, M.M.; Shoup, T.

    1998-10-06

    The invention provides novel amino acid compounds of use in detecting and evaluating brain and body tumors. These compounds combine the advantageous properties of 1-amino-cycloalkyl-1-carboxylic acids, namely, their rapid uptake and prolonged retention in tumors with the properties of halogen substituents, including certain useful halogen isotopes including fluorine-18, iodine-123, iodine-125, iodine-131, bromine-75, bromine-76, bromine-77 and bromine-82. In one aspect, the invention features amino acid compounds that have a high specificity for target sites when administered to a subject in vivo. Preferred amino acid compounds show a target to non-target ratio of at least 5:1, are stable in vivo and substantially localized to target within 1 hour after administration. An especially preferred amino acid compound is [{sup 18}F]-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC). In another aspect, the invention features pharmaceutical compositions comprised of an {alpha}-amino acid moiety attached to either a four, five, or a six member carbon-chain ring. In addition, the invention features analogs of {alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid.

  7. Targeting tumor perfusion and oxygenation to improve the outcome of anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO(2) at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects.

  8. Progress in endoscopic imaging of gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, G; Marchese, M

    2010-04-01

    New technologies in the form of high-magnification or "zoom" endoscopy complemented by chromoscopic agents or Narrow Band Imaging permit early detection of neoplastic lesions, particularly flat and depressed types. Detailed characteristics of the mucosal surface can be obtained, enabling an in vivo "optical biopsy" to make an instant diagnosis at endoscopy, previously possible only by using histological or cytological analysis. Advances in fiber optics, light sources, detectors, and molecular biology have led to the development of several novel methods for tissue evaluation in situ. Promising imaging techniques include fluorescence endoscopy, optical coherence tomography, confocal microendoscopy, molecular imaging, and light scattering and Raman spectroscopy. These techniques probably are able to replace conventional biopsy in the near future, but the endoscopists should become increasingly more familiar with histopathologic findings.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Stark, D D

    1989-02-01

    Careful optimization of scanning techniques, particularly motion artifact suppression, has been essential to achieve reproducible results in abdominal MRI. The investigators experience indicates that MRI can be more accurate than other imaging methods for the detection of focal liver lesions. Furthermore, MRI is able to solve the major clinical problems in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant liver lesions: cancer v cavernous hemangioma or focal fat. MRI has reduced the dependence on liver biopsy and angiography to diagnose and stage focal liver lesions. Unfortunately, both imaging techniques, especially motion artifact suppression methods, vary widely among machines operating at different field strengths. Therefore, as hardware and software evolve, it is necessary to retrace the steps of pulse sequence optimization and clinical testing. Hopefully, in the future, standardized imaging techniques will become available for body MRI.

  10. Non-diffeomorphic registration of brain tumor images by simulating tissue loss and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I.; Hogea, Cosmina S.; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Although a variety of diffeomorphic deformable registration methods exist in the literature, application of these methods in the presence of space-occupying lesions is not straightforward. The motivation of this work is spatial normalization of MR images from patients with brain tumors in a common stereotaxic space, aiming to pool data from different patients into a common space in order to perform group analyses. Additionally, transfer of structural and functional information from neuroanatomical brain atlases into the individual patient's space can be achieved via the inverse mapping, for the purpose of segmenting brains and facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. A method that estimates the brain tissue loss and replacement by tumor is applied for achieving equivalent image content between an atlas and a patient's scan, based on a biomechanical model of tumor growth. Automated estimation of the parameters modeling brain tissue loss and displacement is performed via optimization of an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy, which is optimized in parallel via APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search). The results of the method, applied to 21 brain tumor patients, indicate that the registration accuracy is relatively high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain. Also, the calculated deformation in the vicinity of the tumor is shown to correlate highly with expert-defined visual scores indicating the tumor mass effect, thereby potentially leading to an objective approach to quantification of mass effect, which is commonly used in diagnosis. PMID:19408350

  11. Overcoming limitations in nanoparticle drug delivery: triggered, intravascular release to improve drug penetration into tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Ashley A.; Lindner, Lars H.; Landon, Chelsea D.; Park, Ji-Young; Simnick, Andrew J.; Dreher, Matthew R.; Das, Shiva; Hanna, Gabi; Park, Won; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Koning, Gerben A.; Hagen, Timo L.M. ten; Needham, David; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, the goal of nanoparticle-based chemotherapy has been to decrease normal tissue toxicity by improving drug specificity to tumors. The EPR effect (Enhanced Permeability and Retention) can permit passive accumulation into tumor interstitium. However, suboptimal delivery is achieved with most nanoparticles because of heterogeneities of vascular permeability, which limits nanoparticle penetration. Further, slow drug release limits bioavailability. We developed a fast drug-releasing liposome triggered by local heat that has already shown substantial anti-tumor efficacy and is in human trials. Here, we demonstrate that thermally sensitive liposomes release doxorubicin inside the tumor vasculature. Real-time confocal imaging of doxorubicin delivery to murine tumors in window chambers and histologic analysis of flank tumors illustrates that intravascular drug release increases free drug in the interstitial space. This increases both the time that tumor cells are exposed to maximum drug levels and the drug penetration distance, compared with free drug or traditional pegylated liposomes. These improvements in drug bioavailability establish a new paradigm in drug delivery: rapidly triggered drug release in the tumor bloodstream. PMID:22952218

  12. Image Merge Tailored Access Resection (IMTAR) of Spinal Intradural Tumors. Technical Report of 13 Cases.

    PubMed

    Maduri, Rodolfo; Bobinski, Lukas; Duff, John Michael

    2017-02-01

    Standard translaminar approaches for intradural extramedullary (IDEM) tumors require extensive soft tissue dissection and partial facet removal. Ventral lesions may necessitate wider bone resection with subsequent possible spinal instability. Any manipulation of an already compromised spinal cord may lead to neurological injury. We describe an image-guided minimal access technique for IDEM tumor resection. Retrospective chart review of 13 consecutive patients after institutional ethics committee approval. We superimpose preoperative magnetic resonance imaging data with intraoperative 3-dimensional fluoroscopic images, allowing to simultaneously visualize osseous anatomy and the soft tissue lesion using appropriate windowing. We then plan optimal angle of trajectory to the tumor, which defines the skin incision and the transmuscular trajectory. A tubular retractor is placed to span the tumor. Microsurgical tumor resection is then carried out using this angle of approach. Thirteen patients (mean age. 57 years; male-to-female ratio, 10:3) were operated on during 28 months. Gross total resection was achieved in all patients. Neurological improvement occurred in 12 of the 13 patients. There was no neurological deficit outside of the expected sensory loss due to intentional nerve root sacrifice. No mechanical pain nor tumor recurrence were noted during the follow-up (mean, 16 months; range, 2-30 months). Image merge tailored access resection appears to be at least equivalent in terms of tumor resection, blood loss, and complications to other tubular techniques. It may reduce risks of neurological deficit and spine instability. Image merge tailored access resection is a novel application of merging intraoperative fluoroscopic images with preoperative magnetic resonance images for tailored IDEM resection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Visualizing Implanted Tumors in Mice with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Michael R.; Mayer, Dirk; Barak, Yoram; Chen, Ian Y.; Hu, Wei; Cheng, Zhen; Wang, Shan X.; Spielman, Daniel M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Matin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine if magnetotactic bacteria can target tumors in mice and provide positive contrast for visualization using magnetic resonance imaging. Experimental Design The ability of the magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 (referred to from here as AMB-1), to confer positive magnetic resonance imaging contrast was determined in vitro and in vivo. For the latter studies, AMB-1 were injected either i.t. or i.v. Bacterial growth conditions were manipulated to produce small (~25-nm diameter) magnetite particles, which were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Tumor targeting was confirmed using 64Cu-labeled bacteria and positron emission tomography and by determination of viable cell counts recovered from different organs and the tumor. Results We show that AMB-1 bacteria with small magnetite particles generate T1-weighted positive contrast, enhancing in vivo visualization by magnetic resonance imaging. Following i.v. injection of 64Cu-labeled AMB-1, positron emission tomography imaging revealed increasing colonization of tumors and decreasing infection of organs after 4 hours. Viable cell counts showed that, by day 6, the bacteria had colonized tumors but were cleared completely from other organs. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 1.22-fold (P = 0.003) increased positive contrast in tumors on day 2 and a 1.39-fold increase (P = 0.0007) on day 6. Conclusion Magnetotactic bacteria can produce positive magnetic resonance imaging contrast and colonize mouse tumor xenografts, providing a potential tool for improved magnetic resonance imaging visualization in preclinical and translational studies to track cancer. PMID:19671860

  14. A combining method for tumors detection from near-infrared breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Liu, Jian; Tian, Jinwen; Xie, Zeping

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the new qualitative and quantitative methods, which can diagnose breast tumors. Qualitative methods include blood vessel display inside and outside of pathological changes part of breast, display of equivalent pixel curves at the part of pathological changes and display of breast tumor image edge. Accordingly, three feature extraction operators are proposed, i.e. the combination operators of anisotropic gradient and smoothing operator, an improved Sobel operator and an edge sharpening operator. Furthermore, quantitative diagnose approaches are discussed based on blood and oxygen contents according to abundant clinical data and pathological mechanism of breast tumors. The results of clinic show that the methods of combining qualitative and quantitative diagnose are effective for breast tumor images, especially for early and potential breast cancer.

  15. Photoacoustic imaging with rotational compounding for improved signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Heinmiller, A.; Jose, J.; Needles, A.; Hirson, D.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy with linear array transducers enables fast two-dimensional, cross-sectional photoacoustic imaging. Unfortunately, most ultrasound transducers are only sensitive to a very narrow angular acceptance range and preferentially detect signals along the main axis of the transducer. This often limits photoacoustic microscopy from detecting blood vessels which can extend in any direction. Rotational compounded photoacoustic imaging is introduced to overcome the angular-dependency of detecting acoustic signals with linear array transducers. An integrate system is designed to control the image acquisition using a linear array transducer, a motorized rotational stage, and a motorized lateral stage. Images acquired at multiple angular positions are combined to form a rotational compounded image. We found that the signal-to-noise ratio improved, while the sidelobe and reverberation artifacts were substantially reduced. Furthermore, the rotational compounded images of excised kidneys and hindlimb tumors of mice showed more structural information compared with any single image collected.

  16. Novel Approaches to Imaging Tumor Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tee, Sui-Seng; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolism research has made a dramatic resurgence in recent years, fueled by a newfound appreciation of the interactions between metabolites and phenotype. Metabolic substrates and their products can be biomarkers of a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, but our understanding of their in vivo interactions and pathways has been hindered by the robustness of noninvasive imaging approaches. The past 3 decades have been flushed with the development of new techniques for the study of metabolism in vivo. These methods include nuclear-based, predominantly positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, many of which have been translated to the clinic. The purpose of this review was to introduce both long-standing imaging strategies as well as novel approaches to the study of perturbed metabolic pathways in the setting of carcinogenesis. This will involve descriptions of nuclear probes labeled with C and F as well C for study using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance imaging. Highlighting both advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the aim of this summary was to provide the reader with a framework for interrogation of metabolic aberrations in their system of interest.

  17. Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Marini, Frank C.; Long, Timothy E.; Provenzale, James M.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone. PMID:25565445

  18. Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hill, Tanner K; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S; Marini, Frank C; Long, Timothy E; Provenzale, James M; Mohs, Aaron M

    2015-02-18

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone.

  19. Management of Renal Tumors by Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation: Experience in 105 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Rutherford, Elizabeth E.; Stedman, Brian; Roy-Choudhury, Shuvro H.; Cast, James E. I.; Hayes, Matthew C.; Smart, Christopher J.

    2007-09-15

    Aims. In this article we present our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of 105 renal tumors. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 105 renal tumors in 97 patients, with a mean tumor size of 32 mm (11-68 mm). The mean patient age was 71.7 years (range, 36-89 years). The ablations were carried out under ultrasound (n = 43) or CT (n = 62) guidance. Imaging follow-up was by contrast-enhanced CT within 10 days and then at 6-monthly intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine variables associated with procedural outcome. Results. Eighty-three tumors were completely treated at a single sitting (79%). Twelve of the remaining tumors were successfully re-treated and a clinical decision was made not to re-treat seven patients. A patient with a small residual crescent of tumor is under follow-up and may require further treatment. In another patient, re-treatment was abandoned due to complicating pneumothorax and difficult access. One patient is awaiting further re-treatment. The overall technical success rate was 90.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size to be the only significant variable affecting procedural outcome. (p = 0.007, Pearson {chi}{sup 2}) Five patients had complications. There have been no local recurrences. Conclusion. Our experience to date suggests that RFA is a safe and effective, minimally invasive treatment for small renal tumors.

  20. Management of renal tumors by image-guided radiofrequency ablation: experience in 105 tumors.

    PubMed

    Breen, David J; Rutherford, Elizabeth E; Stedman, Brian; Roy-Choudhury, Shuvro H; Cast, James E I; Hayes, Matthew C; Smart, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of 105 renal tumors. RFA was performed on 105 renal tumors in 97 patients, with a mean tumor size of 32 mm (11-68 mm). The mean patient age was 71.7 years (range, 36-89 years). The ablations were carried out under ultrasound (n = 43) or CT (n = 62) guidance. Imaging follow-up was by contrast-enhanced CT within 10 days and then at 6-monthly intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine variables associated with procedural outcome. Eighty-three tumors were completely treated at a single sitting (79%). Twelve of the remaining tumors were successfully re-treated and a clinical decision was made not to re-treat seven patients. A patient with a small residual crescent of tumor is under follow-up and may require further treatment. In another patient, re-treatment was abandoned due to complicating pneumothorax and difficult access. One patient is awaiting further re-treatment. The overall technical success rate was 90.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size to be the only significant variable affecting procedural outcome. (p = 0.007, Pearson chi(2)) Five patients had complications. There have been no local recurrences. Our experience to date suggests that RFA is a safe and effective, minimally invasive treatment for small renal tumors.

  1. Iodinated hyaluronic acid oligomer-based nanoassemblies for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-04-01

    Nano-sized self-assemblies based on amphiphilic iodinated hyaluronic acid (HA) were developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. 2,3,5-Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) was conjugated to an HA oligomer as a computed tomography (CT) imaging modality and a hydrophobic residue. Nanoassembly based on HA-TIBA was fabricated for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). Cellular uptake of DOX from nanoassembly, compared to a DOX solution group, was enhanced via an HA-CD44 receptor interaction, and subsequently, the in vitro antitumor efficacy of DOX-loaded nanoassembly was improved in SCC7 (CD44 receptor positive squamous cell carcinoma) cells. Cy5.5, a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye, was attached to the HA-TIBA conjugate and the in vivo tumor targetability of HA-TIBA nanoassembly, which is based on the interaction between HA and CD44 receptor, was demonstrated in a NIRF imaging study using an SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. Tumor targeting and cancer diagnosis with HA-TIBA nanoassembly were verified in a CT imaging study using the SCC7 tumor-xenografted mouse model. In addition to efficient cancer diagnosis using NIRF and CT imaging modalities, improved antitumor efficacies were shown. HA and TIBA can be used to produce HA-TIBA nanoassembly that may be a promising theranostic nanosystem for cancers that express the CD44 receptor.

  2. Noninvasive tumor oxygen imaging by photoacoustic lifetime imaging integrated with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Biel, Merrill A.; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Oxygen plays a major role in cancer biology and tumor progression. In PDT, the reduction in efficacy is directly related to lack of oxygen because its molecular mechanism relies on oxygen as an energy mediator. Measuring tumor oxygenation can provide physicians with better diagnosis and optimization of treatment plans. However, clinical tools for directly assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is oxygen needle electrode, which is invasive and measures oxygen level at a single location. We present our work on developing a combined treatment-imaging modality that integrates PDT and photoacoustic oxygen imaging. We propose a system designed for clinical treatments of cancer of the oral cavity. Tissue oxygen imaging is performed by applying Photoacoustic Lifetime Imaging (PALI). This technology relies on photoacoustic probing of oxygen-dependent excitation lifetime of Methylene Blue. The dye is excited by the same wavelength of illumination source for PDT. Once excited, the population of photosensitizer molecules at triplet state has a lifetime depending on the oxygen level. The transition from excited triplet state to ground state can be probe by another laser, which generate photoacoustic signal that is used to map the lifetime. The lifetime map is then converted to pO2 distribution. We expect that PDT efficacy can be improved by applying PALI imaging feedback in real-time to determine, and individually optimize, O2-enriched gas breathing parameters and PDT light-dose during treatment. Successful implementation of PALI in PDT can also drive its application in guiding other cancer treatments that are affected by hypoxia.

  3. Ultrasound imaging of breast tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Umphrey, Heidi; Lockhart, Mark; Robbin, Michelle; Forero-Torres, Andres

    2015-09-01

    A novel image processing strategy is detailed for simultaneous measurement of tumor perfusion and neovascular morphology parameters from a sequence of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) images. After normalization and tumor segmentation, a global time-intensity curve describing contrast agent flow was analyzed to derive surrogate measures of tumor perfusion (i.e., peak intensity, time-to-peak intensity, area under the curve, wash-in rate, wash-out rate). A maximum intensity image was generated from these same segmented image sequences, and each vascular component was skeletonized via a thinning algorithm. This skeletonized data set and collection of vessel segments were then investigated to extract parameters related to the neovascular network and physical architecture (i.e., vessel-to-tissue ratio, number of bifurcations, vessel count, average vessel length and tortuosity). An efficient computation of local perfusion parameters was also introduced and operated by averaging time-intensity curve data over each individual neovascular segment. Each skeletonized neovascular segment was then color-coded by these local measures to produce a parametric map detailing spatial properties of tumor perfusion. Longitudinal DCE-US image data sets were collected in six patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer using a Philips iU22 ultrasound system equipped with a L9-3 transducer and Definity contrast agent. Patients were imaged using US before and after contrast agent dosing at baseline and again at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24 after treatment started. Preliminary clinical results suggested that breast tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be associated with temporal and spatial changes in DCE-US-derived parametric measures of tumor perfusion. Moreover, changes in neovascular morphology parametric measures may also help identify any breast tumor response (or lack thereof) to systemic treatment. Breast cancer management from early detection to therapeutic

  4. Improvement of tumor localization of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy and its application for tumor diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Shun-Ichiro; Hagiya, Yuichiro; Tabata, Kenji; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Okura, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodynamic diagnosis of cancer are widely used in clinical fields. These are performed using photosensitizers. Many metalloporphyrin-related compounds have been developed as photosensitizers for use in PDT, and these tumor localization ability have been improved in recent research. Moreover, the precursor of porphyrin 5-aminolevulinic acid is used in fluorescence diagnosis using its tumor localization ability. In this review, these applications of photosensitizers in cancer therapy and diagnosis are summarized.

  5. Novel Approaches to Imaging Tumor Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui-Seng; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2015-01-01

    The field of metabolism research has made a dramatic resurgence in recent years, fueled by a newfound appreciation of the interactions between metabolites and phenotype. Metabolic substrates and their products can be biomarkers of a wide range of pathologies, including cancer, but our understanding of their in vivo interactions and pathways has been hindered by the robustness of non-invasive imaging approaches. The last 3 decades have been flushed with the development of new techniques for the study of metabolism in vivo. These methods include nuclear based, predominantly positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), many of which have been translated to the clinic. The purpose of this review is to introduce both long standing imaging strategies as well as novel approaches to the study of perturbed metabolic pathways in the setting of carcinogenesis. This will involve descriptions of nuclear probes labeled with 11C and 18F as well 13C for study using hyperpolarized MRI. Highlighting both advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the aim of this summary is to provide the reader with a framework for interrogation of metabolic aberrations in their system of interest. PMID:26049695

  6. Strain-compounding technique with ultrasound Nakagami imaging for distinguishing between benign and malignant breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yin-Yin; Li, Chia-Hui; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chang, King-Jen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2012-05-01

    The scatterer properties of breast tissues are related to the presence of collagen structures, while the elasticity properties of breast tissues depend on their structural organization; these two characteristics are functionally complementary in ultrasound-based tissue characterizations. This study investigated the use of a strain-compounding technique with Nakagami imaging to provide information associated with the scatterer and elasticity characteristics of tissues when attempting to identify benign and malignant breast tumors. The efficacy of the proposed method was tested by collecting raw data of ultrasound backscattered signals from 50 clinical cases (25 benign tumors and 25 malignant tumors, as verified by histology biopsies). The different strain conditions were created by applying manual compression. For each region in which breast tumors were suspected, estimates of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the Gaussian fitting curve for the Nakagami-parameter histogram in the strain-compounding Nakagami images were divided by those of the corresponding reference Nakagami images (uncompressed images); this parameter was denoted as the FWHM ratio. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was adopted to assess the diagnostic performance. The results demonstrated that the difference in scatterer distributions between before and after compounding was greater for benign tumors than for malignant tumors. The FWHM ratio estimates for benign and malignant tumors were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 0.96 ± 0.06 (mean ± standard deviation), respectively (p < 0.01). The mean area under the ROC curve using the FWHM ratio estimates was 0.92, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.83-1.00. These findings indicate that the strain-compounding Nakagami imaging method based on the acquisition of multiple frames under different strain states could provide objective information that would improve the ability to classify benign and malignant breast tumors.

  7. Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging method for breast tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Top, Can Barıs; Tafreshi, Azadeh Kamali; Gençer, Nevzat G

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) method is recently proposed as a non-invasive hybrid breast imaging technique for tumor detection. The acquired data depend on acoustic, elastic and electromagnetic properties of the tissue. The potential of the method is analyzed with simulation studies and phantom experiments. In this paper, the results of these studies are summarized. It is shown that HMMDI method has a potential to detect malignancies inside fibro-glandular tissue.

  8. [Radionuclide imaging of neurendocrine tumors: biological basis and diagnostic results].

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Mallardo, Vania; Rossi, Michele; Vaccaro, Andrea; Raucci, Antonio; Della Vecchi, Nicoletta; Romano, Giovanna; Califano, Teresa; Schillirò, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many radiopharmaceuticals have been successfully used in nuclear medicine to detect neuroendocrine tumors, and many of them are based on a specific mechanism of uptake, while others are non-specific probes. This "review" focuses on the clinical applications of metaiodobenzylguanidine, (111)In-pentreotide and positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. New avances in diagnostic imaging will be discussed. Molecular imaging serves these diagnostic functions and provides powerful means for non-invasively detecting disease.

  9. Assessment of hepatic VX2 tumors with combined percutaneous transhepatic lymphosonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cun; Liang, Ping; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Li, Xin; Han, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Shao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic lymphosonography (PTL) as a novel method for the detection of tumor lymphangiogenesis in hepatic VX2 of rabbits and to evaluate combined PTL and routine contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging for the diagnosis of liver cancer. METHODS: Ten rabbits with VX2 tumor were included in this study. SonoVue (0.1 mL/kg) was injected into each rabbit via an ear vein for contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging, and 0.5 mL SonoVue was injected into the normal liver parenchyma near the VX2 tumor for PTL. Images and/or movie clips were stored for further analysis. RESULTS: Ultrasonographic imaging showed VX2 tumors ranging 5-19 mm in the liver of rabbits. The VX2 tumor was hyperechoic and hypoechoic to liver parenchyma at the early and later phase, respectively. The hepatic lymph vessels were visualized immediately after injection of contrast medium and continuously visualized with SonoVue® during PTL. The boundaries of VX2 tumors were hyperechoic to liver parenchyma and the tumors. There was a significant difference in the values for the boundaries of VX2 tumors after injection compared with the liver normal parenchyma and the tumor parenchyma during PTL. CONCLUSION: PTL is a novel method for the detection of tumor lymphangiogenesis in hepatic VX2 of rabbits. Combined PTL and contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic imaging can improve the diagnosis of liver cancer. PMID:18609718

  10. Quantitative imaging of tumor vasculature using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are often more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We hypothesized that MSOT could reveal both tumor vascular density and function based on modulation of blood oxygenation. We performed MSOT on nude mice (n=8) bearing subcutaneous xenograft PC3 tumors using an inVision 256 (iThera Medical). The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified from 21% to 100% and back. After imaging, Hoechst 33348 was injected to indicate vascular perfusion and permeability. Tumors were then extracted for histopathological analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The acquired data was analyzed to extract a bulk measurement of blood oxygenation (SO2MSOT) from the whole tumor using different approaches. The tumors were also automatically segmented into 5 regions to investigate the effect of depth on SO2MSOT. Baseline SO2MSOT values at 21% and 100% oxygen breathing showed no relationship with ex vivo measures of vascular density or function, while the change in SO2MSOT showed a strong negative correlation to Hoechst intensity (r=- 0.92, p=0.0016). Tumor voxels responding to oxygen challenge were spatially heterogeneous. We observed a significant drop in SO2 MSOT value with tumor depth following a switch of respiratory gas from air to oxygen (0.323+/-0.017 vs. 0.11+/-0.05, p=0.009 between 0 and 1.5mm depth), but no such effect for air breathing (0.265+/-0.013 vs. 0.19+/-0.04, p=0.14 between 0 and 1.5mm depth). Our results indicate that in subcutaneous prostate tumors, baseline SO2MSOT levels do not correlate to tumor vascular density or function while the magnitude of the response to oxygen

  11. Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Antiangiogenic Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Laura V; Clevert, Dirk-Andre; Scheckinger, Siiri; Strieth, Sebastian; Eichhorn, Martin E

    2015-05-01

    Anti-angiogenic treatment is a promising strategy for cancer therapy and is currently evaluated in clinical trials. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the effects of an anti-angiogenic therapy, inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial growth factor (EGF) using a tyrosine kinase inhibitor for blocking tumor angiogenesis and tumor progression in vivo. Experiments were performed using C57/Bl6 mice (25 ± 5 g of body weight (b.w.)) implanted with subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC-1). From day 7 till 21 after tumor cell implantation, animals (n=7 per group) were treated by monotherapy using ZD6474 (50 mg/kg b.w. per os (p.o.)) daily. A control group received only the solvent polysorbate 80. Using contrast enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) parameters of intra-tumoral microcirculation animals were examined 24 h after the last application of ZD6474. Moreover, subcutaneous tumor growth was measured over the whole therapy period. Finally, histological analyses were performed to analyze the functional vessel density in the tumor tissue. ZD6474 reduced tumor growth of LLC-1 in C57/Bl6 mice significantly. A significant difference of maximal signal intensity (ΔSImax) and area below the intensity time curve (AUC) after antiangiogenic therapy was recorded in the tumor center by CE-US. Vessel density after hematoxyline and eosin, as well as CD31, staining showed no significant difference in both groups. Anti-angiogenic effects can be quantitatively demonstrated using CE-US imaging, which represents the spreading of efficient vessels in the tumor tissue, especially in the tumor center. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  13. Improved radiographic image amplifier panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L., Sr.

    1968-01-01

    Layered image amplifier for radiographic /X ray and gamma ray/ applications, combines very high radiation sensitivity with fast image buildup and erasure capabilities by adding a layer of material that is both photoconductive and light-emitting to basic image amplifier and cascading this assembly with a modified Thorne panel.

  14. Targeting tumors with nanobodies for cancer imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sabrina; Heukers, Raimond; Sornkom, Jirawas; Kok, Robbert J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    2013-12-28

    The use of monoclonal antibodies has revolutionized both cancer therapy and cancer imaging. Antibodies have been used to directly inhibit tumor cell proliferation or to target drugs to tumors. Also in molecular imaging, monoclonal antibodies have found their way to the clinic. Nevertheless, distribution within tumors is hampered by their size, leading to insufficient efficacy of cancer treatment and irregular imaging. An attractive alternative for monoclonal antibodies are nanobodies or VHHs. These are the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies from animals from the Camelidae family that were first discovered in 1993. Stimulated by the ease of nanobody selection, production, and low immunogenicity potential, a number of nanobodies specific to different disease-related targets have been developed. For cancer therapy, nanobodies have been employed as antagonistic drugs, and more recently, as targeting moieties of effector-domaINS and of drug delivery systems. In parallel, nanobodies have also been employed for molecular imaging with modalities such as nuclear and optical imaging. In this review, we discuss recent developments in the application of nanobodies as targeting moieties in cancer therapy and cancer imaging. With such a wide range of successful applications, nanobodies have become much more than simple antagonists.

  15. Imaging of soft tissue tumors: general imaging strategy and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, P; Gielen, J; Vanhoenacker, F M; De Schepper, A M; Parizel, P M

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the imaging strategy and protocol for detection, grading and staging, and posttherapeutic follow-up of soft tissue tumors (STT), used in our institution. The role of each imaging technique, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging, is highlighted.

  16. Pediatric neuroendocrine carcinoid tumors: Management, pathology, and imaging findings in a pediatric referral center.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew J; Tocchio, Shannon; Kurtom, Waleed; Tadros, Sameh S

    2017-09-01

    While neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors are increasingly recognized in the adult population, they are often not suspected in children. Retrospective review of all well-differentiated neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors was performed based on pathology reports from a quaternary pediatric medical center between January 2003 and June 2016. Clinical presentations, treatment approaches, imaging findings, and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. A total of 45 cases of pathology-proven carcinoid tumor were reported with an average age of 14.1 years (range: 7-21 years, SD: 2.8 years). Of these cases, 80% (36) were appendiceal, 11% (5) bronchial, 2% (1) colonic, 2% (1) gastric, 2% (1) enteric, and 2% (1) testicular. Metastases were observed in one (3%) appendiceal, one (100%) enteric, and two (40%) bronchial cases. No recurrence was demonstrated in any appendiceal carcinoid cases. Recurrence was seen in one of three extra-appendiceal gastrointestinal tumors. Tumor site and size significantly correlated with metastases and recurrence. Contrary to recent epidemiological investigations in adults, appendiceal carcinoid tumors remain the most common site for pediatric carcinoid tumors. Appendiceal carcinoid tumors exhibited benign clinical courses without recurrence during short-term follow-up. Extra-appendiceal gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors exhibited much more aggressive behavior with greater metastases and recurrence. Bronchial carcinoid tumors demonstrated good clinical response to resection even in cases with mediastinal lymph node involvement. While increased use of urine 5-HIAA levels and somatostatin receptor-specific imaging might improve detection and guide management of extra-appendiceal carcinoid tumors, longer-term follow-up is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Thallium-201 SPECT imaging of brain tumors: Methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.T.; Black, K.L.; Marciano, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Guze, B.H.; Grafton, S.; Hawkins, R.A.; Becker, D.P. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that thallium-201 ({sup 201}Tl) planar scans of brain tumors more accurately reflect viable tumor burden than CT, MRI, or radionuclide studies with other single-photon emitting compounds. We have previously reported the utility of {sup 201}Tl SPECT index in distinguishing low- from high-grade gliomas elsewhere. Here we describe the technical considerations of deriving a simple {sup 201}Tl index, based on uptake in the tumor normalized to homologous contralateral tissue, from SPECT images of brain tumors. We evaluated the importance of consistently correcting for tissue attenuation, as it may achieve better lesion discrimination on qualitative inspection, and the methodologic limitations imposed by partial volume effects at the limits of resolution.

  18. Linear endoscopic ultrasonography vs magnetic resonance imaging in ampullary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita; Castellani, Danilo; Messerotti, Alessandro; Bertani, Helga; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Vetruccio, Elena; Losi, Luisa; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess linear endoscopic ultrasound (L-EUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in biliary tract dilation and suspect small ampullary tumor. METHODS: L-EUS and MRI data were compared in 24 patients with small ampullary tumors; all with subsequent histological confirmation. Data were collected prospectively and the accuracy of detection, histological characterization and N staging were assessed retrospectively using the results of surgical or endoscopic treatment as a benchmark. RESULTS: A suspicion of ampullary tumor was present in 75% of MRI and all L-EUS examinations, with 80% agreement between EUS and histological findings at endoscopy. However, L-EUS and histological TN staging at surgery showed moderate agreement (κ = 0.54). CONCLUSION: L-EUS could be a useful adjunct as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected ampullary tumors. PMID:21105192

  19. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Haris, Mohammad; Singh, Anup; Mohammed, Imran; Ittyerah, Ranjit; Nath, Kavindra; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Debrosse, Catherine; Kogan, Feliks; Cai, Kejia; Poptani, Harish; Reddy, Damodar; Hariharan, Hari; Reddy, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Increased expression of cathepsins has diagnostic as well as prognostic value in several types of cancer. Here, we demonstrate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, which uses poly-L-glutamate (PLG) as an MRI probe to map cathepsin expression in vivo, in a rat brain tumor model. This noninvasive, high-resolution and non-radioactive method exploits the differences in the CEST signals of PLG in the native form and cathepsin mediated cleaved form. The method was validated in phantoms with known physiological concentrations, in tumor cells and in an animal model of brain tumor along with immunohistochemical analysis. Potential applications in tumor diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic response are outlined. PMID:25124082

  20. Handheld confocal laser endomicroscopic imaging utilizing tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to identify experimental glioma cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Georges, Joseph; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F.; Feuerstein, Burt G.; Preul, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have reported that handheld confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can be used with various nonspecific fluorescent dyes to improve the microscopic identification of brain tumor and its boundaries. Here, we show that CLE can be used experimentally with tumor-specific fluorescent labeling to define glioma margins in vivo. Methods: Thirteen rats underwent craniectomy and in vivo imaging 21 days after implantation with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled U251 (n = 7) cells or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressing F98 cells (n = 6). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated EGFR fluorescent antibody (FITC-EGFR) was applied for contrast in F98 tumors. Confocal images of normal brain, obvious tumor, and peritumoral zones were collected using the CLE system. Bench-top confocal microscopy and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections were correlated with CLE images. Results: GFP and FITC-EGFR fluorescence of glioma cells were detected by in vivo visible-wavelength fluorescence CLE. CLE of GFP-labeled tumors revealed bright individual satellite tumor cells within peritumoral tissue, a definitive tumor border, and subcellular structures. Imaging with FITC-EGFR labeling provided weaker contrast in F98-EGFR tumors but was able to delineate tumor cells. Imaging with both methods in various tumor regions correlated with standard confocal imaging and clinical histology. Conclusions: These data suggest that in vivo CLE of selectively tagged neoplasms could allow specific interactive identification of tumoral areas. Imaging of GFP and FITC-EGFR provides real-time histologic information precisely related to the site of microscopic imaging of tumor. PMID:28144472

  1. History and evolution of brain tumor imaging: insights through radiology.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    This review recounts the history of brain tumor diagnosis from antiquity to the present and, indirectly, the history of neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain has from the beginning held an enormous interest because of the inherent difficulty of this endeavor due to the presence of the skull. Because of this, most techniques when newly developed have always been used in neuroradiology and, although some have proved to be inappropriate for this purpose, many were easily incorporated into the specialty. The first major advance in modern neuroimaging was contrast agent-enhanced computed tomography, which permitted accurate anatomic localization of brain tumors and, by virtue of contrast enhancement, malignant ones. The most important advances in neuroimaging occurred with the development of magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted sequences that allowed an indirect estimation of tumor cellularity; this was further refined by the development of perfusion and permeability mapping. From its beginnings with indirect and purely anatomic imaging techniques, neuroradiology now uses a combination of anatomic and physiologic techniques that will play a critical role in biologic tumor imaging and radiologic genomics.

  2. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    PubMed

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  3. High Frequency Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging of Solid Tumors in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelze, M. L.; O'Brien, W. D.; Zachary, J. F.

    A mammary carcinoma and a sarcoma were grown in mice and imaged with ultrasound transducers operating with a center frequency of 20 MHz. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) analysis was used to characterize the tumors using the bandwidth of 10 to 25 MHz. Initial QUS estimates of the scatterer properties (average scatterer diameter and acoustic concentration) did not reveal differences between the two kinds of tumors. Examination of the tumors using light microscopy indicated definite structural differences between the two kinds of tumors. In order to draw out the structural differences with ultrasound, a higher frequency probe (center frequency measured at 70 MHz) was used to interrogate the two kinds of tumors and new models were applied to the QUS analysis. QUS scatterer diameter images of the tumors were constructed using the high frequency probe. Several models for scattering were implemented to obtain estimates of scatterer properties in order to relate estimated scatterer properties to real tissue microstructure. The Anderson model for scattering from a fluid-filled sphere differentiated the two kinds of tumors but did not yield scatterer property estimates that resembled underlying structure. Using the Anderson model, the average estimated scatterer diameters were 25.5 ± 0.14 μm for the carcinoma and 57.5 ± 2.90 for the sarcoma. A new cell model was developed, which was based on scattering from a cell by incorporating the effects of the cytoskeleton and nucleus. The new cell model yielded estimates that appeared to reflect underlying structure more accurately but did not separate the two kinds of tumors. Using the new cell model, the average estimated scatterer diameters were 15.6 ± 2.2 μm for the carcinoma and 16.8 ± 3.82 μm for the sarcoma. The new cell model yielded estimates close to the actual nuclear diameter of the cell (13 μm)

  4. Imaging brain tumor proliferative activity with [124I]iododeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, R G; Roelcke, U; Weinreich, R; Beattie, B; von Ammon, K; Yonekawa, Y; Landolt, H; Guenther, I; Crompton, N E; Vontobel, P; Missimer, J; Maguire, R P; Koziorowski, J; Knust, E J; Finn, R D; Leenders, K L

    2000-02-01

    Iododeoxyuridine (IUdR) uptake and retention was imaged by positron emission tomography (PET) at 0-48 min and 24 h after administration of 28.0-64.4 MBq (0.76-1.74 mCi) of [124I]IUdR in 20 patients with brain tumors, including meningiomas and gliomas. The PET images were directly compared with gadolinium contrast-enhanced or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Estimates for IUdR-DNA incorporation in tumor tissue (Ki) required pharmacokinetic modeling and fitting of the 0-48 min dynamically acquired data to correct the 24-h image data for residual, nonincorporated radioactivity that did not clear from the tissue during the 24-h period after IUdR injection. Standard uptake values (SUVs) and tumor:brain activity ratios (Tm:Br) were also calculated from the 24-h image data. The Ki, SUV, and Tm/Br values were related to tumor type and grade, tumor labeling index, and survival after the PET scan. The plasma half-life of [124I]IUdR was short (2-3 min), and the arterial plasma input function was similar between patients (48 +/- 12 SUV*min). Plasma clearance of the major radiolabeled metabolite ([124I]iodide) varied somewhat between patients and was markedly prolonged in one patient with renal insufficiency. It was apparent from our analysis that a sizable fraction (15-93%) of residual nonincorporated radioactivity (largely [124I]iodide) remained in the tumors after the 24-h washout period, and this fraction varied between the different tumor groups. Because the SUV and Tm:Br ratio values reflect both IUdR-DNA incorporated and exchangeable nonincorporated radioactivity, any residual nonincorporated radioactivity will amplify their values and distort their significance and interpretation. This was particularly apparent in the meningioma and glioblastoma multiforme groups of tumors. Mean tumor Ki values ranged between 0.5 +/- 0.9 (meningiomas) and 3.9 +/- 2.3 microl/min/g (peak value for glioblastoma multiforme, GBM). Comparable SUV and Tm:Br values at 24 h ranged from 0

  5. Diagnostic imaging in mediastinal thyroid tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Cho, S.R.; Purcell, M.; Tsung-Yao, H.; Domstad, P.A.; Liu, C.I.; DeLand, F.H.

    1984-12-01

    Various diagnostic imagings in nine patients with mediastinal goiters were presented. The clinical manifestations of these patients were various, from totally asymptomatic to severe dyspnea. Six of the nine patients underwent surgical intervention, three were follicular adenomas and three were nodular goiters. A chest radiograph (positive in seven out of nine patients) provided the most valuable initial localization of a goiter mass to the anterior, middle, or posterior compartment. Esophagograms (performed in four patients) showed compression of esophagus by the mediastinal mass. I-131 scintigraphy (performed in seven patients) was capable of detection of functional (in three patients) vs nonfunctional status of thyroid status (in four patients). Angiography (performed in five patients), characterized by anatomic continuity with cervical thyroid gland, calcifications, well-defined border of masses and/or contrast enhancement, offered important roles to direct a diagnosis of intrathoracic goiter. The computed tomography becomes increasingly important because all mediastinal goiters are not radioiodine avid.

  6. Doxorubicin loaded silica nanorattles actively seek tumors with improved anti-tumor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuping; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Hao, Nanjing; Liu, Huiyu; Tan, Longfei; Li, Hongbo; Huang, Xinglu; Peng, Bo; Yan, Chuanmiao; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiaoli; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong

    2012-05-01

    Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX-FA-SNs showed lower cytotoxicity in folate receptor negative normal mouse fibroblast cells (L929 cells) compared with free DOX. In vivo tumor-targeted fluorescence imaging indicated specific tumor targeting and uptake of FA-SNs in nude mice bearing subcutaneous HeLa cell-derived xenograft tumors. In vivo anti-tumor experiments demonstrated that DOX-FA-SNs (10 mg kg-1 of DOX) significantly regressed the tumor growth and reduced toxicity compared with free DOX. These results have great significance in developing and optimizing SNs as effective intracellular delivery and specific tumor targeting vehicles.Silica nanorattles (SNs) have proven to be promising vehicles for drug delivery. In order to further enhance efficacy and minimize adverse effects, active targeted delivery to tumors is necessary. In this work, SNs modified with a tumor specific targeting ligand, folic acid (FA), was used as carrier of doxorubicin (DOX) (DOX-FA-SNs). Drug loading, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of DOX-FA-SNs in vitro in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) were evaluated. DOX-FA-SNs showed a higher cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa cells) than DOX loaded carboxyl (-COOH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified SNs (DOX-COOH-SNs and DOX-PEG-SNs, respectively). However, DOX

  7. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of intraorbital granular cell tumor (Abrikossoff's tumor): a case report.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Tai-Chi; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Guo, Wan-You; Chang, Fu-Pang; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak

    2016-05-13

    Granular cell tumors are rare neoplasms which can occur in any part of the body. Granular cell tumors of the orbit account for only 3 % of all granular cell tumor cases. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit have proven useful for diagnosing orbital tumors. However, the rarity of intraorbital granular cell tumors poses a significant diagnostic challenge for both clinicians and radiologists. We report a case of a 37-year-old Chinese woman with a rare intraocular granular cell tumor of her right eye presenting with diplopia, proptosis, and restriction of ocular movement. Preoperative orbital computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement revealed an enhancing solid, ovoid, well-demarcated, retrobulbar nodule. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging features included an intraorbital tumor which was isointense relative to gray matter on T1-weighted imaging and hypointense on T2-weighted imaging. No diffusion restriction of water was noted on either axial diffusion-weighted images or apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features suggested an intraorbital hemangioma. However, postoperative pathology (together with immunohistochemistry) identified an intraorbital granular cell tumor. When intraorbital T2 hypointensity and free diffusion of water are observed on magnetic resonance imaging, a granular cell tumor should be included in the differential diagnosis of an intraocular tumor.

  8. Angle correction for small animal tumor imaging with spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Piracha, Shaheer; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Viapiano, Mariano; Roblyer, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a widefield imaging technique that allows for the quantitative extraction of tissue optical properties. SFDI is currently being explored for small animal tumor imaging, but severe imaging artifacts occur for highly curved surfaces (e.g. the tumor edge). We propose a modified Lambertian angle correction, adapted from the Minnaert correction method for satellite imagery, to account for tissue surface angles up to 75°. The method was tested in a hemisphere phantom study as well as a small animal tumor model. The proposed method reduced µa and µs` extraction errors by an average of 64% and 16% respectively compared to performing no angle correction, and provided more physiologically agreeable optical property and chromophore values on tumors. PMID:27375952

  9. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  10. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor. PMID:26720879

  11. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  12. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with 18F-DOPA PET and PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Di Pietro, Barbara; Grasso, Cristina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to give an overview of the potential clinical utility of [18F]-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET and PET/CT for imaging of brain tumors. Review articles and reference lists were used to supplement the search findings. 18F-DOPA has been investigated as a PET tracer for primary brain tumors, metastases of somatic cancer, and evaluation of relapse of pathology in patients with brain tumor after surgery and/or radiotherapy on the basis of enhanced cell proliferation. Available studies have provided encouraging preliminary results for diagnosis of brain tumors and relapse after surgery/radiotherapy. In the brain, excellent discrimination between tumor and normal tissue can be achieved because of the low physiological uptake of 18F-DOPA and the high ratio between tumor and normal hemispheric tissue. Information on evaluation of brain metastases is limited but encouraging. PET and PET/CT with 18F-DOPA are useful in diagnosing primary brain tumors and should be recommended in the diagnosis of relapse of disease after surgical treatment and/or radiotherapy. Semiquantitative analysis could improve diagnosis while correlative imaging with MRI is essential. Limits are due to low knowledge of potential pitfalls.

  13. Development of image-processing software for automatic segmentation of brain tumors in MR images

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, C.; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    Most of the commercially available software for brain tumor segmentation have limited functionality and frequently lack the careful validation that is required for clinical studies. We have developed an image-analysis software package called ‘Prometheus,’ which performs neural system–based segmentation operations on MR images using pre-trained information. The software also has the capability to improve its segmentation performance by using the training module of the neural system. The aim of this article is to present the design and modules of this software. The segmentation module of Prometheus can be used primarily for image analysis in MR images. Prometheus was validated against manual segmentation by a radiologist and its mean sensitivity and specificity was found to be 85.71±4.89% and 93.2±2.87%, respectively. Similarly, the mean segmentation accuracy and mean correspondence ratio was found to be 92.35±3.37% and 0.78±0.046, respectively. PMID:21897560

  14. Askin tumor: CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tingting; Guan, Yubao; Chen, Yongxin; Li, Jingxu

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the imaging findings of Askin tumors on computed tomography (CT) and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET/CT).Seventeen cases of Askin tumors confirmed by histopathology were retrospectively analyzed in terms of CT (17 cases) and FDG-PET/CT data (6 cases).Fifteen of the tumors were located in the chest wall and the other 2 were in the anterior middle mediastinum. Of the 15 chest wall cases, 13 demonstrated irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses with cystic degeneration and necrosis, and 2 demonstrated homogeneous soft tissue masses on unenhanced CT scans. Two mediastinal tumors demonstrated the irregular, heterogeneous soft tissue masses. Calcifications were found in 2 tumors. The tumors demonstrated heterogeneously enhancement in 16 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case on contrast-enhanced scans. FDG-PET/CT images revealed increased metabolic activity in all 6 cases undergone FDG-PET/CT scan, and the lesion SUVmax ranged from 4.0 to 18.6. At initial diagnosis, CT and FDG-PET/CT scans revealed rib destruction in 9 cases, pleural effusion in 9 cases, and lung metastasis in 1 case. At follow-up, 12 cases showed recurrence and/or metastases, 4 cases showed improvement or remained stable, and 1 was lost to follow-up.In summary, CT and FDG-PET/CT images of Askin tumors showed heterogeneous soft tissue masses in the chest wall and the mediastinum, accompanied by rib destruction, pleural effusion, and increased FDG uptake. CT and FDG-PET/CT imaging play important roles in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with Askin tumors.

  15. Imaging tumor microscopic viscosity in vivo using molecular rotors

    PubMed Central

    Shimolina, Lyubov’ E.; Izquierdo, Maria Angeles; López-Duarte, Ismael; Bull, James A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Klapshina, Larisa G.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2017-01-01

    The microscopic viscosity plays an essential role in cellular biophysics by controlling the rates of diffusion and bimolecular reactions within the cell interior. While several approaches have emerged that have allowed the measurement of viscosity and diffusion on a single cell level in vitro, the in vivo viscosity monitoring has not yet been realized. Here we report the use of fluorescent molecular rotors in combination with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to image microscopic viscosity in vivo, both on a single cell level and in connecting tissues of subcutaneous tumors in mice. We find that viscosities recorded from single tumor cells in vivo correlate well with the in vitro values from the same cancer cell line. Importantly, our new method allows both imaging and dynamic monitoring of viscosity changes in real time in live animals and thus it is particularly suitable for diagnostics and monitoring of the progress of treatments that might be accompanied by changes in microscopic viscosity. PMID:28134273

  16. Diffuse reflectance spectral imaging for breast tumor margin assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Justin Y.; Dhar, Sulochana; Yu, Bing; Brooke, Martin A.; Kuech, Thomas F.; Jokerst, Nan M.; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2012-03-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been previously explored as a promising method for providing real-time visual maps of tissue composition to help surgeons determine breast lumpectomy margins and to ensure the complete removal of a tumor during surgery. We present the simple design, validation, and implementation of a compact and cost-effective spectral imaging system for the application of tumor margin assessment. Our new system consists of a broadband source with bandpass filters for illumination and a fabricated custom 16-pixel photodiode imaging array for the detection of diffuse reflectance. The system prototype was characterized in tissue-mimicking phantoms and has an SNR of greater than 40 dB in phantoms, animals, and human tissue. We show proof-of-concept for performing fast, wide-field spectral imaging with a simple, inexpensive design. The strategy also allows for the scaling to higher pixel number and density in future iterations of the system.

  17. Improved delivery of polymer therapeutics to prostate tumors using plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, Adam Joseph

    When a patient is presented with locally advanced prostate cancer, it is possible to provide treatment with curative intent. However, once the disease has formed distant metastases, the chances of survival drops precipitously. For this reason, proper management of the disease while it remains localized is of critical importance. Treating these malignant cells with cytotoxic agents is effective at cell killing; however, the nonspecific toxicity profiles of these drugs often limit their use until the disease has progressed and symptom palliation is required. Incorporation of these drugs in nanocarriers such as polymers help target them to tumors with a degree of specificity, though major vascular barriers limit their effective delivery. In this dissertation, it is shown that plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) can be used to help overcome some of these barriers and improve delivery to prostate tumors. First, the concept of using PPTT to improve the delivery of macromolecules to solid tumors was validated. This was done by measuring the tumor uptake of albumin. Next, the concept of targeting gold nanorods (GNRs) directly to the tumor's vasculature to better modulate vascular response to heating was tested. Surface conjugation of cyclic RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) to GNRs improved their binding and uptake to endothelial cells in vitro, but not in vivo. Nontargeted GNRs and PPTT were then utilized to guide the location of polymer therapeutic delivery to prostate tumors. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers, which were designed to be targeted to cells previously exposed to heat shock, were used in this study. Treatment of tumors with PPTT facilitated a burst accumulation of the copolymers over 4 hours, and heat shock targeting to cells allowed them to be retained for an extended period of time. Finally, the tumor localization of the HPMA copolymers following PPTT was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These results show that PPTT may be a useful tool

  18. Towards automatic determination of total tumor burden from PET images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renisch, Steffen; Opfer, Roland; Wiemker, Rafael

    2010-03-01

    Quantification of potentially cancerous lesions from imaging modalities, most prominently from CT or PET images, plays a crucial role both in diagnosing and staging of cancer as well as in the assessment of the response of a cancer to a therapy, e.g. for lymphoma or lung cancer. For PET imaging, several quantifications which might bear great discriminating potential (e.g. total tumor burden or total tumor glycolysis) involve the segmentation of the entirety of all of the cancerous lesions. However, this particular task of segmenting the entirety of all cancerous lesions might be very tedious if it has to be done manually, in particular if the disease is scattered or metastasized and thus consists of numerous foci; this is one of the reasons why only few clinical studies on those quantifications are available. In this work, we investigate a way to aid the easy determination of the entirety of cancerous lesions in a PET image of a human. The approach is designed to detect all hot spots within a PET image and rank their probability of being a cancerous lesion. The basis of this component is a modified watershed algorithm; the ranking is performed on a combination of several, primarily morphological measures derived from the individual basins. This component is embedded in a software suite to assess response to a therapy based on PET images. As a preprocessing step, potential lesions are segmented and indicated to the user, who can select the foci which constitute the tumor and discard the false positives. This procedure substantially simplifies the segmentation of the entire tumor burden of a patient. This approach of semi-automatic hot spot detection is evaluated on 17 clinical datasets.

  19. Numerical simulations of MREIT conductivity imaging for brain tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zi Jun; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a new modality capable of imaging the electrical properties of human body using MRI phase information in conjunction with external current injection. Recent in vivo animal and human MREIT studies have revealed unique conductivity contrasts related to different physiological and pathological conditions of tissues or organs. When performing in vivo brain imaging, small imaging currents must be injected so as not to stimulate peripheral nerves in the skin, while delivery of imaging currents to the brain is relatively small due to the skull's low conductivity. As a result, injected imaging currents may induce small phase signals and the overall low phase SNR in brain tissues. In this study, we present numerical simulation results of the use of head MREIT for brain tumor detection. We used a realistic three-dimensional head model to compute signal levels produced as a consequence of a predicted doubling of conductivity occurring within simulated tumorous brain tissues. We determined the feasibility of measuring these changes in a time acceptable to human subjects by adding realistic noise levels measured from a candidate 3 T system. We also reconstructed conductivity contrast images, showing that such conductivity differences can be both detected and imaged.

  20. Clearance Pathways and Tumor Targeting of Imaging Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mengxiao; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A basic understanding of how imaging nanoparticles are removed from the normal organs/tissues but retained in the tumors is important for their future clinical applications in early cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this review, we discuss current understandings of clearance pathways and tumor targeting of small-molecule- and inorganic-nanoparticle-based imaging probes with an emphasis on molecular nanoprobes, a class of inorganic nanoprobes that can escape reticuloendothelial system (RES) uptake and be rapidly eliminated from the normal tissues/organs via kidneys but can still passively target the tumor with high efficiency through the enhanced permeability permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The impact of nanoparticle design (size, shape, and surface chemistry) on their excretion, pharmacokinetics, and passive tumor targeting were quantitatively discussed. Synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and EPR effect offers a promising pathway to design low-toxicity and high-contrast-enhancement imaging nanoparticles that could meet with the clinical translational requirements of regulatory agencies. PMID:26149184

  1. Improving T cell responses to modified peptides in tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-03-01

    Immune recognition and elimination of cancerous cells is the primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. However, obstacles including immune tolerance and tumor-induced immunosuppression often limit beneficial immune responses. Vaccination is one proposed intervention that may help to overcome these issues and is an active area of study in cancer immunotherapy. Immunizing with tumor antigenic peptides is a promising, straight-forward vaccine strategy hypothesized to boost preexisting antitumor immunity. However, tumor antigens are often weak T cell agonists, attributable to several mechanisms, including immune self-tolerance and poor immunogenicity of self-derived tumor peptides. One strategy for overcoming these mechanisms is vaccination with mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, which alter the antigen presentation and/or T cell activation to increase the expansion of tumor-specific T cells. Evaluation of mimotope vaccine strategies has revealed that even subtle alterations in peptide sequence can dramatically alter antigen presentation and T cell receptor recognition. Most of this research has been performed using T cell clones, which may not be accurate representations of the naturally occurring antitumor response. The relationship between clones generated after mimotope vaccination and the polyclonal T cell repertoire is unclear. Our work with mimotopes in a mouse model of colon carcinoma has revealed important insights into these issues. We propose that the identification of mimotopes based on stimulation of the naturally responding T cell repertoire will dramatically improve the efficacy of mimotope vaccination.

  2. Multiresponse imaging system design for improved resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Multiresponse imaging is a process that acquires A images, each with a different optical response, and reassembles them into a single image with an improved resolution that can approach 1/sq rt A times the photodetector-array sampling lattice. Our goals are to optimize the performance of this process in terms of the resolution and fidelity of the restored image and to assess the amount of information required to do so. The theoretical approach is based on the extension of both image restoration and rate-distortion theories from their traditional realm of signal processing to image processing which includes image gathering and display.

  3. Multiresponse imaging system design for improved resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Fales, Carl L.; Huck, Friedrich O.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1991-01-01

    Multiresponse imaging is a process that acquires A images, each with a different optical response, and reassembles them into a single image with an improved resolution that can approach 1/sq rt A times the photodetector-array sampling lattice. Our goals are to optimize the performance of this process in terms of the resolution and fidelity of the restored image and to assess the amount of information required to do so. The theoretical approach is based on the extension of both image restoration and rate-distortion theories from their traditional realm of signal processing to image processing which includes image gathering and display.

  4. Long circulating reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient tumor targeting and multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Shi, Sixiang; Feng, Liangzhu; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A; Ehlerding, Emily B; Goel, Shreya; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G; Nickles, Robert J; Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Taihong; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-07

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface modification is one of the most widely used approaches to improve the solubility of inorganic nanoparticles, prevent their aggregation and prolong their in vivo blood circulation half-life. Herein, we developed double-PEGylated biocompatible reduced graphene oxide nanosheets anchored with iron oxide nanoparticles (RGO-IONP-(1st)PEG-(2nd)PEG). The nanoconjugates exhibited a prolonged blood circulation half-life (∼27.7 h) and remarkable tumor accumulation (>11 %ID g(-1)) via an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Due to the strong near-infrared absorbance and superparamagnetism of RGO-IONP-(1st)PEG-(2nd)PEG, multimodality imaging combining positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging was successfully achieved. The promising results suggest the great potential of these nanoconjugates for multi-dimensional and more accurate tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  5. Long circulating reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient tumor targeting and multimodality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Shi, Sixiang; Feng, Liangzhu; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Goel, Shreya; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Nickles, Robert J.; Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Taihong; Cai, Weibo

    2016-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface modification is one of the most widely used approaches to improve the solubility of inorganic nanoparticles, prevent their aggregation and prolong their in vivo blood circulation half-life. Herein, we developed double-PEGylated biocompatible reduced graphene oxide nanosheets anchored with iron oxide nanoparticles (RGO-IONP-1stPEG-2ndPEG). The nanoconjugates exhibited a prolonged blood circulation half-life (~27.7 h) and remarkable tumor accumulation (>11 %ID g-1) via an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Due to the strong near-infrared absorbance and superparamagnetism of RGO-IONP-1stPEG-2ndPEG, multimodality imaging combining positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging was successfully achieved. The promising results suggest the great potential of these nanoconjugates for multi-dimensional and more accurate tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Other Imaging Modalities in Diagnostic and Tumor Response Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2016-07-01

    Functional imaging is emerging as a valuable contributor to the clinical management of patients with rectal cancer. Techniques such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion imaging, and positron emission tomography can offer meaningful insights into tissue architecture, vascularity, and metabolism. Moreover, new techniques targeting other aspects of tumor biology are now being developed and studied. This study reviews the potential role of functional imaging for the diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and assessment of prognosis in patients with rectal cancer.

  7. Imaging features of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katie N.; Dilaveri, Christina A.; Perry, Kyle; Reynolds, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to describe the imaging findings of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast, with pathologic and clinical correlations. We searched our surgical database for cases of pathologically proven carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast from October 1, 2000, to May 31, 2010. Of the approximate 10,000 breast biopsies identified, 7000 had malignant findings. Ten cases of metastatic carcinoid (0.1% of all malignancies), all with imaging studies available for review, were included in the study. All patients were women and had their primary carcinoid in the gastrointestinal tract (n=9) or lung (n = 1). One patient presented with a palpable breast mass and no history of carcinoid tumor; an ileal carcinoid was discovered after the pathologic diagnosis of metastatic carcinoid was established. In the breast, tumors presented as solitary lesions in half the cases. Metastases to the breast typically presented as circumscribed masses mammographically and as hypoechoic circumscribed masses ultrasonographically; some showed increased through-transmission and increased vascularity with color Doppler evaluation. Five patients had octreotide scans; of these, 4 had increased focal activity in the region of metastasis within the breast. Six patients underwent computed tomography. Without contrast, nodular masses were observed; with contrast, the masses showed rapid enhancement during arterial phase imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (n = 4) also showed rapid enhancement and washout kinetics after contrast administration. Recognition of carcinoid metastases to the breast in patients with known or occult primary carcinoid tumors is important to avoid unnecessary treatment for primary breast cancer. PMID:21771708

  8. Utility of tumor-avid photosensitizers in developing bifunctional agents for tumor imaging and/or phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Chen, Yihui; Zawada, Robert H.; Oseroff, Allan; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2006-02-01

    HPPH (a chlorophyll-a analog) was linked with a cyanine dye and the resulting conjugate was found to be an efficient tumor imaging (fluorescence imaging) and photosensitizing agent (PDT). Our preliminary results suggest that tumor-avid porphyrin-based compounds can be used as vehicles for delivering the desired fluorophores to tumor for fluorescence imaging. In an early diagnosis of microscopic lesions in pre-clinical studies (C3H mice implanted with RIF tumors) the HPPH-cyanine dye conjugate showed tumor-imaging capability (λ ex: 780 nm, λ em: 860 nm) at the non- therapeutic doses that are 100 fold lower than those used therapeutically. Compared to the cyanine dye, the corresponding HPPH-conjugate showed enhanced long-term tumor imaging ability.

  9. Brain tumor segmentation in MR slices using improved GrowCut algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chunhong; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liang; Shi, Zhifeng; Mao, Ying

    2015-12-01

    The detection of brain tumor from MR images is very significant for medical diagnosis and treatment. However, the existing methods are mostly based on manual or semiautomatic segmentation which are awkward when dealing with a large amount of MR slices. In this paper, a new fully automatic method for the segmentation of brain tumors in MR slices is presented. Based on the hypothesis of the symmetric brain structure, the method improves the interactive GrowCut algorithm by further using the bounding box algorithm in the pre-processing step. More importantly, local reflectional symmetry is used to make up the deficiency of the bounding box method. After segmentation, 3D tumor image is reconstructed. We evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method on MR slices with synthetic tumors and actual clinical MR images. Result of the proposed method is compared with the actual position of simulated 3D tumor qualitatively and quantitatively. In addition, our automatic method produces equivalent performance as manual segmentation and the interactive GrowCut with manual interference while providing fully automatic segmentation.

  10. Cancer diagnosis. The role of tumor-imaging radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, E B

    1976-02-01

    Several radiopharmaceuticals have recently been shown to have a considerable affinity for malignant tissue. All the tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in current use are nonspecific and may also be picked up by benign tumors and infectious processes, including abscess and granuloma. The sensitivity of the tumor-imaging procedure depends on the radiopharmaceutical employed, the type of tumor, its size and location, and previous or current treatment. Gallium-67 citrate (67Ga), the most widely used tumor-seeking radiopharmaceutical, seems to have its greatest value in detecting bronchogenic carcinomas irrespective of cell type. The sensitivity for lung cancer in 489 studies was 93 per cent. Gallium-67 is also of great value in the staging of Hodgkin's disease, in which its sensitivity is 87 per cent. Non-Hdgkin's lymphomas are detected with only slightly lower sensitivity. There is, in fact, evidence that 67Ga is at least complemenatry, if not more sensitive than lymphangiography, in the staging of lymphoma. However, adenocarcinomas originating in the gastrointestinal tract are detected by 67Ga with a sensitivity of only about 40 per cent, whereas various chelates of bleomycin (including 111In-Bleo, 99mTc-Bleo and 57Co-Bleo) detect adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract with considerably higher sensitivity. In the few studies available comparing bleomycin chelates, 57Co-Bleo and 99mTc-Bleo appear to be more sensitive in detecting tumor than 111In-Bleo. Other tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticasl which have been employed with somewhat less success include selenium compounds, labeled pyrimidines, several inorganic cations, lanthanide chelates and labeled proteins. Yet to be evaulated clinically is the efficacy of radiolabeled antibodies which are specific for tumor antigens, such as 131I-anti-CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen).

  11. Image fusion for visualization of hepatic vasculature and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jin-Shin; Chen, Shiuh-Yung J.; Sudakoff, Gary S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Dachman, Abraham H.

    1995-05-01

    We have developed segmentation and simultaneous display techniques to facilitate the visualization of the three-dimensional spatial relationships between organ structures and organ vasculature. We concentrate on the visualization of the liver based on spiral computed tomography images. Surface-based 3-D rendering and maximal intensity projection algorithms are used for data visualization. To extract the liver in the serial of images accurately and efficiently, we have developed a user-friendly interactive program with a deformable-model segmentation. Surface rendering techniques are used to visualize the extracted structures, adjacent contours are aligned and fitted with a Bezier surface to yield a smooth surface. Visualization of the vascular structures, portal and hepatic veins, is achieved by applying a MIP technique to the extracted liver volume. To integrate the extracted structures they are surface-rendered and their MIP images are aligned and a color table is designed for simultaneous display of the combined liver/tumor and vasculature images. By combining the 3-D surface rendering and MIP techniques, portal veins, hepatic veins, and hepatic tumor can be inspected simultaneously and their spatial relationships can be more easily perceived. The proposed technique will be useful for visualization of both hepatic neoplasm and vasculature in surgical planning for tumor resection or living-donor liver transplantation.

  12. Retinal SD-OCT image-based pituitary tumor screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2017-03-01

    In most cases, the pituitary tumor compresses optic chiasma and causes optic nerves atrophy, which will reflect in retina. In this paper, an Adaboost classification based method is first proposed to screen pituitary tumor from retinal spectral- domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) image. The method includes four parts: pre-processing, feature extraction and selection, training and testing. First, in the pre-processing step, the retinal OCT image is segmented into 10 layers and the first 5 layers are extracted as our volume of interest (VOI). Second, 19 textural and spatial features are extracted from the VOI. Principal component analysis (PCA) is utilized to select the primary features. Third, in the training step, an Adaboost based classifier is trained using the above features. Finally, in the testing phase, the trained model is utilized to screen pituitary tumor. The proposed method was evaluated on 40 retinal OCT images from 30 patients and 30 OCT images from 15 normal subjects. The accuracy rate for the diseased retina was (85.00+/-16.58)% and the rate for normal retina was (76.68+/-21.34)%. Totally average accuracy of the Adaboost classifier was (81.43+/- 9.15)%. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol Optimization for Delineation of Gross Tumor Volume in Hypopharyngeal and Laryngeal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Verduijn, Gerda M.; Bartels, Lambertus W. Ph.D.; Pameijer, Frank A.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To optimize the use of MRI for delineation of gross tumor volume for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes in hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors. Methods and Materials: Magnetic resonance images (T1 weighted and T2 weighted) of a healthy volunteer were acquired using a 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanner. Various receiver coils were investigated that were compatible with the immobilization mask needed for reliable coregistration with computed tomography data. For the optimal receiver coil, the influence of resolution, slice thickness, and strength of magnetic field on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was studied. Feasibility of the definitive protocol was tested on patients with hypopharyngeal (n = 19) and laryngeal (n = 42) carcinoma. Results: Large differences in SNR were obtained for the various coils. The SNR values obtained using surface coils that were compatible with the immobilization mask were three times higher than those obtained using a standard head-and-neck coil and five times higher than those obtained using a body coil. High-resolution images (0.4 x 0.4 x 4 mm{sup 3}) showed superior anatomic detail and resulted in a 4-min scan time. Image quality at 3.0 T was not significantly better compared with 1.5 T. In 3 patients the MR study could not be performed; for 5 patients images were severely deteriorated by motion artefacts. High-quality MR images were obtained in 53 patients. Conclusions: High-resolution MR images of the hypopharynx and larynx can be obtained in the majority of patients using surface receiver coils in combination with the radiotherapy mask. These MR images can be successfully used for tumor delineation in radiotherapy.

  14. Image observation of ultraweak biophoton emission from animal wound tissue and tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonghong; Tang, Yonghong; Zhong, Xueyun; Tan, Shici; Xing, Da

    1999-09-01

    No clear image of Ultraweak Biophoton Emission (UBE) from animal has been reported so far. With the detection system equipped with a back-illuminated cooled CCD (-60 degree(s)C), we have clearly observed UBE images of the wound tissues and the tumor tissues with long exposure time. The intensity of UBE from the wound tissue or the tumor tissue is higher than that from normal tissues. We proposed that the increase of UBE from wound response is the result from defense mechanism of body in which white blood cells' respiration burst is involved, the UBE from transplanted cancer tissue is related to the disorder of metabolism because of the malignant growth and multiplication of tumor cells. Non- invasive diagnosis might be realized in medicine by this technique following the further improvement of sensitivity of the detector.

  15. Principles of T2 *-weighted dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI technique in brain tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Shiroishi, Mark S; Castellazzi, Gloria; Boxerman, Jerrold L; D'Amore, Francesco; Essig, Marco; Nguyen, Thanh B; Provenzale, James M; Enterline, David S; Anzalone, Nicoletta; Dörfler, Arnd; Rovira, Àlex; Wintermark, Max; Law, Meng

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) is used to track the first pass of an exogenous, paramagnetic, nondiffusible contrast agent through brain tissue, and has emerged as a powerful tool in the characterization of brain tumor hemodynamics. DSC-MRI parameters can be helpful in many aspects, including tumor grading, prediction of treatment response, likelihood of malignant transformation, discrimination between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis, and differentiation between true early progression and pseudoprogression. This review aims to provide a conceptual overview of the underlying principles of DSC-MRI of the brain for clinical neuroradiologists, scientists, or students wishing to improve their understanding of the technical aspects, pitfalls, and controversies of DSC perfusion MRI of the brain. Future consensus on image acquisition parameters and postprocessing of DSC-MRI will most likely allow this technique to be evaluated and used in high-quality multicenter studies and ultimately help guide clinical care. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W; Rozario, T; Bereg, S; Klash, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  17. Musculoskeletal tumors: use of proton MR spectroscopic imaging for characterization.

    PubMed

    Fayad, Laura M; Bluemke, David A; McCarthy, Edward F; Weber, Kristin L; Barker, Peter B; Jacobs, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    To determine the value of multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) in distinguishing malignant skeletal tumors from benign tumors and normal bone marrow using the metabolite choline (Cho) as a marker for malignancy. Pathologic specimens obtained from 13 patients who had undergone wide resection for skeletal tumors underwent evaluation by MRSI at 1.5 T. Coronal T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence obtained for localization purposes (TR/TE = 250/1.8 msec, field of view [FOV] = 18 x 18), and single-slice MRSI (TR/TE = 2000/272 msec, FOV = 18 x 18, 10-mm slice-thickness) were performed. Water, lipid, and Cho images were reconstructed from MRSI data. Cho signal was measured in each specimen and expressed relative to background noise level (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]) where noise was measured between 7.0 and 9.0 ppm. Cho SNRs were compared between areas containing malignant tumor and nonmalignant tissue (benign lesion or normal bone marrow) as determined by histopathology. Specimens included 13 skeletal sarcomas (seven osteosarcomas, three chondrosarcomas, one malignant fibrous histiocytoma, one fibrosarcoma, and one leiomyosarcoma). All specimens included a sample of normal bone marrow and two specimens also contained benign lesions. All sarcomas demonstrated a signal at 3.2 ppm assigned to Cho-containing metabolites in areas of malignancy. Peak Cho SNR was significantly different for areas containing histologically-proven malignancy compared to nonmalignant tissue (9.8 +/- 5.1 vs. 2.7 +/- 1.4, respectively, P < 0.002). These preliminary results indicate that MRSI at 1.5 T is a promising noninvasive method of differentiating malignant skeletal tumors from nonmalignant tissue. Using MRSI, Cho can be detected in skeletal tumors and may serve as a marker for malignancy.

  18. Bispecific Antibody Pretargeting for Improving Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Robert M.

    2005-02-04

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate pretargeting systems that use a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) to improve the detection and treatment of cancer. A bsMAb has specificity to a tumor antigen, which is used to bind the tumor, while the other specificity is to a peptide that can be radiolabeled. Pretargeting is the process by which the unlabeled bsMAb is given first, and after a sufficient time (1-2 days) is given for it to localize in the tumor and clear from the blood, a small molecular weight radiolabeled peptide is given. According to a dynamic imaging study using a 99mTc-labeled peptide, the radiolabeled peptide localizes in the tumor in less than 1 hour, with > 80% of it clearing from the blood and body within this same time. Tumor/nontumor targeting ratios that are nearly 50 times better than that with a directly radiolabeled Fab fragment have been observed (Sharkey et al., ''Signal amplification in molecular imaging by a multivalent bispecific nanobody'' submitted). The bsMAbs used in this project have been composed of 3 antibodies that will target antigens found in colorectal and pancreatic cancers (CEA, CSAp, and MUC1). For the ''peptide binding moiety'' of the bsMAb, we initially examined an antibody directed to DOTA, but subsequently focused on another antibody directed against a novel compound, HSG (histamine-succinyl-glycine).

  19. Tumor imaging in patients with advanced tumors using a new (99m) Tc-radiolabeled vitamin B12 derivative.

    PubMed

    Sah, Bert-Ram; Schibli, Roger; Waibel, Robert; von Boehmer, Lotta; Bläuenstein, Peter; Nexo, Ebba; Johayem, Anass; Fischer, Eliane; Müller, Ennio; Soyka, Jan D; Knuth, Alexander K; Haerle, Stefan K; Schubiger, Pius August; Schaefer, Niklaus G; Burger, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    Targeting cancer cells with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is hampered by unwanted physiologic tissue uptake mediated by transcobalamin. Adhering to good manufacturing practice, we have developed a new (99m)Tc-cobalamin derivative ((99m)Tc(CO)3-[(4-amido-butyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyl-amino-acetato] cobalamin, (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin). The derivative shows no binding to transcobalamin but is recognized by haptocorrin, a protein present in the circulation and notably expressed in many tumor cells. In this prospective study, we investigated cancer-specific uptake of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin in 10 patients with various metastatic tumors. Ten patients with biopsy-proven metastatic cancer were included. Dynamic imaging was started immediately after injection of 300-500 MBq of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin, and whole-body scintigrams were obtained at 10, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min and after 24 h. The relative tumor activity using SPECT/CT over the tumor region after 4 h was measured in comparison to disease-free lung parenchyma. Patients 3-10 received between 20 and 1,000 μg of cobalamin intravenously before injection of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin. The study population comprised 4 patients with adenocarcinomas of the lung, 3 with squamous cell carcinomas of the hypopharyngeal region, 1 with prostate adenocarcinoma, 1 with breast, and 1 with colon adenocarcinoma. The median age of the study group was 61 ± 11 y. Six of 10 patients showed positive tumor uptake on (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin whole-body scintigraphy. The scan was positive in 1 patient with colon adenocarcinoma, in 3 of 4 lung adenocarcinomas, in 1 of 3 hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, and in 1 breast adenocarcinoma. Renal uptake was between 1% and 3% for the left kidney. Predosing with cobalamin increased the tumor uptake and improved blood-pool clearance. The best image quality was achieved with a predose of 20-100 ug of cold cobalamin. The mean patient dose was 2.7 ± 0.9 mSv/patient. To our knowledge, we report for the first

  20. Pros and cons of current brain tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Wen, Patrick Y.; van den Bent, Martin J.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, very few agents have been approved for the treatment of brain tumors. Recent studies have highlighted some of the challenges in assessing activity in novel agents for the treatment of brain tumors. This paper reviews some of the key challenges related to assessment of tumor response to therapy in adult high-grade gliomas and discusses the strengths and limitations of imaging-based endpoints. Although overall survival is considered the “gold standard” endpoint in the field of oncology, progression-free survival and response rate are endpoints that hold great value in neuro-oncology. Particular focus is given to advancements made since the January 2006 Brain Tumor Endpoints Workshop, including the development of Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology criteria, the value of T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, use of objective response rates and progression-free survival in clinical trials, and the evaluation of pseudoprogression, pseudoresponse, and inflammatory response in radiographic images. PMID:25313235

  1. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with radiolabeled choline PET.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando Franco; Barbarisi, Manlio; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Grillea, Giovanni; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2016-05-26

    Several positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals have been emerged in the last decade as feasible in the management of brain lesions, due to the low performance in this field of the 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG), for its high physiological gradient of distribution in the brain. Beyond its usefulness in prostate cancer imaging, the radiolabeled choline is becoming a promising tool in diagnosing benign and malignant lesions of the brain, due to a very low rate of distribution in normal white and grey matters. The aim of our review was to assess the real impact of the radiolabeled choline PET/CT in the management of brain benign lesions, brain tumors, and metastases. Furthermore, emphasis was given to the comparison between the radiolabeled choline and the other radiopharmaceuticals in this field. A literature review was performed. The radiolabeled choline is useful in the management of patients with suspected brain tumor relapse, especially in association with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with caution regarding its intrinsic characteristic of non-tumor-specific tracer. For the same reason, it is not useful in the early evaluation of brain lesions. Similar results are reported for other radiopharmaceuticals. The inclusion of the head in the whole-body scans for somatic tumors is necessary to ensure metastases in the brain or choline-avid benign lesions.

  2. An enzymatically activated fluorescence probe for targeted tumor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hama, Yukihiro; Koyama, Yoshinori; Bernardo, Marcelino; Nagano, Tetsuo; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    β-Galactosidase is a widely used reporter enzyme, but although several substrates are available for in vitro detection, its application for in vivo optical imaging remains a challenge. To obtain a probe suitable for in vivo use, we modified our previously developed activatable fluorescence probe, TG-βGal (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2005, 127, 4888-4894), on the basis of photochemical and photophysical experiments. The new probe, AM-TG-βGal, provides a dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon reaction with β-galactosidase, and further hydrolysis of the ester moiety by ubiquitous intracellular esterases affords a hydrophilic product that is well retained within the cells without loss of fluorescence. We used a mouse tumor model to assess the practical utility of AM-TG-βGal, after confirming that tumors in the model could be labeled with avidin-β-galactosidase conjugate. This conjugate was administered to the mice in vivo, followed by AM-TG-βGal, and subsequent ex vivo fluorescence imaging clearly visualized intraperitoneal tumors as small as 200 μm. This strategy has potential clinical application, for example in video-assisted laparoscopic tumor resection. PMID:17352471

  3. Feasibility of FAIR imaging for evaluating tumor perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jee-Hyun; Cho, Gyunggoo; Song, Youngkyu; Lee, Chulhyun; Park, Bum-Woo; Lee, Chang Kyung; Kim, Namkug; Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Jong Soon; Kang, Moo Rim; Kim, Hwan Mook; Kim, Young Ro; Cho, Kyoung-Sik; Kim, Jeong Kon

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) for measuring blood flow in tumor models. In eight mice tumor models, FAIR and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was performed. The reliability for measuring blood flow on FAIR was evaluated using the coefficient of variation of blood flow on psoas muscle. Three regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in the peripheral, intermediate, and central portions within each tumor. The location of ROI was the same on FAIR and DCE-MR images. The correlation between the blood flow on FAIR and perfusion-related parameters on DCE-MRI was evaluated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The coefficient of variation for measuring blood flow was 9.8%. Blood flow on FAIR showed a strong correlation with Kep (r = 0.77), percent relative enhancement (r = 0.73), and percent enhancement ratio (r = 0.81). The mean values of blood flow (mL/100 g/min) (358 vs. 207), Kep (sec(-) (1)) (7.46 vs. 1.31), percent relative enhancement (179% vs. 134%), and percent enhancement ratio (42% vs. 26%) were greater in the peripheral portion than in the central portion (P < 0.01). As blood flow measurement on FAIR is reliable and closely related with that on DCE-MR, FAIR is feasible for measuring tumor blood flow.

  4. Advanced Imaging Approaches to Characterize Stromal and Metabolic Changes in In Vivo Mammary Tumor Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Optical imaging , metabolism, tumor microenvironment, NADH, FAD, intravital imaging , collagen, metastasis 3.Overall Project Summary Our preliminary...Keely, KW Eliceiri. Novel Intravital Imaging Approaches to Characterize Collagen Alignment in Defined Mammary Tumor Models. Microscopy and...fixturing for intravital FLIM imaging through a rodent mammary imaging window. Stage is raised to accommodate tall 20xW objective. 14     Figure

  5. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: which differences?

    PubMed

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that prognostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the aggressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all.

  6. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  7. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Samit; Lesniak, Wojciech G; Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-03-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings.

  8. Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shuhendler, Adam J.; Ye, Deju; Brewer, Kimberly D.; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Kempen, Paul; Dane Wittrup, K.; Graves, Edward E.; Rutt, Brian; Rao, Jianghong

    2015-01-01

    Personalized cancer medicine requires measurement of therapeutic efficacy as early as possible, which is optimally achieved by three-dimensional imaging given the heterogeneity of cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can obtain images of both anatomy and cellular responses, if acquired with a molecular imaging contrast agent. The poor sensitivity of MRI has limited the development of activatable molecular MR contrast agents. To overcome this limitation of molecular MRI, a novel implementation of our caspase-3-sensitive nanoaggregation MRI (C-SNAM) contrast agent is reported. C-SNAM is triggered to self-assemble into nanoparticles in apoptotic tumor cells, and effectively amplifies molecular level changes through nanoaggregation, enhancing tissue retention and spin-lattice relaxivity. At one-tenth the current clinical dose of contrast agent, and following a single imaging session, C-SNAM MRI accurately measured the response of tumors to either metronomic chemotherapy or radiation therapy, where the degree of signal enhancement is prognostic of long-term therapeutic efficacy. Importantly, C-SNAM is inert to immune activation, permitting radiation therapy monitoring. PMID:26440059

  9. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of benign breast tumor tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, H.; Lasch, P.; Boese, M.; Haensch, W.

    2003-12-01

    We have applied infrared microspectroscopic imaging for the examination of benign breast tumor tissue sections. The IR spectra of the sections were obtained by classical point microscopy with a movable stage and via a microscope equipped with a focal plane array detector. The infrared microscopic data were analysed using functional group mapping techniques and cluster analysis. The output values of the two procedures were reassembled into infrared images of the tissues, and were compared with standard staining images of the corresponding tissue region. The comparative examination of identical tissue sections by the two IR approaches enabled us to assess potential problems associated with tissue microheterogeneity. It was found that in case of fibroadenoma, a benign lesion located in breast ducts, point microscopy with a spot size of ˜30 μm is a useful practical approach which minimizes the possibility of 'contamination' of the spectra because of spectral averaging of all tissue components present in the corresponding microareas. A comparison of the spectra of the benign breast tumor with those of a malignant ductal carcinoma in situ revealed that IR microspectroscopy has the potential to differentiate between these two breast tumor types.

  10. Postictal spectroscopy and imaging findings mimicking brain tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, Elke; Franz, Kea; Pilatus, Ulrich; Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heiner

    2006-07-01

    (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was performed on a patient with an admission diagnosis of recurrent astrocytoma. The patient had undergone surgical resection and radiation therapy for a left occipital astrocytoma WHO grade III 12 years previously, and presented with aphasia, right-sided hemiparesis, and severe headache. Postcontrast T1-weighted images showed cortical enhancement of the left parietotemporal lobe near the post-resection cavity. MRSI revealed a marked increase of trimethylamines (TMA), elevated creatine/creatinephosphate (tCr), and reduced N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA) in the same brain region. The spectroscopic data were consistent with tumor recurrence. However, the pattern of contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evidence of an epileptic focus on electroencephalography (EEG), and spontaneous regression of the symptoms argued against tumor recurrence. In a 4-week follow-up, the contrast enhancement disappeared on MRI and the EEG abnormalities and neurological symptoms resolved. Follow-up spectroscopic data showed a decrease in TMA compared to normal values. The tCr signal remained elevated but returned to normal values after 5 months. In conclusion, postictal neurological deficits with a temporary increase in TMA and tCr were diagnosed. This is the first report of seizure-induced MRS abnormalities mimicking tumor recurrence. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Optical imaging of breast tumors and of gastrointestinal cancer by laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bernd; Grosenick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging offers a high potential for noninvasive detection of cancer in humans. Recent advances in instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging have led to new capabilities for the detection of cancer in highly scattering tissue such as the female breast. We review recent developments in the detection of breast cancer in humans by fluorescent contrast agents. So far, the unspecific contrast agents indocyanine green (ICG) and omocyanine have been applied, whereas molecular probes for direct targeted imaging of this disease are still in preclinical research. We discuss recent improvements in the differentiation of malignant and benign lesions with ICG based on its enhanced extravasation in breast cancer. Whereas fluorescence imaging in thick tissue layers is hampered by strong light scattering, tissue surfaces can be investigated with high spatial resolution. As an example for superficial tumors, lesions of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) are discussed. In these investigations, protoporphyrin IX is used as a tumor-specific (due to its strong enhancement in tumor cells) target for spectroscopic identification and imaging. We present a time-gated method for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy with strong suppression of tissue autofluorescence and show results on patients with Barrett's esophagus and with colitis ulcerosa.

  12. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R; Moding, Everett J; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K; Fales, Andrew M; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R; Kirsch, David G; Badea, Cristian T; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

  13. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Moding, Everett J.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K.; Fales, Andrew M.; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J.; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:26155311

  14. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins

  15. Targeted delivery of antibody-based therapeutic and imaging agents to CNS tumors: Crossing the blood-brain-barrier divide

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Li, Chunsheng; Pryma, Daniel A.; Brem, Steven; Coukos, George; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are inherently difficult to treat in large part due to the cellular blood-brain barriers (BBB) that limit the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor tissue from the systemic circulation. Virtually no large-molecules, including antibody-based proteins, can penetrate the BBB. With antibodies fast becoming attractive ligands for highly specific molecular targeting to tumor antigens, a variety of methods are being investigated to enhance the access of these agents to intracranial tumors for imaging or therapeutic applications. Areas covered This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and the vasculature in brain tumors, described as the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). Antibodies targeted to molecular markers of CNS tumors will be highlighted, and current strategies for enhancing the delivery of antibodies across these cellular barriers into the brain parenchyma to the tumor will be discussed. Non-invasive imaging approaches to assess BBB/BBTB permeability and/or antibody targeting will be presented as a means of guiding the optimal delivery of targeted agents to brain tumors. Expert Opinion Pre-clinical and clinical studies highlight the potential of several approaches in increasing brain tumor delivery across the blood-brain barrier divide. However, each carries its own risks and challenges. There is tremendous potential in using neuroimaging strategies to assist in understanding and defining the challenges to translating and optimizing molecularly-targeted antibody delivery to CNS tumors to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23751126

  16. The sweet spot: FDG and other 2-carbon glucose analogs for multi-modal metabolic imaging of tumor metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cox, Benjamin L; Mackie, Thomas R; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modal imaging approaches of tumor metabolism that provide improved specificity, physiological relevance and spatial resolution would improve diagnosing of tumors and evaluation of tumor progression. Currently, the molecular probe FDG, glucose fluorinated with (18)F at the 2-carbon, is the primary metabolic approach for clinical diagnostics with PET imaging. However, PET lacks the resolution necessary to yield intratumoral distributions of deoxyglucose, on the cellular level. Multi-modal imaging could elucidate this problem, but requires the development of new glucose analogs that are better suited for other imaging modalities. Several such analogs have been created and are reviewed here. Also reviewed are several multi-modal imaging studies that have been performed that attempt to shed light on the cellular distribution of glucose analogs within tumors. Some of these studies are performed in vitro, while others are performed in vivo, in an animal model. The results from these studies introduce a visualization gap between the in vitro and in vivo studies that, if solved, could enable the early detection of tumors, the high resolution monitoring of tumors during treatment, and the greater accuracy in assessment of different imaging agents.

  17. [Preliminary application of an improved Demons deformable registration algorithm in tumor radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Zhen, Xin; Lu, Wenting; Dou, Jianhong; Zhou, Linghong

    2012-01-01

    To validate the efficiency of an improved Demons deformable registration algorithm and evaluate its application in registration of the treatment image and the planning image in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Based on Brox's gradient constancy assumption and Malis's efficient second-order minimization algorithm, a grey value gradient similarity term was added into the original energy function, and a formula was derived to calculate the update of transformation field. The limited Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithm was used to optimize the energy function for automatic determination of the iteration number. The proposed algorithm was validated using mathematically deformed images, physically deformed phantom images and clinical tumor images. Compared with the original Additive Demons algorithm, the improved Demons algorithm achieved a higher precision and a faster convergence speed. Due to the influence of different scanning conditions in fractionated radiation, the density range of the treatment image and the planning image may be different. The improved Demons algorithm can achieve faster and more accurate radiotherapy.

  18. Finite element model-based tumor registration of microPET and high-resolution MR images for photodynamic therapy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Muzic, Raymond F., Jr.; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise; Wilson, David L.; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2006-03-01

    We are investigating imaging techniques to study the tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT). PET can provide physiological and functional information. High-resolution MRI can provide anatomical and morphological changes. Image registration can combine MRI and PET images for improved tumor monitoring. In this study, we acquired high-resolution MRI and microPET [ 18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) images from C3H mice with RIF-1 tumors that were treated with Pc 4-based PDT. For tumor registration, we developed a finite element model (FEM)-based deformable registration scheme. To assess the registration quality, we performed slice by slice review of both image volumes, computed the volume overlap ratios, and visualized both volumes in color overlay. The mean volume overlap ratios for tumors were 94.7% after registration. Registration of high-resolution MRI and microPET images combines anatomical and functional information of the tumors and provides a useful tool for evaluating photodynamic therapy.

  19. Preclinical evaluation of a novel cyanine dye for tumor imaging with in vivo photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temma, Takashi; Onoe, Satoru; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PA imaging or PAI) has shown great promise in the detection and monitoring of cancer. Although nanocarrier-based contrast agents have been studied for use in PAI, small molecule contrast agents are required due to their ease of preparation, cost-effectiveness, and low toxicity. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel cyanine dye IC7-1-Bu as a PAI contrast agent without conjugated targeting moieties for in vivo tumor imaging in a mice model. Basic PA characteristics of IC7-1-Bu were compared with indocyanine green (ICG), a Food and Drug Administration approved dye, in an aqueous solution. We evaluated the tumor accumulation profile of IC7-1-Bu and ICG by in vivo fluorescence imaging. In vivo PAI was then performed with a photoacoustic tomography system 24 and 48 h after intravenous injection of IC7-1-Bu into tumor bearing mice. IC7-1-Bu showed about a 2.3-fold higher PA signal in aqueous solution compared with that of ICG. Unlike ICG, IC7-1-Bu showed high tumor fluorescence after intravenous injection. In vivo PAI provided a tumor to background PA signal ratio of approximately 2.5 after intravenous injection of IC7-1-Bu. These results indicate that IC7-1-Bu is a promising PAI contrast agent for cancer imaging without conjugation of targeting moieties.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging using a high-temperature superconducting resonator in a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging for a spontaneous rat brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-02-01

    This study investigates the peri-tumor signal abnormalities of a spontaneous brain tumor in a rat by using a 4 cm high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator. Fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from diffusion tensor imaging reflect the interstitial characteristic of the peri-lesional tissues of brain tumors. Low FA indicates interstitial tumor infiltration and tissue injury, while high FA indicates better tissue integrity. Better delineation of tissue contents obtained by the HTS surface resonator at 77 K may facilitate therapeutic strategy and improve clinical outcomes.

  1. Improved Interactive Medical-Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Twombly, Ian A.; Senger, Steven

    2003-01-01

    An improved computational-simulation system for interactive medical imaging has been invented. The system displays high-resolution, three-dimensional-appearing images of anatomical objects based on data acquired by such techniques as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). The system enables users to manipulate the data to obtain a variety of views for example, to display cross sections in specified planes or to rotate images about specified axes. Relative to prior such systems, this system offers enhanced capabilities for synthesizing images of surgical cuts and for collaboration by users at multiple, remote computing sites.

  2. Improved real-time imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Yu, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An improved AOTF-based imaging spectrometer that offers several advantages over prior art AOTF imaging spectrometers is presented. The ability to electronically set the bandpass wavelength provides observational flexibility. Various improvements in optical architecture provide simplified magnification variability, improved image resolution and light throughput efficiency and reduced sensitivity to ambient light. Two embodiments of the invention are: (1) operation in the visible/near-infrared domain of wavelength range 0.48 to 0.76 microns; and (2) infrared configuration which operates in the wavelength range of 1.2 to 2.5 microns.

  3. Recent Developments in Active Tumor Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Combination Chemotherapy in Cancer Treatment and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Micah D. K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology and combination therapy are two major fields that show great promise in the treatment of cancer. The delivery of drugs via nanoparticles helps to improve drug’s therapeutic effectiveness while reducing adverse side effects associated with high dosage by improving their pharmacokinetics. Taking advantage of molecular markers over-expressing on tumor tissues compared to normal cells, an “active” molecular marker targeted approach would be beneficial for cancer therapy. These actively targeted nanoparticles would increase drug concentration at the tumor site, improving efficacy while further reducing chemo-resistance. The multidisciplinary approach may help to improve the overall efficacy in cancer therapy. This review article summarizes recent developments of targeted multifunctional nanoparticles in the delivery of various drugs for a combinational chemotherapy approach to cancer treatment and imaging. PMID:26554150

  4. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for Diagnosis and Histomorphologic Imaging of Brain Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Foersch, Sebastian; Heimann, Axel; Ayyad, Ali; Spoden, Gilles A.; Florin, Luise; Mpoukouvalas, Konstantin; Kiesslich, Ralf; Kempski, Oliver; Goetz, Martin; Charalampaki, Patra

    2012-01-01

    Early detection and evaluation of brain tumors during surgery is crucial for accurate resection. Currently cryosections during surgery are regularly performed. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is a novel technique permitting in vivo histologic imaging with miniaturized endoscopic probes at excellent resolution. Aim of the current study was to evaluate CLE for in vivo diagnosis in different types and models of intracranial neoplasia. In vivo histomorphology of healthy brains and two different C6 glioma cell line allografts was evaluated in rats. One cell line expressed EYFP, the other cell line was used for staining with fluorescent dyes (fluorescein, acriflavine, FITC-dextran and Indocyanine green). To evaluate future application in patients, fresh surgical resection specimen of human intracranial tumors (n = 15) were examined (glioblastoma multiforme, meningioma, craniopharyngioma, acoustic neurinoma, brain metastasis, medulloblastoma, epidermoid tumor). Healthy brain tissue adjacent to the samples served as control. CLE yielded high-quality histomorphology of normal brain tissue and tumors. Different fluorescent agents revealed distinct aspects of tissue and cell structure (nuclear pattern, axonal pathways, hemorrhages). CLE discrimination of neoplastic from healthy brain tissue was easy to perform based on tissue and cellular architecture and resemblance with histopathology was excellent. Confocal laser endomicroscopy allows immediate in vivo imaging of normal and neoplastic brain tissue at high resolution. The technology might be transferred to scientific and clinical application in neurosurgery and neuropathology. It may become helpful to screen for tumor free margins and to improve the surgical resection of malignant brain tumors, and opens the door to in vivo molecular imaging of tumors and other neurologic disorders. PMID:22911853

  5. Improving PET imaging for breast cancer using Virtual Pinhole PET half ring insert

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Aswin John; Komarov, Sergey; Wu, Heyu; O’Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    A PET insert with detector having smaller crystals and placed near a region of interest in a conventional PET scanner can improve image resolution locally due to the Virtual-Pinhole PET (VP-PET) effect. This improvement is from the higher spatial sampling of the imaging area near the detector. We have built a prototype half-ring PET insert for head-and-neck cancer imaging applications. In this paper, we extend the use of the insert to breast imaging and show that such a system provides high resolution images of breast and axillary lymph nodes while maintaining the full imaging field of view capability of a clinical PET scanner. We characterize the resolution and contrast recovery for tumors across the imaging field of view. First, we model the system using Monte Carlo methods to determine its theoretical limit of improvement. Simulations were conducted with hot spherical tumors embedded in background activity at tumor-to-background contrast ranging from 3:1 to 12:1. Tumors are arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with their diameters ranging from 2 to 12 mm. Experimental studies were performed using a chest phantom with cylindrical breast attachment. Tumors of different sizes arranged in a Derenzo-like pattern with tumor-to- background ratio of 6:1 are inserted into the breast phantom. Imaging capability of mediastinum and axillary lymph nodes is explored. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experiment show clear improvement in image resolution and contrast recovery with VP-PET half ring insert. The degree of improvement in resolution and contrast recovery depends on location of the tumor. The full field of view imaging capability is shown to be maintained. Minor artifacts are introduced in certain regions. PMID:23999026

  6. Quantitative CD3 PET Imaging Predicts Tumor Growth Response to Anti-CTLA-4 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Larimer, Benjamin M.; Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Caraballo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have made rapid advances, resulting in multiple Food and Drug Administration–approved therapeutics that have markedly improved survival. However, these benefits are limited to a minority subpopulation that achieves a response. Predicting which patients are most likely to benefit would be valuable for individual therapy optimization. T-cell markers such as CD3—by examining active recruitment of the T cells responsible for cancer-cell death—represent a more direct approach to monitoring tumor immune response than pretreatment biopsy or genetic screening. This approach could be especially effective as numerous different therapeutic strategies emerge, decreasing the need for drug-specific biomarkers and instead focusing on T-cell infiltration, which has been previously correlated with treatment response. Methods: A CD3 PET imaging agent targeting T cells was synthesized to test the role of such imaging as a predictive marker. The 89Zr-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-deferoxamine-CD3 PET probe was assessed in a murine tumor xenograft model of anti–cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) immunotherapy of colon cancer. Results: Imaging on day 14 revealed 2 distinct groups of mice stratified by PET signal intensity. Although there was no significant difference in tumor volume on the day of imaging, in the high-uptake group subsequent measurements revealed significantly smaller tumors than in either the low-uptake group or the untreated controls. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the size of tumors between the low-uptake and untreated control mice. Conclusion: These findings indicate that high CD3 PET uptake in the anti-CTLA-4–treated mice correlated with subsequent reduced tumor volume and was a predictive biomarker of response. PMID:27230929

  7. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  8. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  9. Detecting circulating tumor material and digital pathology imaging during pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Radim; Divi, Rao; Verma, Mukesh

    2017-06-15

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Clinical symptoms typically present late when treatment options are limited and survival expectancy is very short. Metastatic mutations are heterogeneous and can accumulate up to twenty years before PC diagnosis. Given such genetic diversity, detecting and managing the complex states of disease progression may be limited to imaging modalities and markers present in circulation. Recent developments in digital pathology imaging show potential for early PC detection, making a differential diagnosis, and predicting treatment sensitivity leading to long-term survival in advanced stage patients. Despite large research efforts, the only serum marker currently approved for clinical use is CA 19-9. Utility of CA 19-9 has been shown to improve when it is used in combination with PC-specific markers. Efforts are being made to develop early-screening assays that can detect tumor-derived material, present in circulation, before metastasis takes a significant course. Detection of markers that identify circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in biofluid samples offers a promising non-invasive method for this purpose. Circulating tumor cells exhibit varying expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers depending on the state of tumor differentiation. This offers a possibility for monitoring disease progression using minimally invasive procedures. EVs also offer the benefit of detecting molecular cargo of tumor origin and add the potential to detect circulating vesicle markers from tumors that lack invasive properties. This review integrates recent genetic insights of PC progression with developments in digital pathology and early detection of tumor-derived circulating material.

  10. Quantification of Heterogeneity as a Biomarker in Tumor Imaging: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Alic, Lejla; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many techniques are proposed for the quantification of tumor heterogeneity as an imaging biomarker for differentiation between tumor types, tumor grading, response monitoring and outcome prediction. However, in clinical practice these methods are barely used. This study evaluates the reported performance of the described methods and identifies barriers to their implementation in clinical practice. Methodology The Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases were searched up to 20 September 2013. Heterogeneity analysis methods were classified into four categories, i.e., non-spatial methods (NSM), spatial grey level methods (SGLM), fractal analysis (FA) methods, and filters and transforms (F&T). The performance of the different methods was compared. Principal Findings Of the 7351 potentially relevant publications, 209 were included. Of these studies, 58% reported the use of NSM, 49% SGLM, 10% FA, and 28% F&T. Differentiation between tumor types, tumor grading and/or outcome prediction was the goal in 87% of the studies. Overall, the reported area under the curve (AUC) ranged from 0.5 to 1 (median 0.87). No relation was found between the performance and the quantification methods used, or between the performance and the imaging modality. A negative correlation was found between the tumor-feature ratio and the AUC, which is presumably caused by overfitting in small datasets. Cross-validation was reported in 63% of the classification studies. Retrospective analyses were conducted in 57% of the studies without a clear description. Conclusions In a research setting, heterogeneity quantification methods can differentiate between tumor types, grade tumors, and predict outcome and monitor treatment effects. To translate these methods to clinical practice, more prospective studies are required that use external datasets for validation: these datasets should be made available to the community to facilitate the development of new and improved methods. PMID:25330171

  11. Detecting circulating tumor material and digital pathology imaging during pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Moravec, Radim; Divi, Rao; Verma, Mukesh

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Clinical symptoms typically present late when treatment options are limited and survival expectancy is very short. Metastatic mutations are heterogeneous and can accumulate up to twenty years before PC diagnosis. Given such genetic diversity, detecting and managing the complex states of disease progression may be limited to imaging modalities and markers present in circulation. Recent developments in digital pathology imaging show potential for early PC detection, making a differential diagnosis, and predicting treatment sensitivity leading to long-term survival in advanced stage patients. Despite large research efforts, the only serum marker currently approved for clinical use is CA 19-9. Utility of CA 19-9 has been shown to improve when it is used in combination with PC-specific markers. Efforts are being made to develop early-screening assays that can detect tumor-derived material, present in circulation, before metastasis takes a significant course. Detection of markers that identify circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) in biofluid samples offers a promising non-invasive method for this purpose. Circulating tumor cells exhibit varying expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers depending on the state of tumor differentiation. This offers a possibility for monitoring disease progression using minimally invasive procedures. EVs also offer the benefit of detecting molecular cargo of tumor origin and add the potential to detect circulating vesicle markers from tumors that lack invasive properties. This review integrates recent genetic insights of PC progression with developments in digital pathology and early detection of tumor-derived circulating material. PMID:28656074

  12. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Tumors Using a Quantitative T1 Mapping Technique via Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Kelsey; Johansen, Mette L.; Craig, Sonya E.; Vincent, Jason; Howell, Michael; Gao, Ying; Lu, Lan; Erokwu, Bernadette; Agnes, Richard S.; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Basilion, James; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark; Flask, Chris; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with molecular imaging agents would allow for the specific localization of brain tumors. Prior studies using T1-weighted MR imaging demonstrated that the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 molecular imaging agent labeled heterotopic xenograft models of brain tumors more intensely than non-specific contrast agents using conventional T1-weighted imaging techniques. In this study, we used a dynamic quantitative T1 mapping strategy to more objectively compare intra-tumoral retention of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent over time in comparison to non-targeted control agents. Our results demonstrate that the targeted SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent, a scrambled-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 control agent, and the non-specific clinical contrast agent Optimark™ all enhanced flank tumors of human glioma cells with similar maximal changes on T1 mapping. However, the retention of the agents differs. The non-specific agents show significant recovery within 20 min by an increase in T1 while the specific agent SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 is retained in the tumors and shows little recovery over 60 min. The retention effect is demonstrated by percent change in T1 values and slope calculations as well as by calculations of gadolinium concentration in tumor compared to muscle. Quantitative T1 mapping demonstrates the superior binding and retention in tumors of the SBK2-Tris-(Gd-DOTA)3 agent over time compared to the non-specific contrast agent currently in clinical use. PMID:26435847

  15. Advanced endoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Helmut; Nägel, Andreas; Buda, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Advanced endoscopic imaging is revolutionizing our way on how to diagnose and treat colorectal lesions. Within recent years a variety of modern endoscopic imaging techniques was introduced to improve adenoma detection rates. Those include high-definition imaging, dye-less chromoendoscopy techniques and novel, highly flexible endoscopes, some of them equipped with balloons or multiple lenses in order to improve adenoma detection rates. In this review we will focus on the newest developments in the field of colonoscopic imaging to improve adenoma detection rates. Described techniques include high-definition imaging, optical chromoendoscopy techniques, virtual chromoendoscopy techniques, the Third Eye Retroscope and other retroviewing devices, the G-EYE endoscope and the Full Spectrum Endoscopy-system. PMID:25789092

  16. Slip Interface Imaging Predicts Tumor-Brain Adhesion in Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ziying; Glaser, Kevin J.; Manduca, Armando; Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Link, Michael J.; Hughes, Joshua D.; Romano, Anthony; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To test the clinical feasibility and usefulness of slip interface imaging (SII) to identify and quantify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion in patients with vestibular schwannomas. Materials and Methods With institutional review board approval and after obtaining written informed consent, SII examinations were performed in nine patients with vestibular schwannomas. During the SII acquisition, a low-amplitude mechanical vibration is applied to the head with a pillow-like device placed in the head coil and the resulting shear waves are imaged by using a phase-contrast pulse sequence with motion-encoding gradients synchronized with the applied vibration. Imaging was performed with a 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system in less than 7 minutes. The acquired shear motion data were processed with two different algorithms (shear line analysis and calculation of octahedral shear strain [OSS]) to identify the degree of tumor-brain adhesion. Blinded to the SII results, neurosurgeons qualitatively assessed tumor adhesion at the time of tumor resection. Standard T2-weighted, fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA), and T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging were reviewed to identify the presence of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) clefts around the tumors. The performance of the use of the CSF cleft and SII to predict the degree of tumor adhesion was evaluated by using the κ coefficient and McNemar test. Results Among the nine patients, SII agreed with the intraoperative assessment of the degree of tumor adhesion in eight patients (88.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 57%, 98%), with four of four, three of three, and one of two cases correctly predicted as no adhesion, partial adhesion, and complete adhesion, respectively. However, the T2-weighted, FIESTA, and T2-weighted FLAIR images that used the CSF cleft sign to predict adhesion agreed with surgical findings in only four cases (44.4% [four of nine]; 95% CI: 19%, 73%). The κ

  17. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  18. Mutual-information-corrected tumor displacement using intraoperative ultrasound for brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) has emerged as a practical neuronavigational tool for brain shift compensation in image-guided tumor resection surgeries. The use of iUS is optimized when coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) of the patient's head. However, the fiducial-based registration alone does not necessarily optimize the alignment of internal anatomical structures deep in the brain (e.g., tumor) between iUS and pMR. In this paper, we investigated and evaluated an image-based re-registration scheme to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between iUS and pMR to improve tumor boundary alignment using the fiducial registration as a starting point for optimization. We show that this scheme significantly (p<<0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment pre-durotomy. The same technique was employed to measure tumor displacement post-durotomy, and the locally measured tumor displacement was assimilated into a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain deformation. Our results demonstrate that the nMI re-registration pre-durotomy is critical for obtaining accurate measurement of tumor displacement, which significantly improved model response at the craniotomy when compared with stereopsis data acquired independently from the tumor registration. This automatic and computationally efficient (<2min) re-registration technique is feasible for routine clinical use in the operating room (OR).

  19. In vivo Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis using Fluorescence Confocal Videomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fitoussi, Victor; Faye, Nathalie; Chamming's, Foucauld; Clement, Olivier; Cuenod, Charles-Andre; Fournier, Laure S.

    2013-01-01

    Fibered confocal fluorescence in vivo imaging with a fiber optic bundle uses the same principle as fluorescent confocal microscopy. It can excite fluorescent in situ elements through the optical fibers, and then record some of the emitted photons, via the same optical fibers. The light source is a laser that sends the exciting light through an element within the fiber bundle and as it scans over the sample, recreates an image pixel by pixel. As this scan is very fast, by combining it with dedicated image processing software, images in real time with a frequency of 12 frames/sec can be obtained. We developed a technique to quantitatively characterize capillary morphology and function, using a confocal fluorescence videomicroscopy device. The first step in our experiment was to record 5 sec movies in the four quadrants of the tumor to visualize the capillary network. All movies were processed using software (ImageCell, Mauna Kea Technology, Paris France) that performs an automated segmentation of vessels around a chosen diameter (10 μm in our case). Thus, we could quantify the 'functional capillary density', which is the ratio between the total vessel area and the total area of the image. This parameter was a surrogate marker for microvascular density, usually measured using pathology tools. The second step was to record movies of the tumor over 20 min to quantify leakage of the macromolecular contrast agent through the capillary wall into the interstitium. By measuring the ratio of signal intensity in the interstitium over that in the vessels, an 'index leakage' was obtained, acting as a surrogate marker for capillary permeability. PMID:24056503

  20. In vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis using fluorescence confocal videomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, Victor; Faye, Nathalie; Chamming's, Foucauld; Clement, Olivier; Cuenod, Charles-Andre; Fournier, Laure S

    2013-09-11

    Fibered confocal fluorescence in vivo imaging with a fiber optic bundle uses the same principle as fluorescent confocal microscopy. It can excite fluorescent in situ elements through the optical fibers, and then record some of the emitted photons, via the same optical fibers. The light source is a laser that sends the exciting light through an element within the fiber bundle and as it scans over the sample, recreates an image pixel by pixel. As this scan is very fast, by combining it with dedicated image processing software, images in real time with a frequency of 12 frames/sec can be obtained. We developed a technique to quantitatively characterize capillary morphology and function, using a confocal fluorescence videomicroscopy device. The first step in our experiment was to record 5 sec movies in the four quadrants of the tumor to visualize the capillary network. All movies were processed using software (ImageCell, Mauna Kea Technology, Paris France) that performs an automated segmentation of vessels around a chosen diameter (10 μm in our case). Thus, we could quantify the 'functional capillary density', which is the ratio between the total vessel area and the total area of the image. This parameter was a surrogate marker for microvascular density, usually measured using pathology tools. The second step was to record movies of the tumor over 20 min to quantify leakage of the macromolecular contrast agent through the capillary wall into the interstitium. By measuring the ratio of signal intensity in the interstitium over that in the vessels, an 'index leakage' was obtained, acting as a surrogate marker for capillary permeability.

  1. Culturing CTLs under Hypoxic Conditions Enhances Their Cytolysis and Improves Their Anti-tumor Function.

    PubMed

    Gropper, Yael; Feferman, Tali; Shalit, Tali; Salame, Tomer-Meir; Porat, Ziv; Shakhar, Guy

    2017-09-12

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) used in immunotherapy are typically cultured under atmospheric O2 pressure but encounter hypoxic conditions inside tumors. Activating CTLs under hypoxic conditions has been shown to improve their cytotoxicity in vitro, but the mechanism employed and the implications for immunotherapy remain unknown. We activated and cultured OT-I CD8 T cells at either 1% or 20% O2. Hypoxic CTLs survived, as well as normoxic ones, in vitro but killed OVA-expressing B16 melanoma cells more efficiently. Hypoxic CTLs contained similar numbers of cytolytic granules and released them as efficiently but packaged more granzyme-B in each granule without producing more perforin. We imaged CTL distribution and motility inside B16-OVA tumors using confocal and intravital 2-photon microscopy and observed no obvious differences. However, mice treated with hypoxic CTLs exhibited better tumor regression and survived longer. Thus, hypoxic CTLs may perform better in tumor immunotherapy because of higher intrinsic cytotoxicity rather than improved migration inside tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumor-bearing mice treated with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Aicher, K P; Dupon, J W; White, D L; Aukerman, S L; Moseley, M E; Juster, R; Rosenau, W; Winkelhake, J L; Brasch, R C

    1990-11-15

    Pharmacological effects of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) were studied in a mouse fibrosarcoma model using magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with a macromolecular contrast agent, albumin(gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid)35. TNF was administered i.v. in a dose of 150 micrograms/kg, 60 to 80 min prior to imaging. Contrast-enhanced and nonenhanced magnetic resonance images of TNF-treated (n = 10) and untreated (n = 8) Meth A fibrosarcomas were obtained at 2.0 Tesla using T1-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Serial images spanning an interval of 60 to 120 min after TNF administration showed that the TNF-treated tumors enhanced significantly more overall than did untreated tumors (43% versus 31%). The most marked differential tumor enhancement was observed in the tumor rim (59% versus 40%). Nontumorous tissue, including muscle and brain, revealed no significant enhancement differences between TNF-treated animals and controls. The observed tumor enhancement corresponded strongly with Evans blue staining; the TNF-treated tumors stained deep blue, while untreated tumors and normal tissues observed did not stain. The different enhancement and Evans blue staining patterns between TNF-treated tumors and untreated tumors are attributed to TNF-induced changes in tumor capillary integrity. The data indicate that TNF effects on tumors include an increased capillary permeability for macromolecules at early times after administration. The ability to detect changes in capillary permeability in vivo using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging may prove to be clinically useful to monitor tumor response to TNF.

  3. Can coffee improve image guidance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirz, Raul; Lathrop, Ray A.; Godage, Isuru S.; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica; Russell, Paul T.; Webster, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes observe large errors when using image guidance in endonasal surgery. We hypothesize that one contributing factor is the possibility that operating room personnel might accidentally bump the optically tracked rigid body attached to the patient after registration has been performed. In this paper we explore the registration error at the skull base that can be induced by simulated bumping of the rigid body, and find that large errors can occur when simulated bumps are applied to the rigid body. To address this, we propose a new fixation method for the rigid body based on granular jamming (i.e. using particles like ground coffee). Our results show that our granular jamming fixation prototype reduces registration error by 28%-68% (depending on bump direction) in comparison to a standard Brainlab reference headband.

  4. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    ultrasound molecular imaging agents enhances signal intensity and detection of OVCA’ was examined in specific aim 1 described in Year-1 report...improved the detection of OVCA at early stage. This improvement in OVCA detectability was due to the enhanced ultrasound imaging signal intensity ...Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis PRINCIPAL

  5. Noninvasive multimodality imaging of the tumor microenvironment: registered dynamic magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies of a preclinical tumor model of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cho, HyungJoon; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Carlin, Sean; Lupu, Mihaela E; Wang, Ya; Rizwan, Asif; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L; Zanzonico, Pat B; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-03-01

    In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327-AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA) and dynamic (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-Fmiso) PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between (18)F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, (18)F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995). Magn Reson Med 33, 506-514) derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early (18)F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early (18)F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan) (18)F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between (18)F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  6. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia12

    PubMed Central

    Cho, HyungJoon; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Carlin, Sean; Lupu, Mihaela E; Wang, Ya; Rizwan, Asif; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L; Zanzonico, Pat B; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327-AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA) and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso) PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995). Magn Reson Med 33, 506–514) derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan) 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue. PMID:19242606

  7. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation.

  8. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective for this research project is to develop methods for utilizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long term goals are to apply this approach to investigate the following: normal tissue toxicity; radiation dose to the tumor; and early tumor imaging. The research plans of this proposal include the following specific aims: optimize labeling of MAbs with fluorine 18, bromine 76 and bromine 75; label MAb Mel-14 (reactive against human gliomas and melanomas) and its Fab and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments while retaining immunoreactivity; determine the distribution of Mel-14 in athymic mice bearing human gliomas; determine pharmacokinetics of Mel-14 in nonhuman primates. Experiments with another MAb, TP-1, and iodine 124 and 131 are also planned. 8 figs.

  9. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Guangming; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Wu, Rongchun; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)-curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA-CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA-CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA-CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes.

  10. Hypoxia targeted carbon nanotubes as a sensitive contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Aguirre, Andres; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Pavlik, Christopher; Smith, Michael B.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    Development of new and efficient contrast agents is of fundamental importance to improve detection sensitivity of smaller lesions. Within the family of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNT) not only have emerged as a new alternative and efficient transporter and translocater of therapeutic molecules but also as a photoacoustic molecular imaging agent owing to its strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region. Drugs, Antibodies and nucleic acids could functionalize the CNT and prepare an appropriate system for delivering the cargos to cells and organs. In this work, we present a novel photoacoustic contrast agent which is based on a unique hypoxic marker in the near infrared region, 2-nitroimidazole -bis carboxylic acid derivative of Indocyanine Green conjugated to single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT-2nitroimidazole-ICG). The 2-nitroimidazole-ICG has an absorption peak at 755 nm and an extinction coefficient of 20,5222 M-1cm-1. The conjugation of this marker with SWCNT shows more than 25 times enhancement of optical absorption of carbon nanotubes in the near infrared region. This new conjugate has been optically evaluated and shows promising results for high contrast photoacoustic imaging of deeply located tumors. The conjugate specifically targets tumor hypoxia, an important indicator of tumor metabolism and tumor therapeutic response. The detection sensitivity of the new contrast agent has been evaluated in-vitro cell lines and with in-vivo tumors in mice.

  11. The role of diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging in the differential diagnosis of cerebral tumors: a review and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The role of conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the detection of cerebral tumors has been well established. However its excellent soft tissue visualization and variety of imaging sequences are in many cases non-specific for the assessment of brain tumor grading. Hence, advanced MRI techniques, like Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI), Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Dynamic-Susceptibility Contrast Imaging (DSCI), which are based on different contrast principles, have been used in the clinical routine to improve diagnostic accuracy. The variety of quantitative information derived from these techniques provides significant structural and functional information in a cellular level, highlighting aspects of the underlying brain pathophysiology. The present work, reviews physical principles and recent results obtained using DWI/DTI and DSCI, in tumor characterization and grading of the most common cerebral neoplasms, and discusses how the available MR quantitative data can be utilized through advanced methods of analysis, in order to optimize clinical decision making. PMID:25609475

  12. Studying tumor metastasis by in vivo imaging and flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Guo, Jin; Liu, Guangda; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Zhang, Li; Tan, Yuan; Chen, Tong; Gu, Zhenqin; Wang, Chen

    2009-02-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, with approximately 1,000,000 cases reported every year. This ranges from 15,000 cases in the United States to more than a 250,000 in China. About 80% of people with primary liver cancer are male. Although two-thirds of people have advanced liver disease when they seek medical help, one third of the patients have cancer that has not progressed beyond the liver. Primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma, or HCC) is associated with liver cirrhosis 60-80% of the time. HCC may metastasize to the lung, bones, kidney, and many other organs. Surgical resection, liver transplantation, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current HCC therapies. However the outcomes are poor-the survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of HCC cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern liver tumor cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess liver tumor cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. A real-time quantitative monitoring of circulating liver tumor cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  13. Photodynamic therapy and imaging based on tumor-targeted nanoprobe, polymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jun; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Nakamura, Hideaki; Subr, Vladimir; Ulbrich, Karel; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potential of tumor-targeted nanoprobe, N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer-conjugated zinc protoporphyrin (PZP) for photodynamic therapy (PDT) and tumor imaging. Materials & Methods: Different tumor models including carcinogen-induced cancer were used, PZP was intravenously injected followed by irradiation with xenon or blue fluorescent light on tumor. Results: One PZP 20 mg/kg (ZnPP equivalent) dose with two or three treatments of light at an intensity of ≥20 J/cm2 caused necrosis and disappearance of most tumors (>70%) in different tumor models. We also confirmed PZP-based tumor imaging in carcinogen-induced breast tumor and colon cancer models. Conclusion: These findings support the potential application of PZP as a tumor-selective nanoprobe for PDT as well as tumor imaging, by virtue of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. PMID:28031879

  14. Caged [(18)F]FDG Glycosylamines for Imaging Acidic Tumor Microenvironments Using Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; Truillet, Charles; Regan, Melanie K; Ganguly, Tanushree; Blecha, Joseph E; Kurhanewicz, John; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Keshari, Kayvan R; Chang, Christopher J; Evans, Michael J; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-20

    Solid tumors are hypoxic with altered metabolism, resulting in secretion of acids into the extracellular matrix and lower relative pH, a feature associated with local invasion and metastasis. Therapeutic and diagnostic agents responsive to this microenvironment may improve tumor-specific delivery. Therefore, we pursued a general strategy whereby caged small-molecule drugs or imaging agents liberate their parent compounds in regions of low interstitial pH. In this manuscript, we present a new acid-labile prodrug method based on the glycosylamine linkage, and its application to a class of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging tracers, termed [(18)F]FDG amines. [(18)F]FDG amines operate via a proposed two-step mechanism, in which an acid-labile precursor decomposes to form the common radiotracer 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose, which is subsequently accumulated by glucose avid cells. The rate of decomposition of [(18)F]FDG amines is tunable in a systematic fashion, tracking the pKa of the parent amine. In vivo, a 4-phenylbenzylamine [(18)F]FDG amine congener showed greater relative accumulation in tumors over benign tissue, which could be attenuated upon tumor alkalinization using previously validated models, including sodium bicarbonate treatment, or overexpression of carbonic anhydrase. This new class of PET tracer represents a viable approach for imaging acidic interstitial pH with potential for clinical translation.

  15. Photoacoustic endoscopic imaging study of melanoma tumor growth in a rat colorectum in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chiye; Yang, Joon-Mo; Chen, Ruimin; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Younan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    We performed a photoacoustic endoscopic imaging study of melanoma tumor growth in a nude rat in vivo. After inducing the tumor at the colorectal wall of the animal, we monitored the tumor development in situ by using a photoacoustic endoscopic system. This paper introduces our experimental method for tumor inoculation and presents imaging results showing the morphological changes of the blood vasculature near the tumor region according to the tumor progress. Our study could provide insights for future studies on tumor development in small animals.

  16. Image updating for brain deformation compensation in tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Olson, Jonathan D.; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) are typically used for intraoperative guidance in image-guided neurosurgery, the accuracy of which can be significantly compromised by brain deformation. Biomechanical finite element models (FEM) have been developed to estimate whole-brain deformation and produce model-updated MR (uMR) that compensates for brain deformation at different surgical stages. Early stages of surgery, such as after craniotomy and after dural opening, have been well studied, whereas later stages after tumor resection begins remain challenging. In this paper, we present a method to simulate tumor resection by incorporating data from intraoperative stereovision (iSV). The amount of tissue resection was estimated from iSV using a "trial-and-error" approach, and the cortical shift was measured from iSV through a surface registration method using projected images and an optical flow (OF) motion tracking algorithm. The measured displacements were employed to drive the biomechanical brain deformation model, and the estimated whole-brain deformation was subsequently used to deform pMR and produce uMR. We illustrate the method using one patient example. The results show that the uMR aligned well with iSV and the overall misfit between model estimates and measured displacements was 1.46 mm. The overall computational time was ~5 min, including iSV image acquisition after resection, surface registration, modeling, and image warping, with minimal interruption to the surgical flow. Furthermore, we compare uMR against intraoperative MR (iMR) that was acquired following iSV acquisition.

  17. Aptamer for imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumor glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Delač, Mateja; Motaln, Helena; Ulrich, Henning; Lah, Tamara T

    2015-09-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded nucleic acids (RNA or ssDNA), identified by an in vitro selection process, denominated SELEX, from a partially random oligonucleotide library. They bind to a molecular target, a protein or other complex macromolecular structures of interest with high affinity and specificity, comparable to those of antibodies. Recently, aptamer selection protocols were developed for targeting living cells, including tumors. Chemical modifications of the aptamers and modalities of their detection and delivery systems are already available with high selectivity and targeting ability for the desired cancer cell type, making them promising for diagnosis and therapy. Glioblastoma multiformae represents the most malignant and fatal stage of glioma, and is also the most frequent brain tumor. Glioblastoma-specific aptamers were developed by either targeting the whole cell surface or known glioma biomarkers. These aptamers may gain importance for imaging, tumor cell isolation from biopsies and drug delivery. In biomedical imaging techniques, aptamers coupled with radionuclide or fluorescent labels, bioconjugates and nanoparticles offer an advanced, noninvasive manner for defining the glioblastoma tissue border. Though single modality aptamer imaging probes have some limitations, these are overcome by the use of multimodal probes. Due to selectivity and chemical characteristics, aptamers can be coupled to functionalized nanoparticles and loaded with a drug, appeared promising for in vivo targeting of glioblastoma. Finally, aptamers are effective mediators for gene silencing when coupled to small interfering RNA and a viral vector, thus providing a novel tool with enhanced targeting capability in drug delivery, designed for tailored treatment of glioblastoma patients.

  18. Improvement of image quality in holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Budhiraja, C J; Som, S C

    1981-05-15

    A novel technique of noise reduction in holographic microscopy has been experimentally studied. It has been shown that significant improvement in the holomicroscopic images of actual low-contrast continuous tone biological objects can be achieved without trade off in image resolution. The technique makes use of holographically produced multidirectional phase gratings used as diffusers and the continuous addition of subchannel holograms. It has been shown that the self-imaging property of this type of diffuser makes the use of these diffusers ideal for microscopic objects. Experimental results have also been presented to demonstrate real-time image processing capability of this technique.

  19. Clinical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Iv, Michael; Telischak, Nicholas; Feng, Dan; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Yeom, Kristen W; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2015-01-01

    Current neuroimaging provides detailed anatomic and functional evaluation of brain tumors, allowing for improved diagnostic and prognostic capabilities. Some challenges persist even with today's advanced imaging techniques, including accurate delineation of tumor margins and distinguishing treatment effects from residual or recurrent tumor. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are an emerging tool that can add clinically useful information due to their distinct physiochemical features and biodistribution, while having a good safety profile. Nanoparticles can be used as a platform for theranostic drugs, which have shown great promise for the treatment of CNS malignancies. This review will provide an overview of clinical ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides and how they can be applied to the diagnostic and therapeutic neuro-oncologic setting.

  20. An improved image reconstruction method for optical intensity correlation Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Feng, Lingjie; Li, Xiyu

    2016-12-01

    The intensity correlation imaging method is a novel kind of interference imaging and it has favorable prospects in deep space recognition. However, restricted by the low detecting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it's usually very difficult to obtain high-quality image of deep space object like high-Earth-orbit (HEO) satellite with existing phase retrieval methods. In this paper, based on the priori intensity statistical distribution model of the object and characteristics of measurement noise distribution, an improved method of Prior Information Optimization (PIO) is proposed to reduce the ambiguous images and accelerate the phase retrieval procedure thus realizing fine image reconstruction. As the simulations and experiments show, compared to previous methods, our method could acquire higher-resolution images with less error in low SNR condition.

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Tumor Physiological, Metabolic, and Redox Changes in Response to the Anti-Angiogenic Agent Sunitinib: Longitudinal Assessment to Identify Transient Vascular Renormalization

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Morris, Herman D.; Lizak, Martin J.; Merkle, Hellmut; Yasukawa, Keiji; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Suburamanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The tumor microenvironment is characterized by a highly reducing redox status, a low pH, and hypoxia. Anti-angiogenic therapies for solid tumors frequently function in two steps: the transient normalization of structurally and functionally aberrant tumor blood vessels with increased blood perfusion, followed by the pruning of tumor blood vessels and the resultant cessation of nutrients and oxygen delivery required for tumor growth. Conventional anatomic or vascular imaging is impractical or insufficient to distinguish between the two steps of tumor response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Here, we investigated whether the noninvasive imaging of the tumor redox state and energy metabolism could be used to characterize anti-angiogenic drug-induced transient vascular normalization. Results: Daily treatment of squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) tumor-bearing mice with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib resulted in a rapid decrease in tumor microvessel density and the suppression of tumor growth. Tumor pO2 imaging by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging showed a transient increase in tumor oxygenation after 2–4 days of sunitinib treatment, implying improved tumor perfusion. During this window of vascular normalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the redox status using an exogenously administered nitroxide probe and hyperpolarized 13C MRI of the metabolic flux of pyruvate/lactate couple revealed an oxidative shift in tumor redox status. Innovation: Redox-sensitive metabolic couples can serve as noninvasive surrogate markers to identify the vascular normalization window in tumors with imaging techniques. Conclusion: A multimodal imaging approach to characterize physiological, metabolic, and redox changes in tumors is useful to distinguish between the different stages of anti-angiogenic treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1145–1155. PMID:24597714

  2. In vivo imaging of tumor physiological, metabolic, and redox changes in response to the anti-angiogenic agent sunitinib: longitudinal assessment to identify transient vascular renormalization.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shingo; Saito, Keita; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Munasinghe, Jeeva P; Morris, Herman D; Lizak, Martin J; Merkle, Hellmut; Yasukawa, Keiji; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Suburamanian, Sankaran; Mitchell, James B; Krishna, Murali C

    2014-09-10

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by a highly reducing redox status, a low pH, and hypoxia. Anti-angiogenic therapies for solid tumors frequently function in two steps: the transient normalization of structurally and functionally aberrant tumor blood vessels with increased blood perfusion, followed by the pruning of tumor blood vessels and the resultant cessation of nutrients and oxygen delivery required for tumor growth. Conventional anatomic or vascular imaging is impractical or insufficient to distinguish between the two steps of tumor response to anti-angiogenic therapies. Here, we investigated whether the noninvasive imaging of the tumor redox state and energy metabolism could be used to characterize anti-angiogenic drug-induced transient vascular normalization. Daily treatment of squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) tumor-bearing mice with the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib resulted in a rapid decrease in tumor microvessel density and the suppression of tumor growth. Tumor pO2 imaging by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging showed a transient increase in tumor oxygenation after 2-4 days of sunitinib treatment, implying improved tumor perfusion. During this window of vascular normalization, magnetic resonance imaging of the redox status using an exogenously administered nitroxide probe and hyperpolarized (13)C MRI of the metabolic flux of pyruvate/lactate couple revealed an oxidative shift in tumor redox status. Redox-sensitive metabolic couples can serve as noninvasive surrogate markers to identify the vascular normalization window in tumors with imaging techniques. A multimodal imaging approach to characterize physiological, metabolic, and redox changes in tumors is useful to distinguish between the different stages of anti-angiogenic treatment.

  3. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  4. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  5. Ratiometric spectral imaging for fast tumor detection and chemotherapy monitoring in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2011-06-01

    We report a novel in vivo spectral imaging approach to cancer detection and chemotherapy assessment. We describe and characterize a ratiometric spectral imaging and analysis method and evaluate its performance for tumor detection and delineation by quantitatively monitoring the specific accumulation of targeted gallium corrole (HerGa) into HER2-positive (HER2 +) breast tumors. HerGa temporal accumulation in nude mice bearing HER2 + breast tumors was monitored comparatively by a. this new ratiometric imaging and analysis method; b. established (reflectance and fluorescence) spectral imaging; c. more commonly used fluorescence intensity imaging. We also tested the feasibility of HerGa imaging in vivo using the ratiometric spectral imaging method for tumor detection and delineation. Our results show that the new method not only provides better quantitative information than typical spectral imaging, but also better specificity than standard fluorescence intensity imaging, thus allowing enhanced in vivo outlining of tumors and dynamic, quantitative monitoring of targeted chemotherapy agent accumulation into them.

  6. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics.

  7. A Nanostructured Matrices Assessment to Study Drug Distribution in Solid Tumor Tissues by Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Silvia; Pifferi, Valentina; Morosi, Lavinia; Morelli, Melinda; Falciola, Luigi; Cappelletti, Giuseppe; Visentin, Sonja; Licandro, Simonetta A.; Frapolli, Roberta; Zucchetti, Massimo; Pastorelli, Roberta; Brunelli, Laura; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Davoli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    The imaging of drugs inside tissues is pivotal in oncology to assess whether a drug reaches all cells in an adequate enough concentration to eradicate the tumor. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI-MSI) is one of the most promising imaging techniques that enables the simultaneous visualization of multiple compounds inside tissues. The choice of a suitable matrix constitutes a critical aspect during the development of a MALDI-MSI protocol since the matrix ionization efficiency changes depending on the analyte structure and its physico-chemical properties. The objective of this study is the improvement of the MALDI-MSI technique in the field of pharmacology; developing specifically designed nanostructured surfaces that allow the imaging of different drugs with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Among several nanomaterials, we tested the behavior of gold and titanium nanoparticles, and halloysites and carbon nanotubes as possible matrices. All nanomaterials were firstly screened by co-spotting them with drugs on a MALDI plate, evaluating the drug signal intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio. The best performing matrices were tested on control tumor slices, and were spotted with drugs to check the ion suppression effect of the biological matrix. Finally; the best nanomaterials were employed in a preliminary drug distribution study inside tumors from treated mice. PMID:28336905

  8. The importance of radiographic imaging in the microscopic assessment of bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Larousserie, F; Kreshak, J; Gambarotti, M; Alberghini, M; Vanel, D

    2013-12-01

    Primary bone tumors are rare and require a multidisciplinary approach. Diagnosis involves primarily the radiologist and the pathologist. Bone lesions are often heterogeneous and the microscopic diagnostic component(s) may be in the minority, especially on core needle biopsies. Reactive processes, benign, and malignant tumors may have similar microscopic aspects. For these challenging cases, the correlation of microscopic and radiologic information is critical, or diagnostic mistakes may be made with severe clinical consequences for the patient. The purpose of this article is to explain how pathologists can best use imaging studies to improve the diagnostic accuracy of bone lesions. Many bone lesions are microscopically and/or radiographically heterogeneous, especially those with both lytic and matrix components. Final diagnosis may require specific microscopic diagnostic features that may be present in the lesion, but not the biopsy specimen. A review of the imaging helps assess if sampling was adequate. The existence of a pre-existing bone lesion, syndrome (such as Ollier disease or multiple hereditary exostosis), or oncologic history may be of crucial importance. Finally, imaging information is very useful for the pathologist to perform accurate local and regional staging during gross examination. Close teamwork between pathologists, radiologists, and clinicians is of utmost importance in the evaluation and management of bone tumors. These lesions can be very difficult to interpret microscopically; imaging studies therefore play a crucial role in their accurate diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimal Co-segmentation of Tumor in PET-CT Images with Context Information

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qi; Bai, Junjie; Han, Dongfeng; Bhatia, Sudershan; Sun, Wenqing; Rockey, William; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    PET-CT images have been widely used in clinical practice for radiotherapy treatment planning of the radiotherapy. Many existing segmentation approaches only work for a single imaging modality, which suffer from the low spatial resolution in PET or low contrast in CT. In this work we propose a novel method for the co-segmentation of the tumor in both PET and CT images, which makes use of advantages from each modality: the functionality information from PET and the anatomical structure information from CT. The approach formulates the segmentation problem as a minimization problem of a Markov Random Field (MRF) model, which encodes the information from both modalities. The optimization is solved using a graph-cut based method. Two sub-graphs are constructed for the segmentation of the PET and the CT images, respectively. To achieve consistent results in two modalities, an adaptive context cost is enforced by adding context arcs between the two subgraphs. An optimal solution can be obtained by solving a single maximum flow problem, which leads to simultaneous segmentation of the tumor volumes in both modalities. The proposed algorithm was validated in robust delineation of lung tumors on 23 PET-CT datasets and two head-and-neck cancer subjects. Both qualitative and quantitative results show significant improvement compared to the graph cut methods solely using PET or CT. PMID:23693127

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopic imaging of intra-tumor heterogeneity and molecular identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Reinecke, Dan; Miller, Kathy; Kruger, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Purpose. To evaluate photoacoustic spectroscopy as a potential imaging modality capable of measuring intra-tumor heterogeneity and spectral features associated with hemoglobin and the molecular probe indocyanine green (ICG). Material and Methods. Immune deficient mice were injected with wildtype and VEGF enhanced MCF-7 breast cancer cells or SKOV3x ovarian cancer cells, which were allowed to grow to a size of 6-12 mm in diameter. Two mice were imaged alive and after euthanasia for (oxy/deoxy)-hemoglobin content. A 0.4 mL volume of 1 μg/mL concentration of ICG was injected into the tail veins of two mice prior to imaging using the photoacoustic computed tomography (PCT) spectrometer (Optosonics, Inc., Indianapolis, IN 46202) scanner. Mouse images were acquired for wavelengths spanning 700-920 nm, after which the major organs were excised, and similarly imaged. A histological study was performed by sectioning the organ and optically imaging the fluorescence distribution. Results. Calibration of PCT-spectroscopy with different samples of oxygenated blood reproduced a hemoglobin dissociation curve consistent with empirical formula with an average error of 5.6%. In vivo PCT determination of SaO II levels within the tumor vascular was measurably tracked, and spatially correlated to the periphery of the tumor. Statistical and systematic errors associated with hypoxia were estimated to be 10 and 13%, respectively. Measured ICG concentrations determined by contrast-differential PCT images in excised organs (tumor, liver) were approximately 0.8 μg/mL, consistent with fluorescent histological results. Also, the difference in the ratio of ICG concentration in the gall bladder-to-vasculature between the mice was consistent with excretion times between the two mice. Conclusion. PCT spectroscopic imaging has shown to be a noninvasive modality capable of imaging intra-tumor heterogeneity of (oxy/deoxy)-hemoglobin and ICG in vivo, with an estimated error in SaO II at 17% and in

  11. Whole-body MR imaging for staging of malignant tumors in pediatric patients: results of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network 6660 Trial.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Marilyn J; Acharyya, Suddhasatta; Hoffer, Frederic A; Wyly, J Brad; Friedmann, Alison M; Snyder, Bradley S; Babyn, Paul S; Khanna, Geetika; Siegel, Barry A

    2013-02-01

    To compare whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with conventional imaging for detection of distant metastases in pediatric patients with common malignant tumors. This institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant, multicenter prospective cohort study included 188 patients (109 male, 79 female; mean age, 10.2 years; range, < 1 to 21 years) with newly diagnosed lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or soft-tissue sarcoma. Informed consent was obtained and all patients underwent noncontrast material-enhanced whole-body MR imaging and standard-practice conventional imaging. All images were reviewed centrally by 10 pairs of readers. An independent panel verified the presence or absence of distant metastases. Detection of metastasis with whole-body MR and conventional imaging was quantified by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The effects of tumor subtype, patient age, and distant skeletal and pulmonary disease on diagnostic accuracy were also analyzed. Of the 134 eligible patients, 66 (33 positive and 33 negative for metastasis) were selected for image review and analysis. Whole-body MR imaging did not meet the noninferiority criterion for accuracy when compared with conventional imaging for detection of metastasis (difference between average AUCs was -0.03 [95% confidence interval: -0.10, 0.04]); however, the average AUC for solid tumors was significantly higher than that for lymphomas (P = .006). More skeletal metastases were detected by using whole-body MR imaging than by using conventional imaging (P = .03), but fewer lung metastases were detected (P < .001). Patient age did not affect accuracy. The noninferior accuracy for diagnosis of distant metastasis in patients with common pediatric tumors was not established for the use of whole-body MR imaging compared with conventional methods. However, improved accuracy was seen with whole-body MR imaging in patients with nonlymphomatous tumors.

  12. Imaging Review of Skeletal Tumors of the Pelvis—Part I: Benign Tumors of the Pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Gandikota; Finlay, Karen; Morag, Yoav; Brandon, Catherine; Jacobson, Jon; Jamadar, David

    2012-01-01

    The osseous pelvis is a well-recognized site of origin of numerous primary and secondary musculoskeletal tumors. The radiologic evaluation of a pelvic lesion often begins with the plain film and proceeds to computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possibly biopsy. Each of these modalities, with inherent advantages and disadvantages, has a role in the workup of pelvic osseous masses. Clinical history and imaging characteristics can significantly narrow the broad differential diagnosis for osseous pelvic lesions. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the radiologist with the presentation and appearance of some of the common benign neoplasms of the osseous pelvis and share our experience and approach in diagnosing these lesions. PMID:22666102

  13. Significance of image analysis in the diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor-like lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Gahm, Thomas; Delling, Guenter

    1990-11-01

    The distinction between different types of giant-cell containing lesions often represents a challenge for pathologists since wide ranges and overlappings of their morphological features are common. But despite of their similarities the treatment is very different and depends on an accurate morpological diagnostic. Our present study was undertaken to investigate the nuclear DNA content (NDC) of giant-cell containing lesions and its value for the diagnostic. Furthermore we studied the significance of NDC to predict the biological behavior of giant-cell tumors. 12 aneurysmal bone cysts 25 central osteosarcomas (biopsies) and 16 giant-cell tumors of the Hamburger Knochentumorregister were included in this study. In all cases fresh material was available. 20 imprintcytologies from each specimen of each case were prepared . 10 were used for Feulgen-staining to perform quantitative DNA-measurements. 10 were used for Pappenheim-staining for morphological examination. Conventionally prepared sections of each specimen of each patient radiological findings and clinical data served as control-system. The recently developed DNA measuring program CESAR based on image analysis (IBAS I Kontron Germany) was used for this study. The obtained DNA distributions were classified according to a new developed DNAgrading system for imprintcytologies (s. table 1). All investigated aneurysmal bone cysts were 0 I (euploid). 23 central osteosarcomas were G III (aneuploid). 2 central osteosarcomas (predominantly cartilage producing) were G II (only a small number of hypertetraploid cells). 9 giant-cell tumors were G II. 7 Giant

  14. Binocular Goggle Augmented Imaging and Navigation System provides real-time fluorescence image guidance for tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Sudlow, Gail P.; Liang, Kexian; Som, Avik; Akers, Walter J.; Fields, Ryan C.; Margenthaler, Julie; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    The inability to identify microscopic tumors and assess surgical margins in real-time during oncologic surgery leads to incomplete tumor removal, increases the chances of tumor recurrence, and necessitates costly repeat surgery. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a wearable goggle augmented imaging and navigation system (GAINS) that can provide accurate intraoperative visualization of tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in real-time without disrupting normal surgical workflow. GAINS projects both near-infrared fluorescence from tumors and the natural color images of tissue onto a head-mounted display without latency. Aided by tumor-targeted contrast agents, the system detected tumors in subcutaneous and metastatic mouse models with high accuracy (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98% ± 5% standard deviation). Human pilot studies in breast cancer and melanoma patients using a near-infrared dye show that the GAINS detected sentinel lymph nodes with 100% sensitivity. Clinical use of the GAINS to guide tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping promises to improve surgical outcomes, reduce rates of repeat surgery, and improve the accuracy of cancer staging.

  15. Binocular Goggle Augmented Imaging and Navigation System provides real-time fluorescence image guidance for tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping

    PubMed Central

    B. Mondal, Suman; Gao, Shengkui; Zhu, Nan; Sudlow, Gail P.; Liang, Kexian; Som, Avik; Akers, Walter J.; Fields, Ryan C.; Margenthaler, Julie; Liang, Rongguang; Gruev, Viktor; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The inability to identify microscopic tumors and assess surgical margins in real-time during oncologic surgery leads to incomplete tumor removal, increases the chances of tumor recurrence, and necessitates costly repeat surgery. To overcome these challenges, we have developed a wearable goggle augmented imaging and navigation system (GAINS) that can provide accurate intraoperative visualization of tumors and sentinel lymph nodes in real-time without disrupting normal surgical workflow. GAINS projects both near-infrared fluorescence from tumors and the natural color images of tissue onto a head-mounted display without latency. Aided by tumor-targeted contrast agents, the system detected tumors in subcutaneous and metastatic mouse models with high accuracy (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 98% ± 5% standard deviation). Human pilot studies in breast cancer and melanoma patients using a near-infrared dye show that the GAINS detected sentinel lymph nodes with 100% sensitivity. Clinical use of the GAINS to guide tumor resection and sentinel lymph node mapping promises to improve surgical outcomes, reduce rates of repeat surgery, and improve the accuracy of cancer staging. PMID:26179014

  16. Improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents: Gd(DOTA) conjugates of a cycloalkane-based RGD peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Ko, In Ok; Kim, Tae-Jeong; Chang, Yongmin; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Jung Young

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Development of improved tumor-targeting MRI contrast agents. • To increase the targeting ability of RGD, we developed cycloalkane-based RGD peptides. • Gd(DOTA) conjugates of cycloalkane-based RGD peptide show improved tumor signal enhancement in vivo MR images. - Abstract: Two new MRI contrast agents, Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACP-K) (1) and Gd-DOTA-c(RGD-ACH-K) (2), which were designed by incorporating aminocyclopentane (ACP)- or aminocyclohexane (ACH)-carboxylic acid into Gd-DOTA (gadolinium-tetraazacyclo dodecanetetraacetic acid) and cyclic RGDK peptides, were synthesized and evaluated for tumor-targeting ability in vitro and in vivo. Binding affinity studies showed that both 1 and 2 exhibited higher affinity for integrin receptors than cyclic RGDyK peptides, which were used as a reference. These complexes showed high relaxivity and good stability in human serum and have the potential to improve target-specific signal enhancement in vivo MR images.

  17. Monitoring tumor metastasis by in vivo imaging and flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhenqin; Guo, Jin; Liu, Guangda; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Chen; Wei, Xunbin

    2009-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  18. Quantification of lung tumor rotation with automated landmark extraction using orthogonal cine MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Lee, Danny; Greer, Peter B.; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco; Keall, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The quantification of tumor motion in sites affected by respiratory motion is of primary importance to improve treatment accuracy. To account for motion, different studies analyzed the translational component only, without focusing on the rotational component, which was quantified in a few studies on the prostate with implanted markers. The aim of our study was to propose a tool able to quantify lung tumor rotation without the use of internal markers, thus providing accurate motion detection close to critical structures such as the heart or liver. Specifically, we propose the use of an automatic feature extraction method in combination with the acquisition of fast orthogonal cine MRI images of nine lung patients. As a preliminary test, we evaluated the performance of the feature extraction method by applying it on regions of interest around (i) the diaphragm and (ii) the tumor and comparing the estimated motion with that obtained by (i) the extraction of the diaphragm profile and (ii) the segmentation of the tumor, respectively. The results confirmed the capability of the proposed method in quantifying tumor motion. Then, a point-based rigid registration was applied to the extracted tumor features between all frames to account for rotation. The median lung rotation values were  -0.6   ±   2.3° and  -1.5   ±   2.7° in the sagittal and coronal planes respectively, confirming the need to account for tumor rotation along with translation to improve radiotherapy treatment.

  19. Improving the efficiency of image guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Adrian; Ajaz, Mazhar; Stewart, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an essential component of the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancers. It enables the dose to the tumor to be boosted whilst allowing relative sparing of the normal tissues. Traditionally, cervical brachytherapy was prescribed to point A but since the GEC-ESTRO guidelines were published in 2005, there has been a move towards prescribing the dose to a 3D volume. Image guided brachytherapy has been shown to reduce local recurrence, and improve survival and is optimally predicated on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological studies, patient workflow, operative parameters, and intensive therapy planning can represent a challenge to clinical resources. This article explores the ways, in which 3D conformal brachytherapy can be implemented and draws findings from recent literature and a well-developed hospital practice in order to suggest ways to improve the efficiency and efficacy of a brachytherapy service. Finally, we discuss relatively underexploited translational research opportunities. PMID:28115963

  20. Assessment of contrast enhanced respiration managed cone-beam CT for image guided radiotherapy of intrahepatic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Nikolaj K. G.; Stewart, Errol; Lock, Michael; Fisher, Barbara; Kozak, Roman; Chen, Jeff; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Contrast enhancement and respiration management are widely used during image acquisition for radiotherapy treatment planning of liver tumors along with respiration management at the treatment unit. However, neither respiration management nor intravenous contrast is commonly used during cone-beam CT (CBCT) image acquisition for alignment prior to radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigate the potential gains of injecting an iodinated contrast agent in combination with respiration management during CBCT acquisition for liver tumor radiotherapy. Methods: Five rabbits with implanted liver tumors were subjected to CBCT with and without motion management and contrast injection. The acquired CBCT images were registered to the planning CT to determine alignment accuracy and dosimetric impact. The authors developed a simulation tool for simulating contrast-enhanced CBCT images from dynamic contrast enhanced CT imaging (DCE-CT) to determine optimal contrast injection protocols. The tool was validated against contrast-enhanced CBCT of the rabbit subjects and was used for five human patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results: In the rabbit experiment, when neither motion management nor contrast was used, tumor centroid misalignment between planning image and CBCT was 9.2 mm. This was reduced to 2.8 mm when both techniques were employed. Tumors were not visualized in clinical CBCT images of human subjects. Simulated contrast-enhanced CBCT was found to improve tumor contrast in all subjects. Different patients were found to require different contrast injections to maximize tumor contrast. Conclusions: Based on the authors’ animal study, respiration managed contrast enhanced CBCT improves IGRT significantly. Contrast enhanced CBCT benefits from patient specific tracer kinetics determined from DCE-CT.

  1. Intravital imaging of embryonic and tumor neovasculature using viral nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hon Sing; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Ablack, Amber; Destito, Giuseppe; Zijlstra, Andries; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Manchester, Marianne; Lewis, John D

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles are a novel class of biomolecular agents that take advantage of the natural circulatory and targeting properties of viruses to allow the development of therapeutics, vaccines and imaging tools. We have developed a multivalent nanoparticle platform based on the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) that facilitates particle labeling at high density with fluorescent dyes and other functional groups. Compared with other technologies, CPMV-based viral nanoparticles are particularly suited for long-term intravital vascular imaging because of their biocompatibility and retention in the endothelium with minimal side effects. The stable, long-term labeling of the endothelium allows the identification of vasculature undergoing active remodeling in real time. In this study, we describe the synthesis, purification and fluorescent labeling of cpMV nanoparticles, along with their use for imaging of vascular structure and for intravital vascular mapping in developmental and tumor angiogenesis models. Dye-labeled viral nanoparticles can be synthesized and purified in a single day, and imaging studies can be conducted over hours, days or weeks, depending on the application. PMID:20671724

  2. An "imaging-biopsy" strategy for colorectal tumor reconfirmation by multipurpose paramagnetic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiaohong; Zhang, Bingbo; Wang, Xiaohui; Liu, Fengjun; Shi, Donglu; Cheng, Yingsheng

    2015-04-01

    Glucose transporter1 (Glut1) plays important roles in treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) involving early-stage diagnosis, subtype, TNM stage, and therapeutic schedule. Currently, in situ marking and tracking of the tumor biomarkers via clinical imaging remains great challenges in early stage CRC diagnosis. In this study, we have developed a unique cell-targeted, paramagnetic-fluorescent double-signal molecular nanoprobe for CRC in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis and subsequent biopsy. The unique molecular nanoprobe is composed of a fluorescent quantum dot (QD) core; a coating layer of paramagnetic DTPA-Gd coupled BSA ((Gd)DTPA∙BSA), and a surface targeting moiety of anti-Glut1 polyclonal antibody. The engineered (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb is 35 nm in diameter and colloidally stable under both basic and acidic conditions. It exhibits strong fluorescent intensities and high relaxivity (r1 and r2: 16.561 and 27.702 s(-1) per mM of Gd(3+)). Distribution and expression of Glut1 of CRC cells are investigated by in vitro cellular confocal fluorescent imaging and MR scanning upon treating with the (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb nanoprobes. In vivo MRI shows real-time imaging of CRC tumor on nude mice after intravenously injection of the (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb nanoprobes. Ex vivo biopsy is subsequently conducted for expression of Glut1 on tumor tissues. These nanoprobes are found biocompatible in vitro and in vivo. (Gd)DTPA∙BSA@QDs-PcAb targeted nanoprobe is shown to be a promising agent for CRC cancer in vivo MRI diagnosis and ex vivo biopsy analysis. The "imaging-biopsy" is a viable strategy for tumor reconfirmation with improved diagnostic accuracy and biopsy in personalized treatment.

  3. First Application of 7-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery of Skull Base Tumors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Thomas F; Dyvorne, Hadrien A; Padormo, Francesco; Pawha, Puneet S; Delman, Bradley N; Shrivastava, Raj K; Balchandani, Priti

    2017-07-01

    Successful endoscopic endonasal surgery for the resection of skull base tumors is reliant on preoperative imaging to delineate pathology from the surrounding anatomy. The increased signal-to-noise ratio afforded by 7-T MRI can be used to increase spatial and contrast resolution, which may lend itself to improved imaging of the skull base. In this study, we apply a 7-T imaging protocol to patients with skull base tumors and compare the images with clinical standard of care. Images were acquired at 7 T on 11 patients with skull base lesions. Two neuroradiologists evaluated clinical 1.5-, 3-, and 7-T scans for detection of intracavernous cranial nerves and internal carotid artery (ICA) branches. Detection rates were compared. Images were used for surgical planning and uploaded to a neuronavigation platform and used to guide surgery. Image analysis yielded improved detection rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7 T. The 7-T images were successfully incorporated into preoperative planning and intraoperative neuronavigation. Our study represents the first application of 7-T MRI to the full neurosurgical workflow for endoscopic endonasal surgery. We detected higher rates of cranial nerves and ICA branches at 7-T MRI compared with 3- and 1.5-T MRI, and found that integration of 7 T into surgical planning and guidance was feasible. These results suggest a potential for 7-T MRI to reduce surgical complications. Future studies comparing standardized 7-, 3-, and 1.5-T MRI protocols in a larger number of patients are warranted to determine the relative benefit of 7-T MRI for endonasal endoscopic surgical efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of Metastatic Breast Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression Using Dual Optical/SPECT Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    the whole body image the prominent light source is the heart as the polymer . Agent washout produces a strong signal in the bladder.is a vascular...breast cancer tumor grows in the mammary fat pad, a whole body image shows anatomic details as well as the tumor; a higher magnification image reveals

  5. An improved imaging method for extended targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Songming; Zhang, Sui

    2017-03-01

    When we use direct imaging methods for solving inverse scattering problems, we observe artificial lines which make it hard to determine the shape of targets. We propose a signal space test to study the cause of the artificial lines and we use multiple frequency data to reduce the effect from them. Finally, we use the active contour without edges (ACWE) method to further improve the imaging results. The final reconstruction is accurate and robust. The computational cost is lower than iterative imaging methods which need to solve the forward problem in each iteration.

  6. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  7. Postictal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes Masquerading as Brain Tumor Progression: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Pirio, Anastasie M.; Billakota, Santoshi; Peters, Katherine B.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common among patients with brain tumors. Transient, postictal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities are a long recognized phenomenon. However, these radiographic changes are not as well studied in the brain tumor population. Moreover, reversible neuroimaging abnormalities following seizure activity may be misinterpreted for tumor progression and could consequently result in unnecessary tumor-directed treatment. Here, we describe two cases of patients with brain tumors who developed peri-ictal pseudoprogression and review the relevant literature. PMID:27462237

  8. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  9. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  10. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  11. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C

    2016-07-13

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  12. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  13. Classification of Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors in Ultrasound Images with Posterior Acoustic Shadowing Using Half-Contour Features.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wu, Shuicai; Chang, King-Jen; Chen, Wei-Ren; Chen, Yung-Sheng; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    Posterior acoustic shadowing (PAS) can bias breast tumor segmentation and classification in ultrasound images. In this paper, half-contour features are proposed to classify benign and malignant breast tumors with PAS, considering the fact that the upper half of the tumor contour is less affected by PAS. Adaptive thresholding and disk expansion are employed to detect tumor contours. Based on the detected full contour, the upper half contour is extracted. For breast tumor classification, six quantitative feature parameters are analyzed for both full contours and half contours, including standard deviation of degree (SDD), which is proposed to describe tumor irregularity. Fifty clinical cases (40 with PAS and 10 without PAS) were used. Tumor circularity (TC) and SDD were both effective full- and half-contour parameters in classifying images without PAS. Half-contour TC [74 % accuracy, 72 % sensitivity, 76 % specificity, 0.78 area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), p > 0.05] significantly improved the classification of breast tumors with PAS compared to that with full-contour TC (54 % accuracy, 56 % sensitivity, 52 % specificity, 0.52 AUC, p > 0.05). Half-contour SDD (72 % accuracy, 76 % sensitivity, 68 % specificity, 0.81 AUC, p < 0.05) improved the classification of breast tumors with PAS compared to that with full-contour SDD (62 % accuracy, 80 % sensitivity, 44 % specificity, 0.61 AUC, p > 0.05). The proposed half-contour TC and SDD may be useful in classifying benign and malignant breast tumors in ultrasound images affected by PAS.

  14. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-02-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  15. FDG-PET imaging in patients with pulmonary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Moore, William; Freiberg, Evan; Bishawi, Muath; Halbreiner, Micheal S; Matthews, Robert; Baram, Daniel; Bilfinger, Thomas V

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the imaging findings in patients with pathologically proven carcinoid tumors and determine if SUV can help to differentiate typical from atypical (more aggressive) pulmonary carcinoid tumors. A retrospective review of patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of a pulmonary carcinoid tumor at our institution from 2002 to 2010 that had a preoperative PET scan was performed after institutional review board approval was obtained. PET results, including SUV uptake and location, were recorded as well as all data from pathology reports. Carcinoids were considered to be more aggressive if they showed pathological diagnosis consistent with atypical carcinoid, lymph node invasion, poor histological grade (poorly differentiated), or evidence of systemic metastases. Atypical carcinoid pathology consisted of focal necrosis or a higher mitotic index (2-10 per square millimeter) with features of nests, trabeculae, pleomorphic cells, or dense hyperchromasia. SUV uptake was then evaluated and compared between the typical and atypical carcinoid groups using nonparametric statistical methods. We identified 29 patients from 2002 to 2010 at our institution with a pathological diagnosis of pulmonary carcinoid. Twenty-three were histopathologically typical, and the other 6 showed atypia. Mean (SD) nodule size was 2.4 (1.3) cm in the typical group versus 5.0 (3.2) cm in the atypical group (P = 0.065). Mean (SD) SUV uptake in the typical carcinoid group was 2.7 (1.6) and in the atypical group the SUV was 8.1 (4.1) (P < 0.01). A cutoff SUV of 6 or greater is predictive of malignancy (odds ratio, 23.6; P < 0.01), as well as a nodule size of 3.5 cm or greater (odds ratio, 5.1; P = 0.024). Preoperative PET imaging result is frequently positive in carcinoid tumors, and the biological behavior correlates well with SUV; however, size is not as strong of a predictor of malignancy. Size of 3.5 cm or greater and SUV of 6 or greater have a predictive value of greater than 95

  16. Evolution of bombesin conjugates for targeted PET imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwen; Abiraj, Keelara; Thorek, Daniel L J; Waser, Beatrice; Smith-Jones, Peter M; Honer, Michael; Reubi, Jean Claude; Maecke, Helmut R

    2012-01-01

    Bombesin receptors are under intense investigation as molecular targets since they are overexpressed in several prevalent solid tumors. We rationally designed and synthesized a series of modified bombesin (BN) peptide analogs to study the influence of charge and spacers at the N-terminus, as well as amino acid substitutions, on both receptor binding affinity and pharmacokinetics. This enabled development of a novel (64/67)Cu-labeled BN peptide for PET imaging and targeted radiotherapy of BN receptor-positive tumors. Our results show that N-terminally positively charged peptide ligands had significantly higher affinity to human gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) than negatively charged or uncharged ligands (IC(50): 3.2±0.5 vs 26.3±3.5 vs 41.5±2.5 nM). The replacement of Nle(14) by Met, and deletion of D-Tyr(6), further resulted in 8-fold higher affinity. Contrary to significant changes to human GRPr binding, modifications at the N-terminal and at the 6(th), 11(th), and 14(th) position of BN induced only slight influences on affinity to mouse GRPr. [Cu(II)]-CPTA-[βAla(11)] BN(7-14) ([Cu(II)]-BZH7) showed the highest internalization rate into PC-3 cells with relatively slow efflux because of its subnanomolar affinity to GRPr. Interestingly, [(64/67)Cu]-BZH7 also displayed similar affinities to the other 2 human BN receptor subtypes. In vivo studies showed that [(64/67)Cu]-BZH7 had a high accumulation in PC-3 xenografts and allowed for clear-cut visualization of the tumor in PET imaging. In addition, a CPTA-glycine derivative, forming a hippurane-type spacer, enhanced kidney clearance of the radiotracer. These data indicate that the species variation of BN receptor plays an important role in screening radiolabeled BN. As well, the positive charge from the metallated complex at the N-terminal significantly increases affinity to human GRPr. Application of these observations enabled the novel ligand [(64/67)Cu]-BZH7 to clearly visualize PC-3 tumors in vivo

  17. Pediatric soft-tissue tumors and pseudo-tumors: MR imaging features with pathologic correlation: part 1. Imaging approach, pseudotumors, vascular lesions, and adipocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Oscar M; Laffan, Eoghan E; Ngan, Bo-Yee

    2009-01-01

    A wide spectrum of entities may give rise to soft-tissue masses in children, including benign and malignant tumors, pseudotumors, and both neoplastic and nonneoplastic vascular lesions. Because of its excellent tissue contrast, multiplanar capability, and lack of ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of deep and large soft-tissue masses in children. In the vast majority of cases, however, accurate interpretation of the MR imaging findings requires correlation with the clinical findings. For example, in most posttraumatic and inflammatory pseudotumors, the clinical history is fundamental to establishing the diagnosis. In the evaluation of periarticular cysts, the location of the mass and its relationship to a joint are crucial for diagnosis, whereas in the evaluation of vascular lesions, including hemangiomas and vascular malformations, clinical findings combined with MR imaging findings are needed for accurate diagnosis in most cases. The identification of fat within adipocytic tumors is useful, but tissue biopsy may be required for final diagnosis. Nevertheless, MR imaging is useful in determining the origin and character of pediatric soft-tissue masses, defining their extent and their relationship to adjacent structures, and performing posttherapy follow-up.

  18. Imaging of head and neck tumors with technetium(V)-99m DMSA. A new tumor-seeking agent

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Endo, K.; Fujita, T.; Nakashima, T.; Sakahara, H.; Torizuka, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Ishii, Y.; Makimoto, K.; Hata, N.

    1985-12-01

    Tumor scintigraphy, using Tc(V)-99m DMSA was performed on 76 patients with head and neck tumors. In 32 cases, SPECT also was performed. Tc(V)-99m DMSA was found to have a sensitivity of 75% (56 cases), a specificity of 85% (20 cases) and an accuracy of 78% on planar imaging. ECT studies showed accumulation of Tc(V)-99m DMSA in all 25 malignant cases studied. However, in benign tumors, four of seven cases (57%) showed radionuclide uptake. Tc(V)-99m DMSA has superior physical properties to Ga-67 and could be of use in the diagnosis of head and neck tumors.

  19. In Vivo Targeting and Imaging of Tumor Vasculature with Radiolabeled, Antibody-Conjugated Nano-Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Feng, Liangzhu; Yang, Yunan; Nayak, Tapas R.; Goel, Shreya; Bean, Jero; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Liu, Zhuang; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that nano-graphene can be specifically directed to the tumor neovasculature in vivo through targeting of CD105 (i.e. endoglin), a vascular marker for tumor angiogenesis. The covalently functionalized nano-graphene oxide (GO) exhibited excellent stability and target specificity. Pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting efficacy of the GO conjugates were investigated with serial non-invasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies, which were validated by in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo experiments. The incorporation of an active targeting ligand (TRC105, a monoclonal antibody that binds to CD105) led to significantly improved tumor uptake of functionalized GO, which was specific for the neovasculature with little extravasation, warranting future investigation of these GO conjugates for cancer-targeted drug delivery and/or photothermal therapy to enhance therapeutic efficacy. Since poor extravasation is a major hurdle for nanomaterial-based tumor targeting in vivo, this study also establishes CD105 as a promising vascular target for future cancer nanomedicine. PMID:22339280

  20. Improving Performance During Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James R.; Tabriz, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective Image-guided procedures have become a mainstay of modern health care. This article reviews how human operators process imaging data and use it to plan procedures and make intraprocedural decisions. Methods A series of models from human factors research, communication theory, and organizational learning were applied to the human-machine interface that occupies the center stage during image-guided procedures. Results Together, these models suggest several opportunities for improving performance as follows: 1. Performance will depend not only on the operator’s skill but also on the knowledge embedded in the imaging technology, available tools, and existing protocols. 2. Voluntary movements consist of planning and execution phases. Performance subscores should be developed that assess quality and efficiency during each phase. For procedures involving ionizing radiation (fluoroscopy and computed tomography), radiation metrics can be used to assess performance. 3. At a basic level, these procedures consist of advancing a tool to a specific location within a patient and using the tool. Paradigms from mapping and navigation should be applied to image-guided procedures. 4. Recording the content of the imaging system allows one to reconstruct the stimulus/response cycles that occur during image-guided procedures. Conclusions When compared with traditional “open” procedures, the technology used during image-guided procedures places an imaging system and long thin tools between the operator and the patient. Taking a step back and reexamining how information flows through an imaging system and how actions are conveyed through human-machine interfaces suggest that much can be learned from studying system failures. In the same way that flight data recorders revolutionized accident investigations in aviation, much could be learned from recording video data during image-guided procedures. PMID:24921628

  1. Intravital imaging of multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment through skin-fold window chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Shuhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Tumor immune microenvironment became very important for the tumor immunotherapy. There were several kinds of immune cells in tumor stromal, and they played very different roles in tumor growth. In order to observe the behaviors of multiple immune cells in tumor microenvironment and the interaction between immune cells and tumor cells at the same time, we generated a multicolor-labeled tumor immune microenvironment model. The tumor cells and immune cells were labeled by different fluorescent proteins. By using of skin-fold window chamber implanted into mice and intravital imaging technology, we could dynamically observe the different immune cells in tumor microenvironment. After data analysis from the video, we could know the behavior of TILs, DCs and Tregs in tumor immune microenvironment; furthermore, we could know these immune cells play different roles in the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Endothelial cell targeted molecular imaging in tumor angiogenesis: strategies and current status.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Zeng, Yun; Liu, Yanhong; Liu, Gang; Ai, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays crucial roles in tumor growth, progression and metastasis. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of tumor neovasculature is a fundamental prerequisite for effective therapeutic intervention, particularly anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. Emerging molecular imaging techniques now allow recognition of cellular/molecular processes before gross pathological changes, leading to better understanding of fundamental biological processes of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we will summarize recent progresses on molecular imaging of attractive biochemical epitopes in tumor angiogenesis, especially the endothelial cell targets-based imaging probes.

  3. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Shen, Shuming; Harris, Eleanor; Wang, Zheng; Jiang, Wei; Guo, Yu; Feng, Yuanming

    2014-01-01

    To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors. A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT) and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET) image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV), the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC), and the local standard deviation (SDlocal). Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation. The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09) and 0.07(± 0.01) for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm) and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm) with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00) with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method. With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  4. A Bayesian approach for three-dimensional markerless tumor tracking using kV imaging during lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Caillet, Vincent; Dunbar, Michelle; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Feain, Ilana

    2017-04-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers can potentially enable broad access to more accurate and precise lung radiotherapy. A major challenge is that kilovoltage (kV) imaging based methods are rarely able to continuously track the tumor due to the inferior tumor visibility on 2D kV images. Another challenge is the estimation of 3D tumor position based on only 2D imaging information. The aim of this work is to address both challenges by proposing a Bayesian approach for markerless tumor tracking for the first time. The proposed approach adopts the framework of the extended Kalman filter, which combines a prediction and measurement steps to make the optimal tumor position update. For each imaging frame, the tumor position is first predicted by a respiratory-correlated model. The 2D tumor position on the kV image is then measured by template matching. Finally, the prediction and 2D measurement are combined based on the 3D distribution of tumor positions in the past 10 s and the estimated uncertainty of template matching. To investigate the clinical feasibility of the proposed method, a total of 13 lung cancer patient datasets were used for retrospective validation, including 11 cone-beam CT scan pairs and two stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy cases. The ground truths for tumor motion were generated from the the 3D trajectories of implanted markers or beacons. The mean, standard deviation, and 95th percentile of the 3D tracking error were found to range from 1.6–2.9 mm, 0.6–1.5 mm, and 2.6–5.8 mm, respectively. Markerless tumor tracking always resulted in smaller errors compared to the standard of care. The improvement was the most pronounced in the superior–inferior (SI) direction, with up to 9.5 mm reduction in the 95th-percentile SI error for patients with  >10 mm 5th-to-95th percentile SI tumor motion. The percentage of errors with 3D magnitude  <5 mm was 96.5% for markerless tumor tracking and 84.1% for the

  5. Using computer-extracted image phenotypes from tumors on breast magnetic resonance imaging to predict breast cancer pathologic stage.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Elizabeth S; Drukker, Karen; Li, Hui; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Zuley, Margarita; Ganott, Marie; Net, Jose M; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Brandt, Kathleen R; Whitman, Gary J; Conzen, Suzanne D; Lan, Li; Ji, Yuan; Zhu, Yitan; Jaffe, Carl C; Huang, Erich P; Freymann, John B; Kirby, Justin S; Morris, Elizabeth A; Giger, Maryellen L

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that computer-extracted image phenotypes (CEIPs) of biopsy-proven breast cancer on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately predict pathologic stage. The authors used a data set of deidentified breast MRIs organized by the National Cancer Institute in The Cancer Imaging Archive. In total, 91 biopsy-proven breast cancers were analyzed from patients who had information available on pathologic stage (stage I, n = 22; stage II, n = 58; stage III, n = 11) and surgically verified lymph node status (negative lymph nodes, n = 46; ≥ 1 positive lymph node, n = 44; no lymph nodes examined, n = 1). Tumors were characterized according to 1) radiologist-measured size and 2) CEIP. Then, models were built that combined 2 CEIPs to predict tumor pathologic stage and lymph node involvement, and the models were evaluated in a leave-1-out, cross-validation analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as the value of interest. Tumor size was the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage, but CEIPs that captured biologic behavior also emerged as predictive (eg, stage I and II vs stage III demonstrated an AUC of 0.83). No size measure was successful in the prediction of positive lymph nodes, but adding a CEIP that described tumor "homogeneity" significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.62; P = .003) compared with chance. The current results indicate that MRI phenotypes have promise for predicting breast cancer pathologic stage and lymph node status. Cancer 2016;122:748-757. © 2015 American Cancer Society. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for brain tumor image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yinghua; Hatami, Nisa; Yee, Matthew; Phipps, Jennifer; Elson, Daniel S.; Gorin, Fredric; Schrot, Rudolph J.; Marcu, Laura

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the application of an endoscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system to the intraoperative diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The clinically compatible FLIM prototype integrates a gated (down to 0.2 ns) intensifier imaging system with a fiber-bundle (fiber image guide of 0.5 mm diameter, 10,000 fibers with a gradient index lens objective 0.5 NA, and 4 mm field of view) to provide intraoperative access to the surgical field. Experiments conducted in three patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor resection demonstrate that FLIM-derived parameters allow for delineation of tumor from normal cortex. For example, at 460+/-25-nm wavelength band emission corresponding to NADH/NADPH fluorescence, GBM exhibited a weaker florescence intensity (35% less, p-value <0.05) and a longer lifetime τGBM-Amean=1.59+/-0.24 ns than normal cortex τNC-Amean=1.28+/-0.04 ns (p-value <0.005). Current results demonstrate the potential use of FLIM as a tool for image-guided surgery of brain tumors.

  7. Single Image Dehazing for Visibility Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; Ji, D.

    2015-08-01

    Images captured in foggy weather conditions often suffer from poor visibility, which will create a lot of impacts on the outdoor computer vision systems, such as video surveillance, intelligent transportation assistance system, remote sensing space cameras and so on. In this paper, we propose a new transmission estimated method to improve the visibility of single input image (with fog or haze), as well as the image's details. Our approach stems from two important statistical observations about haze-free images and the haze itself. First, the famous dark channel prior, a statistics of the haze-free outdoor images, can be used to estimate the thickness of the haze; and second, gradient prior law of transmission maps, which is based on dark channel prior. By integrating these two priors, to estimate the unknown scene transmission map is modeled into a TV-regularization optimization problem. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can effectively improve the visibility and keep the details of fog degraded images in the meanwhile.

  8. Adaptive Radiotherapy Planning on Decreasing Gross Tumor Volumes as Seen on Megavoltage Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav Dar, A. Rashid; Bauman, Glenn; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) changes for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer by using daily megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT) studies acquired before each treatment fraction on helical tomotherapy and to relate the potential benefit of adaptive image-guided radiotherapy to changes in GTV. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were prescribed 30 fractions of radiotherapy on helical tomotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer at London Regional Cancer Program from Dec 2005 to March 2007. The GTV was contoured on the daily MVCT studies of each patient. Adapted plans were created using merged MVCT-kilovoltage CT image sets to investigate the advantages of replanning for patients with differing GTV regression characteristics. Results: Average GTV change observed over 30 fractions was -38%, ranging from -12 to -87%. No significant correlation was observed between GTV change and patient's physical or tumor features. Patterns of GTV changes in the 17 patients could be divided broadly into three groups with distinctive potential for benefit from adaptive planning. Conclusions: Changes in GTV are difficult to predict quantitatively based on patient or tumor characteristics. If changes occur, there are points in time during the treatment course when it may be appropriate to adapt the plan to improve sparing of normal tissues. If GTV decreases by greater than 30% at any point in the first 20 fractions of treatment, adaptive planning is appropriate to further improve the therapeutic ratio.

  9. Multiscale imaging and computational modeling of blood flow in the tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eugene; Stamatelos, Spyros; Cebulla, Jana; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Popel, Aleksander S; Pathak, Arvind P

    2012-11-01

    The evolution in our understanding of tumor angiogenesis has been the result of pioneering imaging and computational modeling studies spanning the endothelial cell, microvasculature and tissue levels. Many of these primary data on the tumor vasculature are in the form of images from pre-clinical tumor models that provide a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information in many dimensions and across different spatial scales. However, until recently, the visualization of changes in the tumor vasculature across spatial scales remained a challenge due to a lack of techniques for integrating micro- and macroscopic imaging data. Furthermore, the paucity of three-dimensional (3-D) tumor vascular data in conjunction with the challenges in obtaining such data from patients presents a serious hurdle for the development and validation of predictive, multiscale computational models of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the development of multiscale models of tumor angiogenesis, new imaging techniques capable of reproducing the 3-D tumor vascular architecture with high fidelity, and the emergence of "image-based models" of tumor blood flow and molecular transport. Collectively, these developments are helping us gain a fundamental understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of tumor angiogenesis that will benefit the development of new cancer therapies. Eventually, we expect this exciting integration of multiscale imaging and mathematical modeling to have widespread application beyond the tumor vasculature to other diseases involving a pathological vasculature, such as stroke and spinal cord injury.

  10. Multiscale Imaging and Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eugene; Stamatelos, Spyros; Cebulla, Jana; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution in our understanding of tumor angiogenesis has been the result of pioneering imaging and computational modeling studies spanning the endothelial cell, microvasculature and tissue levels. Many of these primary data on the tumor vasculature are in the form of images from pre-clinical tumor models that provide a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information in many dimensions and across different spatial scales. However, until recently, the visualization of changes in the tumor vasculature across spatial scales remained a challenge due to a lack of techniques for integrating micro- and macroscopic imaging data. Furthermore, the paucity of three-dimensional (3-D) tumor vascular data in conjunction with the challenges in obtaining such data from patients presents a serious hurdle for the development and validation of predictive, multiscale computational models of tumor angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the development of multiscale models of tumor angiogenesis, new imaging techniques capable of reproducing the 3-D tumor vascular architecture with high fidelity, and the emergence of “image-based models”of tumor blood flow and molecular transport. Collectively, these developments are helping us gain a fundamental understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of tumor angiogenesis that will benefit the development of new cancer therapies. Eventually, we expect this exciting integration of multiscale imaging and mathematical modeling to have widespread application beyond the tumor vasculature to other diseases involving a pathological vasculature, such as stroke and spinal cord injury. PMID:22565817

  11. Modeling and quantifying biochemical changes in C6 tumor gliomas by Fourier transform infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Beljebbar, Abdelilah; Amharref, Nadia; Lévèques, Antoine; Dukic, Sylvain; Venteo, Lydie; Schneider, Laurence; Pluot, Michel; Manfait, Michel

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate molecular changes associated with glioma tissues using FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging (FT-IRM). A multivariate statistical analysis allowed one to successfully discriminate between normal, tumoral, peri-tumoral, and necrotic tissue structures. Structural changes were mainly related to qualitative and quantitative changes in lipid content, proteins, and nucleic acids that can be used as spectroscopic markers for this pathology. We have developed a spectroscopic model of glioma to quantify these chemical changes. The model constructed includes individual FT-IR spectra of normal and glioma brain constituents such as lipids, DNA, and proteins (measured on delipidized tissue). Modeling of FT-IR spectra yielded fit coefficients reflecting the chemical changes associated with a tumor. Our results demonstrate the ability of FT-IRM to assess the importance and distribution of each individual constituent and its variation in normal brain structures as well as in the different pathological states of glioma. We demonstrated that (i) cholesterol and phosphatidylethanolamine contributions are highest in corpus callosum and anterior commissure but decrease gradually towards the cortex surface as well as in the tumor, (ii) phosphatidylcholine contribution is highest in the cortex and decreases in the tumor, (iii) galactocerebroside is localized only in white, but not in gray matter, and decreases in the vital tumor region while the necrosis area shows a higher concentration of this cerebroside, (iv) DNA and oleic acid increase in the tumor as compared to gray matter. This approach could, in the future, contribute to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve the grading, prognosis, and play a vital role in therapeutic strategy and monitoring.

  12. Characterization of the Tumor Microenvironment and Tumor–Stroma Interaction by Non-invasive Preclinical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ackerstaff, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Tumors are often characterized by hypoxia, vascular abnormalities, low extracellular pH, increased interstitial fluid pressure, altered choline-phospholipid metabolism, and aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect). The impact of these tumor characteristics has been investigated extensively in the context of tumor development, progression, and treatment response, resulting in a number of non-invasive imaging biomarkers. More recent evidence suggests that cancer cells undergo metabolic reprograming, beyond aerobic glycolysis, in the course of tumor development and progression. The resulting altered metabolic content in tumors has the ability to affect cell signaling and block cellular differentiation. Additional emerging evidence reveals that the interaction between tumor and stroma cells can alter tumor metabolism (leading to metabolic reprograming) as well as tumor growth and vascular features. This review will summarize previous and current preclinical, non-invasive, multimodal imaging efforts to characterize the tumor microenvironment, including its stromal components and understand tumor–stroma interaction in cancer development, progression, and treatment response. PMID:28197395

  13. Markerless EPID image guided dynamic multi-leaf collimator tracking for lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottmann, J.; Keall, P.; Berbeco, R.

    2013-06-01

    Compensation of target motion during the delivery of radiotherapy has the potential to improve treatment accuracy, dose conformity and sparing of healthy tissue. We implement an online image guided therapy system based on soft tissue localization (STiL) of the target from electronic portal images and treatment aperture adaptation with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC). The treatment aperture is moved synchronously and in real time with the tumor during the entire breathing cycle. The system is implemented and tested on a Varian TX clinical linear accelerator featuring an AS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquiring images at a frame rate of 12.86 Hz throughout the treatment. A position update cycle for the treatment aperture consists of four steps: in the first step at time t = t0 a frame is grabbed, in the second step the frame is processed with the STiL algorithm to get the tumor position at t = t0, in a third step the tumor position at t = ti + δt is predicted to overcome system latencies and in the fourth step, the DMLC control software calculates the required leaf motions and applies them at time t = ti + δt. The prediction model is trained before the start of the treatment with data representing the tumor motion. We analyze the system latency with a dynamic chest phantom (4D motion phantom, Washington University). We estimate the average planar position deviation between target and treatment aperture in a clinical setting by driving the phantom with several lung tumor trajectories (recorded from fiducial tracking during radiotherapy delivery to the lung). DMLC tracking for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy without fiducial markers was successfully demonstrated. The inherent system latency is found to be δt = (230 ± 11) ms for a MV portal image acquisition frame rate of 12.86 Hz. The root mean square deviation between tumor and aperture position is smaller than 1 mm. We demonstrate the feasibility of real-time markerless DMLC

  14. Markerless EPID image guided dynamic multi-leaf collimator tracking for lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rottmann, J.; Keall, P.; Berbeco, R.

    2014-01-01

    Compensation of target motion during the delivery of radiotherapy has the potential to improve treatment accuracy, dose conformity and sparing of healthy tissue. We implement an online image guided therapy system based on soft tissue localization (STiL) of the target from electronic portal images and treatment aperture adaptation with a dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC). The treatment aperture is moved synchronously and in real-time with the tumor during the entire breathing cycle. The system is implemented and tested on a Varian TX clinical linear accelerator featuring an AS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) acquiring images at a frame rate of 12.86 Hz throughout the treatment. A position update cycle for the treatment aperture consists of 4 steps: in the first step at time t = t0 a frame is grabbed, in the second step the frame is processed with the STiL algorithm to get the tumor position at t = t0, in a third step the tumor position at t = t + δt is predicted to overcome system latencies and in the fourth step, the DMLC control software calculates the required leaf motions and applies them at time t = t + δt. The prediction model is trained before the start of the treatment with data representing the tumor motion. We analyze the system latency with a dynamic chest phantom (4D motion phantom, Washington University). We estimate the average planar position deviation between target and treatment aperture in a clinical setting by driving the phantom with several lung tumor trajectories (recorded from fiducial tracking during radiotherapy delivery to the lung). DMLC tracking for lung SBRT without fiducial markers was successfully demonstrated. The inherent system latency is found to be δt = (230 ± 11) ms for a MV portal image acquisition frame rate of 12.86 Hz. The root mean square deviation between tumor and aperture position is smaller than 1 mm. We demonstrate the feasibility of real-time markerless DMLC tracking with a standard LINAC

  15. Helping Improve a Child's Self-Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divney, Esther P.

    This document reviews a doctoral dissertation on the self-concepts of Negro children for suggestions teachers can use in the classroom to improve the self-images of their own students. Many psychologists and educators view the attitudes and conceptions that the child has about himself as the central factor in his personality, and studies have…

  16. MRI-aided tissues interface characterization: An accurate signal propagation time calculation method for UWB breast tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Xiao, Xia; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2016-12-01

    Radar-based ultrawideband (UWB) microwave imaging is expected to be a safe, low-cost tool for breast cancer detection. However, since radar wave travels at different speeds in different tissues, propagation time is hard to be estimated in heterogeneous breast. Wrongly estimated propagation time leads to error of tumor location in resulting image, aka imaging error. In this paper, we develop a magnetic resonance imaging-aided (MRI-aided) propagation time calculation technique which is independent from radar imaging system but can help decrease the imaging error. The technique can eliminate the influence of the rough interface between fat layer and gland layer in breast and get relative accurate thicknesses of two layers. The propagation time in each layer is calculated and summed. The summed propagation time is used in Confocal imaging algorithm to increase the accuracy of resulting image. 25 patients' breast models with glands of varying size are classified into four categories for imaging simulation tests. Imaging accuracy in terms of tumor location along x-direction has been improved for 21 among 25 cases, as a result, overall around 50% improvement compared to conventional UWB imaging.

  17. Development of human serum albumin conjugated with near-infrared dye for photoacoustic tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazaki, Kengo; Sano, Kohei; Makino, Akira; Takahashi, Atsushi; Deguchi, Jun; Ohashi, Manami; Temma, Takashi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has emerged as a noninvasive diagnostic method which detects ultrasonic waves thermoelastically induced by optical absorbers irradiated with laser. For tumor diagnosis, PA contrast agent has been proposed to enhance the PA effect for detecting tumors sensitively. Here, we prepared a human serum albumin (HSA) conjugated with indocyanine green (ICG) as a PA contrast agent allowing enhanced permeability and retention effect for sensitive tumor imaging. The feasibility of PA imaging with HSA-ICG to detect allografted tumors was evaluated in tumor-bearing mice. In vivo fluorescence imaging and radiolabeled biodistribution study showed that the biodistribution dramatically changed as the number of ICG bound to HSA increased, and the maximum accumulation of ICG was achieved when around three ICG molecules were loaded on an HSA. In vivo PA imaging demonstrated a tumor-selective and dose-dependent increase of PA signal intensity in mice injected with HSA-ICG (R2=0.88, 387% increase for HSA-ICG, 104 nmol ICG). In conclusion, HSA-ICG clearly visualized the allografted tumors with high tumor-to-background ratios having high quantitative and spatial resolution for the sensitive PA imaging of tumors. HSA-ICG could be useful as a favorable contrast agent for PA tumor imaging for the management of cancer.

  18. Near-infrared fluorescence heptamethine carbocyanine dyes mediate imaging and targeted drug delivery for human brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Xu, Qijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qinlong; Yu, John S.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors and brain metastases are among the deadliest malignancies of all human cancers, largely due to the cellular blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers that limit the delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents from the systemic circulation to tumors. Thus, improved strategies for brain tumor visualization and targeted treatment are critically needed. Here we identified and synthesized a group of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes and derivative NIRF dye-drug conjugates for effective imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin in mice, which is mechanistically mediated by tumor hypoxia and organic aniontransporting polypeptide genes. We also demonstrate that these dyes, when conjugated to chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine, significantly restricted the growth of both intracranial glioma xenografts and prostate tumor brain metastases and prolonged survival in mice. These results show promise in the application of NIRF dyes as novel theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of brain tumors. PMID:26197410

  19. Near-infrared fluorescence heptamethine carbocyanine dyes mediate imaging and targeted drug delivery for human brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Xu, Qijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qinlong; Yu, John S; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumors and brain metastases are among the deadliest malignancies of all human cancers, largely due to the cellular blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers that limit the delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents from the systemic circulation to tumors. Thus, improved strategies for brain tumor visualization and targeted treatment are critically needed. Here we identified and synthesized a group of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes and derivative NIRF dye-drug conjugates for effective imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin in mice, which is mechanistically mediated by tumor hypoxia and organic anion-transporting polypeptide genes. We also demonstrate that these dyes, when conjugated to chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine, significantly restricted the growth of both intracranial glioma xenografts and prostate tumor brain metastases and prolonged survival in mice. These results show promise in the application of NIRF dyes as novel theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of brain tumors.

  20. SU-E-J-108: Template Matching Based On Multiple Templates Can Improve the Tumor Tracking Performance When There Is Large Tumor Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X; Lin, J; Diwanji, T; Mooney, K; D'Souza, W; Mistry, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recently, template matching has been shown to be able to track tumor motion on cine-MRI images. However, artifacts such as deformation, rotation, and/or out-of-plane movement could seriously degrade the performance of this technique. In this work, we demonstrate the utility of multiple templates derived from different phases of tumor motion in reducing the negative effects of artifacts and improving the accuracy of template matching methods. Methods: Data from 2 patients with large tumors and significant tumor deformation were analyzed from a group of 12 patients from an earlier study. Cine-MRI (200 frames) imaging was performed while the patients were instructed to breathe normally. Ground truth tumor position was established on each frame manually by a radiation oncologist. Tumor positions were also automatically determined using template matching with either single or multiple (5) templates. The tracking errors, defined as the absolute differences in tumor positions determined by the manual and automated methods, when using either single or multiple templates were compared in both the AP and SI directions, respectively. Results: Using multiple templates reduced the tracking error of template matching. In the SI direction where the tumor movement and deformation were significant, the mean tracking error decreased from 1.94 mm to 0.91 mm (Patient 1) and from 6.61 mm to 2.06 mm (Patient 2). In the AP direction where the tumor movement was small, the reduction of the mean tracking error was significant in Patient 1 (from 3.36 mm to 1.04 mm), but not in Patient 2 ( from 3.86 mm to 3.80 mm). Conclusion: This study shows the effectiveness of using multiple templates in improving the performance of template matching when artifacts like large tumor deformation or out-of-plane motion exists. Accurate tumor tracking capabilities can be integrated with MRI guided radiation therapy systems. This work was supported in part by grants from NIH/NCI CA 124766 and Varian

  1. Intraoperative imaging of tumors with indo-cyanine green fluorescence with an endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Chong, Sang Hoon; Moscatelli, Frank A.; Singhal, Sunil; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2015-03-01

    Surgery is the most effective treatment strategy for solid tumors. Intraoperative imaging of tumors helps detect tumor margins and establish the most appropriate surgical margins. Endoscopic surgery is a standard of care procedure for the resection of tumors, and is applicable for a wide range of solid tumors. While several imaging methodologies can be used for intraoperative imaging, optical imaging is promising for clinical application because it can detect microscopic disease, is minimally invasive, is inexpensive, does not require advance training for surgeons and can provide real-time images. Fluorescence from an injected contrast agent (Indo-cyanine green, ICG) has been effectively used for the identification of tumors in humans. In this study, we adapt a commercially available endoscope for intraoperative imaging of solid tumors. Our instrument utilizes light from a near-infrared 780nm LED to illuminate the surgical field of view and two CCD cameras for imaging the reflected fluorescence as well as the background tissue. We show that our instrument can simultaneously image fluorescence from the tumor as well as the background tissue. We characterize our instrument in tissue simulating phantoms, with tumor simulating `targets'.

  2. Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscope quantitatively demonstrates marked increase of collagen in tumor after chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Anju M.; Xu, Shuoyu; Sun, Wanxin; Zhou, Jianbiao; Tai, Dean C. S.; Chen, Chien-Shing; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2010-09-01

    Pulse-modulated second harmonic imaging microscopes (PM-SHIMs) exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over conventional SHIMs on sensitive imaging and quantification of weak collagen signals inside tissues. We quantify the spatial distribution of sparse collagen inside a xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) tumor specimens treated with a new drug against receptor tyrosine kinase (ABT-869), and observe a significant increase in collagen area percentage, collagen fiber length, fiber width, and fiber number after chemotherapy. This finding reveals new insights into tumor responses to chemotherapy and suggests caution in developing new drugs and therapeutic regimens against cancers.

  3. Tumor receptor imaging: proceedings of the National Cancer Institute workshop, review of current work, and prospective for further investigations.

    PubMed

    Katzenellenbogen, J A; Coleman, R E; Hawkins, R A; Krohn, K A; Larson, S M; Mendelsohn, J; Osborne, C K; Piwnica-Worms, D; Reba, R C; Siegel, B A

    1995-08-01

    In February 1994, the National Cancer Institute held a workshop to evaluate the current and future role of emission tomographic imaging methods, positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography, in improving the accuracy of cancer diagnosis and the effectiveness of treatment and in elucidating basic aspects of human cancer biology. Reviews covered many of the receptor and transport systems for hormones and growth factors, as well as metabolic changes important in human cancer, and topical presentations reviewed the current status of receptor-based imaging in the most well-characterized systems: somatostatin receptor imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, estrogen receptor imaging of breast cancer, and epidermal growth factor receptor and tumor metabolic imaging. A critical analysis was made of the current research and of new directions for the future development and use of receptor-imaging methods in oncology. In each area, recommendations were made for further investigation, where emerging understanding of tumor cell biology and defined molecular targets might be combined with the methods of radiopharmaceutical design and evaluation, to develop new approaches to critical issues in the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of cancer through tumor receptor imaging.

  4. Carbon nanotube based respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of a murine model of lung tumors with optical imaging correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heathcote, Samuel; Wang, Ko-han; Kim, William Y.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-03-01

    Current optical imaging techniques can successfully measure tumor load in murine models of lung carcinoma but lack structural detail. We demonstrate that respiratory gated micro-CT imaging of such models gives information about structure and correlates with tumor load measurements by optical methods. Four mice with multifocal, Kras-induced tumors expressing firefly luciferase were imaged against four controls using both optical imaging and respiratory gated micro-CT. CT images of anesthetized animals were acquired with a custom CNT-based system using 30 ms x-ray pulses during peak inspiration; respiration motion was tracked with a pressure sensor beneath each animal's abdomen. Optical imaging based on the Luc+ signal correlating with tumor load was performed on a Xenogen IVIS Kinetix. Micro-CT images were post-processed using Osirix, measuring lung volume with region growing. Diameters of the largest three tumors were measured. Relationships between tumor size, lung volumes, and optical signal were compared. CT images and optical signals were obtained for all animals at two time points. In all lobes of the Kras+ mice in all images, tumors were visible; the smallest to be readily identified measured approximately 300 microns diameter. CT-derived tumor volumes and optical signals related linearly, with r=0.94 for all animals. When derived for only tumor bearing animals, r=0.3. The trend of each individual animal's optical signal tracked correctly based on the CT volumes. Interestingly, lung volumes also correlated positively with optical imaging data and tumor volume burden, suggesting active remodeling.

  5. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging in the assessment of orbital tumors: comparison with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging in image quality and diagnostic performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Yanjun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guoyi; Liu, Hu; Shi, Haibin; Wu, Feiyun

    2017-01-01

    Background Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) could improve the imaging quality of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in various organs. However, whether it could improve the imaging quality and diagnostic performance for the patients with orbital tumors is still unknown. Purpose To compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of RS-EPI DWI with that of conventional single-shot EPI (SS-EPI) DWI in patients with orbital tumors. Material and Methods SS-EPI and RS-EPI DW images of 32 patients with pathologically diagnosed orbital tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Qualitative imaging parameters (imaging sharpness, geometric distortion, ghosting artifacts, and overall imaging quality) and quantitative imaging parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC], signal-to-noise ratio [SNR], contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]) were assessed by two independent radiologists, and compared between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the diagnostic value of ADC in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors. Results RS-EPI DW imaging produced less geometric distortion and ghosting artifacts, and better imaging sharpness and overall imaging quality than SS-EPI DWI (for all, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, RS-EPI DWI produced significantly lower SNR ( P < 0.001) and ADC ( P < 0.001), and higher contrast ( P < 0.001) than SS-EPI DWI, while producing no difference in CNR ( P = 0.137). There was no significant difference on the diagnostic performance between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI, when using ADC as the differentiating index ( P = 0.529). Conclusion Compared with SS-EPI, RS-EPI DWI provided significantly better imaging quality and comparable diagnostic performance in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors.

  6. Imaging Arrays With Improved Transmit Power Capability

    PubMed Central

    Zipparo, Michael J.; Bing, Kristin F.; Nightingale, Kathy R.

    2010-01-01

    Bonded multilayer ceramics and composites incorporating low-loss piezoceramics have been applied to arrays for ultrasound imaging to improve acoustic transmit power levels and to reduce internal heating. Commercially available hard PZT from multiple vendors has been characterized for microstructure, ability to be processed, and electroacoustic properties. Multilayers using the best materials demonstrate the tradeoffs compared with the softer PZT5-H typically used for imaging arrays. Three-layer PZT4 composites exhibit an effective dielectric constant that is three times that of single layer PZT5H, a 50% higher mechanical Q, a 30% lower acoustic impedance, and only a 10% lower coupling coefficient. Application of low-loss multilayers to linear phased and large curved arrays results in equivalent or better element performance. A 3-layer PZT4 composite array achieved the same transmit intensity at 40% lower transmit voltage and with a 35% lower face temperature increase than the PZT-5 control. Although B-mode images show similar quality, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) images show increased displacement for a given drive voltage. An increased failure rate for the multilayers following extended operation indicates that further development of the bond process will be necessary. In conclusion, bonded multilayer ceramics and composites allow additional design freedom to optimize arrays and improve the overall performance for increased acoustic output while maintaining image quality. PMID:20875996