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  1. 'Simple 7' Steps Can Help Improve Blood Pressure in Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... html 'Simple 7' Steps Can Help Improve Blood Pressure in Blacks Adherence to the American Heart Association ... can reduce black Americans' risk of high blood pressure, researchers say. "We found that even small improvements ...

  2. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  3. Team-Based Care and Improved Blood Pressure Control

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Krista K.; Thota, Anilkrishna B.; Njie, Gibril J.; Finnie, Ramona K.C.; Hopkins, David P.; Mukhtar, Qaiser; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Zeigler, Donald; Kottke, Thomas E.; Rask, Kimberly J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Brooks, Joy F.; Braun, Lynne T.; Cooksey, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Context Uncontrolled hypertension remains a widely prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the U.S. team-based care, established by adding new staff or changing the roles of existing staff such as nurses and pharmacists to work with a primary care provider and the patient. Team-based care has the potential to improve the quality of hypertension management. The goal of this Community Guide systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of team-based care in improving blood pressure (BP) outcomes. Evidence acquisition An existing systematic review (search period, January 1980–July 2003) assessing team-based care for BP control was supplemented with a Community Guide update (January 2003–May 2012). For the Community Guide update, two reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed quality of eligible studies. Evidence synthesis Twenty-eight studies in the prior review (1980–2003) and an additional 52 studies from the Community Guide update (2003–2012) qualified for inclusion. Results from both bodies of evidence suggest that team-based care is effective in improving BP outcomes. From the update, the proportion of patients with controlled BP improved (median increase=12 percentage points); systolic BP decreased (median reduction=5.4 mmHg); and diastolic BP also decreased (median reduction=1.8 mmHg). Conclusions Team-based care increased the proportion of people with controlled BP and reduced both systolic and diastolic BP, especially when pharmacists and nurses were part of the team. Findings are applicable to a range of U.S. settings and population groups. Implementation of this multidisciplinary approach will require health system–level organizational changes and could be an important element of the medical home. PMID:24933494

  4. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: The CoCo trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM) has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Objective Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Outcome Primary outcome: Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries). Methods/Design Randomised controlled study. Population: 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system). Expected results/conclusion The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range ≤ 140/≤ 90 mmHg, yellow: blood pressure >140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg) lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded) blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation) of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467 PMID:20398258

  5. Improved blood pressure control among school bus drivers with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Joseph; Severance-Fonte, Tina; Morandi-Matricaria, Elizabeth; Wogen, Jenifer; Frech-Tamas, Feride

    2010-04-01

    The impact of a hypertension awareness and educational program, BP DownShift, was evaluated among school bus drivers in a southern US state. At baseline (August 2007), blood pressure (BP) measurements, self-reported demographics, and hypertension awareness and management practices were collected from drivers who consented to participate in the study. Interventions included 4 educational mailings, installation of BP machines at all bus terminals, and access to free dietitian consultations and gym memberships. BP was evaluated using Department of Transportation guidelines. BP was remeasured and a survey was administered at follow-up (May 2008). At baseline, 208 drivers consented to the BP screening; 120 (58%) returned for a follow-up assessment. Most participants completing the study were female (73%) and African American (72%). Mean age was 50 years and mean body mass index was 32 kg/m(2); 52% of participants were obese. In all, 58% of participants reported a prior diagnosis of hypertension by a physician, and 63% reported taking antihypertensive medication. Both systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) were lower at follow-up (135/82 mmHg vs. 145/87 mmHg at baseline; P < 0.001, both comparisons); 42% had a reduction in SBP > 10 mmHg, and 44% had a reduction in DBP > 5 mmHg. At follow-up, 58% were controlled to BP < 140/90, compared to 38% at baseline (P < 0.001). At follow-up, an increased proportion of previously diagnosed drivers reported home BP monitoring, healthy diet, and regular exercise as components of hypertension self-management. The implementation of our hypertension education, self-management, and awareness program was associated with an improvement in BP control, which may positively impact commercial driver's license recertification as well as improve employee health.

  6. Bayesian fusion algorithm for improved oscillometric blood pressure estimation.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, Mohamad; Dajani, Hilmi R; Groza, Voicu Z; Bolic, Miodrag; Rajan, Sreeraman; Batkin, Izmail

    2016-11-01

    A variety of oscillometric algorithms have been recently proposed in the literature for estimation of blood pressure (BP). However, these algorithms possess specific strengths and weaknesses that should be taken into account before selecting the most appropriate one. In this paper, we propose a fusion method to exploit the advantages of the oscillometric algorithms and circumvent their limitations. The proposed fusion method is based on the computation of the weighted arithmetic mean of the oscillometric algorithms estimates, and the weights are obtained using a Bayesian approach by minimizing the mean square error. The proposed approach is used to fuse four different oscillometric blood pressure estimation algorithms. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a pilot dataset of 150 oscillometric recordings from 10 subjects. It is found that the mean error and standard deviation of error are reduced relative to the individual estimation algorithms by up to 7 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of systolic pressure, respectively, and by up to 2 mmHg and 3 mmHg in estimation of diastolic pressure, respectively.

  7. Improvement of a sensor unit for wrist blood pressure monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Sangjun; Kwon, Jongwon; Park, Yongman; Ayuzenara, Odgerel; Kim, Hiesik

    2007-12-01

    A blood pressure sensor unit for ubiquitous healthcare monitoring was newly developed. The digital wrist band-type blood pressure devices for home are popular already in the market. It is useful for checking blood pressure level at home and control of hypertension. Especially, it is very essential home device to check the health condition of blood circulation disease. Nowadays many product types are available. But the measurement of blood pressure is not accurate enough compared with the mechanical type. It needs to be upgraded to assure the precise health data enough to use in the hospital. The structure, feature and output signal of capacitor type pressure sensors are analyzed. An improved design of capacitor sensor is suggested. It shows more precise health data after use on a wrist band type health unit. They can be applied for remote u-health medical service.

  8. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  9. Blood Pressure Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure readings at home. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... options might work best for you. Low blood pressure Low blood pressure that either doesn't cause ...

  10. Improving blood pressure control through provider education, provider alerts, and patient education: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Roumie, Christianne L; Elasy, Tom A; Greevy, Robert; Griffin, Marie R; Liu, Xulei; Stone, William J; Wallston, Kenneth A; Dittus, Robert S; Alvarez, Vincent; Cobb, Janice; Speroff, Theodore

    2006-08-01

    Inadequate blood pressure control is a persistent gap in quality care. To evaluate provider and patient interventions to improve blood pressure control. Cluster randomized, controlled trial. 2 hospital-based and 8 community-based clinics in the Veterans Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. 1341 veterans with essential hypertension cared for by 182 providers. Eligible patients had 2 or more blood pressure measurements greater than 140/90 mm Hg in a 6-month period and were taking a single antihypertensive agent. Providers who cared for eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive an e-mail with a Web-based link to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) guidelines (provider education); provider education and a patient-specific hypertension computerized alert (provider education and alert); or provider education, hypertension alert, and patient education, in which patients were sent a letter advocating drug adherence, lifestyle modification, and conversations with providers (patient education). Proportion of patients with a systolic blood pressure less than 140 mm Hg at 6 months; intensification of antihypertensive medication. Mean baseline blood pressure was 157/83 mm Hg with no differences between groups (P = 0.105). Six-month follow-up data were available for 975 patients (73%). Patients of providers who were randomly assigned to the patient education group had better blood pressure control (138/75 mm Hg) than those in the provider education and alert or provider education alone groups (146/76 mm Hg and 145/78 mm Hg, respectively). More patients in the patient education group had a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or less compared with those in the provider education or provider education and alert groups (adjusted relative risk for the patient education group compared with the provider education alone group, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.06 to 1.62]; P = 0

  11. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can improve your health in other ways. Mastering stress management techniques can lead to other behavior changes — including those that reduce your blood pressure. When looking for ways to manage stress, remember that you have many options. For example: ...

  12. Clinical decision support to improve blood pressure control in hemodialysis patients: a nonrandomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wiebe, Natasha; Majumdar, Sumit; Klarenbach, Scott; Jindal, Kailash; Manns, Braden; Mortis, Garth; Campbell, Patricia; Tonelli, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based clinical decision support aims to improve the quality of patient care. The utility of decision support for improving blood pressure control in hemodialysis patients is unknown. This was a nonrandomized controlled trial of adult patients receiving chronic in-center hemodialysis during the period of April 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006, in 1 of the 2 major university-based renal programs in Alberta, Canada. Physicians in the intervention center were provided with twice-monthly audits and printed management suggestions based on guideline-recommended blood pressure targets. The same data were available to physicians in the control group but without audit and feedback decision support. Eight hundred and thirty hemodialysis patients were receiving dialysis treatment at the time the study was initiated. Preintervention and postintervention blood pressure data were available for 361 patients. The primary outcome, the proportion of postdialysis systolic blood pressures at target over 12 months, did not differ between the intervention and the control programs (unadjusted odds ratio 0.59; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34-1.02, p = 0.06; adjusted odds ratio 0.62; 95% CI, 0.35-1.11, p = 0.11). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in other measures of blood pressure such as the mean change in postdialysis systolic blood pressures (unadjusted mean difference 4 mm Hg, 95% CI, -1 to 9, p = 0.36; adjusted mean difference 2 mm Hg, 95% CI, -1 to 5, p = 0.19). In this population of chronic hemodialysis patients, a computer-based clinical decision support system was not associated with improved blood pressure control.

  13. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  14. Association Between Neurologic Improvement With Decline in Blood Pressure and Recanalization in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Nandakumar; Warach, Steven; Hsia, Amie W.; Adams, Harold P.; Auh, Sungyoung; Latour, Lawrence L.; Merino, José G.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with stroke often have a decline in blood pressure after thrombolysis. Neurologic improvement could result from recanalization or better collateral flow despite persistent occlusion. We hypothesized that neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in blood pressure may be a clinical sign of recanalization after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. OBSERVATIONS Patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, and MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, from 1999 to 2009 were included in the study if they had pretreatment and 24-hour magnetic resonance angiographic scans, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores at those times, and proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion demonstrated prior to treatment. The recanalization status on 24-hour magnetic resonance angiography was classified as none, partial, or complete. Seventeen patients met study criteria. On 24-hour magnetic resonance angiography, 3 patients had no recanalization, 8 had partial recanalization, and 6 had complete recanalization. At 24 hours after thrombolysis, neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or greater was seen in 4 patients with partial recanalization, 4 patients with complete recanalization, and none of the patients with no recanalization. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or greater after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator may be a clinical sign of recanalization. This observation needs confirmation in a larger cohort. PMID:25330362

  15. Improving Urban African Americans’ Blood Pressure Control through Multi-level Interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) Study: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ephraim, Patti L.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Roter, Debra; Bone, Lee; Wolff, Jennifer; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Levine, David; Aboumatar, Hanan; Cooper, Lisa A; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie; Gudzune, Kimberly; Albert, Michael; Monroe, Dwyan; Simmons, Michelle; Hickman, Debra; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette; Matens, Richard; Noronha, Gary; Fagan, Peter; Ramamurthi, Hema; Ameling, Jessica; Charlston, Jeanne; Sam, Tanyka; Carson, Kathryn A.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Crews, Deidra; Greer, Raquel; Sneed, Valerie; Flynn, Sarah J.; DePasquale, Nicole; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Background Given their high rates of uncontrolled blood pressure, urban African Americans comprise a particularly vulnerable subgroup of persons with hypertension. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the important role of family and community support in improving patients’ management of a variety of chronic illnesses. However, studies of multilevel interventions designed specifically to improve urban African American patients’ blood pressure self-management by simultaneously leveraging patient, family, and community strengths are lacking. Methods/Design We report the protocol of the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study, a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effectiveness of interventions that engage patient, family, and community-level resources to facilitate urban African American hypertensive patients’ improved hypertension self-management and subsequent hypertension control. African American patients with uncontrolled hypertension receiving health care in an urban primary care clinic will be randomly assigned to receive 1) an educational intervention led by a community health worker alone, 2) the community health worker intervention plus a patient and family communication activation intervention, or 3) the community health worker intervention plus a problem-solving intervention. All participants enrolled in the study will receive and be trained to use a digital home blood pressure machine. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be patients’ blood pressure control at 12 months. Discussion Results from the ACT study will provide needed evidence on the effectiveness of comprehensive multi-level interventions to improve urban African American patients’ hypertension control. PMID:24956323

  16. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  18. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as two numbers. ...

  19. The impact of the improvement of insomnia on blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Yang, Yiling; Li, Qiubing; Yang, Xueqing; Wang, Yan; Ku, Wai Lim; Li, Haicong

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of the improvement of insomnia on the blood pressure levels of hypertensive patients. A total of 402 patients with a diagnosis of insomnia and hypertension were selected and randomly divided into two groups. The treatment group (202 cases) received standard anti-hypertensive treatment with Estazolam, and the control group (200 cases) received standard anti-hypertensive treatment with placebo. The sedentary diastolic and systolic blood pressures were measured before the treatment and every 7 days during the experiment. To assess the sleep quality and anxiety and depression levels of patients, the scores of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Scale-17 were reported at the same time points. At the conclusion of the experiment, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Scale-17 scores of the treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P < 0.001). The insomnia treatment efficacy of Estazolam in the treatment group was 67.3%, significantly higher than that (14.0%) of the control (P < 0.001). The blood pressure of the treatment group showed significant improvement throughout the experiment. By Day 28, the decrease of sedentary diastolic and systolic blood pressures in the treatment group was significantly greater than that of the control (sedentary systolic blood pressure: 10.5 ± 3.9 versus 3.4 ± 2.5 mmHg; sedentary diastolic blood pressure: 8.1 ± 3.6 versus 2.7 ± 2.1 mmHg, P < 0.001), and the compliance rate of goal blood pressure (< 140/90 mmHg) was 74.8% with Estazolam, compared with 50.5% with placebo (P < 0.001). Thus, the current findings indicated that the improvement of insomnia can significantly help lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  1. Blood pressure improvement with continuous positive airway pressure is independent of obstructive sleep apnea severity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Jessie P; Edwards, Bradley A; Gautam, Shiva P; Montesi, Sydney B; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Aizpuru, Felipe; Barandiarán, Felipe Aizpuru; Barbé, Ferran; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-04-15

    We sought to perform a patient-level meta-analysis using the individual patient data of the trials identified in our previous study-level meta-analysis investigating the effect of positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on blood pressure (BP). Patient-level meta-analysis. N/A. 968 adult OSA subjects without major comorbidities drawn from eight randomized controlled trials. Therapeutic PAP versus non-therapeutic control conditions (sham-PAP, pill placebo or standard care) over at least one week. The mean reductions in BP between PAP and non-therapeutic control arms were -2.27 mm Hg (95% CI -4.01 to -0.54) for systolic BP and -1.78 mm Hg (95% CI -2.99 to -0.58) for diastolic BP. The presence of uncontrolled hypertension at baseline was significantly associated with a reduction in systolic BP of 7.1 mm Hg and diastolic BP of 4.3 mm Hg after controlling for OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, PAP level), patient demographics (age, gender, body mass index, use of antihypertensive medication/s), and measures of PAP efficacy (PAP adherence and treatment duration). OSA patients with uncontrolled hypertension are likely to gain the largest benefit from PAP in terms of a substantial reduction in BP, even after controlling for disease severity.

  2. Improving CKD Diagnosis and Blood Pressure Control in Primary Care: A Tailored Multifaceted Quality Improvement Programme

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, John; Harvey, Gill; Hegarty, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. From 2009 to 2014, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Greater Manchester (NIHR CLAHRC GM) in England ran 4 phased, 12-month quality improvement (QI) projects with 49 primary care practices in GM. Two measureable aims were set – halve undiagnosed CKD in participating practices using modelled estimates of prevalence; and optimise blood pressure (BP) control (<140/90 mm Hg in CKD patients without proteinuria; <130/80 mm Hg in CKD patients with proteinuria) for 75% of recorded cases of CKD. The 4 projects ran as follows: P1 = Project 1 with 19 practices (September 2009 to September 2010), P2 = Project 2 with 11 practices (March 2011 to March 2012), P3 = Project 3 with 12 practices (September 2012 to October 2013), and P4 = Project 4 with 7 practices (April 2013 to March 2014). Methods Multifaceted intervention approaches were tailored based on a contextual analysis of practice support needs. Data were collected from practices by facilitators at baseline and again at project close, with self-reported data regularly requested from practices throughout the projects. Results Halving undiagnosed CKD as per aim was exceeded in 3 of the 4 projects. The optimising BP aim was met in 2 projects. Total CKD cases after the programme increased by 2,347 (27%) from baseline to 10,968 in a total adult population (aged ≥18 years) of 231,568. The percentage of patients who managed to appropriate BP targets increased from 34 to 74% (P1), from 60 to 83% (P2), from 68 to 71% (P3), and from 63 to 76% (P4). In nonproteinuric CKD patients, 88, 90, 89, and 91%, respectively, achieved a target BP of <140/90 mm Hg. In proteinuric CKD patients, 69, 46, 48, and 45%, respectively, achieved a tighter target of <130/80 mm Hg. Analysis of national data over similar timeframes indicated that practices participating in the programme achieved higher CKD

  3. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  4. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Ramirez, Claudia E.; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R.; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A.

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5–10 mg), or ergotamine and caffeine (1 and 100 mg, respectively) in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 min, at baseline and at 1 h post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131 ± 19 and 95 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.003 for time effect). Midodrine also significantly increased seated SBP (121 ± 19 mmHg at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.015 for time effect vs. placebo), but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p = 0.621). There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p = 0.034). These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease. PMID:25104940

  5. Electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation improves microvascular flow independent of blood pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Paul W G; Prins, Wilhelmina B; Plokker, Herbert W M; van Dongen, Eric P A; van Iterson, Mat; Ince, Can

    2012-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that there is a discrepancy between global hemodynamic parameters and microvascular flow in patients before and after successful elective electrical cardioversion (ECV) for atrial fibrillation (AF). Prospective observational study. Preanesthesia holding area in a teaching hospital. Adult patients who underwent successful elective ECV for AF. ECV. Routine measurements of heart rate and noninvasive blood pressure were recorded and the sublingual microcirculation was visualized by sidestream darkfield imaging before and after the conversion of AF to sinus rhythm by elective ECV. The conversion to sinus rhythm significantly improved the microvascular flow index for smaller and larger microvessels. For smaller microvessels, perfused vessel density did not reach significance after conversion to sinus rhythm, whereas the proportion of perfused vessels was significantly larger and indices of heterogeneity for microvascular flow index decreased significantly. No correlation could be identified for the changes in mean blood pressure, perfused vessel density, and microvascular flow index for smaller microvessels. Successful ECV in patients with AF improves indices of sublingual microvascular perfusion. This change has no clear relation to the change in blood pressure and cannot be predicted from it. It may be prudent not to rely solely on global hemodynamic parameters to assess end-organ perfusion in this setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvement in blood pressure control with impedance cardiography-guided pharmacologic decision making.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Donald L; Gomes, Cathy P; Rutherford, Jillian P

    2004-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated improvement in blood pressure (BP) control utilizing noninvasive hemodynamic measurements with impedance cardiography (ICG). The purpose of this article is to report the effect of utilizing ICG-guided decision making to treat uncontrolled hypertension in a community generalist setting. Patient medical records were retrospectively reviewed for subjects on two antihypertensive agents with systolic blood pressure > or =140 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure > or =90 mm Hg. All subjects were treated utilizing a previously published ICG-guided treatment algorithm. Twenty-one subjects met the BP and medication criteria. BP at entry was 157.2+/-13.9/78.7+/-9.9 mm Hg. Subjects were treated for 215+/-85 days (5.0+/-2.0 visits). After ICG-guided treatment, 12/21 (57.1%) achieved sustained BP control (p<0.001). BP was lowered to 141.6+/-22.0 (p<0.001)/77.1+/-10.7 (p>0.05) mm Hg. Antihypertensive agents increased from 2.0+/-0.0 to 2.5+/-0.7 (p<0.05). In this series of subjects with uncontrolled BP taking two antihypertensive agents, ICG-guided pharmacologic decision making resulted in significant reduction in BP and improvement in BP control.

  7. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad; Haghighat, Neda; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Shidfar, Farzad; Heidari, Iraj; Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya; Eghtesadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG) and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG)] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045) was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P = 0.027), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (P = 0.025), Apo B (P = 0.012) and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043) levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (-5.93 ± 6.25 vs. -1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (-6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002), FBS (-7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019) over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control.

  8. Preventing increased blood pressure in the obese Zucker rat improves severity of stroke

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Jessica M.; Mintz, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for stroke, but the determinants of increased stroke risk in obesity are unknown. We have previously reported that obese Zucker rats (OZRs) have a worse stroke outcome and display evidence of remodeling of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), in parallel with hypertension, compared with lean controls. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertension is an essential determinant of cerebral vascular remodeling and increased stroke damage in OZRs. Blood pressure was measured by telemetery in lean and obese rats with and without hydrochlorthiazide (HCT; 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) from 8 to 15 wk of age. A separate group of rats was also chronically fed a low-sodium (LS) diet. Vessel structure was assessed in isolated, pressurized MCAs. Cerebral ischemia was induced for 60 min using an intralumenal suture technique, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. HCT treatment effectively prevented the increase in blood pressure in obese rats; however, the LS diet did not lower pressure. Importantly, infarct size was normalized by HCT after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Additionally, HCT improved the changes in MCA structure observed in untreated OZRs. There were no benefits of the LS diet on stroke injury or vessel structure. These results indicate that increased pressure is essential for driving the changes in infarct size in OZRs. PMID:20418477

  9. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  10. Chronotherapy improves blood pressure control and reduces vascular risk in CKD.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Smolensky, Michael H; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R; Crespo, Juan J; Moyá, Ana; Ríos, María T; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), the prevalence of increased blood pressure during sleep and blunted sleep-time-relative blood pressure decline (a nondipper pattern) is very high and increases substantially with disease severity. Elevated blood pressure during sleep is the major criterion for the diagnoses of hypertension and inadequate therapeutic ambulatory blood pressure control in these patients. Substantial, clinically meaningful ingestion-time-dependent differences in the safety, efficacy, duration of action and/or effects on the 24 h blood pressure pattern of six different classes of hypertension medications and their combinations have been substantiated. For example, bedtime ingestion of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers is more effective than morning ingestion in reducing blood pressure during sleep and converting the 24 h blood pressure profile into a dipper pattern. We have identified a progressive reduction in blood pressure during sleep--a novel therapeutic target best achieved by ingestion of one or more hypertension medications at bedtime--as the most significant predictor of decreased cardiovascular risk in patients with and without CKD. Recent findings suggest that in patients with CKD, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring should be used for the diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular disease risk, and that therapeutic strategies given at bedtime rather than on awakening are preferable for the management of hypertension.

  11. Dietary Nitrate Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Decreases Blood Pressure in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Michael J.; Justus, Nicholas W.; Hauser, Jordan I.; Case, Ashlee H.; Helms, Christine C.; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T.; Miller, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3−) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3− ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient’s maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3− and nitrite (NO2−) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3− by 938% and NO2− by 379%. Median (+ interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 sec., respectively). Compared to placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3− supplementation can elevate plasma NO3− and NO2− concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients. PMID:25445634

  12. CHRONIC AEROBIC EXERCISE IMPROVES BLOOD PRESSURE DIPPING STATUS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN NON-DIPPERS

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chenyi; Diaz, Keith M.; Kretzschmar, Jan; Feairheller, Deborah L.; Sturgeon, Kathleen M.; Perkins, Amanda; Veerabhadrappa, Praveen; Williamson, Sheara T.; Lee, Hojun; Grimm, Heather; Babbitt, Dianne M.; Brown, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effects of exercise training on nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping status remain unclear. African Americans have the highest prevalence of non-dippers compared to other racial/ethnic populations. In this 6-month study we tested the hypothesis that long-term aerobic exercise training would increase the levels of nocturnal BP dipping in African American non-dippers. Methods and Results We recruited African Americans who were non-diabetic, non-smoking and free of cardiovascular (CV) and renal disease. For this analysis, only African Americans with a non-dipping profile, defined as those with absence of a nocturnal decline in systolic or diastolic BP (< 10% of daytime values) which was determined by ambulatory BP monitoring. A pre-post design was employed with baseline and final evaluation including office blood pressure measurement, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, fasted blood sampling, and graded exercise testing. Participants engaged in 6 months of supervised aerobic exercise training (AEXT). Following the AEXT intervention, there were significant increases in systolic BP dipping (baseline: 5.8 ± 3.9% vs. final: 9.4 ± 6.1%, p=0.0055) and pulse pressure dipping (Baseline: −3.1% ± 6.6% vs. final: 5.0% ± 12.8%, p=0.0109). Of the 18 participants with a non-dipping profile at baseline, 8 were non-classified as non-dippers after the AEXT intervention. There were no significant changes in office SBP/DBP following the AEXT intervention. Conclusions This study suggests that the non-dipping pattern of ambulatory BP can be improved by chronic AEXT in African American non-dippers and regardless of a change in 24-hr average BP. This finding may be clinically important because of the target organ implication of non-dipping nocturnal BP. PMID:25100263

  13. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves exercise performance and decreases blood pressure in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Berry, Michael J; Justus, Nicholas W; Hauser, Jordan I; Case, Ashlee H; Helms, Christine C; Basu, Swati; Rogers, Zachary; Lewis, Marc T; Miller, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation via beetroot juice has been shown to increase the exercise capacity of younger and older adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute NO3(-) ingestion on the submaximal constant work rate exercise capacity of COPD patients. Fifteen patients were assigned in a randomized, single-blind, crossover design to receive one of two treatments (beetroot juice then placebo or placebo then beetroot juice). Submaximal constant work rate exercise time at 75% of the patient's maximal work capacity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included plasma NO3(-) and nitrite (NO2(-)) levels, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO2), dynamic hyperinflation, dyspnea and leg discomfort. Relative to placebo, beetroot ingestion increased plasma NO3(-) by 938% and NO2(-) by 379%. Median (+interquartile range) exercise time was significantly longer (p = 0.031) following the ingestion of beetroot versus placebo (375.0 + 257.0 vs. 346.2 + 148.0 s, respectively). Compared with placebo, beetroot ingestion significantly reduced iso-time (p = 0.001) and end exercise (p = 0.008) diastolic blood pressures by 6.4 and 5.6 mmHg, respectively. Resting systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced (p = 0.019) by 8.2 mmHg for the beetroot versus the placebo trial. No other variables were significantly different between the beetroot and placebo trials. These results indicate that acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation can elevate plasma NO3(-) and NO2(-) concentrations, improve exercise performance, and reduce blood pressure in COPD patients.

  14. [Effects of Web-based health education on blood glucose and blood pressure improvement in postmenopausal women with impaired fasting blood glucose].

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hee-Seung; Park, Min-Jeong; Shim, Hye-Sun

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an educational intervention that used both cellular phones and the Internet to provide a short messaging service (SMS) relating to blood glucose, blood pressure, and serum lipid levels in postmenopausal women with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). Twenty-eight postmenopausal women were assigned to an intervention group and twenty-one postmenopausal women to a control group. The intervention was provided for 12 weeks. Patients in the intervention group were asked to access a web site by using a cellular phone or to use the Internet directly and input their blood glucose and blood pressure levels weekly. Participants were sent the optimal recommendations weekly by both cellular phone and Internet. The intervention group had a mean decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) level of 8.1 mmHg but changes for the control group were not significant. There was a significant mean change in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) level for the intervention group (-7.7 mmHg). The mean change in the control group was not significant. This educational intervention using the Internet and a SMS by cellular phone improved levels of SBP and DBP in postmenopausal women with IFG.

  15. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... have this problem. High blood pressure is often discovered during a visit to the provider for another ... to develop high blood pressure. If you have diabetes, heart disease, or kidney problems, or if you ...

  16. Low blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Hypotension; Blood pressure - low; Postprandial hypotension; Orthostatic hypotension; Neurally mediated hypotension; NMH ... Blood pressure varies from one person to another. A drop as little as 20 mmHg, can cause problems for ...

  17. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... high blood pressure can lead to… stroke. kidney failure. heart attack and heart failure. all of the above. ... high blood pressure can lead to stroke, kidney failure, heart attack and heart failure A is the correct ...

  18. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  19. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  20. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, ... and kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  1. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  2. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Mar 22,2017 What do your ... it’s too high for blood pressure High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  3. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Low Blood Pressure - When Blood Pressure Is Too Low Updated:Dec 13,2016 How ... content was last reviewed October 2016 High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  4. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  5. Improving the Blood Pressure Control With the ProActive Attitude of Hypertensive Patients Seeking Follow-up Services

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shangfeng; Bishwajit, Ghose; Ji, Lu; Feng, Da; Fang, Haiqing; Fu, Hang; Shao, Tian; Shao, Piaopiao; Liu, Chunyan; Feng, Zhanchun; Luba, Tegene R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Proactive attitude of hypertensive patients seeking follow-up services (FUS) lies at the core of self-efficacy. However, few evidence have shown the activeness of seeking FUS in the context of blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. Improvements in follow-up visits may not just by services itself cause better control of blood pressure among hypertensive patients, rather due to the patient's pro-active attitude of the patient in seeking FUS. A cross-sectional study was carried out in selected rural regions of China to explore the association between blood pressure control and sociodemographic and economic variables and activeness of hypertensive patients in seeking FUS. The primary clinical outcome for this study was blood pressure control (systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) Out of the total 2321 participants with hypertension aged 35 years or older participated in this survey. Number of proactive FUS seekers were 3.17 times greater than those of passive seekers (odds ratio [OR] = 3.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.56–3.93, P < 0.001). In all subgroups, hypertensive patients who were seeking FUS actively were more likely to control blood pressure better than those seeking FUS passively. Proactive attitude of seeking follow-up services can improve blood pressure control among hypertensive patients. PMID:27057859

  6. More accurate systolic blood pressure measurement is required for improved hypertension management: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Meir; Slotki, Itzchak; Shavit, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The commonly used techniques for systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) measurement are the auscultatory Korotkoff-based sphygmomanometry and oscillometry. The former technique is relatively accurate but is limited to a physician's office because its automatic variant is subject to noise artifacts. Consequently, the Korotkoff-based measurement overestimates the blood pressure in some patients due to white coat effect, and because it is a single measurement, it cannot properly represent the variable blood pressure. Automatic oscillometry can be used at home by the patient and is preferred even in clinics. However, the technique's accuracy is low and errors of 10-15 mmHg are common. Recently, we have developed an automatic technique for SBP measurement, based on an arm pressure cuff and a finger photoplethysmographic probe. The technique was found to be significantly more accurate than oscillometry, and comparable to the Korotkoff-based technique, the reference-standard for non-invasive blood pressure measurements. The measurement of SBP is a mainstay for the diagnosis and follow-up of hypertension, which is a major risk factor for several adverse events, mainly cardiovascular. Lowering blood pressure evidently reduces the risk, but excessive lowering can result in hypotension and consequently hypoperfusion to vital organs, since blood pressure is the driving force for blood flow. Erroneous measurement by 10 mmHg can lead to a similar unintended reduction of SBP and may adversely affect patients treated to an SBP of 120-130 mmHg. In particular, in elderly patients, unintended excessive reduction of blood pressure due to inaccurate SBP measurement can result in cerebral hypoperfusion and consequent cognitive decline. By using a more accurate technique for automatic SBP measurement (such as the photoplethysmographic-based technique), the optimal blood pressure target can be achieved with lower risk for hypotension and its adverse events.

  7. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Engineering Development Lab., Inc.'s E-2000 Neck Baro Reflex System was developed for cardiovascular studies of astronauts. It is regularly used on Space Shuttle Missions, and a parallel version has been developed as a research tool to facilitate studies of blood pressure reflex controls in patients with congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc. An advanced version, the PPC-1000, was developed in 1991, and the technology has been refined substantially. The PPC provides an accurate means of generating pressure for a broad array of laboratory applications. An improved version, the E2010 Barosystem, is anticipated.

  8. High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Ali; Khalili, Mohammad; Haghighat, Neda; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Shidfar, Farzad; Heidari, Iraj; Ebrahimpour-Koujan, Soraiya; Eghtesadi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to examine the effects of high-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate on lipid profiles, weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, and inflammation in individuals with Type 2 diabetes and hypertension. METHODS Sixty individuals [32 in dark chocolate group (DCG) and 28 in white chocolate group (WCG)] with Type 2 diabetes on stable medication were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind study. Subjects were randomized to consume 25 g DCG or WCG for 8 weeks. Changes in weight, blood pressure, glycemic control, lipid profile, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured at the beginning and end of the intervention. This clinical trial was registered at the Iranian registry of clinical trials. RESULTS In DCC group, compared with baseline, serum levels of Apo A-1 (P = 0.045) was increased and fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P = 0.027), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (P = 0.025), Apo B (P = 0.012) and Log of hsCRP (P = 0.043) levels were decreased at the end of study. No changes were seen within the WCG in studied parameters. High polyphenol chocolate consumption compared to white chocolate resulted in significant decrease in of systolic (−5.93 ± 6.25 vs. −1.07 ± 7.97 mmHg, P = 0.004) and diastolic blood pressure (−6.4 ± 6.25 vs. 0.17 ± 7.9 mmHg, P = 0.002), FBS (−7.84 ± 19.15 vs. 4.00 ± 20.58 mg/dl, P = 0.019) over the course of 8 weeks of daily chocolate consumption neither weight nor body mass index and TG levels altered from baseline. CONCLUSION High polyphenol chocolate is effective in improving TG levels in hypertensive patients with diabetes and decreasing blood pressure and FBS without affecting weight, inflammatory markers, insulin resistance or glycemic control. PMID:26089927

  9. [Does self-measurement of blood pressure improve compliance in hypertensive patients?].

    PubMed

    Foerster, E C; Achermann, R; Groth, H; Edmonds, D; Siegenthaler, W; Vetter, W

    1985-02-02

    To increase compliance in antihypertensive therapy, adherence was measured before and after distribution of non-automatic blood pressure devices. After 2 weeks of taking placebo, 37 essential hypertensive patients, both male and female, were treated over a period of 8 months with an antihypertensive combination drug containing triamterene. At each follow-up, compliance was checked by triamterene urine fluorescence. In the third month of therapy all patients were given a non-automatic blood pressure device. The results showed that self-recording of blood pressure increased the compliance rate of the group from 65% at the beginning of the trial to 81% at the end. Patients who showed poor adherence and consistently insufficient blood pressure values increased their compliance rate from 0% before to 70% after self-measuring of blood pressure. In the light of these findings, self-recording of blood pressure can be recommended in cases where compliance is suspected to be poor and blood pressure is inadequately controlled.

  10. Blood Pressure Directed Booster Trainings Improve Intensive Care Unit Provider Retention of Excellent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Heather; Maltese, Matthew R; Niles, Dana E; Fischman, Elizabeth; Legkobitova, Veronika; Leffelman, Jessica; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M

    2015-11-01

    Brief, intermittent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training sessions, "Booster Trainings," improve CPR skill acquisition and short-term retention. The objective of this study was to incorporate arterial blood pressure (ABP) tracings into Booster Trainings to improve CPR skill retention. We hypothesized that ABP-directed CPR "Booster Trainings" would improve intensive care unit (ICU) provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without need for interval retraining. A CPR manikin creating a realistic relationship between chest compression depth and ABP was used for training/testing. Thirty-six ICU providers were randomized to brief, bedside ABP-directed CPR manikin skill retrainings: (1) Booster Plus (ABP visible during training and testing) versus (2) Booster Alone (ABP visible only during training, not testing) versus (3) control (testing, no intervention). Subjects completed skill tests pretraining (baseline), immediately after training (acquisition), and then retention was assessed at 12 hours, 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome was retention of excellent CPR skills at 3 months. Excellent CPR was defined as systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg or higher and compression rate 100 to 120 per minute. Overall, 14 of 24 (58%) participants acquired excellent CPR skills after their initial training (Booster Plus 75% vs 50% Booster Alone, P = 0.21). Adjusted for age, ABP-trained providers were 5.2× more likely to perform excellent CPR after the initial training (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.3-21.2; P = 0.02), and to retain these skills at 12 hours (adjusted odds ratio, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.3-14.9; P = 0.018) and 3 months (adjusted odds ratio, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.2-13.9; P = 0.023) when compared to baseline performance. The ABP-directed CPR booster trainings improved ICU provider 3-month retention of excellent CPR skills without the need for interval retraining.

  11. Ambulatory blood pressure improves prediction of cardiovascular risk: implications for better antihypertensive management.

    PubMed

    Krakoff, Lawrence R

    2013-04-01

    Accurate measurement of arterial pressure is necessary for diagnosis of hypertension and for assessment of its therapy. The development and growing application of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) furthers these goals. Use of ABPM has defined white coat hypertension (WCH) and masked hypertension (MH), important prognostic diagnoses. ABPM categorizes blood pressure in several ways that increase accuracy for diagnosis and prediction of cardiovascular risk. Measurements of blood pressure throughout the day, at night during sleep, during the morning surge, and, in some instances selected intervals can be especially valuable for both research and clinical management. ABPM is being explored for its value in measuring pulse pressure and a derived index of arterial stiffness. ABPM has also shown to be valuable for defining the effects of antihypertensive drugs therapy. Results of such studies are crucial for advancing antihypertensive management. This review will summarize the important and emerging role of ABPM in defining risk for cardiovascular disease.

  12. Does self-measurement of blood pressure improve patient compliance in hypertension?

    PubMed

    Edmonds, D; Foerster, E; Groth, H; Greminger, P; Siegenthaler, W; Vetter, W

    1985-04-01

    Compliance with antihypertensive therapy was measured before and after distribution of non-automatic blood pressure devices. After 2 weeks of placebo treatment, 37 patients were treated with an antihypertensive combination drug containing triamterene. Adherence to therapy was assessed over 8 months by measuring urine fluorescence due to triamterene at intervals of 2-4 weeks, unknown to the patients. After 3 months of therapy, all patients, not just those with poor compliance, were given blood pressure devices and were carefully instructed in their use. The results showed that self-recording of blood pressure increased the compliance rate in the total group from 65% at the beginning of the study to 81% at the end. In those who initially showed poor compliance, there was an increase in compliance from 0 to 70% after self-measuring of blood pressure was introduced. We conclude that self-recording of blood pressure may be of value in patients with unsatisfactory blood pressure responses in whom poor compliance is suspected.

  13. Home blood pressure monitoring, secure electronic messaging and medication intensification for improving hypertension control: a mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralston, J D; Cook, A J; Anderson, M L; Catz, S L; Fishman, P A; Carlson, J; Johnson, R; Green, B B

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the role of home monitoring, communication with pharmacists, medication intensification, medication adherence and lifestyle factors in contributing to the effectiveness of an intervention to improve blood pressure control in patients with uncontrolled essential hypertension. We performed a mediation analysis of a published randomized trial based on the Chronic Care Model delivered over a secure patient website from June 2005 to December 2007. Study arms analyzed included usual care with a home blood pressure monitor and usual care with home blood pressure monitor and web-based pharmacist care. Mediator measures included secure messaging and telephone encounters; home blood pressure monitoring; medications intensification and adherence and lifestyle factors. Overall fidelity to the Chronic Care Model was assessed with the Patient Assessment of Chronic Care (PACIC) instrument. The primary outcome was percent of participants with blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mm Hg. At 12 months follow-up, patients in the web-based pharmacist care group were more likely to have BP <140/90 mm Hg (55%) compared to patients in the group with home blood pressure monitors only (37%) (p = 0.001). Home blood pressure monitoring accounted for 30.3% of the intervention effect, secure electronic messaging accounted for 96%, and medication intensification for 29.3%. Medication adherence and self-report of fruit and vegetable intake and weight change were not different between the two study groups. The PACIC score accounted for 22.0 % of the main intervention effect. The effect of web-based pharmacist care on improved blood pressure control was explained in part through a combination of home blood pressure monitoring, secure messaging, and antihypertensive medication intensification.

  14. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fatigue. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics and strenuous exercise can lead to dehydration. Blood ... can cause low blood pressure, including: Water pills (diuretics), such as furosemide (Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (Maxzide, Microzide, ...

  15. Improving blood pressure control in end stage renal disease through a supportive educative nursing intervention.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension in patients on hemodialysis (HD) contributes significantly to their morbidity and mortality. This study examined whether a supportive nursing intervention incorporating monitoring, goal setting, and reinforcement can improve blood pressure (BP) control in a chronic HD population. A randomized controlled design was used and 118 participants were recruited from six HD units in the Detroit metro area. The intervention consisted of (1) BP education sessions; (2) a 12-week intervention, including monitoring, goal setting, and reinforcement; and (3) a 30-day post-intervention follow-up period. Participants in the treatment were asked to monitor their BP, sodium, and fluid intake weekly for 12 weeks in weekly logs. BP, fluid and sodium logs were reviewed weekly with the researcher to determine if goals were met or not met. Reinforcement was given for goals met and problem solving offered when goals were not met. The control group received standard care. Both systolic and diastolic BPs were significantly decreased in the treatment group.

  16. Positive airway pressure improves nocturnal beat-to-beat blood pressure surges in obesity hypoventilation syndrome with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason R; Fonkoue, Ida T; Grimaldi, Daniela; Emami, Leila; Gozal, David; Sullivan, Colin E; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has been shown to have a modest effect on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of PAP therapy on rapid, yet significant, BP swings during sleep, particularly in obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The present study hypothesizes that PAP therapy will improve nocturnal BP on the first treatment night (titration PAP) in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and that these improvements will become more significant with 6 wk of PAP therapy. Seventeen adults (7 men, 10 women; age 50.4 ± 10.7 years, BMI 49.3 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) with OHS and clinically diagnosed OSA participated in three overnight laboratory visits that included polysomnography and beat-to-beat BP monitoring via finger plethysmography. Six weeks of PAP therapy, but not titration PAP, lowered mean nocturnal BP. In contrast, when nocturnal beat-to-beat BPs were aggregated into bins consisting of at least three consecutive cardiac cycles with a >10 mmHg BP surge (i.e., Δ10-20, Δ20-30, Δ30-40, and Δ>40 mmHg), titration, and 6-wk PAP reduced the number of BP surges per hour (time × bin, P < 0.05). PAP adherence over the 6-wk period was significantly correlated to reductions in nocturnal systolic (r = 0.713, P = 0.001) and diastolic (r = 0.497, P = 0.043) BP surges. Despite these PAP-induced improvements in nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges, 6 wk of PAP therapy did not alter daytime BP. In conclusion, PAP treatment reduces nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and this improvement in nocturnal BP regulation was greater in patients with higher PAP adherence.

  17. Positive airway pressure improves nocturnal beat-to-beat blood pressure surges in obesity hypoventilation syndrome with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jason R.; Fonkoue, Ida T.; Grimaldi, Daniela; Emami, Leila; Gozal, David; Sullivan, Colin E.

    2016-01-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has been shown to have a modest effect on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is a paucity of data on the effect of PAP therapy on rapid, yet significant, BP swings during sleep, particularly in obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). The present study hypothesizes that PAP therapy will improve nocturnal BP on the first treatment night (titration PAP) in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and that these improvements will become more significant with 6 wk of PAP therapy. Seventeen adults (7 men, 10 women; age 50.4 ± 10.7 years, BMI 49.3 ± 2.4 kg/m2) with OHS and clinically diagnosed OSA participated in three overnight laboratory visits that included polysomnography and beat-to-beat BP monitoring via finger plethysmography. Six weeks of PAP therapy, but not titration PAP, lowered mean nocturnal BP. In contrast, when nocturnal beat-to-beat BPs were aggregated into bins consisting of at least three consecutive cardiac cycles with a >10 mmHg BP surge (i.e., Δ10–20, Δ20–30, Δ30–40, and Δ>40 mmHg), titration, and 6-wk PAP reduced the number of BP surges per hour (time × bin, P < 0.05). PAP adherence over the 6-wk period was significantly correlated to reductions in nocturnal systolic (r = 0.713, P = 0.001) and diastolic (r = 0.497, P = 0.043) BP surges. Despite these PAP-induced improvements in nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges, 6 wk of PAP therapy did not alter daytime BP. In conclusion, PAP treatment reduces nocturnal beat-to-beat BP surges in OHS patients with underlying OSA, and this improvement in nocturnal BP regulation was greater in patients with higher PAP adherence. PMID:26818059

  18. Passive heat therapy improves endothelial function, arterial stiffness and blood pressure in sedentary humans.

    PubMed

    Brunt, Vienna E; Howard, Matthew J; Francisco, Michael A; Ely, Brett R; Minson, Christopher T

    2016-09-15

    A recent 30 year prospective study showed that lifelong sauna use reduces cardiovascular-related and all-cause mortality; however, the specific cardiovascular adaptations that cause this chronic protection are currently unknown. We investigated the effects of 8 weeks of repeated hot water immersion ('heat therapy') on various biomarkers of cardiovascular health in young, sedentary humans. We showed that, relative to a sham group which participated in thermoneutral water immersion, heat therapy increased flow-mediated dilatation, reduced arterial stiffness, reduced mean arterial and diastolic blood pressure, and reduced carotid intima media thickness, with changes all on par or greater than what is typically observed in sedentary subjects with exercise training. Our results show for the first time that heat therapy has widespread and robust effects on vascular function, and as such, could be a viable treatment option for improving cardiovascular health in a variety of patient populations, particularly those with limited exercise tolerance and/or capabilities. The majority of cardiovascular diseases are characterized by disorders of the arteries, predominantly caused by endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. Intermittent hot water immersion ('heat therapy') results in elevations in core temperature and changes in cardiovascular haemodynamics, such as cardiac output and vascular shear stress, that are similar to exercise, and thus may provide an alternative means of improving health which could be utilized by patients with low exercise tolerance and/or capabilities. We sought to comprehensively assess the effects of 8 weeks of heat therapy on biomarkers of vascular function in young, sedentary subjects. Twenty young, sedentary subjects were assigned to participate in 8 weeks (4-5 times per week) of heat therapy (n = 10; immersion in a 40.5°C bath sufficient to maintain rectal temperature ≥ 38.5°C for 60 min per session) or thermoneutral water

  19. Music improves dopaminergic neurotransmission: demonstration based on the effect of music on blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Sutoo, Den'etsu; Akiyama, Kayo

    2004-08-06

    The mechanism by which music modifies brain function is not clear. Clinical findings indicate that music reduces blood pressure in various patients. We investigated the effect of music on blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Previous studies indicated that calcium increases brain dopamine (DA) synthesis through a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent system. Increased DA levels reduce blood pressure in SHR. In this study, we examined the effects of music on this pathway. Systolic blood pressure in SHR was reduced by exposure to Mozart's music (K.205), and the effect vanished when this pathway was inhibited. Exposure to music also significantly increased serum calcium levels and neostriatal DA levels. These results suggest that music leads to increased calcium/CaM-dependent DA synthesis in the brain, thus causing a reduction in blood pressure. Music might regulate and/or affect various brain functions through dopaminergic neurotransmission, and might therefore be effective for rectification of symptoms in various diseases that involve DA dysfunction.

  20. A technology-supported collaboration between a health plan and a community pharmacy to improve blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Frail, Caitlin K; Cooper, Susan; Gallagher, Tim; Sarkis, Josh; Topor, Laura; Bruzek, Richard J

    To assess the impact of a health plan and community pharmacy partnership to improve blood pressure control. A midwestern health plan and a regional community pharmacy chain. Health plan members with a hypertension diagnosis and attributed to the pharmacy chain based on prescription claims were invited to participate. Interested patients enrolled in the program at their pharmacies and were assigned a "smart card" for use with a blood pressure kiosk in the pharmacy. When the card was used at the kiosk, individual patient readings were linked directly to their electronic pharmacy record and an online patient portal. Pharmacists intervened with patients and prescribers as necessary to address adherence issues and adjust therapy as needed. Before and after blood pressure readings were assessed to determine the impact of patient self-monitoring and pharmacist intervention for patients with 1) uncontrolled blood pressure at first reading and 2) multiple readings throughout the pilot period. Fifty-six of 276 eligible patients (20%) were enrolled in the program. Fourteen patients qualified for before and after assessments, having uncontrolled blood pressure on initial reading and multiple readings throughout the pilot. These patients demonstrated a mean reduction in systolic blood pressure of 12 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 8 mm Hg. Nine of 16 eligible pharmacy locations enrolled patients at their sites. Challenges faced in the initiative included gaining adequate pharmacist and patient engagement. The pilot demonstrated promising early results in a model that has potential to improve blood pressure monitoring and management in a community pharmacy setting. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Development Laboratory developed a system for the cardiovascular study of weightless astronauts. This was designed to aid people with congestive heart failure and diabetes. While in space, astronauts' blood pressure rises, heart rate becomes unstable, and there are sometimes postflight lightheadedness or blackouts. The Baro-Cuff studies the resetting of blood pressure. When a silicone rubber chamber is strapped to the neck, the Baro-Cuff stimulates the carotid arteries by electronically controlled pressure application. Blood pressure controls in patients may be studied.

  2. Common Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Measurements Do Not Improve Cardiovascular Risk Prediction in Individuals With Elevated Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Groenewegen, Karlijn A.; Anderson, Todd J.; Britton, Annie R.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hedblad, Bo; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kavousi, Maryam; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Ikram, M. Arfan; Lonn, Eva M.; Lorenz, Matthias W.; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Nijpels, Giel; Okazaki, Shuhei; O’Leary, Daniel H.; Polak, Joseph F.; Price, Jacqueline F.; Robertson, Christine; Rembold, Christopher M.; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T.; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D.A.; Franco, Oscar H.; Peters, Sanne A.E.; den Ruijter, Hester M.

    2015-01-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a marker of cardiovascular risk. It is unclear whether measurement of mean common CIMT improves 10-year risk prediction of first-time myocardial infarction or stroke in individuals with elevated blood pressure. We performed an analysis among individuals with elevated blood pressure (ie, a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm Hg) in USE-IMT, a large ongoing individual participant data meta-analysis. We refitted the risk factors of the Framingham Risk Score on asymptomatic individuals (baseline model) and expanded this model with mean common CIMT (CIMT model) measurements. From both models, 10-year risks to develop a myocardial infarction or stroke were estimated. In individuals with elevated blood pressure, we compared discrimination and calibration of the 2 models and calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI). We included 17 254 individuals with elevated blood pressure from 16 studies. During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 2014 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. The C-statistics of the baseline and CIMT models were similar (0.73). NRI with the addition of mean common CIMT was small and not significant (1.4%; 95% confidence intervals, −1.1 to 3.7). In those at intermediate risk (n=5008, 10-year absolute risk of 10% to 20%), the NRI was 5.6% (95% confidence intervals, 1.6–10.4). There is no added value of measurement of mean common CIMT in individuals with elevated blood pressure for improving cardiovascular risk prediction. For those at intermediate risk, the addition of mean common CIMT to an existing cardiovascular risk score is small but statistically significant. PMID:24614213

  3. Follow-up of Antihypertensive Therapy Improves Blood Pressure Control: Results of HYT (HYperTension survey) Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fici, F; Seravalle, G; Koylan, N; Nalbantgil, I; Cagla, N; Korkut, Y; Quarti-Trevano, F; Makel, W; Grassi, G

    2017-05-11

    Although improved during the past few years, blood pressure control remains sub optimal. The impact of follow-up assessment on blood pressure control was evaluated in a group of patients of the HYT (HYperTension survey), treated with a combination of different dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers (CCBs regimen) and inhibitors of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and with uncontrolled blood pressure. This was obtained assessing (a) the rate of blood pressure control at 3 and 6 months of follow-up in the whole group of patients, (b) the rate of blood pressure control and the average blood pressure values in subjects treated with different DHP-CCBs regimen. From the 4993 patients with uncontrolled blood pressure, (BP ≥ 140/90 or ≥140/85 in patients with diabetes), 3729 (mean age 61.2 ± 11.5 years), maintained CCBs regimen combined wih RAAS blockers and were evaluated at 3 and 6 months follow-up. At each visit BP (semiautomatic device, Omron-M6, 3 measurements), heart rate, adverse events and treatment persistence were collected. At 1st and 2nd follow-up the rate of controlled BP was 63.5 and 72.8% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 35.3% at baseline), whereas in diabetes was 32.5 and 37.9% respectively (p < 0.05 vs 20% at baseline). No differences in heart rate were observed. No differences in control rate were observed between the different CCBs regimen. The incidence of drugs related adverse events was 3.6%. These findings provide evidence that: (a) the follow-up of hypertensive patients under therapy increase the rate of blood pressure control; (b) there is no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect between different CCBs regimen; (c) lipophilic CCBs induce less ankle edema.

  4. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  5. Team-based care and improved blood pressure control: a community guide systematic review.

    PubMed

    Proia, Krista K; Thota, Anilkrishna B; Njie, Gibril J; Finnie, Ramona K C; Hopkins, David P; Mukhtar, Qaiser; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Zeigler, Donald; Kottke, Thomas E; Rask, Kimberly J; Lackland, Daniel T; Brooks, Joy F; Braun, Lynne T; Cooksey, Tonya

    2014-07-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension remains a widely prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the U.S. team-based care, established by adding new staff or changing the roles of existing staff such as nurses and pharmacists to work with a primary care provider and the patient. Team-based care has the potential to improve the quality of hypertension management. The goal of this Community Guide systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of team-based care in improving blood pressure (BP) outcomes. An existing systematic review (search period, January 1980-July 2003) assessing team-based care for BP control was supplemented with a Community Guide update (January 2003-May 2012). For the Community Guide update, two reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed quality of eligible studies. Twenty-eight studies in the prior review (1980-2003) and an additional 52 studies from the Community Guide update (2003-2012) qualified for inclusion. Results from both bodies of evidence suggest that team-based care is effective in improving BP outcomes. From the update, the proportion of patients with controlled BP improved (median increase=12 percentage points); systolic BP decreased (median reduction=5.4 mmHg); and diastolic BP also decreased (median reduction=1.8 mmHg). Team-based care increased the proportion of people with controlled BP and reduced both systolic and diastolic BP, especially when pharmacists and nurses were part of the team. Findings are applicable to a range of U.S. settings and population groups. Implementation of this multidisciplinary approach will require health system-level organizational changes and could be an important element of the medical home. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Phenylalanine improves dilation and blood pressure in GTP cyclohydrolase inhibition-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brett M; Dorrance, Anne M; Webb, R Clinton

    2004-06-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of the nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), is partly regulated by the GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). GFRP can inhibit GTPCH by end-product negative feedback, and L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) reverses this inhibition and increases BH4 biosynthesis in vitro. We hypothesized that L-Phe would increase endothelium-dependent relaxation and decrease blood pressure in rats made hypertensive by GTPCH inhibition. Di-amino-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP, 10 mmol/L), a known inhibitor of GTPCH, was given with or without L-Phe or D-Phe (2 mmol/L) in the drinking water of rats for 3 days and blood pressure was measured via tail-cuff. Endothelium-intact aortic segments were hung in organ chambers for measurement of isometric force generation. Systolic blood pressure was increased significantly in DAHP-treated rats compared with controls. The addition of L-Phe attenuated the hypertensive effect, whereas D-Phe had no effect. Acetylcholine- and A23187-induced relaxation was decreased in aortas from DAHP-treated rats compared with controls, but was restored in aortas from DAHP+L-Phe-treated rats. Following NOS inhibition, sensitivity to sodium nitroprusside was increased in aortas from DAHP-treated rats, but restored in DAHP+L-Phe-treated rats. These results suggest that L-Phe can reverse GTPCH inhibition in vivo leading to increased vasodilation and decreased blood pressure.

  7. [Measuring blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Estrada Reventos, Dolors; Pujol Navarro, Ester

    2008-09-01

    High blood pressure is one of the main factors which lead to cardiovascular cerebral-vascular and kidney diseases; therefore, nursing professionals should have enough basic knowledge to enable them to carry out a precocious diagnosis and correct follow-up procedures. Although students in nursing schools are taught how to correctly measure blood pressure, often this teaching does not meet the recommendations provided by different national and international guidelines. Thus it is important to know how to use the correct methodology to measure blood pressure.

  8. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes: what family physicians can do to improve control of blood pressure--an observational study.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Wayne; Lawson, Beverley; Buhariwalla, Farokh; Goodfellow, Mary; Goodine, Rose Anne; Hall, Jennifer; Lacey, Kendrick; MacDonald, Ian; Burge, Frederick I; Natarajan, Nandini; Sketris, Ingrid; Mann, Beth; Dunbar, Peggy; Van Aarsen, Kristine; Godwin, Marshall S

    2011-08-11

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising, and most of these patients also have hypertension, substantially increasing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The majority of these patients do not reach target blood pressure levels for a wide variety of reasons. When a literature review provided no clear focus for action when patients are not at target, we initiated a study to identify characteristics of patients and providers associated with achieving target BP levels in community-based practice. We conducted a practice-based, cross-sectional observational and mailed survey study. The setting was the practices of 27 family physicians and nurse practitioners in 3 eastern provinces in Canada. The participants were all patients with type 2 diabetes who could understand English, were able to give consent, and would be available for follow-up for more than one year. Data were collected from each patient's medical record and from each patient and physician/nurse practitioner by mailed survey. Our main outcome measures were overall blood pressure at target (< 130/80), systolic blood pressure at target, and diastolic blood pressure at target. Analysis included initial descriptive statistics, logistic regression models, and multivariate regression using hierarchical nonlinear modeling (HNLM). Fifty-four percent were at target for both systolic and diastolic pressures. Sixty-two percent were at systolic target, and 79% were at diastolic target. Patients who reported eating food low in salt had higher odds of reaching target blood pressure. Similarly, patients reporting low adherence to their medication regimen had lower odds of reaching target blood pressure. When primary care health professionals are dealing with blood pressures above target in a patient with type 2 diabetes, they should pay particular attention to two factors. They should inquire about dietary salt intake, strongly emphasize the importance of reduction, and refer for detailed counseling if

  9. Improved Blood Pressure Control Using an Interactive Mobile Phone Support System.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Ulrika; Kjellgren, Karin; Hallberg, Inger; Lindwall, Magnus; Taft, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This explorative, longitudinal study evaluated the effect of the daily use of a mobile phone-based self-management support system for hypertension in reducing blood pressure (BP) among 50 primary care patients with hypertension over 8 weeks. The self-management system comprises modules for (1) self-reports of BP, pulse, lifestyle, symptoms, and well-being; (2) delivery of reminders and encouragements; and (3) graphical feedback of self-reports. Daily use of the support system significantly reduced BP (systolic BP -7 mm Hg, diastolic BP -4.9 mm Hg) between baseline and week 8, with daily improvements leveling off as the study progressed. Three homogenous subsets of patients were identified who, despite different initial BP levels, showed similar decreases in BP during the study, indicating that patients benefited irrespective of baseline BP. In showing significant reductions in BP, our results suggest that the self-management support system may be a useful tool in clinical practice to help patients self-manage their hypertension.

  10. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... is at rest between beats Health care workers write blood pressure numbers with the systolic number above ... available to discuss recent findings and ongoing research projects about health conditions and social determinants that disproportionately ...

  11. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  12. Cocoa reduces blood pressure and insulin resistance and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Lippi, Cristina; Croce, Giuseppe; Valeri, Letizia; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Desideri, Giovambattista; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Ferri, Claudio

    2005-08-01

    Consumption of flavanol-rich dark chocolate (DC) has been shown to decrease blood pressure (BP) and insulin resistance in healthy subjects, suggesting similar benefits in patients with essential hypertension (EH). Therefore, we tested the effect of DC on 24-hour ambulatory BP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in patients with EH. After a 7-day chocolate-free run-in phase, 20 never-treated, grade I patients with EH (10 males; 43.7+/-7.8 years) were randomized to receive either 100 g per day DC (containing 88 mg flavanols) or 90 g per day flavanol-free white chocolate (WC) in an isocaloric manner for 15 days. After a second 7-day chocolate-free period, patients were crossed over to the other treatment. Noninvasive 24-hour ambulatory BP, FMD, OGTT, serum cholesterol, and markers of vascular inflammation were evaluated at the end of each treatment. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were calculated from OGTT values. Ambulatory BP decreased after DC (24-hour systolic BP -11.9+/-7.7 mm Hg, P<0.0001; 24-hour diastolic BP -8.5+/-5.0 mm Hg, P<0.0001) but not WC. DC but not WC decreased HOMA-IR (P<0.0001), but it improved QUICKI, ISI, and FMD. DC also decreased serum LDL cholesterol (from 3.4+/-0.5 to 3.0+/-0.6 mmol/L; P<0.05). In summary, DC decreased BP and serum LDL cholesterol, improved FMD, and ameliorated insulin sensitivity in hypertensives. These results suggest that, while balancing total calorie intake, flavanols from cocoa products may provide some cardiovascular benefit if included as part of a healthy diet for patients with EH.

  13. Long-term anti-hypertensive therapy with benidipine improves arterial stiffness over blood pressure lowering.

    PubMed

    Kita, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Eto, Tanenao; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2005-12-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects arterial stiffness and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. However, because it is closely related to blood pressure (BP), PWV is an imperfect measure for evaluating the effects of anti-hypertensive drugs on arterial wall properties. To clarify the effect of benidipine on arterial properties, we first derived the regression line between BP and PWV changes in a short-term experiment. Using this line, we evaluated the long-term effect of benidipine on PWV changes. In the short-term experiment, 29 participants were intravenously administered nicardipine for 90 min. Maximum decreases of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were plotted against the corresponding decreases in BP. In the long-term experiment, 9 hypertensive patients were treated with benidipine for 1 year, during which BP and baPWV were monitored. After 1 year, benidipine was suspended for 2 weeks, and BP and baPWV were reevaluated. In the short-term experiment, PWV was dependent on BP only, and the equation of the regression line was deltaPWV (cm/s) =10.114 x deltaMBP (mmHg) (r=0.913) or deltaPWV (%) =0.719 x deltaMBP (%) (r=0.926). In the long-term therapy, benidipine treatment achieved stable BP control within 3 months; the real PWV decreases (r-PWV) were almost identical to the PWV decrease estimated (e-PWV) from BP lowering at 3 months. However, r-PWV exceeded e-PWV after 6 months. Relative BP and PWV improvements compared to the control were maintained 2 weeks after suspension of benidipine. In conclusion, long-term benidipine administration improves arterial wall properties beyond what can be accounted for by changes in BP.

  14. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  15. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  16. Incremental costs associated with physician and pharmacist collaboration to improve blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Kulchaitanaroaj, Puttarin; Brooks, John M; Ardery, Gail; Newman, Dana; Carter, Barry L

    2012-08-01

    To compare costs associated with a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention with costs of usual care. Cost analysis using health care utilization and outcome data from two prospective, cluster-randomized, controlled clinical trials. Eleven community-based medical offices. A total of 496 patients with hypertension; 244 were in the usual care (control) group and 252 were in the intervention group. To compare the costs, we combined cost data from the two trials. Total costs included costs of provider time, laboratory tests, and antihypertensive drugs. Provider time was calculated based on an online survey of intervention pharmacists and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Cost parameters were taken from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for average wage rates, the Medicare laboratory fee schedule, and a publicly available Web site for drug prices. Total costs were adjusted for patient characteristics. Adjusted total costs were $774.90 in the intervention group and $445.75 in the control group (difference $329.16, p<0.001). In a sensitivity analysis, the difference in adjusted total costs between the two groups ranged from $224.27-515.56. The intervention cost required to have one additional patient achieve blood pressure control within 6 months was $1338.05, determined by the difference in costs divided by the difference in hypertension control rates between the groups ($329.16/24.6%). The cost over 6 months to lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure 1 mm Hg was $36.25 and $94.32, respectively. The physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention increased not only blood pressure control but also the cost of care. Additional research, such as a cost-benefit or a cost-minimization analysis, is needed to assess whether financial savings related to reduced morbidity and mortality achieved from better blood pressure control outweigh the cost of the intervention. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  18. Ellagic acid improves electrocardiogram waves and blood pressure against global cerebral ischemia rat experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Nejad, Khojasteh Hoseiny; Dianat, Mahin; Sarkaki, Alireza; Naseri, Mohammad Kazem Gharib; Badavi, Mohammad; Farbood, Yaghoub

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global cerebral ischemia (GCIR) arises in patients that are shown a variety of clinical difficulty including cardiac arrest, asphyxia, and shock. In spite of advances in understanding of the brain, ischemia and protective effects to improve ischemic injury still remain unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of ellagic acid (EA) pretreatment in the rat models of global cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Methods: This experimental study was conducted in 2014 at the Physiology Research Center of the Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in Ahvaz, Iran. Adult male Wistar rats (250–300 g) were used in this study. GCIR was induced by bilateral vertebral and common carotid arteries occlusion (4-VO). 32 rats were divided randomly to four groups: 1) So (Sham) received normal saline as vehicle of EA, 2) EA, 3) normal saline + GCIR, and 4) EA + GCIR. After anesthesia (a mix of xylazine and ketamine), animal subjected to 20 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion in related groups. EA (100 mg/kg, dissolved in normal saline) or 1.5 ml/kg normal saline was administered (gavage, 10 days) to the related groups. EEG was recorded from NTS in GCIR treated groups. Results: Present data showed that: 1) EEG in GCIR treated groups was flattened; 2) Blood pressure, voltage of QRS and P-R interval were reduced significantly in the ischemic groups compared to before ischemia, and pretreatment with EA prevented this reduction; and 3) MDA level and heart rate was increased by GCIR and pretreatment with EA reduced MDA level and restored the HR to normal level. Conclusion: Results indicate that global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion impairs certain heart functions and ellagic acid as an antioxidant can restore these parameters. The results of this study suggest the possible utility of ellagic acid in patients with brain stroke. PMID:26396728

  19. Ellagic acid improves electrocardiogram waves and blood pressure against global cerebral ischemia rat experimental models.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Khojasteh Hoseiny; Dianat, Mahin; Sarkaki, Alireza; Naseri, Mohammad Kazem Gharib; Badavi, Mohammad; Farbood, Yaghoub

    2015-08-01

    Global cerebral ischemia (GCIR) arises in patients that are shown a variety of clinical difficulty including cardiac arrest, asphyxia, and shock. In spite of advances in understanding of the brain, ischemia and protective effects to improve ischemic injury still remain unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of ellagic acid (EA) pretreatment in the rat models of global cerebral ischemia reperfusion. This experimental study was conducted in 2014 at the Physiology Research Center of the Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in Ahvaz, Iran. Adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were used in this study. GCIR was induced by bilateral vertebral and common carotid arteries occlusion (4-VO). 32 rats were divided randomly to four groups: 1) So (Sham) received normal saline as vehicle of EA, 2) EA, 3) normal saline + GCIR, and 4) EA + GCIR. After anesthesia (a mix of xylazine and ketamine), animal subjected to 20 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion in related groups. EA (100 mg/kg, dissolved in normal saline) or 1.5 ml/kg normal saline was administered (gavage, 10 days) to the related groups. EEG was recorded from NTS in GCIR treated groups. Present data showed that: 1) EEG in GCIR treated groups was flattened; 2) Blood pressure, voltage of QRS and P-R interval were reduced significantly in the ischemic groups compared to before ischemia, and pretreatment with EA prevented this reduction; and 3) MDA level and heart rate was increased by GCIR and pretreatment with EA reduced MDA level and restored the HR to normal level. Results indicate that global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion impairs certain heart functions and ellagic acid as an antioxidant can restore these parameters. The results of this study suggest the possible utility of ellagic acid in patients with brain stroke.

  20. (-)-Epicatechin reduces blood pressure and improves vasorelaxation in spontaneously hypertensive rats by NO-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Galleano, Monica; Bernatova, Iveta; Puzserova, Angelika; Balis, Peter; Sestakova, Natalia; Pechanova, Olga; Fraga, Cesar G

    2013-08-01

    Studies in humans have found consumption of certain flavanoid-containing foods to be associated with improvement in endothelial function and with reduction of blood pressure (BP). (-)-Epicatechin is a compound representative of the flavanols (a subfamily of flavonoids), abundant in cocoa seeds, which is preserved during the industrialization process to chocolate. The antihypertensive effect of dietary (-)-epicatechin was investigated on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Consumption of (-)-epicatechin-supplemented diet (3 g (-)-epicatechin/kg diet) decreased BP in SHR by 27 and 23 mm Hg on days 2 and 6, respectively. On day 6, a 173% increase of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was observed in the aorta of EPI-SHR as compared to nonsupplemented SHR (P < 0.05). Responses to acetylcholine (ACh) were then examined in femoral arteries in the absence and the presence of L-NAME, a nonselective NOS inhibitor, to assess the ACh-mediated relaxation ascribed to NO-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the femoral artery was significantly higher in EPI-SHR than in SHR, with a predominance of the NO-dependent component of this relaxation. The endothelium-independent relaxation, assayed by using the NO donor sodium nitroprusside, resulted in nonsignificant difference in the three experimental groups, demonstrating an unaffected function of vascular smooth muscle cells. These results give further support to the concept that (-)-epicatechin can modulate BP in hypertension by increasing NO levels in the vasculature. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Exercise training improves ambulatory blood pressure but not arterial stiffness in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pascoalino, Lucas Nóbilo; Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes; Tavares, Aline Cristina; Castro, Rafael Ertner; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia Moreira; Bacal, Fernando; Issa, Victor Sarli; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent comorbidity after heart transplantation (HT). Exercise training (ET) is widely recommended as a key non-pharmacologic intervention for the prevention and management of hypertension, but its effects on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and some mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension have not been studied in this population. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ET on ABP and arterial stiffness of HT recipients. 40 HT patients, randomized to ET (n = 31) or a control group (n = 9) underwent a maximal graded exercise test, 24-hour ABP monitoring, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment before the intervention and at a 12-week follow-up assessment. The ET program was performed thrice-weekly and consisted primarily of endurance exercise (40 minutes) at ~70% of maximum oxygen uptake (Vo2MAX). The ET group had reduced 24-hour (4.0 ± 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.01) and daytime (4.8 ± 1.6 mm Hg, p < 0.01) systolic ABP, and 24-hour (7.0 ± 1.4 mm Hg, p < 0.001) daytime (7.5 ± 1.6 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and nighttime (5.9 ± 1.5 mm Hg, p < 0.001) diastolic ABP after the intervention. The ET group also had improved Vo2MAX (9.7% ± 2.6%, p < 0.001) after the intervention. However, PWV did not change after ET. No variable was changed in the control group after the intervention. The 12-week ET program was effective for reducing ABP but not PWV in heart transplant recipients. This result suggests that endurance ET may be a tool to counteract hypertension in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute arginine supplementation fails to improve muscle endurance or affect blood pressure responses to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau K; Jones, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    Dietary supplement companies claim that arginine supplements acutely enhance skeletal muscular endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute arginine α-ketoglutarate supplementation (AAKG) will affect local muscle endurance of the arm and shoulder girdle or the blood pressure (BP) response to anaerobic exercise. Twelve trained college-aged men (22.6 ± 3.8 years) performed 2 trials of exercise separated by at least 1 week. At 4 hours before, and 30 minutes before exercise, a serving of an AAKG supplement (3,700 mg arginine alpha-ketoglutarate per serving) or placebo was administered. Resting BP was assessed pre-exercise after 16 minutes of seated rest, and 5 and 10 minutes postexercise. Three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups were performed to exhaustion with 3 minutes of rest between each set. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The AAKG supplementation did not improve muscle endurance or significantly affect the BP response to anaerobic work. Subjects performed fewer total chin-ups (23.75 ± 6.38 vs. 25.58 ± 7.18) and total trial repetitions (137.92 ± 28.18 vs. 141.08 ± 28.57) in the supplement trial (p ≤ 0.05). Subjects executed fewer reverse chin-ups (5.83 ± 1.85 vs. 6.75 ± 2.09) during set 2 after receiving the supplement as compared to the placebo (p < 0.05). Because AAKG supplementation may hinder muscular endurance, the use of these supplements before resistance training should be questioned.

  3. Rationale and design of the Medication adherence Improvement Support App For Engagement-Blood Pressure (MedISAFE-BP) trial.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Kyle; Ghazinouri, Roya; Krumme, Alexis; McDonough, Julianne; Durfee, Erin; Oley, Leslie; Mohta, Namita; Juusola, Jessie; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the health and economic burden imposed by stroke, heart disease, and renal insufficiency. Antihypertensives can prevent many of the harmful effects of elevated blood pressure, but medication nonadherence is a known barrier to the effectiveness of these treatments. Smartphone-based applications that remind patients to take their medications, provide education, and allow for social interactions between individuals with similar health concerns have been widely advocated as a strategy to improve adherence but have not been subject to rigorous testing. The MedISAFE-BP study is a prospective, randomized control trial designed to evaluate the impact on blood pressure and medication adherence of an mhealth application (Medisafe). Four hundred thirteen patients with uncontrolled hypertension have been enrolled and randomized in a 1:1 fashion to usual care or to the use of the Medisafe mhealth platform. Patients will be followed up for 12 weeks and the trial's co-primary outcomes will be change in systolic blood pressure and self-reported medication adherence. The MedISAFE-BP trial is the first study to rigorously evaluate an mhealth application's effect on blood pressure and medication adherence. The results will inform the potential effectiveness of this simple system in improving cardiovascular disease risk factors and clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritional effects on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Valerie H; Champagne, Catherine M

    2007-02-01

    There has not been a thorough recent evaluation of the nutritional effects on blood pressure. Apart from outstanding clinical trials like Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, there have been controversial papers on a number of factors influencing blood pressure. This paper is a systematic review of the current literature as it relates to hypertension. Results from many meta-analyses and well controlled clinical trials on the effects of a variety of nutritional factors are presented in this review. Evidence suggests that dietary sodium intake needs reduction. There is a seemingly inverse relationship between protein intake and blood pressure, but data are inconclusive. High monounsaturated fat and fish oil appear to be beneficial. Several studies on dietary fiber indicate that the strongest evidence for blood pressure lowering effects is in hypertensive as opposed to normotensive participants. Vegetarians seem to have lower levels of hypertension and cardiovascular disease risk. Low carbohydrate diets show short-term beneficial effects but are not sustained. High levels of potassium, magnesium, calcium and soy seem to have some benefit, but results remain inconclusive. Weight reduction positively impacts blood pressure. More compelling research defining specific factors is needed to inform the public as to steps needed to reduce blood pressure and improve cardiovascular risk.

  5. Argan (Argania spinosa) oil lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Alvarez de Sotomayor, Maria; Pérez-Guerrero, Concepción; Ettaib, Abdelkader; Hmamouchi, Mohamed; Marhuenda, Elisa; Herrera, Maria Dolores

    2004-12-01

    Traditionally hand-pressed argan oil, obtained from Argania spinosa seeds, is eaten raw in south-west Morocco; its rich composition of tocopherols, MUFA and PUFA make a study of its actions on risk factors for CVD, such as hypertension, interesting. The effects of 7 weeks of treatment with argan oil (10 ml/kg) on the blood pressure and endothelial function of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats were investigated. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured every week by the tail-cuff method and endothelial function was assessed by carbachol (10(-8) to 10(-4) M)-induced relaxations of aortic rings and small mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine. Argan-oil administration reduced the mean blood pressure of SHR after the fifth week of treatment (P<0.05) and increased (P<0.01) the endothelial responses of arteries from SHR. The NO synthase inhibitor, L-N-omega-nitroarginine (3 x 10(-5) M) revealed a greater participation of NO in the relaxant effect after the treatment. When cyclooxygenase (COX) was blocked with indomethacin (10(-5) M), an involvement of COX products in the endothelium-dependent response was characterized. Enzyme immunoassay of thromboxane B2 showed a significant decrease (P<0.05) in the release of thromboxane A2 in both aorta and small mesenteric artery after argan-oil treatment of SHR. Experiments in the presence of the thromboxane A2-prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist ICI 192,605 (10(-5) M) confirmed this result. Results after incubation with the antioxidants superoxide dismutase and catalase suggested that a decreased oxidative stress might contribute to explain the beneficial effects of argan-oil treatment.

  6. Self-directed Mindfulness Training and Improvement in Blood Pressure, Migraine Frequency, and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Margaret; Bradley, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interest in case studies has undergone a resurgence concurrent with increasing prioritization of illustrations of patient-centered care. However, substantial inclusion of the patient in these reports remains limited. Here, a doctor and patient collaborate to present her case report of self-directed mindfulness training and the subsequent changes in blood pressure, migraine frequency, and quality of life. Methods: After receiving encouragement from her naturopathic doctor, the patient initiated an 8-week program in mindfulness training following the Kabat-Zinn protocol and logged her daily blood pressure and symptoms before and after meditation sessions over an 11-week period. Results: Patient-reported outcomes included decreased perceived stress, increased focus, and a newfound sense of centeredness and calm. Changes in objective outcomes were clinically and statistically significant, including reductions in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure between week 1 and week 11 (P = .0001 and P = .0004 for systolic and diastolic, respectively, by paired, 2-sided t-tests). Self-reported frequency of chronic migraine was also reduced. Critical to the patient's success was that mindfulness training was first approached in a simple, accessible manner prior to embarking on a deeper, extended experience. Discussion and Conclusion: Self-directed mindfulness training can have a meaningful impact on both subjective and objective health outcomes. It may take years of encouragement from a healthcare provider before a patient is ready to adopt a mind-body practice; it is important to recognize and counsel patients with messages appropriate to their stage of change and self-efficacy. Additionally, case studies that combine the voice of the clinician and the patient can provide useful illustrations of truly patient-centered care. PMID:24278842

  7. Test Your Blood Pressure IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... How High Blood Pressure is Diagnosed BP vs. Heart Rate Low Blood Pressure Resistant Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension High Blood Pressure Myths ... Healthy 6 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 7 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 8 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 9 Warning ...

  8. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  9. Improvements in Blood Pressure Among Undiagnosed Hypertensive Participants in a Community-Based Lifestyle Intervention, Mississippi, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Jessica L.; Landry, Alicia S.; Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Connell, Carol; Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Effective strategies are needed to reach and treat people who lack awareness of or have uncontrolled hypertension. We used data from a community-based participatory research initiative, Hub City Steps, to quantify the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension and determine the relationship between hypertension status at baseline and postintervention improvements in blood pressure and health-related quality of life. Methods Hub City Steps was a 6-month preintervention–postintervention lifestyle intervention targeting hypertension risk factors. Outcome measures were collected at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Generalized linear mixed models were used to test for effects by time and hypertension status. Results Of the enrolled sample (N = 269), most were overweight or obese (91%), African American (94%), and women (85%). When considering hypertension status, 42% had self-reported diagnosis of hypertension (self-reported subgroup; 84% with antihypertensive medication use); 36% had no self-reported medical history of hypertension, but when blood pressure was measured they had a clinical diagnosis of prehypertension or hypertension (undiagnosed subgroup); and 22% had no self-reported or clinical hypertension diagnosis (no hypertension subgroup). From baseline to 6 months, systolic blood pressure significantly improved for participants with self-reported hypertension [8.2 (SD, 18.2) mm Hg] and undiagnosed hypertension [12.3 (SD, 16.3) mm Hg], with undiagnosed participants experiencing the greatest improvements (P < .001). Effects remained significant after controlling for covariates. Health-related quality of life significantly improved for all 3 hypertension subgroups, with no apparent subgroup differences. Conclusion This study reveals advantages of a culturally appropriate community-based participatory research initiative to reach those with undetected hypertension and effectively improve blood pressure status and health-related quality of life. PMID

  10. Need for Better Blood Pressure Measurement in Developing Countries to Improve Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Perruolo, Eleonora; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is now the foremost cause of disability and is responsible for the highest percentage of attributable death among risk factors. These global changes are mainly due to the increase in the prevalence of hypertension in most low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) as a consequence of relevant socioeconomic changes occurring during the last decades. Implementation of global prevention efforts urgently needs to be accelerated because of the increasing incidence of haemorrhagic stroke, renal failure, and hypertensive heart disease in developing countries. Blood pressure (BP) measurement has different implications in epidemiological studies performed in low-resource settings. First, the frequency of blood pressure measurement is a simple but reliable indicator of access to healthcare in epidemiological studies, which may disclose the favourable effects of urbanization; the opportunity to have BP measured increases hypertension awareness, facilitates drug treatment, and leads to better achievement of BP control. Second, BP measurement is a key element in cardiovascular risk stratification, focusing solely on the preferred strategy in low-resource settings where costs of biochemical tests might be less sustainable. Third, the issue of obtaining reliable estimation of BP values is crucial to achieve sound data on the burden of hypertension in LMICs, and some aspects of BP measurement, such as the use of reliable automated devices, the number of measurements/visits to achieve a consistent diagnosis of hypertension, and the possible confounding effect of environmental factors, must be closely considered. PMID:25420484

  11. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause high blood pressure. Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system makes angiotensin and ... blood volumes and high blood pressure. Sympathetic Nervous System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions ...

  12. Improved control of blood pressure and albuminuria among patients with type-2 diabetes in Finnish open care.

    PubMed

    Varis, Juha; Metsärinne, Kaj; Koivisto, Veikko; Niskanen, Leo; Rissanen, Aila; Virkamäki, Antti; Appelroth, Tina; Pöntynen, Nora; Poussa, Tuija; Kantola, Ilkka

    2017-04-01

    Risk of cardiovascular events within the diabetic population has decreased and survival increased with patients living longer and thus facing the development of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This calls for good care of patient with diabetes with a focus on hypertension. Patient data were collected from 42 Finnish primary care centres. Each was asked to enrol 10-12 consecutive patients with type-2 diabetes between March 2011 and August 2012. Along with the office blood pressure measurements and laboratory tests, the presence of albuminuria was measured and glomerular filtration rate estimated (eGFR). The 2013 ESH criteria for diabetic hypertensive patients (<140/85 mmHg) was reached by 39% of all 625 study patients and 38% of the pharmacologically treated 520 patients. The absence of detectable albumin in urine was significantly associated with the control of systolic blood pressure and achievement of treatment goals. Beta blockers were the most common antihypertensive agents and patients treated with them had lower eGFR compared to those not treated with these agents. The blood pressure of patients was not in full concordance with the present guideline recommendations. However, satisfactory improvement in blood pressure control, reduction of albuminuria and hence ESRD prevention was achieved.

  13. Virgin Coconut Oil Prevents Blood Pressure Elevation and Improves Endothelial Functions in Rats Fed with Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil

    PubMed Central

    Nurul-Iman, Badlishah Sham; Kamisah, Yusof; Jaarin, Kamsiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) in male rats that were fed with repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, plasma nitric oxide level, and vascular reactivity. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (i) control (basal diet), (ii) VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral), (iii) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) (5HPO), and (iv) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) and VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral) (5HPO + VCO). Blood pressure was significantly increased in the group that was given the 5HPO diet compared to the control group. Blood pressure in the 5HPO + VCO group was significantly lower than the 5HPO group. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) level in the 5HPO group was significantly lower compared to the control group, whereas in the 5HPO + VCO group, the plasma NO level was significantly higher compared to the 5HPO group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO group exhibited attenuated relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as well as increased vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the control group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO + VCO group showed only attenuated vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the 5HPO group. In conclusion, VCO prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil. PMID:23861707

  14. Virgin coconut oil prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil.

    PubMed

    Nurul-Iman, Badlishah Sham; Kamisah, Yusof; Jaarin, Kamsiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the effects of virgin coconut oil (VCO) in male rats that were fed with repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, plasma nitric oxide level, and vascular reactivity. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (i) control (basal diet), (ii) VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral), (iii) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) (5HPO), and (iv) five-times-heated palm oil (15%) and VCO (1.42 mL/kg, oral) (5HPO + VCO). Blood pressure was significantly increased in the group that was given the 5HPO diet compared to the control group. Blood pressure in the 5HPO + VCO group was significantly lower than the 5HPO group. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) level in the 5HPO group was significantly lower compared to the control group, whereas in the 5HPO + VCO group, the plasma NO level was significantly higher compared to the 5HPO group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO group exhibited attenuated relaxation in response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as well as increased vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the control group. Aortic rings from the 5HPO + VCO group showed only attenuated vasoconstriction to phenylephrine compared to the 5HPO group. In conclusion, VCO prevents blood pressure elevation and improves endothelial functions in rats fed with repeatedly heated palm oil.

  15. Predicting Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Clinic (PROOF-BP): Derivation and Validation of a Tool to Improve the Accuracy of Blood Pressure Measurement in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, James P; Stevens, Richard; Gill, Paramjit; Martin, Una; Godwin, Marshall; Hanley, Janet; Heneghan, Carl; Hobbs, F D Richard; Mant, Jonathan; McKinstry, Brian; Myers, Martin; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Patients often have lower (white coat effect) or higher (masked effect) ambulatory/home blood pressure readings compared with clinic measurements, resulting in misdiagnosis of hypertension. The present study assessed whether blood pressure and patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict the difference between ambulatory/home and clinic blood pressure readings (the home-clinic difference). A linear regression model predicting the home-clinic blood pressure difference was derived in 2 data sets measuring automated clinic and ambulatory/home blood pressure (n=991) using candidate predictors identified from a literature review. The model was validated in 4 further data sets (n=1172) using area under the receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. A masked effect was associated with male sex, a positive clinic blood pressure change (difference between consecutive measurements during a single visit), and a diagnosis of hypertension. Increasing age, clinic blood pressure level, and pulse pressure were associated with a white coat effect. The model showed good calibration across data sets (Pearson correlation, 0.48-0.80) and performed well-predicting ambulatory hypertension (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-0.79 [systolic]; 0.87; 0.85-0.89 [diastolic]). Used as a triaging tool for ambulatory monitoring, the model improved classification of a patient's blood pressure status compared with other guideline recommended approaches (93% [92% to 95%] classified correctly; United States, 73% [70% to 75%]; Canada, 74% [71% to 77%]; United Kingdom, 78% [76% to 81%]). This study demonstrates that patient characteristics from a single clinic visit can accurately predict a patient's ambulatory blood pressure. Usage of this prediction tool for triaging of ambulatory monitoring could result in more accurate diagnosis of hypertension and hence more appropriate treatment.

  16. Short-term remote ischemic preconditioning is not associated with improved blood pressure and exercise capacity in young adults.

    PubMed

    Banks, Laura; Wells, Greg D; Clarizia, Nadia A; Jean-St-Michel, Emilie; McKillop, Adam L; Redington, Andrew N; McCrindle, Brian W

    2016-08-01

    We sought to determine whether a 9-day remote ischemic preconditioning (IPC) causes improvements in exercise performance, energetics, and blood pressure. Ten participants (mean age 24 ± 4 years) had no changes in aerobic capacity (preintervention: 38 ± 10 mL/(kg·min)(-1) vs. postintervention: 38 ± 10 mL/(kg·min)(-1)), blood pressure (preintervention: 112 ± 7/66 ± 6 mm Hg vs. postintervention: 112 ± 10/62 ± 5 mm Hg), cardiac phosphocreatinine-to-adenosine-triphosphate ratio (preintervention: 2.1 ± 0.5 vs. postintervention: 2.3 ± 0.4), and postexercise skeletal muscle phosphocreatine recovery (preintervention: 34 ± 11 s vs. postintervention: 31 ± 11 s). Short-term remote IPC may be ineffective in improving these outcomes.

  17. Improving management and effectiveness of home blood pressure monitoring: a qualitative UK primary care study

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Sabrina; Greenfield, Sheila M; Nouwen, Arie; McManus, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring blood pressure (SMBP) is becoming an increasingly prevalent practice in UK primary care, yet there remains little conceptual understanding of why patients with hypertension engage in self-monitoring. Aim To identify psychological factors or processes prompting the decision to self-monitor blood pressure. Design and setting A qualitative study of patients previously participating in a survey study about SMBP from four general practices in the West Midlands. Method Taped and transcribed in-depth interviews with 16 patients (6 currently monitoring, 2 used to self-monitor, and 8 had never self-monitored). Thematic analysis was undertaken. Results Three main themes emerged: ‘self’ and ‘living with hypertension’ described the emotional element of living with an asymptomatic condition; ‘self-monitoring behaviour and medication’ described overall views about self-monitoring, current practice, reasons for monitoring, and the impact on medication adherence; and ‘the GP–patient transaction’ described the power relations affecting decisions to self-monitor. Self-monitoring was performed by some as a protective tool against the fears of a silent but serious condition, whereas others self-monitor simply out of curiosity. People who self-monitored tended not to discuss this with their nurse or GP, partly due to perceiving minimal or no interest from their clinician about home monitoring, and partly due to fear of being prescribed additional medication. Conclusion The decision to self-monitor appeared often to be an individual choice with no schedule or systems to integrate it with other medical care. Better recognition by clinicians that patients are self-monitoring, perhaps utilising the results in shared decision-making, might help integrate it into daily practice. PMID:26500326

  18. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  19. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  20. Continuous non-invasive monitoring improves blood pressure stability in upright position: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Simanova, Alena; Tovarnicka, Tereza; Sevcikova, Silvie; Kletecka, Jakub; Zatloukal, Jan; Pradl, Richard; Chytra, Ivan; Kasal, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the standard-of-care during low and intermediate risk anaesthesia, yet it could lead to delayed recognition of BP fluctuations. Perioperative hypotension is known to be associated with postoperative complications. Continuous, non-invasive methods for BP monitoring have been developed recently. We have tested a novel non-invasive, continuous monitor (using the volume clamp method) to assist with maintaining BP in safe ranges for patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. Forty adult patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in an upright position were included in this prospective randomised controlled trial. Patients were equally allocated to the group with continuous monitoring of BP using the CNAP® Monitor and to the control group managed using an intermittent oscillometric BP cuff. The absolute and proportional time spent outside the range of ±20% of the target BP along with other hemodynamic and clinical parameters were evaluated. The continuous monitoring decreased the anaesthesia time spent below -20% pressure range [absolute: 12 min (4-20) vs. 27 min (16-34); p=0.001; relative to procedure length: 14% (7-20) vs. 33.5% (17.5-53); p=0.003]. No significant differences were observed in postoperative morbidity or in hospital length of stay. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring via the CNAP® Monitor allows for better BP management in patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. In our randomised trial the time spent in hypotension was significantly shorter using continuous monitoring.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of a multipronged intervention to improve blood pressure control among stroke survivors in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, Mayowa O; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Olaniyan, Olanrewaju; Salako, Babatunde L; Arulogun, Oyedunni; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is the second-leading cause of death in low- and middle-income countries, but use of evidence-based therapies for stroke prevention in such countries, especially those in Africa, is extremely poor. This study is designed to enhance the implementation and sustainability of secondary stroke-preventive services following hospital discharge. The primary study aim is to test whether a Chronic Care Model-based initiative entitled the Tailored Hospital-based Risk reduction to Impede Vascular Events after Stroke (THRIVES) significantly improves blood pressure control after stroke. This prospective triple-blind randomized controlled trial will include a cohort of 400 patients with a recent stroke discharged from four medical care facilities in Nigeria. The culturally sensitive, system-appropriate intervention comprises patient report cards, phone text messaging, an educational video, and coordination of posthospitalization care. The primary outcome is improvement of blood pressure control. Secondary endpoints include control of other stroke risk factors, medication adherence, functional status, and quality of life. We will also perform a cost analysis of THRIVES from the viewpoint of government policy-makers. We anticipate that a successful intervention will serve as a scalable model of effective postdischarge chronic blood pressure management for stroke in sub-Saharan Africa and possibly for other symptomatic cardiovascular disease entities in the region. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  2. The role of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and prostaglandins in reducing blood pressure and improving thrombogenic indices.

    PubMed

    Iacono, J M; Dougherty, R M

    1983-01-01

    Evidence linking dietary fats to blood pressure and thrombogenic indices is reviewed. Results of dietary studies performed at Beltsville, Maryland, have demonstrated that under controlled dietary conditions, i.e., when total fat intake is maintained at 25% fat calories with a P/S ratio of 1, at either a fixed or free-choice salt intake and where the body weight is maintained relatively constant, blood pressure can be lowered and platelet aggregation indices can be improved in men and women in the 40-60 age group. Results of a pilot epidemiologic study of farmers aged 40-45 in Finland and Italy generally confirm the experimental nutrition studies reported above. A possible explanation of these results based on the conversion of linoleic acid to prostaglandins as well as the physiological actions of prostaglandins is discussed.

  3. Improving blood pressure control in a large multiethnic California population through changes in health care delivery, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kate M; Handler, Joel; Wall, Hilary K; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-10-30

    The Kaiser Permanente Southern California (Kaiser) health care system succeeded in improving hypertension control in a multiethnic population by adopting a series of changes in health care delivery. Data from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) was used to assess blood pressure control from 2004 through 2012. Hypertension control increased overall from 54% to 86% during that period, and 80% or more in every subgroup, regardless of race/ethnicity, preferred language, or type of health insurance plan. Health care delivery changes improved hypertension control across a large multiethnic population, which indicates that health care systems can achieve a clinical target goal of 70% for hypertension control in their populations.

  4. Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring in Daily Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Ushida, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Keita; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akio; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yamada, Ichiro

    Continuous monitoring of blood pressure in daily life could improve early detection of cardiovascular disorders, as well as promoting healthcare. Conventional ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) equipment can measure blood pressure at regular intervals for 24 hours, but is limited by long measuring time, low sampling rate, and constrained measuring posture. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for continuous real-time measurement of blood pressure during daily activities. Our method is based on blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculation, which formula we improved to take into account changes in the inner diameter of blood vessels. Blood pressure estimation results using our new method showed a greater precision of measured data during exercise, and a better accuracy than the conventional PWV method.

  5. Improving general practitioners' knowledge regarding blood pressure measurement in selected cities of Pakistan through workshop.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Syed Hasnain; Ashraf, Tariq; Anjum, Qudsia

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate enhancement in the knowledge of general practitioners (GPs), from the urban cities in the province of Sindh, Pakistan, regarding blood pressure measurement through workshop. This was a quasi-experimental study that involved GPs from 5 cities of Sindh province, Pakistan. The GPs were required to complete a pretested self-administered questionnaire before and after the workshop session. The questionnaire included few demographic variables and 17 questions based on the American Heart Association recommendations. The mean pretest and posttest scores were compared using Student's t test. A total of 350 GPs returned completed questionnaires, with a preponderance of males (n = 264, 75.4%) than females (n = 86, 24.6%). The mean correct responses increased significantly after the workshop session from 8 ± 2.1 to 14 ± 2.5 (P = .01). The knowledge of GPs was almost doubled after the workshop and was significantly different for variables such as qualification, affiliation with teaching hospital, and number of years of practice (P = .001). This survey, a representation of GPs from the Sindh province, indicated a significant doubling in knowledge after the workshop, proving that continuing medical education sessions play an important role in increasing awareness and staying updated.

  6. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  7. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Jan 18,2017 ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  8. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  9. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  10. HUB city steps: a 6-month lifestyle intervention improves blood pressure among a primarily African-American community.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, Jamie; Connell, Carol; Madson, Michael B; Thomson, Jessica L; Landry, Alicia S; Fontenot Molaison, Elaine; Blakely Reed, Vickie; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2014-04-01

    The effectiveness of community-based participatory research (CBPR) efforts to address the disproportionate burden of hypertension among African Americans remains largely untested. The objective of this 6-month, noncontrolled, pre-/post-experimental intervention was to examine the effectiveness of a CBPR intervention in achieving improvements in blood pressure, anthropometric measures, biological measures, and diet. Conducted in 2010, this multicomponent lifestyle intervention included motivational enhancement, social support provided by peer coaches, pedometer diary self-monitoring, and monthly nutrition and physical activity education sessions. Of 269 enrolled participants, 94% were African American and 85% were female. Statistical analysis included generalized linear mixed models using maximum likelihood estimation. From baseline to 6 months, blood pressure decreased significantly: mean (± standard deviation) systolic blood pressure decreased from 126.0 ± 19.1 to 119.6 ± 15.8 mm Hg, P=0.0002; mean diastolic blood pressure decreased from 83.2 ± 12.3 to 78.6 ± 11.1 mm Hg, P<0.0001). Sugar intake also decreased significantly as compared with baseline (by approximately 3 tsp; P<0.0001). Time differences were not apparent for any other measures. Results from this study suggest that CBPR efforts are a viable and effective strategy for implementing nonpharmacologic, multicomponent, lifestyle interventions that can help address the persistent racial and ethnic disparities in hypertension treatment and control. Outcome findings help fill gaps in the literature for effectively translating lifestyle interventions to reach and engage African-American communities to reduce the burden of hypertension.

  11. Continuous and interval training programs using deep water running improves functional fitness and blood pressure in the older adults.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Thaís; Kanitz, Ana Carolina; Delevatti, Rodrigo Sudatti; Bagatini, Natália Carvalho; Barroso, Bruna Machado; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two periodized training programs of deep water running on functional fitness and blood pressure in the older adults. Thirty-six individuals were divided into continuous group (CONT) and interval group (INT). Both groups were trained for 28 weeks (twice weekly). Measures were performed before the training period, after 12 weeks and training period. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc of Bonferroni were used (α = 0.05). There were no differences between groups in functional tests, with the exception of the flexibility of the upper limbs, in which the INT group showed the highest values. There was a significant improvement in both groups of foot up-and-go test (CONT 6.45 to 5.67; INT 6.59 to 5.78, in seconds), flexibility of lower limbs (CONT -4.76 to -0.61; INT 0.54 to 4.63, in centimeters), strength of upper (CONT 18.76 to 27.69; INT 18.66 to 26.58, in repetitions) and lower limbs (CONT 14.46 to 21.23; INT 14.40 to 21.58, in repetitions), and 6-min walk (CONT 567.50 to 591.16; INT 521.41 to 582.77, in meters). No differences were shown between groups for systolic blood pressure; however, diastolic blood pressure remained higher in CONT during all training. The blood pressure decreased significantly in both groups after the training (CONT 142 ± 16/88 ± 3 to 125 ± 14/77 ± 7 mmHg; INT 133 ± 15/75 ± 7 to 123 ± 17 and 69 ± 11 mmHg). Both programs of deep water running training promoted improvements of similar magnitude in all parameters of functional fitness, with the exception of flexibility of upper limbs, and decreased blood pressure in the older individuals.

  12. Mechanisms of efficacy of CBT for Cambodian refugees with PTSD: improvement in emotion regulation and orthostatic blood pressure response.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark H; Otto, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of a randomized controlled trial, we examined a model of the mechanisms of efficacy of culturally adapted cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Cambodian refugees with pharmacology-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comordid orthostatic panic attacks (PAs). Twelve patients were in the initial treatment condition, 12 in the delayed treatment condition. The patients randomized to CBT had much greater improvement than patients in the waitlist condition on all psychometric measures and on one physiological measure-the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis (d = 1.31)-as evaluated by repeated-measures MANOVA and planned contrasts. After receiving CBT, the Delayed Treatment Group improved on all measures, including the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis. The CBT treatment's reduction of PTSD severity was significantly mediated by improvement in orthostatic panic and emotion regulation ability. The current study supports our model of the generation of PTSD in the Cambodian population, and suggests a key role of decreased vagal tone in the generation of orthostatic panic and PTSD in this population. It also suggests that vagal tone is involved in emotion regulation, and that both vagal tone and emotion regulation improve across treatment.

  13. CPAP treatment supported by telemedicine does not improve blood pressure in high cardiovascular risk OSA patients: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Monique; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Tamisier, Renaud; Laplaud, David; Dias-Domingos, Sonia; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Laurent; Koltes, Christian; Chavez, Léonidas; De Lamberterie, Gilles; Herengt, Frédéric; Levy, Patrick; Flore, Patrice; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with hypertension, which is one of the intermediary mechanisms leading to increased cardiovascular morbidity. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of a combination of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and telemedicine support on blood pressure (BP) reduction in high cardiovascular risk OSA patients. A multi-center randomized controlled trial that compared standard CPAP care and CPAP care and a telemedicine intervention. Sleep clinics in France. 107 adult (18-65 years old) OSA patients (AHI > 15 events/h) with a high cardiovascular risk (cardiovascular SCORE > 5% or secondary prevention). Patients were randomized to either standard care CPAP (n = 53) or CPAP and telemedicine (n = 54). Patients assigned to telemedicine were equipped with a smartphone for uploading BP measurements, CPAP adherence, sleepiness, and quality of life data; in return, they received pictograms containing health-related messages. The main outcome was home self-measured BP and secondary outcomes were cardiovascular risk evolution, objective physical activity, CPAP adherence, sleepiness and quality of life. Self-measured BP did not improve in either group (telemedicine or standard care). Patients in primary prevention showed greater BP reduction with CPAP treatment than those in secondary prevention. CPAP treatment supported by telemedicine alone did not improve blood pressure and cardiovascular risk in high cardiovascular risk OSA patients. This study emphasizes the need for diet and physical activity training programs in addition to CPAP when aiming at decreasing cardiometabolic risk factors in these patients. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01226641.

  14. High Blood Pressure - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well-Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - العربية (Arabic) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center High Blood Pressure - العربية ( ... Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - myanma bhasa (Burmese) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) ( ...

  15. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  16. REPEATED MEASUREMENTS OF BLOOD PRESSURE AND CHOLESTEROL IMPROVES CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK PREDICTION: AN INDIVIDUAL-PARTICIPANT-DATA META-ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Paige, Ellie; Barrett, Jessica; Pennells, Lisa; Sweeting, Michael; Willeit, Peter; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Psaty, Bruce M; Goldbourt, Uri; Best, Lyle G; Assmann, Gerd; Salonen, Jukka T; Nietert, Paul J; Verschuren, Wm Monique; Brunner, Eric J; Kronmal, Richard A; Salomaa, Veikko; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Dagenais, Gilles R; Sato, Shinichi; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Willeit, Johann; Onat, Altan; de la Cámara, Agustin Gómez; Roussel, Ronan; Völzke, Henry; Dankner, Rachel; Tipping, Robert W; Meade, Tom W; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Kuller, Lewis H; Peters, Annette; Gallacher, John; Kromhout, Daan; Iso, Hiroyasu; Knuiman, Matthew; Casiglia, Edoardo; Kavousi, Maryam; Palmieri, Luigi; Sundström, Johan; Davis, Barry R; Njølstad, Inger; Couper, David; Danesh, John; Thompson, Simon G; Wood, Angela

    2017-05-26

    The added value of incorporating information from repeated measurements of blood pressure and cholesterol for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction has not been rigorously assessed. We used data from the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration on 191,445 adults (38 cohorts from across 17 countries with data from 1962-2014) with > 1 million measurements of systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; over a median 12 years of follow-up, 21,170 CVD events occurred. Risk prediction models using cumulative means of repeated measurements and summary measures from longitudinal modelling of the repeated measurements were compared to models using measurements from a single time point. Risk discrimination (C-index) and net reclassification were calculated, and changes in C-indices were meta-analysed across studies. Compared to the single time point model, the cumulative means and the longitudinal models increased the C-index by 0.0040 (95% CI: 0.0023, 0.0057) and 0.0023 (0.0005, 0.0042), respectively. Reclassification was also improved in both models; compared to the single time point model, overall net reclassification improvements were 0.0369 (0.0303, 0.0436) for the cumulative means model and 0.0177 (0.0110, 0.0243) for the longitudinal model. In conclusion, incorporating repeated measurements of blood pressure and cholesterol into CVD risk prediction models slightly improves risk prediction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  17. Diet and exercise training reduce blood pressure and improve autonomic modulation in women with prehypertension.

    PubMed

    Sales, Allan R K; Silva, Bruno M; Neves, Fabricia J; Rocha, Natália G; Medeiros, Renata F; Castro, Renata R T; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2012-09-01

    Despite mortality from heart disease has been decreasing, the decline in death in women remains lower than in men. Hypertension (HT) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Therefore, approaches to prevent or delay the onset of HT would be valuable in women. Given this background, we investigated the effect of diet and exercise training on blood pressure (BP) and autonomic modulation in women with prehypertension (PHT). Ten women with PHT (39 ± 6 years, mean ± standard deviation) and ten with normotension (NT) (35 ± 11 years) underwent diet and exercise training for 12 weeks. Autonomic modulation was assessed through heart rate (HR) and systolic BP (SBP) variability, using time and frequency domain analyses. At preintervention, women with PHT had higher SBP (PHT: 128 ± 7 vs. NT: 111 ± 6 mmHg, p < 0.05) and lower HR variability [standard deviation of normal-to-normal beats (SDNN), PHT: 41 ± 18 vs. NT: 60 ± 19 ms, p < 0.05]. At post-intervention, peak oxygen consumption and muscular strength increased (p < 0.05), while body mass index decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). However, SBP decreased (118 ± 8 mmHg, p < 0.05 vs. preintervention) and total HR variability tended to increase (total power: 1,397 ± 570 vs. 2,137 ± 1,110 ms(2), p = 0.08) only in the group with PHT; consequently, HR variability became similar between groups at post-intervention (p > 0.05). Moreover, reduction in SBP was associated with augmentation in SDNN (r = -0.46, p < 0.05) and reduction in low-frequency power [LF (n.u.); r = 0.46, p < 0.05]. In conclusion, diet and exercise training reduced SBP in women with PHT, and this was associated with augmentation in parasympathetic and probably reduction in sympathetic cardiac modulation.

  18. Dietary flavonoids added to pharmacological antihypertensive therapy are effective in improving blood pressure.

    PubMed

    de Jesús Romero-Prado, Marina María; Curiel-Beltrán, Jesús Aarón; Miramontes-Espino, María Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto Germán; Rios-Arellano, Angeles; Balam-Salazar, Lol-Be

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the daily intake of flavonoids is associated with a decreased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of the addition of dietary flavonoids (DF) to antihypertensive treatment (AHT), based on telmisartan (Tms) or captopril (Cpr), on blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio, leptin, lipid profile and inflammation in hypertensive young patients. An open-label, randomized, controlled trial was performed among 79 patients aged 20-55 years with grade I or grade II systemic arterial hypertension. The subjects were assigned to one of four groups for AHT plus DF during 6 months: Cpr (n = 14), Cpr + DF (n = 19), Tms (n = 25) and Tms + DF (n = 21). DF consisted of dark chocolate, dehydrated red apple and green tea in an infusion to obtain a daily dose of 425.8 ± 13.9 mg epicatechin equivalents. The BP and anthropometric parameters were measured every 2 weeks. Lipid profile, leptin and hsCRP were determined by standard methods. The combination AHT-DF produced an additional and significant reduction in (i) SBP/DBP of -5/-4 mmHg, being -7/-5 for Cpr + DF and -4/-3 for Tms + DF; (ii) triglyceride levels (-30.6%) versus AHT alone (-9.6%); and (iii) leptin: Cpr + DF versus Tms + DF (p < 0.005). Finally, C-reactive protein plasma levels were reduced significantly in all groups independently of the applied treatment. We conclude that the addition of flavonoids to pharmacological antihypertensive therapy shows additional benefits on BP, lipid profile, leptin, obesity and inflammation.

  19. Can sesame consumption improve blood pressure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Khosravi-Boroujeni, Hossein; Nikbakht, Elham; Natanelov, Ernesta; Khalesi, Saman

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke and renal failure. Sesame consumption may benefit blood pressure (BP) owing to its high polyunsaturated fatty acid, fibre, phytosterol and lignan contents. To clarify this, a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials was conducted. The PubMed (MEDLINE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Cochrane Library (Central) databases were systematically searched until August 2016. Eight controlled trials with a total of 843 participants met the eligibility criteria. A random effect meta-analysis showed that sesame consumption can reduce systolic BP (-7.83 mmHg, 95% CI: -14.12, -1.54; P < 0.05, I(2)  = 99%) and diastolic BP (-5.83 mmHg, 95% CI: -9.58, -2.08; P < 0.01, I(2)  = 98%). To reduce the heterogeneity, the meta-analysis was limited to high methodology quality trials (n = 4), which resulted in a significant reduction in systolic BP (-3.23 mmHg, 95% CI: -5.67, -0.79; I(2)  = 33%) and a non-significant reduction in diastolic BP (-2.08 mmHg, 95% CI: -4.85, 0.69; I(2)  = 62%). This study concluded that sesame consumption can reduce systolic and diastolic BP. However, further investigations with larger sample sizes and better methodology quality are required to confirm the BP-lowering effect of sesame consumption. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Increasing peripheral insulin sensitivity by PTP1B deletion improves control of blood pressure in obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Chantemèle, Eric J. Belin; Ali, Mohammed. Irfan; Mintz, James D.; Rainey, William E.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Fulton, David J.; Stepp, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension (HT). The co-presentation of HT and insulin resistance (IR) suggests a role for IR in blood pressure (BP) dysregulation. To test this hypothesis peripheral IR has been genetically subtracted in a model of obesity by crossing leptin receptor mutant mice (KdbHPTP) with mice lacking protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (insulin desensitizer, HdbKPTP) to generate obese insulin sensitive mice (KdbKPTP). BP was recorded in lean (HdbHPTP, HdbKPTP) and obese (KdbHPTP, KdbKPTP) mice via telemetry and a frequency analysis of the recording was performed to determine BP variability. Correction of IR in obese mice normalized BP values to baseline levels (HdbHPTP: 116±2 mmHg; KdbHPTP: 129±4; KdbKPTP: 114±5mmHg) and restored BP variability by decreasing its standard deviation and the frequency of BP values over the upper autoregulatory limit of the kidneys. However, while IR-induced increases in proteinuria (vs. 53±13μg/day, HdbHPTP) were corrected in KdbKPTP (112±39 vs. 422±159 μg/day, KdbHPTP), glomerular hypertrophy was not. IR reduced plasma aldosterone levels ruling out a role for mineralocorticoids in the development of hypertension. Taken together, these data indicate that correction of IR prevents hypertension, BP variability and microalbuminuria in obese mice. While the mechanism remains to be fully determined, increases in aldosterone or sympathoactivation of the cardiovascular system seem to be less likely contributors. PMID:23045458

  1. Mirtogenol® potentiates latanoprost in lowering intraocular pressure and improves ocular blood flow in asymptomatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Steigerwalt, Robert D; Belcaro, Gianni; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Burki, Carolina; Schönlau, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The dietary supplement Mirtogenol® was previously shown to lower elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). We here present the effects of this supplement on IOP in comparison as well as in combination with latanoprost eye drops. Methods: Seventy-nine patients with asymptomatic ocular hypertension were randomly assigned to three groups receiving either the supplement, or latanoprost eye drops, or both in combination. Intraocular pressure and retinal blood flow were investigated in monthly intervals over 24 weeks. Results: Mirtogenol alone lowered IOP from baseline 38.1 to 29.0 mmHg after 16 weeks, with little further improvement during the following eight weeks. Latanoprost rapidly lowered IOP from baseline 37.7 to 27.2 mmHg within four weeks, without further effects thereafter. The combination of the supplement and latanoprost lowered IOP from 38.0 to 27.3 mmHg after four weeks, and further decreased IOP to 24.2 mmHg after six weeks. After 24 weeks IOP with the combination treatment (23.0 mmHg) was significantly lower than with latanoprost alone (27.2 mmHg). Mirtogenol and latanoprost individually showed comparable effects for gradually increasing central artery blood flow with treatment duration. Combination treatment showed higher systolic blood flow velocity throughout the trial period. The diastolic blood flow velocity gradually increased with treatment duration in all three groups. From twelve weeks onwards, the diastolic component with combination treatment was higher than with individual treatments. Conclusions: Mirtogenol lowered elevated IOP in patients almost as effectively as latanoprost, however, it takes much longer (24 vs 4 weeks). The combination of both was more effective for lowering IOP and the combination yielded better retinal blood flow. No serious side effects occurred during the study, apart from standard side effects in patients related to Latanoprost. These promising results warrant further research of Mirtogenol with a larger patient

  2. Aliskiren improves blood pressure control and prevents cardiac damage in high-risk hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Mazza, A; Montemurro, D; Zuin, M; Schiavon, L; Zorzan, S; Chondrogiannis, S; Ferretti, A; Ramazzina, E; Rubello, D

    2013-08-01

    Longitudinal study aimed to evaluate the antihypertensive efficacy, safety and the effect on cardiac damage of Aliskiren, administered to a group of high-risk hypertensive patients with mild impairment of renal function and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) despite a two-drug antihypertensive treatment. One hundred and six patients (56 men and 50 females) aged 61.9±12.7 years, were assigned to receive Aliskiren 150-300 mg once-daily for 12 months. Clinic BP measurements were taken at every follow-up visit (1st, 6th and 12th month), while biochemical tests, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 24-hours ambulatory BP measurements (ABMP) and echocardiography were evaluated at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Analysis of variance for repeated measures compared BP, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and eGFR values changes. A significant reduction (all P<0.0001) of clinic systolic (-28.6 mmHg) and diastolic (-12.8 mmHg) BP values, mean 24h-systolic (-12.3 mmHg) and 24h-diastolic (-6.5 mmHg), day-time systolic (-11.5 mmHg) and diastolic (-6.4 mmHg), night-time systolic (-11.9 mmHg) and diastolic (-7 mmHg) ABPM values and in the use of antihypertensive drugs was observed (3.0±0.9 vs. 2.0±0.7, p=0.01). LVMI was significantly reduced (130.2±36.1 vs. 115.9±33.4 g/m2, P<0.0001); eGFR was steady (75.3±17.3 vs. 73.1±21.5 ml/min/1.73m2, P>0.05). Putative adverse events caused withdrawal of 7 subjects (6 for gastrointestinal disturbances, 1 for alopecia). Aliskiren was effective in decreasing both clinical and ABPM values and in reducing LVMI in both genders without any influence on eGFR. The treatment resulted safe, even in combination with ACE-inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. A significant reduction in the use of concomitant antihypertensive drugs was observed.

  3. Chronotherapy with conventional blood pressure medications improves management of hypertension and reduces cardiovascular and stroke risks.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Smolensky, Michael H; Fernández, José R; Mojón, Artemio; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Correlation between blood pressure (BP) and target organ damage, vascular risk and long-term patient prognosis is greater for measurements derived from around-the-clock ambulatory BP monitoring than in-clinic daytime ones. Numerous studies consistently substantiate the asleep BP mean is both an independent and a much better predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than either the awake or 24 h means. Sleep-time hypertension is much more prevalent than suspected, not only in patients with sleep disorders, but also among those who are elderly or have type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease or resistant hypertension. Hence, cost-effective adequate control of sleep-time BP is of marked clinical relevance. Ingestion time, according to circadian rhythms, of hypertension medications of six different classes and their combinations significantly affects BP control, particularly sleep-time BP, and adverse effects. For example, because the high-amplitude circadian rhythm of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activates during nighttime sleep, bedtime vs. morning ingestion of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers better reduces the asleep BP mean, with additional benefit, independent of medication terminal half-life, of converting the 24 h BP profile into more normal dipper patterning. The MAPEC (Monitorización Ambulatoria para Predicción de Eventos Cardiovasculares) study, first prospective randomized treatment-time investigation designed to test the worthiness of bedtime chronotherapy with ⩾1 conventional hypertension medications so as to specifically target attenuation of asleep BP, demonstrated, relative to conventional morning therapy, 61% reduction of total CVD events and 67% decrease of major CVD events, that is, CVD death, myocardial infarction, and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The MAPEC study, along with other earlier conducted less refined trials, documents the asleep BP mean is the most significant

  4. [Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project].

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, María Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2017-06-08

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality.

  5. Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, Maria Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems–strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:27378199

  6. Improved Blood Pressure Control to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Morbidity and Mortality: The Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pragna; Ordunez, Pedro; DiPette, Donald; Escobar, Maria Cristina; Hassell, Trevor; Wyss, Fernando; Hennis, Anselm; Asma, Samira; Angell, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    Hypertension is the leading remediable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, affecting more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is responsible for more than 10 million preventable deaths globally each year. While hypertension can be successfully diagnosed and treated, only one in seven persons with hypertension have controlled blood pressure. To meet the challenge of improving the control of hypertension, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the authors developed the Standardized Hypertension Treatment and Prevention Project, which involves a health systems-strengthening approach that advocates for standardized hypertension management using evidence-based interventions. These interventions include the use of standardized treatment protocols, a core set of medications along with improved procurement mechanisms to increase the availability and affordability of these medications, registries for cohort monitoring and evaluation, patient empowerment, team-based care (task shifting), and community engagement. With political will and strong partnerships, this approach provides the groundwork to reduce high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease-related morbidity and mortality. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A randomized trial using motivational interviewing for maintenance of blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention: HUB city steps

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Alicia; Madson, Michael; Thomson, Jessica; Zoellner, Jamie; Connell, Carol; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention conducted with African-Americans. Participants were tracked through a 12-month maintenance phase following a 6-month intervention targeting physical activity and diet. For the maintenance phase, participants were randomized to receive a low (4) or high (10) dose of motivational interviewing delivered via telephone by trained research staff. Generalized linear models were used to test for group differences in blood pressure. Blood pressure significantly increased during the maintenance phase. No differences were apparent between randomized groups. Results suggest that 10 or fewer motivational interviewing calls over a 12-month period may be insufficient to maintain post-intervention improvements in blood pressure. Further research is needed to determine optimal strategies for maintaining changes. PMID:26590242

  8. Blood Pressure Lowering and Safety Improvements With Liver Angiotensinogen Inhibition in Models of Hypertension and Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Adam E; Yeh, Steve T; Graham, Mark J; Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Prakash, Thazha P; Crooke, Rosanne M

    2017-09-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is an important contributor to cardiovascular disease. Despite the armamentarium of antihypertensive treatments, there remains a need for novel agents effective in individuals who cannot reach acceptable blood pressure levels. Inhibitors targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are widely used but may not optimally inhibit RAAS and demonstrate an acceptable safety profile. Experiments were conducted to characterize a series of AGT (angiotensinogen) antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and compare their efficacy and tolerability to traditional RAAS blockade. AGT ASOs which target multiple systemic sites of AGT versus an N-acetylgalactosamine-conjugated AGT ASO that targets the liver were compared with captopril and losartan. Spontaneously hypertensive rats fed an 8% NaCl diet, a model of malignant hypertension resistant to standard RAAS inhibitors, demonstrated robust and durable blood pressure reductions with AGT ASO treatments, which was not observed with standard RAAS blockade. Studies in rat models of acute kidney injury produced by salt deprivation revealed kidney injury with ASO treatment that reduced kidney-expressed AGT, but not in animals treated with the N-acetylgalactosamine AGT ASO despite comparable plasma AGT reductions. Administration of either captopril or losartan also produced acute kidney injury during salt deprivation. Thus, intrarenal RAAS derived from kidney AGT, and inhibited by the standard of care, contributes to the maintenance of renal function during severe RAAS challenge. Such improvements in efficacy and tolerability by a liver-selective AGT inhibitor could be desirable in individuals not at their blood pressure goal with existing RAAS blockade. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Hypertension Improvement Project (HIP) Latino: results of a pilot study of lifestyle intervention for lowering blood pressure in Latino adults

    PubMed Central

    del Pilar Rocha-Goldberg, María; Corsino, Leonor; Batch, Bryan; Voils, Corrine I.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of a culturally tailored behavioral intervention for improving hypertension-related health behaviors in Hispanic/Latino adults. Design Feasibility pilot study in a community health center and a Latino organization in Durham, North Carolina (NC). Intervention The culturally adapted behavioral intervention consisted of 6 weekly group sessions incorporating motivational interviewing techniques. Goals included weight loss if overweight, adoption of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, and increased physical activity. Participants were also encouraged to monitor their daily intake of fruits, vegetables, dairy and fat, and to record physical activity. Cultural adaptations included conducting the study in familiar places, using Spanish-speaking interventionist, culturally-appropriate food choices, and physical activity. Main outcomes Systolic blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), exercise, and dietary pattern were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Qualitative evaluations of the recruitment process and the intervention were also conducted. Results There were 64 potential participants identified via health care provider referrals (33%), printed media (23%), and direct contact (44%). Seventeen participants completed the intervention and had main outcome data available. Participants “strongly agreed/ agreed” that the group sessions provided them with the tools they needed to achieve weight loss, blood pressure control, and the possibility of sustaining the lifestyle changes after completing the intervention. At the end of the intervention, all physiological, diet, and exercise outcomes were more favorable, with the exception of fat. After 6 weeks, systolic blood pressure decreased an average of −10.4 ± 10.6 mmHg, weight decreased 1.5 ± 3.2 lbs, BMI decreased 0.3 ± 0.5, and physical activity increased 40 minutes per week. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lifestyle

  10. Melatonin treatment improves blood pressure, lipid profile, and parameters of oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koziróg, Marzena; Poliwczak, Adam Rafał; Duchnowicz, Piotr; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Sikora, Joanna; Broncel, Marlena

    2011-04-01

    Experimental studies have proven that melatonin has many beneficial pleiotropic actions. The aim of this study was to assess melatonin efficacy in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS). The study included 33 healthy volunteers (who were not treated with melatonin) and 30 patients with MS, who did not respond to 3-month lifestyle modification. Patients with MS were treated with melatonin (5 mg/day, 2 hr before bedtime) for 2 months. The following parameters were studied: systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), levels of glucose, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, activities of antioxidative enzymes: catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates (TBARS). After 2-month therapy in comparison with baseline, the following significant changes were measured: systolic blood pressure (132.8±9.8 versus 120.5±11.0 mmHg, P<0.001), DBP (81.7±8.8 versus 75±7.4 mmHg, P<0.01), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (149.7±26.4 versus 139.9±30.2 mg/dL, P<0.05), TBARS (0.5±0.2 versus 0.4±0.1 μm/gHb, P<0.01), and CAT (245.9±46.9 versus 276.8±39.4 U/gHb). Melatonin administered for 2 months significantly improved antioxidative defense (increase in CAT activity, decrease in TBARS level) and lipid profile (decrease in LDL-C), and lowered blood pressure. We conclude that melatonin therapy may be of benefit for patients with MS, particularly with arterial hypertension. Further studies with higher doses of melatonin or prolonged supplementation are awaited.

  11. Chronic Angiotensin-(1-7) Improves Insulin Sensitivity in High-Fat Fed Mice Independent of Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian M; Otero, Yolanda F; Bracy, Deanna P; Wasserman, David H; Biaggioni, Italo; Arnold, Amy C

    2016-05-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) improves glycemic control in animal models of cardiometabolic syndrome. The tissue-specific sites of action and blood pressure dependence of these metabolic effects, however, remain unclear. We hypothesized that Ang-(1-7) improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing peripheral glucose delivery. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were placed on standard chow or 60% high-fat diet for 11 weeks. Ang-(1-7) (400 ng/kg per minute) or saline was infused subcutaneously during the last 3 weeks of diet, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed at the end of treatment. High-fat fed mice exhibited modest hypertension (systolic blood pressure: 137 ± 3 high fat versus 123 ± 5 mm Hg chow;P=0.001), which was not altered by Ang-(1-7) (141 ± 4 mm Hg;P=0.574). Ang-(1-7) did not alter body weight or fasting glucose and insulin in chow or high-fat fed mice. Ang-(1-7) increased the steady-state glucose infusion rate needed to maintain euglycemia in high-fat fed mice (31 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 16 ± 1 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.017) reflecting increased whole-body insulin sensitivity, with no effect in chow-fed mice. The improved insulin sensitivity in high-fat fed mice was because of an enhanced rate of glucose disappearance (34 ± 5 Ang-(1-7) versus 20 ± 2 mg/kg per minute vehicle;P=0.049). Ang-(1-7) enhanced glucose uptake specifically into skeletal muscle by increasing translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the sarcolemma. Our data suggest that Ang-(1-7) has direct insulin-sensitizing effects on skeletal muscle, independent of changes in blood pressure. These findings provide new insight into mechanisms by which Ang-(1-7) improves insulin action, and provide further support for targeting this peptide in cardiometabolic disease.

  12. Application of organic acid salts and high-pressure treatments to improve the preservation of blood sausage.

    PubMed

    Diez, Ana M; Santos, Eva M; Jaime, Isabel; Rovira, Jordi

    2008-02-01

    Blood sausages are traditional products in many parts of the world. In most cases, a very short shelf-life limits their consumption to the areas in which they are produced. In this work, different mild preservation methods were applied to Morcilla de Burgos, a Spanish blood sausage, consisting of a range of organic acid salts (OAS) and high-pressure processing (HPP), with the aim of increasing its shelf-life. In the first experiment, three batches of morcillas were produced using three different commercial OAS-PL (3% potassium lactate), PL+SL (3% potassium and sodium lactate) and PL+SD (2.5% potassium lactate and sodium diacetate)-together with a control batch and were stored under chill conditions (4 degrees C) for 35 days. In a further experiment, vacuum-packaged morcillas were treated at three different pressure levels-300, 500 and 600MPa-for 10min, and stored under chill conditions for 28 days. In both batches, a sensory difference test was performed on day 1 after treatment and the morcilla samples were subjected to microbiological and sensory analysis after each week in storage. The results suggest that, in both cases, an addition of PL+SL and the application of 600MPa for 10min increases the shelf-life of the morcillas by 15 days. Once again, it is evident that the initial opportunities for contamination play a very important role in improving the shelf-life of food products.

  13. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... consistently too high. How your blood pressure and circulatory system work In order to survive and function properly, ... and organs need the oxygenated blood that your circulatory system carries throughout the body. When the heart beats, ...

  14. Ablation of the N-type calcium channel ameliorates diabetic nephropathy with improved glycemic control and reduced blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shoko; Yokoi, Hideki; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kasahara, Masato; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Fujikura, Junji; Naito, Masaki; Kuwabara, Takashige; Imamaki, Hirotaka; Ishii, Akira; Saleem, Moin A.; Numata, Tomohiro; Mori, Yasuo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Yanagita, Motoko; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade of the N- and L-type calcium channel lessens renal injury in kidney disease patients. The significance of specific blockade of α1 subunit of N-type calcium channel, Cav2.2, in diabetic nephropathy, however, remains to be clarified. To examine functional roles, we mated Cav2.2−/− mice with db/db (diabetic) mice on the C57BLKS background. Cav2.2 was localized in glomeruli including podocytes and in distal tubular cells. Diabetic Cav2.2−/− mice significantly reduced urinary albumin excretion, glomerular hyperfiltration, blood glucose levels, histological deterioration and systolic blood pressure (SBP) with decreased urinary catecholamine compared to diabetic Cav2.2+/+ mice. Interestingly, diabetic heterozygous Cav2.2+/− mice also decreased albuminuria, although they exhibited comparable systolic blood pressure, sympathetic nerve activity and creatinine clearance to diabetic Cav2.2+/+ mice. Consistently, diabetic mice with cilnidipine, an N-/L-type calcium channel blocker, showed a reduction in albuminuria and improvement of glomerular changes compared to diabetic mice with nitrendipine. In cultured podocytes, depolarization-dependent calcium responses were decreased by ω-conotoxin, a Cav2.2-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, reduction of nephrin by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in podocytes was abolished with ω-conotoxin, cilnidipine or mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, Cav2.2 inhibition exerts renoprotective effects against the progression of diabetic nephropathy, partly by protecting podocytes. PMID:27273361

  15. Automated office blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G; Godwin, Marshall

    2012-05-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) is gradually disappearing from clinical practice with the mercury sphygmomanometer now considered to be an environmental hazard. Manual BP is also subject to measurement error on the part of the physician/nurse and patient-related anxiety which can result in poor quality BP measurements and office-induced (white coat) hypertension. Automated office (AO) BP with devices such as the BpTRU (BpTRU Medical Devices, Coquitlam, BC) has already replaced conventional manual BP in many primary care practices in Canada and has also attracted interest in other countries where research studies using AOBP have been undertaken. The basic principles of AOBP include multiple readings taken with a fully automated recorder with the patient resting alone in a quiet room. When these principles are followed, office-induced hypertension is eliminated and AOBP exhibits a much stronger correlation with the awake ambulatory BP as compared with routine manual BP measurements. Unlike routine manual BP, AOBP correlates as well with left ventricular mass as does the awake ambulatory BP. AOBP also simplifies the definition of hypertension in that the cut point for a normal AOBP (< 135/85 mm Hg) is the same as for the awake ambulatory BP and home BP. This article summarizes the currently available evidence supporting the use of AOBP in routine clinical practice and proposes an algorithm in which AOBP replaces manual BP for the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  16. Improvement of insulin resistance, blood pressure and interstitial pH in early developmental stage of insulin resistance in OLETF rats by intake of propolis extracts.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Hosogi, Shigekuni; Niisato, Naomi; Yokoyama, Noriko; Hayata, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Fukuda, Takuya; Fukui, Michiaki; Nakamura, Naoto; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2013-03-22

    Propolis, a resinous mixture collected from plants by the Apis mellifera bee, contains high level nutrient factors including vitamins, polyphenols, and amino acids that would be expected to improve insulin sensitivity. Insulin resistance would secondarily cause elevation of blood pressure and increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of propolis extracts on blood glucose levels and blood pressures in an early developmental stage of insulin resistance in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. OLETF rats (10 weeks old) were divided into three different groups: normal diet, 0.1% propolis diet, and 0.5% propolis diet. After 8 weeks, blood glucose levels, blood pressures, plasma metabolic factors and hormones, and interstitial fluid pH were measured. Casual blood glucose levels were decreased associated with a reduction of plasma insulin levels in both propolis diet groups compared with normal diet group. Propolis decreased systolic blood pressure with no significant changes in plasma aldosterone levels. We also found that interstitial fluid pH in ascites, liver, and skeletal muscle was higher in rats fed propolis diet than rats fed normal diet. These data suggests that dietary propolis improves insulin sensitivity and blood pressures in the early stage of the process in development of insulin resistance, which may be mediated by suppression of metabolic acidosis.

  17. Embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmud-Ul; Islam, Md. Kafiul; Shawon, Mehedi Azad; Nowrin, Tasnuva Faruk

    2010-02-01

    A more efficient newer algorithm of detecting systolic and diastolic pressure of human body along with a complete package of an effective user-friendly embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system has been proposed in this paper to reduce the overall workload of medical personals as well as to monitor patient's condition more conveniently and accurately. Available devices for measuring blood pressure have some problems and limitations in case of both analog and digital devices. The sphygmomanometer, being analog device, is still being used widely because of its reliability and accuracy over digital ones. But it requires a skilled person to measure the blood pressure and obviously not being automated as well as time consuming. Our proposed system being a microcontroller based embedded system has the advantages of the available digital blood pressure machines along with a much improved form and has higher accuracy at the same time. This system can also be interfaced with computer through serial port/USB to publish the measured blood pressure data on the LAN or internet. The device can be programmed to determine the patient's blood pressure after each certain interval of time in a graphical form. To sense the pressure of human body, a pressure to voltage transducer is used along with a cuff in our system. During the blood pressure measurement cycle, the output voltage of the transducer is taken by the built-in ADC of microcontroller after an amplifier stage. The recorded data are then processed and analyzed using the effective software routine to determine the blood pressure of the person under test. Our proposed system is thus expected to certainly enhance the existing blood pressure monitoring system by providing accuracy, time efficiency, user-friendliness and at last but not the least the 'better way of monitoring patient's blood pressure under critical care' all together at the same time.

  18. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you stand up after lying down. Ordinarily, gravity causes blood to pool in your legs whenever ... eating. It affects mostly older adults. Just as gravity pulls blood to your feet when you stand, ...

  19. Audit-based education lowers systolic blood pressure in chronic kidney disease: the Quality Improvement in CKD (QICKD) trial results

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignana, Simon; Gallagher, Hugh; Jones, Simon; Chan, Tom; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Tahir, Aumran; Thomas, Nicola; Jain, Neerja; Dmitrieva, Olga; Rafi, Imran; McGovern, Andrew; Harris, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Strict control of systolic blood pressure is known to slow progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared audit-based education (ABE) to guidelines and prompts or usual practice in lowering systolic blood pressure in people with CKD. This 2-year cluster randomized trial included 93 volunteer general practices randomized into three arms with 30 ABE practices, 32 with guidelines and prompts, and 31 usual practices. An intervention effect on the primary outcome, systolic blood pressure, was calculated using a multilevel model to predict changes after the intervention. The prevalence of CKD was 7.29% (41,183 of 565,016 patients) with all cardiovascular comorbidities more common in those with CKD. Our models showed that the systolic blood pressure was significantly lowered by 2.41 mm Hg (CI 0.59–4.29 mm Hg), in the ABE practices with an odds ratio of achieving at least a 5 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure of 1.24 (CI 1.05–1.45). Practices exposed to guidelines and prompts produced no significant change compared to usual practice. Male gender, ABE, ischemic heart disease, and congestive heart failure were independently associated with a greater lowering of systolic blood pressure but the converse applied to hypertension and age over 75 years. There were no reports of harm. Thus, individuals receiving ABE are more likely to achieve a lower blood pressure than those receiving only usual practice. The findings should be interpreted with caution due to the wide confidence intervals. PMID:23536132

  20. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  1. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:May 3,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  2. Drinking pattern and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Seppä, K; Laippala, P; Sillanaukee, P

    1994-03-01

    Large amounts of alcohol are known to increase blood pressure. There is little evidence about the effect of binge drinking of alcohol on blood pressure, although this is the dominant style of alcohol drinking in several countries. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between binge drinking and blood pressure using daily heavy drinkers as a reference group. We examined 260 consecutive nonalcoholic 40- and 45-year-old men participating in a health screening. There were 37 teetotalers, 147 social drinkers, 62 weekend heavy drinkers attending the health screening 2 to 7 days after binge drinking, and 14 men who drank heavily every day. Group division was made using self-reported alcohol consumption and a structured alcohol questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured manually by a mercury manometer. BMDP statistical software was used in the statistical analysis of the material. The diastolic blood pressure of weekend heavy drinkers (mean intake during the weekend, 289 g) did not differ from that found in teetotalers but systolic blood pressure was slightly higher (5 mm Hg, P = .04). In contrast, daily heavy drinkers (mean intake during the weekend [Friday to Saturday], 151 g) had significantly higher systolic (8 mm Hg, P = .04) and diastolic (6 mm Hg, P = .05) blood pressure values than teetotalers. We conclude that different drinking habits seem to have different effects on blood pressure, those of daily heavy drinking being more prominent than those of weekend heavy drinking.

  3. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  4. High Blood Pressure and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Dec 14,2016 Pregnancy and ... Women . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  5. High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

    MedlinePlus

    ... other ways to control blood pressure, including healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining a normal weight, Roth said. Murray said some of the factors responsible for the worldwide increase in high blood pressure are unhealthy diets and obesity. In addition, in developing countries, more people are ...

  6. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  7. Improving Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Henry L.; Lloyd, Suzanne M.; Ford, Ian; Meredith, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and symptomatic coronary artery disease are also likely to be hypertensive and, overall, are at very high cardiovascular (CV) risk. This paper reports the findings of a posthoc analysis of the 1113 patients with diabetes mellitus in the ACTION trial: ACTION itself showed that outcomes in patients with stable angina and hypertension were significantly improved when a long-acting calcium channel blocking drug (nifedipine GITS) was added to their treatment regimens. This further analysis of the ACTION database in those patients with diabetes has identified a number of practical therapeutic issues which are still relevant because of potential outcome benefits, particularly in relation to BP control. For example, despite background CV treatment and, specifically, despite the widespread use of ACE Inhibitor drugs, the addition of nifedipine GITS was associated with significant benefits: improvement in BP control by an average of 6/3 mmHg and significant improvements in outcome. In summary, this retrospective analysis has identified that the addition of nifedipine GITS resulted in improved BP control and significant outcome benefits in patients with diabetes who were at high CV risk. There is evidence to suggest that these findings are of direct relevance to current therapeutic practice. PMID:21274458

  8. Vagal blocking improves glycemic control and elevated blood pressure in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shikora, S; Toouli, J; Herrera, M F; Kulseng, B; Zulewski, H; Brancatisano, R; Kow, L; Pantoja, J P; Johnsen, G; Brancatisano, A; Tweden, K S; Knudson, M B; Billington, C J

    2013-01-01

    An active device that downregulates abdominal vagal signalling has resulted in significant weight loss in feasibility studies. To prospectively evaluate the effect of intermittent vagal blocking (VBLOC) on weight loss, glycemic control, and blood pressure (BP) in obese subjects with DM2. Twenty-eight subjects were implanted with a VBLOC device (Maestro Rechargeable System) at 5 centers in an open-label study. Effects on weight loss, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and BP were evaluated at 1 week to 12 months. 26 subjects (17 females/9 males, 51 ± 2 years, BMI 37 ± 1 kg/m(2), mean ± SEM) completed 12 months followup. One serious adverse event (pain at implant site) was easily resolved. At 1 week and 12 months, mean excess weight loss percentages (% EWL) were 9 ± 1% and 25 ± 4% (P < 0.0001), and HbA1c declined by 0.3 ± 0.1% and 1.0 ± 0.2% (P = 0.02, baseline 7.8 ± 0.2%). In DM2 subjects with elevated BP (n = 15), mean arterial pressure reduced by 7 ± 3 mmHg and 8 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.04, baseline 100 ± 2 mmHg) at 1 week and 12 months. All subjects MAP decreased by 3 ± 2 mmHg (baseline 95 ± 2 mmHg) at 12 months. VBLOC was safe in obese DM2 subjects and associated with meaningful weight loss, early and sustained improvements in HbA1c, and reductions in BP in hypertensive DM2 subjects. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00555958.

  9. Discussing Coronary Risk with Patients to Improve Blood Pressure Treatment: Secondary Results from the CHECK-UP Study

    PubMed Central

    Lowensteyn, Ilka; Joseph, Lawrence; Kaouache, Mohammed; Marchand, Sylvie; Coupal, Louis; Boudreau, Ghislain

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Hypertension is common among patients with dyslipidemia but is often poorly treated. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate how a decision aid, used by primary care physicians to improve lipid therapy, impacted on the treatment of hypertension. Study Design Data were analyzed from patients enrolled in a randomized trial focusing primarily on the treatment of dyslipidemia. Patients received usual care or a coronary risk profile every three months to monitor the risk reduction following lifestyle changes and/or pharmacotherapy to treat dyslipidemia. Hypertension management was assessed based on a post hoc analysis of individuals whose blood pressure exceeded current national hypertension guidelines. Results There were 2,631 subjects who completed the study. Among 1,352 patients without diagnosed hypertension, 30% were above target on at least three consecutive visits. Among 1,279 individuals with known hypertension, 69% were above target on at least two consecutive visits. Overall, patients receiving risk profiles were more likely to receive appropriate antihypertensive therapy (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.11 – 1.78) compared to those receiving usual care. After adjustment for inter-physician variability and potential confounders, the use of the risk profile was associated with an increased likelihood of starting therapy (OR = 1.78, 95% CI 1.06 – 3.00) or modifying therapy (OR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.91). Conclusions In this clinical trial of dyslipidemia management, inadequately controlled hypertension was common, occurring in nearly 50% of individuals. Ongoing coronary risk assessment was associated with more appropriate blood pressure management. Cardiovascular risk assessment decision aids should be further evaluated in a randomized trial of hypertension therapy. PMID:18937013

  10. Blueberries Improve Endothelial Function, but Not Blood Pressure, in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Gupta, Alok K.; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A.; Johnson, William D.; Cefalu, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus −0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26024297

  11. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-05-27

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

  12. A Randomized Trial Using Motivational Interviewing for Maintenance of Blood Pressure Improvements in a Community-Engaged Lifestyle Intervention: HUB City Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Alicia; Madson, Michael; Thomson, Jessica; Zoellner, Jamie; Connell, Carol; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention conducted with…

  13. A randomized trail using motivational interviewing for maintenance of blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention: HUB City Steps

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. Purpose: To compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle int...

  14. A Randomized Trial Using Motivational Interviewing for Maintenance of Blood Pressure Improvements in a Community-Engaged Lifestyle Intervention: HUB City Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Alicia; Madson, Michael; Thomson, Jessica; Zoellner, Jamie; Connell, Carol; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effective dose of motivational interviewing for maintaining intervention-induced health outcome improvements. The purpose of this study was to compare effects of two doses of motivational interviewing for maintaining blood pressure improvements in a community-engaged lifestyle intervention conducted with…

  15. High blood pressure in women.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D A; Oparil, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a sexual dimorphism in blood pressure of humans and experimental animals: males tend to have higher blood pressure than females with functional ovaries, while ovariectomy or menopause tends to abolish the sexual dimorphism and cause females to develop a "male" pattern of blood pressure. Hypertensive male laboratory animals tend to have NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, while females are NaCl resistant unless their ovaries are removed, in which case NaCl sensitivity appears. The hormonal basis of NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure and of the sexual dimorphism of hypertension remains to be defined. Synthetic estrogens and progestins, as found in oral contraceptives, tend to elevate blood pressure, while naturally occurring estrogens lower it, or have no effect. Hypertension increases cardiovascular risk in women, as well as men, although the benefits of antihypertensive treatment have been more difficult to demonstrate in women. In the population of the United States, women are more aware of their hypertension, more likely to be treated medically, and more likely to have their blood pressure controlled.

  16. [Ambulatory measurement of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Mallion, J M; Tremel, F; Siché, J P; Azzouzi, L; Baguet, J P

    1995-12-09

    The advent of new techniques has greatly contributed to the development of ambulatory measurement as a noninvasive method for evaluating blood pressure. The technique implies use of a validated and reliable standardized apparatus. The operator must strictly comply with operating procedures, which must also be explained to the patient. Ambulatory measurement can be meaningful only if the results are compatible with reference values, which have now been established, and if the causes of possible error can be recognized and interpreted. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement has greatly improved our knowledge of physiological and pathological variations over the circadian cycle including day/night variability and the effects of psychosensorial stimulation. Diagnostic indications are clearly identified and include borderline hypertension suspected but not identified after about 3 months, the white coat effect, severe hypertension when modifications in the circadian cycle are suspected, paroxysmal hypertension, suspected pheochromocytoma, and gravid hypertension or an inversion of the circadian cycle possibly preceding an episode of eclampsia. There are also a certain number of particular indications in patients with degenerative or primary conditions affecting their autonomy. The true prognostic value of these recordings was recognized several years ago and has been confirmed by clinical trials. For example, the white blouse effect has no significant implication in terms or predicting less favourable morbidity or mortality. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurement has been definitively shown to be a valid method for evaluating the therapeutic effect of an anti-hypertensive drug in a given patient, especially when resting levels are questioned. For therapeutic trials, ambulatory measurements serve as a reference to evaluate the effect of treatment on the circadian cycle. Peak/dip levels can thus be determined in comparison with the residual effect of the drug. A

  17. Chaos in blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C D; Nafz, B; Persson, P B

    1996-03-01

    A number of control mechanisms are comprised within blood pressure regulation, ranging from events on the cellular level up to circulating hormones. Despite their vast number, blood pressure fluctuations occur preferably within a certain range (under physiological conditions). A specific class of dynamic systems has been extensively studied over the past several years: nonlinear coupled systems, which often reveal a characteristic form of motion termed "chaos". The system is restricted to a certain range in phase space, but the motion is never periodic. The attractor the system moves on has a non-integer dimension. What all chaotic systems have in common is their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The question arises as to whether blood pressure regulation can be explained by such models. Many efforts have been made to characterise heart rate variability and EEG dynamics by parameters of chaos theory (e.g., fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents). These method were successfully applied to dynamics observed in single organs, but very few studies have dealt with blood pressure dynamics. This mini-review first gives an overview on the history of blood pressure dynamics and the methods suitable to characterise the dynamics by means of tools derived from the field of nonlinear dynamics. Then applications to systemic blood pressure are discussed. After a short survey on heart rate variability, which is indirectly reflected in blood pressure variability, some dynamic aspects of resistance vessels are given. Intriguingly, systemic blood pressure reveals a change in fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents, when the major short-term control mechanism--the arterial baroreflex--is disrupted. Indeed it seems that cardiovascular time series can be described by tools from nonlinear dynamics [66]. These methods allow a novel description of some important aspects of biological systems. Both the linear and the nonlinear tools complement each other and can be useful in

  18. Common carotid intima-media thickness measurements do not improve cardiovascular risk prediction in individuals with elevated blood pressure: the USE-IMT collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bots, Michiel L; Groenewegen, Karlijn A; Anderson, Todd J; Britton, Annie R; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hedblad, Bo; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kavousi, Maryam; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Ikram, M Arfan; Lonn, Eva M; Lorenz, Matthias W; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Nijpels, Giel; Okazaki, Shuhei; O'Leary, Daniel H; Polak, Joseph F; Price, Jacqueline F; Robertson, Christine; Rembold, Christopher M; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Franco, Oscar H; Peters, Sanne A E; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2014-06-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a marker of cardiovascular risk. It is unclear whether measurement of mean common CIMT improves 10-year risk prediction of first-time myocardial infarction or stroke in individuals with elevated blood pressure. We performed an analysis among individuals with elevated blood pressure (i.e., a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm Hg) in USE-IMT, a large ongoing individual participant data meta-analysis. We refitted the risk factors of the Framingham Risk Score on asymptomatic individuals (baseline model) and expanded this model with mean common CIMT (CIMT model) measurements. From both models, 10-year risks to develop a myocardial infarction or stroke were estimated. In individuals with elevated blood pressure, we compared discrimination and calibration of the 2 models and calculated the net reclassification improvement (NRI). We included 17 254 individuals with elevated blood pressure from 16 studies. During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 2014 first-time myocardial infarctions or strokes occurred. The C-statistics of the baseline and CIMT models were similar (0.73). NRI with the addition of mean common CIMT was small and not significant (1.4%; 95% confidence intervals, -1.1 to 3.7). In those at intermediate risk (n=5008, 10-year absolute risk of 10% to 20%), the NRI was 5.6% (95% confidence intervals, 1.6-10.4). There is no added value of measurement of mean common CIMT in individuals with elevated blood pressure for improving cardiovascular risk prediction. For those at intermediate risk, the addition of mean common CIMT to an existing cardiovascular risk score is small but statistically significant.

  19. Improvement of sleep-disordered breathing in children is associated with a reduction in overnight blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-12-01

    Childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with elevated blood pressure (BP); however, little is known about the long-term outcomes in this population. We aimed to assess long-term changes in overnight BP in children with SDB. Forty children with previously diagnosed SDB and 20 nonsnoring control participants underwent repeat overnight polysomnography (PSG) with continuous BP measurement 4years after the original diagnosis. At follow-up, children aged 11-16years were categorized into 2 groups of resolved (absence of snoring and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [OAHI]⩽1) or unresolved (continued to snore or had an OAHI >1) SDB. There were no group differences in age, sex, or body mass index (BMI) z score. OAHI was lower at follow-up (P<.05) in both the resolved (n=18) and unresolved (n=22) groups. BP was elevated during wake and sleep in both SDB groups compared to the control group at baseline (P<.01 for all), but it decreased by 5-15mmHg at follow-up during sleep for both SDB groups (P<.05 for all). BP during wake was unchanged in the SDB groups at follow-up but increased in the control group (P<.05). At follow-up, BP did not differ between the control group and the SDB groups during wake or sleep. Improved oxygen saturation (SpO2) during sleep was a significant predictor of a reduction in BP. SDB improved over the 4-year follow-up and both resolved and unresolved groups exhibited a significant reduction in BP during sleep, with levels similar to the control group. Our study highlights the fact that even small improvements can improve the cardiovascular effects of SDB. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved 24-hour blood pressure control with sirolimus versus calcineurin inhibitor based immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Steigerwalt, S P; Brar, N; Dhungel, A; Butcher, D; Steigerwalt, S; El-Ghouroury, M; Provenzano, R

    2009-12-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) have brought dramatic improvements in early renal allograft survival. However, CNI are associated with posttransplant hypertension (PTHTN), a risk factor for mortality from cardiovascular disease and graft failure. Sirolimus (SRL) is emerging as an alternative to CNI. SRL effects on blood pressure (BP) in humans are unclear. We compared the prevalence of PTHTN among patients receiving SRL as maintenance immunosuppression with a group receiving CNI by using 24-hour ambulatory BP (AMBP). AMBP has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and progression of kidney disease better than casual office BP measurements in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Renal transplant recipients with office hypertension (defined as BP > 130/80 or on antihypertensive medications), receiving stable immunosuppression and displaying consistent serum creatinine values for > or =6 months were eligible. We enrolled the first 40 patients to consent. Office BP was measured twice using a BP-Tru machine. AMBP was then analyzed for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and nocturnal blood pressure fall (NF; "dipping"). Patients were placed in the SRL group (n = 18) and the CNI group (n = 20) based on their maintenance immunosuppressive protocol. Two patients were excluded because of incomplete data. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil, and 14/38, maintenance steroids. We collected, demographics as well as type and date of renal allograft, medications, comorbidities, CKD stage, proteinuria, and plasma creatinine at the time of study enrollment. Patients in the SRL group displayed lower 24-hour SBP than the CNI group (128.0 +/- 10.8 vs 137.7 +/- 14; P = .029). Nightime MAP, nightime SBP, and nighttime DBP were all lower in the SRL group. NF did not reach significance between the SRL and CNI groups (44% vs 15%; P = .074). Patient demographics and number of antihypertensive medications did not differ. The lower 24-hour SBP seen in the SRL group by AMBP may

  1. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Some women with gestational hypertension eventually develop preeclampsia. Chronic hypertension. Chronic hypertension is high blood pressure ... determine when it began. Chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. This condition occurs in women with chronic hypertension ...

  3. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... all their lives. back to top Types of Medications FDA has approved many medications to treat high ...

  4. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  5. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  6. Program Participation and Blood Pressure Improvement in the Heart of New Ulm Project, Minnesota, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sidebottom, Abbey C.; Boucher, Jackie L.; Pereira, Raquel; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Heart of New Ulm (HONU) Project is a community-based heart disease prevention intervention that delivers various component programs through health care, work sites, and the community. We examined the association between HONU program participation and blood pressure (BP) control over the first 2 years of the project. Methods The sample included residents aged 40 to 79 years from the target zip code who attended a heart health screening at baseline (2009) and again at follow-up (2011). BP control was defined as achieving or maintaining a BP less than 140/90 mm Hg in 2011. Results BP improvements were observed in the sample: 81.7% of those who had controlled BP in 2009 maintained controlled BP 2 years later, and 52.4% of those with uncontrolled BP at baseline had controlled BP 2 years later (mean [SD] change in systolic BP, −10.6 mm Hg [20.8]). In the final adjusted model, participation in any 2 component programs of the HONU Project was associated with significantly higher odds of BP control among those with uncontrolled BP at baseline (n = 374). Participation in any component of the HONU Project among those with uncontrolled BP was associated with significant BP improvement compared with no participation. Conclusions The clinical, work site, and community education and behavioral programs (eg, healthful diet or physical activity) delivered as part of a population-level heart disease prevention intervention were associated with meaningful BP improvements over 2 years among those with uncontrolled BP at baseline. PMID:24674634

  7. Blood Pressure and Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Forbang, Nketi; Ix, Joachim; Criqui, Michael; Rifkin, Dena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension in older adults is a dynamic process, with significant diurnal fluctuation. Little research has been done on the associations between increased short-term blood pressure variability and blunted night-time dipping in respect to decreased physical function in the elderly. Our aim is to use a cross-sectional analysis to illuminate any associations. Methods: A cross-sectional sub-study (mean age: 72, 67.5% female) was performed on selected participants from the San Diego Population Study (Criqui, et al, 2003). Blood pressure was measured both in the office (3 independent blood pressure readings) and using a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring cuff. Blood pressure variability was measured using average real variability (ARV). Physical function was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test. Statistical analysis was performed on IBM SPSS Statistics (1911) software. Results: An unadjusted univariate analysis adjusted for age and gender showed associations between 24-hr ARV of SBP (P = .001), 24-hr ARV pulse pressure (P < .001), and percent systolic dipping (P = .011) and SPPB score. After multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender was performed, the results were substantially attenuated. However, the association of ARV of SBP was not significant with a P-value of .052 and the ARV of pulse pressure remained significant with a P-value of .022. Multivariate hierarchical linear regression models revealed insignificant trends. Conclusions: Increased short-term variability and blunted night-time dipping were associated physical function but were not independent of age and body mass index (BMI). Further research can be done as to the biology of how both age and BMI influence blood pressure patterns. The trends observed in this study may warrant the investigation of abnormal blood pressure patterns in those who are either elderly or have increased BMI.

  8. Renal sympathetic denervation in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease: does improvement in renal function follow blood pressure control?

    PubMed

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Chen, Shaojie; Andrea, Bruno Rustum; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães de Queiroz; Graciano, Miguel Luis; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-seven patients with resistant hypertension and chronic kidney disease were treated by renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) and followed for 12 months. Patients were retrospectively divided into controlled and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) groups. Increases in mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were found at months 1, 3, 6, and 12 in the controlled group (P < .0001, for every time point). The mean change in eGFR after 12 months was 18.54 ± 8.15 mL/min/1.73 m(2) higher in the controlled group (P=.0318). In patients in the controlled group with baseline eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), responders (with an increase in eGFR > 6.2%) corresponded to 50% at 6 months and 83% at 12 months. In the patients with baseline eGFR ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m(2), all patients were labeled as responders at months 6 and 12. Median albumin:creatinine ratio after 12 months was lower than baseline only in the controlled group (P = .0003). Our results suggest that patients with this profile who reached BP control by RSD also experienced a significant improvement in renal function.

  9. Screening for High Blood Pressure in Adults During Ambulatory Nonprimary Care Visits: Opportunities to Improve Hypertension Recognition.

    PubMed

    Handler, Joel; Mohan, Yasmina; Kanter, Michael H; Reynolds, Kristi; Li, Xia; Nguyen, Miki; Young, Deborah R; Koebnick, Corinna

    2015-06-01

    Visits with nonprimary care providers such as optometrists may be missed opportunities for the detection of high blood pressure (BP). For this study, normotensive adults with at least 12 months of health plan membership on January 1, 2009 (n=1,075,522) were followed-up for high BP through March 14, 2011. Of 111,996 patients with a BP measurement ≥140/90 mm Hg, 82.7% were measured during primary care visits and 17.3% during nonprimary care visits. Individuals with a BP ≥140/90 mm Hg measured during nonprimary care visits were older and more likely to be male and non-Hispanic white. The proportion of patients with follow-up and false-positives were comparable between primary and nonprimary care. The main nonprimary care specialty to identify a first BP ≥140/90 mm Hg was ophthalmology/optometry with 24.5% of all patients. Results suggest that expanding screening for hypertension to nonprimary care settings may improve the detection of hypertension.

  10. Rice bran fractions improve blood pressure, lipid profile, and glucose metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ardiansyah; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Koseki, Takuya; Ohinata, Kousaku; Hashizume, Katsumi; Komai, Michio

    2006-03-08

    Effect of dietary supplementation of two types of rice bran fraction on blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, and glucose metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats was studied. Male 4-week-old rats were divided into one group fed the AIN-93M-based control (C) diet and two groups fed diet supplemented with 60 g/kg of Driselase and ethanol fractions (DF and EF, respectively) of rice bran. After 8 weeks feeding, the BP decreased in the DF and EF groups in comparison with the C group (p < 0.01). Plasma ACE inhibitory activity, BUN, BUN/creatinine ratio, albumin, triglyceride, and glucose levels were lower in the DF and EF groups than in the C group (p < 0.01). Plasma nitric oxide and urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels were lower in the DF and EF groups than in the C group (p < 0.01). Rice bran fractions appear to have a beneficial dietary component that improves hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia.

  11. Creating community collaboration to improve the care of patients with high blood pressure: lessons from Rochester, New York.

    PubMed

    Bisognano, John D; Speranza, Paul S; Becker, Lawrence M; Norwood, Wade S; Bradley, Al; Nazar, Michael D; Beckman, Howard B

    2012-03-01

    Over the past two years, the business community of Monroe County, which includes Rochester, New York, has been engaging in a collaborative to improve outcomes for people with high blood pressure. As the employers examined the costs of care in the community, they recognized two important factors. First, the costs of care for the uninsured, the underinsured, and the Medicare population influence the business community's cost of care. Second, trying to redesign care just for their employees alone was not effective. This project is unique in that the stimulus and funding for community-wide action comes from the business community. They saw beyond the often unsuccessful short-term cost reduction programs and joined with a community-focused organization, the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency, to construct a multi-year, multi-faceted intervention designed to encourage practice redesign and an invigorated community commitment to partnership and accountability. This report describes the process to date and hopefully will stimulate conversations about mechanisms to encourage similar collaboration within other communities. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  13. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  14. Wrist Blood Pressure Monitors: Are They Accurate?

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at heart level. Even then, blood pressure measurements taken at the wrist are usually higher and ... a very large arm or find blood pressure measurements painful. In these cases, measuring blood pressure at ...

  15. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  16. Taurine Supplementation Lowers Blood Pressure and Improves Vascular Function in Prehypertension: Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianqian; Wang, Bin; Li, Yingsha; Sun, Fang; Li, Peng; Xia, Weijie; Zhou, Xunmei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Jing; Zeng, Xiangru; Zhao, Zhigang; He, Hongbo; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-03-01

    Taurine, the most abundant, semiessential, sulfur-containing amino acid, is well known to lower blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive animal models. However, no rigorous clinical trial has validated whether this beneficial effect of taurine occurs in human hypertension or prehypertension, a key stage in the development of hypertension. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we assessed the effects of taurine intervention on BP and vascular function in prehypertension. We randomly assigned 120 eligible prehypertensive individuals to receive either taurine supplementation (1.6 g per day) or a placebo for 12 weeks. Taurine supplementation significantly decreased the clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs, especially in those with high-normal BP. Mean clinic systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 7.2/2.6 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 4.7/1.3 mm Hg. Mean ambulatory systolic BP reduction for taurine/placebo was 3.8/0.3 mm Hg, and diastolic BP was 3.5/0.6 mm Hg. In addition, taurine supplementation significantly improved endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilation and increased plasma H2S and taurine concentrations. Furthermore, changes in BP were negatively correlated with both the plasma H2S and taurine levels in taurine-treated prehypertensive individuals. To further elucidate the hypotensive mechanism, experimental studies were performed both in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that taurine treatment upregulated the expression of hydrogen sulfide-synthesizing enzymes and reduced agonist-induced vascular reactivity through the inhibition of transient receptor potential channel subtype 3-mediated calcium influx in human and mouse mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, the antihypertensive effect of chronic taurine supplementation shows promise in the treatment of prehypertension through improvement of vascular function. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Blood pressure reductions following catheter-based renal denervation are not related to improvements in adherence to antihypertensive drugs measured by urine/plasma toxicological analysis.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Meyer, Markus R; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Helfer, Andreas G; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Ukena, Christian; Burnier, Michel; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Maurer, Hans H; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. The adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medication following renal denervation is unknown. This study investigated adherence to prescribed antihypertensive treatment by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in plasma and urine at baseline and 6 months after renal denervation in 100 patients with resistant hypertension, defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. At baseline, complete adherence to all prescribed antihypertensive agents was observed in 52 patients, 46 patients were partially adherent, and two patients were completely non-adherent. Baseline office blood pressure was 167/88 ± 19/16 mmHg with a corresponding 24-h blood pressure of 154/86 ± 15/13 mmHg. Renal denervation significantly reduced office and ambulatory blood pressure at 6-month follow-up by 15/5 mmHg (p < 0.001/p < 0.001) and 8/4 mmHg (p < 0.001/p = 0.001), respectively. Mean adherence to prescribed treatment was significantly reduced from 85.0 % at baseline to 80.7 %, 6 months after renal denervation (p = 0.005). The blood pressure decrease was not explained by improvements in adherence following the procedure. Patients not responding to treatment significantly reduced their drug intake following the procedure. Adherence was highest for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and beta blockers (>90 %) and lowest for vasodilators (21 %). In conclusion, renal denervation can reduce office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension despite a significant reduction in adherence to antihypertensive treatment after 6 months.

  18. Night time blood pressure dip

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the “dip”, is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors. PMID:26225196

  19. Night time blood pressure dip.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-07-26

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the "dip", is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors.

  20. Vegetarian diet and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Beilin, L J; Armstrong, B K; Margetts, B M; Rouse, I L; Vandongen, R

    1987-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence from epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials that adoption of an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet leads to blood pressure reduction in both normotensive and hypertensive subjects. This effect appears to be independent of both dietary sodium and weight loss but additive to effects of weight reduction. Long-term adherence to a vegetarian diet is associated with less of a rise of blood pressure with age and a decreased prevalence of hypertension. The nutrients responsible for these effects have not been clearly identified and the mechanisms involved are unknown. Resolution of these questions is needed to enable more widespread adoption of dietary changes which may reduce the prevalence of hypertension, reduce antihypertensive drug dependence and by effects on blood pressure and blood lipids ameliorate the natural history of hypertensive cardiovascular disease.

  1. Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Arterial pressure compared with ambient bodily-fluid pressure. Implanted apparatus, capable of measuring blood pressure of patient, includes differential-pressure transducer connected to pressure sensor positioned in major artery. Electrical signal is function of differential pressure between blood-pressure sensor and reference-pressure sensor transmitted through skin of patient to recorder or indicator.

  2. Blood pressure regulation: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Guyton, A C; Hall, J E; Lohmeier, T E; Jackson, T E; Kastner, P R

    1981-06-01

    In this paper we have attempted to explain the difference between proportional pressure control systems and the renal-blood volume-pressure control mechanism, which is an infinite gain pressure control system. Because of this infinite gain of the kidney mechanism, this mechanism has the capability of returning arterial pressure all the way back to the control leve. Furthermore, this mechanism can override the other pressure control mechanisms because of its extreme control capability. On the other hand, the renal-blood volume mechanism for pressure control itself be controlled by many other factors. These other factors are said to change the pressure "set-point" level of the renal system, and then the renal system automatically brings the pressure to the set-point level. It is especially noteworthy, however, that some of the factors that play extreme roles in short-term pressure control-such as heart strength, vascular capacity, and total peripheral resistance-will not alter the long-term arterial pressure level (unless they in some way concurrently alter the set-point of the kidney mechanism).

  3. Changing the "Normal Range" for Blood Pressure from 140/90 to 130/Any Improves Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fulks, Michael; Stout, Robert L; Dolan, Vera F

    2015-01-01

    Objective .- Redefine the "normal" reference range for blood pressure from <140/90 to one that more effectively identifies individuals with increased mortality risk. Method .- Data from the recently published 2014 CRL blood pressure study was used. It includes 2,472,706 life insurance applicants tested by Clinical Reference Laboratory from 1993 to 2007 with follow-up for vital status using the September 2011 Social Security Death Master File. Various upper limits of blood pressure (BP in mm Hg) were evaluated to determine if any was superior to the current, commonly used limit of 140/90 in identifying individuals with increased mortality risk. Results .- An alternative reference range using a systolic BP (SBP) <130 with any diastolic BP (DBP) included 84% of life insurance applicants. It had a lower mortality rate and narrower range of relative risk than <140/90, including 89% as many applicants but only 68% as many deaths. This pattern of lives and deaths was consistent across age and sex. Conclusion .- Switching to a "normal" reference range of SBP <130 offers superior risk assessment relative to using BP <140/90 while still including a sufficient percentage of the population.

  4. Chronotherapy with valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination in essential hypertension: improved sleep-time blood pressure control with bedtime dosing.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Mojón, Artemio; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2011-08-01

    Administration of angiotensin receptor blockers at bedtime results in greater reduction of nighttime blood pressure than dosing upon awakening, independent of the terminal half-life of each individual medication. To obtain blood pressure (BP) target goals most patients require treatment with more than one hypertension medication. However, the potential differing effects on BP regulation of combination therapy depending on the time-of-day of administration have scarcely been investigated. Accordingly, the authors prospectively evaluated the administration-time-dependent BP-lowering efficacy of valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combination therapy. The authors conducted a randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint trial on 204 subjects with essential hypertension (95 men/109 women), 49.7 ± 11.1 (mean ± SD) yrs of age. The BP of participants in this trial was not properly controlled with respect to published ambulatory BP criteria after initially randomized to valsartan monotherapy (160 mg/day), whether routinely ingested upon awakening by one group or at bedtime by another group for 12 wks. Thus, HCTZ (12.5 mg/day) was added to valsartan as a single-pill formulation, maintaining the original treatment-time, i.e., upon awakening or at bedtime, of participants of the two groups, for another 12 wks. BP was measured by ambulatory monitoring for 48 h at inclusion and after each 12-wk span of therapy. Physical activity was simultaneously monitored every minute by wrist actigraphy to accurately define the beginning and end of daytime activity and nocturnal sleep so that the respective BP means for every participant at each evaluation could be precisely determined. Combination therapy resulted in a similar statistically significant reduction of the 48-h BP mean from baseline for both treatment-time groups (17.0/11.5 mm Hg in systolic/diastolic BP after combination therapy on awakening; 17.9/12.1 mm Hg reduction after combination treatment at bedtime; p

  5. Low-intensity voluntary running lowers blood pressure with simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and insulin sensitivity in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Wei; Qian, Feng-Lei; Wang, Jian; Tao, Tao; Guo, Jing; Wang, Lie; Lu, Ai-Yun; Chen, Hong

    2008-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of voluntary running at different intensity levels on blood pressure, endothelium-dependent vessel dysfunction and insulin resistance in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with severe hypertension. Ten-month-old male and female SHR with severe hypertension were assigned to voluntary running at either low intensity (30% of maximal aerobic velocity) or moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic velocity) on a motor-driven treadmill for 6 weeks, 20 min per day and 7 days per week. Age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats and SHR were kept under sedentary conditions as controls. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the tail-cuff method. At the end of the exercise training, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipids assay, and aortae were isolated to examine their function in vitro. Low-intensity but not moderate-intensity running significantly lowered blood pressure in both male and female SHR (p<0.01). There was significant impairment in acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in SHR (p<0.01), which was improved by low-intensity training (p<0.05). Nitric oxide synthase blockade abrogated the improvement in endothelium-dependent relaxation. Hypertensive rats had elevated blood glucose and insulin levels with lowered insulin sensitivity that was ameliorated by low-intensity running. A significant increase in blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and a significant decrease in triglycerides were found in exercised SHR. In conclusion, low-intensity voluntary exercise lowers hypertension in aged SHR with severe hypertension. Exercise-induced simultaneous improvement in endothelium-dependent vessel relaxation and insulin sensitivity may act concomitantly in attenuating cardiovascular risk factors in aged hypertensive rats with significantly high blood pressure.

  6. Decrease in blood pressure and improved psychological aspects through meditation training in hypertensive older adults: A randomized control study.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Rosas Marchiori, Márcia; Kozasa, Elisa Harumi; Miranda, Roberto Dischinger; Monezi Andrade, André Luiz; Perrotti, Tatiana Caccese; Leite, José Roberto

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of Zen meditation on blood pressure (BP) and quality of life in elderly subjects. A total of 59 volunteers (21 men and 38 women), aged ≥60 years with systolic BP between 130 and 159 mmHg and diastolic BP between 85 and 99 mmHg, were randomly divided into a meditation group (MG), n = 28 and a control group (CG), n = 31. The MG meditated twice a day for 20 min for 3 months, and the CG remained on a waiting list. The BP levels were measured monthly in both groups. The volunteers' medication was kept stable. A quality of life assessment instrument was applied at the beginning and end of the study. For systolic BP, analysis of variance showed the influence of time (F(4,228)  = 4.74, P < 0.01, β = 0.98) and the interaction group × time (F(4,228)  = 3.07, P < 0.01, β = 0.89). The MG showed a significant decrease in systolic BP levels in the second measurement after 1 month of meditation practice when compared with the CG (Newman-Keuls test, P < 0.05). Starting at the second measurement, systolic BP levels in the MG were lower than the baseline and first measurement levels; however, the systolic BP levels were similar to those observed in the CG. In the quality of life assessment evaluation, a significant improvement in psychological aspects and overall quality of life in the MG compared with the CG was observed. These results suggest that Zen meditation is an interesting tool as a complementary treatment for hypertension in elderly subjects. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Blueberry intervention improves vascular reactivity and lowers blood pressure in high-fat-, high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Ishisaka, Akari; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Terao, Junji

    2013-05-28

    Growing evidence suggests that intake of flavonoid-containing foods may exert cardiovascular benefits in human subjects. We have investigated the effects of a 10-week blueberry (BB) supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and vascular reactivity in rats fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet, known to induce endothelial dysfunction. Rats were randomly assigned to follow a control chow diet, a chow diet supplemented with 2 % (w/w) BB, a high-fat diet (10 % lard; 0·5 % cholesterol) or the high fat plus BB for 10 weeks. Rats supplemented with BB showed significant reductions in systolic BP (SBP) of 11 and 14 %, at weeks 8 and 10, respectively, relative to rats fed the control chow diet (week 8 SBP: 107·5 (SEM 4·7) v. 122·2 (SEM 2·1) mmHg, P= 0·018; week 10 SBP: 115·0 (SEM 3·1) v. 132·7 (SEM 1·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Furthermore, SBP was reduced by 14 % in rats fed with the high fat plus 2 % BB diet at week 10, compared to those on the high-fat diet only (SBP: 118·2 (SEM 3·6) v. 139·5 (SEM 4·5) mmHg, P< 0·0001). Aortas harvested from BB-fed animals exhibited significantly reduced contractile responses (to L-phenylephrine) compared to those fed the control chow or high-fat diets. Furthermore, in rats fed with high fat supplemented with BB, aorta relaxation was significantly greater in response to acetylcholine compared to animals fed with the fat diet. These data suggest that BB consumption can lower BP and improve endothelial dysfunction induced by a high fat, high cholesterol containing diet.

  8. Reassessment of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Improves Renal Risk Stratification in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-Term Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Minutolo, Roberto; Gabbai, Francis B; Chiodini, Paolo; Garofalo, Carlo; Stanzione, Giovanna; Liberti, Maria Elena; Pacilio, Mario; Borrelli, Silvio; Provenzano, Michele; Conte, Giuseppe; De Nicola, Luca

    2015-09-01

    In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) performs better than clinic BP in predicting outcome, but whether repeated assessment of ABP further refines prognosis remains ill-defined. We recruited 182 consecutive hypertensive patients with nondialysis chronic kidney disease who underwent 2 ABPs 12 months apart to evaluate the enhancement in risk stratification provided by a second ABP obtained 1 year after baseline on the risk (hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval) of composite renal end point (death, chronic dialysis, and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline ≥40%). The difference in daytime and nighttime systolic BP between the 2 ABPs (daytime and nighttime bias) was added to a survival model including baseline ABP. Net reclassification improvement was also calculated. Age was 65.6±13.4 years; 36% had diabetes mellitus and 36% had previous cardiovascular event; estimated glomerular filtration rate was 42.2±19.6 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), and clinic BP was 145±18/80±11 mm Hg. Baseline ABP (daytime, 131±16/75±10 and nighttime, 122±18/66±10 mm Hg) and daytime/nighttime BP goals (58.2% and 43.4%) did not change at month 12. Besides baseline ABP values, bias for daytime and nighttime systolic BP linearly associated with renal outcome (1.12, 1.04-1.21 and 1.18, 1.08-1.29 for every 5-mm Hg increase, respectively). Classification of patients at risk improved when considering nighttime systolic level at second ABP (net reclassification improvement, 0.224; 95% confidence interval, 0.005-0.435). Patients with first and second ABPs above target showed greater renal risk (2.15, 1.29-3.59 and 1.71, 1.07-2.72, for daytime and nighttime, respectively). In nondialysis chronic kidney disease, reassessment of ABP at 1 year further refines renal prognosis; such reassessment should specifically be considered in patients with uncontrolled BP at baseline.

  9. Association of multimodal treatment-induced improvements in stress, exercise volume, nutrition, and weight with improved blood pressure in severely obese women.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2013-09-01

    Research suggests that obesity, physical inactivity, anxiety (psychological tension), and a poor diet are associated with high blood pressure (BP). Although medication is the treatment of choice, behavioral methods might also improve BP in individuals with both prehypertension and hypertension. Severely obese women from the southeast USA (N = 155; M(age) = 45 years; M(body mass index) (BMI) = 41 kg/m(2)) that fulfilled criteria for either prehypertension (n = 96) or hypertension (n = 59) volunteered for a Young Men's Christian Association-based exercise and nutrition support treatment that also included instruction in stress-management methods. Significant (p values of ≤0.001) within-group improvements over 26 weeks in tension, overall mood, exercise volume, fruit and vegetable consumption, BMI, and systolic and diastolic BP were found. There were significant (p values of <0.05) bivariate correlations between improvements in tension, overall mood, volume of exercise, fruit and vegetable intake, BMI, and systolic and diastolic BP improvements. Multiple regression analyses, separately entering changes in tension and overall mood along with changes in volume of exercise, fruit and vegetable intake, and BMI, explained 19 and 20 % of the variances in systolic BP, respectively, (p values of <0.001) and 8 % of the variances, each (p values of ≤0.02), in diastolic BP. In each multiple regression equation, improvements in the psychological factors of tension and overall mood demonstrated the greatest independent contribution to the variances accounted for in BP improvements. The ability of nonpharmaceutical, behavioral methods to improve BP in women with prehypertension and hypertension was suggested, with changes in the psychological factors of tension and overall mood appearing to be especially salient. Practical applications of findings were suggested.

  10. Blood Pressure Self-Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure self-measurement has been used extensively as part of several clinical processes including in the home monitoring setting for mitigating white coat effect and gaining more detailed insights into the blood pressure variability of patients over time. Self-measurement of BP is also being used as part of telemonitoring and telemedicine processes, as well as in the waiting rooms and self-measurement rooms of general practice clinics, specialized hospital department's outpatient clinics, and in other types of care facilitates and institutions.The aim of this review is to provide an overview of where, when, and how blood pressure self-measurement is being used, which official clinical guidelines and procedures are available for its implementation, as well as the opportunities and challenges that are related to its use.

  11. Effect of health insurance and facility quality improvement on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in Nigeria: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Marleen E; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Akande, Tanimola M; Kramer, Berber; Osagbemi, Gordon K; Tanovic, Zlata; Gustafsson-Wright, Emily; Brewster, Lizzy M; Lange, Joep M A; Schultsz, Constance

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Hypertension is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, but the lack of affordable treatment and the poor quality of health care compromise antihypertensive treatment coverage and outcomes. OBJECTIVE To report the effect of a community-based health insurance (CBHI) program on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in rural Nigeria. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We compared changes in outcomes from baseline (2009) between the CBHI program area and a control area in 2011 through consecutive household surveys. Households were selected from a stratified random sample of geographic areas. Among 3023 community-dwelling adults, all nonpregnant adults (aged ≥18 years) with hypertension at baseline were eligible for this study. INTERVENTION Voluntary CBHI covering primary and secondary health care and quality improvement of health care facilities. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The difference in change in blood pressure from baseline between the program and the control areas in 2011, which was estimated using difference-in-differences regression analysis. RESULTS Of 1500 eligible households, 1450 (96.7%) participated, including 564 adults with hypertension at baseline (313 in the program area and 251 in the control area). Longitudinal data were available for 413 adults (73.2%) (237 in the program area and 176 in the control area). Baseline blood pressure in respondents with hypertension who had incomplete data did not differ between areas. Insurance coverage in the hypertensive population increased from 0% to 40.1% in the program area (n = 237) and remained less than 1% in the control area (n = 176) from 2009 to 2011. Systolic blood pressure decreased by 10.41 (95% CI, -13.28 to -7.54) mm Hg in the program area, constituting a 5.24 (-9.46 to -1.02)-mm Hg greater reduction compared with the control area (P = .02), where systolic blood pressure decreased by 5.17 (-8.29 to -2.05) mm Hg. Diastolic blood pressure decreased by 4.27 (95

  12. The Diterpene Glycoside, Rebaudioside A, Does not Improve Glycemic Control or Affect Blood Pressure After Eight Weeks Treatment in the Goto-Kakizaki Rat

    PubMed Central

    Dyrskog, Stig E.U.; Jeppesen, Per B.; Chen, Jianguo; Christensen, Lars P.; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    The plant, Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (SrB), has been used for the treatment of diabetes in traditional medicine. Previously, we have demonstrated that long-term administration of the glycoside stevioside has insulinotropic, glucagonostatic, anti-hyperglycemic and blood pressure-lowering effects in type 2 diabetic animal models. The aim of this study was to elucidate if long-term administration of rebaudioside A, another glycoside isolated from the plant SrB, could improve glycemic control and lower blood pressure in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. We divided male Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats into two groups which were fed a standard laboratory chow diet for eight weeks. The diet was supplemented with oral rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) in the experimental group. Blood glucose, weight, blood pressure and food intake were measured weekly. Animals were equipped with an intra-arterial catheter, and at week eight the conscious rats underwent an intra-arterial glucose tolerance test (IAGTT) (2.0 g/kg BW). During the IAGTT, the level of glucose, glucagon, and insulin responses did not differ significantly between the two groups. Fasting levels of glucose, glucagon, insulin or levels of blood lipids did not differ between the groups throughout the study period. We observed no effect on blood pressure or weight development. In conclusion, oral supplementation with rebaudioside A (0.025 g/kg BW/day) for eight weeks did not influence blood pressure or glycemic control in GK rats. Rebaudioside A failed to show the beneficial effects in diabetic animals previously demonstrated for stevioside. PMID:17491683

  13. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  14. High blood pressure and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  15. Alcohol: Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure (hypertension) Does drinking alcohol affect your blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. Having more than three drinks ...

  16. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  17. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  18. 2012 consensus document of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA): strategies to improve blood pressure control in Italy: from global cardiovascular risk stratification to combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Massimo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Ambrosioni, Ettore; Cottone, Santina; Cuspidi, Cesare; Borghi, Claudio; De Luca, Nicola; Fallo, Francesco; Ferri, Claudio; Morganti, Alberto; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Sarzani, Riccardo; Sechi, Leonardo; Virdis, Agostino; Tocci, Giuliano; Trimarco, Bruno; Filippi, Alessandro; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-03-01

    Observational clinical studies have demonstrated that only 30-40% of patients with arterial hypertension achieve the recommended blood pressure goals (below 140/90 mmHg). In contrast, interventional trials consistently showed that it is possible to achieve effective blood pressure targets in about 70% of treated hypertensive patients with different cardiovascular risk profiles, especially through the use of rational, effective and well tolerated combination therapies. In order to bridge the gap between current and desired blood pressure control and to achieve more effective prevention of cardiovascular diseases, the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA) has developed an interventional strategy aimed at reaching nearly 70% of treated controlled hypertensive patients by 2015. This ambitious goal can be realistically achieved by a more rational use of modern tools and supports, and also through the use of combination therapy in hypertension in daily clinical practice, especially if this approach can be simplified into a single pill (fixed combination therapy), which is a therapeutic option now also available in Italy. Since about 70-80% of treated hypertensive patients require a combination therapy based on at least two classes of drugs in order to achieve the recommended blood pressure goals, it is of key importance to implement this strategy in routine clinical practice. Amongst the various combination therapies currently available for hypertension treatment and control, the use of those strategies based on drugs that antagonize the renin-angiotensin system, such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers) and ACE inhibitors, in combination with diuretics and/or calcium channel blockers, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events and to improve patient compliance to treatment, resulting in a greater antihypertensive efficacy and better tolerability compared with monotherapy. The present document

  19. Atorvastatin improves sodium handling and decreases blood pressure in salt-loaded rats with chronic renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Juncos, Luis I; Martín, Fernando L; Baigorria, Sandra T; Pasqualini, María E; Fiore, María C; Eynard, Aldo R; Juncos, Luis A; García, Néstor H

    2012-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation seem to mediate the cardiovascular risks associated with salt sensitivity. Because hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors decrease oxidation and increase nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, we examined the effects of atorvastatin (ator) on tissue injury in rats with a reduced renal mass produced by 5/6 nephrectomy. This salt-sensitive hypertension model causes kidney and cardiovascular injuries. After undergoing 5/6 nephrectomy or sham surgery, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into five groups: sham, reduced renal mass and a normal salt diet (NNaD), NNaD+ator (50 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)), reduced renal mass and a high salt diet (HNaD), and HNaD+ator. After assessing the sodium balance for 7 d, we measured blood pressure (BP), creatinemia, proteinuria, nitrites, and 12(S)-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid, the renal cortical expression of endothelial NO synthase, and the ratio of left ventricular weight to body weight. In NNaD rats, creatinine, proteinuria, and 12(S)-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid increased, renal NO indices decreased, but the Na(+) balance, BP, and the left ventricular weight/body weight ratio remained unchanged. In the NNaD group, atorvastatin normalized the NO indices and decreased BP and proteinuria, although the remaining parameters continued unchanged. In contrast, HNaD increased creatinemia, proteinuria, and 12(S)-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid excretion rates and decreased renal endothelial NO synthase. Salt retention was accompanied by increased BP and ventricular weight. In this HNaD group, atorvastatin prevented a BP increase, partly decreased sodium retention, but failed to improve NO indices, proteinuria, oxidant stress, and the left ventricular weight/body weight ratio. Atorvastatin exerts beneficial effects on renal function, injury, and salt sensitivity in rats with a reduced renal mass on an NNaD. The HNaD hampers these beneficial effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  20. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  1. A review of methods for the signal quality assessment to improve reliability of heart rate and blood pressures derived parameters.

    PubMed

    Gambarotta, Nicolò; Aletti, Federico; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2016-07-01

    The assessment of signal quality has been a research topic since the late 1970s, as it is mainly related to the problem of false alarms in bedside monitors in the intensive care unit (ICU), the incidence of which can be as high as 90 %, leading to alarm fatigue and a drop in the overall level of nurses and clinicians attention. The development of efficient algorithms for the quality control of long diagnostic electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings, both single- and multi-lead, and of the arterial blood pressure (ABP) signal is therefore essential for the enhancement of care quality. The ECG signal is often corrupted by noise, which can be within the frequency band of interest and can manifest similar morphologies as the ECG itself. Similarly to ECG, also the ABP signal is often corrupted by non-Gaussian, nonlinear and non-stationary noise and artifacts, especially in ICU recordings. Moreover, the reliability of several important parameters derived from ABP such as systolic blood pressure or pulse pressure is strongly affected by the quality of the ABP waveform. In this work, several up-to-date algorithms for the quality scoring of a single- or multi-lead ECG recording, based on time-domain approaches, frequency-domain approaches or a combination of the two will be reviewed, as well as methods for the quality assessment of ABP. Additionally, algorithms exploiting the relationship between ECG and pulsatile signals, such as ABP and photoplethysmographic recordings, for the reduction in the false alarm rate will be presented. Finally, some considerations will be drawn taking into account the large heterogeneity of clinical settings, applications and goals that the reviewed algorithms have to deal with.

  2. Multicenter cluster-randomized trial of a multifactorial intervention to improve antihypertensive medication adherence and blood pressure control among patients at high cardiovascular risk (the COM99 study).

    PubMed

    Pladevall, Manel; Brotons, Carlos; Gabriel, Rafael; Arnau, Anna; Suarez, Carmen; de la Figuera, Mariano; Marquez, Emilio; Coca, Antonio; Sobrino, Javier; Divine, George; Heisler, Michele; Williams, L Keoki

    2010-09-21

    Medication nonadherence is common and results in preventable disease complications. This study assessed the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention to improve both medication adherence and blood pressure control and to reduce cardiovascular events. In this multicenter, cluster-randomized trial, physicians from hospital-based hypertension clinics and primary care centers across Spain were randomized to receive and provide the intervention to their high-risk patients. Eligible patients were ≥ 50 years of age, had uncontrolled hypertension, and had an estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk greater than 30%. Physicians randomized to the intervention group counted patients' pills, designated a family member to support adherence behavior, and provided educational information to patients. The primary outcome was blood pressure control at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included both medication adherence and a composite end point of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular-related hospitalizations. Seventy-nine physicians and 877 patients participated in the trial. The mean duration of follow-up was 39 months. Intervention patients were less likely to have an uncontrolled systolic blood pressure (odds ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.78) and were more likely to be adherent (odds ratio 1.91, 95% confidence interval 1.19 to 3.05) than control group patients at 6 months. After 5 years, 16% of the patients in the intervention group and 19% in the control group met the composite end point (hazard ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.67 to 1.39). A multifactorial intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive medication was effective in improving both adherence and blood pressure control, but it did not appear to improve long-term cardiovascular events.

  3. The implementation of a translational study involving a primary care based behavioral program to improve blood pressure control: The HTN-IMPROVE study protocol (01295)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the impact of hypertension and widely accepted target values for blood pressure (BP), interventions to improve BP control have had limited success. Objectives We describe the design of a 'translational' study that examines the implementation, impact, sustainability, and cost of an evidence-based nurse-delivered tailored behavioral self-management intervention to improve BP control as it moves from a research context to healthcare delivery. The study addresses four specific aims: assess the implementation of an evidence-based behavioral self-management intervention to improve BP levels; evaluate the clinical impact of the intervention as it is implemented; assess organizational factors associated with the sustainability of the intervention; and assess the cost of implementing and sustaining the intervention. Methods The project involves three geographically diverse VA intervention facilities and nine control sites. We first conduct an evaluation of barriers and facilitators for implementing the intervention at intervention sites. We examine the impact of the intervention by comparing 12-month pre/post changes in BP control between patients in intervention sites versus patients in the matched control sites. Next, we examine the sustainability of the intervention and organizational factors facilitating or hindering the sustained implementation. Finally, we examine the costs of intervention implementation. Key outcomes are acceptability and costs of the program, as well as changes in BP. Outcomes will be assessed using mixed methods (e.g., qualitative analyses--pattern matching; quantitative methods--linear mixed models). Discussion The study results will provide information about the challenges and costs to implement and sustain the intervention, and what clinical impact can be expected. PMID:20637095

  4. High intensity interval training (HIIT) improves resting blood pressure, metabolic (MET) capacity and heart rate reserve without compromising cardiac function in sedentary aging men.

    PubMed

    Grace, Fergal; Herbert, Peter; Elliott, Adrian D; Richards, Jo; Beaumont, Alexander; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F

    2017-05-13

    This study examined a programme of pre-conditioning exercise with subsequent high intensity interval training (HIIT) on blood pressure, echocardiography, cardiac strain mechanics and maximal metabolic (MET) capacity in sedentary (SED) aging men compared with age matched masters athletes (LEX). Using a STROBE compliant observational design, 39 aging male participants (SED; n=22, aged 62.7±5.2yrs) (LEX; n=17, aged=61.1±5.4yrs) were recruited to a study that necessitated three distinct assessment phases; enrolment (Phase A), following pre-conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B), then following 6weeks of HIIT performed once every five days by both groups before reassessment (Phase C). Hemodynamic, echocardiographic and cardiac strain mechanics were obtained at rest and maximal cardiorespiratory and chronotropic responses were obtained at each measurement phase. The training intervention improved systolic, mean arterial blood pressure, rate pressure product and heart rate reserve (each P<0.05) in SED and increased MET capacity in both SED and LEX (P<0.01) which was amplified by HIIT. Echocardiography and cardiac strain measures were unremarkable apart from trivial increase to intra-ventricular septum diastole (IVSd) (P<0.05) and decrease to left ventricular internal dimension diastole (LVId) (P<0.05) in LEX following HIIT. A programme of preconditioning exercise with HIIT induces clinically relevant improvements in blood pressure, rate pressure product and encourages recovery of heart rate reserve in SED, while improving maximal MET capacity in both SED and LEX without inducing any pathological cardiovascular remodeling. These data add to the emerging repute of HIIT as a safe and promising exercise prescription to improve cardiovascular function and metabolic capacity in sedentary aging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systemic leukotriene B4 receptor antagonism lowers arterial blood pressure and improves autonomic function in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Marvar, Paul J; Hendy, Emma B; Cruise, Thomas D; Walas, Dawid; DeCicco, Danielle; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Schwaber, James S; Waki, Hidefumi; Murphy, David; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-10-15

    Evidence indicates an association between hypertension and chronic systemic inflammation in both human hypertension and experimental animal models. Previous studies in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) support a role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4 ), a potent chemoattractant involved in the inflammatory response, but its mode of action is poorly understood. In the SHR, we observed an increase in T cells and macrophages in the brainstem; in addition, gene expression profiling data showed that LTB4 production, degradation and downstream signalling in the brainstem of the SHR are dynamically regulated during hypertension. When LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) receptors were blocked with CP-105,696, arterial pressure was reduced in the SHR compared to the normotensive control and this reduction was associated with a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure (BP) indicators. These data provide new evidence for the role of LTB4 as an important neuro-immune pathway in the development of hypertension and therefore may serve as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of neurogenic hypertension. Accumulating evidence indicates an association between hypertension and chronic systemic inflammation in both human hypertension and experimental animal models. Previous studies in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) support a role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4 ), a potent chemoattractant involved in the inflammatory response. However, the mechanism for LTB4 -mediated inflammation in hypertension is poorly understood. Here we report in the SHR, increased brainstem infiltration of T cells and macrophages plus gene expression profiling data showing that LTB4 production, degradation and downstream signalling in the brainstem of the SHR are dynamically regulated during hypertension. Chronic blockade of the LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor with CP-105,696, reduced arterial pressure in the SHR compared to the normotensive control and this reduction was associated with a significant

  6. Amlodipine in hypertension: a first-line agent with efficacy for improving blood pressure and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Hassan; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hypertension is well established as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although there is undeniable evidence to support the beneficial effects of antihypertensive therapy on morbidity and mortality, adequate blood pressure management still remains suboptimal. Research into the treatment of hypertension has produced a multitude of drug classes with different efficacy profiles. These agents include β-blockers, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers and calcium channel blockers. One of the oldest groups of antihypertensives, the calcium channel blockers are a heterogeneous group of medications. Methods This review paper will focus on amlodipine, a dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, which has been widely used for 2 decades. Results Amlodipine has good efficacy and safety, in addition to strong evidence from large randomised controlled trials for cardiovascular event reduction. Conclusions Amlodipine should be considered a first-line antihypertensive agent. PMID:27752334

  7. CHRONOBIOLOGY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Bakken, E. E.; Wang, Z.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Laffi, G.; Maggioni, C.; Kumagai, Y.; Homolka, P.; Havelková, A.; Dušek, J.; Svačinová, H.; Siegelová, J.; Fišer, B.

    2008-01-01

    BIOCOS, the project aimed at studying BIOlogical systems in their COSmos, has obtained a great deal of expertise in the fields of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring and of marker rhythmometry for the purposes of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Prolonging the monitoring reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of circadian parameters; the current recommendation of BIOCOS requires monitoring for at least 7 days. The BIOCOS approach consists of a parametric and a non-parametric analysis of the data, in which the results from the individual subject are being compared with gender- and age-specified reference values in health. Chronobiological designs can offer important new information regarding the optimization of treatment by timing its administration as a function of circadian and other rhythms. New technological developments are needed to close the loop between the monitoring of blood pressure and the administration of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:19122770

  8. Polytherapy with two or more antihypertensive drugs to lower blood pressure in elderly Ontarians. Room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Norman RC; McAlister, Finlay A; Duong-Hua, Minh; Tu, Karen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although guidelines now recommend polytherapy to achieve blood pressure targets, little is know about which antihypertensive drugs are combined in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To examine current practices for the coprescribing of antihypertensive agents. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was performed using linked administrative databases on all Ontario residents 66 years of age or older who were newly treated for hypertension between July 1, 1994, and March 31, 2002, and did not have diabetes or other relevant comorbidities. All patients were followed for two years to determine which antihypertensives were prescribed concurrently. RESULTS: Of the 166,018 patients in the described cohort, 1819 (1%) were prescribed a combination therapy tablet as their first-line therapy. The number of patients prescribed antihypertensive polytherapy within the first two years of diagnosis increased from 2071 (21%) of the 9825 hypertensive patients starting treatment in the second half of 1994 to 2578 (37%) of the 6988 hypertensive patients beginning treatment in the first quarter of 2002 (P<0.0001). Overall, 11,003 (27%) of polytherapy prescriptions were for drugs without additive hypotensive effects when combined and this proportion did not change over time. CONCLUSIONS: Although there has been an increase in the use of polytherapy in elderly hypertensive patients without comorbidities in Ontario over the past decade, more than one-quarter of the two drugs prescribed together have not been proven to have additive hypotensive effects. Because this likely contributes to suboptimal blood pressure control rates, future guidelines and educational programs should devote increased attention to the choice of optimal polytherapy combinations. PMID:17703255

  9. The Environment and Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D

    2017-05-01

    A host of environmental factors can significantly increase arterial blood pressure (BP) including cold temperature, high altitude, loud noises, and ambient air pollutants. Although brief exposures acutely elevate BP, over the long term, chronic exposures may be capable of promoting the development of sustained hypertension. Given their omnipresent nature, environmental factors may play a role in worsening BP control and heightening overall cardiovascular risk at the global public health level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney disease is diagnosed with urine and blood tests. Health care providers measure blood pressure with a blood pressure ... the sample to a lab for analysis. A health care provider may order a blood test to estimate how much blood the kidneys filter ...

  11. The choice of home blood pressure result reporting method is essential: Results mailed to physicians did not improve hypertension control compared with ordinary office-based blood pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Varis, Juha; Kantola, Ilkka

    2010-10-01

    Effective antihypertensive care is not possible without regular and reliable blood pressure measurements. The use of blood pressure home measurement has increased a lot during the last years. Various methods have been used in communication between the patients and physicians. In a randomized study we compared traditional office-based hypertension treatment protocol (n=68) to the home-based blood pressure measurement protocol (n=89) in which the patient mailed their home-measured BP diary in a letter to the office of their physician. The studied home-based antihypertensive care system was not more effective than the ordinary office-based treatment. The results highlight the importance of continuous home measurement data interpretation by the physician. The system based on mailing the results to the physician office does not seem to be a suitable method in communication between the patient and the physician. Online or other telemedicine-aided means of communication might yield better antihypertensive control.

  12. Organizational factors associated with readiness to implement and translate a primary care based telemedicine behavioral program to improve blood pressure control: the HTN-IMPROVE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension is prevalent and often sub-optimally controlled; however, interventions to improve blood pressure control have had limited success. Objectives Through implementation of an evidence-based nurse-delivered self-management phone intervention to facilitate hypertension management within large complex health systems, we sought to answer the following questions: What is the level of organizational readiness to implement the intervention? What are the specific facilitators, barriers, and contextual factors that may affect organizational readiness to change? Study design Each intervention site from three separate Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISNs), which represent 21 geographic regions across the US, agreed to enroll 500 participants over a year with at least 0.5 full time equivalent employees of nursing time. Our mixed methods approach used a priori semi-structured interviews conducted with stakeholders (n = 27) including nurses, physicians, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals between 2010 and 2011. Researchers iteratively identified facilitators and barriers of organizational readiness to change (ORC) and implementation. Additionally, an ORC survey was conducted with the stakeholders who were (n = 102) preparing for program implementation. Results Key ORC facilitators included stakeholder buy-in and improving hypertension. Positive organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: other similar programs that support buy-in, adequate staff, and alignment with the existing site environment; improved patient outcomes; is positive for the professional nurse role, and is evidence-based; understanding of the intervention; IT infrastructure and support, and utilization of existing equipment and space. The primary ORC barrier was unclear long-term commitment of nursing. Negative organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: added workload, competition with existing programs

  13. Organizational factors associated with readiness to implement and translate a primary care based telemedicine behavioral program to improve blood pressure control: the HTN-IMPROVE study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Ryan J; Kaufman, Miriam A; Bosworth, Hayden B; Weiner, Bryan J; Zullig, Leah L; Lee, Shoou-Yih Daniel; Kravetz, Jeffrey D; Rakley, Susan M; Roumie, Christianne L; Bowen, Michael E; Del Monte, Pamela S; Oddone, Eugene Z; Jackson, George L

    2013-09-08

    Hypertension is prevalent and often sub-optimally controlled; however, interventions to improve blood pressure control have had limited success. Through implementation of an evidence-based nurse-delivered self-management phone intervention to facilitate hypertension management within large complex health systems, we sought to answer the following questions: What is the level of organizational readiness to implement the intervention? What are the specific facilitators, barriers, and contextual factors that may affect organizational readiness to change? Each intervention site from three separate Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISNs), which represent 21 geographic regions across the US, agreed to enroll 500 participants over a year with at least 0.5 full time equivalent employees of nursing time. Our mixed methods approach used a priori semi-structured interviews conducted with stakeholders (n = 27) including nurses, physicians, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals between 2010 and 2011. Researchers iteratively identified facilitators and barriers of organizational readiness to change (ORC) and implementation. Additionally, an ORC survey was conducted with the stakeholders who were (n = 102) preparing for program implementation. Key ORC facilitators included stakeholder buy-in and improving hypertension. Positive organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: other similar programs that support buy-in, adequate staff, and alignment with the existing site environment; improved patient outcomes; is positive for the professional nurse role, and is evidence-based; understanding of the intervention; IT infrastructure and support, and utilization of existing equipment and space.The primary ORC barrier was unclear long-term commitment of nursing. Negative organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: added workload, competition with existing programs, implementation length, and limited available nurse staff time

  14. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to achieve target blood pressure goals with treatment. Overweight You are more likely to develop prehypertension or high blood pressure if you’re overweight or obese . The terms “overweight” and “obese” refer ...

  15. Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Health Lines Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys Past Issues / Fall ... Not Alone / Keep Weight Off / Facts About Fat / Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys Fall 2008 Issue: ...

  16. Taking your blood pressure at home (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ...

  17. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  18. Liraglutide Improves Glycemic and Blood Pressure Control and Ameliorates Progression of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Takeyuki; Ozeki, Akiko; Asai, Kazuki; Saka, Marie; Hobo, Akinori; Furuta, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial disease associated with cardiovascular complications. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis also experience an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. To prevent progression of cardiovascular complications in DM patients, glycemic control is important. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide analog liraglutide for treating type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Sixteen type 2 diabetes patients on peritoneal dialysis were enrolled. Before liraglutide initiation, 11 patients were on insulin therapy, three were on oral antidiabetic agents, and two were on diet therapy. Of the 16 patients, 12 had switched to liraglutide because of severe hypoglycemia and four because of hyperglycemia. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and 12 months after liraglutide initiation. Hemoglobin A1c, glycosylated albumin, and fasting/postprandial glucose levels gradually decreased after liraglutide initiation. After 6 and 12 months of treatment, postprandial glucose levels showed a significant difference from baseline. Moreover, the mean daily glucose level and glycemic fluctuations decreased. Systolic blood pressure upon waking also decreased. In addition, after 12 months, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) decreased and left ventricular ejection fraction increased. Changes in LVMI positively correlated with morning systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose levels. One patient restarted insulin because of anorexia but severe hypoglycemia was not observed. These findings suggest that liraglutide therapy in type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis is safe and effective for decreasing glucose levels, glycemic fluctuations, and blood pressure, apart from improving left ventricular function.

  19. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  20. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  1. Reliability of nocturnal blood pressure dipping.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; von Känel, R; Profant, J; Nelesen, R; Ancoli-Israel, S; Ziegler, M

    2000-08-01

    Increasing evidence documents the fact that individuals whose blood pressure drops or 'dips' relatively little at night have a higher risk of numerous cardiovascular illnesses. To examine the reliability of various measures of nocturnal blood pressure dipping. This study examined 17 individuals with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on three 24 h recordings while they pursued a schedule similar to that of in-patients on a clinical research unit. Nocturnal dipping of blood pressure was scored three ways: as the drop in blood pressure between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. ('clocktime'), as the drop in blood pressure tailored to each individual's reported bedtime ('bedtime'), and as the drop in blood pressure accompanying polysomnographically verified sleep ('sleeptime'). Adequate reliability was obtained for all three measures of dipping. There was, in general, a significant correlation across testing occasions (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.5 to 0.8, depending on which criterion of dipping was selected and whether the endpoint was systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, or mean arterial blood pressure. The reliability of systolic blood pressure dipping was somewhat lower than that of diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure dipping. Dipping appears to be a reliable construct. While no one definition of dipping was demonstrably better than another, the most sensible definition of dipping would allow some adjustment for defining 'night' on the basis of each individual's idiosyncratic bed time.

  2. Oral supplementation with glycine reduces oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome, improving their systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, Margarita; Cruz, Miguel; Duran-Reyes, Genoveva; Munguia-Miranda, Catarina; Loza-Rodríguez, Hilda; Pulido-Casas, Evelyn; Torres-Ramírez, Nayeli; Gaja-Rodriguez, Olga; Kumate, Jesus; Baiza-Gutman, Luis Arturo; Hernández-Saavedra, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species derived from abdominal fat and uncontrolled glucose metabolism are contributing factors to both oxidative stress and the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study was designed to evaluate the effects of daily administration of an oral glycine supplement on antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in MetS patients. The study included 60 volunteers: 30 individuals that were supplemented with glycine (15 g/day) and 30 that were given a placebo for 3 months. We analysed thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb) in plasma; the enzymatic activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in erythrocytes; and the expression of CAT, GPX, and SOD2 in leukocytes. Individuals treated with glycine showed a 25% decrease in TBARS compared with the placebo-treated group. Furthermore, there was a 20% reduction in SOD-specific activity in the glycine-treated group, which correlated with SOD2 expression. G6PD activity and SNO-Hb levels increased in the glycine-treated male group. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) also showed a significant decrease in the glycine-treated men (p = 0.043). Glycine plays an important role in balancing the redox reactions in the human body, thus protecting against oxidative damage in MetS patients.

  3. Cutaneous control of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Randall S; Titze, Jens; Weller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Textbook theory holds that blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the brain, by blood vessels, or by the kidney. Recent evidence suggests that BP could be regulated in the skin. The skin holds a complex capillary counter current system, which controls body temperature, skin perfusion, and apparently systemic BP. Epidemiological data suggest that sunlight exposure plays a role in controlling BP. Ultraviolet A radiation produces vasodilation and a fall in BP. Keratinocytes and immune cells control blood flow in the extensive countercurrent loop system of the skin by producing nitric oxide, a key regulator of vascular tone. The balance between hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α activity in keratinocytes controls skin perfusion, systemic thermoregulation, and systemic BP by nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the skin accumulates Na which generates a barrier to promote immunological host defense. Immune cells control skin Na metabolism and the clearance of Na via the lymphatic system. Reduced lymphatic clearance increases BP. Apart from the well-known role of the brain, blood vessels, and the kidney, the skin is important for systemic BP control in humans and in experimental animals.

  4. Effect of Lowering Dialysate Sodium Concentration on Interdialytic Weight Gain and Blood Pressure in Patients Undergoing Thrice-Weekly In-center Nocturnal Hemodialysis: A Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Jair Munoz; Bayes, Liz Y.; Sun, Sumi; Doss, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients on in-center nocturnal hemodialysis therapy typically experience higher interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) than patients on conventional hemodialysis therapy. We determined the safety and effects of decreasing dialysate sodium concentration on IDWG and blood pressure in patients on thrice-weekly in-center nocturnal hemodialysis therapy. Study Design Quality improvement, pre-post intervention. Settings & Participants 15 participants in a single facility. Quality Improvement Plan Participants underwent three 12-week treatment phases, each with different dialysate sodium concentrations, as follows: phase A, 140 mEq/L; phase B, 136 or 134 mEq/L; and phase A+, 140 mEq/L. Participants were blinded to the exact timing of the intervention. Outcomes IDWG, IDWG/dry weight (IDWG%), and blood pressure. Measurements Outcome data were obtained during the last 2 weeks of each phase and compared with mixed models. The fraction of sessions with adverse events (eg, cramping and hypotension) also was reported. Results IDWG, IDWG%, and predialysis systolic blood pressure decreased significantly by 0.6 ± 0.6 kg, 0.6% ± 0.8%, and 8.3 ± 14.9 mm Hg, respectively, in phase B compared with phase A (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). No differences in predialysis diastolic and mean arterial or postdialysis blood pressures were found (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). The proportion of treatments with intradialytic hypotension was low and similar in each phase (P = 0.9). In phase B compared with phase A, predialysis plasma sodium concentration was unchanged (P > 0.05), whereas postdialysis plasma sodium concentration decreased by 3.7 ± 1.9 mEq/L (P < 0.05). Limitations Modest sample size. Conclusion Decreasing dialysate sodium concentrations in patients undergoing thrice-weekly in-center nocturnal hemodialysis resulted in a clinical and statistically significant decrease in IDWG, IDWG%, postdialysis plasma sodium concentration, and predialysis systolic blood pressure without

  5. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  6. Searching for baseline blood pressure: A comparison of blood pressure at three different care points.

    PubMed

    Ard, John L; Kendale, Samir

    2016-12-01

    A common approach to blood pressure management in the operating room is to keep the intraoperative, pressures within 20% of baseline blood pressure. One question that arises from this recommendation is; what is a patient's true baseline blood pressure? In order to get a more precise definition of baseline blood pressure, a comparison of the first operating room blood pressure was made with the blood pressure taken in a preoperative holding area before surgery, and the blood pressure taken in pre-surgical testing. (before day of surgery). A database of 2087 adult general anesthesia cases was generated, which contained the blood pressure (BP) in the pre-surgical testing clinic, the first BP in preoperative holding on the day of surgery, and the first BP in the operating room. Comparisons were made between the blood pressures taken at each phase of care. All components of BP taken in the OR were statistically significantly higher (p<0.001 for all comparisons) than in either PST or the holding area, while the BP in the latter locations were not significantly different. This blood pressure difference persists whether or not the patient is taking antihypertensive medications. The higher blood pressure measured in the operating rooms precludes using this measurement to determine baseline blood pressure. Blood pressures taken prior to arrival in the operating room are similar to blood pressures taken before the day of surgery. Blood pressure measurements taken prior to entrance in the operating room can be used to determine baseline blood pressure.

  7. Fixed-Dose Triple Combination of Antihypertensive Drugs Improves Blood Pressure Control: From Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Alberto; Lenti, Salvatore; Schiavon, Laura; Sacco, Antonella Paola; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is the main clinical goal in the management of hypertensive patients; however, BP in most of these patients remains uncontrolled, despite the widespread availability of antihypertensive drugs as free-combination therapy. This study compared the efficacy of a fixed-dose triple combination (FDTC) of antihypertensive drugs with that of a free combination of three antihypertensives in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Ninety-two patients (mean age 60.8 ± 12.1, 58.0% male) with uncontrolled essential hypertension (office systolic BP ≥ 140 or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg) previously treated with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor plus hydrochlorothiazide were switched to once-daily FDTC therapy with perindopril/indapamide/amlodipine (5-10/1.25-2.5/5-10 mg). Patients were age- and sex-matched with a control group of hypertensive patients receiving free-combination therapy with three drugs including a RAAS inhibitor, a diuretic, and a calcium channel blocker. Office BP and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) were evaluated at baseline and after 1 and 4 months. Significant reductions in ambulatory 24-h, daytime, and nighttime systolic BP, and pulse pressure (PP) were found in the FDTC group relative to reductions seen with free-combination therapy, after the first month only of follow-up. Target BP values (mean 24-h ambulatory systolic/diastolic BP < 130/80 mmHg) were reached by more recipients of FDTC than free-combination therapy (64.8% vs. 46.9%, p < 0.05) at month 4 of follow-up, despite reductions in 24-h ABPM values from baseline being similar in both groups at this time point. FDTC of perindopril/indapamide/amlodipine was effective at reducing SBP and PP in previously treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension, and well tolerated, providing support for clinicians in choosing a fixed-dose triple combination over the free-combination of a RAAS inhibitor, a diuretic, and a calcium antagonist.

  8. Regional neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in those with low blood pressure secondary to high-level spinal cord injury: improved by alpha-1 agonist midodrine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren E R; Ainslie, Philip N; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with high-level spinal cord injury (SCI) experience low blood pressure (BP) and cognitive impairments. Such dysfunction may be mediated in part by impaired neurovascular coupling (NVC) (i.e., cerebral blood flow responses to neurologic demand). Ten individuals with SCI >T6 spinal segment, and 10 age- and sex-matched controls were assessed for beat-by-beat BP, as well as middle and posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv, PCAv) in response to a NVC test. Tests were repeated in SCI after 10 mg midodrine (alpha1-agonist). Verbal fluency was measured before and after midodrine in SCI, and in the control group as an index of cognitive function. At rest, mean BP was lower in SCI (70 ± 10 versus 92 ± 14 mm Hg; P<0.05); however, PCAv conductance was higher (0.56 ± 0.13 versus 0.39 ± 0.15 cm/second/mm Hg; P<0.05). Controls exhibited a 20% increase in PCAv during cognition; however, the response in SCI was completely absent (P<0.01). When BP was increased with midodrine, NVC was improved 70% in SCI, which was reflected by a 13% improved cognitive function (P<0.05). Improvements in BP were related to improved cognitive function in those with SCI (r(2)=0.52; P<0.05). Impaired NVC, secondary to low BP, may partially mediate reduced cognitive function in individuals with high-level SCI.

  9. More rigorous protocol adherence to intensive structured management improves blood pressure control in primary care: results from the Valsartan Intensified Primary carE Reduction of Blood Pressure study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Simon; Stocks, Nigel P.; Burrell, Louise M.; de Looze, Ferdinandus J.; Esterman, Adrian; Harris, Mark; Hung, Joseph; Swemmer, Carla H.; Kurstjens, Nicol P.; Jennings, Garry L.; Carrington, Melinda J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine protocol adherence to structured intensive management in the Valsartan Intensified Primary carE Reduction of Blood Pressure (VIPER-BP) study involving 119 primary care clinics and 1562 randomized participants. Methods: Prospective criteria for assessing adherence to treatment prescription, uptitration, and visit attendance at 6, 10, 14, and 18 weeks postrandomization were applied to 1038 intervention participants. Protocol adherence scores of 1–5 (least to most adherent) were compared to blood pressure (BP) control during 26 weeks of follow-up. Results: Mean age was 59.3 ± 12.0 years, 963 (62%) were men, and 1045 (67%) had longstanding hypertension. Clinic attendance dropped from 91 (week 6) to 83% (week 26) and pharmacological instructions were followed for 93% (baseline) to 61% at week 14 (uptitration failures commonly representing protocol deviations). Overall, 26-week BP levels and BP target attainment ranged from 132 ± 14/79 ± 9 and 51% to 141 ± 15/83 ± 11 mmHg and 19% in those participants subject to the highest (n = 270, 26%) versus least (n = 148, 14%) per protocol adherence, respectively; adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.22 per unit protocol adherence score, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15–1.31; for achieving BP target (P < 0.001). Participants with a per protocol score of 4 or 5 (512/1038, 49.3%) were 1.54-fold (95% CI 1.31–1.81; P < 0.001) more likely to achieve their individual BP target compared with usual care. Clinics equipped with a practice nurse significantly influenced protocol adherence (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06–1.37; P = 0.004) and individual BP control (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.04–1.41; P = 0.015). Conclusion: There is considerable potential for structured care management to improve BP control in primary care, especially when optimally applied. PMID:24759125

  10. An online spaced-education game among clinicians improves their patients' time to blood pressure control: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, B Price; Turchin, Alexander; Breydo, Eugene; Gagnon, David; Conlin, Paul R

    2014-05-01

    Many patients with high blood pressure (BP) do not have antihypertensive medications appropriately intensified at clinician visits. We investigated whether an online spaced-education (SE) game among primary care clinicians can decrease time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. A 2-arm randomized trial was conducted over 52 weeks among primary care clinicians at 8 hospitals. Educational content consisted of 32 validated multiple-choice questions with explanations on hypertension management. Providers were randomized into 2 groups: SE clinicians were enrolled in the game, whereas control clinicians received identical educational content in an online posting. SE game clinicians were e-mailed 1 question every 3 days. Adaptive game mechanics resent questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly or correctly, respectively. Clinicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice consecutively. Posting of relative performance among peers fostered competition. Primary outcome measure was time to BP target (<140/90 mm Hg). One hundred eleven clinicians enrolled. The SE game was completed by 87% of clinicians (48/55), whereas 84% of control clinicians (47/56) read the online posting. In multivariable analysis of 17 866 hypertensive periods among 14 336 patients, the hazard ratio for time to BP target in the SE game cohort was 1.043 (95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.081; P=0.018). The number of hypertensive episodes needed to treat to normalize one additional patient's BP was 67.8. The number of clinicians needed to teach to achieve this was 0.43. An online SE game among clinicians generated a modest but significant reduction in the time to BP target among their hypertensive patients. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00904007. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  12. The Effect of Anthocyanins on Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongjian; Bo, Yacong; Wang, Xi; Lu, Wenjie; Wang, Xule; Han, Zhanying; Qiu, Chunguang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The findings of clinical studies concerning the association between anthocyanins supplementation and blood pressure (BP) are inconsistent. In order to provide a more precise estimate of the overall effect of anthocyanins on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials about anthocyanins supplementation and BP. PubMed, Web of Science, Wanfang Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (until October 2015) were searched to identify potential studies with information on anthocyanins extract supplementation and arterial BP. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as a summary statistic. Net changes in SBP and DBP between anthocyanins supplementation and placebo groups were calculated by subtracting the values at end of follow-up from those at baseline. Meta regression was used to explore the potential moderators of effect size. The publication bias was assessed using Begger's Funnel plots and Egger's tests; P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Finally, 6 clinical studies with 472 participants for the effect of anthocyanins consumption on BP were included in the present meta-analysis. There is no significant effect on either SBP (WMD: 1.15 mm Hg, 95% CI: −3.17 to 5.47, I2 = 56%) or DBP (WMD: 1.06 mm Hg, 95% CI: −0.71 to 2.83, I2 = 0%) following supplementation with anthocyanins. In summary, results from this meta-analysis do not favor any clinical efficacy of supplementation with anthocyanins in improving blood pressure. Further well-designed large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with long follow-up period are needed to verify the association of anthocyanins supplementation and blood pressure. PMID:27082604

  13. Effective multi-level, multi-sector, school-based obesity prevention programming improves weight, blood pressure, and academic performance, especially among low-income, minority children.

    PubMed

    Hollar, Danielle; Lombardo, Michelle; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriella; Hollar, Theodore L; Almon, Marie; Agatston, Arthur S; Messiah, Sarah E

    2010-05-01

    Successfully addressing childhood onset obesity requires multilevel (individual, community, and governmental), multi-agency collaboration. The Healthier Options for Public Schoolchildren (HOPS)/OrganWise Guys (OWG) quasi-experimental controlled pilot study (four intervention schools, one control school, total N=3,769; 50.2% Hispanic) was an elementary school-based obesity prevention intervention designed to keep children at a normal, healthy weight, and improve health status and academic achievement. The HOPS/OWG included the following replicable, holistic components: (1) modified dietary offerings, (2) nutrition/lifestyle educational curricula; (3) physical activity component; and (4) wellness projects. Demographic, anthropometric (body mass index [BMI]), blood pressure, and academic data were collected during the two-year study period (2004-6). Statistically significant improvements in BMI, blood pressure, and academic scores, among low-income Hispanic and White children in particular, were seen in the intervention versus controls. Holistic school-based obesity prevention interventions can improve health outcomes and academic performance, in particular among high-risk populations.

  14. Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heart to the blood pressure . We conclude that when the heart hypertrophies, as a result of the hypertension , the changed cardiac behavior, in turn...Plenary Talks Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure N.Westerhof, Lab. for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research...Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam Blood pressure and blood flow result from the interaction of the heart, the pump, and the arterial system, the load

  15. Lay beliefs about high blood pressure in a low- to middle-income urban African-American community: an opportunity for improving hypertension control.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ruth P; Freeman, Anne; Kazda, Michael J; Andrews, Thomas C; Berry, Leonard; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Victor, Ronald G

    2002-01-01

    Lay beliefs about illness are a potential barrier to improving the control of hypertension. We investigated the extent to which lay beliefs about hypertension diverge from current medical understanding. We conducted street intercept interviews and focus group discussions in six predominantly African-American census tracts in the southern sector of Dallas County, Texas. Sixty subjects, aged 18 to 67 years, were stopped along popular thoroughfares and administered a brief survey. Additionally, 107 participants were interviewed in 12 homogeneous focus groups, balanced by sex and age (18 to 74 years). Participants were asked about the meaning, causes, consequences, and treatment of high blood pressure. The street intercept data indicated that 35% (n = 21) of respondents related high blood pressure to eating pork or other foods that makes the blood travel too fast to the head, and only 15% (n = 9) related hypertension to an elevated pressure in blood vessels. The focus group data indicated that hypertension was causally linked to eating pork in 8 of the 12 groups; was perceived as a symptomatic illness in all 12 groups; and was considered treatable with vitamins, garlic, and other herbs in 11 groups, with prescription medications in 10 groups and with lifestyle modifications such as weight loss in 8 groups. Hypertension was mentioned as a leading cause of death among African Americans in none of the 4 focus groups of 18-year-old to 29-year-old participants, in 2 of the 4 focus groups of 30-year-old to 49-year-old participants, and in 3 of the 4 focus groups of 50-year-old to 74-year-old participants. In a low- to middle-income urban African-American community, the predominant beliefs about hypertension diverged sharply from current medical understanding. Lack of appreciation of these lay beliefs by providers may contribute to noncompliance and poor rates of hypertension control.

  16. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  17. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  18. Sensory stimulation for lowering intraocular pressure, improving blood flow to the optic nerve and neuroprotection in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rom, Edith

    2013-12-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is a group of optic neuropathies that can lead to irreversible blindness. Sensory stimulation in the form of acupuncture or ear acupressure may contribute to protecting patients from blindness when used as a complementary method to orthodox treatment in the form of drops, laser or surgery. The objective of this article is to provide a narrative overview of the available literature up to July 2012. It summarises reported evidence on the potential beneficial effects of sensory stimulation for glaucoma. Sensory stimulation appears to significantly enhance the pressure-lowering effect of orthodox treatments. Studies suggest that it may also improve blood flow to the eye and optic nerve head. Furthermore, it may play a role in neuroprotection through regulating nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their receptors, thereby encouraging the survival pathway in contrast to the pathway to apoptosis. Blood flow and neuroprotection are areas that are not directly influenced by orthodox treatment modalities. Numerous different treatment protocols were used to investigate the effect of sensory stimulation on intraocular pressure, blood flow or neuroprotection of the retina and optic nerve in the animal model and human pilot studies. Objective outcomes were reported to have been evaluated with Goldmann tonometry, Doppler ultrasound techniques and electrophysiology (pattern electroretinography, visually evoked potentials), and supported with histological studies in the animal model. Taken together, reported evidence from these studies strongly suggests that sensory stimulation is worthy of further research.

  19. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Mouradian, Vahram; Hovhannisyan, Levon

    2015-03-01

    We are presenting a novel photoplethysmographic (PPG) optical sensor and device with ambient optical, electrical and electromagnetic noises cancellation, thus allowing only the useful optical signals to be received by the health monitoring device. We are also presenting a new processing technique for canceling the ambient noises contributed by optical, electrical and electromagnetic artifacts in the measured PPG signals. Such a device and method allow the enhancement of the performance of the PPG sensors compared to conventional apparatus and methods. The presented sensor and methodology have been integrated into a prototype standalone device for noninvasive, continuous, wearable, remote and mobile monitoring of blood pressure and other human vital signs, such as heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration rate, etc This small device allows the user to read, store, process and transmit all the measurements made using the PPG optical sensor and the electronic unit to a remote location.

  20. Improvement of Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism, and Lipid Profile by the Intake of Powdered Asparagus (蘆筍 Lú Sŭn) Bottom-stems and Cladophylls

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Mie; Ohkawara, Tatsuya; Kagami-Katsuyama, Hiroyo; Sato, Hiroji; Nishihira, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Asparagus (蘆筍 Lú Sǔn; Asparagus officinalis L.) is a common vegetable, long used as an herbal medicine. The cladophylls and bottom-stems of asparagus have various pharmacological effects, but they are generally discarded at harvesting. The present open clinical trial was performed to examine the effects of the intake of cladophylls and bottom-stems on the improvement of metabolic syndrome characterized by hypertension, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers ingested either cladophyll or bottom-stem powder (6 g/day) daily for 10 weeks. The cladophyll intake resulted in significant reduction in the subjects’ diastolic blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and decreased both the left cardio-ankle vascular index score and the total cholesterol level (T-CHO). The bottom-stem intake significantly reduced the subjects’ systolic and diastolic blood pressure and FPG as well as T-CHO. These results suggest the possibility that asparagus cladophylls and bottom-stems differentially improve hypertension, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. PMID:24716185

  1. Effect of nocturnal blood pressure measurement on sleep and blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed

    Middeke, M

    1996-01-01

    Nocturnal hypertension is of diagnostic interest and has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Nighttime blood pressure can easily be measured using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). However, during nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure measurement pump noise, tactile stimuli and pressure produced by cuff inflation may alter the quality of sleep and subsequently influence the physiological fall of night time blood pressure. Eight studies were performed to determine whether non-invasive automated blood pressure monitoring during day and/or night provokes alert reaction, arousal, sleep disturbances and changes in blood pressure and/or heart rate. From these studies it can be concluded: 1) Nighttime blood pressure can be evaluated properly using ABPM. 2) Nocturnal blood pressure is not overestimated by ABPM. 3) ABPM does not induce an alarm reaction and a blood pressure rise when monitored with a silently operating recorder. 4) Sleep is often disturbed by blood pressure measurement without provoking a blood pressure increase. 5) In older patients blood pressure measurement and age-related alterations in sleep quality may influence each other. A patient's protocol has to be carried out and sleep quality should be recorded to provide a proper interpretation of nocturnal blood pressure behavior. ABPM is an important and valuable method to record nocturnal blood pressure for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  2. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  3. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-09-15

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension.

  4. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  5. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  6. Principles of Blood Pressure Measurement - Current Techniques, Office vs Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Annina S; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-07-15

    Blood pressure measurement has a long history and a crucial role in clinical medicine. Manual measurement using a mercury sphygmomanometer and a stethoscope remains the Gold Standard. However, this technique is technically demanding and commonly leads to faulty values. Automatic devices have helped to improve and simplify the technical aspects, but a standardised procedure of obtaining comparable measurements remains problematic and may therefore limit their validity in clinical practice. This underlines the importance of less error-prone measurement methods such as ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements and automated office blood pressure measurements. These techniques may help to uncover patients with otherwise unrecognised or overestimated arterial hypertension. Additionally these techniques may yield a better prognostic value.

  7. Nifedipine improves blood flow and oxygen supply, but not steady-state oxygenation of tumours in perfusion pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

    PubMed

    Thews, O; Hummel, M; Kelleher, D K; Lecher, B; Vaupel, P

    2002-12-02

    Isolated limb perfusion allows the direct application of therapeutic agents to a tumour-bearing extremity. The present study investigated whether the dihydropyridine-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine could improve blood flow and oxygenation status of experimental tumours during isolated limb perfusion. Perfusion was performed by cannulation of the femoral artery and vein in rats bearing DS-sarcoma on the hind foot dorsum. Perfusion rate was adjusted to maintain a perfusion pressure of 100-140 mmHg throughout the experiment. Following equilibration, nifedipine was continuously infused for 30 min (8.3 microg min(-1) kg(-1) BW). During constant-pressure isolated limb perfusion, nifedipine can significantly increase perfusion rate (+100%) and RBC flux (+60%) through experimental leg tumours. "Steal phenomena" in favour of the surrounding normal tissue and oedema formation were not observed. Despite the increased oxygen availability (+63%) seen upon application of this calcium channel blocker, nifedipine does not result in a substantial reduction of tumour hypoxia, most probably due to an increase in O(2) uptake with rising O(2) supply to the tumour-bearing hind limb. Nifedipine application during isolated limb perfusion can enhance tumour microcirculation and may therefore promote the delivery (pharmacokinetics) of anti-cancer drugs to the tumour and by this improve the efficacy of pressure-controlled isolated limb perfusion.

  8. Blood pressure behaviour during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Palatini, P

    1988-06-01

    Aerobic exercise is currently being recommended in addition to pharmacological therapy for lowering blood pressure levels in hypertensive patients, i.e. in subjects whose resting blood pressure levels exceed 145/90 mm Hg. On the other hand competitive sports are generally contraindicated in hypertensives, who are thought to be at increased risk of morbidity or mortality from their blood pressure levels. The present knowledge of blood pressure behaviour during isotonic physical activity is almost wholly based on the results obtained by means of the ergometric tests. Several maximal and submaximal exercise protocols have been introduced, but none has proved to be superior for diagnostic purposes. There is general agreement that the systolic blood pressure increase determined by isotonic exercise usually ranges from 50 to 70 mm Hg in both normotensive or hypertensive subjects. Diastolic blood pressure shows only minor changes in the normotensives, while in the hypertensives it tends to substantially increase because of their inability to adequately reduce their peripheral resistance. This mechanism may also explain the delay shown by the hypertensives in reaching pre-exercise blood pressure values during the recovery. On average diastolic blood pressure increases to a greater extent during bicycle ergometry than during treadmill, while no differences in exertional systolic blood pressure have been observed between the 2 tests. The results of several studies indicate that the blood pressure response to isotonic exercise is a marker for detection of hypertension earlier in the course of the disease, while resting blood pressure is still normal. According to some authors it is also of value in predicting future hypertension in individuals with borderline pressure levels. There are no conclusive data on the effect of training on blood pressure response to exercise. The majority of the published studies report small exertional pressure reductions after conditioning, which

  9. One Week of Daily Dosing with Beetroot Juice Improves Submaximal Endurance and Blood Pressure in Older Patients with Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Eggebeen, Joel; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Haykowsky, Mark; Morgan, Timothy M.; Basu, Swati; Brukaker, Peter; Rejeski, Jack; Kitzman, Dalane W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether a relatively low single dose or week-long dosing of dietary inorganic nitrate can improve exercise tolerance in patients with Heart Failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Background Exercise intolerance is the primary manifestation of HFPEF and is largely due to non-cardiac factors that reduce oxygen delivery to active skeletal muscles. A recent study showed improved exercise capacity in patients with HFPEF after a single, acute dose of beetroot juice (BRJ, 12.9 mmol inorganic nitrate) while another recent study showed neutral and negative effects of an organic nitrate. Methods Twenty HFPEF patients (age: 69 ± 7 years) were enrolled in an initial cross-over design comparing a single, acute dose of BRJ (6.1 mmol nitrate) to a nitrate-depleted, placebo BRJ. A second, one week of daily dosing, phase employed an all-treated design in which patients consumed BRJ for an average of 7 days. The primary outcome of the study was submaximal aerobic endurance, measured as cycling time to exhaustion at 75% of measured maximal power output. Results No adverse events were associated with the intervention. Submaximal aerobic endurance improved 24% after one week of daily BRJ dosing (p =0.02), but was not affected by the single, acute dose of the BRJ compared to placebo. Consumption of BRJ significantly reduced resting systolic blood pressure and increased plasma nitrate and nitrite in both dosing schemes. Conclusions One week of daily dosing with BRJ (6.1 mmol inorganic nitrate) significantly improves submaximal aerobic endurance and blood pressure in elderly HFPEF patients. PMID:26874390

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fixler, D E; Wallace, J M; Thornton, W E; Dimmitt, P

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to identify youths with chronic blood pressure elevation. Nineteen adolescent boys were studied, ten had 5-year average systolic or diastolic pressures above the 95th percentile, nine had normal pressure. A Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer III system recorded an average of 121 readings on each subject. The coefficients of variation for pressure were similar for hypertensive and normotensive individuals. During classes, eight of the ten hypertensive youths had elevated pressures in over half of the measurements. Also during these classes eight of ten hypertensive boys had average systolic or diastolic pressure above the 95th percentile, whereas only one of nine normotensive boys had average pressures above this level. We suggest that schooltime ambulatory pressures may be most useful in classifying the blood pressure trend in a youth.

  11. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  12. Effects of age on blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... become less elastic with age. The average blood pressure increases from 120/70 to 150/90 and may persist slightly high, even if treated. The blood vessels respond more slowly to a change in body ...

  13. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... mellitus , thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... red blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  14. Sustained Blood Pressure Responding during Synthetic Work.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-15

    split-half reliabilities of both heart rate and mean * blood pressure were high during task performance. Significant correlations were observed between... blood pressure responses elicited by :1 16 an anagram task showed a high test-retest reliability, even over an interval of 13 months. Examination of the...8217AD-AI5 733 JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MO DEPT OF PSYCHIATRY F/6 6/5 SUSTAINED BLOOD PRESSURE RESPONDING DURING SYNTHETIC WORK.(U) JUN A2 R L RAY

  15. Biofeedback With Implanted Blood-Pressure Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Additional uses found for equipment described in "Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device" (GSC-13042). Implanted with device electronic circuitry that measures, interprets, and transmits data via inductive link through patient's skin to external receiver. Receiver includes audible alarm generator activated when patient's blood pressure exceeds predetermined threshold. Also included in receiver a blood-pressure display, recorder, or both, for use by patient or physician.

  16. The Republic of Georgia High Blood Pressure Control Program.

    PubMed

    Barbakadze, Vakhtang Y; Koblianidze, Levan G; Kipshidze, Nodar N; Grim, Clarence E; Grim, Carlene M; Tavill, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    52% of adults have uncontrolled hypertension in the Republic of Georgia. We incorporated a blood pressure control program into an existing primary healthcare system in an attempt to improve the rate of blood pressure control. We conducted standardized trainings of rural primary care providers--doctors and nurses--in accurate measurement of blood pressure according to the Shared Care Method of Training and Certification. Our attention was focused especially on patient management based on Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC) guidelines. Antihypertensive treatment was implemented by a stepped-care approach; hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol were given to patients at follow-up visits at no cost. The treatment goal was < 140/ 90 mm Hg based on the office blood pressure. A total of 251 patients with uncontrolled hypertension were enrolled in the program; 32% had stage I hypertension, 41% had stage II hypertension, and 27% had stage III, as defined by JNC VI. During the first 30 months of followup, blood pressure decreased gradually from 170/95 to 140/ 82 mm Hg. The rate of high blood pressure control increased progressively up to 59%. We conclude that hypertension control can be improved in all groups of patients, even in a healthcare system with limited resources. We emphasize that Georgia or any other healthcare system should not wait for universal health care to improve high blood pressure control. It can be incorporated into whatever system exists today.

  17. High blood pressure tests (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. These lab tests include urinalysis, blood cell count, blood chemistry (potassium, sodium, creatinine, fasting glucose, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol), and an ECG (electrocardiogram). ...

  18. Dietary spermidine for lowering high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Schroeder, Sabrina; Pendl, Tobias; Harger, Alexandra; Stekovic, Slaven; Schipke, Julia; Magnes, Christoph; Schmidt, Albrecht; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Dammbrueck, Christopher; Gross, Angelina S; Herbst, Viktoria; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Pietrocola, Federico; Pieber, Thomas R; Sigrist, Stephan J; Linke, Wolfgang A; Mühlfeld, Christian; Sadoshima, Junichi; Dengjel, Joern; Kiechl, Stefan; Kroemer, Guido; Sedej, Simon; Madeo, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Loss of cardiac macroautophagy/autophagy impairs heart function, and evidence accumulates that an increased autophagic flux may protect against cardiovascular disease. We therefore tested the protective capacity of the natural autophagy inducer spermidine in animal models of aging and hypertension, which both represent major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary spermidine elicits cardioprotective effects in aged mice through enhancing cardiac autophagy and mitophagy. In salt-sensitive rats, spermidine supplementation also delays the development of hypertensive heart disease, coinciding with reduced arterial blood pressure. The high blood pressure-lowering effect likely results from improved global arginine bioavailability and protection from hypertension-associated renal damage. The polyamine spermidine is naturally present in human diets, though to a varying amount depending on food type and preparation. In humans, high dietary spermidine intake correlates with reduced blood pressure and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and related death. Altogether, spermidine represents a cardio- and vascular-protective autophagy inducer that can be readily integrated in common diets. PMID:28118075

  19. Blood Pressure Reduction in the Acute Phase of an Ischemic Stroke Does Not Improve Short- or Long-Term Dependency or Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rong; Liu, Feng-Di; Wang, Shuo; Peng, Jia-Li; Tao, Xiao-Xiao; Zheng, Bo; Zhang, Qi-Ting; Yao, Qian; Shen, Xiao-Lei; Li, Wen-Ting; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Su, Jing-Jing; Shu, Liang; Zhang, Min; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of current literature to determine whether lowering blood pressure (BP) during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke improves short- and long-term outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase were searched until September 5, 2014 using combinations of the search terms: blood pressure reduction, reduced blood pressure, lowering blood pressure, ischemic stroke, acute stroke, and intra-cerebral hemorrhage. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trial and patients with acute stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) treated with an antihypertensive agent or placebo. Outcome measures were change in systolic and diastolic BP (SBP, DBP) after treatment, and short- and long-term dependency and mortality rates. A total of 459 studies were identified, and ultimately 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The total number of participants in the treatment groups was 5672 (range, 6–2308), and in the control groups was 5416 (range, 6–2033). In most studies, more than 50% of the participants were males and the mean age was more than 60 years. The mean follow-up time ranged from 5 days to 12 months. As expected, treatment groups had a greater decrease in BP than control groups, and this effect was seen with different classes of antihypertensive drugs. Short-term and long-term dependency rates were similar between treatment and control groups (short-term dependency: pooled odds ratio [OR] = 1.041, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.936–1.159, P = 0.457; long-term dependency: pooled OR = 1.013, 95% CI: 0.915–1.120, P = 0.806). Short-term or long-term mortality was similar between the treatment and control groups (short-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.020, 95% CI: 0.749–1.388, P = .902; long-term mortality: pooled OR = 1.039, 95% CI: 0.883–1.222, P = 0.644). Antihypertensive agents effectively reduce BP during the acute phase of an ischemic stroke, but provide no benefit with

  20. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will use a gauge, a stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. For most ... pressure. Stress management techniques include exercising, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating. ...

  1. Blood pressure measurement--an overview.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Thomas

    2012-01-27

    Arterial hypertension continues to represent the leading cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Diagnosis and therapy of arterial hypertension require adequate blood pressure measurements. Blood pressure is affected by constitutional and environmental factors as well as the measurement procedure itself, inducing substantial uncertainty with regard to adequate diagnosis and control of arterial hypertension. Therefore, current guidelines recommend that the diagnosis of arterial hypertension should not be solely based on conventional blood pressure measurements in the physician's office or in the hospital, but also on out-of-office ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements using clinically validated semi-automated or automated blood pressure measurement devices. Despite the enormous progress in the field of arterial hypertension, many aspects of blood pressure measurement require further intensive investigation, for example blood pressure measurement in special populations and distinct clinical situations, as well as the applicability and validation of novel measurement approaches and devices. This article provides an overview of current methods and trends in the field of non-invasive blood pressure measurement, an update on current clinical guidelines and an overview of blood pressure measurement in special populations.

  2. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Dionne, Janis

    2011-02-01

    Recently there have been great advances in the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in children. A major boost has been the publication of normative data for blood pressure in children. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease and post renal transplantation and has helped in identifying both white coat hypertension and masked hypertension. Current evidence does suggest that sole reliance on clinic blood pressure might not be always appropriate and ABPM has a definite role in pediatric hypertension.

  3. Regional neurovascular coupling and cognitive performance in those with low blood pressure secondary to high-level spinal cord injury: improved by alpha-1 agonist midodrine hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Aaron A; Warburton, Darren ER; Ainslie, Philip N; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with high-level spinal cord injury (SCI) experience low blood pressure (BP) and cognitive impairments. Such dysfunction may be mediated in part by impaired neurovascular coupling (NVC) (i.e., cerebral blood flow responses to neurologic demand). Ten individuals with SCI >T6 spinal segment, and 10 age- and sex-matched controls were assessed for beat-by-beat BP, as well as middle and posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv, PCAv) in response to a NVC test. Tests were repeated in SCI after 10 mg midodrine (alpha1-agonist). Verbal fluency was measured before and after midodrine in SCI, and in the control group as an index of cognitive function. At rest, mean BP was lower in SCI (70±10 versus 92±14 mm Hg; P<0.05); however, PCAv conductance was higher (0.56±0.13 versus 0.39±0.15 cm/second/mm Hg; P<0.05). Controls exhibited a 20% increase in PCAv during cognition; however, the response in SCI was completely absent (P<0.01). When BP was increased with midodrine, NVC was improved 70% in SCI, which was reflected by a 13% improved cognitive function (P<0.05). Improvements in BP were related to improved cognitive function in those with SCI (r2=0.52; P<0.05). Impaired NVC, secondary to low BP, may partially mediate reduced cognitive function in individuals with high-level SCI. PMID:24473484

  4. Nutraceuticals for blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Arnoldi, Anna; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2015-01-01

    Significant effects on blood pressure (BP) have been reported from large nutritional interventions, particularly the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diet. In more recent years, numerous studies have investigated the possible BP-lowering effect of different nutraceuticals; these range from specific foods to minerals, lipids, whole proteins, peptides, amino acids, probiotics, and vitamins. While a very large body of evidence supports the use of potassium, L-arginine, vitamins C and D, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, some probiotics, coenzyme Q10, controlled-release melatonin, aged garlic extract, and coffee, the use of other nutraceuticals, such as green tea, flaxseed, and resveratrol, has not as yet been supported by adequate evidence. In some cases, e.g. proteins/peptides, the responsible component needs also to be fully uncovered. Finally, while for most of the products only short-term studies are available, with no specific end-points, an ongoing very large prospective study on chocolate flavanols will answer the question whether this may reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, in addition to data on long-term safety, further clinical research is advisable in order to identify, among active nutraceuticals, those with the best cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit ratio for a wide use in the general population with a raised cardiovascular risk consequent to uncomplicated hypertension.

  5. The DASH diet and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Craddick, Shirley R; Elmer, Patricia J; Obarzanek, Eva; Vollmer, William M; Svetkey, Laura P; Swain, Martha C

    2003-11-01

    High blood pressure (also called hypertension) is one of the most important and common risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other chronic diseases. National guidelines recommend that all individuals with blood pressure readings of 120/80 mm Hg or higher adopt healthy lifestyle habits, including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, to manage their blood pressure. The DASH diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and reduced in fat, has been shown in large, randomized, controlled trials to reduce blood pressure significantly. The DASH diet also has been shown to reduce blood cholesterol and homocysteine levels and to enhance the benefits of antihypertensive drug therapy. The DASH diet should be promoted, along with maintaining healthy weight, reducing sodium intake, increasing regular physical activity, and limiting alcohol intake, for lowering blood pressure and reducing the risk of CVD.

  6. Determinants of blood pressure in Navajo adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, J L; Topper, M D; Arena, V C; Welty, T K

    1990-01-01

    Hypertension is becoming more common among Navajo people, especially among young men. In a group of 580 Navajo adolescents, we looked for factors associated with variations in blood pressure level. Using our criteria, 11.1% of adolescent males and 1.6% of females had an elevated screening blood pressure. In males, blood pressure was a function of age only, and not significantly related either to obesity (body mass index) or measures of acculturation and personal adjustment. In females, blood pressure was not related to age, but was associated with body mass index. Systolic pressure in females was also associated with poor personal adjustment. Level of acculturation (by our index) had no bearing on blood pressure level in this population.

  7. Perioperative Blood Pressure Control and Management.

    PubMed

    Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Carr, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure monitoring and management is a vital part of the perianesthetic period. Disturbances in blood pressure, especially hypotension, can have significant impacts on the well-being of small animal patients. There are a variety of mechanisms present to control blood pressure, including ultra-short-, short-, and long-term mechanisms. Several conditions can contribute to decreased blood pressure, including anesthetics, tension pneumothorax, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, surgical positioning, and abdominal distension. If hypotension is encountered, the initial response is to provide appropriate fluid therapy. If this is inadequate, other interventions can be used to increase blood pressure and thereby increase perfusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic use of ambulary blood pressure monitoring in medical practice.

    PubMed

    McCall, W C; McCall, V R

    1981-07-01

    This paper covers the use of a long-term, ambulatory, indirect blood pressure monitoring device in a series of sequentially selected, consenting patients exhibiting an office blood pressure of 140/90 mmGh or greater. Of the 62 patients reported, 32 percent were found to have randomly elevated pressures neither requiring treatment or labeling as hypertensive. The Pressurometer III (Del Mar Avionics) offers a major improvement in the diagnosis of hypertension.

  9. Palpatory Method of Measuring Diastolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh; Bhaskaran, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most common method for measuring blood pressure is palpatory but only systolic pressure can be measured with this method. In this study we are describing palpatory method of measuring diastolic blood pressure as well. Patients & Methods: We have studied in 200 patients and compared systolic as well as diastolic blood pressures with two methods, auscutatory and palpatory. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured by one of the authors with new palpatory method and noted down. Then an independent observer, who was blinded to the palpatory method's values, measured blood pressure by auscultatory method and noted down. The values were compared in term of range and percentage. Results: The difference were analysed and found that 102 (51%) patients had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measured by palpatory method, within ± 2 mmHg of auscutatory method, 37 (19%) patients had within ± 4 mmHg, 52 (25%) patients had same readings as with auscutatory method, and in 9 (0.5%) patients it could not be measured. Conclusion: The palpatory method would be very useful where frequent blood pressure measurement are being done manually like in wards, in busy OPD, patient on treadmill and also whenever stethoscope is not available. The blood pressure can be measured in noisy environment too. PMID:21547184

  10. Blood pressure and blood lead concentration in bus drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.S.; Osterloh, J.; Becker, C.E.; Bernard, B.; Smith, A.H.; Fisher, J.M.; Syme, S.L.; Holman, B.L.; Johnston, T.

    1988-06-01

    San Francisco bus drivers have an increased prevalence of hypertension. This study examined relationships between blood lead concentration and blood pressure in 342 drivers. The analysis reported in this study was limited to subjects not on treatment for hypertension (n = 288). Systolic and diastolic pressure varied from 102 to 173 mm Hg and from 61 to 105 mm Hg, respectively. The blood lead concentration varied from 2 to 15 ..mu..g/dL. The relationship between blood pressure and the logarithm of blood lead concentration was examined using multiple regression analysis. Covariates included age, body mass index, sex, race, and caffeine intake. The largest regression coefficient relating systolic blood pressure and blood lead concentration was 1.8 mm Hg/ln (..mu..g/dL). The coefficient for diastolic blood pressure was 2.5 mm Hg/ln (..mu..g/dL). These findings suggest effects of lead exposure at lower blood lead concentrations than those concentrations that have previously been linked with increases in blood pressure.

  11. Lifestyle intervention might easily improve blood pressure in hypertensive men with the C genotype of angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene

    PubMed Central

    Kitade, Azusa; Nagaoka, Junko; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Harada, Kiyomi; Aoi, Wataru; Wada, Sayori; Asano, Hiroaki; Sakane, Naoki; Higashi, Akane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Recent studies have reported an association of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) 3123Cytosine/Adenine (3123C/A) polymorphism with essential hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism affects blood pressure for free-living hypertensive men during a 5-month intervention period. SUBJECTS/METHODS The subjects were free-living hypertensive Japanese men aged 40 to 75 years who agreed to intervention in the period from 2004 to 2011. Detection of the AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction. The dietary intervention was designed to decrease salt level and to increase potassium level through cooking instructions and self-monitoring of the diet. The exercise session consisted of activities such as stretching, resistance training, and walking. Blood pressure, urinary sodium and potassium excretion, dietary and lifestyle data, and non-fasting venous blood sample were collected at baseline and after the intervention period. RESULTS Thirty nine subjects were eligible for participation and the follow-up rate was 97.4%. The C allele proportion was 57.9%. AT2R 3123C/A polymorphism was X-chromosome-linked, therefore we analyzed the C and A genotypes. At baseline, no significant differences were observed between the genotype groups. After the intervention, there were no significant differences in lifestyle habit between the groups. Nevertheless, the estimated salt excretion (g/day) was significantly decreased only in the C genotype (13.0-10.3, P = 0.031). No significant change was observed in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (mmHg) in the A genotype, but a significant decrease was observed in the C genotype (150.0-141.5, P = 0.024). CONCLUSTIONS In the C genotype, it might be easy to improve SBP through lifestyle intervention in free-living hypertensive Japanese men, however generalization could not be achieved by the small sample size. PMID

  12. Super, Red Palm and Palm Oleins Improve the Blood Pressure, Heart Size, Aortic Media Thickness and Lipid Profile in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Chee-Meng; Ng, Mei-Han; Choo, Yuen-May; Mok, Shiueh-Lian

    2013-01-01

    Background Oleic acid has been shown to lower high blood pressure and provide cardiovascular protection. Curiosity arises as to whether super olein (SO), red palm olein (RPO) and palm olein (PO), which have high oleic acid content, are able to prevent the development of hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Four-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were fed 15% SO, RPO or PO supplemented diet for 15 weeks. After 15 weeks of treatment, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) of SHR treated with SO, RPO and PO were 158.4±5.0 mmHg (p<0.001), 178.9±2.7 mmHg (p<0.001) and 167.7±2.1 mmHg (p<0.001), respectively, compared with SHR controls (220.9±1.5 mmHg). Bradycardia was observed with SO and PO. In contrast, the SBP and heart rate of treated WKY rats were not different from those of WKY controls. The SO and PO significantly reduced the increased heart size and thoracic aortic media thickness observed in untreated SHR but RPO reduced only the latter. No such differences, however, were observed between the treated and untreated WKY rats. Oil Red O enface staining of thoracic-abdominal aorta did not show any lipid deposition in all treated rats. The SO and RPO significantly raised serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the SHR while body weight and renal biochemical indices were unaltered in both strains. Serum lipid profiles of treated SHR and WKY rats were unchanged, with the exception of a significant reduction in LDL-C level and total cholesterol/HDL ratio (atherogenic index) in SO and RPO treated SHR compared with untreated SHR. Conclusion The SO, RPO and PO attenuate the rise in blood pressure in SHR, accompanied by bradycardia and heart size reduction with SO and PO, and aortic media thickness reduction with SO, RPO and PO. The SO and RPO are antiatherogenic in nature by improving blood lipid profiles in SHR. PMID:23409085

  13. How Is High Blood Pressure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... secondary high blood pressure, he or she will work to treat the other condition or change the medicine suspected of causing your ... when the medications they are taking do not work well for them or another medical condition is leading to uncontrolled blood pressure. Health care ...

  14. The importance of prompt blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension affects almost one-third of adults in the United States, but blood pressure is adequately controlled in only about 50% to 60% of persons with treated hypertension. Abundant clinical trial evidence has shown that antihypertensive therapy significantly reduces the risk of vascular events, and meta-analyses of observational and clinical trials have shown that greater reductions in blood pressure are associated with greater reductions in risk. Recent trials have also suggested that prompt control of blood pressure is beneficial in high-risk patients with hypertension. A post hoc analysis of a trial comparing an angiotensin II receptor blocker-based program with a calcium channel blocker-based treatment regimen found that the blood pressure response after 1 month (regardless of the drug used) predicted the risk of vascular events and survival. Therapy with > or =2 medications given separately or as a fixed combination is more likely than monotherapy to lower blood pressure to goal in part because drugs from different classes target different mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. Moreover, the likelihood of achieving blood pressure goals is greater if the time to achieve control is shortened, and prompt control of blood pressure is more likely with multiple-drug therapy than with monotherapy.

  15. Dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Dumler, Francis

    2009-01-01

    We sought to summarize major recent studies in the field of dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure, and discuss the following trials. INTERSALT: Sodium intake correlates with the rise in blood pressure with age, but not with the prevalence of hypertension. The population study identified a minimal impact of sodium intake on blood pressure (0.9 mm Hg/10 mmol difference in salt intake). DASH: This diet induced significant reductions in blood pressure compared with the control diet. Further decreases were observed with DASH and a 50 mmol/day sodium intake. VANGUARD: Blood pressure was inversely related to urinary potassium, calcium and magnesium but not to sodium excretion. TONE: Cardiovascular events were highest in the usual care group (83%) and lowest in the sodium reduction-plus-weight loss group (56%). META-ANALYSIS: A systematic review of 11 long-term controlled randomized trials reported a small decrease (1.1 mm Hg) in median systolic but not diastolic blood pressure with a reduced dietary sodium intake. In conclusion, (1) sodium restriction in hypertensive patients reduces blood pressure, and (2) the long-term impact of reduced salt intake on blood pressure, mortality, and morbidity remains to be defined.

  16. Blood Pressure. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on blood pressure. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, a pupil performance checklist, a handout on blood pressure, and student completion cards to issue to…

  17. High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health News on: Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated ...

  18. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  19. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  20. Long-term study of patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment shows that dapagliflozin reduces weight and blood pressure but does not improve glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Donald E; Fioretto, Paola; Tang, Weihua; List, James F

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, glycemic improvement by sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition depends on the kidney's ability to filter glucose. Dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, reduces hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes and normal or mildly impaired renal function. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we assessed daily treatment with dapagliflozin in 252 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment. The primary endpoint, the mean change in HbA1c, was not statistically different from placebo after 24 weeks (−0.41% and −0.44% for 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and −0.32% for placebo). The mean weight change from baseline was −1.54 and −1.89 kg for the 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and +0.21 kg for placebo. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased in the dapagliflozin groups compared to placebo. Through 104 weeks, 13 patients receiving dapagliflozin and no patients receiving placebo experienced bone fracture. At 1 week, the mean serum creatinine increased with dapagliflozin 5 mg (+0.13 mg/dl) and 10 mg (+0.18 mg/dl) and did not change further after 104 weeks. Mean serum electrolytes did not change in any group, and there were fewer episodes of hyperkalemia with dapagliflozin than placebo. Thus, in patients with moderate renal impairment, dapagliflozin did not improve glycemic control, but reduced weight and blood pressure. PMID:24067431

  1. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow during incremental increases of intracranial pressure produced by infusion of fluid into the cisterna magna were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow remained constant at intracranial pressure levels up to approximately 50 mm Hg. At intracranial pressure levels between 50-96 mm Hg a marked increase in cerebral blood flow occurred, associated with the development of systemic hypertension and changes in cerebrovascular resistance. Further increases of intracranial pressure led to a progressive fall in cerebral blood flow. Prior section of the cervical cord prevented both the increase in cerebral blood flow and the systemic hypertension. Alteration of cerebral perfusion pressure by bleeding during the hyperaemia in a further group of animals suggested that autoregulation was at least partially preserved during this phase. After maximum hyperaemia had occurred, however, autoregulation appeared to be lost. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4624687

  2. Confidence limits for interpretation of home blood pressure recordings.

    PubMed

    Krakoff, Lawrence R

    2009-08-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of arterial blood pressure is needed for the management of hypertension. Multiple measurements can be obtained from recorded home blood pressures devices. Averages and other statistics can be calculated. Confidence intervals provide an assessment of the precision with which average pressures are measured. This study evaluated confidence intervals for systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and pulse pressure from recorded home blood pressure measurements. Fifty-three patients with high normal blood pressure, suspected white coat hypertension, or refractory hypertension were assessed by recorded home blood pressure. They were instructed to take four measurements each day for 1 week using a device that stores each measurement. Measurements were downloaded from the device to a computer, stored as data files, and analyzed by software. Average pressures and confidence intervals for each participant were rapidly calculated by standard statistical methods. The average width of the 95% confidence intervals for systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, and pulse pressure were 8, 5, and 6 mmHg, respectively with large inter-individual differences. Significant positive correlations were found between the width of the confidence intervals and the average systolic (P<0.05) or pulse pressure (P<0.01). However, the correlation for diastolic pressure was not significant. Confidence intervals can be easily calculated for recorded home blood pressures with device storage and may provide a useful approach when cut-off points for classification as normal pressure, high normal pressure, or definite hypertension are to be excluded. This information, combined with knowledge of other risk factors, may help guide decisions for improved management.

  3. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressure changes within the venous outflow tract from the brain were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Segmental vascular resistance changes were also calculated and the results correlated with the changes in cerebral blood flow, measured by the 133Xenon clearance method. Three different methods were used to raise intracranial pressure: cisterna magna infusion, a supratentorial subdural balloon, and an infratentorial subdural balloon. A close correlation was found between the cortical vein pressure and intracranial pressure with all methods of raising intracranial pressure: the overall correlation coefficient was 0·98. In the majority of animals sagittal sinus pressure showed little change through a wide range of intracranial pressure. In three of the six animals in the cisterna magna infusion group, however, sagittal sinus pressure increased to levels approaching the intracranial pressure during the later stages of intracranial hypertension. Jugular venous pressure showed little change with increasing intracranial pressure. The relationship between cerebral prefusion pressure and cerebral blood flow differed according to the method of increasing intracranial pressure. This was due to differing patterns of change in prevenous vascular resistance as venous resistance increased progressively with increasing pressure in all three groups. The present results confirm, therefore, the validity of the current definition of cerebral perfusion pressure—that is, cerebral perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus mean intracranial pressure—by demonstrating that intracranial pressure does represent the effective cerebral venous outflow pressure. Images PMID:4209160

  4. Effect of measuring ambulatory blood pressure on sleep and on blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R. J.; Jenkins, N. E.; Stradling, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether recording of ambulatory blood pressure at night causes arousal from sleep and a change in the continuous blood pressure recorded simultaneously. DESIGN--Repeated measurement of blood pressure with two ambulatory blood pressure machines (Oxford Medical ABP and A&D TM2420) during continuous measurement of beat to beat blood pressure and continuous electroencephalography. SETTING--Sleep research laboratory. SUBJECTS--Six normal subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The duration of electroencephalographic arousal and the beat to beat changes in blood pressure produced by the measurement of ambulatory blood pressure; the size of any changes that this arousal and change in blood pressure produced in the blood pressure recorded by the ambulatory machine. RESULTS--Both ambulatory blood pressure machines caused arousal from sleep: the mean duration of arousal was 16 seconds (95% range 0-202) with the ABP and 8 seconds (0-73) with the TM2420. Both also caused a rise in beat to beat blood pressure. During non-rapid eye movement sleep, this rise led to the ABP machine overestimating the true systolic blood pressure during sleep by a mean of 10 (SD 14.8) mm Hg and the TM2420 by a mean of 6.3 (8.2) mm Hg. On average, diastolic pressure was not changed, but measurements in individual subjects changed by up to 23 mm Hg. These changes varied in size among subjects and stages of sleep and were seen after measurements that did not cause any electroencephalographic arousal. CONCLUSIONS--Ambulatory blood pressure machines cause appreciable arousal from sleep and therefore alter the blood pressure that they are trying to record. This effect should be taken into account when recordings of blood pressure at night are interpreted in clinical work and epidemiological research. PMID:8167489

  5. In vivo expression of angiotensin-(1-7) lowers blood pressure and improves baroreflex function in transgenic (mRen2)27 rats.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2012-08-01

    Transgenic (mRen2)27 rats are hypertensive with impaired baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate compared with Hannover Sprague-Dawley rats. We assessed blood pressure and baroreflex function in male hemizygous (mRen2)27 rats (30-40 weeks of age) instrumented for arterial pressure recordings and receiving into the cisterna magna either an Ang-(1-7) fusion protein or a control fusion protein (CTL-FP). The maximum reduction in mean arterial pressure achieved was -38 ± 7 mm Hg on day 3, accompanied by a 55% enhancement in baroreflex sensitivity in Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Both the high-frequency alpha index (HF-α) and heart rate variability increased, suggesting increased parasympathetic tone for cardiac control. The mRNA levels of several components of the renin-angiotensin system in the dorsal medulla were markedly reduced including renin (-80%), neprilysin (-40%), and the AT1a receptor (-40%). However, there was a 2-fold to 3-fold increase in the mRNA levels of the phosphatases PTP-1b and dual-specificity phosphatase 1 in the medulla of Ang-(1-7) fusion protein-treated rats. Our finding that replacement of Ang-(1-7) in the brain of (mRen2)27 rats reverses in part the hypertension and baroreflex impairment is consistent with a functional deficit of Ang-(1-7) in this hypertensive strain. We conclude that the increased mRNA expression of phosphatases known to counteract the phosphoinositol 3 kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases, and the reduction of renin and AT1a receptor mRNA levels may contribute to the reduction in arterial pressure and improvement in baroreflex sensitivity in response to Ang-(1-7).

  6. Role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Bombelli, Michele; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Dell'oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has gained growing popularity in the diagnosis and treatment of essential hypertension for several reasons, such as the lack of the so-called white-coat effect, the greater reproducibility as compared with clinic blood pressure, the ability to provide information on blood pressure phenomena of prognostic value and the closer relationship with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. All the above-mentioned main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are also true for resistant hypertension. In addition, however, in resistant hypertension, blood pressure monitoring allows one to precisely define the diagnosis of this clinical condition, by excluding the presence of white-coat hypertension, which is responsible for a consistent number of "false" resistant hypertensive cases. The approach also allows one to define the patterns of blood pressure variability in this clinical condition, as well as its relationships with target organ damage. Finally, it allows one to assess the effects of therapeutic interventions, such as renal nerves ablation, aimed at improving blood pressure control in this hypertensive state. The present paper will critically review the main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of this high-risk hypertensive state.

  7. SY 09-4 PUBLIC POLICIES TO REDUCE SALT IN PROCESSED FOODS: HOW THEY MAY CORRELATE WITH IMPROVEMENT IN BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL AND REDUCED CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norm

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension is the second leading global risk for death and disability after unhealthy diets. Amongst dietary risks, excess dietary salt (sodium) is the leading risk. As dietary sodium increases, blood pressure increases linearly. In meta-analyses of higher quality cohort studies and in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, higher dietary sodium is linearly associated with increased cardiovascular disease. There are an estimated xxxx deaths and xxx DALYs in 2013 from excess dietary sodium. The World Health Organization has a recommended sodium (salt) intake of less than 2000 mg (5 g)/day with the World Health Assembly setting a voluntary target of a 30% reduction by 2025. In high income countries, the vast majority of dietary salt comes from additives during commercial food processing. In low income countries the vast majority of salt is 'discretionary' being added at home in cooking and at the table, often as condiments (e.g. soya/fish sauce or bouillon). Many highly populated countries are in nutritional transition and have the highest salt intakes with both commercial and discretionary sources. Notably diets of natural foods without added salt contain 500-800 mg sodium/day. Policies to reduce commercial sources of salt have had demonstrated efficacy at reducing salt intake, blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Use of salt replacers (potassium partly replacing sodium) hold promise to reduce discretionary salt and in randomized controlled trials reduce blood pressure. There is renewed 'scientific' controversy about reducing dietary salt. The controversy is largely based on a small number of individuals many of whom have had associations with the food and salt industry and/or have conducted research using methods highly prone to erroneous findings. Sadly several of those dissenting have made false or misleading statements about the science supporting salt reduction, altered scientific formula to make their controversial data appear more

  8. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells improve murine ventricular function upon intramyocardial delivery in right ventricular chronic pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Oommen, Saji; Yamada, Satsuki; Cantero Peral, Susana; Campbell, Katherine A; Bruinsma, Elizabeth S; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J

    2015-03-26

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as potential therapeutic strategy for damaged heart muscles. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are the most prevalent stem cell source available, yet have not been fully tested in cardiac regeneration. Herein, studies were performed to evaluate the cardiovascular safety and beneficial effect of mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from human umbilical cord blood upon intramyocardial delivery in a murine model of right ventricle (RV) heart failure due to pressure overload. UCB-derived MNCs were delivered into the myocardium of a diseased RV cardiac model. Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) was used to produce pressure overload in athymic nude mice that were then injected intramyocardially with UCB-MNCs (0.4×10^6 cells/heart). Cardiac functions were then monitored by telemetry, echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic analysis of heart samples to determine the ability for cell-based repair. The cardio-toxicity studies provided evidence that UCB cell transplantation has a safe therapeutic window between 0.4 to 0.8 million cells/heart without altering QT or ST-segments or the morphology of electrocardiograph waves. The PAB cohort demonstrated significant changes in RV chamber dilation and functional defects consistent with severe pressure overload. Using cardiac MRI analysis, UCB-MNC transplantation in the setting of PAB demonstrated an improvement in RV structure and function in this surgical mouse model. The RV volume load in PAB-only mice was 24.09±3.9 compared to 11.05±2.09 in the cell group (mm3, P-value<0.005). The analysis of pathogenic gene expression (BNP, ANP, Acta1, Myh7) in the cell-transplanted group showed a significant reversal with respect to the diseased PAB mice with a robust increase in cardiac progenitor gene expression such as GATA4, Kdr, Mef2c and Nkx2.5. Histological analysis indicated significant fibrosis in the RV in response to PAB that was reduced following UCB-MNC's transplantation along with

  9. Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) trial: a multi-level intervention to improve blood pressure control in hypertensive blacks.

    PubMed

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Tobin, Jonathan N; Fernandez, Senaida; Gerin, William; Diaz-Gloster, Marleny; Cassells, Andrea; Khalida, Chamanara; Pickering, Thomas; Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Ravenell, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Despite strong evidence of effective interventions targeted at blood pressure (BP) control, there is little evidence on the translation of these approaches to routine clinical practice in care of hypertensive blacks. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a multilevel, multicomponent, evidence-based intervention compared with usual care in improving BP control among hypertensive blacks who receive care in community health centers. The primary outcomes are BP control rate at 12 months and maintenance of intervention 1 year after the trial. The secondary outcomes are within-patient change in BP from baseline to 12 months and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Counseling African Americans to Control Hypertension (CAATCH) is a group randomized clinical trial with 2 conditions: intervention condition and usual care. Thirty community health centers were randomly assigned equally to the intervention condition group (n=15) or the usual care group (n=15). The intervention comprises 3 components targeted at patients (interactive computerized hypertension education, home BP monitoring, and monthly behavioral counseling on lifestyle modification) and 2 components targeted at physicians (monthly case rounds based on Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure guidelines, chart audit and provision of feedback on clinical performance and patients' home BP readings). All outcomes are assessed at quarterly study visits for 1 year. Chart review is conducted at 24 months to evaluate maintenance of intervention effects and sustainability of the intervention. Poor BP control is one of the major reasons for the mortality gap between blacks and whites. Findings from this study, if successful, will provide salient information needed for translation and dissemination of evidence-based interventions targeted at BP control into clinical practice for this high-risk population.

  10. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  11. Salt, blood pressure, and human health.

    PubMed

    Alderman, M H

    2000-11-01

    The positive relation of sodium intake and blood pressure, first recognized a century ago, has been well established in ecological, epidemiological, and experimental human studies. Equally well established is the association of increasing blood pressure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Indeed, the pharmacological capacity to reduce blood pressure has produced one of the great public health accomplishments of the 20th century. These two facts-the positive relation of blood pressure to strokes and heat attacks and the positive association of sodium intake to blood pressure-underlie the hypothesis that a reduction in sodium intake, by virtue of its hypotensive effect, might prevent strokes and heart attacks. Moreover, even if the effect on blood pressure were in the range of a 1- to 2-mm Hg decline in blood pressure for every 75- to 100-mmol difference in sodium intake, the impact of such a change, applied to the whole population, would be enormous. The problem with this appealing possibility is that a reduction in salt consumption of this magnitude has other-and sometimes adverse-health consequences. The question, therefore, is whether the beneficial hypotensive effects of sodium restriction will outweigh its hazards. Unfortunately, few data link sodium intake to health outcomes, and that which is available is inconsistent. Without knowledge of the sum of the multiple effects of a reduced sodium diet, no single universal prescription for sodium intake can be scientifically justified.

  12. Reproductive hormones and blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, P; Wang, J X

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in cardiovasular changes during human pregnancy and the complicated aetiology of gestational hypertension are unclear. Reproductive hormones have known effects on the cardiovascular system in the non-pregnant state and in animal systems, but their effects in human pregnancy are uncertain. In this study of pregnant women, the effects of serum concentrations of relaxin, progesterone and oestradiol on arterial blood pressure were studied. Higher serum concentrations of progesterone and relaxin, but not oestradiol, in early pregnancy were related to lower mean systolic blood pressures in the second and third trimesters. No relationship was found between hormonal concentrations and diastolic blood pressures. However, women with a diastolic blood pressure of >90 mmHg in late pregnancy showed statistically significant lower relaxin concentrations in early pregnancy in comparison with women whose diastolic blood pressure was blood pressure (P: < 0.0001) and serum relaxin (P: < 0.01) in early pregnancy, but not progesterone, were independently related to systolic blood pressure in late pregnancy. The results support previous experimental and clinical studies. The effect of relaxin may be explained by a possible vasodilatatory action seen in animal studies and appears to be moderate.

  13. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  14. Modern approaches to blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Staessen, J.; O'Brien, E.; Thijs, L.; Fagard, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Blood pressure (BP) is usually measured by conventional sphygmomanometry. Although apparently simple, this procedure is fraught with many potential sources of error. This review focuses on two alternative techniques of BP measurement: ambulatory monitoring and self measurement.
REVIEW—BP values obtained by ambulatory monitoring or self measurement are characterised by high reproducibility, are not subject to digit preference or observer bias, and minimise the transient rise of the blood pressure in response to the surroundings of the clinic or the presence of the observer, the so called white coat effect. For ambulatory monitoring, the upper limits of systolic/diastolic normotension in adults include 130/80 mm Hg for the 24 hour BP and 135/85 and 120/70 mm Hg for the daytime BP and night time BP, respectively. For the the self measured BP these thresholds include 135/85 mm Hg. Automated BP measurement is most useful to identify patients with white coat hypertension. Whether or not white coat hypertension predisposes to sustained hypertension remains debated. However, outcome is better correlated with the ambulatory BP than with the conventional BP. In patients with white coat hypertension, antihypertensive drugs lower the BP in the clinic, but not the ambulatory BP, and also do not improve prognosis. Ambulatory BP monitoring is also better than conventional BP measurement in assessing the effects of treatment. Ambulatory BP monitoring is necessary to diagnose nocturnal hypertension and is especially indicated in patients with borderline hypertension, elderly patients, pregnant women, patients with treatment resistant hypertension, and also in patients with symptoms suggestive of hypotension.
CONCLUSIONS—The newer techniques of BP measurement are now well established in clinical research, for diagnosis in clinical practice, and will increasingly make their appearance in occupational and environmental medicine.


Keywords: ambulatory blood

  15. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Intracranial pressure was raised by expansion of a supratentorial subdural ballon in anaesthetized baboons. Pressures were measured at several sites, both supratentorial and infratentorial, and cerebral blood flow was measured in each cerebral hemisphere separately. Pressures recorded from the right and left lateral ventricles corresponded closely throughout. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between the pressures in the right and left subdural spaces and the mean intraventricular pressure. There was, thus, no evidence of intracompartmental pressure gradients within the supratentorial space. Pressure gradients did, however, develop between the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments in the majority of experiments, although the level of supratentorial pressure at which this occurred, varied. Despite the presence of a large mass lesion over the right cerebral hemisphere, no significant differences developed between levels of cerebral blood flow in the two hemispheres, although flow in the right hemisphere remained consistently slightly lower than that in the left after the ballon was inserted. PMID:4836754

  16. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  17. The Birmingham blood pressure school study.

    PubMed Central

    De Giovanni, J. V.; Pentecost, B. L.; Beevers, D. G.; Beevers, M.; Jackson, S. H.; Bannan, L. T.; Osbourne, V. L.; Mathews, K.

    1983-01-01

    Four-hundred and twenty-eight school leavers of 3 ethnic groups (white, black and Asian) were screened for blood pressure, resting pulse rate and general anthropometric characteristics. Asian pupils were both shorter and lighter than the other two groups whilst black males were heavier and taller. There was no significant difference in the mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure between the 3 groups, although the black pupils had a stronger family history of hypertension, particularly on the mother's side. These observations differ in some respects from other ethnic blood pressure studies and establish values for the local population. PMID:6647172

  18. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow with increasing intracranial pressure were studied in anaesthetized baboons during expansion of a subdural balloon in one of two different sites. With an infratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow bore no clear relation to intracranial pressure, but was linearly related to cerebral perfusion pressure. Apart from an initial change in some animals, cerebrovascular resistance remained constant with increasing intracranial pressure, and autoregulation appeared to be lost from the outset. With a supratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow remained constant as intracranial pressure was increased to levels around 60 mm Hg, corresponding to a cerebral perfusion pressure range of approximately 100 to 40 mmHg. Cerebrovascular resistance fell progressively, and autoregulation appeared to be effective during this phase. At higher intracranial pressure levels (lower cerebral perfusion pressure levels), autoregulation was lost and cerebral blood flow became directly dependent on cerebral perfusion pressure. The importance of the cause of the increase in intracranial pressure on the response of the cerebral circulation and the relevance of these findings to the clinical situation are discussed. PMID:4196632

  19. Does Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Lifestyle Intervention Indicate Metabolic Risk and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Improvement Over 1 Year?

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Gill, Dawn P; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether responders (minimum 4-mm Hg reduction of systolic blood pressure [BP]) at 24 weeks) to a 52-week lifestyle intervention had greater changes in metabolic risk factors and health-related quality of life than nonresponders. Participants (N=126; age, 57.4 [9.1] years) had waist circumference (WC), resting BP, glycated hemoglobin, lipids, and fitness assessed at baseline and at 12, 24, and 52 months. The 36-item short-form survey was administered to assess HRQOL. At baseline, responders had higher mental health scores (P=.04) and systolic and diastolic BPs (P<.001) than nonresponders. Across 52 weeks, responders also had greater improvements in diastolic BP (P<.001), WC (P=.01), and maximal oxygen uptake (P=.04) compared with nonresponders. Participants with clinically important changes in systolic BP at 24 weeks had greater metabolic improvements across 52 weeks, compared with those without clinically important systolic BP changes.

  20. Consumption of extra virgin olive oil improves body composition and blood pressure in women with excess body fat: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Galvão Cândido, Flávia; Xavier Valente, Flávia; da Silva, Laís Emilia; Gonçalves Leão Coelho, Olívia; Gouveia Peluzio, Maria do Carmo; Gonçalves Alfenas, Rita de Cássia

    2017-08-14

    Despite the fact that extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is widely used in obese individuals to treat cardiovascular diseases, the role of EVOO on weight/fat reduction remains unclear. We investigated the effects of energy-restricted diet containing EVOO on body composition and metabolic disruptions related to obesity. This is a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 41 adult women with excess body fat (mean ± SD 27.0 ± 0.9 year old, 46.8 ± 0.6% of total body fat) received daily high-fat breakfasts containing 25 mL of soybean oil (control group, n = 20) or EVOO (EVOO group, n = 21) during nine consecutive weeks. Breakfasts were part of an energy-restricted normal-fat diets (-2090 kJ, ~32%E from fat). Anthropometric and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were assessed, and fasting blood was collected on the first and last day of the experiment. Fat loss was ~80% higher on EVOO compared to the control group (mean ± SE: -2.4 ± 0.3 kg vs. -1.3 ± 0.4 kg, P = 0.037). EVOO also reduced diastolic blood pressure when compared to control (-5.1 ± 1.6 mmHg vs. +0.3 ± 1.2 mmHg, P = 0.011). Within-group differences (P < 0.050) were observed for HDL-c (-2.9 ± 1.2 mmol/L) and IL-10 (+0.9 ± 0.1 pg/mL) in control group, and for serum creatinine (+0.04 ± 0.01 µmol/L) and alkaline phosphatase (-3.3 ± 1.8 IU/L) in the EVOO group. There was also a trend for IL-1β EVOO reduction (-0.3 ± 0.1 pg/mL, P = 0.060). EVOO consumption reduced body fat and improved blood pressure. Our results indicate that EVOO should be included into energy-restricted programs for obesity treatment.

  1. Blood pressure and industrial lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, R; Gill, J S; Beevers, D G

    1993-03-15

    The association between environmental lead exposure and raised blood pressure remains controversial. This association was examined in a cross-sectional study in 1981 on 809 male workers who were occupationally exposed to lead in a factory manufacturing car lead accumulator batteries in Birmingham, United Kingdom. Lead exposure was assessed by blood lead levels, blood zinc protoporphyrin levels, and years of industrial exposure to lead. The geometric mean blood lead level was 31.6 micrograms/dl with minimum and maximum values of 0 microgram/dl and 98 micrograms/dl, respectively. Unadjusted systolic blood pressure rose with increasing blood lead levels (analysis of variance, F = 3.3, p < 0.05) from 127 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI) 123.5-130.5) in men with blood lead levels less than 21 micrograms/dl to 133 mmHg (95% CI 128.7-137.3) in men with levels exceeding 50 micrograms/dl. Following adjustment for the confounding effects of age, body mass index, and alcohol consumption, however, the effect of blood lead on systolic pressure was diminished (analysis of variance, F = 1.3, not significant) to 129 mmHg and 132 mmHg in the respective categories. There was no association between diastolic blood pressure and blood lead. Zinc protoporphyrin levels and years of industrial lead exposure did not raise adjusted systolic or diastolic pressure. In conclusion, subject to the limitations inherent in a cross-sectional survey, the findings are consistent with a weak effect of industrial lead exposure on systolic blood pressure, within the range of exposures observed in this study.

  2. Working meeting on blood pressure measurement: suggestions for measuring blood pressure to use in populations surveys.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    As part of the Pan American Hypertension Initiative (PAHI), the Pan American Health Organization and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health of the United States of America conducted a working meeting to discuss blood pressure (BP) measurement methods used in various hypertension prevalence surveys and clinical trials, with the objective of developing a BP measurement protocol for use in hypertension prevalence surveys in the Americas. No such common protocol has existed in the Americas, so it has been difficult to compare hypertension prevention and intervention strategies. This piece describes a proposed standard method for measuring blood pressure for use in population surveys in the Region of the Americas. The piece covers: considerations for developing a common blood pressure measurement protocol, critical issues in measuring blood pressure in national surveys, minimum procedures for blood pressure measurement during surveillance, and quality assessment of blood pressure.

  3. What Is High Blood Pressure Medicine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... make the other lifestyle changes that will help reduce blood pressure, including: reaching and maintaining a healthy weight, lowering sodium (salt) intake, eating a heart-healthy diet, being more regularly physically active, and limiting alcohol ...

  4. Caffeine: How Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. References Zhang Z, et al. Habitual coffee consumption and risk of hypertension: A systematic review and ... 1212. Steffen M, et al. The effect of coffee consumption on blood pressure and the development of hypertension: ...

  5. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  6. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  7. Alcohol drinking and blood pressure among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jerez, S J; Coviello, A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate alcohol consumption among adolescents from Tucuman, Argentina, and to determine its possible relationship with increased levels of blood pressure. Three hundred fifty-six students aged 13-18 included in the study were asked to answer questionnaires anonymously. Two blood pressures measures were then taken. Differences between both sexes were found in quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption. Enjoyment was determined to be the main reason for drinking. There was an association between frequency and alcohol-related problems, and smoking habits. There were also differences in blood pressure among males and females. A weak, but significant, relationship between quantity/frequency index and diastolic blood pressure was found. A greater prevalence of hypertension in male heavy drinkers was noted as well. Because this addiction implies multiple social problems and it also accounts for a hypertension risk factor, the importance of aiming at developing prevention strategies for alcohol abuse among adolescents is stressed.

  8. Blood pressure and migration in children.

    PubMed

    Beaglehole, R; Eyles, E; Prior, I

    1979-03-01

    The effect of migration on childhood blood pressure levels has been studied by comparing children before and after migration to New Zealand with children who stayed at home on the Pacific atolls of Tokelau. Data were collected in 1971 on 502 children (97% response rate) aged 5--14 years resident in Tokelau and follow-up data were collected in New Zealand and in Tokelau in 1975--1977 (respknse rate 91%). No selection factors were detected before migration. After migration, the younger migrants had significantly higher blood pressures and were heavier, but not taller, than the non-migrants. Weight differences explained some but not all of the blood pressure differences. There were no differences in body size between the 2 groups of older children although the older non migrant girls had higher blood pressure than the migrant girls.

  9. Correlates of Blood Pressure in Elementary Schoolchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Christopher L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This cross-sectional study determined which anthropometric, dietary, and physical fitness variables were the best predictors of blood pressure in 323 white elementary school children. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  10. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  11. Birth weight and childhood blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Vidar O; Steinthorsdottir, Sandra D; Eliasdottir, Sigridur B; Indridason, Olafur S; Palsson, Runolfur

    2012-12-01

    A large body of literature suggests an inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure in children, adolescents and adults. The most persistent findings have been observed in children with a history of low birth weight or intrauterine growth restriction, while a large number of studies carried out in populations with normally distributed birth weight have shown conflicting results. A recently reported strong direct association between high birth weight and blood pressure, and the significant positive effect of postnatal growth on blood pressure suggests that the fetal origins of adult disease hypothesis should be expanded to include the role of excessive fetal and postnatal growth. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relationship between birth weight and blood pressure in childhood, with a focus on confounding variables that may explain the conflicting results of published work in this field.

  12. Weightlifting: Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Circulation. 2007;116:572. Cornelissen VA, et al. Impact of resistance training on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors: A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Hypertension. ...

  13. Blood pressure variability on antihypertensive therapy in acute intracerebral hemorrhage: the Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement-intracerebral hemorrhage study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eijirou; Koga, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Junpei; Kario, Kazuomi; Kamiyama, Kenji; Furui, Eisuke; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Okuda, Satoshi; Todo, Kenichi; Kimura, Kazumi; Okada, Yasushi; Okata, Takuya; Arihiro, Shoji; Sato, Shoichiro; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2014-08-01

    The associations between early blood pressure (BP) variability and clinical outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage after antihypertensive therapy, recently clarified by a post hoc analysis of Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial 2 (INTERACT2), were confirmed using the Stroke Acute Management with Urgent Risk-factor Assessment and Improvement (SAMURAI)-intracerebral hemorrhage study cohort. Patients with hyperacute (<3 hours from onset) intracerebral hemorrhage with initial systolic BP (SBP) >180 mm Hg were registered in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. All patients received antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg using intravenous nicardipine. BPs were measured hourly during the initial 24 hours. BP variability was determined as SD and successive variation. The associations between BP variability and hematoma expansion (>33%), neurological deterioration within 72 hours, and unfavorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale, 4-6) at 3 months were assessed. Of the 205 patients, 33 (16%) showed hematoma expansion, 14 (7%) showed neurological deterioration, and 81 (39%) had unfavorable outcomes. The SD and successive variation of SBP were 13.8 (interquartile range, 11.5-16.8) and 14.9 (11.7-17.7) mm Hg, respectively, and those of diastolic BP were 9.4 (7.5-11.2) and 13.1 (11.2-15.9) mm Hg, respectively. On multivariate regression analyses, neurological deterioration was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio, 2.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.45-6.12 per quartile) and the successive variation of SBP (2.37; 1.32-4.83), and unfavorable outcome was associated with successive variation of SBP (1.42; 1.04-1.97). Hematoma expansion was not associated with any BP variability. SBP variability during the initial 24 hours of acute intracerebral hemorrhage was independently associated with neurological deterioration and unfavorable outcomes

  14. Carotid Stenosis and Ocular Blood Pressure Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jullian, M.; Kinsner, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the human carotid vascular system was developed to study the effects of carotid stenosis on ocular blood pressure and ocular pulse waveform. The model incorporates a non-linear element representing a stenosis. A state variable representation of a reduced model is used in a computer simulation. Results show that carotid stenosis as low as 20% are detectable in the ocular blood pressure waveform.

  15. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Salt, blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; MacGregor, Graham A

    2007-07-01

    To review the evidence that relates salt intake to blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Raised blood pressure throughout the range seen in developed countries is the major cause of cardiovascular disease, responsible for 62% of strokes and 49% of coronary heart disease. There is overwhelming evidence that dietary salt is a major cause of raised blood pressure, and a modest reduction in salt intake lowers blood pressure, which is predicted to reduce cardiovascular disease. Several lines of evidence including ecological, population and prospective cohort studies, as well as follow-up studies of individuals who participated in short-term salt reduction trials, have consistently shown a direct relation between salt intake and cardiovascular risk, and a reduction in population salt intake is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular mortality in the population. The evidence for universal salt reduction is strong, and reducing salt from the current intake of 10-12 g/day to the recommended level of 5-6 g/day will have a major effect on blood pressure and cardiovascular mortality. Additionally, this will result in considerable savings on health expenditure as, not only is raised blood pressure the biggest cause of death, but the second biggest cause of disability worldwide.

  17. Cocoa, blood pressure, and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Claudio; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferri, Livia; Proietti, Ilenia; Di Agostino, Stefania; Martella, Letizia; Mai, Francesca; Di Giosia, Paolo; Grassi, Davide

    2015-11-18

    High blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular events worldwide. Clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that cocoa-rich products reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to this, cocoa has a high content in polyphenols, especially flavanols. Flavanols have been described to exert favorable effects on endothelium-derived vasodilation via the stimulation of nitric oxide-synthase, the increased availability of l-arginine, and the decreased degradation of NO. Cocoa may also have a beneficial effect by protecting against oxidative stress alterations and via decreased platelet aggregation, decreased lipid oxidation, and insulin resistance. These effects are associated with a decrease of blood pressure and a favorable trend toward a reduction in cardiovascular events and strokes. Previous meta-analyses have shown that cocoa-rich foods may reduce blood pressure. Long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa products are needed to determine whether or not blood pressure is reduced on a chronic basis by daily ingestion of cocoa. Furthermore, long-term trials investigating the effect of cocoa on clinical outcomes are also needed to assess whether cocoa has an effect on cardiovascular events. A 3 mmHg systolic blood pressure reduction has been estimated to decrease the risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. This paper summarizes new findings concerning cocoa effects on blood pressure and cardiovascular health, focusing on putative mechanisms of action and "nutraceutical " viewpoints.

  18. Blood pressure management in children on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Paglialonga, F; Consolo, S; Edefonti, A; Montini, G

    2017-06-09

    Hypertension is a leading cause of cardiovascular complications in children on dialysis. Volume overload and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system play a major role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. The first step in managing blood pressure (BP) is the careful assessment of ambulatory BP monitoring. Volume control is essential and should start with the accurate identification of dry weight, based on a comprehensive assessment, including bioimpedance analysis and intradialytic blood volume monitoring (BVM). Reduction of interdialytic weight gain (IDWG) is critical, as higher IDWG is associated with a worse left ventricular mass index and poorer BP control: it can be obtained by means of salt restriction, reduced fluid intake, and optimized sodium removal in dialysis. Optimization of peritoneal dialysis and intensified hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration have been shown to improve both fluid and sodium management, leading to better BP levels. Studies comparing different antihypertensive agents in children are lacking. The pharmacokinetic properties of each drug should be considered. At present, BP control remains suboptimal in many patients and efforts are needed to improve the long-term outcomes of children on dialysis.

  19. 4-Aminopyridine, A Blocker of Voltage-Dependent K+ Channels, Restores Blood Pressure and Improves Survival in the Wistar Rat Model of Anaphylactic Shock.

    PubMed

    Bellou, Abdelouahab; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman; Aburawi, Elhadi H; Dhanasekaran, Subramanian; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Shafiuallah, Mohamed; Zerrouki, Moufida; Yasin, Javed; Bellou, Leila; Alper, Seth L; Bellou, Sirine; Kazzam, Elsadig

    2016-11-01

    Anaphylactic shock is associated with severe hypotension. Potassium channel blockers, such as 4-aminopyridine, induce vasoconstriction. The objective of this study was to test the ability of 4-aminopyridine to restore blood pressure and increase survival in anaphylactic shock. Experimental study. Physiology laboratory. Adult male Wistar rats. Rats were sensitized with ovalbumin (1 mg SC), and anaphylactic shock was induced by IV injection of ovalbumin (1 mg). Experimental groups included non-allergic rats (NA) (n = 6); allergic rats (Controls) (n = 6); allergic rats treated with 4-aminopyridine (4-aminopyridine) (1 mg/kg) (n = 6); and allergic rats treated with epinephrine (EPI) (10 µg/kg) (n = 6). Treatments were administered 1 minute after induction of anaphylactic shock. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and survival were measured for 60 minutes. Plasma levels of histamine, leukotriene B4, prostaglandin E2, prostaglandin F2, pH, and HCO3 were measured. Mean arterial blood pressure was normal in the NA group; severe hypotension and high mortality were observed in controls; normalization of mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and increased survival were observed in 4-aminopyridine and EPI groups. All allergic 4-aminopyridine-treated rats survived after the induction of anaphylactic shock. Histamine level was higher in controls and the 4-aminopyridine group but reduced in the EPI group. Prostaglandin E2 increased in controls and EPI group and decreased in 4-aminopyridine group; prostaglandin F2 increased in controls but decreased in 4-aminopyridine and EPI groups. Leukotriene B4 decreased in 4-aminopyridine and EPI groups. Metabolic acidosis was prevented in the 4-aminopyridine group. Our data suggest that voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition with 4-aminopyridine treatment restores blood pressure and increases survival in the Wistar rat model of anaphylactic shock. 4-aminopyridine or related voltage-dependent K channel blockers could be a

  20. Cocoa, Blood Pressure, and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Ludovici, Valeria; Barthelmes, Jens; Nägele, Matthias P.; Enseleit, Frank; Ferri, Claudio; Flammer, Andreas J.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Sudano, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) represents the most common cause of death worldwide. The consumption of natural polyphenol-rich foods, and cocoa in particular, has been related to a reduced risk of CVD, including coronary heart disease and stroke. Intervention studies strongly suggest that cocoa exerts a beneficial impact on cardiovascular health, through the reduction of blood pressure (BP), improvement of vascular function, modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, and reduction of platelet aggregation. These potentially beneficial effects have been shown in healthy subjects as well as in patients with risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes, and smoking) or established CVD (coronary heart disease or heart failure). Several potential mechanisms are supposed to be responsible for the positive effect of cocoa; among them activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, increased bioavailability of NO as well as antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. It is the aim of this review to summarize the findings of cocoa and chocolate on BP and vascular function. PMID:28824916

  1. Role of home blood pressure monitoring in overcoming therapeutic inertia and improving hypertension control: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Bills, Jennifer E; Hecht, Tyler J W; Light, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension remains the most common modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, yet hypertension control rates remain dismal. Home blood pressure (BP) monitoring has the potential to improve hypertension control. The purpose of this review was to quantify both the magnitude and mechanisms of benefit of home BP monitoring on BP reduction. Using a structured review, studies were selected if they reported either changes in BP or percentage of participants achieving a pre-established BP goal between randomized groups using home-based and office-based BP measurements. A random-effects model was used to estimate the magnitude of benefit and relative risk. The search yielded 37 randomized controlled trials with 9446 participants that contributed data for this meta-analysis. Compared with clinic-based measurements (control group), systolic BP improved with home-based BP monitoring (-2.63 mm Hg; 95% CI, -4.24, -1.02); diastolic BP also showed improvement (-1.68 mm Hg; 95% CI, -2.58, -0.79). Reductions in home BP monitoring-based therapy were greater when telemonitoring was used. Home BP monitoring led to more frequent antihypertensive medication reductions (relative risk, 2.02 [95% CI, 1.32 to 3.11]) and was associated with less therapeutic inertia defined as unchanged medication despite elevated BP (relative risk for unchanged medication, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.68 to 0.99]). Compared with clinic BP monitoring alone, home BP monitoring has the potential to overcome therapeutic inertia and lead to a small but significant reduction in systolic and diastolic BP. Hypertension control with home BP monitoring can be enhanced further when accompanied by plans to monitor and treat elevated BP such as through telemonitoring.

  2. Menopause and High Blood Pressure: What's the Connection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure (hypertension) Is there a connection between menopause and high blood pressure? Answers from Shannon K. ... Tommaso, M.D. Blood pressure generally increases after menopause. Some doctors think this increase suggests that hormonal ...

  3. Sleep Deprivation: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure (hypertension) Is it true that sleep deprivation can cause high blood pressure? Answers from ... be linked to increased blood pressure. People who sleep five hours or less a night may be ...

  4. Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_163468.html Too Many Americans Have High Blood Pressure, Doctors Warn With February designated National Heart Month, ... physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor ...

  5. [Cost of diabetes complications treatment: effect of improving glycemic control, blood pressure and lipid status on the occurrence of complications and costs of disease treatment].

    PubMed

    Sarić, Terezija; Poljicanin, Tamara; Metelko, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    Chronic complications of diabetes are the main cause of mortality and disability in people with diabetes, while also leading to growing healthcare system cost burdens. In order to analyze the effects of possible interventions on the health of population and their effectiveness in reducing the cost of the healthcare system, we have made health-economic models of diabetes chronic complications development. The models simulated long-term effect of improving glycemic control, blood pressure and lipid status in patients over a period of 10 years. The simulation results showed that the total savings over the analyzed period could amount to over 2 billion HRK, as effective long term control of risk factors leads to a reduction in the development of complications and death in people with diabetes. Successful treatments of patients provide a variety of savings for each of the chronic complications, and are obtained by simulating the biggest savings in the cost of hospitalization and rehabilitation. The cost-effectiveness analysis leads to the conclusion that the more intensive patient's control and earlier application of a treatment is cost-effective, and change of the healthcare system activities is a necessity.

  6. [Clinical significance of nocturnal blood pressure and blood pressure variability: analysis of 522 cases].

    PubMed

    Palatini, P; Mormino, P; Martina, S; Businaro, R; Penzo, M; Racioppa, A; Guzzardi, G; Anaclerio, M; Pessina, A C

    1990-03-01

    Purpose of the study was to investigate whether and to what extent blood pressure variability and average night-time blood pressure are related to cardiovascular complications in hypertension. To this aim 60 normotensive and 462 hypertensive subjects were studied by means of non-invasive 24 hour blood pressure monitoring, using either the Avionics, or the ICR Spacelabs, or the Takeda system. Each subject was attributed a target organ damage score on the basis of 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and fundoscopy, starting from 0 (no damage) up to 5 (maximum degree of damage). The 522 subjects were subsequently subdivided into 5 classes of increasing average daytime diastolic blood pressure. In each class a higher degree of cardiovascular complications was present in the subjects with the higher blood pressure variability and the higher average night-time blood pressure. From these results it may be inferred that both blood pressure variability and night-time blood pressure are related to the degree of target organ damage in hypertension. This stresses the importance of recording blood pressure throughout the 24 hours.

  7. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G

    2002-05-01

    The gold standard for clinical blood pressure measurement continues to be readings taken by a physician using a mercury sphygmomanometer, but this is changing as mercury is gradually being phased out. The oscillometric technique, which primarily detects mean arterial pressure, is increasingly popular for use in electronic devices. Other methods include ultrasound (used mainly to detect systolic pressure) and the finger cuff method of Penaz, which can record beat-to-beat pressure noninvasively from the finger. The preferred location of measurement is the upper arm, but errors may occur because of changes in the position of the arm. Other technical sources of error include inappropriate cuff size and too rapid deflation of the cuff. Clinic readings may be unrepresentative of the patient's true blood pressure because of the white coat effect, which is defined as the difference between the clinic readings and the average daytime blood pressure. Patients with elevated clinic pressure and normal daytime pressure are said to have white coat hypertension. There are three commonly used methods for measuring blood pressure for clinical purposes: clinic readings, self-monitoring by the patient at home, and 24-hour ambulatory readings. Self-monitoring is growing rapidly in popularity and is generally carried out using electronic devices that work on the oscillometric technique. Although standard validation protocols exist, many devices on the market have not been tested for accuracy. Such devices can record blood pressure from the upper arm, wrist, or finger, but the arm is preferred. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring has been found to be the best predictor of cardiovascular risk in the individual patient and is the only technique that can describe the diurnal rhythm of blood pressure accurately. Ambulatory monitoring is mainly used for diagnosing hypertension, whereas self-monitoring is used for following the response to treatment. Different techniques of blood pressure

  8. Benefit of Blood Pressure Control in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kintscher, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The coexistence of arterial hypertension and diabetes represents a devastating partnership for cardiovascular health. Thus, blood pressure and blood glucose control are essential therapeutic goals to reduce cardiovascular risk and other diabetes-related endpoints in these patients. The major benefit of blood pressure lowering in diabetes comes from a marked reduction of cardiovascular and renal endpoints. New target blood pressure values to achieve maximum cardiovascular and renal protection will be discussed. In addition to the reduction of macrovascular endpoints, blood pressure lowering therapy in diabetic patients has also been discussed to improve microvascular diseases during diabetes, in particular microalbuminuria or diabetic retinopathy. However, current clinical trial evidence is less robust than for macrovascular disease. Clinical studies showed controversial results, and will be discussed. Finally, new data from the ADVANCE-ON study about the long-term, sustained benefit of blood pressure lowering in hypertensive, diabetic patients has been recently published, and will be evaluated in the context of previous evidence. In summary, the present article will discuss selected new topics in the field of hypertension and diabetes focusing on the benefits achieved by blood pressure lowering in these patients.

  9. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes.

  10. Ambulatory versus conventional methods for monitoring blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bergel, E; Carroli, G; Althabe, F

    2002-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders are among the most common medical complications of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality world-wide. Blood pressure measurement plays a central role in the screening and management of hypertension during pregnancy. In recent years the validity of conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with ambulatory automated devices that provide a large number of measurements over a period of time, usually a 24-hour period. To assess whether the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy improves subsequent maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes, women-newborn quality of life or use of health service resources, compared with conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurements. These effects will be assessed for the following subgroups: (1) Women at low or average risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (unselected). (2) Women defined as high risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. (3) Women with hypertension without other signs of pre-eclampsia. (4) Women with established pre-eclampsia. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, LILACS and EMBASE were searched. Date of last search: July 2001. All randomised trials comparing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring versus conventional (clinic) blood pressure monitoring in pregnancy. Quasi-random designs will be excluded. Two reviewers evaluated all potentially relevant articles, examined each study for possible inclusion and assessed the methodological quality using the Cochrane guidelines. No trials included. There is no randomised controlled trial evidence to support the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy. Randomized trials with adequate design and sample sizes are needed to evaluate the possible advantages and risks of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy

  11. Sustained effect of health insurance and facility quality improvement on blood pressure in adults with hypertension in Nigeria: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Marleen E; Rosendaal, Nicole T A; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Bolarinwa, Oladimeji A; Kramer, Berber; Brals, Daniëlla; Gustafsson-Wright, Emily; Adenusi, Peju; Brewster, Lizzy M; Osagbemi, Gordon K; Akande, Tanimola M; Schultsz, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading risk factor for death in sub-Saharan Africa. Quality treatment is often not available nor affordable. We assessed the effect of a voluntary health insurance program, including quality improvement of healthcare facilities, on blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive adults in rural Nigeria. We compared changes in outcomes from baseline (2009) to midline (2011) and endline (2013) between non-pregnant hypertensive adults in the insurance program area (PA) and a control area (CA), through household surveys. The primary outcome was the difference between the PA and CA in change in BP, using difference-in-differences analysis. Of 1500 eligible households, 1450 (96.7%) participated, including 559 (20.8%) hypertensive individuals, of which 332 (59.4%) had follow-up data. Insurance coverage increased from 0% at baseline to 41.8% at endline in the PA and remained under 1% in the CA. The PA showed a 4.97 mm Hg (95% CI: -0.76 to +10.71 mm Hg) greater decrease in systolic BP and a 1.81 mm Hg (-1.06 to +4.68 mm Hg) greater decrease in diastolic BP from baseline to endline compared to the CA. Respondents with stage 2 hypertension showed an 11.43 mm Hg (95% CI: 1.62 to 21.23 mm Hg) greater reduction in systolic BP and 3.15 mm Hg (-1.22 to +7.53 mm Hg) greater reduction in diastolic BP in the PA compared to the CA. Attrition did not affect the results. Access to improved quality healthcare through an insurance program in rural Nigeria was associated with a significant longer-term reduction in systolic BP in subjects with moderate or severe hypertension. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Caffeine raises blood pressure at work.

    PubMed

    Lane, J D; Phillips-Bute, B G; Pieper, C F

    1998-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of moderate doses of caffeine on ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate during workday activities. Healthy, nonsmoking, habitual coffee drinkers (N = 21) received daily doses of 100 mg and 500 mg of caffeine on 2 days in a crossover design. Treatment order was random and counterbalanced, and administration was double-blind. Ambulatory monitoring was conducted for 6 to 9 hours during normal workday activities and diary entries were completed at each measurement. Ambulatory data were analyzed for the effects of caffeine dose, controlling for variations in posture, physical activity, and perceived stress. The average workday blood pressure and heart rate were significantly higher when the higher dose of caffeine was consumed. Controlling for other factors, dose-related differences were 4 mm Hg for systolic and 3 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure, and were 3 bpm for heart rate. Results support earlier evidence that caffeine raises blood pressure at work, and demonstrate that these pressor effects are independent of changes in posture, physical activity, or stress. Daily blood pressure increases associated with caffeine consumption could increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. In addition, caffeine consumption effects might confound ambulatory investigations of the cardiovascular effects of other psychosocial, personality, or health-behavior factors.

  13. Nighttime blood pressure in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Santos Lasaosa, Sonia; Navarro Calzada, Jorge; Velázquez Benito, Alba; Pérez Lázaro, Cristina

    2011-10-01

    It has been proposed that desaturation of oxygen during an apnea event is the trigger for cluster headache. Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with a higher than normal cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients lack the sleep-related, nocturnal decrease, or "dip" in blood pressure, which is seen in normal individuals. The aim of this study is to assess whether this non-dipper pattern is present in cluster headache patients. A total of 30 normotensive cluster headache patients underwent an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. "Non dippers" were defined as patients with a nighttime mean blood pressure fall <10%. Fifteen cluster headache patients (50%) were non-dippers, a frequency higher than expected. The pattern of nocturnal non-dipping is associated with a higher body mass index. Non-dipper patients displayed higher mean nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressure. No significant difference was observed in the mean 24-hour and daytime blood pressure. The high incidence (50%) of non-dipper pattern in both processes, cluster headache and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, provides support for the hypothesis of a relationship between theses 2 disorders. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  14. Occupational lead exposure and blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, D K; Hodgson, M J; Bromet, E J; Dew, M A; Connell, M M

    1987-01-01

    Recent community studies have suggested that low level lead exposure is significantly associated with blood pressure in the general population. This finding is inconsistent with the results of recent occupational studies of lead exposed workers, although the occupational studies contained serious methodological weaknesses. The present study examined the relation between occupational lead exposure and diastolic and systolic blood pressure in randomly selected samples of 270 exposed and 158 non-exposed workers. Four exposure indicators were examined: employment at a lead battery plant nu a control plant, current blood lead value, current zinc protoporphyrin value, and time weighted average blood lead value. After controlling for other known risk factors such as age, education, income, cigarette usage, alcohol consumption, and exercise, the associations between exposure and blood pressure were small and non-significant. In the absence of a biologically feasible hypothesis regarding the mechanism by which low level lead exposure would influence blood pressure the present findings challenge the validity of the general population association. PMID:3689706

  15. Confounders of auscultatory blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Baker, R H; Ende, J

    1995-04-01

    The appropriate use of any test requires the clinician to appreciate that test's limitations. By recognizing the potential confounders of the auscultatory assessment of blood pressure, the clinician minimizes the likelihood of enacting therapeutic decisions based on inaccurate data. When approaching the treatment of a hypertensive patient, several points should be kept in mind. First, the measurement of persistent and severe hypertension in a patient receiving treatment who describes symptoms of orthostatic hypotension with apparently adequate standing blood pressure or who lacks corroborating retinal, echocardiographic, or electrocardiographic signs of hypertension should raise the concern of pseudohypertension or a white-coat response. Similarly, when one finds a normal or near-normal systolic blood pressure in a patient with a clinical picture consistent with severe hypertension, one should make a directed effort to look for an unrecognized auscultatory gap. Second, marked discrepancies in measurements as obtained by different operators or in different settings should raise concern of the white-coat response or methodologic errors by one operator, such as undercuffing, excessive pressure on the head of the stethoscope, rapid deflation of the cuff, or use of different arms. In treating hypertension in even the minimally obese patient, a special point must be made that an adequate size cuff be used for all blood pressure determinations. Third, when blood pressure is determined with the patient in any but the satndardized back-and-arm-supported seated position described above, the clinician should acknowledge the possibility that the position may alter the patient's classification. Fourth, the diagnosis and management of hypertension requires multiple measurements of blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Experimental intrarenal reflux and blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    The effect on the blood pressure of experimental vesico-ureteric reflux was investigated in adult female Wistar rats. In 6 rats, reflux with isotonic saline produced a transient rise in systemic blood pressure followed by a fall, with return to normal within 2 min (mean BP readings: 121-130-93 mmHg). In 6 rats during water diuresis, reflux with distilled water produced similar changes (114-120-79 mmHg). In 6 rats in which the ureters were divided before reflux, no rise in blood pressure occurred although in 2 of these the pressure showed a marked fall. The pattern of blood pressure changes which occurred as a result of reflux was similar to that produced by a rapid i.v. injection of a corresponding volume of saline and it was concluded that the changes accompanying reflux are due to pyelovenous backflow. This was confirmed by producing reflux with 5% lissamine green which appeared in the peripheral capillaries within 4 s of the reflux in 3 rats. Slow dilatation of the pelvis with saline in 9 rats showed that rupture of the pelvic epithelium occurred at a mean pressure of 99 mmHg. PMID:607990

  17. [Blood pressure goals on the test bench].

    PubMed

    Slany, Jörg

    2011-10-01

    There is little evidence from controlled prospective studies to support the low blood pressure goals stipulated for the treatment of hypertension by present guidelines, especially in high-risk patients with diabetes, renal insufficiency or coronary heart disease. Aim of this review is to scrutinize the potential benefit and risk of low blood pressure on the basis of recent studies and secondary analyses of older studies. In patients with coronary heart disease or equivalent or with diabetes lowering systolic blood pressure to 130 to 135 mmHg reduced primary or secondary cardiovascular endpoints in the majority of studies. Between 120 and 129 mmHg some positive effects could be shown in patients with coronary heart disease but not in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. In patients with diabetic or nondiabetic nephropathy including those with proteinurea no convincing data exist which show a better outcome with systolic blood pressure below 130 versus below 140 mmHg. However, several studies suggest that the risk of stroke may decrease by lowering systolic pressure to 120 mmHg or even lower. Below 120 mmHg an increased risk of cardiac and noncardiac events or death was shown in quite a number of studies. In patients between 70 and 80 years, current evidence suggests lowering systolic blood pressure to 135 to 145 mmHg and in those above 80 years to 145 to 155 mmHg. No evidence was found to justify different diastolic pressure goals for different groups of patients; optimal values fall between 70 and 85 mmHg. Limitations of recent studies are short follow-up, few event rates and small differences in achieved pressure between groups leaving uncertainty about long-term effects. Apart from prevention of stroke there is sparse evidence that lowering systolic blood pressure below 130 mmHg may be beneficial. Current evidence suggests that lowering systolic and diastolic pressure into a range of 130 to 140/70 to 85 may be adequate for all patients with the exception

  18. Maternal Blood Pressure During Pregnancy and Early Childhood Blood Pressures in the Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wai-Yee; Lee, Yung-Seng; Yap, Fabian Kok-Peng; Aris, Izzudin Mohd; Ngee, Lek; Meaney, Michael; Gluckman, Peter D.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Kwek, Kenneth; Chong, Yap-Seng; Saw, Seang-Mei; Pan, An

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although epidemiological studies suggest that offspring of women with preeclampsia are at increased risk to higher blood pressures and cardiovascular disease, little is known about the nature of blood pressures between the mother and her offspring. As blood pressures comprise of both pulsatile (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and pulse pressure [PP]) and stable (diastolic blood pressure [DBP]) components, and they differ between central and peripheral sites, we sought to examine maternal peripheral and central blood pressure components in relation to offspring early childhood blood pressures. A prospective birth cohort of 567 Chinese, Malay, and Indian mother–offspring with complete blood pressure information were studied. Maternal brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 26 to 28 weeks gestation; and central SBP and PP were estimated from radial artery waveforms. Offspring brachial artery SBP, DBP, and PP were measured at 3 years of age. Associations between continuous variables of maternal blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, PP, central SBP, and PP) and offspring blood pressures (peripheral SBP, DBP, and PP) were examined using multiple linear regression with adjustment for maternal characteristics (age, education level, parity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and physical activity during pregnancy, and pre-pregnancy BMI) and offspring characteristics (sex, ethnicity, BMI, and height at 3 years of age). In the multivariate models, offspring peripheral SBP increased by 0.08 (95% confidence interval 0.00–0.17, P = 0.06) mmHg with every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central SBP, and offspring peripheral PP increased by 0.10 (0.01–0.18, P = 0.03) mmHg for every 1-mmHg increase in maternal central PP. The relations of maternal-offspring peripheral blood pressures (SBP, DBP, and PP) were positive but not statistically significant, and the corresponding values were 0.05 (−0.03 to 0.13; P = 0.21), 0.03 (−0.04 to 0.10; P = 0

  19. Estimation of central systolic blood pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Lung-Ching; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Ding, Philip Yu-An; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2010-06-01

    Current noninvasive techniques for assessing central aortic pressure require the recording of an arterial pressure wave using a high-fidelity applanation tonometer. We therefore developed and validated a novel method to estimate the central aortic systolic pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor alone. Invasive high-fidelity right brachial and central aortic pressure waves, and left-brachial pulse volume plethysmography from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor, were obtained at baseline and 3 min after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin in 100 patients during cardiac catheterization. In the initial 50 patients (Generation Group), Central systolic blood pressure was predicted by a multi-variate prediction model generated from the comprehensive analysis of the invasive brachial pressure wave, including brachial late-systolic shoulder pressure value and parameters related to wave reflection and arterial compliance. Another prediction model was similarly constructed from the noninvasively calibrated pulse volume plethysmography. Both models were validated in the subsequent 50 patients (Validation Group) with results: r=0.98 (P<0.001) and mean difference=0.5+/-4.5 (95% confidence interval -8.3 to 9.3) mm Hg for the invasive model, and r=0.93 (P<0.001) and mean difference=-0.1+/-7.6 (95% confidence interval -15.0 to 14.8) mm Hg for the noninvasive model. Thus, our results indicate that central aortic systolic blood pressure could be estimated by analysis of the noninvasive brachial pressure wave alone from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

  20. WNK signalling pathways in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Meena; Kurz, Thimo; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a major public health problem affecting more than a billion people worldwide with complications, including stroke, heart failure and kidney failure. The regulation of blood pressure is multifactorial reflecting genetic susceptibility, in utero environment and external factors such as obesity and salt intake. In keeping with Arthur Guyton's hypothesis, the kidney plays a key role in blood pressure control and data from clinical studies; physiology and genetics have shown that hypertension is driven a failure of the kidney to excrete excess salt at normal levels of blood pressure. There is a number of rare Mendelian blood pressure syndromes, which have shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in dysregulated ion transport in the distal kidney. One in particular is Familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt), an autosomal dominant monogenic form of hypertension characterised by high blood pressure, hyperkalemia, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, and hypercalciuria. The clinical signs of FHHt are treated by low doses of thiazide diuretic, and it mirrors Gitelman syndrome which features the inverse phenotype of hypotension, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Gitelman syndrome is caused by loss of function mutations in the thiazide-sensitive Na/Cl cotransporter (NCC); however, FHHt patients do not have mutations in the SCL12A3 locus encoding NCC. Instead, mutations have been identified in genes that have revealed a key signalling pathway that regulates NCC and several other key transporters and ion channels in the kidney that are critical for BP regulation. This is the WNK kinase signalling pathway that is the subject of this review.

  1. `Sausage string' patterns in blood vessels at high blood pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstrøm, Preben; Eguíluz, Victor M.; Gustafsson, Finn; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    A new Rayleigh-type instability is proposed to explain the `sausage-string' pattern of alternating constrictions and dialtations formed in blood vessels at high blood pressure conditions. Our theory involves the nonlinear stress-strain characteristics of the vessel wall, and provides predictions for the conditions under which the normal cylindrical geometry of a blood vessel becomes unstable. The theory explains key features observed experimentally, e.g. the limited occurrence of the sausage-string pattern to small arteries and large arterioles, and only in those with small wall-to-lumen ratios.

  2. Blood Pressure in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Arthur J.

    1981-01-01

    In infants the flush and Doppler methods of blood pressure measurement are usually used. The flush method measures mean pressure; the Doppler method, systolic and diastolic pressures. Normal flush values from 1 to 12 months of age do not exceed 100 mm of mercury; Doppler systolic levels do not exceed 113 mm of mercury. Data concerning normal limits for children and adolescents are conflicting. For practical purposes, a persistent pressure of 140 mm of mercury systolic or 90 mm of mercury diastolic in patients more than 10 years of age is indicative of hypertension. In those younger than 10 years, systolic pressure does not normally exceed 130 mm of mercury and diastolic pressure does not normally exceed 85 mm of mercury. Primary hypertension is relatively infrequent in pediatric patients and diagnosis should be made with deliberation and caution. Antihypertensive drug therapy is indicated only for severe hypertension and in selected cases of moderate hypertension. PMID:7245735

  3. Combining heart rate and systolic blood pressure to improve risk stratification in older patients with heart failure: Findings from the RICA Registry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gil, Justo; Manzano, Luis; Flather, Marcus; Formiga, Francesc; Martel, Alicia Conde; Molinero, Alberto Muela; López, Raul Quirós; Jiménez, Jose Luis Arias; Iborra, Pau Llácer; Perez-Calvo, Juan Ignacio; Montero-Pérez-Barquero, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) are independent prognostic variables in patients with heart failure (HF). We evaluated if combining HR and SBP could improve prognostic assessment in older patients. Variables associated with all-cause mortality and readmission for HF during 9months of follow-up were analyzed from the Spanish Heart Failure Registry (RICA). HR and SBP values were stratified in three combined groups. We evaluated 1551 patients, 82years and 56% women. Using HR strata of <70 and ≥70bpm we found mortality rates of 9.8 and 13.6%, respectively (hazard ratio 1.0 and 1.35). For SBP≥140, 120-140 and <120mmHg, mortality rates were 8.2, 10.4 and 20.3%. respectively (hazard ratio 1.0, 1.34 and 2.76). Using combined strata of HR<70bpm and SBP≥140mmHg (n=176; low-risk), HR<70 and SBP<140+HR≥70 and SBP<120 (n=1089; moderate-risk) and HR≥70 and SBP<120 (n=286; high-risk) we found mortality rates of 4.5%, 11.0% and 24.0%, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression for all-cause mortality shows for low-, middle- and high-risk groups was 1 (reference), 1.93 (95% CI: 0.93-3.99, p=0.077) and 4.32 (95% CI: 2.04-9.14, p<0.001). BMI, NYHA, MDRD, hypertension and sodium were also independent prognostic factors. The combination provides better risk discrimination than use of HR and SBP alone and may provide a simple and reliable tool for risk assessment for older HF patients in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Daily blueberry consumption improves blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah A; Figueroa, Arturo; Navaei, Negin; Wong, Alexei; Kalfon, Roy; Ormsbee, Lauren T; Feresin, Rafaela G; Elam, Marcus L; Hooshmand, Shirin; Payton, Mark E; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2015-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have a high prevalence of hypertension and often develop arterial stiffness thereby increasing cardiovascular disease risk. Although antihypertensive drug therapies exist, increasing numbers of people prefer natural therapies. In vivo studies and a limited number of clinical studies have demonstrated the antihypertensive and vascular-protective effects of blueberries. To examine the effects of daily blueberry consumption for 8 weeks on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension. This was an 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Forty-eight postmenopausal women with pre- and stage 1-hypertension recruited from the greater Tallahassee, FL, area participated. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 22 g freeze-dried blueberry powder or 22 g control powder. Resting brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated and arterial stiffness was assessed using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, and superoxide dismutase were measured at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Statistical analysis was performed using a split plot model of repeated measures analysis of variance. After 8 weeks, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (131±17 mm Hg [P<0.05] and 75±9 mm Hg [P<0.01], respectively) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (1,401±122 cm/second; P<0.01) were significantly lower than baseline levels (138±14 mm Hg, 80±7 mm Hg, and 1,498±179 cm/second, respectively), with significant (P<0.05) group×time interactions in the blueberry powder group, whereas there were no changes in the group receiving the control powder. Nitric oxide levels were greater (15.35±11.16 μmol/L; P<0.01) in the blueberry powder group at 8 weeks compared with baseline values (9.11±7.95 μmol/L), whereas there were no changes in the control group. Daily blueberry consumption may

  5. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  6. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  7. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  8. [Blood pressure and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)].

    PubMed

    Kiałka, Marta; Milewicz, Tomasz; Klocek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder occurring in women of childbearing age. The literature describes the relationship between PCOS and high blood pressure levels and increased risk of arterial hypertension development, which is an important and strong risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events in the future. Among the main causes of hypertension in PCOS women insulin resistance, hyperandrogenism, greater sympathetic nerve activity and concomitance of obesity are stressed. Because PCOS may contribute to earlier development of hypertension, as well as pre-hypertension, therefore it is advisable to monitor blood pressure systematically, to control known risk factors, and to initiate the treatment of hypertension when the disease occur.

  9. Phaeochromocytoma with nocturnal elevation of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T.; Jo, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    1978-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with phaeochromocytoma showed blood pressure changes characterized by the regular appearance of hypertension at night. The urinary excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites showed augmentation roughly parallel with the elevation of the blood pressure. During normotensive periods, the urinary excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites was elevated. The findings suggested that the pressor effect of catecholamine hypersecretion was compromised to a certain degree and that the regular nocturnal appearances of hypertensive paroxysm conceivably resulted from a spontaneous cyclic augmentation of the catecholamine secretion from the tumour. PMID:625458

  10. Coping strategies and diastolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wright, T A; Sweeney, D

    1989-10-01

    An organizational field study involving 95 civil service employees examined the ways these individuals coped with the stressful events of their daily living. Lazarus' cognitive-phenomenological analysis of psychological stress provided the theoretical framework. Subjects indicated on Lazarus' Ways of Coping Checklist those coping thoughts and actions used in the specific encounter described as stressful. As hypothesized, individuals experiencing higher diastolic blood pressure were more likely to cope using strategies characterized by wishful thinking, avoidance, and minimization of threat than were individuals exhibiting lower blood pressure. Implications from both an individual and organizational perspective are discussed.

  11. Blood pressure in head‐injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Patrick; Gregson, Barbara A; Piper, Ian; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mendelow, A David; Chambers, Iain R

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the statistical characteristics of blood pressure (BP) readings from a large number of head‐injured patients. Methods The BrainIT group has collected high time‐resolution physiological and clinical data from head‐injured patients who require intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. The statistical features of this dataset of BP measurements with time resolution of 1 min from 200 patients is examined. The distributions of BP measurements and their relationship with simultaneous ICP measurements are described. Results The distributions of mean, systolic and diastolic readings are close to normal with modest skewing towards higher values. There is a trend towards an increase in blood pressure with advancing age, but this is not significant. Simultaneous blood pressure and ICP values suggest a triphasic relationship with a BP rising at 0.28 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP, for ICP up to 32 mm Hg, and 0.9 mm Hg/mm Hg of ICP for ICP from 33 to 55 mm Hg, and falling sharply with rising ICP for ICP >55 mm Hg. Conclusions Patients with head injury appear to have a near normal distribution of blood pressure readings that are skewed towards higher values. The relationship between BP and ICP may be triphasic. PMID:17138594

  12. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  13. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  14. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  15. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  16. 21 CFR 870.2850 - Extravascular blood pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extravascular blood pressure transducer. 870.2850... blood pressure transducer. (a) Identification. An extravascular blood pressure transducer is a device used to measure blood pressure by changes in the mechanical or electrical properties of the device....

  17. Utility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Graves, John W; Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi

    2006-11-01

    Diagnosis of hypertension is critically dependent on accurate blood pressure measurement. "Accurate" refers to carefully following the guidelines for blood pressure measurement laid out for children and adults to minimize observer and subject errors that commonly occur in clinical blood pressure measurement. Accurate blood pressure measurement is more important in children and adolescents as the misdiagnosis of hypertension may have a life-long adverse impact on insurability and employment. Automated blood pressure measurement offers multiple advantages in achieving high-quality blood pressure determinations by reducing observer errors. The most commonly used form of automated blood pressure measurement is 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM). Information on ABPM in children has grown exponentially over the last decade. Normative data exists for diagnosis of hypertension in children using ABPM including a novel method for determining normal values with the LMS method. There is further information about the utility of different determinants of 24-h blood pressure such as dipping status, morning surge and blood pressure load. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states in children including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease, solitary functioning kidney, and after renal transplantation. Increasingly nonambulatory automated blood pressure determinations have been used in management of hypertension in children. Although nonambulatory automated readings lack information about nocturnal blood pressure or blood pressure during daily activity, studies have suggested that home automated blood pressure measurements are a helpful adjunct to the usual office blood pressure reading.

  18. A wireless blood pressure monitoring system for personal health management.

    PubMed

    Li, Wun-Jin; Luo, Yuan-Long; Chang, Yao-Shun; Lin, Yuan-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a wireless blood pressure monitoring system which provides a useful tool for users to measure and manage their daily blood pressure values. This system includes an ARM-based blood pressure monitor with a ZigBee wireless transmission module and a PC-based management unit with graphic user interface and database. The wireless blood pressure monitor can measure the blood pressure and heart rate and then store and forward the measuring information to the management unit through the ZigBee wireless transmission. On the management unit, user can easy to see their blood pressure variation in the past using a line chart. Accuracy of blood pressure measurement has been verified by a commercial blood pressure simulator and shown the bias of systolic blood pressure is ≤ 1 mmHg and the bias of diastolic blood pressure is ≤ 1.4 mmHg.

  19. Improved Atmospheric Surface Pressure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Dool, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    It has been popular to remove upfront the global atmosphere's surface pressure, as known from a weather center's analysis, from mass signals measured by satellites such as Grace, so as to use the residual satellite data to focus exclusively on the lesser known variable mass signals from the ocean, continental hydrology, and snow&ice. The approach is obviously limited by the precision by which meteorological centers know surface pressure. This precision is improving! The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the improvements made in recent Reanalyses (1979-present) of surface pressure in comparison to older analyses of the same. These improvements include also great technical advance, like higher spatial and temporal resolution that allows for a superior description of atmospheric tides. Of course the mass redistribution and mass balance of the atmosphere is interesting for its own sake, and some of those results will be presented as well.

  20. 1 in 7 Obese People Has Normal Blood Pressure, Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 7 Obese People Has Normal Blood Pressure, Cholesterol But that doesn't mean the excess weight ... people studied, 14 percent had normal blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure readings, the study found. Doctors ...

  1. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  2. Ethnicity, education, and blood pressure in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Ordunez, Pedro; Munoz, Jose Luis Bernal; Espinosa-Brito, Alfredo; Silva, Luis Carlos; Cooper, Richard S

    2005-07-01

    The causes of variation in hypertension risk by ethnicity and educational level are not well understood. To gain further insight into this issue in a nonindustrialized country, a population-based sample of 1,667 persons aged 15-74 years was recruited in Cienfuegos, Cuba. In this 2001-2002 study, interviewers classified 29% of participants as Black or mulatto and 71% as White. Educational attainment was stratified at the median number of school years. Compared with White women, non-White women had higher blood pressures (3.0/1.7, systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure) and a higher prevalence of hypertension (24%, 95% confidence interval: 20, 28 vs. 15%, 95% confidence interval: 12, 18). Among men, no differences in blood pressure were observed by ethnicity. Men with a lower level of education had a 14% lower risk of hypertension compared with men above the median. However, women with a lower level of education had a 24% increase in risk. The effect of education was equally strong among Whites alone and when occupation was used for stratification. No variation was observed for body mass index or self-reported health behaviors by ethnicity or education. The narrower ethnic gradient in hypertension prevalence than seen in North America and the gender-specific social status effect, in the context of relatively equal living conditions, suggest that the influence of psychosocial stressors may be specific to cultural contexts.

  3. Blood pressure measurement and display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farkas, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    System is described that employs solid state circuitry to transmit visual display of patient's blood pressure. Response of sphygmomanometer cuff and microphone provide input signals. Signals and their amplitudes, from turn-on time to turn-off time, are continuously fed to data transmitter which transmits to display device.

  4. Neighborhood Disadvantage and Variations in Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cathorall, Michelle L.; Xin, Huaibo; Peachey, Andrew; Bibeau, Daniel L.; Schulz, Mark; Aronson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the extent to which neighborhood disadvantage accounts for variation in blood pressure. Methods: Demographic, biometric, and self-reported data from 19,261 health screenings were used. Addresses of participants were geocoded and located within census block groups (n = 14,510, 75.3%). Three hierarchical linear models were…

  5. Self-measurement of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Although experience is still limited and more research is needed, the World Hypertension League recommends self-measurement of blood pressure in selected patients as an additional source of information to the practising physician, and as a way of encouraging patients to participate more actively in the therapeutic regimen. PMID:3260828

  6. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-31

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes. We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We extracted data regarding trial characteristics, incidence and progression of retinopathy, visual acuity, quality of life

  7. A blend of sesame oil and rice bran oil lowers blood pressure and improves the lipid profile in mild-to-moderate hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Sankar; Singh, Ravinder; Chatterjee, Biprabuddha; Zhang, Bo; Ali, Amanat

    2016-01-01

    Sesame oil and rice bran oil are known for their unsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants contents and have been reported to reduce the cardiovascular risk. To determine the effect of a blend of 20% unrefined cold-pressed lignans-rich sesame oil and 80% physically refined γ-oryzanol-rich rice bran oil (Vivo) as cooking oil in mild-to-moderate hypertensive patients. In this prospective, open-label dietary approach, 300 hypertensive patients and 100 normotensives were divided into groups as: (1) normotensives treated with sesame oil blend, (2) hypertensives treated with sesame oil blend, (3) hypertensives treated with nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker (20 mg/d), and (4) hypertensives receiving the combination of sesame oil blend and nifedipine (20 mg/d). Sesame oil blend was supplied to respective groups, and they were instructed to use it as the only cooking oil for 60 days. Resting blood pressure was measured at days 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60, whereas the fasting lipid profile was measured at days 0 and 60. Significant reduction in blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial) from days 0 to 15, 30, 45, and 60 were observed in hypertensives treated with sesame oil blend alone (P < .001), nifedipine alone (P < .001), and combination of sesame oil blend and nifedipine (P < .001). Sesame oil blend with nifedipine-treated group showed greatest reduction in blood pressure. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels reduced, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased significantly only in hypertensives treated with sesame oil blend alone and the combination of sesame oil blend and nifedipine (P < .001). We demonstrate for the first time that using a blend of sesame oil and rice bran oil as cooking oil showed a significant antihypertensive and lipid-lowering action and had noteworthy additive effect with antihypertensive medication. Copyright © 2016 National

  8. [Elevated blood pressure as cardiovascular risk factor].

    PubMed

    Kowalewski, Wiesław; Hebel, Kazimiera

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases for decades have been and still are the main and current health problem of the Polish society and there are many reasons for these diseases. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. The factors significantly increasing risk the of cardiovascular disease are in addition to high blood pressure, smoking (also passive), high blood fats (cholesterol and its HDL, LDL fractions as well as triglyceride levels, obesity, lack of exercise, diabetes and hereditary features. Other important factors which play an important role are external factors such as e.g. environmental pollution, lifestyle, stress. Prediction of cardiovascular disease should start from the evaluation of the fetal period because low birth weight may be a risk of coronary heart disease, hypertension, obesity or diabetes in adulthood. The authors of the referred tests showed that the level of blood pressure observed during childhood is closely associated with the level of blood pressure in adults and is also dependent on the body weight. Since the issue of the effects of high pressure on the cardiovascular system is inherent in the issue of the metabolic syndrome, it should be mentioned also that another causative factor may be an irregularity in the removal of urine from the body and the amount of insulin. The control of hypertension is a complex problem, at least in view of the wide range of adverse factors affecting the human body: hypertension is often either a constituent of other lesions. Therefore, it is difficult to treat high blood pressure in the strict sense; more often it is a combination therapy based on pharmacology caused for other reasons.

  9. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Frequently Relapsing Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Subhankar; Sinha, Aditi; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Agarwala, Anuja; Saxena, Anita; Hari, Pankaj; Bagga, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    carefully screen these patients in order to ensure their appropriate management. While clinic blood pressure monitoring detects most patients with hypertension, it misses a significant proportion with masked hypertension, underscoring the need for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and screening for end organ damage. High BMI was the chief risk factor for hypertension, suggesting that control of overweight and hypertension might improve cardiovascular outcomes.

  10. Prevalence of self-reported high blood pressure awareness, advice received from health professionals, and actions taken to reduce high blood pressure among US adults--Healthstyles 2002.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Carma; Neff, Linda J; Croft, Janet B; Keenan, Nora L; Malarcher, Ann M; Hyduk, Alexandra; Bansil, Pooja; Mensah, George A

    2005-09-01

    High blood pressure awareness, advice received from health care providers, and adoption of heart-healthy behaviors were assessed using the Healthstyles 2002 survey. About 20% of respondents reported that they had high blood pressure, and 53% of these were currently taking medications to lower blood pressure. Black men had the highest adjusted prevalence of high blood pressure (32%). Medication use among persons with high blood pressure was lower among Hispanics (45%) than among blacks (54%) and whites (54%). Persons reporting having high blood pressure were five times more likely to report having received advice from a health care professional to go on a diet or change eating habits (p<0.05) and reduce salt or sodium in their diet (p<0.05), but five times less likely to have received advice to exercise (p<0.05) than those reporting not having high blood pressure, after adjustment for differences in sex, race/ethnicity, and age. Persons with self-reported high blood pressure were also more likely to be making these modifications (p<0.05). Among people with high blood pressure, current medication use was associated with both receiving and following advice for diet change and salt reduction (p<0.05). Future initiatives are needed to improve the proportion of Hispanics and blacks taking prescribed medications to improve high blood pressure control and reduce risk for serious sequelae such as heart disease and stroke.

  11. The importance of sleep blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Trefor Owen

    2010-06-01

    Blood pressure (BP) varies throughout the day owing to interactions between the sympathetic nervous and the renin-angiotensin systems. When awake BP is controlled by sympathetic nervous system activity but during sleep the renin-angiotensin system becomes more important. The lower BP during sleep is a more powerful predictor of outcome than the awake BP. Certain individuals do not have the fall in BP with sleep and this worsens the outcome. Inadequate handling of sodium by the kidney is an important factor preventing this BP fall. The different drug classes have varying effects on BP during 24 h. Drugs that act independently of the two controlling systems have a similar effect at day and night. Drugs that act on the sympathetic nervous system have a greater effect during the day and little effect during sleep unless the sympathetic system is still active. Drugs that act via the renin-angiotensin system have a greater effect during sleep. Controlling BP during sleep may improve outcome.

  12. Effects of thiazolidinediones on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Giles, Thomas D; Sander, Gary E

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists (known as thiazolidinediones; TDZs) activate nuclear receptors that regulate gene expression; they were developed as insulin-sensitizing drugs to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although the prototypic TZD troglitazone was withdrawn from the market due to hepatic toxicity, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are mainstays in managing type 2 diabetes mellitus. TZDs exert their hypoglycemic effect by reducing insulin resistance, hence improving insulin sensitivity. However, TZDs also exhibit a broad range of cardiovascular actions, with the clinical consequence of reduction in blood pressure (BP), observed in animal models and human diabetic subjects. The magnitude of reduction appears to be about 4 to 5 mm Hg in systolic and 2 to 4 mm Hg in diastolic BP--sufficient to significantly reduce subsequent cardiovascular event rates. But these BP-reducing properties, which are not present with metformin or sulfonylureas, are particularly important when viewed in conjunction with hypoglycemic effects. A significant proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and BP mildly above target range might be successfully treated for both processes with a single drug.

  13. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and underlying disorders.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Kazunori; Okada, Yasushi; Jinnouchi, Juro; Gotoh, Seiji; Yokoyama, Yoko; Fujimoto, Shigeru; Ibayashi, Setsuro

    2006-01-01

    The Acute Candesartan Cilexetil Therapy in Stroke Survivors (ACCESS) study indicated that early treatment with an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker in acute stroke patients who had relatively high blood pressure improved cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the chronic stage. To better interpret the findings of this study, we determined whether stroke patients with high acute blood pressure had specific underlying conditions. We divided 712 consecutive patients who were hospitalized within 48 h after the onset of brain infarction into two groups: 77 patients with high acute blood pressure that met the criteria of the ACCESS study and the 635 remaining patients. Underlying risk factors and comorbidities, stroke characteristics, as well as mortality, vascular events, and disability at 3 weeks were compared between the two groups. Patients with high acute blood pressure more frequently had diabetes mellitus (p < 0.01), intracranial arterial stenosis (p < 0.02), higher levels of hemoglobin A1c (p < 0.005), higher creatinine levels (p < 0.005), and tended to more frequently have ischemic heart disease (p < 0.09) and infarcts <1.5 cm in diameter (p < 0.09) than the other patients. On multivariate analysis, high levels of hemoglobin A1c, high creatinine levels, and intracranial arterial stenosis were independently predictive of high acute blood pressure. At 3 weeks after the stroke onset, patients with high acute blood pressure were more dependent in their daily living activities (p < 0.02) and more frequently developed vascular events or death (p < 0.005) than the other patients. Poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and advanced renal damage appeared to correlate with acute hypertension after stroke. Since intracranial arterial stenosis also seemed to contribute to high acute blood pressure, one should be careful not to induce cerebral hypoperfusion by the early use of antihypertensives. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. National High Blood Pressure 12-Month Kit. May 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. National High Blood Pressure Education Program.

    Part I of this kit provides information for program planners and health professionals on ways to overcome barriers to health care among the medically underserved, promote high blood pressure control through the media and other community channels, and improve adherence to treatment among hypertensive patients. It lists additional resources for…

  15. Genetic effects of adiponectin on blood lipids and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongfeng; Zhao, Jiangpei

    2011-02-01

    Results from the published studies on the association of adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) polymorphisms with blood lipids and blood pressure are conflicting. We investigated the association of three ADIPOQ polymorphisms, +45 T > G (rs2241766), +276 G > T (rs1501299) and -11377 C > G (rs266729), with these traits in this meta-analysis. We included 35 studies in this meta-analysis. Dominant models were used for this meta-analysis. We did not detect a significant association of the -11377 C > G polymorphism with blood lipids or blood pressure (P > 0·05). The association of the +45 T > G polymorphism with blood lipids and blood pressure was, similarly, not significant (P > 0·05). The meta-analysis suggested a significant overall association of the +276 G > T polymorphism with lower levels of total cholesterol: weighted mean difference (WMD) = -0·10, 95% confidence interval (CI, -0·17, -0·03), P = 0·005, P(heterogeneity)  = 0·04. This association was marginally significant in East Asians and East Asians with type 2 diabetes: WMD = -0·10, 95% CI (-0·20, 0·00), P = 0·05, P(heterogeneity)  = 0·002, and WMD = -0·09, 95% CI (-0·18, -0·00), P = 0·05, P(heterogeneity)  = 0·80, respectively. After exclusion of a study that was the source of heterogeneity, the association was significant in overall populations and marginally significant in East Asians: WMD= -0·06, 95% CI (-0·11, -0·01), P = 0·01, P(heterogeneity)  = 0·98, and WMD = -0·06, 95% CI (-0·12, 0·00), P = 0·07, P(heterogeneity)  = 0·83, respectively. However, none of these associations were significant after Bonferroni correction (significant threshold: P < 0·003). Our meta-analysis does not suggest any association of the three ADIPOQ polymorphisms with blood lipids and blood pressure. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Nifedipine plus candesartan combination increases blood pressure control regardless of race and improves the side effect profile: DISTINCT randomized trial results

    PubMed Central

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E.; Sica, Domenic; Haller, Hermann; Cha, Gloria; Gil-Extremera, Blas; Harvey, Peter; Heyvaert, Frank; Lewin, Andrew J.; Villa, Giuseppe; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: DISTINCT (reDefining Intervention with Studies Testing Innovative Nifedipine GITS – Candesartan Therapy) aimed to determine the dose–response and tolerability of nifedipine GITS and/or candesartan cilexetil therapy in participants with hypertension. Methods: In this 8-week, multinational, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, adults with mean seated DBP of at least 95 to less than 110 mmHg received combination or monotherapy with nifedipine GITS (N) 20, 30 or 60 mg and candesartan cilexetil (C) 4, 8, 16 or 32 mg, or placebo. The primary endpoint, change in DBP from baseline to Week 8, was analysed using the response surface model (RSM); this analysis was repeated for mean seated SBP. Results: Overall, 1381 participants (mean baseline SBP/DBP: 156.5/99.6 mmHg) were randomized. Both N and C contributed independently to SBP/DBP reductions [P < 0.0001 (RSM)]. A positive dose–response was observed, with all combinations providing statistically better blood pressure (BP) reductions from baseline versus respective monotherapies (P < 0.05) and N60C32 achieving the greatest reduction [–23.8/–16.5 mmHg; P < 0.01 versus placebo (–5.3/–6.7 mmHg) and component monotherapies]. Even very low-dose (N20 and C4) therapy provided significant BP-lowering, and combination therapy was similarly effective in different racial groups. N/C combination demonstrated a lower incidence of vasodilatory adverse events than N monotherapy (18.3 versus 23.6%), including headache (5.5 versus 11.0%; P = 0.003, chi-square test) and peripheral oedema over time (3.6 versus 5.8%; n.s.). Conclusion: N/C combination was effective in participants with hypertension and showed an improved side effect profile compared with N monotherapy. PMID:25144296

  17. Whole-Body Vibration Exercise Therapy Improves Cardiac Autonomic Function and Blood Pressure in Obese Pre- and Stage 1 Hypertensive Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexei; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Kinsey, Amber W; Figueroa, Arturo

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body vibration (WBV) is an unconventional exercise therapy that appears to provide the same benefits of resistance training in postmenopausal women while being more safe and gentle on the joints. This study evaluated the effect of an 8-week WBV exercise regimen on heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure (BP) in obese postmenopausal women. Randomized controlled study with two parallel groups. Twenty-five (age 50-65 years) obese (body-mass index >30 and <40 kg/m(2)) postmenopausal women. Participants were randomly assigned to a WBV training group or nonexercising control group. Participants in the WBV group completed the supervised training 3 times a week. WBV training consisted of four static and four dynamic leg exercises (normal, high, and wide-stance squats and calf-raises) with vertical vibration (25-40 Hz and low-high amplitude) progressed throughout the 8 weeks. Brachial systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) and HRV: sympathovagal balance (natural logarithm of low frequency [LnLF]/natural logarithm of high frequency [LnHF]; normalized low frequency [nLF]/normalized high frequency [nHF]), parasympathetic tone (LnHF, nHF, natural logarithm of root mean square of successive differences [LnRMSSD]), sympathetic tone (LnLF, nLF), natural logarithm of total power, and heart rate (HR). There were significant group × time interactions (p < 0.05) for brachial SBP, DBP, LnLF/LnHF, and nLF/nHF that significantly decreased (p < 0.01) after WBV, compared with no changes after control. There was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in nHF and decrease in nLF in the WBV group compared with baseline, yet the changes were not different than those in the control group. No significant changes were observed in LnTP, LnLF, LnHF, LnRMSSD, or HR after 8 weeks in either group. WBV training for 8 weeks is an adequate unconventional exercise intervention for improving sympathovagal balance and BP in previously sedentary obese postmenopausal women.

  18. Blood pressure documentation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ana Carolina Queiroz Godoy; Machado, Juliana Pereira; Veiga, Eugenia Velludo

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the frequency of blood pressure documentation performed by nursing professionals in an emergency department. This is a cross-sectional, observational, descriptive, and analytical study, which included medical records of adult patients admitted to the observation ward of an emergency department, between March and May 2014. Data were obtained through a collection instrument divided into three parts: patient identification, triage data, and blood pressure documentation. For statistical analysis, Pearson's correlation coefficient was used, with a significance level of α<0.05. One hundred fifty-seven records and 430 blood pressure measurements were analyzed with an average of three measurements per patient. Of these measures, 46.5% were abnormal. The mean time from admission to documentation of the first blood pressure measurement was 2.5 minutes, with 42 minutes between subsequent measures. There is no correlation between the systolic blood pressure values and the mean time interval between blood pressure documentations: 0.173 (p=0.031). The present study found no correlation between frequency of blood pressure documentation and blood pressure values. The frequency of blood pressure documentation increased according to the severity of the patient and decreased during the length of stay in the emergency department. Analisar a frequência de registros da pressão arterial realizados por profissionais de enfermagem em uma unidade de emergência. Estudo transversal, observacional, descritivo e analítico, que incluiu registros de pacientes adultos admitidos em leitos de observação de uma unidade de emergência no período de março a maio de 2014. Os dados foram obtidos por meio de um instrumento de coleta de dados dividido em três partes: identificação do paciente, dados de triagem e registro da pressão arterial. Para a análise estatística, foi utilizado o coeficiente de correlação de Pearson, com nível de significância de α<0,05. Foram analisados

  19. Clinical significance of home blood pressure measurements for the prevention and management of high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yutaka; Hosaka, Miki; Elnagar, Noha; Satoh, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    1. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring (M) provides BP information at many points on any particular day during unrestricted routine daily activities, whereas home blood pressure (HBP) monitoring provides a lot of BP information obtained under fixed times and conditions over a long period of time, thus mean values of HBP provide high reproducibility, and thus an overall superiority compared with ABP.  2. HBP is at least equally or better able than ABP to predict hypertensive target organ damage and prognosis of cardiovascular disease.  3. HBPM allows for ongoing disease monitoring by patients, improves adherence to antihypertensive treatment, and can provide health-care providers with timely clinical data and direct and immediate feedback regarding diagnosis and treatment of hypertension.  4. HBPM provides BP information in relation to time; that is, BP in the morning, in the evening and at night during sleep, and it is an essential tool for the diagnosis of white-coat and masked hypertension.  5. HBPM yields minimal alerting affects and no or minimal placebo effect, and can therefore distinguish small, but significant, serial changes in BP. It is thus the most practical method for monitoring BP in the day-to-day management of hypertension. 6. The superiority of HBPM over ABPM and clinic BPM is apparent from almost all practical and clinical research perspectives. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Blue Maize Extract Improves Blood Pressure, Lipid Profiles, and Adipose Tissue in High-Sucrose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Gerónimo, Rosa Isela; Alarcón-Zavaleta, Tania Margarita; Oliart-Ros, Rosa María; Meza-Alvarado, José Enrique; Herrera-Meza, Socorro; Chávez-Servia, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    The effect of blue maize extract in factors related to metabolic syndrome (MS) in Wistar rats was investigated. Total polyphenols, monomeric anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity were analyzed in blue maize. MS was induced in Wistar rats fed with high-sucrose (HS) diet for 12 weeks. During a period of 4 weeks, blue maize extract was administrated to HS groups fed with high-sucrose and high-cholesterol-high-sucrose (HS+C) diets. In the blue maize extract administered by orogastric cannulation, the levels of total polyphenols and anthocyanins were 9.97 and 2.92 mg/kg of weight, respectively. HS diet administered during a period of 12 weeks increased significantly systolic blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), alterations related to the MS. Abdominal adipose tissue was only increased in the HS + C group. Blue maize extract administration enhanced HDL-C and decreased systolic blood pressure, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and epididymal adipose tissue weight. The blue maize may represent a promising nutraceutical option for the treatment of MS.

  1. Improving actions to control high blood pressure in Hispanic communities — Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Across the U.S. Project, 2009–2012☆

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Youlian; Siegel, Paul Z.; White, Shannon; Dulin, Rick; Taylor, April

    2015-01-01

    Background Compared with the general population in the United States (U.S.), Hispanics with hypertension are less likely to be aware of their condition, to take antihypertensive medication, and to adopt healthy lifestyles to control high blood pressure. We examined whether a multi-community intervention successfully increased the prevalence of actions to control hypertension among Hispanics. Methods Annual survey from 2009–2012 was conducted in six Hispanic communities in the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Across the U.S. project. The survey used address based sampling design that matched the geographies of intervention program. Results Age- and sex-standardized prevalences of taking hypertensive medication, changing eating habits, cutting down on salt, and reducing alcohol use significantly increased among Hispanics with self-reported hyper-tension in REACH communities. The 3-year relative percent increases were 5.8, 6.8, 7.9, and 35.2% for the four indicators, respectively. These favorable (healthier) trends occurred in both foreign-born and U.S.-born Hispanics. Conclusion This large community-based participatory intervention resulted in more Hispanic residents in the communities taking actions to control high blood pressure. PMID:26656406

  2. A website for blood pressure measuring devices: dableducational.com.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Eoin

    2003-08-01

    Consumers are faced with an ever-increasing array of blood pressure measuring devices, whether for use in clinical areas or for use by individuals anxious to measure their own blood pressure. Validation protocols that allow for independent evaluation of blood pressure measuring devices are available, and some of the devices on the market have been evaluated according to these protocols. The results of such evaluations have been published periodically in medical journals. However, such surveys are not readily available to the public and to health care authorities with responsibility for purchasing blood pressure measuring equipment for use in clinical medicine, and because of the necessarily lengthy publication process they are no longer up-to-date at the time of publication. Moreover, the results of published validation studies are often flawed because of protocol violations and the conclusions may not be valid. These considerations have been the stimulus for the establishment of an independent non-profit website, which will provide quarterly updates on the accuracy and performance of blood pressure measuring devices on the market as well as an expert assessment of the validation procedures on which recommendations are based. The ethos of the website is primarily educational and it is hoped that it will serve as a forum for the provision of much-needed information that will ultimately improve the management of hypertension. The website is due to be launched shortly and this paper outlines the general principles that have governed its establishment and the facilities that it will provide.

  3. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and target organ damage in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Stabouli, Stella; Kotsis, Vasilios; Zakopoulos, Nikos

    2007-10-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents is rising in association with the increasing rate of childhood obesity, and it is associated with early target organ damage. Published guidelines on high blood pressure in children and adolescents, focused on the early and accurate diagnosis of hypertension, resulted in improved ability to identify children with hypertension. Although auscultation using a mercury sphygmomanometer remains the method of choice for evaluation of hypertension in children, accumulating evidence suggests that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a more accurate method for diagnosis, and it is more closely associated with target organ damage. In addition, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a valuable tool in the assessment of white-coat hypertension, and masked hypertension in children and adolescents. Masked hypertension in children and adolescents is associated with a similar risk of target organ damage as in established hypertension.

  4. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  5. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  6. [Measurement of blood pressure variability and the clinical value].

    PubMed

    Kékes, Ede; Kiss, István

    2014-10-19

    Authors have collected and analyzed literature data on blood pressure variability. They present the methods of blood pressure variability measurement, clinical value and relationships with target organ damages and risk of presence of cardiovascular events. They collect data about the prognostic value of blood pressure variability and the effects of different antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability. They underline that in addition to reduction of blood pressure to target value, it is essential to influence blood pressure fluctuation and decrease blood pressure variability, because blood pressure fluctuation presents a major threat for the hypertensive subjects. Data from national studies are also presented. They welcome that measurement of blood pressure variability has been included in international guidelines.

  7. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Concistrè, A; Grillo, A; La Torre, G; Carretta, R; Fabris, B; Petramala, L; Marinelli, C; Rebellato, A; Fallo, F; Letizia, C

    2017-07-12

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is associated with a cluster of cardiovascular manifestations, including hypertension, leading to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of our study was to investigate the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived short-term blood pressure variability in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, in comparison with patients with essential hypertension and normotensive controls. Twenty-five patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (7 normotensive,18 hypertensive) underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at diagnosis, and fifteen out of them were re-evaluated after parathyroidectomy. Short-term-blood pressure variability was derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and calculated as the following: 1) Standard Deviation of 24-h, day-time and night-time-BP; 2) the average of day-time and night-time-Standard Deviation, weighted for the duration of the day and night periods (24-h "weighted" Standard Deviation of BP); 3) average real variability, i.e., the average of the absolute differences between all consecutive BP measurements. Baseline data of normotensive and essential hypertension patients were matched for age, sex, BMI and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring values with normotensive and hypertensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients, respectively. Normotensive-primary hyperparathyroidism patients showed a 24-h weighted Standard Deviation (P < 0.01) and average real variability (P < 0.05) of systolic blood pressure higher than that of 12 normotensive controls. 24-h average real variability of systolic BP, as well as serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels, were reduced in operated patients (P < 0.001). A positive correlation of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone with 24-h-average real variability of systolic BP was observed in the entire primary hyperparathyroidism patients group (P = 0.04, P  = 0.02; respectively). Systolic blood pressure variability is increased in normotensive

  8. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1100 - Blood pressure alarm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure alarm. 870.1100 Section 870.1100...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1100 Blood pressure alarm. (a) Identification. A blood pressure alarm is a device that accepts the signal from a blood...

  13. PZR transducer for monitoring blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo-Aguilar, Abraham; Martinez-Piñón, Fernando; Álvarez-Chávez, Jose A.

    2009-03-01

    Results on a designed piezo resistive transducer (PZR) are presented in this work. The PZR will be specially manufactured for accurately measuring human blood pressure levels. Such transducer consists of four indifussed piezoresistors within a 10-μm Si membrane. The voltage signal response (VSR) is predicted when pressure is applied to the membrane, using a MEMS design tool that includes Finite Element Analysis (FEA). This transducer has the purpose of serving as a basis for the integration of an implantable Bio-MEMS BP sensor.

  14. A MULTI-CENTER CLUSTER-RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF A MULTI-FACTORIAL INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATION ADHERENCE AND BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL AMONG PATIENTS AT HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK (The COM99 study)*

    PubMed Central

    Pladevall, Manel; Brotons, Carlos; Gabriel, Rafael; Arnau, Anna; Suarez, Carmen; de la Figuera, Mariano; Marquez, Emilio; Coca, Antonio; Sobrino, Javier; Divine, George; Heisler, Michele; Williams, L Keoki

    2010-01-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is common and results in preventable disease complications. This study assesses the effectiveness of a multifactorial intervention to improve both medication adherence and blood pressure control and to reduce cardiovascular events. Methods and Results In this multi-center, cluster-randomized trial, physicians from hospital-based hypertension clinics and primary care centers across Spain were randomized to receive and provide the intervention to their high-risk patients. Eligible patients were ≥50 years of age, had uncontrolled hypertension, and had an estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk greater than 30%. Physicians randomized to the intervention group counted patients’ pills, designated a family member to support adherence behavior, and provided educational information to patients. The primary outcome was blood pressure control at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included both medication adherence and a composite end-point of all cause mortality and cardiovascular-related hospitalizations. Seventy-nine physicians and 877 patients participated in the trial. The mean duration of follow-up was 39 months. Intervention patients were less likely to have an uncontrolled systolic blood pressure (odds ratio 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50–0.78) and were more likely to be adherent (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.19–3.05) when compared with control group patients at 6 months. After five years 16% of the patients in the intervention group and 19% in the control group met the composite end-point (hazard ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.67–1.39). Conclusions A multifactorial intervention to improve adherence to antihypertensive medication was effective in improving both adherence and blood pressure control, but it did not appear to improve long-term cardiovascular events. PMID:20823391

  15. Health Instruction Packages: How to Take a Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Carolyn; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach dental hygiene students, nursing students, and the general public how to measure blood pressure. The first module, "Can You Take a Blood Pressure?" by Carolyn Lancaster, defines blood pressure, distinguishes between systolic and diastolic pressure and…

  16. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure measurement... three pressures can be derived through the use of tranducers placed on the surface of the body....

  17. Health Instruction Packages: How to Take a Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Carolyn; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach dental hygiene students, nursing students, and the general public how to measure blood pressure. The first module, "Can You Take a Blood Pressure?" by Carolyn Lancaster, defines blood pressure, distinguishes between systolic and diastolic pressure and…

  18. Role of community programs in controlling blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fulwood, Robinson; Guyton-Krishnan, Jeanette; Wallace, Madeleine; Sommer, Ellen

    2006-12-01

    Despite more than 30 years of intense activity to improve control--and more recently prevention--high blood pressure continues to be a major public health problem. Evidence-based reviews have identified best practices and quality improvement strategies to address prevention and control. Since the 1970s, community-based programs have been instrumental in raising awareness, increasing knowledge, and promoting changes in health behavior to improve blood pressure control. Most of these programs have emphasized the use of partnerships and involvement of community residents in conducting screening and referral activities, implementing clinical practice guidelines, and increasing healthy eating and physical activity. Many also have used health care team approaches, including the use of trained community health workers to deliver targeted, culturally sensitive heart health education, particularly related to the prevention of cardiovascular disease risk factors in general and high blood pressure in particular. Increased focus on implementation of evidence-based lifestyle and clinical management strategies coupled with community-based approaches may help increase blood pressure control rates within communities.

  19. Utility of home blood pressure monitoring to evaluate postprandial blood pressure in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Alfie, José

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hypotension, defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 20 mmHg or greater within 2 hours after a meal, is a risk factor for stroke, coronary events and mortality. The clinical suspicion is typically raised by episodes of postprandial syncope or falls, whereas asymptomatic postprandial hypotension is mostly neglected. The magnitude of the postprandial fall in SBP, as detected by 24-hour recording in apparently healthy middle-aged to elderly subjects, was proportional to the severity of the silent cerebrovascular damage. Postprandial hypotension can also be detected by self-measured blood pressure before and within 2 hours after meals using automatic devices. The review highlights the value of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as a screening test for asymptomatic postprandial hypotension in hypertensive patients. Using a HBPM protocol that included duplicated blood pressure measurements before and after three consecutive lunches, we detected unsuspected postprandial hypotension in 27.4% of the 230 hypertensive patients screened. The prevalence of postprandial hypotension was 13.2% in controlled and 42.2% in uncontrolled hypertensive patients (p < 0.001), raising the dilemma of further lowering blood pressure in the setting of postprandial hypotension. The inclusion of preprandial and postprandial measurements in the protocol of HBPM is useful to identify hypertensive patients with postprandial hypotension and may guide adjustments in antihypertensive treatment according to postprandial blood pressure. © The Author(s), 2015.

  20. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prediabetes (PreDM) in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV). Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rats (n = 19) after weaning were fed either an American (AD) or a standard (SD) diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat) simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat) mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG), adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day) and active (night) periods. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP). Results [mean(SEM)]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p < 0.01). Fasting glucose, adipokine (leptin and adiponectin) concentrations significantly increased (at 90 and 172 days; all p < 0.05), along with a trend for increased concentrations of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1 and TNF-α) on day 90. The AD fed group, with significantly higher FG, also exhibited significantly elevated circadian (24-hour) overall mean SBP, DBP, PP and HR (all p < 0.05). Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental

  1. High blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Bluhm, Brian

    2012-04-01

    High blood pressure in children and adolescents is a growing health problem that is often overlooked by physicians. Normal blood pressure values for children and adolescents are based on age, sex, and height, and are available in standardized tables. Prehypertension is defined as a blood pressure in at least the 90th percentile, but less than the 95th percentile, for age, sex, and height, or a measurement of 120/80 mm Hg or greater. Hypertension is defined as blood pressure in the 95th percentile or greater. A secondary etiology of hypertension is much more likely in children than in adults, with renal parenchymal disease and renovascular disease being the most common. Overweight and obesity are strongly correlated with primary hypertension in children. A history and physical examination are needed for all children with newly diagnosed hypertension to help rule out underlying medical disorders. Children with hypertension should also be screened for other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia, and should be evaluated for target organ damage with a retinal examination and echocardiography. Hypertension in children is treated with lifestyle changes, including weight loss for those who are overweight or obese; a healthy, low-sodium diet; regular physical activity; and avoidance of tobacco and alcohol. Children with symptomatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, target organ damage, diabetes, or persistent hypertension despite nonpharmacologic measures should be treated with antihypertensive medications. Thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, and calcium channel blockers are safe, effective, and well tolerated in children.

  2. The effect of nutrition on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Savica, Vincenzo; Bellinghieri, Guido; Kopple, Joel D

    2010-08-21

    The incidence and severity of hypertension are affected by nutritional status and intake of many nutrients. Excessive energy intake and obesity are major causes of hypertension. Obesity is associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, possibly other mineralcorticoid activity, insulin resistance, salt-sensitive hypertension and excess salt intake, and reduced kidney function. High sodium chloride intake strongly predisposes to hypertension. Increased alcohol consumption may acutely elevate blood pressure. High intakes of potassium, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and protein, along with exercise and possibly vitamin D, may reduce blood pressure. Less-conclusive studies suggest that amino acids, tea, green coffee bean extract, dark chocolate, and foods high in nitrates may reduce blood pressure. Short-term studies indicate that specialized diets may prevent or ameliorate mild hypertension; most notable are the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products, and the DASH low-sodium diet. Long-term compliance to these diets remains a major concern.

  3. Ethanol and blood pressure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, D.C.; Edgar, S.; McCarron, D.A. )

    1989-02-09

    Epidemiologists have identified alcohol as a risk factor in hypertension. Attempts to increase blood pressure in rats with chronic alcohol ingestion have met with mixed results. Some investigators have reported increases in blood pressure while others have reported decreases. Most investigators have given alcohol in the drinking water which produced differences in food intake across groups. To control for food intake, Wister rats were simultaneously pair fed a liquid diet with either ethanol as 35% of calories or a control diet using ARF/Israel pair-feeding devices. At 5 weeks of age, animals on ethanol diets had lower systolic blood pressure than control animals (145 (n-19) vs. 121 (n-19) mmHg). There was no difference in weight between ethanol and control animals. The same pattern of results was apparent at 7 weeks (143 (n-13) vs. 119 (n-13) mmHg) and 9 weeks (147 (n-7) vs. 124 (n-7)). The data indicate that ethanol produces hypotension in rats when food intake is controlled.

  4. Blood pressure control for diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Do, Diana V; Wang, Xue; Vedula, Satyanarayana S; Marrone, Michael; Sleilati, Gina; Hawkins, Barbara S; Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and a leading cause of visual impairment and blindness. Research has established the importance of blood glucose control to prevent development and progression of the ocular complications of diabetes. Simultaneous blood pressure control has been advocated for the same purpose, but findings reported from individual studies have supported varying conclusions regarding the ocular benefit of interventions on blood pressure. Objectives The primary aim of this review was to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effect of interventions to control or reduce blood pressure levels among diabetics on incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy, preservation of visual acuity, adverse events, quality of life, and costs. A secondary aim was to compare classes of anti-hypertensive medications with respect to the same outcomes. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL as well as ongoing trial registries. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 April 2014. We also reviewed reference lists of review articles and trial reports selected for inclusion. In addition, we contacted investigators of trials with potentially pertinent data. Selection criteria We included in this review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which either type 1 or type 2 diabetic participants, with or without hypertension, were assigned randomly to intense versus less intense blood pressure control, to blood pressure control versus usual care or no intervention on blood pressure, or to different classes of anti-hypertensive agents versus placebo. Data collection and analysis Pairs of review authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts from electronic and manual searches and the full text of any document that appeared to be relevant. We assessed included trials independently for risk of bias with respect to outcomes reported in this review. We extracted data regarding trial

  5. High-normal blood pressure is associated with visit-to-visit blood pressure variability in the US adults.

    PubMed

    Faramawi, Mohammed F; Delongchamp, Robert; Said, Qayyim; Balamurugan, Appathurai; Hassan, Alaa; Abouelenien, Saly; Ismaeil, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    High-normal blood pressure and visit-to-visit blood pressure variability are common in clinical settings. They are associated with cardiovascular outcomes. No population based studies have assessed the association between these two phenomena. Our objective was to test the relationship of high-normal blood pressure with visit-to-visit blood pressure variability. A cross-sectional study. We used data from the cross-sectional Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to test the relationship between high-normal blood pressure and visit-to-visit blood pressure variability; we conducted multivariable regression analyses to evaluate the relationship between these two variables. The analysis included 6,071 participants. The participants' mean age was 37.16 years. The means of visit-to-visit systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability were 5.84 mmHg and 5.26 mmHg. High-normal blood pressure was significantly associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure variability (p values <0.05). High-normal blood pressure is associated with visit-to-visit blood pressure variability. Additional research is required to replicate the reported results in prospective studies and evaluate approaches to reduce blood pressure variability observed in clinical settings among patients with high-normal blood pressure to reduce the subsequent complications of blood pressure variability.

  6. Blood pressure percentile charts to identify high or low blood pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Banker, Ashish; Bell, Cynthia; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Samuels, Joshua

    2016-07-19

    The goal was to develop familiar blood pressure (BP) charts representing BP percentile curves similar to CDC growth charts to improve screening of both high and low BP in children. Since height accounts for substantially more BP variability than age and is a more direct measure of body size and maturation in children, height-specific BP percentile curves were drawn separately for males and females. We used the 2004 Fourth Report data source and equations to calculate the BP threshold value for each gender and 5 cm height group. By slightly underestimating a child's BP percentile for high BP and slightly overestimating a child's BP percentile for low BP, these charts guarantee 100 % sensitivity in detecting abnormal BP. Sensitivity and specificity of the chart cut-offs were confirmed in a sample of 1254 healthy children from a school-based blood pressure screening program. The 1st, 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, 95th, and 99th BP percentile curves are depicted in the chart for each corresponding gender and height from 85 to 190 cm, mimicking the ubiquitous CDC "growth charts". Shaded areas of the chart differentiate abnormal BP status categories: hypotension, normal BP, prehypertension, Stage 1 hypertension, and Stage 2 hypertension. Sensitivity was confirmed to be 100 % with specificity above 94 %. These simplified BP charts improve upon currently available BP screening reference with the following features: (a) tracking BP longitudinally in an individual child, (b) full physiological range of BP percentiles represented in percentile curve format for rapid identification both high and low BP, (c) easy to use with absolute height alone avoiding the additional step of determining height percentile, (d) incorporation of adult threshold for pre-hypertension to assist in accurate transition from adolescence into adulthood, (e) high sensitivity and specificity to ensure all children at risk are identified with very few false positives.

  7. Acute and chronic systemic CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade improves blood pressure regulation and metabolic profile in hypertensive (mRen2)27 rats.

    PubMed

    Schaich, Chris L; Shaltout, Hossam A; Brosnihan, K Bridget; Howlett, Allyn C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-08-01

    We investigated acute and chronic effects of CB1 cannabinoid receptor blockade in renin-angiotensin system-dependent hypertension using rimonabant (SR141716A), an orally active antagonist with central and peripheral actions. In transgenic (mRen2)27 rats, a model of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension with increased body mass and insulin resistance, acute systemic blockade of CB1 receptors significantly reduced blood pressure within 90 min but had no effect in Sprague-Dawley rats. No changes in metabolic hormones occurred with the acute treatment. During chronic CB1 receptor blockade, (mRen2)27 rats received daily oral administration of SR141716A (10 mg/kg/day) for 28 days. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced within 24 h, and at Day 21 of treatment values were 173 mmHg in vehicle versus 149 mmHg in drug-treated rats (P < 0.01). This accompanied lower cumulative weight gain (22 vs. 42 g vehicle; P < 0.001), fat mass (2.0 vs. 2.9% of body weight; P < 0.05), and serum leptin (2.8 vs. 6.0 ng/mL; P < 0.05) and insulin (1.0 vs. 1.9 ng/mL; P < 0.01), following an initial transient decrease in food consumption. Conscious hemodynamic recordings indicate twofold increases occurred in spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (P < 0.05) and heart rate variability (P < 0.01), measures of cardiac vagal tone. The beneficial actions of CB1 receptor blockade in (mRen2)27 rats support the interpretation that an upregulated endocannabinoid system contributes to hypertension and impaired autonomic function in this angiotensin II-dependent model. We conclude that systemic CB1 receptor blockade may be an effective therapy for angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and associated metabolic syndrome.

  8. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  9. Blood pressure self-measurement in the obstetric waiting room.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Kamper, Christina H; Toftegaard, Thomas S; Bertelsen, Olav W

    2013-11-01

    Pregnant diabetic patients are often required to self-measure their blood pressure in the waiting room before consultation. Currently used blood pressure devices do not guarantee valid measurements when used unsupervised. This could lead to misdiagnosis and treatment error. The aim of this study was to investigate current use of blood pressure self-measurement in the waiting room in order to identify challenges that could influence the resulting data quality. Also, we wanted to investigate the potential for addressing these challenges with e-health and telemedicine technology. We observed 81 pregnant diabetics' ability to correctly self-measure in the waiting room during a 4-week observational descriptive study. Specifically, we investigated the level of patient adherence to six recommendations with which patients are instructed to comply in order to obtain a reliable blood pressure reading. We found that the patients did not adhere to given instructions when performing blood pressure self-measurement in the waiting room. None of the 81 patients adhered to all six investigated recommendations, while around a quarter adhered to five out of six of the recommendations. The majority followed four or fewer of the recommendations. Results indicate that unsupervised self-measurement of blood pressure is not a reliable method. Thus, there is a need for increased staff presence and patient training or, alternatively, for introducing improved technology support. This could include context-aware patient adherence aids and clinical decision support systems for automatically validating self-measured data based on e-health and telemedicine technology.

  10. High blood pressure and visual sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Alvin; Samples, John R.

    2003-09-01

    The study had two main purposes: (1) to determine whether the foveal visual sensitivities of people treated for high blood pressure (vascular hypertension) differ from the sensitivities of people who have not been diagnosed with high blood pressure and (2) to understand how visual adaptation is related to standard measures of systemic cardiovascular function. Two groups of middle-aged subjects-hypertensive and normotensive-were examined with a series of test/background stimulus combinations. All subjects met rigorous inclusion criteria for excellent ocular health. Although the visual sensitivities of the two subject groups overlapped extensively, the age-related rate of sensitivity loss was, for some measures, greater for the hypertensive subjects, possibly because of adaptation differences between the two groups. Overall, the degree of steady-state sensitivity loss resulting from an increase of background illuminance (for 580-nm backgrounds) was slightly less for the hypertensive subjects. Among normotensive subjects, the ability of a bright (3.8-log-td), long-wavelength (640-nm) adapting background to selectively suppress the flicker response of long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cones was related inversely to the ratio of mean arterial blood pressure to heart rate. The degree of selective suppression was also related to heart rate alone, and there was evidence that short-term changes of cardiovascular response were important. The results suggest that (1) vascular hypertension, or possibly its treatment, subtly affects visual function even in the absence of eye disease and (2) changes in blood flow affect retinal light-adaptation processes involved in the selective suppression of the flicker response from LWS cones caused by bright, long-wavelength backgrounds.

  11. Race May Play Role in Obese Teens' Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Race May Play Role in Obese Teens' Blood Pressure Extra pounds appear more problematic for whites and ... teenagers are at increased risk of high blood pressure, but the effects of those extra pounds may ...

  12. Can Whole-Grain Foods Lower Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... more whole-grain foods help lower my blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. It might. ... help reduce your chance of developing high blood pressure (hypertension). Whole grains are grains that include the ...

  13. Can Weight Loss Reduce the Need for Blood Pressure Medication?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can weight loss reduce the need for blood pressure medication? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. If you're ... pounds (2.3 kilograms) can lower your blood pressure. As you slim down, it may be possible ...

  14. Exercise May Help Black Americans Lower Blood Pressure Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Exercise May Help Black Americans Lower Blood Pressure Risk Recommended 150 minutes of moderate activity weekly ... may lower black Americans' risk of high blood pressure, a new study finds. The new research included ...

  15. Snapshot: Blood Pressure in the U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Home Blood Pressure: Make Control Your Goal Infographic Recommend on Facebook ... Copy the code below to use the Blood Pressure Infographic on your web page or social media ...

  16. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  17. High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about high blood pressure; Hypertension - what to ask your doctor ... problems? What medicines am I taking to treat high blood pressure? Do they have any side effects? What should ...

  18. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, AFib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Aug ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  19. A Nutritional Strategy for the Treatment of High Blood Pressure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podell, Richard N.

    1984-01-01

    Some physicians wonder if high blood pressure can be controlled without the use of drugs and their potential side effects. Current findings concerning nutrition and high blood pressure are presented. (RM)

  20. High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure, Afib and Your Risk of Stroke Updated:Sep ... have a stroke for the first time have high blood pressure . And an irregular atrial heart rhythm — a condition ...

  1. [An integrated system of blood pressure measurement with bluetooth communication].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Sun, Hongyang; Xu, Zuyang; Chai, Xinyu

    2012-07-01

    The development of the integrated blood pressure system with bluetooth communication function is introduced. Experimental results show that the system can complete blood pressure measurement and data transmission wireless effectively, which can be used in m-Health in future.

  2. How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:May 3,2017 Stroke ... your risk of stroke by understanding those you can control. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings ...

  3. Oscillometric blood pressure measurement: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    van Montfrans, G A

    2001-12-01

    Oscillometric blood pressure measurement has become very popular, but although a number of devices have now passed both the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and British Hypertension Society criteria, complacency with the state of the technique is as yet premature. In individual subjects, a substantial number of readings may deviate more than a clinically relevant 5 mmHg in devices that have earned a British Hypertension Society grade A rating. The marketing of pressure-wave-simulating devices is a welcome development as monitors can now be tested for reproducibility; an intra-device standard deviation of less than 2 mmHg has been proposed as the limit. Authors suggest that these simulators are currently better suited to intra- than between-device testing since they are not yet fully confident that the simulated waveforms are indistinguishable from the man-made pressure waves. Simulators should, however, be incorporated into our standard validation protocols in order eventually to obviate the human, fallible, factor in the validation protocols. The currently employed maximal amplitude algorithm has many drawbacks as the parameter identification points for systolic and diastolic pressure depend on many factors, for example pulse pressure, heart rate and arterial stiffness. These errors have now been demonstrated in clinical studies. Modern pattern recognition algorithms are being constructed but have not yet produced convincing results. As repeatedly stated, the development of a more robust and more widely applicable algorithm than the maximal amplitude approach should be allocated a high priority.

  4. Clinical relevance of central blood pressure - a critical review.

    PubMed

    Kostapanos, Michael; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2016-11-01

    Vital organs are exposed to the central rather than the brachial blood pressure. To date, central blood pressure can be assessed noninvasively through the use of several devices. In this review, we critically discuss the clinical relevance of central blood pressure assessment. Considerable evidence suggests that central blood pressure is a better predictor of end-organ damage than brachial blood pressure. However, there is still uncertainty concerning the value of central pressure for predicting cardiovascular outcomes, as the existing studies are underpowered to address this issue. A full synthesis of the available data is needed in this regard. Among the different antihypertensive drug classes, beta-blockers appear to lower central blood pressure less than brachial blood pressure. This difference may, at least in part, explain the reduced efficacy of beta-blockers in the prevention of cardiovascular outcomes compared with the other antihypertensive drug classes, which may lower central and brachial blood pressure to a similar extent. Nevertheless, this differential effect might not be relevant to the newer beta-blockers with vasodilating properties, including nebivolol, celliprolol and carvedilol. However, whether a preferential reduction of central blood pressure results in better outcomes should be further assessed by appropriately powered clinical trials. Other emerging challenges include the assessment of the potential predictive value of central blood pressure variability and the development of new antihypertensive medications based on central blood pressure rather than brachial blood pressure.

  5. Sex differences in alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Judith A M; Joyner, Michael J; Charkoudian, Nisha; Wallin, B Gunnar; Hart, Emma C

    2010-08-01

    We tested whether the inter-individual variability in alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure plays a critical role in the sex differences in tonic support of blood pressure by the autonomic nervous system. Blockade of the alpha-adrenergic receptors was achieved via phentolamine and showed a smaller (P < 0.05) decrease in blood pressure in women compared to men, implying that alpha-adrenergic support of blood pressure is less in women than in men.

  6. Magnetic sensor for arterial distension and blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ruhhammer, Johannes; Herbstritt, Tamara; Ruh, Dominic; Foerster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Goldschmidtboeing, Frank; Seifert, Andreas; Woias, Peter

    2014-12-01

    A novel sensor for measuring arterial distension, pulse and pressure waveform is developed and evaluated. The system consists of a magnetic sensor which is applied and fixed to arterial vessels without any blood vessel constriction, hence avoiding stenosis. The measurement principle could be validated by in vitro experiments on silicone tubes, and by in vivo experiments in an animal model, thereby indicating the non-linear viscoelastic characteristics of real blood vessels. The sensor is capable to provide absolute measurements of the dynamically varying arterial diameter. By calibrating the sensor, a long-term monitoring system for continuously measuring blood pressure and other cardiovascular parameters could be developed based on the method described. This will improve diagnostics for high risk patients and enable a better, specific treatment.

  7. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1140 Venous blood pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1110 - Blood pressure computer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure computer. 870.1110 Section 870.1110...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1110 Blood pressure computer. (a) Identification. A blood pressure computer is a device that accepts the electrical signal...

  11. 21 CFR 870.1110 - Blood pressure computer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure computer. 870.1110 Section 870.1110...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1110 Blood pressure computer. (a) Identification. A blood pressure computer is a device that accepts the electrical signal...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1110 - Blood pressure computer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure computer. 870.1110 Section 870.1110...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1110 Blood pressure computer. (a) Identification. A blood pressure computer is a device that accepts the electrical signal...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1110 - Blood pressure computer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure computer. 870.1110 Section 870.1110...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1110 Blood pressure computer. (a) Identification. A blood pressure computer is a device that accepts the electrical signal...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  16. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  17. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an...

  18. Results of Blood Pressure Screening in White College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This report presents blood pressure norms for 18- to 24-year-old White college students, as well as data on the prevalence of high blood pressure for this group. Results were obtained from voluntary blood pressure screening of 1,660 men and 953 women. (IAH)

  19. Results of Blood Pressure Screening in White College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, William K.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This report presents blood pressure norms for 18- to 24-year-old White college students, as well as data on the prevalence of high blood pressure for this group. Results were obtained from voluntary blood pressure screening of 1,660 men and 953 women. (IAH)

  20. What about African Americans and High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... whites. • Heredity —A tendency to have high blood pressure runs in families. • Age — In general, the older you get, the greater your chance of developing high blood pressure. • Sex — Men tend to develop high blood pressure ...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  2. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  3. 21 CFR 870.1130 - Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. 870.1130 Section 870.1130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Noninvasive blood pressure measurement system. (a) Identification. A noninvasive blood pressure...

  4. Comparison of blood pressure measurements of anesthetized dogs obtained noninvasively with a cylindrical blood pressure cuff and an anatomically modified conical blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sara J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Domingues, Michelle; Shelby, Amanda M; Stout, Rhett W; Acierno, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    To compare blood pressure measured noninvasively with an oscillometric device that involved use of a novel conical cuff and a traditional cylindrical blood pressure cuff. 17 adult hound-type dogs. Dogs were anesthetized, and a 20-gauge, 1.5-inch catheter was inserted in the median sacral artery. The catheter was attached to a pressure transducer via fluid-filled noncompliant tubing, and direct blood pressure was recorded with a multifunction monitor. A specially fabricated conical cuff was placed on the antebrachium. Four sets of direct and indirect blood pressure measurements were simultaneously collected every 2 minutes. Four sets of measurements were then obtained by use of a cylindrical cuff. The cylindrical cuff met American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus guidelines for validation of indirect blood pressure measurements for mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP). The conical cuff met the consensus guidelines for difference of paired measurements, SD, and percentages of measurements within 10 and 20 mm Hg of the value for the reference method, but it failed a correlation analysis. In addition, although bias for the conical cuff was less than that for the cylindrical cuff for SAP, MAP, and DAP measurements, the limits of agreement for the conical cuff were wider than those for the cylindrical cuff for SAP and MAP measurements. On the basis of results of this study, use of a conical cuff for oscillometric blood pressure measurement cannot be recommended.

  5. Improved high pressure turbine shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessen, I. I.; Rigney, D. V.; Schwab, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A new high pressure turbine shroud material has been developed from the consolidation of prealloyed powders of Ni, Cr, Al and Y. The new material, a filler for cast turbine shroud body segments, is called Genaseal. The development followed the identification of oxidation resistance as the primary cause of prior shroud deterioration, since conversion to oxides reduces erosion resistance and increases spalling under thermal cycled engine conditions. The NICrAlY composition was selected in preference to NIAL and FeCRALY alloys, and was formulated to a prescribed density range that offers suitable erosion resistance, thermal conductivity and elastic modulus for improved behavior as a shroud.

  6. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed.

  7. Skin blood flow dynamics and its role in pressure ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Burns, Stephanie; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a significant healthcare problem affecting the quality of life in wheelchair bounded or bed-ridden people and are a major cost to the healthcare system. Various assessment tools such as the Braden scale have been developed to quantify the risk level of pressure ulcers. These tools have provided an initial guideline on preventing pressure ulcers while additional assessments are needed to improve the outcomes of pressure ulcer prevention. Skin blood flow function that determines the ability of the skin in response to ischemic stress has been proposed to be a good indicator for identifying people at risk of pressure ulcers. Wavelet spectral and nonlinear complexity analyses have been performed to investigate the influences of the metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic activities on microvascular regulation in people with various pathological conditions. These findings have contributed to the understanding of the role of ischemia and viability on the development of pressure ulcers. The purpose of the present review is to provide an introduction of the basic concepts and approaches for the analysis of skin blood flow oscillations, and present an overview of the research results obtained so far. We hope this information may contribute to the development of better clinical guidelines for the prevention of pressure ulcers. PMID:23602509

  8. Blood pressure management in mechanical circulatory support

    PubMed Central

    Adatya, Sirtaz

    2015-01-01

    Durable mechanical support has become widely available for end stage heart failure as destination therapy and as bridge to transplantation. The accurate measurement of blood pressure (BP) as well as the recognition and management of hypertension in patients with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-VADs) is an essential component of optimal clinical care. Strategies for the control of BP in CF-VAD patients are increasingly important as there is an evolving understanding of the connection between hypertension, pump output, and adverse outcomes. As clinical experience grows, optimal BP targets, as well as methods to measure BP in CF-VAD patients have been further defined. PMID:26793332

  9. Clinical aspects of blood pressure autorhythmometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.; Halberg, F.

    1974-01-01

    Self-measurements made by a 55-year-old physician with mild to moderate hypertension of ten years' duration are considered. The physician had been in excellent health until age 45 when sustained elevation of blood pressure up to 180/100 mmHg and a slight aortic diastolic murmur were noted. On the basis of the investigation it is suggested that physical and mental performance measures provide an objective basis for assessing the desirability of a given physiological change. Such studies will have to be complemented by a search for long-term effects.

  10. Clinical aspects of blood pressure autorhythmometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.; Halberg, F.

    1974-01-01

    Self-measurements made by a 55-year-old physician with mild to moderate hypertension of ten years' duration are considered. The physician had been in excellent health until age 45 when sustained elevation of blood pressure up to 180/100 mmHg and a slight aortic diastolic murmur were noted. On the basis of the investigation it is suggested that physical and mental performance measures provide an objective basis for assessing the desirability of a given physiological change. Such studies will have to be complemented by a search for long-term effects.

  11. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  12. Automatic Blood Pressure Measurements During Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Charles S.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor circuits and a computer algorithm for automatically measuring blood pressure during ambulatory monitoring and exercise stress testing have been under development at SRI International. A system that records ECG, Korotkov sound, and arm cuff pressure for off-line calculation of blood pressure has been delivered to NASA, and an LSLE physiological monitoring system that performs the algorithm calculations in real-time is being constructed. The algorithm measures the time between the R-wave peaks and the corresponding Korotkov sound on-set (RK-interval). Since the curve of RK-interval versus cuff pressure during deflation is predictable and slowly varying, windows can be set around the curve to eliminate false Korotkov sound detections that result from noise. The slope of this curve, which will generally decrease during exercise, is the inverse of the systolic slope of the brachial artery pulse. In measurements taken during treadmill stress testing, the changes in slopes of subjects with coronary artery disease were markedly different from the changes in slopes of healthy subjects. Measurements of slope and O2 consumption were also made before and after ten days of bed rest during NASA/Ames Research Center bed rest studies. Typically, the maximum rate of O2 consumption during the post-bed rest test is less than the maximum rate during the pre-bed rest test. The post-bed rest slope changes differ from the pre-bed rest slope changes, and the differences are highly correlated with the drop in the maximum rate of O2 consumption. We speculate that the differences between pre- and post-bed rest slopes are due to a drop in heart contractility.

  13. Blood Pressure Regulation: Every Adaptation is an Integration?

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, Michael J.; Limberg, Jacqueline K.

    2013-01-01

    This focused review serves to explore relevant issues in regard to blood pressure regulation and by doing so, provides the initial stimulus paper for the Thematic Review series “Blood Pressure Regulation” to be published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology over the coming months. In this introduction, we highlight how variable normal blood pressure can be and challenge the reader to take another look at some key concepts related to blood pressure regulation. We point out that there is frequently an underappreciated balance between peripheral vasodilation and systemic blood pressure regulation and ask the question: Are changes in blood pressure, in effect, reasonable and integrated adaptations to the physiological challenge at hand? We conclude with the idea that blood pressure regulatory systems are both flexible and redundant; ensuring a wide variety of activities associated with life can be accompanied by a perfusion pressure that can serve multiple masters. PMID:23558925

  14. Canadian national high blood pressure prevention and control strategy.

    PubMed

    Chockalingam, A; Campbell, N; Ruddy, T; Taylor, G; Stewart, P

    2000-09-01

    Despite major efforts to prevent and control high blood pressure, it is one of the most common and important health problems facing Canadians. To address this issue, Health Canada, in collaboration with the Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, established an Expert Working Group to prepare a national strategy. The present report outlines a strategy to prevent and control high blood pressure. It is directed at policy makers at the local, provincial, and/or territorial and national levels in both the health and nonhealth sectors. The strategy is based on current research and expertise. A multifaceted, comprehensive approach is proposed because there is no one intervention that will accomplish the goal of improving the health of Canadians through high blood pressure prevention and control. The present report focuses on the general population. It does not address the unique needs of children, pregnant women or aboriginal peoples. Each of these groups needs to be studied in its own right, and, in particular, with the involvement of aboriginal people themselves. An implementation committee has been established to realize this strategy, and the Canadian Hypertension Society is a key stakeholder in this effort. Several initiatives are underway. Strong advocates are necessary to increase public awareness and to support the system changes required for a successful public health approach to reduce the prevalence of hypertension and its complications.

  15. Using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to assess blood pressure of firefighters with parental history of hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Carlos Eduardo; de Mattos, Marco Antonio; Toledo, Daniele Gusmão; de Siqueira Filho, Aristarco Gonçalves

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of family history of systemic arterial hypertension (FSAH) on the effect of stress from work in Uniformed Firefighters (BMCs) through Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM). A prospective case-control study. Sixty-six healthy BMC underwent ABPM during 12 hours of work at the Communication Center (CC). Thirty-four had hypertensive parents (group 1) and thirty-two had normotensive parents (group 2). Group I differed from group 2 in that it showed higher mean systolic (134.1 +/- 9.9 mmHg X 120.8 +/- 9.9 mmHg p < 0.0001) and diastolic (83.8 +/- 8.3 mmHg X 72.9 +/- 8.6 mmHg p < 0.001) blood pressure, in addition to greater systolic (31.4 +/- 25.6 % X 9.4 +/- 9.4 % p = 0.0001) and diastolic (28.3 +/- 26.6 % X 6.1 +/- 8.9 % p = 0.0001) loads. The prevalence of systemic arterial hypertension (SAH) in group 1 at the workplace was 32.3%. Monitored away from the job, these subjects showed normal blood pressure (functionally hypertensive). Group 2 revealed normal blood pressure (BP) at work. Higher blood pressure in BMC with hypertensive parents is explained independently by the SAH. Subjects who developed SAH during their work at the CC may be considered functionally hypertensive, whereas those with normotensive parents and who underwent psychological stress are free of blood pressure changes.

  16. Calf blood pressure: clinical implications and correlations with arm blood pressure in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Crapanzano, M S; Strong, W B; Newman, I R; Hixon, R L; Casal, D; Linder, C W

    1996-02-01

    Indirect measurement of lower extremity blood pressure is often used in the clinical setting, although normative data after the newborn period are not readily available. Indirect blood pressure (BP) measurement was obtained in the right arms and right calves of 148 healthy infants and young children 2 weeks to 3 years of age. All measurements were made using an oscillometric device. The infants and children are quiet or asleep and in the supine position. A BP cuff of proper size was chosen. Three measurements were made in both extremities; the average of the second and third measurements was used for all analyses. Age correlated better with calf systolic blood pressure (SBPc) than with arm SBP (SBPa) (r = .52 vs .17). Calf diastolic blood pressure (DBPc) and calf mean blood pressure (MBPc) correlated moderately poorly with age (r = .37 and .39, respectively). There was no order effect. SBPc correlated best with height (r = .53), then age (r = .52), and, finally, weight (r = .51). The correlation between BPc and BPa was moderately low. The correlation of SBPc with SBPa was r = .46; that of DBPc with DBPa was r = .37; and that of MBPc with MBPa was r = .41. From birth to 6 months, SBPc was slightly lower than SBPa (1 to 3 mm Hg). SBPc increased linearly relative to SBPa and began to exceed SBPa at 6 months of age. The pattern of DBP and MBP was similar. Wide variability of blood pressure parameters was noted between the infants and children at all ages. Reference data are presented for BPc and the difference between BPc and BPa in healthy infants and children from 2 weeks to 3 years of age. BPc is not equivalent to BPa and should not be arbitrarily substituted. Because of the wide variability among healthy infants and children, SBPc measurements should be interpreted with caution when evaluating for coarctation of the aorta.

  17. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1140 - Venous blood pressure manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Venous blood pressure manometer. 870.1140 Section... pressure manometer. (a) Identification. A venous blood pressure manometer is a device attached to a venous catheter to indicate manometrically the central or peripheral venous pressure. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. Effects of endurance training on blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Véronique A; Fagard, Robert H

    2005-10-01

    Previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials on the effects of chronic dynamic aerobic endurance training on blood pressure reported on resting blood pressure only. Our aim was to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis including resting and ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure-regulating mechanisms, and concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. Inclusion criteria of studies were: random allocation to intervention and control; endurance training as the sole intervention; inclusion of healthy sedentary normotensive or hypertensive adults; intervention duration of > or =4 weeks; availability of systolic or diastolic blood pressure; and publication in a peer-reviewed journal up to December 2003. The meta-analysis involved 72 trials, 105 study groups, and 3936 participants. After weighting for the number of trained participants and using a random-effects model, training induced significant net reductions of resting and daytime ambulatory blood pressure of, respectively, 3.0/2.4 mm Hg (P<0.001) and 3.3/3.5 mm Hg (P<0.01). The reduction of resting blood pressure was more pronounced in the 30 hypertensive study groups (-6.9/-4.9) than in the others (-1.9/-1.6; P<0.001 for all). Systemic vascular resistance decreased by 7.1% (P<0.05), plasma norepinephrine by 29% (P<0.001), and plasma renin activity by 20% (P<0.05). Body weight decreased by 1.2 kg (P<0.001), waist circumference by 2.8 cm (P<0.001), percent body fat by 1.4% (P<0.001), and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance by 0.31 U (P<0.01); HDL cholesterol increased by 0.032 mmol/L(-1) (P<0.05). In conclusion, aerobic endurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction of vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favorably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. E-health blood pressure control program.

    PubMed

    Ahern, David K; Stinson, Lynda J; Uebelacker, Lisa A; Wroblewski, Joseph P; McMurray, Jerome H; Eaton, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Both technological and human factors design requirements for integration of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) into a patient centered medical home (PCMH) model primary care practice are described. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension were given home blood pressure (BP) monitors, and after a three-month run-in period introduced to either a high-tech only (HBPM connectivity to personal health record and tailored Web portal access) or a high-tech/"high-touch" (high-tech solution plus patient navigator [PN]) solution. Features of the Web portal included: BP graphing function, traffic-light feedback system of BP goal attainment, economic incentives for self-monitoring, and dual patient-facing and care-team-facing dashboard functions. The e-health BP control system with PN support was well received by patients, providers, and the healthcare team. Current e-health technology and limited technological literacy of many patients suggest that a PN or some other personnel resource may be required for the adoption of patient-facing technology in primary care.

  3. [High blood pressure and physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Sosner, P; Gremeaux, V; Bosquet, L; Herpin, D

    2014-06-01

    High blood pressure is a frequent pathology with many cardiovascular complications. As highlighted in guidelines, the therapeutic management of hypertension relies on non-pharmacological measures, which are diet and regular physical activity, but both patients and physicians are reluctant to physical activity prescription. To acquire the conviction that physical activity is beneficial, necessary and possible, we can take into account some fundamental and clinical studies, as well as the feedback of our clinical practice. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and hypertension contributes to increase this risk. Conversely, regular practice of physical activity decreases very significantly the risk by up to 60%. The acute blood pressure changes during exercise and post-exercise hypotension differs according to the dynamic component (endurance or aerobic and/or strength exercises), but the repetition of the sessions leads to the chronic hypotensive benefit of physical activity. Moreover, physical activity prescription must take into account the assessment of global cardiovascular risk, the control of the hypertension, and the opportunities and desires of the patient in order to promote good adherence and beneficial lifestyle change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The elusiveness of population-wide high blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Whelton, Paul K

    2015-03-18

    High blood pressure (hypertension) is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is highly prevalent in the US general population, especially in those who are old, African American, or socially disadvantaged. Prevalence is also high and increasing worldwide. Awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension have improved over time, but there is still considerable room for improvement. The optimal solution to this health challenge varies by country. Several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions are well proven as effective means to prevent hypertension and improve control rates in those with established hypertension. Better prevention and control of hypertension will yield substantial general population health benefits and remain high priorities in public health.

  5. Previous blood pressure measurement and associated factors in student adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Marina Gabriella Pereira de Andrada; Farah, Breno Quintella; de Barros, Mauro Virgilio Gomes; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify prevalence of previous blood pressure measurement and analyze some associated factors in adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study included 6,077 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. Demographic characteristics included (sex, age, period of study, region of residence, work, skin color, and economic) status, history of blood pressure measurement within last 12 months, local of blood pressure measurement, and reading obtained. To assess associations between previous blood pressure measurement with demographic characteristics and high blood pressure we used descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results Out of the adolescents, 56.8% reported no blood pressure measurement within the last 12 months. The health centers and the physician’s office were most mentioned places for blood pressure measurement (28.3% and 36.9%, respectively). Boys (odds ratio of 1.64 95%CI: 1.46-1.84) aged 14 to 16 years (odds ratio of 1.12; 95%CI: 1.01-1.25), whose economic status was unfavorable (odds ratio of 1.48; 95%CI: 1.32-1.67) were significantly associated with no blood pressure measurement. Working was a protective factor for was not blood pressure measurement (odds ratio of 0.84; 95%CI: 0.73-0.97). Conclusion Most of adolescents did not have their blood pressure measured within the last 12 months. Boys aged 14 to 16 years and those with unfavorable economic status had higher chance of not having their blood pressure measured. PMID:26466061

  6. Relationship between height and blood pressure in Japanese schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuki; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Nakamura, Harunobu; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroichi; Iki, Masayuki

    2010-10-01

    Blood pressure examinations for health education use have been conducted at several schools in Japan. It has been reported that blood pressure is closely associated with bodyweight and height in US children. The aim of the present paper was to evaluate the association between height and blood pressure in Japanese schoolchildren. In Iwata city in Japan, blood pressure screening was conducted by the school administration. A total of 98.9% (10,152/10,270 children) of all fifth (10-year-olds) and ninth graders (14-year-olds) residing in the Old Iwata area from 2002 to 2007 were analyzed. In 10-year-old and 14-year-old boys, regression analysis indicated that a positive correlation between weight and blood pressure was the strongest among the three body size indices (height, weight, and body mass index), but the association between height and blood pressure was also significant. For girls from both the 10 and 14 year age groups, the correlation of weight and blood pressure was stronger than those for the other body size indices, but there were also significant associations between height and blood pressure, except for height and diastolic blood pressure in the 14-year-olds. There is a significant positive relationship between height and blood pressure. Further study is necessary to provide a blood pressure reference based on height in the Japanese program to prevent children from developing lifestyle-related risk factors. © 2010 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2010 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. [Development of an automatic pneumatic tourniquet system that determines pressures in synchrony with systolic blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyun; Li, Kaiyuan; Zhang, Zhengbo; Guo, Junyan; Wang, Weidong

    2012-11-01

    The correlation coefficients between arterial occlusion pressure and systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, limb circumference, body mass etc were obtained through healthy volunteer experiments, in which tourniquet were applied on upper/lower extremities. The prediction equations were derived from the data of experiments by multiple regression analysis. Based on the microprocessor C8051F340, a new pneumatic tourniquet system that can determine tourniquet pressure in synchrony with systolic blood pressure was developed and verified the function and stability of designed system. Results showed that the pneumatic tourniquet which automatically adjusts occlusion pressure in accordance with systolic blood pressure could stop the flow of blood to get a bloodless field.

  8. Birthweight and blood pressure among children in Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Woelk, G.; Emanuel, I.; Weiss, N.; Psaty, B.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To determine whether poor uterine growth may be associated with increased blood pressure and subsequent hypertension in adulthood.
METHODS—A retrospective cohort study of 756 schoolchildren (mean age 6.5 years) was carried out in six low income areas in Harare city, Zimbabwe. Indices of intrauterine growth and blood pressure were assessed.
RESULTS—Adjusted for current weight, the children's systolic blood pressure was inversely related to their birthweight; for each decreasing kg of birthweight, systolic blood pressure rose by 1.73 mm Hg (95% CI; 0.181 to 3.28). After adjustment for current weight, systolic blood pressure was also inversely associated with occipito-frontal circumference, but not with birth length or gestational age. Diastolic blood pressure was not associated with any of the intrauterine indices.
CONCLUSION—Fetal size may be inversely related to systolic blood pressure in childhood in an African population.

 PMID:9828738

  9. Birthweight and blood pressure among children in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Woelk, G; Emanuel, I; Weiss, N S; Psaty, B M

    1998-09-01

    To determine whether poor uterine growth may be associated with increased blood pressure and subsequent hypertension in adulthood. A retrospective cohort study of 756 schoolchildren (mean age 6.5 years) was carried out in six low income areas in Harare city, Zimbabwe. Indices of intrauterine growth and blood pressure were assessed. Adjusted for current weight, the children's systolic blood pressure was inversely related to their birthweight; for each decreasing kg of birthweight, systolic blood pressure rose by 1.73 mm Hg (95% CI; 0.181 to 3.28). After adjustment for current weight, systolic blood pressure was also inversely associated with occipito-frontal circumference, but not with birth length or gestational age. Diastolic blood pressure was not associated with any of the intrauterine indices. Fetal size may be inversely related to systolic blood pressure in childhood in an African population.

  10. Accuracy in Blood Pressure Monitoring: The Effect of Noninvasive Blood Pressure Cuff Inflation on Intra-arterial Blood Pressure Values

    PubMed Central

    Sheshadri, Veena; Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Nagappa, Mahesh; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi

    2017-01-01

    Context: Both invasive and noninvasive blood pressure (invasive arterial blood pressure [IABP] and noninvasive BP [NIBP]) monitors are used perioperatively; however, they often produce different values. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear, and it is possible that the act of cuff inflation itself might affect the IABP values, especially with the recurrent cycling of NIBP cuff. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ipsilateral NIBP cuff inflation on the contralateral IABP values. Settings and Designs: Prospective, observational study. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients were studied. The NIBP device was set to cycle every 5 min for a total of 6 times. During each cuff inflation cycle, changes in IABP values from the arterial line in the contralateral arm were recorded. A total of 582 measurements were included for data analysis. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square, paired t-test, analysis of variance. Results: Mean (± standard deviation) changes in systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP, and mean BP with cuff inflation were 6.7 ± 5.9, 2.6 ± 4.0, and 4.0 ± 3.9 mmHg, respectively. We observed an increase of 0–10 mmHg in SBP in majority (73.4%) of cuff inflations. The changes in IABP did not differ between the patients with or without hypertension or with the baseline SBP. Conclusions: This study showed that there is a transient reactive rise in IABP values with NIBP cuff inflation. This is important information in the perioperative and intensive care settings, where both these measurement techniques are routinely used. The exact mechanism for this effect is not known but may be attributed to the pain and discomfort from cuff inflation. PMID:28298779

  11. Accuracy in Blood Pressure Monitoring: The Effect of Noninvasive Blood Pressure Cuff Inflation on Intra-arterial Blood Pressure Values.

    PubMed

    Sheshadri, Veena; Tiwari, Akhilesh Kumar; Nagappa, Mahesh; Venkatraghavan, Lashmi

    2017-01-01

    Both invasive and noninvasive blood pressure (invasive arterial blood pressure [IABP] and noninvasive BP [NIBP]) monitors are used perioperatively; however, they often produce different values. The reason for this discrepancy is not clear, and it is possible that the act of cuff inflation itself might affect the IABP values, especially with the recurrent cycling of NIBP cuff. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ipsilateral NIBP cuff inflation on the contralateral IABP values. Prospective, observational study. One hundred consecutive patients were studied. The NIBP device was set to cycle every 5 min for a total of 6 times. During each cuff inflation cycle, changes in IABP values from the arterial line in the contralateral arm were recorded. A total of 582 measurements were included for data analysis. Chi-square, paired t-test, analysis of variance. Mean (± standard deviation) changes in systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP, and mean BP with cuff inflation were 6.7 ± 5.9, 2.6 ± 4.0, and 4.0 ± 3.9 mmHg, respectively. We observed an increase of 0-10 mmHg in SBP in majority (73.4%) of cuff inflations. The changes in IABP did not differ between the patients with or without hypertension or with the baseline SBP. This study showed that there is a transient reactive rise in IABP values with NIBP cuff inflation. This is important information in the perioperative and intensive care settings, where both these measurement techniques are routinely used. The exact mechanism for this effect is not known but may be attributed to the pain and discomfort from cuff inflation.

  12. [Riva-Rocci and blood pressure].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2013-01-01

    Scipione Riva-Rocci (1863-1937) was educated in Turin as a physician and later as a doctor of internal medicine. In 1896 and 1897 he published a series of four articles (in Italian) on a new method for measuring blood pressure. Previous non-invasive methods were all based on compression of the radial pulse, in keeping with centuries of medical tradition, but they were cumbersome and unreliable. Riva-Rocci's innovation consisted in compressing the brachial artery instead, at the level of the upper arm. For this purpose he devised an inflatable rubber tube, which was rigid on the outside. Disappearance of the radial pulse on palpation indicated the systolic arterial pressure, as Riva-Rocci confirmed by calibration experiments in animals and with human cadavers. His instrument was introduced world-wide after a chance visit by the American neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1869-1939). The Russian surgeon Nikolai Korotkoff (1874-1920) was the first to apply auscultation of the artery below the cuff (in 1905), a method that allowed determination of diastolic arterial pressure. Riva-Rocci was Chief of Medicine at the municipal hospital in Varese from 1900 to 1928, where he developed a special interest in paediatrics.

  13. [Uncontrolled factors of blood pressure in essential hypertension: from "patient's high blood pressure" to "hypertensive patient"].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang; Wang, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is a significant medical and public health issue which puts an enormous burden on health care resources and the community. It is a chronic medical condition in which the systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) is elevated. Serious complications including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases would be preventable if the rise in BP with age could be prevented or diminished. The majority of hypertensive patients require long-term treatment. Oral antihypertensive drugs, lifestyle modification including exercise and dietary modification are milestones for hypertension therapy. However, the control rate of hypertension hasn't reached the expected requirements currently. "Three lows" status quo, just low awareness, low treatment, and low control, are still the major problems confronting modern medicine. Recently, uncontrolled factors of blood pressure are widely concerned, which include insomnia, constipation, mood disorders, exogenous, etc. What's more, the control strategies of hypertension should not only pay close attention to "patient's high blood pressure", but also to "hypertensive patient". Therefore, the treatment of uncontrolled factors of blood pressure plays an important role in hypertensive therapy, which could be further research priorities.

  14. Blood pressure 2 years after a chronic disease management intervention study.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Sheldon; Vincent, Lloyd; Wentworth, Joan; Hildebrandt, Denise; Kiss, Alexander; Perkins, Nancy; Hartman, Susan; Ironstand, Laurie; Hoppe, Jacquie; Hunter, Katie; Pylypchuk, George

    2010-02-01

    To follow blood pressure change over time in participants who had participated in a 1- year chronic disease management program focused on blood pressure reduction. The expectation was that blood pressure would return back to the baseline once the study was completed. Prospective, single-arm observational study. Study participants were Status Indians living on-reserve with type 2 diabetes and persistent hypertension who had participated in the DREAM3 study. Blood pressure was measured with the BpTRU automated device every 6 months for 2 years. The primary endpoint was the change in systolic blood pressure over the follow-up period. Sixty of the original 96 participants agreed to participate in the follow-up. Mean blood pressure at the beginning of the follow-up was 130/76 (SD 18/12) mmHg. Mean blood pressure at the end of the follow-up period was 132/76 (17/9 SD) mmHg. Target blood pressure (<130/80 mmHg) was present in 53%. The 99% confidence limit around change of blood pressure over the 24 months of follow-up was +/-4.7 mmHg. Contrary to expectations, the participants maintained their blood pressure control and did not revert to baseline levels. Community awareness and engagement resulting from the chronic disease management program led to a sustainable improvement in the health parameters of the participants and the community that lasted beyond the duration of the 1-year DREAM3 project.

  15. Association between ambient temperature and blood pressure and blood pressure regulators: 1831 hypertensive patients followed up for three years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Wang, Jinwei; Tian, Jun; Tang, Xun; Yu, Canqing; Marshall, Roger J; Chen, Dafang; Cao, Weihua; Zhan, Siyan; Lv, Jun; Lee, Liming; Hu, Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested an association between ambient air temperature and blood pressure. However, this has not been reliably confirmed by longitudinal studies. Also, whether the reaction to temperature stimulation is modified by other factors such as antihypertensive medication is rarely investigated. The present study explores the relationship between ambient temperature and blood pressure, without and with antihypertensive medication, in a study of 1,831 hypertensive patients followed up for three years, in two or four weekly check ups, accumulating 62,452 follow-up records. Both baseline and follow-up blood pressure showed an inverse association with ambient temperature, which explained 32.4% and 65.6% of variation of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure (P<0.05) respectively. The amplitude of individual blood pressure fluctuation with temperature throughout a year (a 29 degrees centigrade range) was 9.4/7.3 mmHg. Medication with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor benazepril attenuated the blood pressure fluctuation by 2.4/1.3 mmHg each year, though the inverse association of temperature and blood pressure remained. Gender, drinking behavior and body mass index were also found to modify the association between temperature and diastolic blood pressure. The results indicate that ambient temperature may negatively regulate blood pressure. Hypertensive patients should monitor and treat blood pressure more carefully in cold days, and it could be especially important for the males, thinner people and drinkers.

  16. Relating cardiovascular risk to out-of-office blood pressure and the importance of controlling blood pressure 24 hours a day.

    PubMed

    White, William B

    2008-08-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a natural circadian rhythm characterized by a decrease during sleep, then a steep increase in the early morning period followed by higher values throughout the active waking period. Because an excessive early morning surge in blood pressure is associated with an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, it represents a potential therapeutic target in patients with hypertension, especially those already at high risk for such events. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is an out-of-office technique that allows assessment of blood pressure control during a 24-hour period, including the morning surge. It is known that 24-hour control based on ABPM is a better predictor of hypertensive target-organ involvement and cardiovascular events than conventional in-office blood pressure measurement. ABPM also reveals that many antihypertensive drugs do not adequately control early morning blood pressure, particularly when given once daily in the morning. There are several effective ways to improve morning blood pressure control. These include using agents with a long pharmacologic half-life; prescribing drug formulations specifically designed to target the morning blood pressure surge when given at bedtime; or increasing dosages to twice daily that of conventional shorter-acting agents.

  17. Feasibility of blood pressure telemonitoring in patients with poor blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    McCant, Felicia; McKoy, Gwendolyn; Grubber, Janet; Olsen, Maren K; Oddone, Eugene; Powers, Benjamin; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2009-01-01

    We examined the feasibility of using home blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring devices for managing patients with poor BP control. We enrolled 591 subjects with a diagnosis of hypertension. Patients were randomized to usual care (n = 147) or to the intervention arm (n = 441). Those in the intervention arm were issued with a home BP telemonitoring device. The device transmitted BP readings automatically via the home telephone line. Technical alerts were generated if patients did not transmit their BP readings according to the protocol. During the first six months, 693 technical alerts were generated by 267 patients. About half of these patients (112) generated more than two technical alerts. Resolution of the alerts showed that 61% were caused by patient non-adherence. Patients who generated >2 technical alerts were younger (61 vs. 64 years; P = 0.001) and were more likely to be non-Caucasian (64% vs. 47%, P = 0.002) than those generating 2 or fewer alerts. Despite the potential for improving health care using home BP telemonitoring, certain patients will require more support to use the equipment successfully.

  18. Management of blood pressure in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, John A; Dawson, Jesse; Quinn, Terence J

    2013-08-01

    The importance of elevated or low arterial blood pressure (BP) early after stroke, and the need for pharmacological intervention to control BP, remains controversial. Debate surrounds if, when and how to intervene. This debate is informed by conflicting results from observational data and underpowered clinical trials and substantive outcome data are lacking. Accordingly, management decisions have largely been left up to the individual treating physician and guidelines are based on 'good practice' and theory rather than level 1, grade A evidence. Substantial progress has been made in recent years, particularly in the field of hemorrhagic stroke, where recently presented and soon to completed large-scale trials may finally give us a firm evidence base. For ischemic stroke, many important studies have informed our understanding of the basic pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of BP management in acute stroke and, although not yet constituting a solid 'evidence base', are helping us from the 'cognitive quick-sand' of small studies and personal experiences.

  19. Sodium intake and blood pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Hanevold, Coral D

    2013-10-01

    Elevation of blood pressure (BP) and the risk for progression to hypertension (HTN) is of increasing concern in children and adolescents. Indeed, it is increasingly recognized that target organ injury may begin with even low levels of BP elevation. Sodium intake has long been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for HTN. While it seems clear that sodium impacts BP in children, its effects may be enhanced by other factors including obesity and increasing age. Evidence from animal and human studies indicates that sodium may have adverse consequences on the cardiovascular system independent of HTN. Thus, moderation of sodium intake over a lifetime may reduce risk for cardiovascular morbidity in adulthood. An appetite for salt is acquired, and intake beyond our need is almost universal. Considering that eating habits in childhood have been shown to track into adulthood, modest sodium intake should be advocated as part of a healthy lifestyle.

  20. Familial aggregation and childhood blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoling; Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Snieder, Harold

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure (BP) in children. The evidence for familial aggregation of childhood BP is substantial. Twin studies have shown that a large part of the familial aggregation of childhood BP is due to genes. The first part of this review provides the latest progress in gene finding for childhood BP, focusing on the combined effects of multiple loci identified from the genome-wide association studies on adult BP. We further review the evidence on the contribution of the genetic components of other family risk factors to the familial aggregation of childhood BP including obesity, birth weight, sleep quality, sodium intake, parental smoking, and socioeconomic status. At the end, we emphasize the promise of using genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML) analysis, a method that uses genome-wide data from unrelated individuals, in answering a number of unsolved questions in the familial aggregation of childhood BP.

  1. Familial Aggregation and Childhood Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Snieder, Harold

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure (BP) in children. The evidence for familial aggregation of childhood BP is substantial. Twin studies have shown that a large part of the familial aggregation of childhood BP is due to genes. The first part of this review provides the latest progress in gene finding for childhood BP, focusing on the combined effects of multiple loci identified from the genome-wide association studies on adult BP. We further review the evidence on the contribution of the genetic components of other family risk factors to the familial aggregation of childhood BP including obesity, birth weight, sleep quality, sodium intake, parental smoking, and socioeconomic status. At the end, we emphasize the promise of using genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum likelihood (GREML) analysis, a method that uses genome-wide data from unrelated individuals, in answering a number of unsolved questions in the familial aggregation of childhood BP. PMID:25432901

  2. [Hypertensive urgency or high blood pressure variability?

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    2017-01-01

    Hypertensive urgency (HU) is a common reason particularly for elderly patients to seek medical advice. Severe asymptomatic hypertension and situational high blood pressure (BP) in patients with its high variability is frequently taken as HU. The use of short-acting antihypertensive drugs is not only indicated in these situations, but it may also increase the risk of cardiovascular events (CVE). Over the past decade, increased BP variability is an independent predictor for a higher risk of CVE. Among the major groups of antihypertensive drugs, there are calcium antagonists, mainly amlodipine, which has the greatest potential to reduce BP variability. Thus, calcium antagonists can be considered as first-line drugs for patients with high BP variability.

  3. Whey protein lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function and lipid biomarkers in adults with prehypertension and mild hypertension: results from the chronic Whey2Go randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Ágnes A; Giromini, Carlotta; Chatzidiakou, Yianna; Givens, D Ian; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the greatest cause of death globally, and their reduction is a key public-health target. High blood pressure (BP) affects 1 in 3 people in the United Kingdom, and previous studies have shown that milk consumption is associated with lower BP. We investigated whether intact milk proteins lower 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) and other risk markers of CVD. The trial was a double-blinded, randomized, 3-way-crossover, controlled intervention study. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to consume 2 × 28 g whey protein/d, 2 × 28 g Ca caseinate/d, or 2 × 27 g maltodextrin (control)/d for 8 wk separated by a 4-wk washout. The effects of these interventions were examined with the use of a linear mixed-model ANOVA. Thirty-eight participants completed the study. Significant reductions in 24-h BP [for systolic blood pressure (SBP): -3.9 mm Hg; for diastolic blood pressure (DBP): -2.5 mm Hg; P = 0.050 for both)] were observed after whey-protein consumption compared with control intake. After whey-protein supplementation compared with control intake, peripheral and central systolic pressures [-5.7 mm Hg (P = 0.007) and -5.4 mm Hg (P = 0.012), respectively] and mean pressures [-3.7 mm Hg (P = 0.025) and -4.0 mm Hg (P = 0.019), respectively] were also lowered. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased significantly after both whey-protein and calcium-caseinate intakes compared with control intake [1.31% (P < 0.001) and 0.83% (P = 0.003), respectively]. Although both whey protein and calcium caseinate significantly lowered total cholesterol [-0.26 mmol/L (P = 0.013) and -0.20 mmol/L (P = 0.042), respectively], only whey protein decreased triacylglycerol (-0.23 mmol/L; P = 0.025) compared with the effect of the control. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were reduced after whey protein consumption (P = 0.011) and after calcium-caseinate consumption (P = 0.039), respectively

  4. Whey protein lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function and lipid biomarkers in adults with prehypertension and mild hypertension: results from the chronic Whey2Go randomized controlled trial12

    PubMed Central

    Givens, D Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the greatest cause of death globally, and their reduction is a key public-health target. High blood pressure (BP) affects 1 in 3 people in the United Kingdom, and previous studies have shown that milk consumption is associated with lower BP. Objective: We investigated whether intact milk proteins lower 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) and other risk markers of CVD. Design: The trial was a double-blinded, randomized, 3-way–crossover, controlled intervention study. Forty-two participants were randomly assigned to consume 2 × 28 g whey protein/d, 2 × 28 g Ca caseinate/d, or 2 × 27 g maltodextrin (control)/d for 8 wk separated by a 4-wk washout. The effects of these interventions were examined with the use of a linear mixed-model ANOVA. Results: Thirty-eight participants completed the study. Significant reductions in 24-h BP [for systolic blood pressure (SBP): −3.9 mm Hg; for diastolic blood pressure (DBP): −2.5 mm Hg; P = 0.050 for both)] were observed after whey-protein consumption compared with control intake. After whey-protein supplementation compared with control intake, peripheral and central systolic pressures [−5.7 mm Hg (P = 0.007) and −5.4 mm Hg (P = 0.012), respectively] and mean pressures [−3.7 mm Hg (P = 0.025) and −4.0 mm Hg (P = 0.019), respectively] were also lowered. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased significantly after both whey-protein and calcium-caseinate intakes compared with control intake [1.31% (P < 0.001) and 0.83% (P = 0.003), respectively]. Although both whey protein and calcium caseinate significantly lowered total cholesterol [−0.26 mmol/L (P = 0.013) and −0.20 mmol/L (P = 0.042), respectively], only whey protein decreased triacylglycerol (−0.23 mmol/L; P = 0.025) compared with the effect of the control. Soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 were reduced after whey protein consumption (P = 0.011) and after

  5. Regional cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, N R; Rezai, K; Godersky, J C; Eslinger, P; Damasio, H; Kirchner, P T

    1987-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rcbf) was studied preoperatively and at 2 and 6 months postoperatively in 22 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients using xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computed tomography. Sixteen of the 22 patients improved (improved group) and six did not (unimproved group). The following comparisons were made: (1) preoperative rcbf in the improved group, to 14 normal elderly volunteers and to that in 59 SDAT (senile dementia of the Alzheimer type) patients; (2) preoperative rcbf in the improved and unimproved groups to determine if rcbf could predict surgical outcome; (3) pre- to postoperative rcbf in the improved group to see if increased cbf accounted for clinical improvement. The findings were: (1) preoperative rcbf in the improved group was lower than that in normal controls but was the same as that in SDAT; however, the ratios of rcbf values in anterior and posterior brain regions were significantly different between improved group and SDAT (p = 0.02); (2) an anterior/posterior ratio of 1.05 correctly classified surgical outcome in 19/22 patients; five of six in the unimproved group were above this cut off while 14/16 in the improved group were below; (3) in the improved group rcbf increased at 2 but not at 6 months after surgery without a corresponding reduction of clinical signs, supporting the notion that increase in cbf probably does not account for clinical improvement in normal pressure hydrocephalus. Images PMID:3501800

  6. The epidemiology of blood pressure and its worldwide management.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Kazem; Emdin, Connor A; MacMahon, Stephen

    2015-03-13

    Despite the vast amount of evidence on the benefits of blood pressure lowering accumulated to date, elevated blood pressure is still the leading risk factor for disease and disability worldwide. The purpose of this review is to summarize the epidemiological evidence underpinning the association between blood pressure and a range of conditions. This review focuses on the association between systolic and diastolic blood pressures and the risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Evidence for and against the existence of a J-shaped curve association between blood pressure and cardiovascular risk, and differences in the predictive power of systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure, are described. In addition, global and regional trends in blood pressure levels and management of hypertension are reviewed. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Current status of home blood pressure monitoring in Asia: Statement from the HOPE Asia Network.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yook-Chin; Buranakitjaroen, Peera; Chen, Chen-Huan; Divinagracia, Romeo; Hoshide, Satoshi; Park, Sungha; Shin, Jinho; Siddique, Saulat; Sison, Jorge; Soenarta, Arieska Ann; Sogunuru, Guru Prasad; Tay, Jam Chin; Turana, Yuda; Wang, Ji-Guang; Wong, Lawrence; Zhang, Yuqing; Kario, Kazuomi

    2017-08-17

    Hypertension represents a major burden in Asia, with a high prevalence rate but poor level of awareness and control reported in many countries in the region. Home blood pressure monitoring has been validated as an accurate and reliable measure of blood pressure that can help guide hypertension treatment as well as identify masked and white-coat hypertension. Despite its benefits, there has been limited research into home blood pressure monitoring in Asia. The authors reviewed the current evidence on home blood pressure monitoring in Asia, including but not limited to published literature, data presented at congresses, and national hypertension management guidelines to determine the current utilization of home blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice in the region. Public policies to enable greater access to home blood pressure monitoring and its use in clinical care would add considerably to improving hypertension outcomes in Asia. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Blood pressure control versus atrial fibrillation management in stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Carmine; Sada, Lidia; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for atrial fibrillation which in turn is the most prevalent concomitant condition in hypertensive patients. While both these pathological conditions are independent risk factors for stroke, the association of hypertension and atrial fibrillation increases the incidence of disabling strokes. Moreover, documented or silent atrial fibrillation doubles the rate of cardiovascular death. Lowering blood pressure is strongly recommended, particularly for primary stroke prevention. However, a relatively small percentage of hypertensive patients still achieve the recommended blood pressure goals. The management of atrial fibrillation with respect to stroke prevention is changing. New oral anticoagulants represent a major advancement in long-term anticoagulation therapy in non valvular atrial fibrillation. They have several benefits over warfarin, including improved adherence to the anticoagulation therapy. This is an important issue since non-adherence to stroke prevention medications is a risk factor for first and recurrent strokes.

  9. Peripheral blood pressure by Dinamap and central blood pressure by applanation tonometry in outpatient general practice.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Simões, Ana Rita; Ricardo Miranda, Paula; Matias, Catarina; Rosendo, Inês; Constantino, Liliana; Santos, Tiago; Neto, Maria da Glória; Francisco, Maria dos Prazeres

    2013-06-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) is the pressure exerted by the blood column at any given moment on the aortic and carotid artery walls, which is a close proxy for the blood pressure inside the brain and the heart, and is thus a better marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than peripheral blood pressure (PBP). To assess how the augmentation index (AI), peripheral pulse pressure (pPP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR) vary in hypertensive patients according to level of control of CBP and PBP. We performed an observational, cross-sectional study in a convenience sample from a general practice in Central Portugal over a period of four days in May 2010. Measurements were taken after a four-minute resting period. The following values were considered to reflect controlled pressures: PBP <140/90 mmHg, CBP <130/80 mmHg, pPP <55 mmHg and cPP <45 mmHg. The sample included 92 patients, 38 male (41.3%), mean age 62.3±11.1 years, with no significant difference in gender distribution. PBP was controlled in 55 (59.8%), and CBP in 53 (57.6%). Both PBP and CBP were controlled in 50 patients (54.3%) and neither was controlled in 34 (37.9%). pPP and cPP were significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (p<0.001) and CBP (p<0.001). AI was non-significantly lower in those with controlled PBP (78±9 vs. 80.7) and those with controlled CBP (78±9 vs.81±7) (p=0.02). SEVR was within the desirable range in 92 patients (92.2%). 78.4% of individuals were taking drugs acting on the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS). In a convenience sample of 92 patients, PBP and CBP were controlled in 59.8% and 57.6%, respectively. Those with controlled PBP had significantly better peripheral systolic and diastolic blood pressure, CBP, pPP and cPP; the same was true of those with controlled CBP, who also had a significantly better AI. The percentage of the cardiac cycle in diastole had a desirable value for 92,2% of the subjects. Copyright © 2011

  10. Resveratrol Treatment Normalizes the Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fabricio, Victor; Oishi, Jorge Camargo; Biffe, Bruna Gabriele; Ruffoni, Leandro Dias Gonçalves; da Silva, Karina Ana; Nonaka, Keico Okino; Rodrigues, Gerson Jhonatan

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite knowing that resveratrol has effects on blood vessels, blood pressure and that phytostrogens can also improve the endothelium-dependent relaxation/vasodilation, there are no reports of reveratrol's direct effect on the endothelial function and blood pressure of animals with estrogen deficit (mimicking post-menopausal increased blood pressure). Objective To verify the effect of two different periods of preventive treatment with resveratrol on blood pressure and endothelial function in ova