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  1. A pain education programme to improve patient satisfaction with cancer pain management: a randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Chou, Pi-Ling; Lin, Chia-Chin

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of a pain education programme to increase the satisfaction of patients with cancer with regard to pain management and (2) to examine how patient satisfaction with pain management mediates the barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. The patients' satisfaction with pain management is not merely an indicator, it is actually a contributor to medication adherence. However, very few studies investigate methods for improving patient satisfaction with pain management. This study used an experimental and longitudinal design. A total of 61 patient-family pairs (n = 122) were randomly assigned to either experimental or control groups. The instruments included the American Pain Society outcome questionnaire, the Barriers Questionnaire-Taiwan form, self-reporting evaluations of analgesic adherence and the Pain Education Booklet. The experimental group (n = 31) participated in a pain education programme, while those in the control group (n = 30) did not. The two groups were compared using generalised estimation equations after the second and fourth weeks. A Sobel test was used to examine the mediating relationships among patient satisfaction with pain management, barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the level of satisfaction they felt for physicians and nurses regarding pain management. For those in the experimental group, satisfaction with pain management was a significant mediator between barriers to using analgesics and analgesic adherence. This research provides evidence supporting the effectiveness of a pain education programme for patients and their family members in increasing patient satisfaction with regard to the management of cancer pain. It is important for health providers to consider patient satisfaction when attempting to improve adherence to pain management regimes in a clinical setting. © 2011 Blackwell

  2. Stop the pain! A nation-wide quality improvement programme in paediatric oncology pain control.

    PubMed

    Zernikow, Boris; Hasan, Carola; Hechler, Tanja; Huebner, Bettina; Gordon, Deb; Michel, Erik

    2008-10-01

    Little is known about the impact of translation of pain management clinical practice guidelines on pain control in paediatrics. In an effort to overcome this, a longitudinal, nation-wide, multi-centre paediatric quality improvement (QI) study was initiated by the German Society of Pediatric Haematology and Oncology (GPOH) entitled Schmerz-Therapie in der Onkologischen Paediatrie (STOP). The project's primary major aims were to improve paediatric oncology pain control in Germany, and to evaluate the project's impact on the pain management quality. To achieve these aims, STOP encompassed six sequential phases to evaluate present practice, develop recommendations for practical pain control, actively engage participants in improvement strategies, and assess change. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe STOP in its entirety, report on comparisons between active quality management (QM) departments that actively participated in the project and non-active QM departments regarding differences in pain control, patients' and parents' perspectives on pain control and health professionals' knowledge, and to discuss the impact of STOP as a whole. Four hypotheses were examined: (1) changes in health care professionals' knowledge on pain in paediatric oncology and pain management after a three-year period (2) impact of active participation in the STOP-project; (3) differences in patients' and parents' perspective in active QM versus non-active QM departments; (4) impact of the STOP-project on the health care professionals' knowledge in active QM versus non-active QM departments. Data included surveys, interviews, and standardised pre-/post-intervention documentation of pain control. All German paediatric oncology departments were invited to participate. The prime means of intervention was education (printed material, passive participation; additional lectures and feed-back, active participation). Quality indicators were defined and compared with regards to the four

  3. The PRO-SELF(©) Pain Control Program improves patients' knowledge of cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Rustøen, Tone; Valeberg, Berit Taraldsen; Kolstad, Eva; Wist, Erik; Paul, Steven; Miaskowski, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Inadequate knowledge is one barrier to effective cancer pain management. This study's aim was to evaluate the effects of a psychoeducational intervention (the Norwegian version of the PRO-SELF(©) Pain Control Program) compared with a control group in increasing patients' knowledge of cancer pain management. Adult oncology outpatients with pain from bone metastasis of 2.5 or greater on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale were randomized into the PRO-SELF (n=87) or control (n=92) groups. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire and the Pain Experience Scale (PES) at the beginning and end of the study to assess their knowledge and attitudes. The six-week intervention consisted of education, skills building, and nurse coaching. Mixed-model analyses with tests of a group×time interaction were done for each of the individual items and total PES scores to evaluate between-group differences in changes in knowledge over time. Except for functional status, no differences were found between the PRO-SELF and control groups on any baseline demographic, clinical, or pain characteristics. Significant group×time interactions were found for all the single item and total PES scores. Compared with the control group, patients in the PRO-SELF group had significant increases in knowledge scores. The use of a knowledge and attitude survey, like the PES, as part of a psychoeducational intervention provides an effective foundation for patient education in cancer pain management. This individualized approach to education about pain management may save staff time and improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pain physiology education improves health status and endogenous pain inhibition in fibromyalgia: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira; Paul, Lorna; De Schryver, Mieke; Pascal, Aurelie; Lambrecht, Luc; Nijs, Jo

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that education on pain physiology can have positive effects on pain, disability, and catastrophization in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. A double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed to examine whether intensive pain physiology education is also effective in fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and whether it is able to influence the impaired endogenous pain inhibition of these patients. Thirty FM patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental (receiving pain physiology education) or the control group (receiving pacing self-management education). The primary outcome was the efficacy of the pain inhibitory mechanisms, which was evaluated by spatially accumulating thermal nociceptive stimuli. Secondary outcome measures included pressure pain threshold measurements and questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, behavior, and health status. Assessments were performed at baseline, 2 weeks, and 3 months follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAS were used to reveal possible therapy effects and effect sizes were calculated. After the intervention the experimental group had improved knowledge of pain neurophysiology (P<0.001). Patients from this group worried less about their pain in the short term (P=0.004). Long-term improvements in physical functioning (P=0.046), vitality (P=0.047), mental health (P<0.001), and general health perceptions (P<0.001) were observed. In addition, the intervention group reported lower pain scores and showed improved endogenous pain inhibition (P=0.041) compared with the control group. These results suggest that FM patients are able to understand and remember the complex material about pain physiology. Pain physiology education seems to be a useful component in the treatment of FM patients as it improves health status and endogenous pain inhibition in the long term.

  5. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients.

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression improves pain and perceived control in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Doering, Lynn V; McGuire, Anthony; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Chen, Belinda; Bodán, Rebecca C; Czer, Lawrence S; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression after cardiac surgery (CS) is associated with increased pain and decreased sleep quality. While cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) aimed at depression is effective in relieving depressive symptoms after cardiac surgery, little is known about its ability to ameliorate other common postoperative problems that affect recovery and quality of life. Aims The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of CBT for depression on pain severity, pain interference, sleep, and perceived control in patients recovering from CS. Methods Depressed patients recovering from CS were randomized to receive either eight weeks of CBT or usual care. At baseline and post-intervention, patients completed questionnaires for depressive symptoms, pain, sleep, and perceived control. Group comparisons were conducted using t-tests or chi square analysis. Repeated measures analysis was used to assess the effect of the intervention in changes over time. Results The sample (n=53) included 16.9% women and had a mean age of 67.8±9.2 years. CBT for depression increased perceived control (p<0.001) and decreased pain interference (p=0.02) and pain severity (p=0.03). Group effects remained significant (p<0.05) for perceived control and pain interference and a trend was observed for pain severity (p<0.10) after controlling for variables that differed at baseline. There were no group differences in sleep disturbance over time. Conclusions A depression-focused CBT intervention yields benefits in other common postoperative problems, specifically improved perceived control and decreased pain in depressed cardiac surgery patients. PMID:26115954

  7. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. Objective To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. Design A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38–85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. Outcomes The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Results Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001), standing (P < 0.001) and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). Conclusion This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. Trial registration UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413 PMID:27701428

  8. Patient perspectives of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and methods for improving pain control and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Patak, Lance S; Tait, Alan R; Mirafzali, Leela; Morris, Michelle; Dasgupta, Sunavo; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) attributes that negatively impact patient satisfaction and ability to control pain while using PCA and (2) obtain data on patient perceptions of new PCA design features. We conducted a prospective survey study of postoperative pain control among patients using a PCA device. The survey was designed to evaluate patient satisfaction with pain control, understanding of PCA, difficulties using PCA, lockout-period management, and evaluation of new PCA design features. A total of 350 eligible patients completed the survey (91%). Patients who had difficulties using PCA were less satisfied (P < 0.001) and were more likely to feel unable to control their pain (P < 0.001). Satisfaction and self-reported ability to control pain were not affected by patient education about the PCA. Forty-nine percent of patients reported not knowing if they would receive medicine when they pushed the PCA button, and of these, 22% believed that this uncertainty made their pain worse. The majority of patients preferred the proposed PCA design features for easier use, including a light on the button, making it easier to find (57%), and a PCA button that vibrates (55%) or lights up (70%), alerting the patient that the PCA pump is able to deliver more medicine. A majority of patients, irrespective of their satisfaction with PCA, preferred a new PCA design. Certain attributes of current PCA technology may negatively impact patient experience, and modifications could potentially address these concerns and improve patient outcomes.

  9. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce pain: ■■ Radiation therapy. Different forms of radiation energy are used to shrink the tumor and reduce ... acupressure.) The goal is to change the body’s energy flow so it can heal itself. When receiving ...

  10. The effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse Program to improve pain management in the hospital setting: A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Zoëga, Sigridur; Serlin, Ronald C; Sveinsdottir, Herdis; Hafsteinsdottir, Elin Johanna Gudrun; Fridriksdottir, Nanna; Gretarsdottir, Elfa Tholl; Ward, Sandra Evelyn

    2017-07-16

    The Pain Resource Nurse program is a widely disseminated, evidence-based, nursing staff development program, designed to improve pain management in hospitals. The program has shown promising results, but has never been tested with a rigorous research design. Our objective was to test the effectiveness of the Pain Resource Nurse program. Hypothesized outcomes included improvements in nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and assessment practices, and in patients' participation in decision-making, adequacy of pain management, pain severity, time spent in severe pain, pain interference, and satisfaction. Cluster randomized controlled trial. A 650-bed university hospital in Iceland Participants: The sample consisted of a) patients ≥18 years of age, native speaking, hospitalized for at least 24h, alert and able to participate; and b) registered nurses who worked on the participating units. Twenty three surgical and medical inpatient units were randomly assigned to the Pain Resource Nurse program (n=12) or to wait list control (n=11). The American Pain Society Outcome Questionnaire and the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey were used to collect data from patients and nurses respectively. Baseline data (T1) for patients were collected simultaneously on all units, followed by data collection from nurses. Then randomization took place, and the Pain Resource Nurse program was instituted. Ten months later, follow up (T2) data were collected, after which the nurses on the control group units received the Pain Resource Nurse program. At baseline, data were collected from 305 of the 396 eligible patients and at follow up from 326 of the 392 eligible patients, a 77% and 83% response rate respectively. At baseline, 232 of 479 eligible nurses responded and at follow-up 176 of the eligible 451 nurses responded, a 49% and 39% response rate, respectively. A nested mixed model analysis of covariance revealed that the intervention was successful in changing pain assessment practices, with pain

  11. Does adding ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia safely improve post-thoracotomy pain?

    PubMed

    Mathews, Timothy J; Churchhouse, Antonia M D; Housden, Tessa; Dunning, Joel

    2012-02-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'is the addition of ketamine to morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) following thoracic surgery superior to morphine alone'. Altogether 201 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. This consisted of one systematic review of PCA morphine with ketamine (PCA-MK) trials, one meta-analysis of PCA-MK trials, four randomized controlled trials of PCA-MK, one meta-analysis of trials using a variety of peri-operative ketamine regimes and two cohort studies of PCA-MK. Main outcomes measured included pain score rated on visual analogue scale, morphine consumption and incidence of psychotomimetic side effects/hallucination. Two papers reported the measurements of respiratory function. This evidence shows that adding ketamine to morphine PCA is safe, with a reported incidence of hallucination requiring intervention of 2.9%, and a meta-analysis finding an incidence of all central nervous system side effects of 18% compared with 15% with morphine alone, P = 0.31, RR 1.27 with 95% CI (0.8-2.01). All randomized controlled trials of its use following thoracic surgery found no hallucination or psychological side effect. All five studies in thoracic surgery (n = 243) found reduced morphine requirements with PCA-MK. Pain scores were significantly lower in PCA-MK patients in thoracic surgery papers, with one paper additionally reporting increased patient satisfaction. However, no significant improvement was found in a meta-analysis of five papers studying PCA-MK in a variety of surgical settings. Both papers reporting respiratory outcomes found improved oxygen saturations and PaCO(2) levels in PCA-MK patients following thoracic surgery

  12. Swimming Improves Pain and Functional Capacity of Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Giovana; Jennings, Fabio; Nery Cabral, Michele Vieira; Pirozzi Buosi, Ana Letícia; Natour, Jamil

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of swimming on pain, functional capacity, aerobic capacity, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Randomized controlled trial. Rheumatology outpatient clinics of a university hospital. Women with FM (N=75; age range, 18-60y) randomly assigned to a swimming group (SG) (n=39) or a walking group (WG) (n=36). The SG performed 50 minutes of swimming 3 times a week for 12 weeks, with a heart rate at 11 beats under the anaerobic threshold. The WG performed walking with a heart rate at the anaerobic threshold, with the same duration and frequency as the SG. Participants were evaluated before the exercise protocols (t0), at 6 weeks (t6), and at 12 weeks (t12) after the onset of the protocols. The primary outcome measure was the visual analog scale for pain. The secondary measurements were the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey for quality of life; a spiroergometric test for cardiorespiratory variables; and the timed Up & Go test for functional performance. Patients in both groups experienced improvement in pain after the 12-week program, with no difference between groups (P=.658). The same results were found regarding functional capacity and quality of life. Moreover, no statistical difference between groups was found regarding aerobic capacity over time. Swimming, like walking, is an effective method for reducing pain and improving both functional capacity and quality of life in patients with FM. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effectiveness of a clinical intervention in improving pain control in outpatients with cancer treated by radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, Isabelle . E-mail: isabelle.vallieres@mail.chuq.qc.ca; Aubin, Michele; Blondeau, Lucie; Simard, Serge; Giguere, Anik

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of a multicomponent clinical intervention to reduce pain in outpatients with cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive either a clinical intervention including an information session, the use of a pain diary, and the possibility to contact a physician to adjust the pain medication, or the usual treatment of pain by the staff radiation oncologist. All patients reported their average and worst pain levels at baseline and 2 and 3 weeks after the start of the intervention. Results: The study groups were similar with respect to their baseline characteristics and pain levels at randomization. After 3 weeks, the average and worst pain experienced by patients randomized to the clinical intervention group was significantly inferior to the average pain experienced by patients in the control group (2.9/10 vs. 4.4/10 and 4.2/10 vs. 5.5/10, respectively). Results showed that the experimental group patients decreased their pain levels more than the control group patients did over time. Conclusion: An intervention including patient education, a pain diary, and defining a procedure for therapeutic adjustments can be effective to improve pain relief in outpatients with cancer.

  14. Clinical utility of far-infrared therapy for improvement of vascular access blood flow and pain control in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Jeong; Cho, Eun Hee; Jo, Hye Min; Min, Changwook; Ji, Young Sok; Park, Moo Yong; Kim, Jin Kuk; Hwang, Seung Duk

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintenance of a well-functioning vascular access and minimal needling pain are important goals for achieving adequate dialysis and improving the quality of life in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Far-infrared (FIR) therapy may improve endothelial function and increase access blood flow (Qa) and patency in HD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of FIR therapy on Qa and patency, and needling pain in HD patients. Methods This prospective clinical trial enrolled 25 outpatients who maintained HD with arteriovenous fistula. The other 25 patients were matched as control with age, sex, and diabetes. FIR therapy was administered for 40 minutes during HD 3 times/wk and continued for 12 months. The Qa was measured by the ultrasound dilution method, whereas pain was measured by a numeric rating scale at baseline, then once per month. Results One patient was transferred to another facility, and 7 patients stopped FIR therapy because of an increased body temperature and discomfort. FIR therapy improved the needling pain score from 4 to 2 after 1 year. FIR therapy increased the Qa by 3 months and maintained this change until 1 year, whereas control patients showed the decrease in Qa. The 1-year unassisted patency with FIR therapy was not significantly different from control. Conclusion FIR therapy improved needling pain. Although FIR therapy improved Qa, the unassisted patency was not different compared with the control. A larger and multicenter study is needed to evaluate the effect of FIR therapy. PMID:27069856

  15. Strength Training Improves Fatigue Resistance and Self-Rated Health in Workers with Chronic Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Jay, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is widespread in the working population and leads to muscular fatigue, reduced work capacity, and fear of movement. While ergonomic intervention is the traditional approach to the problem, physical exercise may be an alternative strategy. This secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual care ergonomic training (control). At baseline and follow-up, participants performed a handgrip muscular fatigue test (time above 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force) with simultaneous recording of electromyography. Additionally, participants replied to a questionnaire regarding self-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P < 0.05). Time to fatigue increased by 97% following strength training and this change was correlated to the reduction in fear avoidance (Spearman's rho = −0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267. PMID:27830144

  16. Strength Training Improves Fatigue Resistance and Self-Rated Health in Workers with Chronic Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is widespread in the working population and leads to muscular fatigue, reduced work capacity, and fear of movement. While ergonomic intervention is the traditional approach to the problem, physical exercise may be an alternative strategy. This secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual care ergonomic training (control). At baseline and follow-up, participants performed a handgrip muscular fatigue test (time above 50% of maximal voluntary contraction force) with simultaneous recording of electromyography. Additionally, participants replied to a questionnaire regarding self-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P < 0.05). Time to fatigue increased by 97% following strength training and this change was correlated to the reduction in fear avoidance (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267.

  17. Aquatic therapy improves pain, disability, quality of life, body composition and fitness in sedentary adults with chronic low back pain. A controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Baena-Beato, Pedro Ángel; Artero, Enrique G; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel; Robles-Fuentes, Alejandro; Gatto-Cardia, María Claudia; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effects of a two-month intensive aquatic therapy programme on back pain, disability, quality of life, body composition and health-related fitness in sedentary adults with chronic low back pain. Controlled clinical trial. Community. Forty-nine sedentary patients with chronic low back pain. Patients were allocated into active group (n = 24, two months, five times/week) or waiting list, control group (n = 25) according to space on the programme. Outcomes variables were pain (visual analogue scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index), quality of life (Quality Short-Form Health Survey 36), body composition (weight, body mass index, body fat percentage and skeletal muscle mass) and health-related fitness (sit-and-reach, handgrip strength, curl-up, Rockport 1-mile test). The active group significantly improved low back pain (-3.83 ± 0.35 mm on the visual analogue scale ), disability (-12.7 ± 1.3 points for the Oswestry Disability Index) and the standardized physical component (10.3 ± 1.4 points for the Quality Short-Form Health Survey 36) of quality-of-life domains (P < 0.001), with no significant changes on the standardized mental component (P = 0.114). In relation to body composition and fitness, the active group showed significant improvements (all P-values < 0.01). The control group presented no significant change in any parameter. A two-month intensive aquatic therapy programme of high-frequency (five times/week) decreases levels of back pain and disability, increases quality of life, and improves body composition and health-related fitness in sedentary adults with chronic low back pain.

  18. Improving communication in cancer pain management nursing: a randomized controlled study assessing the efficacy of a communication skills training program.

    PubMed

    Canivet, Delphine; Delvaux, Nicole; Gibon, Anne-Sophie; Brancart, Cyrielle; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication is needed for optimal cancer pain management. This study assessed the efficacy of a general communication skills training program for oncology nurses on communication about pain management. A total of 115 nurses were randomly assigned to a training group (TG) or control group (CG). The assessment included the recording of interviews with a simulated cancer patient at baseline for both groups and after training (TG) or 3 months after baseline (CG). Two psychologists rated the content of interview transcripts to assess cancer pain management communication. Group-by-time effects were measured using a generalized estimating equation. Trained nurses asked the simulated patient more questions about emotions associated with pain (relative rate [RR] = 4.28, p = 0.049) and cognitions associated with pain treatment (RR = 3.23, p < 0.001) and used less paternalistic statements about cancer pain management (RR = 0.40, p = 0.006) compared with untrained nurses. The general communication skills training program improved only a few of the communication strategies needed for optimal cancer pain management in nursing. General communication skills training programs should be consolidated using specific modules focusing on communication skills related to cancer pain management.

  19. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-12-15

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 {mu}g IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions.

  20. Regional anaesthesia to improve pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients: a qualitative systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Schaldenbrand, K; Wallis, B; De Oliveira, G S

    2014-09-01

    Summary The development of analgesic interventions in paediatric surgical patients is often limited by the inherent difficulties of conducting large randomized clinical trials to test interventions in those patients. Regional anaesthesia is a valid strategy to improve postoperative pain in the adult surgical population, but the effects of regional anaesthesia on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric patients are currently not well defined. The main objective of the current review was to systematically evaluate the use of regional anaesthesia techniques to minimize postoperative pain in paediatric patients. A systematic search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of the regional anaesthesia techniques on postoperative pain outcomes in paediatric surgical patients' procedures. Seventy-three studies on 5125 paediatric patients were evaluated. Only few surgical procedures had more than one small randomized controlled trial favouring the use of regional anaesthesia to minimize postoperative pain (ophthalmological surgery, cleft lip repair, inguinal hernia, and urological procedures). Additional evidence is required to support the use of specific regional anaesthesia techniques to improve postoperative pain for several surgical procedures (craniectomy, adenotonsillectomy, appendectomy, cardiac surgery, umbilical hernia repair, upper and lower extremity) in paediatric patients. Currently, only a very limited number of regional anaesthesia techniques have demonstrated significant improvement on postoperative pain outcomes for a restricted number of surgical procedures. More studies are needed in order to establish regional anaesthesia as a valid strategy to improve analgesia in the paediatric surgical population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Resistance exercise improves muscle strength, health status and pain intensity in fibromyalgia--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Anette; Palstam, Annie; Löfgren, Monika; Ernberg, Malin; Bjersing, Jan; Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre; Gerdle, Björn; Kosek, Eva; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa

    2015-06-18

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by persistent widespread pain, increased pain sensitivity and tenderness. Muscle strength in women with FM is reduced compared to healthy women. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a progressive resistance exercise program on muscle strength, health status, and current pain intensity in women with FM. A total of 130 women with FM (age 22-64 years, symptom duration 0-35 years) were included in this assessor-blinded randomized controlled multi-center trial examining the effects of progressive resistance group exercise compared with an active control group. A person-centred model of exercise was used to support the participants' self-confidence for management of exercise because of known risks of activity-induced pain in FM. The intervention was performed twice a week for 15 weeks and was supervised by experienced physiotherapists. Primary outcome measure was isometric knee-extension force (Steve Strong®), secondary outcome measures were health status (FIQ total score), current pain intensity (VAS), 6MWT, isometric elbow-flexion force, hand-grip force, health related quality of life, pain disability, pain acceptance, fear avoidance beliefs, and patient global impression of change (PGIC). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and immediately after the intervention. Long-term follow up comprised the self-reported questionnaires only and was conducted after 13-18 months. Between-group and within-group differences were calculated using non-parametric statistics. Significant improvements were found for isometric knee-extension force (p = 0.010), health status (p = 0.038), current pain intensity (p = 0.033), 6MWT (p = 0.003), isometric elbow flexion force (p = 0.02), pain disability (p = 0.005), and pain acceptance (p = 0.043) in the resistance exercise group (n = 56) when compared to the control group (n = 49). PGIC differed significantly (p = 0.001) in favor of the resistance exercise group at post-treatment examinations

  2. [Improvement of lumbal motor control and trunkmuscle conditions with a novel low back pain prevention exercise program].

    PubMed

    Kovácsné Bobály, Viktória; Szilágyi, Brigitta; Makai, Alexandra; Koller, Ákos; Járomi, Melinda

    2017-01-01

    Ballet dancers often suffer from low back pain. Low back pain can be reduced by strengthening the core muscles with the help of a special exercise program. In the study 62 ballet dancer women (average age: 14.89 ± 1.21 years) were included. Intervention group: n = 30 participant, average age: 14.86 ± 1.00 years, control group: n = 32 participant, average age: 14.91 ± 1.37 years. We examined the pain intensity that occurs during training with visual analog scale, the habitual posture with photogrammetry, the abdominal muscle strength with Kraus-Weber test, the static muscle strength of the trunk muscles with core test and the lumbar motor control with leg lowering test. The intervention group did a trunk prevented exercise program during 3 months, and then we examined them again. In the intervention group the intensity of pain significantly decreased (VAS1: p = 0.012; VAS2: p = 0.021), the abdominal muscle strength significantly improved (K-W. B: p=0.025; K-W. C: p<0.001), the static muscle strength of trunk muscles significantly increased (Core-test: p<0.001) and the lumbar motor control significantly improved in both legs (Leg low. R.: p<0.001; Leg low. L.: p<0.001). Also, the habitual posture greatly improved (frontal view: 34.78%, side view: 52.17%). In ballet dancers with a special exercise program, which improves the conditions of trunk muscles, the motor control of lumbar regions can be improved and the lower back pain and the incidence of injuries can be reduced. Orv., Hetil., 2017, 158(2), 58-66.

  3. Additional Effects of a Physical Therapy Protocol on Headache Frequency, Pressure Pain Threshold, and Improvement Perception in Patients With Migraine and Associated Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Gonçalves, Maria Claudia; Carvalho, Gabriela Ferreira; Florencio, Lidiane Lima; Dach, Fabíola; Speciali, José Geraldo; Bigal, Marcelo Eduardo; Chaves, Thaís Cristina

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the additional effect provided by physical therapy in migraine treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Tertiary university-based hospital. Among the 300 patients approached, 50 women (age range, 18-55y) diagnosed with migraine were randomized into 2 groups: a control group (n=25) and a physiotherapy plus medication group (n=25) (N=50). Both groups received medication for migraine treatment. Additionally, physiotherapy plus medication patients received 8 sessions of physical therapy over 4 weeks, comprised mainly of manual therapy and stretching maneuvers lasting 50 minutes. A blinded examiner assessed the clinical outcomes of headache frequency, intensity, and self-perception of global change and physical outcomes of pressure pain threshold and cervical range of motion. Data were recorded at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. Twenty-three patients experienced side effects from the medication. Both groups reported a significantly reduced frequency of headaches; however, no differences were observed between groups (physiotherapy plus medication patients showed an additional 18% improvement at posttreatment and 12% improvement at follow-up compared with control patients, P>.05). The reduction observed in the physiotherapy plus medication patients was clinically relevant at posttreatment, whereas clinical relevance for control patients was demonstrated only at follow-up. For pain intensity, physiotherapy plus medication patients showed statistical evidence and clinical relevance with reduction posttreatment (P<.05). In addition, they showed better self-perception of global change than control patients (P<.05). The cervical muscle pressure pain threshold increased significantly in the physiotherapy plus medication patients and decreased in the control patients, but statistical differences between groups were observed only in the temporal area (P<.05). No differences were observed between groups regarding cervical range of motion. We cannot

  4. Counseling for Pain Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espin, Olivia M.; Ganikos, Mary L.

    1975-01-01

    New techniques are being developed that enhance the effectiveness of psychological forces in controlling bodily reactions. All of them are powerful tools for the psychological control of pain. This article reviews such techniques and addresses itself to the contributions that counselors can make to alleviate physical pain. (Author)

  5. Peripheral neurostimulation and specific motor training of deep abdominal muscles improve posturomotor control in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Flamand, Véronique H; Moffet, Hélène; Schneider, Cyril

    2013-09-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is associated with an impaired control of transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscle (TrA/IO), volitionally and during anticipatory postural adjustment (delay) along with maladaptive reorganization of primary motor cortex (M1). Specific training of deep trunk muscles and repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (RPMS) improve motor control. We thus tested whether RPMS over TrA/IO combined with training could promote TrA/IO motor control and decrease pain beyond the gains already reached in CLBP. Thirteen CLBP patients, randomly allocated to RPMS and sham groups and compared with 9 pain-free controls, were tested in 1 session before/after (stimulation alone) and after (stimulation+TrA/IO training) combination. TrA/IO motor patterns were recorded during ballistic shoulder flexion using surface electromyography. Transcranial magnetic stimulation tested M1 excitability and short-interval intracortical inhibition. A blinded physical therapist assessed pain, disability, and kinesiophobia. The missing short-interval intracortical inhibition in CLBP was restored by RPMS alone then reduced after combination of RPMS with training. This combination also normalized the (at-first delayed) anticipatory activation of iTrA/IO (ipsilateral to arm raised) and the (at-first shortened) TrA/IO coactivation duration. Sham did not influence. Pain was reduced in both groups but kinesiophobia was decreased only in RPMS 2 weeks later. This study supports that peripheral neurostimulation (adjuvant to training) could improve TrA/IO motor learning and pain in CLBP associated with motor impairment. Testing of enlarged samples over several sessions should question the long-term influence of this new approach in CLBP.

  6. Individualized low-load motor control exercises and education versus a high-load lifting exercise and education to improve activity, pain intensity, and physical performance in patients with low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Björn; Berglund, Lars; Michaelson, Peter; Aasa, Ulrika

    2015-02-01

    Randomized controlled trial. Low back pain is a common disorder. Patients with low back pain frequently have aberrant and pain-provocative movement patterns that often are addressed with motor control exercises. To compare the effects of low-load motor control (LMC) exercise and those of a high-load lifting (HLL) exercise. Seventy participants with recurrent low back pain, who were diagnosed with nociceptive mechanical pain as their dominating pain pattern, were randomized to either LMC or HLL exercise treatments. Participants were offered 12 treatment sessions over an 8-week period. All participants were also provided with education regarding pain mechanisms. Participants were assessed prior to and following treatment. The primary outcome measures were activity (the Patient-Specific Functional Scale) and average pain intensity over the last 7 days (visual analog scale). The secondary outcome measure was a physical performance test battery that included 1 strength, 3 endurance, and 7 movement control tests for the lumbopelvic region. Both interventions resulted in significant within-group improvements in pain intensity, strength, and endurance. The LMC group showed significantly greater improvement on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (4.2 points) compared with the HLL group (2.5 points) (P<.001). There were no significant between-group differences in pain intensity (P=.505), strength, and 1 of the 3 endurance tests. However, the LMC group showed an increase (from 2.9 to 5.9) on the movement control test subscale, whereas the HLL group showed no change (from 3.9 to 3.1) (P<.001). An LMC intervention may result in superior outcomes in activity, movement control, and muscle endurance compared to an HLL intervention, but not in pain intensity, strength, or endurance. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01061632). Therapy, level 2b-.

  7. Interprofessional education to improve pain management.

    PubMed

    Irajpour, Alireza; Norman, Ian; Griffiths, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Pain is a prevalent problem in community care and there is evidence that knowledge and understanding of pain management can be lacking among health professionals, leading to under-treatment. This mini-review aimed to assess the effectiveness of interprofessional education on health professionals' pain documentation and on the pain intensity reported by patients. A search of key databases identified two randomized controlled trials and two quasi-experimental studies. Two studies assessed change in pain documentation following interprofessional education; one revealed a statistically significant improvement and another indicated 29% increase in documentation of pain assessments. Two studies demonstrated no significant changes in patient outcomes, while the other revealed significant improvements. However, integration of the results was not possible because of the various methods of measurement used by the different researchers. Although broadly supportive of interprofessional education, the evidence is not helpful in determining the best way of improving pain management in the community.

  8. Plaque control improves the painful symptoms of oral lichen planus gingival lesions. A short-term study.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Daniela S; Jeremias, Fabiano; Capela, Marisa V; Onofre, Mirian A; Massucato, Elaine Maria S; Orrico, Silvana R P

    2013-11-01

    Lichen planus is a mucocutaneous disease with manifestation in the oral mucosa, the gingiva being one of the most affected regions. In some cases, the lesion may be painful and lead to fragility of the tissues, so that precise diagnosis and adequate treatment are indispensible factors for improving the clinical condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of plaque control in the improvement of clinical features and painful symptoms of oral lichen planus with gingival involvement. Twenty patients diagnosed with gingival lichen planus confirmed by histopathological examination were selected. The patients were evaluated by a trained examiner, with regard to the clinical features of the lesions [Index of Escudier et al. (Br J Dermatol, 157, 2007, 765)]; painful symptoms (Visual Analog Scale); and periodontally, as regards the visible plaque and gingival bleeding indices. Periodontal treatment consisted of supragingival scaling and oral hygiene instruction, with professional plaque removal afterward for a period of 4 weeks. The entire sample was evaluated at the baseline and at the conclusion of treatment, and the results were analyzed by the Wilcoxon nonparametric test. The data demonstrated that the majority of patients were women (90%), with a mean age of 55.9 years. Periodontal treatment resulted in statistically significant reduction (P < 0.05) in the periodontal indices, with consequent improvement in the clinical features and painful symptoms of the lesions. It was demonstrated that plaque control was effective in improving the clinical features and painful symptoms of oral lichen planus with gingival involvement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Hydrotherapy improves pain and function in older women with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Marcos; Cisneros, Lígia; Dias, Rosângela; Fritsch, Carolina; Gomes, Wellington; Pereira, Leani; Santos, Mary Luci; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique

    2017-07-05

    Currently, there is poor evidence of the effect of hydrotherapy alone on patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis. The study aimed to assess the impact of hydrotherapy on pain, function, and muscle function in older women with knee osteoarthritis. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of hydrotherapy in women with knee osteoarthritis. Seventy-three women aged 65 and older were randomized to hydrotherapy (n=36) or a control group (n=37). The hydrotherapy group received the intervention program in a heated pool (twice per week for six weeks) and an educational protocol while the control group received an educational protocol only. Primary outcomes (before and post-treatment) were pain intensity (0-100) and function (0-100), assessed with the WOMAC questionnaire. Secondary outcomes (before and post-treatment) were knee extensor and knee flexor muscle performance (strength, power, and endurance), assessed by an isokinetic dynamometer. The magnitude of change between the groups for the outcomes was calculated using linear regression models adjusted by baseline outcome values. The hydrotherapy group had better outcomes for pain (adjusted mean difference=11 points, 95% CI: 3-18) and function (adjusted mean difference=12 points, 95% CI: 5-18). Patients receiving hydrotherapy had better performance for knee flexor and extensor strength, knee flexor power, and knee extensor endurance. Older women with knee osteoarthritis are likely to have benefits from a course of hydrotherapy exercises. Registry of clinical trials (Trial number RBR-8F57KR) - http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-8f57kr/. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. IMPROVE trial: a randomized controlled trial of patient-controlled analgesia for sickle cell painful episodes: rationale, design challenges, initial experience, and recommendations for future studies.

    PubMed

    Dampier, Carlton D; Smith, Wally R; Wager, Carrie G; Kim, Hae-Young; Bell, Margaret C; Miller, Scott T; Weiner, Debra L; Minniti, Caterina P; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Ataga, Kenneth I; Eckman, James R; Hsu, Lewis L; McClish, Donna; McKinlay, Sonja M; Molokie, Robert; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Telen, Marilyn J

    2013-04-01

    The hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) is pain from a vaso-occlusive crisis. Although ambulatory pain accounts for most days in pain, pain is also the most common cause of hospitalization and is typically treated with parenteral opioids. The evidence base is lacking for most analgesic practice in SCD, particularly for the optimal opioid dosing for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), in part because of the challenges of the trial design and conduct for this rare disease. The purpose of this report is to describe our Network's experiences with protocol development, implementation, and analysis, including overall study design, the value of pain assessments rather than 'crisis' resolution as trial endpoints, and alternative statistical analysis strategies. The Improving Pain Management and Outcomes with Various Strategies (IMPROVE) PCA trial was a multisite inpatient randomized controlled trial comparing two PCA-dosing strategies in adults and children with SCD and acute pain conducted by the SCD Clinical Research Network. The specified primary endpoint was a 25-mm change in a daily average pain intensity using a Visual Analogue Scale, and a number of related pain intensity and pain interference measures were selected as secondary efficacy outcomes. A time-to-event analysis strategy was planned for the primary endpoint. Of 1116 individuals admitted for pain at 31 participating sites over a 6-month period, 38 were randomized and 4 withdrawn. The trial was closed early due to poor accrual, reflecting a substantial number of challenges encountered during trial implementation. While some of the design issues were unique to SCD or analgesic studies, many of the trial implementation challenges reflected the increasing complexity of conducting clinical trials in the inpatient setting with multiple care providers and evolving electronic medical record systems, particularly in the context of large urban academic medical centers. Complicated clinical organization of many

  11. Controlling acute pain to improve the quality of postoperative pain management: an update from the European Society of Regional Anesthesia meeting held in Maastricht (September 2016).

    PubMed

    Andrés, Jose De; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Huygen, Frank; Neugebauer, Edmund; Fawcett, William

    2017-08-10

    Improvement in postoperative pain management remains a global concern with a significant unmet need for patients. This was the focus of a 'Change Pain' session at the 35th European Society of Regional Anesthesia meeting (Maastricht, September 2016). Awareness of the size and nature of the problem is important to improve postoperative pain management strategies. Optimal treatment of acute pain should aim to avoid long-term sequelae such as the development of chronic pain disorders (e.g., phantom limb pain). Cases highlighting unsuccessful and successful strategies to manage individuals undergoing surgery were presented. The benefits of personalized care, encouraging patients to be more involved in decisions regarding their treatment and their preferred clinical outcomes were discussed and considered to be a step forward in acute pain management.

  12. Improvement in pain intensity, spine stiffness, and mobility during a controlled individualized physiotherapy program in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gyurcsik, Zsuzsanna Némethné; András, Anita; Bodnár, Nóra; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szántó, Sándor

    2012-12-01

    Physical therapy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is important for maintaining or improving mobility, fitness, functioning, and global health. It also plays a role in the prevention and management of structural deformities. In this study we assessed the functional status of AS patients in relation to disease duration and activity. Furthermore, in volunteering patients we analyzed the efficacy of a controlled, individualized physiotherapeutic program. Altogether, clinical data of 75 AS patients were retrospectively analyzed. Anthropometrical data, duration since diagnosis and disease activity, pain intensity, tender points, sacroiliac joint involvement determined by X-ray, functional condition, and physical activity level were recorded. Subjective, functional, and physical tests were performed. Out of the 75 patients, 10 volunteered to undergo a complex physical exercise program twice a week for 3 months. The program included 1.5 h of general posture reeducation, manual mobilization of the spine, and pelvic-, upper-, and lower-extremity exercises, stretching with joint prevention strategies and functional exercises. In AS, pain intensity recorded on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), BASFI, BASDAI, modified Schober index, chest expansion and occiput-to-wall distance values showed significant correlation with disease activity. The 3-month physical therapy improved several subjective and functional parameters, and markedly reduced pain intensity and spine stiffness. A complex, individualized physical therapy program may be useful and should be introduced to AS patients in order to maintain and increase spine mobility, preserve functional capacity, decrease the pain and stiffness.

  13. A 13-Weeks Mindfulness Based Pain Management Program Improves Psychological Distress in Patients with Chronic Pain Compared with Waiting List Controls

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eradication of pain is seldom an option in chronic pain management. Hence, mindfulness meditation has become popular in pain management. Objective: This pilot study compared the effect of a 13-weeks cognitive behavioural therapy program with integrated mindfulness meditation (CBTm) in patients with chronic non-malignant pain with a control condition. It was hypothesised that the CBTm program would reduce pain intensity and psychological distress compared to the control condition and that level of mindfulness and acceptance both would be associated with the reduction in pain intensity and psychological distress. Methods: A case-control design was used and data were collected from a convenience sample of 70 patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Fifty patients were consecutively recruited to the CBTm intervention and 20 patients matched waiting list controls. Assessments of clinical pain and psychological distress were performed in both groups at baseline and after 13 weeks. Results: The CBTm program reduced depression, anxiety and pain-catastrophizing compared with the control group. Increased level of mindfulness and acceptance were associated with change in psychological distress with the exception of depression, which was only associated with change in level of mindfulness. Surprisingly, changes in level of mindfulness did not correlate with changes in acceptance. Conclusions: The results indicate that different mechanisms are targeted with cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness. The finding that changes in level of mindfulness did not correlate with changes in acceptance may indicate that acceptance is not a strict prerequisite for coping with pain related distress. PMID:27708686

  14. Does moderate-to-high intensity Nordic walking improve functional capacity and pain in fibromyalgia? A prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of moderate-to-high intensity Nordic walking (NW) on functional capacity and pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Methods A total of 67 women with FM were recruited to the study and randomized either to moderate-to-high intensity Nordic Walking (n = 34, age 48 ± 7.8 years) or to a control group engaging in supervised low-intensity walking (LIW, n = 33, age 50 ± 7.6 years). Primary outcomes were the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire Pain scale (FIQ Pain). Secondary outcomes were: exercise heart rate in a submaximal ergometer bicycle test, the FIQ Physical (activity limitations) and the FIQ total score. Results A total of 58 patients completed the post-test. Significantly greater improvement in the 6MWT was found in the NW group (P = 0.009), as compared with the LIW group. No between-group difference was found for the FIQ Pain (P = 0.626). A significantly larger decrease in exercise heart rate (P = 0.020) and significantly improved scores on the FIQ Physical (P = 0.027) were found in the NW group as compared with the LIW group. No between-group difference was found for the change in the FIQ total. The effect sizes were moderate for the above mentioned outcomes. Conclusions Moderate-to-high intensity aerobic exercise by means of Nordic walking twice a week for 15 weeks was found to be a feasible mode of exercise, resulting in improved functional capacity and a decreased level of activity limitations. Pain severity did not change over time during the exercise period. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00643006. PMID:20942911

  15. An educational intervention to reduce pain and improve pain management for Malawian people living with HIV/AIDS and their family carers: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nkhoma, Kennedy; Seymour, Jane; Arthur, Antony

    2013-07-13

    Many HIV/AIDS patients experience pain often due to advanced HIV/AIDS infection and side effects of treatment. In sub-Saharan Africa, pain management for people with HIV/AIDS is suboptimal. With survival extended as a direct consequence of improved access to antiretroviral therapy, the prevalence of HIV/AIDS related pain is increasing. As most care is provided at home, the management of pain requires patient and family involvement. Pain education is an important aspect in the management of pain in HIV/AIDS patients. Studies of the effectiveness of pain education interventions for people with HIV/AIDS have been conducted almost exclusively in western countries. A randomised controlled trial is being conducted at the HIV and palliative care clinics of two public hospitals in Malawi. To be eligible, patient participants must have a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS (stage III or IV). Carer participants must be the individual most involved in the patient's unpaid care. Eligible participants are randomised to either: (1) a 30-minute face-to-face educational intervention covering pain assessment and management, augmented by a leaflet and follow-up telephone call at two weeks; or (2) usual care. Those allocated to the usual care group receive the educational intervention after follow-up assessments have been conducted (wait-list control group). The primary outcome is pain severity measured by the Brief Pain Inventory. Secondary outcomes are pain interference, patient knowledge of pain management, patient quality of life, carer knowledge of pain management, caregiver motivation and carer quality of life. Follow-up assessments are conducted eight weeks after randomisation by palliative care nurses blind to allocation. This randomised controlled trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa among people living with HIV/AIDS and their carers will assess whether a pain education intervention is effective in reducing pain and improving pain management, quality of life and carer motivation. Current

  16. Effect of improving depression care on pain and functional outcomes among older adults with arthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Elizabeth H B; Katon, Wayne; Von Korff, Michael; Tang, Lingqi; Williams, John W; Kroenke, Kurt; Hunkeler, Enid; Harpole, Linda; Hegel, Mark; Arean, Patricia; Hoffing, Marc; Della Penna, Richard; Langston, Chris; Unützer, Jürgen

    2003-11-12

    Depression and arthritis are disabling and common health problems in late life. Depression is also a risk factor for poor health outcomes among arthritis patients. To determine whether enhancing care for depression improves pain and functional outcomes in older adults with depression and arthritis. Preplanned subgroup analyses of Improving Mood-Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT), a randomized controlled trial of 1801 depressed older adults (> or =60 years), which was performed at 18 primary care clinics from 8 health care organizations in 5 states across the United States from July 1999 to August 2001. A total of 1001 (56%) reported coexisting arthritis at baseline. Antidepressant medications and/or 6 to 8 sessions of psychotherapy (Problem-Solving Treatment in Primary Care). Depression, pain intensity (scale of 0 to 10), interference with daily activities due to arthritis (scale of 0 to 10), general health status, and overall quality-of-life outcomes assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. In addition to reduction in depressive symptoms, the intervention group compared with the usual care group at 12 months had lower mean (SE) scores for pain intensity (5.62 [0.16] vs 6.15 [0.16]; between-group difference, -0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.92 to -0.14; P =.009), interference with daily activities due to arthritis (4.40 [0.18] vs 4.99 [0.17]; between-group difference, -0.59; 95% CI, -1.00 to -0.19; P =.004), and interference with daily activities due to pain (2.92 [0.07] vs 3.17 [0.07]; between-group difference, -0.26; 95% CI, -0.41 to -0.10; P =.002). Overall health and quality of life were also enhanced among intervention patients relative to control patients at 12 months. In a large and diverse population of older adults with arthritis (mostly osteoarthritis) and comorbid depression, benefits of improved depression care extended beyond reduced depressive symptoms and included decreased pain as well as improved functional status and

  17. Intrathecal ketorolac does not improve acute or chronic pain after hip arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Bauer, Maria; Curry, Regina; Larsson, Anders; Sessler, Daniel I; Eisenach, James C

    2014-10-01

    Hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli following surgery has been reported in patients who subsequently develop chronic pain after surgery. In animals, peripheral injury increases prostaglandin production in the spinal cord, and spinal cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduce hypersensitivity after injury. We therefore tested the hypothesis that spinal ketorolac reduces hypersensitivity and acute and chronic pain after hip arthroplasty ( www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT 00621530). Sixty-two patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty with spinal anesthesia were randomized to receive 13.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine with spinal saline or 13.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine with 2 mg preservative-free ketorolac. The primary outcome was area of hypersensitivity surrounding the wound 48 h after surgery, but this only occurred in 4 patients, precluding assessment of this outcome. The groups did not differ in acute pain, acute opioid use, or pain incidence or severity at 2 and 6 months after surgery. There were no serious adverse events. Our results suggest that a single spinal dose of ketorolac does not substantially reduce acute surgical pain and is thus unlikely to reduce the risk of persistent incisional pain.

  18. Intrathecal ketorolac does not improve acute or chronic pain after hip arthroplasty: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Bauer, Maria; Curry, Regina; Larsson, Anders; Sessler, Daniel I.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mechanical stimuli following surgery has been reported in patients who subsequently develop chronic pain after surgery. In animals, peripheral injury increases prostaglandin production in the spinal cord, and spinal cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduce hypersensitivity after injury. We therefore tested the hypothesis that spinal ketorolac reduces hypersensitivity and acute and chronic pain after hip arthroplasty (www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT 00621530). Sixty-two patients having total hip arthroplasty with spinal anesthesia were randomized to receive 13.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine with spinal saline or 13.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine with 2 mg preservative-free ketorolac. The primary outcome was area of hypersensitivity surrounding the wound 48 hr after surgery, but this only occurred in 4 patients, precluding assessment of this outcome. The groups did not differ in acute pain, acute opioid use, or pain incidence or severity 2 and 6 months after surgery. There were no serious adverse events. Our results suggest that a single spinal dose of ketorolac does not substantially reduce acute surgical pain, and is thus unlikely to reduce the risk of persistent incisional pain. PMID:24535482

  19. Glia as the “bad guys”: Implications for improving clinical pain control and the clinical utility of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Linda R.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Ledeboer, Annemarie; Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Milligan, Erin D.; Maier, Steven F.

    2007-01-01

    Within the past decade, there has been increasing recognition that glia are far more than simply “housekeepers” for neurons. This review explores two recently recognized roles of glia (microglia and astrocytes) in: (a) creating and maintaining enhanced pain states such as neuropathic pain, and (b) compromising the efficacy of morphine and other opioids for pain control. While glia have little-to-no role in pain under basal conditions, pain is amplified when glia become activated, inducing the release of proinflammatory products, especially proinflammatory cytokines. How glia are triggered to become activated is a key issue, and appears to involve a number of neuron-to-glia signals including neuronal chemokines, neurotransmitters, and substances released by damaged, dying and dead neurons. In addition, glia become increasingly activated in response to repeated administration of opioids. Products of activated glia increase neuronal excitability via numerous mechanisms, including direct receptor-mediated actions, upregulation of excitatory amino acid receptor function, downregulation of GABA receptor function, and so on. These downstream effects of glial activation amplify pain, suppress acute opioid analgesia, contribute to the apparent loss of opioid analgesia upon repeated opioid administration (tolerance), and contribute to the development of opioid dependence. The potential implications of such glial regulation of pain and opioid actions are vast, suggestive that targeting glia and their proinflammatory products may provide a novel and effective therapy for controlling clinical pain syndromes and increasing the clinical utility of analgesic drugs. PMID:17175134

  20. A randomized controlled trial of the effect of participatory ergonomic low back pain training on workplace improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Hayashida, Kenshi; Kusumoto, Akira; Nagata, Tomohisa; Mori, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the effects of participatory workplace improvement (PWI) -based provision of ergonomic training and ergonomic action checklists (ACLs) to on-site managers on workplace improvement activities for low back pain (LBP). Methods: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted at a manufacturing company in Japan. Teams entered in the study were randomly assigned to a control and an intervention group. A total of three interventional training sessions on methods of ergonomics were provided to on-site managers in the intervention group, with 1-month intervals between sessions. Ergonomic ACLs were provided at the same time. After completion of the training sessions, each team then provided a report of improvements each month for the next 10 months. Two people in charge of safety and health chose two major objectives of the implemented activities from the five categories. The reported number of improvements was analyzed using a Poisson regression model. Results: In the intervention group, although the incident rate ratio (IRR) of PWIs in countermeasures for the LBP category was significantly elevated after the training sessions, the IRR of improvements decreased over time during the 10-month follow-up period. No significant difference was observed in the IRR of total PWIs in either the control or intervention group. Conclusions: PWI-based provision of ergonomic training sessions and ergonomics ACLs to on-site managers was shown to be effective for workplace improvement activities targeted at LBP. However, because the effects decrease over time, efforts should be made to maintain the effects through regular interventions. PMID:28320978

  1. Improving paediatric pain management: introducing the 'Pain Passport'.

    PubMed

    Newstead, Beth A; Armitage, Sarah; Appelboam, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The 'Pain Passport' is a novel method of improving the management of pain in children. It consists of a leaflet carried by the patient which records serial pain scores. It attempts to empower patients and prompt medical and nursing staff to evaluate the child's pain. Preliminary audit data in support of this concept are encouraging.

  2. OnabotulinumtoxinA Improves Pain in Patients With Post-Stroke Spasticity: Findings From a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wissel, Jörg; Ganapathy, Vaidyanathan; Ward, Anthony B; Borg, Jörgen; Ertzgaard, Per; Herrmann, Christoph; Haggstrom, Anders; Sakel, Mohamed; Ma, Julia; Dimitrova, Rozalina; Fulford-Smith, Antony; Gillard, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Patients with post-stroke spasticity (PSS) commonly experience pain in affected limbs, which may impact quality of life. To assess onabotulinumtoxinA for pain in patients with PSS from the BOTOX(®) Economic Spasticity Trial, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Patients with PSS (N = 273) were randomized to 22- to 34-week double-blind treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA + standard care (SC) or placebo injection + SC and were eligible to receive open-label onabotulinumtoxinA up to 52 weeks. Assessments included change from baseline on the 11-point pain numeric rating scale, proportion of patients with baseline pain ≥4 achieving ≥30% and ≥50% improvement in pain, and pain interference with work at Week 12, end of double-blind treatment, and Week 52. At baseline, most patients (74.3%) experienced pain and 47.4% had pain ≥4 (pain subgroup). Mean pain reduction from baseline at Week 12 was significantly greater with onabotulinumtoxinA + SC (-0.77, 95% CI -1.14 to -0.40) than placebo + SC (-0.13, 95% CI -0.51 to 0.24; P < 0.05). Higher proportions of patients in the pain subgroup achieved ≥30% and ≥50% reductions in pain at Week 12 with onabotulinumtoxinA + SC (53.7% and 37.0%, respectively) compared with placebo (28.8% and 18.6%, respectively; P < 0.05). Reductions in pain were sustained through Week 52. Compared with placebo + SC, onabotulinumtoxinA consistently reduced pain interference with work. This is the first randomized, placebo-controlled trial demonstrating statistically significant and clinically meaningful reductions in pain and pain interference with work with onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with PSS. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Postoperative pain control in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    van den Nieuwenhuyzen, M C; Janss, R A; Brand, R; van Kleef, J W

    1994-04-30

    To determine how postoperative analgesia care is managed in the Netherlands. Descriptive study (questionnaire). Departments of anaesthesiology in all 168 Dutch hospitals. Questionnaires were sent inquiring about postoperative pain therapies and their complications, the organisation and management of postoperative analgesic care, the importance of effective pain control, factors of influence on patient's assessment of pain and the management of the quality of postoperative analgesia. The questionnaires of 73% (n = 122) of the hospitals were suitable for analysis. Locoregional analgesic techniques are used, but intermittent intramuscular administration of an opioid is still the analgesic therapy of choice in the postoperative period. 89% of the interviewed anaesthesiologists assess the average intensity of postoperative pain as moderate or severe, and more than half of the interviewed anaesthesiologists answered that effective postoperative pain management is of substantial influence on the postoperative recovery of the patient. It is essential to improve postoperative pain control in the Netherlands. Frequent assessments and precise documentation of the intensity of pain and pain relief, on which further therapy can be based, might be a first step in improving postoperative pain control. Optimal postoperative pain management requires the input of equipment and staff.

  4. Topical lidocaine to improve oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth ulcers: a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Sandy M; McCarthy, Michelle; Tancharoen, Chasari; Lee, Katherine J; Davidson, Andrew; Babl, Franz E

    2014-03-01

    We establish the efficacy of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions compared with placebo. This was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of viscous lidocaine versus placebo at a single pediatric emergency department. Study staff, clinicians, nurses, caregivers, and participants were blinded to the group assignment. Children with acute infectious ulcerative mouth conditions (gingivostomatitis, ulcerative pharyngitis, or hand, foot, and mouth disease) and poor oral fluid intake were randomized to receive 0.15 mL/kg of either 2% viscous lidocaine or placebo with identical appearance and flavor. The primary outcome was the amount of fluid ingested in the 60 minutes after administration of the intervention, with a difference in intake of 4 mL/kg considered clinically important. Secondary outcomes were specific milliliter per kilogram fluid targets and incidence of adverse events. One hundred participants were recruited (50 per treatment group), all of whom completed the 60-minute fluid trial period. Oral intake 1 hour after drug administration was similar in both groups: lidocaine median 8.49 mL/kg (interquartile range 4.07, 13.84 mL/kg) versus placebo 9.31 mL/kg (interquartile range 3.06, 15.18 mL/kg); difference in medians 0.82 mL/kg (95% confidence interval -2.52 to 3.26); Mann-Whitney P=.90. Likewise, short-term secondary outcomes were similar between the groups and there were no adverse events in either group. Viscous lidocaine is not superior to a flavored gel placebo in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth ulcers. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Buprenorphine Transdermal System Improves Sleep Quality and Reduces Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Low Back Pain: Results from Two Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Yarlas, Aaron; Miller, Kate; Wen, Warren; Lynch, Shau Yu; Ripa, Steven R; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of buprenorphine (Butrans®) transdermal System (BTDS) treatment on sleep outcomes for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain (CLBP). Two enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal, double-blind, controlled trials examined BTDS treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Trial I evaluated BTDS 10 and 20 mcg/hour against a placebo control among opioid-naïve patients. Trial II compared BTDS 20 mcg/hour against a lower-dose control (BTDS 5 mcg/hour) among opioid-experienced patients. The patient-reported Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) assessed overall sleep quality (Sleep Problems Index [SPI]), Disturbance, and other sleep outcomes. In each trial, MOS-SS scores were compared between target treatment and control arms during the 12-week double-blind phase. Correspondence of changes in sleep outcomes and pain severity and the degree to which pain reduction mediates treatment impact on sleep outcomes were examined. Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were collected from 541 (Trial I) and 441 (Trial II) patients prior to randomization and from 369 (Trial I) and 274 (Trial II) patients at week 12. Patients receiving target treatment showed statistically significantly more improvement in SPI and Disturbance scores at 12 weeks than their respective controls (Ps < 0.05). Improvements in SPI and Disturbance for target treatment arms were statistically larger those of the controls by week 4 of the double-blind phase. The clinical significance of these differences was not determined. Pain reduction predicted improvements in sleep outcomes. Buprenorphine Transdermal System improved sleep quality and disturbance for opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Benefits of BTDS for these sleep outcomes emerged within 4 weeks and were maintained over the entire 12-week treatment period. © 2015 Optum. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of

  6. Parenting in the context of chronic pain: a controlled study of parents with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Anna C; Fales, Jessica L

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to describe what adults with chronic pain experience in their role as parents, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods. The first aim was to compare parents with chronic pain to parents without chronic pain on perceptions of their adolescent's pain, parental response to pain, and catastrophizing beliefs about pain. The study also examined predictors of parental protective behaviors, and examined whether these associations differed by study group. Parents with chronic pain (n=58) and parents without chronic pain (n=72) participated, and completed questionnaire measures of pain characteristics and pain interference, as well as measures of parental catastrophizing and protective pain responses. Parents with chronic pain also completed a structured interview about their experience of being a parent. Interview responses were videotaped and subsequently coded for content. Compared with controls, parents with chronic pain endorsed more pain in their adolescents, and were more likely to catastrophize about their adolescent's pain and respond with protective behaviors. Parent's own pain interference and the perception of higher pain in their adolescent was associated with increased protective parenting in the chronic pain group. Qualitative coding revealed a number of areas of common impact of chronic pain on parenting. Chronic pain impacts everyday parenting activities and emotions, and impacts pain-specific parent responses that are known to be related to increased pain and pain catastrophizing in children and adolescents. Parents with chronic pain might benefit from interventions that address potential parenting difficulties, and might improve outcomes for their children.

  7. Deep Neuromuscular Block Improves Surgical Conditions during Bariatric Surgery and Reduces Postoperative Pain: A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, Bart; Martini, Chris H.; Boon, Martijn; Olofsen, Erik; in ‘t Veld, Bas; Liem, Ronald S. L.; Knook, Mireille T. T.; Swank, Dingeman J.; Dahan, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background It remains unknown whether the administration of a deep neuromuscular block (NMB) during bariatric surgery improves surgical conditions and patient outcome. The authors studied the effect of deep versus moderate NMB in laparoscopic bariatric surgery on surgical conditions and postoperative pain. Methods and Results One hundred patients scheduled to undergo elective bariatric surgery were randomized to a deep NMB (post-tetanic-count 2–3) or a moderate NMB (train-of-four 1–2). The quality of the surgical field was scored using the Leiden-Surgical Rating Scale (L-SRS), a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (extremely poor conditions) to 5 (optimal conditions). Three surgeons scored the L-SRS at 10-min intervals during surgery; postoperative pain scores were obtained in the postanesthesia-care-unit (PACU) and on the ward. Mean (95% confidence interval) L-SRS scores in moderate NMB 4.2 (4.0–4.4) versus 4.8 (4.7–4.9) in deep NMB (p < 0.001). Moderate NMB resulted in 17% of scores at L-SRS scores of 1–3, while deep NMB resulted in 100% scores at the high end of the L-SRS (4–5). Deep NMB led to improved pain scores in the PACU (4.6 (4.2–4.9) versus 3.9 (3.6–4.4), p = 0.03) and reduced shoulder pain on the ward (1.8 (1.5–2.1) versus 1.3 (1.1–1.5), p = 0.03). A composite score of pain and opioid use in the PACU favoured deep NMB (p = 0.001). Conclusions In bariatric surgery, deep relaxation has advantages for surgeon and patient. Compared to moderate NMB, deep NMB produced stable and improved surgical conditions with less postoperative pain. PMID:27936214

  8. Does Postural Awareness Contribute to Exercise-Induced Improvements in Neck Pain Intensity? A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Tai Chi and Neck Exercises.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Wayne, Peter M; Fehr, Johannes; Stumpe, Christoph; Dobos, Gustav; Cramer, Holger

    2017-08-15

    Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. This secondary analysis aims to examine associations of improvement of chronic neck pain with patients' and intervention-related characteristics. Previous research has found that Tai Chi and neck exercises significantly improved chronic nonspecific neck pain; however, the factors for treatment success remain unclear. Subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group Tai Chi or conventional neck exercises, and they attended 12 weekly sessions of 60 to 90 minutes. The interventions included exercises to improve body awareness, that is, interoceptive and postural awareness. A linear forward stepwise regression analysis was conducted to examine associations with improvements in neck pain intensity. Potential predictor variables included baseline pain, age, sex, the type of intervention, attendance rate and home practice duration, and changes in psychological well-being, perceived stress, and postural and interoceptive awareness during the study. Overall 75 patients were randomized into Tai Chi or conventional exercises, with the majority being women (78.7%). Participants reported an average pain intensity of 50.7 ± 20.4 mm visual analog scale at baseline, and the average reduction of pain intensity in both groups was 21.4 ± 21.3 mm visual analog scale. Regression analysis revealed that reductions in pain intensity from baseline to 12 weeks were predicted by higher pain intensity at baseline (r = 0.226, P < 0.001), a decrease in anxiety (r = 0.102, P = 0.001), and an increase in postural awareness (r = 0.078, P = 0.0033), explaining a total of 40.6% of variance. Neck pain improvement was significantly associated with changes in postural awareness in subject with chronic nonspecific neck pain independent of treatment characteristics. Training of postural awareness might be an important mechanism of action of different exercise-based interventions

  9. Protocol for a placebo-controlled, within-participants crossover trial evaluating the efficacy of intranasal oxytocin to improve pain and function among women with chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Rash, Joshua A; Toivonen, Kirsti; Robert, Magali; Nasr-Esfahani, Maryam; Jarrell, John F; Campbell, Tavis S

    2017-04-16

    This protocol presents the rationale and design for a trial evaluating the efficacy of intranasal oxytocin in improving pain and function among women with chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide traditionally recognised for involvement in labour, delivery and lactation. Novel evidence suggests that oxytocin decreases pain sensitivity in humans. While oxytocin administration has been reported to lower pain sensitivity among patients experiencing chronic back pain, headache, constipation and colon pain, no research has evaluated the association between intranasal oxytocin and chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain. The association between oxytocin and pain may differ in women with chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain relative to other chronic pain conditions because of the abundance of oxytocin receptors in the uterus. This is a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, within-participants crossover trial. 50 women with chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain will be recruited through a local chronic pain centre and gynaecology clinics. Women will complete baseline measures and be randomised to an experimental or control condition that involve 2 weeks of self-administering twice-daily doses of 24 IU intranasal oxytocin or placebo, respectively. Women will then undergo a 2-week washout period before crossing over to receive the condition that they had not yet received. The primary outcome will be pain and function measured using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form. Secondary outcomes include emotional function, sleep disturbance and global impression of change. This trial will provide data on the 14-day safety and side-effect profile of intranasal oxytocin self-administered as an adjuvant treatment for chronic pelvic musculoskeletal pain. This trial was granted approval from Health Canada and the University of Calgary Conjoint Health Research Ethics Board, and is registered online at ClinicalTrials.gov (#NCT02888574). Results will

  10. Can exposure and acceptance strategies improve functioning and life satisfaction in people with chronic pain and whiplash-associated disorders (WAD)? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Ahlqvist, Josefin; Bring, Annika; Melin, Lennart; Olsson, Gunnar L

    2008-01-01

    Although 14% to 42% of people with whiplash injuries end up with chronic debilitating pain, there is still a paucity of empirically supported treatments for this group of patients. In chronic pain management, there is increasing consensus regarding the importance of a behavioural medicine approach to symptoms and disability. Cognitive behaviour therapy has proven to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic pain. An approach that promotes acceptance of, or willingness to experience, pain and other associated negative private events (e.g. fear, anxiety, and fatigue) instead of reducing or controlling symptoms has received increasing attention. Although the empirical support for treatments emphasizing exposure and acceptance (such as acceptance and commitment therapy) is growing, there is clearly a need for more outcome studies, especially randomized controlled trials. In this study, participants (N = 21) with chronic pain and whiplash-associated disorders were recruited from a patient organization and randomized to either a treatment or a wait-list control condition. Both groups continued to receive treatment as usual. In the experimental condition, a learning theory framework was applied to the analysis and treatment. The intervention consisted of a 10-session protocol emphasizing values-based exposure and acceptance strategies to improve functioning and life satisfaction by increasing the participants' abilities to behave in accordance with values in the presence of interfering pain and distress (psychological flexibility). After treatment, significant differences in favor of the treatment group were seen in pain disability, life satisfaction, fear of movements, depression, and psychological inflexibility. No change for any of the groups was seen in pain intensity. Improvements in the treatment group were maintained at 7-month follow-up. The authors discuss implications of these findings and offer suggestions for further research in this area.

  11. An innovative nonpharmacological intervention combined with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia increased patient global improvement in pain and satisfaction after major surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chia-Chun; Lee, Chien-Ching; Wang, Li-Kai; Lin, Bor-Shyh; Wu, Wen-Ju; Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Jen-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate whether a nonpharmacological approach through implementation of a communication improvement program (named CICARE for Connect, Introduce, Communicate, Ask, Respond and Exit) into standard operating procedure (SOP) in acute pain service (APS) improved satisfaction in patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA). Patients and methods This was a nonrandomized before–after study. Adult patients (aged between 20 and 80 years) who received IV-PCA after major surgery were included. Implementing CICARE into SOP was conducted in APS. Anonymous questionnaires were used to measure outcomes in this prospective two-part survey. The first part completed by APS nurses contained patients’ characteristics, morphine dosage, delivery/demand ratios, IV-PCA side effects and pain at rest measured with an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10). A score of NRS ≥4 was defined as inadequately treated pain. The ten-question second part was completed by patients voluntarily after IV-PCA was discontinued. Each question was assessed with a 5-point Likert scale (1: extremely poor; 5: excellent). Patients were separated into “before” and “after” CICARE groups. Primary outcomes were patient global impression of improvement in pain (PGI-Improvement) and patient satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included quality of communication skills, instrument proficiency and accessibility/availability of IV-PCA. Results The response rate was 55.3%, with 187 usable questionnaires. CICARE effectively improved patient global impression of improvement in pain, patient satisfaction, communication skills and accessibility/availability of IV-PCA. No significant differences were noted in instrument proficiency, morphine dosage, delivery/demand ratios, rates of inadequately treated pain at rest and side effects of IV-PCA between groups. Paradoxical findings were noted between the rates of inadequately treated pain/side effects and PGI-Improvement

  12. Implementation of observational pain management protocol to improve pain management for long-term institutionalized older care residents with dementia: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Justina Yat Wa; Lai, Claudia

    2014-03-13

    Systematic use of observational pain tools has been advocated as a means to improve pain management for care home residents with dementia. Pain experts suggest that any observational tool should be used as part of a comprehensive pain management protocol, which should include score interpretation and verification with appropriately suggested treatments. The Observational Pain Management Protocol (Protocol) was therefore developed. This study aims to investigate the extent to which the implementation of this Protocol can improve pain management in care home residents with dementia. In this two-group, single-blinded, cluster-randomized controlled trial, 122 care home residents with dementia and pain-related diagnoses will be recruited from eight care homes (that is 15 to 16 residents from each care home). Invitations will be sent to all local care homes who meet the home selection criteria. The eight care homes will be randomly selected from all care homes that agree to join this trial. They will then be randomized to either the control or experimental conditions. Participants from each care home will be placed into their home's corresponding group to avoid 'contamination' effects across participants. Each intervention cycle will take 16 weeks (that is, baseline assessment and care home staff training for 4 weeks and Protocol implementation for 12 weeks). The Protocol will guide the pain management of the participants in the experimental care homes. Meanwhile, the control care homes will continue their usual pain management strategies. Intervention effects will be measured weekly during the protocol implementation period and compared with the baseline measurements, as well as between the experimental and control conditions. Although similar pain protocols have been suggested previously, the recommendations were based on experts' opinions rather than evaluation of research studies. The feasibility and effectiveness of this kind of pain management protocol, tailored to

  13. Melatonin analgesia is associated with improvement of the descending endogenous pain-modulating system in fibromyalgia: a phase II, randomized, double-dummy, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ). Conclusion Melatonin increased the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulating system as assessed by the reduction on NPS(0-10) during the CPM-TASK. Melatonin alone or associated with amitriptyline was better than amitriptyline alone in improving pain on the VAS, whereas its association with amitriptyline produced only marginal additional clinical effects on FIQ and PPT. Trial registration Current controlled trail is registered at clinical trials.gov upon under number NCT02041455. Registered January 16, 2014. PMID:25052847

  14. Use of Low Level of Continuous Heat as an Adjunct to Physical Therapy Improves Knee Pain Recovery and the Compliance for Home Exercise in Patients With Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael S; Alshammari, Faris S; Lee, Haneul

    2016-11-01

    Petrofsky, JS, Laymon, MS, Alshammari, FS, and Lee, H. Use of low level of continuous heat as an adjunct to physical therapy improves knee pain recovery and the compliance for home exercise in patients with chronic knee pain: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3107-3115, 2016-This study examined if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) wraps at home between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in patients with chronic knee pain. Fifty individuals with chronic nonspecific knee pain was randomly allocated to 2 groups: the LLCH group and the placebo group. All subjects underwent 1 hour of conventional physical therapy twice per week for 2 weeks at the outpatient clinic and they were asked to accomplish 1 hour of therapeutic exercise at home each day between sessions. The LLCH group applied LLCH knee wraps for 6 hours at home before home exercise while placebo group took a placebo ibuprofen. (This was done since placebo heat is impossible to use since subjects would notice that the wraps were cold) Before, during, and after intervention, pain intensity, active range of motion of the knee (AROM), knee strength, and home exercise compliance were measured. The LLCH group showed pain attenuation after 2 weeks of therapy sessions (p ≤ 0.05). AROM and strength of the knee significantly improved over time compared to the placebo group. Home exercise compliance was significantly higher in the LLCH group than placebo group (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicated that the use of LLCH as an adjunct to conventional physical therapy for chronic knee pain significantly improved pain attenuation and recovery of strength and movement in patients with chronic knee pain.

  15. Spinal mechanisms of pain control.

    PubMed

    Desmoulin, Geoffrey T; Yasin, Nasif I; Chen, Darryl W

    2007-09-01

    To demonstrate initial results using Khan Kinetic Treatment (KKT) as a chronic neck pain treatment and to present pain control mechanistic theory on which the treatment is based. A self-reported functional assessment, neck pain questionnaire, and pain medication dose were used as outcome measures for 44 matched patients randomly split into 2 groups ("treatment" and "control"). The treatment group underwent a treatment period consisting of several individual KKT treatments, whereas the control group continued conventional therapy. Compared with a control group, the treatment group lowered both their self-recorded neck pain scores (P=0.012) and pain medication dose (P=0.048), although current functional assessment questionnaires (range of motion, overall activity, and recreation/work activities) did not detect changes (P=0.233, 0.311, and 0.472, respectively). We address the theory of the pain control mechanisms of the device in detail. Although we await randomized placebo controlled trials and additional results from ongoing mechanistic studies, initial results show that KKT is potentially an effective treatment for chronic neck pain and may contribute to the reduction of pain relieving medication.

  16. Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy for chronic low back pain to reduce pain, and improve functionality and general well-being compared with physiotherapy: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schnelle, Christoph; Messerschmidt, Steffen; Minford, Eunice J; Greenaway-Twist, Kate; Szramka, Maxine; Masiorski, Marianna; Sheldrake, Michelle; Jones, Mark

    2017-07-17

    Low back pain causes more global disability than any other condition. Once the acute pain becomes chronic, about two-thirds of sufferers will not fully recover after 1-2 years. There is a paucity of effective treatments for non-specific, chronic low back pain. It has been noted that low back pain is associated with changes in the connective tissue in the affected area, and a very low-impact treatment, Esoteric Connective Tissue Therapy (ECTT), has been developed to restore flexibility in connective tissue. ECTT uses patterns of very small, circular movements, to the legs, arms, spine, sacrum and head, which anecdotally are effective in pain relief. In an unpublished single-arm phase I/II trial with chronic pain patients, ECTT showed a 56% reduction in pain after five treatments and 45% and 54% improvements at 6 months and 7-9 years of follow-up respectively. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare ECTT with physiotherapy for reducing pain and improving physical function and physical and mental well-being in patients with chronic low back pain. The trial will be held at two hospitals in Vietnam. One hundred participants with chronic low back pain greater than or equal to 40/100 on the visual analogue scale will be recruited and randomised to either ECTT or physiotherapy. Four weekly treatments will be provided by two experienced ECTT practitioners (Treatment Group, 40 minutes each) and hospital-employed physiotherapy nurses (Control Group, 50 minutes). The primary outcomes will be changes in pain, physical function per the Quebec Pain Functionality Questionnaire and physical and mental well-being recorded by the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), with mixed modelling used as the primary statistical tool because the data are longitudinal. Initial follow-up will be at either 4 or 8 months, with a second follow-up after 12 months. The trial design has important strengths, because it is to be conducted in hospitals under medical supervision

  17. Liposomal lidocaine to improve procedural success rates and reduce procedural pain among children: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Soin, Herpreet Kaur; Schuh, Suzanne; Koren, Gideon; Scolnik, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Background Historically, children have been undertreated for their pain, and they continue to undergo painful cutaneous procedures without analgesics. A new topical anesthetic, liposomal lidocaine 4% cream (Maxilene, RGR Pharma, Windsor, Ont.), has become available. It has pharmacologic properties that are superior to other topical anesthetics, including an onset of action of only 30 minutes. We sought to determine the success rate of cannulation, analgesic effectiveness, procedure duration and rate of adverse skin reactions when liposomal lidocaine is used before intravenous cannulation of children. Methods In this double-blind randomized controlled trial, children aged 1 month to 17 years received liposomal lidocaine or placebo before cannulation. Success on first cannulation attempt was recorded, and, among children 5 years and older, pain was evaluated before and after the attempt by the child, parents and research assistant using a validated measure (Faces Pain Scale-Revised). For children younger than 5 years, pain was evaluated by the parents and research assistant only. The total duration of the procedure and adverse skin reactions were also recorded. Results Baseline characteristics did not differ (p > 0.05) between children who received liposomal lidocaine (n = 69) and those who received placebo (n = 73). Cannulation on the first attempt was achieved in 74% of children who received liposomal lidocaine compared with 55% of those who received placebo (p = 0.03). Among children 5 years of age and older (n = 67), lower mean pain scores during cannulation were reported by those receiving liposomal lidocaine (p = 0.01). Similarly, lower mean pain scores during cannulation were reported by the parents and research assistant for all children who received liposomal lidocaine than for all those who received placebo (p < 0.001). The mean total procedure duration was shorter with liposomal lidocaine (6.7 v. 8.5 minutes; p = 0.04). The incidence of transient dermal

  18. Improving cancer pain management in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Within Malaysia's otherwise highly accessible public healthcare system, palliative medicine is still an underdeveloped discipline. Government surveys have shown that opioid consumption in Malaysia is dramatically lower than the global average, indicating a failure to meet the need for adequate pain control in terminally ill patients. Indeed, based on daily defined doses, only 24% of patients suffering from cancer pain receive regular opioid analgesia. The main barriers to effective pain control in Malaysia relate to physicians' and patients' attitudes towards the use of opioids. In one survey of physicians, 46% felt they lacked knowledge to manage patients with severe cancer pain, and 64% feared effects such as respiratory depression. Fear of addiction is common amongst patients, as is confusion regarding the legality of opioids. Additional barriers include the fact that no training in palliative care is given to medical students, and that smaller clinics often lack facilities to prepare and stock cheap oral morphine. A number of initiatives aim to improve the situation, including the establishment of palliative care departments in hospitals and implementation of post-graduate training programmes. Campaigns to raise public awareness are expected to increase patient demand for adequate cancer pain relief as part of good care. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of exposure and acceptance strategies to improve functioning and quality of life in longstanding pediatric pain--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wicksell, Rikard K; Melin, Lennart; Lekander, Mats; Olsson, Gunnar L

    2009-02-01

    Although several studies have illustrated the effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) on adult pain patients, there are few randomized controlled trials on children and adolescents. There is particularly a need for studies on pediatric patients who are severely disabled by longstanding pain syndromes. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, as an extension of traditional CBT, focuses on improving functioning and quality of life by increasing the patient's ability to act effectively in concordance with personal values also in the presence of pain and distress. Following a pilot study, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of an ACT-oriented intervention based on exposure and acceptance strategies and to compare this with a multidisciplinary treatment approach including amitriptyline (n=32). The ACT condition underwent a relatively brief treatment protocol of approximately 10 weekly sessions. Assessments were made before and immediately after treatment, as well as at 3.5 and 6.5 months follow-up. Prolonged treatment in the MDT group complicated comparisons between groups at follow-up assessments. Results showed substantial and sustained improvements for the ACT group. When follow-up assessments were included, ACT performed significantly better than MDT on perceived functional ability in relation to pain, pain intensity and to pain-related discomfort (intent-to-treat analyses). At post-treatment, significant differences in favor of the ACT condition were also seen in fear of re/injury or kinesiophobia, pain interference and in quality of life. Thus, results from the present study support previous findings and suggest the effectiveness of this ACT-oriented intervention for pediatric longstanding pain syndromes.

  20. Do glial cells control pain?

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Marc R; Wen, Yeong-Ray; Decosterd, Isabelle; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic pain is a real challenge, and current treatments focusing on blocking neurotransmission in the pain pathway have only resulted in limited success. Activation of glia cells has been widely implicated in neuroinflammation in the central nervous system, leading to neruodegeneration in many disease conditions such as Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis. The inflammatory mediators released by activated glial cells, such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β can not only cause neurodegeneration in these disease conditions, but also cause abnormal pain by acting on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons in injury conditions. Pain can also be potentiated by growth factors such as BDNF and bFGF that are produced by glia to protect neurons. Thus, glia cells can powerfully control pain when they are activated to produce various pain mediators. We will review accumulating evidence supporting an important role of microglia cells in the spinal cord for pain control under injury conditions (e.g. nerve injury). We will also discuss possible signaling mechanisms in particular MAP kinase pathways that are critical for glia control of pain. Investigating signaling mechanisms in microglia may lead to more effective management of devastating chronic pain. PMID:18504511

  1. Rotation exercise classes did not improve function in women with non-specific chronic low back pain: A randomized single blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Segal-Snir, Yael; Lubetzky, V Anat; Masharawi, Youssef

    2016-08-10

    Exercise is considered the first line of treatment for people with non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) but the ideal exercise type is currently unclear. Given the unique anatomical structure of the lower lumbar spine and the lumbosacral junction transverse-plane rotation exercises may be helpful for people suffering from pain in this region. We aimed to examine the effect of spinal rotation exercises delivered in a group format on range of motion, pain level and function parameters in women with NSCLBP. This was a randomized controlled single-blinded study. Thirty-five women with NSCLBP, participated in either a bi-weekly rotation exercise classes (n= 20) or a `wait-list' control group (n = 15). The exercises aimed at improving lumbar mobility in the transverse plane. Pain rated on a Visual Analog Scale, back specific disability (Rolland Morris questionnaire), and lumbar range of motion (flexion, extension and left and right rotation) were taken prior to intervention, immediately following 4 weeks of intervention and 8 weeks later. There were no significant differences for either group (p> 0.05) on all dependent variables at all times of measurements. A specific group program of rotation exercises had no effect on the functional status, pain level and lumbar range of motion in women with NSCLBP.

  2. Fentanyl Patches to Supplement Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Blocks for Improving Pain Control After Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hwang; Kang, Chan; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Hwang, Jung-Mo; Shin, Byung-Kon

    2016-01-01

    The analgesic effects of preoperative ultrasound-guided nerve blocks wear off after about 12 hours, leaving some patients in substantial pain. Transdermal fentanyl concentrations peak at 12 to 24 hours after application and maintain this concentration for approximately 72 hours. We sought to determine whether combining the use of a transdermal fentanyl patch with either a sciatic or femoral-sciatic nerve block would improve pain control in patients undergoing foot and/or ankle surgery. Consecutive patients in the no-patch control group (n = 104) were enrolled from July 2011 to October 2011, and those in the treatment group (n = 232) were enrolled from November 2011 to May 2012 and received a transdermal patch (4.125 mg/7.5 cm(2) releasing 25 μg of fentanyl per hour) applied to their chest postoperatively. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome measure was the number of requests for additional postoperative pain medication. Additional postoperative analgesia was requested by 49 of the 104 control patients (47.1%) and 63 of the 232 treated patients (27.1%; p = .002). The mean pain scores were also lower in the treatment group, with a statistically significant difference (p < .05) at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Thus, patients receiving a fentanyl patch combined with an ultrasound-guided nerve block required less supplemental analgesia to maintain adequate pain control than did those receiving a nerve block alone. In conclusion, a fentanyl patch is a useful adjunct to an ultrasound-guided nerve block in foot and ankle surgery. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Group-based multimodal exercises integrated with cognitive-behavioural therapy improve disability, pain and quality of life of subjects with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Monticone, Marco; Ambrosini, Emilia; Rocca, Barbara; Cazzaniga, Daniele; Liquori, Valentina; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Vernon, Howard

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a group-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme on disability, pain and quality of life in subjects with chronic neck pain. Randomized controlled trial. Specialized rehabilitation centre. A total of 170 patients (mean age of 53 years (13); 121 females). The multidisciplinary group underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme combining multimodal exercises with psychologist-lead cognitive-behavioural therapy sessions. The general exercise group underwent general physiotherapy. Both groups followed group-based programmes once a week for ten weeks. Additionally, the multidisciplinary group met with the psychologist once a week for a 60-minute session. The Neck Disability Index (primary outcome), the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, a pain numerical rating scale and the Short-Form Health Survey. The participants were evaluated before, after training and after 12 months. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was used for each outcome measure. Significant effects ( p-value <0.001) were found over time and between groups for all outcome measures. After training, significant improvements were found for both groups for all outcome measures except kinesiophobia and catastrophizing, which did not change in the control group; however, the improvements were significantly greater for the multidisciplinary group. At 12-month follow-up a clinically meaningful between-group difference of 12.4 Neck Disability Index points was found for disability. A group-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme including cognitive-behavioural therapy was superior to group-based general physiotherapy in improving disability, pain and quality of life of subjects with chronic neck pain. The effects lasted for at least one year.

  4. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: a multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-10-01

    Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann-Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and improving ankle mobility after acute ankle sprain: A multicentre, randomised, blinded, controlled and non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    González de Vega, C; Speed, C; Wolfarth, B; González, J

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute ankle sprains are common and activity limiting injuries, and topical diclofenac gel has proven efficacy in alleviating pain and restoring function. This trial aimed to compare a topical natural agent, Traumeel with topical diclofenac gel (1%) in the management of acute ankle sprain. Methods This prospective, multicentre, randomised, blinded, active-control and non-inferiority study involved 449 physically active adults sustaining unilateral grade 1 or 2 ankle sprain within the past 24 h. Participants were randomised to receive 2 g of Traumeel ointment (T-O) (n = 152) or Traumeel gel (T-G) (n = 150) or diclofenac gel (D-G) (n = 147), administered topically to the ankle three times a day for 14 days, with 6-weeks follow up. Results Day 7 median percentage reductions in Visual Analogue Scale pain score were 60.6%, 71.1% and 68.9% for the T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Total pain relief was reported by 12 (8.5%), 7 (5.0%) and 8 (5.9%) participants in each group, respectively. Median improvements in Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Activities of Daily Living subscale score were 26.2, 26.2 and 25.0 points for T-O, T-G and D-G groups, respectively. Mann–Whitney effect sizes and lower bound confidence intervals demonstrated non-inferiority of Traumeel vs. diclofenac for reducing pain and functional improvement. At 6 weeks, participants reported total pain relief and normal functioning. Adverse events (n = 43) were reported by 31/447 participants (6.9%). Treatments were equally well tolerated. Conclusions T-O and T-G decreased pain and improved joint function to the same extent as D-G in acute ankle sprain, and were well tolerated. PMID:23889885

  6. Adding motor control training to muscle strengthening did not substantially improve the effects on clinical or kinematic outcomes in women with patellofemoral pain: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Nayra Deise Dos Anjos; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Lima, Bruna Maria de; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Bley, André Serra; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia

    2017-08-18

    Randomized controlled trial. Patients with Patellofemoral pain (PFP) usually present muscular weakness, pain and impaired motor control. Muscle strengthening is an effective treatment strategy for PFP, but the additional benefits of movement control training remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of movement control training associated with muscle strengthening, with a conventional program of strengthening alone in women with PFP. Thirty-four women were randomly assigned to two groups. The Strengthening group (S group) performed 12 sessions to strengthen the knee and hip muscles. The Movement Control & Strengthening group (MC&S group) performed the same exercises and movement control training of the trunk and lower limbs. Effects of the treatment (i.e., between-group differences) were calculated using linear mixed models. Primary outcomes were function and pain intensity after completion of the treatment protocol. Secondary outcomes were; muscle strength and kinematic outcomes during the step down task after 4 weeks of treatment; and function and pain intensity 3 and 6 months after randomization. The MC&S group did not present significantly better function (MD -2.5 points, 95% CI;-10.7-5.5) or pain (MD -0.3 points, 95% CI;-1.7-1.0) at 4 weeks. There was a small difference in favour of the MC&S group for AKPS scores at 3 months (MD -8.5 points; 95% CI;-16.8 to -0.3). No significant between-group differences were observed for the other outcomes. Movement control training was no more effective than the isolated strengthening protocol, in terms of pain, function, muscle strength, or kinematics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Can Musical or Painting Interventions Improve Chronic Pain, Mood, Quality of Life, and Cognition in Patients with Mild Alzheimer's Disease? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Pongan, Elodie; Tillmann, Barbara; Leveque, Yohana; Trombert, Béatrice; Getenet, Jean Claude; Auguste, Nicolas; Dauphinot, Virginie; El Haouari, Hanane; Navez, Malou; Dorey, Jean-Michel; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Laurent, Bernard; Rouch, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Among non-pharmacological therapies, musical intervention is often used for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and patients presenting chronic pain. However, their efficacy is still under debate. Our aim was to determine the efficacy of choral singing versus painting sessions on chronic pain, mood, quality of life, and cognition in AD patients. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial, 59 mild AD patients were randomized to a 12-week singing (SG; n = 31) or painting group (PG; n = 28). Chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and quality of life were assessed before, after, and 1 month after the sessions. Cognitive abilities were assessed before and after interventions. The evolution of these different measures was assessed with mixed linear models. The primary data analysis was by intention-to-treat, and completed by a 'per protocol' approach. Both singing and painting interventions led to significant pain reduction (Time effect: F = 4.71; p = 0.01), reduced anxiety (Time effect: F = 10.74; p < 0.0001), improved Quality of Life (Time effect: F = 6.79; p = 0.002), improved digit span (F = 12.93; p = 0.001), and inhibitory processes (Time effect: F = 4.93; p = 0.03). Depression was reduced over time in PG only (Time x Group effect: F = 4.53; p = 0.01). Verbal Memory performance remained stable over time in SG, but decreased in PG (Time x group effect: F = 9.29; p = 0.004). Findings suggest that singing and painting interventions may reduce pain and improve mood, quality of life, and cognition in patients with mild AD, with differential effects of painting for depression and singing for memory performance.

  8. Parenting in the context of chronic pain: A controlled study of parents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna C.; Fales, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to describe what adults with chronic pain experience in their role as parents, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods. The first aim is to compare parents with chronic pain to parents without chronic pain on perceptions of their adolescent’s pain, parental response to pain, and catastrophizing beliefs about pain. The study also examined predictors of parental protective behaviors, and examined whether these associations differed by study group. Methods Parents with chronic pain (n=58) and parents without chronic pain (n=72) participated, and completed questionnaire measures of pain characteristics and pain interference, as well as measures of parental catastrophizing and protective pain responses. Parents with chronic pain also completed a structured interview about their experience of being a parent. Interview responses were videotaped and subsequently coded for content. Results Compared to controls, parents with chronic pain endorsed more pain in their adolescents, and were more likely to catastrophize about their adolescent’s pain and respond with protective behaviors. Parent’s own pain interference and the perception of higher pain in their adolescent was associated with increased protective parenting in the chronic pain group. Qualitative coding revealed a number of areas of common impact of chronic pain on parenting. Discussion Chronic pain impacts everyday parenting activities and emotions, and impacts pain-specific parent responses that are known to be related to increased pain and pain catastrophizing in children and adolescents. Parents with chronic pain might benefit from interventions that address potential parenting difficulties, and might improve outcomes for their children. PMID:25232862

  9. Pediatric pain control practices of North American Burn Centers.

    PubMed

    Martin-Herz, Susanne Pelley; Patterson, David R; Honari, Shari; Gibbons, Janet; Gibran, Nicole; Heimbach, David M

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated pediatric pain control practices in North American Burn Centers using a mail-in survey. Questions were asked regarding pain control practices, pain assessment methods, and perceived treatment efficacy for inpatients and outpatients in four age groups. Eighty-two centers responded with 111 surveys. Intravenous morphine was the most frequently used analgesic for wound care pain. The most common background pain medications were intravenous morphine, acetaminophen with codeine, and acetaminophen alone. The use of long-acting medications increased with increasing age. Additional areas reported in the text include nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic adjuvants, treatment of itching, pain assessment, outpatient pain management, and efficacy of pain control and assessment practices. There have been great advances in pediatric burn pain control and assessment in recent years, but room for improvement remains. This study provides a basis for evaluation and comparison among burn centers. It further highlights areas that may warrant additional study and intervention.

  10. Does changing pain-related knowledge reduce pain and improve function through changes in catastrophizing?

    PubMed

    Lee, Hopin; McAuley, James H; Hübscher, Markus; Kamper, Steven J; Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from randomized controlled studies shows that reconceptualizing pain improves patients' knowledge of pain biology, reduces catastrophizing thoughts, and improves pain and function. However, causal relationships between these variables remain untested. It is hypothesized that reductions in catastrophizing could mediate the relationship between improvements in pain knowledge and improvements in pain and function. To test this causal mechanism, we conducted longitudinal mediation analyses on a cohort of 799 patients who were exposed to a pain education intervention. Patients provided responses to the neurophysiology of pain questionnaire, catastrophic thoughts about pain scale, visual analogue pain scale, and the patient specific functional scale, at baseline, 1-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. With adjustment for potential confounding variables, an improvement in pain biology knowledge was significantly associated with a reduction in pain intensity (total effect = -2.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.96 to -1.44). However, this effect was not mediated by a reduction in catastrophizing (indirect effect = -0.16, 95% CI = -0.36 to 0.02). This might be due to a weak, nonsignificant relationship between changes in catastrophizing and pain intensity (path b = 0.19, 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.41). Similar trends were found in models with function as the outcome. Our findings indicate that change in catastrophizing did not mediate the effect of pain knowledge acquisition on change in pain or function. The strength of this conclusion is moderated, however, if patient-clinician relational factors are conceptualized as a consequence of catastrophizing, rather than a cause.

  11. Improving postoperative pain management in children by providing regular training and an updated pain therapy concept.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M; Mechea, A; Hoffmann, F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, children's hospitals have increasingly implemented postoperative pain management protocols to reduce postoperative pain and improve patient satisfaction. The effectiveness and long-term sustainability of such protocols have rarely been studied. Therefore, we conducted a prospective intervention study to assess the impact of regular training and improvement of clinical processes on the quality of postoperative pain management. We conducted an initial assessment of the status quo of postoperative pain management (Audit 1) followed by repeated training and improvement of clinical processes (analgesic pocket card, parents' brochure, modification of the patient chart, bimonthly advanced trainings sessions) and a follow-up review after 3 years (Audit 2). We used a data entry form, a patient survey, and an anonymous questionnaire for the nursing staff as measurement tools. Our analysis included a total of 93 and 85 patients in the initial and final audits. The return rates of the nursing staff questionnaire were 83% (Audit 1) and 77% (Audit 2). The training and process improvements resulted in significant improvement in the administration of analgesics for pain requiring treatment, the control of pain measurement after the administration of analgesics and the use of non-pharmacological pain therapies. The patients reported faster administration of analgesics for acute pain and improved pain relief following the intervention. Repeated training and improvement of clinical processes can significantly improve the long-term quality of postoperative pain management in children with a tolerable amount of effort on the part of health care professionals and institutions. © 2015 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  12. Short-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and improves the masticatory muscle activity in temporomandibular disorder patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Paula de Lima; Costa, Dayse Regina Alves da; Oliveira, Ana Izabela Sobral de; Carvalho, Elyson Adam Nunes; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Costa, Yuri Martins; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the short-term effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) by examining pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and electromyography (EMG) activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Forty patients with myofascial TMD were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial and were divided into two groups: active (n=20) and placebo (n=20) TENS. Outcome variables assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after (T2) and 48 hours after treatment (T1) were: pain intensity with the aid of a visual analogue scale (VAS); PPT of masticatory and cervical structures; EMG activity during mandibular rest position (MR), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and habitual chewing (HC). Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was applied to the data and the significance level was set at 5%. There was a decrease in the VAS values at T1 and T2 when compared with T0 values in the active TENS group (p<0.050). The PPT between-group differences were significant at T1 assessment of the anterior temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and T2 for the masseter and the SCM (p<0.050). A significant EMG activity reduction of the masseter and anterior temporalis was presented in the active TENS during MR at T1 assessment when compared with T0 (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the anterior temporalis was significantly higher in the active TENS during MVC at T1 and T2 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle was significantly higher in the active TENS during HC at T1 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The short-term therapeutic effects of TENS are superior to those of the placebo, because of reported facial pain, deep pain sensitivity and masticatory muscle EMG activity improvement.

  13. Clinical feasibility of cervical exercise to improve neck pain, body function, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Doo; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of cervical exercise on neck pain, disability, and psychosocial factors in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. [Subjects] Thirty patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, who also complained of neck pain. [Methods] The cervical exercise group (n = 15) participated in cervical exercises for 30 min, 3 times/week for 6 weeks, and the control group (n = 16) underwent conventional physical therapy alone, without exercise. The exercises were performed in the following order: cervical relaxation, local muscle stabilization, and global muscle stabilization using a sling system. [Results] Compared to the control group, the cervical exercise group demonstrated significant decreases as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 4.2 vs. 1.0; Neck disability index, 3.9 vs. 1.9; and depression on the Symptom checklist-90-revised, 9.4 vs. 4.3 and on the Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 6.3 vs. 2.8. However, anxiety on the Symptom checklist-90-revised (3.1 vs. 1.3) was not significantly different. Effect sizes were as follows: Visual analogue scale score, 1.8; Neck disability index, 0.9; depression, 1.0; and anxiety on Symptom checklist-90-revised and Hopkins symptom checklist-25, 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. [Conclusion] Cervical exercise is effective in improving neck pain, disability, and efficacy of psychological treatment for depression in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

  14. Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin; Pélerin, Fanny; Maudet, Corinne; Housez, Béatrice; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Jüsten, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort. Probiotics have been reported to benefit IBS symptoms but the level of benefit remains quite unclear. Objective This study was designed to assess the benefit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms. Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial has been performed in 379 subjects with diagnosed IBS. Subjects were randomly supplemented with the probiotics (1000 mg) or placebo for 12 weeks. Questionnaires (gastrointestinal symptoms, stools, wellbeing, and quality of life) were completed. Primary endpoint was percentage of responders defined as having a 50% decrease in the weekly average “intestinal pain/discomfort score” for at least 4 out of the last 8 weeks of the study. Results There was no overall benefit of S. cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms and wellbeing in the study population. Moreover, S. cerevisiae I-3856 was not statistically significant predictor of the responder status of the subjects (p > 0.05). Planned subgroup analyses showed significant effect in the IBS-C subjects: improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher in active group, compared to placebo, on abdominal pain/discomfort and bloating throughout the study and at the end of the supplementation. Conclusions In this study, S. cerevisiae I-3856 at the dose of 1000 mg per day does not improve intestinal pain and discomfort in general IBS patients. However, it seems to have an effect in the subgroup with constipation which needs further studies to confirm (NCT01613456 in ClinicalTrials.gov registry). PMID:27403301

  15. A comparison of two short education programs for improving low back pain-related disability in the elderly: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Francisco; Abraira, Víctor; Santos, Severo; Díaz, Elena; Gestoso, Mario; Muriel, Alfonso; Gil del Real, María Teresa; Mufraggi, Nicole; Noguera, Juan; Zamora, Javier

    2007-05-01

    Cluster randomized clinical trial. To assess the effectiveness of 2 minimal education programs for improving low back pain (LBP)-related disability in the elderly. No education program has shown effectiveness on low back pain (LBP)-related disability in the elderly. A total of 129 nursing homes (6389 residents) in northern Spain were invited to participate in the study. The actual participants were 12 nursing homes randomly assigned to 3 groups and 661 subjects. An independent physician gave a 20-minute talk with slide projections summarizing the content of the Back Book (active management group), the Back Guide (postural hygiene group), and a pamphlet on cardiovascular health (controls). Disability was measured with the Roland-Morris questionnaire (RMQ). Blind assessments were performed before the intervention, and 30 and 180 days later. The effect of the intervention on disability was estimated by generalized mixed linear random effects models. Mean age of participants ranged between 79.9 and 81.2 years. Disability improved in all groups, but at the 30-day assessment the postural education group showed an additional improvement of 1.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.2-1.9), RMQ points and at the 180-day assessment the active education group an additional improvement of 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.6-3.4). In the subset of subjects with LBP when entering the study, postural education had no advantages over controls, while an additional improvement of 3.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.5- 4.5) RMQ points at the 180-day assessment was observed in the active education group. In institutionalized elderly, the handing out of the Back Book supported by a 20-minute group talk improves disability 6 months later, and is even more effective in those subjects with LBP.

  16. Electric pain control (EPC) of a painful forearm amputation stump.

    PubMed

    Györy, A N; Caine, D C

    1977-07-30

    Surgically and pharmaceutically uncontrollable pain in the forearm stump of a 28-year-old mine explosion victim of the Viet-Nam War, was successfully treated by electric pain control (EPC), which led to his full rehabilitation. The electrodes of the pain-control equipment were built into the prosthetic socket to enable treatment to be continued while the patient was working in his full-time occupation as a storeman. The theory underlying this form of treatment is briefly described and the method of manufacture of the modified prosthetic socket is provided, so that similar application of electric pain control can also be used in other patients.

  17. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years) with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1) 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 μg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50) or 2) a placebo (placebo group, n=50). Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions. Results In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030) and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038) were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L) grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05) was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No adverse effect of treatment was identified in the safety assessment. Conclusion In subjects with knee pain, GCQID supplementation was effective for relieving knee pain and improving locomotor functions. PMID:26604721

  18. Pain Control After Surgery: Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and ... Mental Health Sex and Birth Control Sex and Sexuality Birth Control Family HealthInfants and Toddlers Kids and ...

  19. Short-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain and improves the masticatory muscle activity in temporomandibular disorder patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    FERREIRA, Ana Paula de Lima; da COSTA, Dayse Regina Alves; de OLIVEIRA, Ana Izabela Sobral; CARVALHO, Elyson Adam Nunes; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; COSTA, Yuri Martins; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Studies to assess the effects of therapies on pain and masticatory muscle function are scarce. Objective To investigate the short-term effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) by examining pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and electromyography (EMG) activity in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Material and Methods Forty patients with myofascial TMD were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled trial and were divided into two groups: active (n=20) and placebo (n=20) TENS. Outcome variables assessed at baseline (T0), immediately after (T2) and 48 hours after treatment (T1) were: pain intensity with the aid of a visual analogue scale (VAS); PPT of masticatory and cervical structures; EMG activity during mandibular rest position (MR), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and habitual chewing (HC). Two-way ANOVA for repeated measures was applied to the data and the significance level was set at 5%. Results There was a decrease in the VAS values at T1 and T2 when compared with T0 values in the active TENS group (p<0.050). The PPT between-group differences were significant at T1 assessment of the anterior temporalis and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and T2 for the masseter and the SCM (p<0.050). A significant EMG activity reduction of the masseter and anterior temporalis was presented in the active TENS during MR at T1 assessment when compared with T0 (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the anterior temporalis was significantly higher in the active TENS during MVC at T1 and T2 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). The EMG activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscle was significantly higher in the active TENS during HC at T1 when compared with placebo (p<0.050). Conclusions The short-term therapeutic effects of TENS are superior to those of the placebo, because of reported facial pain, deep pain sensitivity and masticatory muscle EMG activity improvement. PMID:28403351

  20. Does a transversus abdominis plane (TAP) local anaesthetic block improve pain control in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy? A best evidence topic.

    PubMed

    Keir, Arran; Rhodes, Louise; Kayal, Ajit; Khan, Omar A

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed whether local anaesthetic infiltration of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP block) during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy improves pain control. Ten papers were found using the reported search, of which four represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group, study type, relevant outcomes and key results of these papers were tabulated. Three of the randomised controlled trials demonstrated a reduction in analgesic requirements associated with TAP blocks following laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared to placebo. The remaining randomised study compared TAP blocks with local anaesthetic infiltration of laparoscopic port sites and showed no significant difference in clinical outcomes between these two techniques. We conclude that there is good evidence that TAP block in laparoscopic cholecystectomy leads to a reduction in pain scores and analgesic requirement, however there is no significant difference when compared to local anaesthetic infiltration of trocar insertion sites. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  2. Improving patient satisfaction with pain management using Six Sigma tools.

    PubMed

    DuPree, Erin; Martin, Lisa; Anderson, Rebecca; Kathuria, Navneet; Reich, David; Porter, Carol; Chassin, Mark R

    2009-07-01

    Patient satisfaction as a direct and public measure of quality of care is changing the way hospitals address quality improvement. The feasibility of using the Six Sigma DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) methodology to improve patient satisfaction as it relates to pain management was evaluated. This project used the DMAIC methodology to improve patients' overall satisfaction with pain management on two inpatient units in an urban academic medical center. Pre- and postintervention patient surveys were conducted. The DMAIC methodology provided a data-driven structure to determine the optimal improvement strategies, as well as a long-term plan for maintaining any improvements. In addition, the Change Acceleration Process (CAP) was used throughout the project's various DMAIC stages to further the work of the team by creating a shared need to meet the objectives of the project. Overall satisfaction with pain management "excellent" ratings increased from 37% to 54%. Both units surpassed the goal of at least 50% of responses in the "excellent" category. Several key drivers of satisfaction with pain management were uncovered in the Analyze phase of the project, and each saw rating increases from the pre-intervention to postintervention surveys. Ongoing monitoring by the hospital inpatient satisfaction survey showed that the pain satisfaction score improved in subsequent quarters as compared with the pre-intervention period. The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology can be used successfully to improve patient satisfaction. The project led to measurable improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management, which have endured past the duration of the Six Sigma project. The Control phase of DMAIC allows the improvements to be incorporated into daily operations.

  3. Gabapentin Does Not Appear to Improve Postoperative Pain and Sleep Patterns in Patients Who Concomitantly Receive Regional Anesthesia for Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shawn; Reilly, Mark C.; Shulman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, gabapentin has gained popularity as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of postoperative pain. Numerous studies have shown a decrease in pain score, even with immediate postoperative activity, which is significant for early post-op ambulation and regaining functionality sooner. However, studies have been in conclusive in patients undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery. For this reason, we hoped to study the effect of gabapentin on postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, or a hip fracture repair. This was done in the setting of ensuring adequate postoperative analgesia with regional blocks and opioid PCA, as is protocol at our institution. Given the sedative effects of gabapentin and the potential for improving postoperative sleep patterns, we also studied the drug's effect on this aspect of our patient's postoperative course. We utilized the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and Visual Analog Scale for pain to obtain a more objective standardized score amongst our study population. Our results indicate that gabapentin does not offer any additional relief in pain or improve sleep habits in patients who have received either a femoral or lumbar plexus block for lower extremity orthopedic surgery. This trial is registered with NCT01546857. PMID:28348503

  4. Perioperative bromelain reduces pain and swelling and improves quality of life measures after mandibular third molar surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Majid, Omer Waleed; Al-Mashhadani, Bashar Adil

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of oral bromelain (4 × 250 mg) versus oral diclofenac sodium (4 × 25 mg) on pain, swelling, trismus, and quality of life (QOL) after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was planned. The sample included patients requiring extraction under local anesthesia of a single partial bony impacted mandibular third molar. The patients were randomly distributed into 1 of 3 groups: bromelain, diclofenac, and placebo. Treatment started 1 day before surgery and continued for 4 days. The predictor variable was the type of the drug given to the patients. The outcome variables were pain, swelling, and trismus, which were measured at 1, 3, and 7 days postoperatively. The other study variables included QOL measures to assess the patients' perception regarding the effect of surgery on their well-being and daily activities. A validated questionnaire was used to measure QOL. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance, multiple measures analysis of variance, or Pearson's χ(2) test, as appropriate. P < .05 was considered significant. A total of 45 subjects requiring surgical removal of a single impacted mandibular third molar under local anesthesia were included in the present study. The bromelain and diclofenac groups both showed a significant reduction in pain compared with the placebo group at all intervals (P < .05). Diclofenac also resulted in a significant reduction of swelling at 3 and 7 days, and bromelain resulted in an insignificant reduction. A nonsignificant reduction in trismus occurred in both treatment groups compared with the placebo group. Both treatment groups also showed a significant difference in the effect on QOL in most subscales and total scores (P < .05). The effect was comparable between the 2 treatment groups for all parameters and at all intervals. The results of our study have shown that oral bromelain is an effective therapy to

  5. An 8-week thoracic spine stabilization exercise program improves postural back pain, spine alignment, postural sway, and core endurance in university students:a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Toprak Çelenay, Şeyda; Özer Kaya, Derya

    2017-04-18

    To investigate the effects of an 8-week thoracic stabilization exercise program on back pain, spinal alignment, postural sway, and core endurance in university students. University students were randomly allocated into exercise (n: 28) and control (n: 25) groups. The exercise program was carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Postural pain, spinal alignment, postural sway, and core endurance were assessed via visual analogue scale, Spinal Mouse, Biodex Balance System, and McGill's trunk muscle endurance tests at the baseline and after 8 weeks of training. Differences were observed for postural pain, thoracic and lumbar curvature, dynamic stability index (eyes closed), and core endurance scores in the exercise group between baseline and week 8 (P < 0.05) and all the parameters were significantly different when compared to those of the control group (P < 0.05). The program decreased postural pain, spinal curvatures, and postural sway, and increased core endurance in university students. The program can be effective in postural pain and misalignment of spine problems related to core weakness and balance disorders.

  6. Neural manual vs. robotic assisted mobilization to improve motion and reduce pain hypersensitivity in hand osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Valdes, Kristin; Imperio, Grace; Borboni, Alberto; Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Galeri, Silvia; Negrini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study is to detail the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of neural manual vs. robotic assisted on pain in sensitivity as well as analyse the quantitative and qualitative movement of hand in subjects with hand osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-two patients, aged 50 to 90 years old of both genders, with a diagnosis of hand Osteoarthritis (OA), will be recruited. Two groups of 36 participants will receive an experimental intervention (neurodynamic mobilization intervention plus exercise) or a control intervention (robotic assisted passive mobilization plus exercise) for 12 sessions over 4 weeks. Assessment points will be at baseline, end of therapy, and 1 and 3 months after end of therapy. The outcomes of this intervention will be pain and determine the central pain processing mechanisms. [Result] Not applicable. [Conclusion] If there is a reduction in pain hypersensitivity in hand OA patients it can suggest that supraspinal pain-inhibitory areas, including the periaqueductal gray matter, can be stimulated by joint mobilization. PMID:28603349

  7. Neural manual vs. robotic assisted mobilization to improve motion and reduce pain hypersensitivity in hand osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Valdes, Kristin; Imperio, Grace; Borboni, Alberto; Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Galeri, Silvia; Negrini, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study is to detail the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of neural manual vs. robotic assisted on pain in sensitivity as well as analyse the quantitative and qualitative movement of hand in subjects with hand osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-two patients, aged 50 to 90 years old of both genders, with a diagnosis of hand Osteoarthritis (OA), will be recruited. Two groups of 36 participants will receive an experimental intervention (neurodynamic mobilization intervention plus exercise) or a control intervention (robotic assisted passive mobilization plus exercise) for 12 sessions over 4 weeks. Assessment points will be at baseline, end of therapy, and 1 and 3 months after end of therapy. The outcomes of this intervention will be pain and determine the central pain processing mechanisms. [Result] Not applicable. [Conclusion] If there is a reduction in pain hypersensitivity in hand OA patients it can suggest that supraspinal pain-inhibitory areas, including the periaqueductal gray matter, can be stimulated by joint mobilization.

  8. Hypnoanalgesia for Dilatation and Curettage Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mehdi; Aziz Mohammadi, Susan; Moslemifar, Mehdi; Kamali, Kurosh; Joudi, Marjan; Sabri Benhangi, Azam; Mohaddes, Mojtaba; Joudi, Mona; Mohajeri, Mozhgan

    2017-01-01

    There are many acceptable approaches ranging from light to moderate intravenous sedation or analgesic drugs that are used to provide pain control in dilatation and curettage. We report the use of hypnosis as a nonpharmacologic approach to control pain in this manner. PMID:28824863

  9. Use of non-opioid analgesics as adjuvants to opioid analgesia for cancer pain management in an inpatient palliative unit: does this improve pain control and reduce opioid requirements?

    PubMed

    Shinde, Shivani; Gordon, Pamela; Sharma, Prashant; Gross, James; Davis, Mellar P

    2015-03-01

    Cancer pain is complex, and despite the introduction of the WHO cancer pain ladder, few studies have looked at the prevalence of adjuvant medication use in an inpatient palliative medicine unit. In this study, we evaluate the use of adjuvant pain medications in patients admitted to an inpatient palliative care unit and whether their use affects pain scores or opiate dosing. In this retrospective observational study, patients admitted to the inpatient palliative care unit over a 3-month period with a diagnosis of cancer on opioid therapy were selected. Data pertaining to demographics, diagnosis, oral morphine dose equivalent of the opioid at the time of discharge, adjuvant analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and pain scores as reported by nurses and physicians were collected. Seventy-seven patients were eligible over a 3-month period, out of which 65 (84 %) were taking an adjuvant medication. The most commonly prescribed adjuvant was gabapentin (70 %). Fifty-seven percent were taking more than one adjuvant. There were more women in the group receiving adjuvants (57 vs. 17%, p = 0.010). Those without adjuvants compared with those on adjuvants did not have worse pain scores on discharge as reported by physicians (0.8 ± 0.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.7, p = 0.58) or nurses (2.0 ± 2.7 vs. 2.1 ± 2.6, p = 0.86). There was no difference in morphine equivalent doses of the opioid in both groups (median (min, max); 112 (58, 504) vs. 200 (30, 5,040)) at the time of discharge; 75-80 % of patients had improvement in pain scores as measured by a two-point reduction in numerical rating scale (NRS). This study shows that adjuvant medications are commonly used for treating pain in patients with cancer. More than half of study population were on two adjuvants or an adjuvant plus NSAID along with an opioid. We did not demonstrate any benefit in terms of improved pain scores or opioid doses with adjuvants, but this could reflect confounding variables and physician choice

  10. Does core stability exercise improve lumbopelvic stability (through endurance tests) more than general exercise in chronic low back pain? A quasi-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Mohammad Bagher; Rezaei, Mandana; Zamanlou, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to compare core stability and general exercises (GEs) in chronic low back pain (LBP) patients based on lumbopelvic stability (LPS) assessment through three endurance core stability tests. There is a controversy about preference of core stability exercise (CSE) over other types of exercise for chronic LBP. Studies which have compared these exercises used other outcomes than those related to LPS. As it is claimed that CSE enhances back stability, endurance tests for LPS were used. A 16-session CSE program and a GE program with the same duration were conducted for two groups of participants. Frequency of interventions for both groups was three times a week. Forty-three people (aged 18-60 years) with chronic non-specific LBP were alternately allocated to core stability (n = 22) or GE group (n = 21) when admitted. The primary outcomes were three endurance core stability tests including: (1) trunk flexor; (2) trunk extensor; and (3) side bridge tests. Secondary outcomes were disability and pain. Measurements were taken at baseline and the end of the intervention. After the intervention, test times increased and disability and pain decreased within groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in increasing test times (p = 0.23 to p = 0.36) or decreasing disability (p = 0.16) and pain (p = 0.73). CSE is not more effective than GE for improving endurance core stability tests and reducing disability and pain in chronic non-specific LBP patients.

  11. Sodium oxybate reduces pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance and improves functionality in fibromyalgia: results from a 14-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Russell, I Jon; Holman, Andrew J; Swick, Todd J; Alvarez-Horine, Sarah; Wang, Y Grace; Guinta, Diane

    2011-05-01

    This 14-week, phase 3, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial evaluated sodium oxybate (SXB) 4.5 and 6g per night versus placebo in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). SXB is the sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). GHB is an endogenous compound, synthesized from γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and found broadly in the central nervous system and body. Among 548 randomized patients, a ≥30% reduction in pain was experienced by 54.2% and 58.5% of patients treated with SXB 4.5 and 6g, respectively, versus 35.2% for placebo with a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Relative to placebo, both SXB doses significantly reduced fatigue (with a 100-mm VAS; P<0.001) and sleep disturbance (with the Jenkins Sleep Scale; P<0.001), and resulted in significant improvements in function as measured by the FM Impact Questionnaire (P=0.003 and P=0.001 for 4.5 and 6 g per night, respectively). On the Short-Form 36 Health Survey, SXB-related improvement was significant on the Physical, but not the Mental, Component Scale. The proportion of patients who reported a global improvement of "much" or "very much" better on the Patient Global Impression of Change was significantly greater in both SXB groups versus placebo (P<0.001). Headache, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea, anxiety, and sinusitis were the most commonly reported adverse events, with an incidence at least twice that of placebo. These results expand the evidence from previous clinical trials suggesting that SXB is effective and safe in FM.

  12. Induced sensorimotor brain plasticity controls pain in phantom limb patients

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Fukuma, Ryohei; Seymour, Ben; Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Saitoh, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    The cause of pain in a phantom limb after partial or complete deafferentation is an important problem. A popular but increasingly controversial theory is that it results from maladaptive reorganization of the sensorimotor cortex, suggesting that experimental induction of further reorganization should affect the pain, especially if it results in functional restoration. Here we use a brain–machine interface (BMI) based on real-time magnetoencephalography signals to reconstruct affected hand movements with a robotic hand. BMI training induces significant plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex, manifested as improved discriminability of movement information and enhanced prosthetic control. Contrary to our expectation that functional restoration would reduce pain, the BMI training with the phantom hand intensifies the pain. In contrast, BMI training designed to dissociate the prosthetic and phantom hands actually reduces pain. These results reveal a functional relevance between sensorimotor cortical plasticity and pain, and may provide a novel treatment with BMI neurofeedback. PMID:27807349

  13. Nurse's role in controlling cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mahfudh, Salma Said

    2011-10-01

    Nurses spend more time with patients than any other member of the healthcare team. They play a critical, active and very important part in controlling cancer patients' pain and alleviating suffering. In controlling cancer pain the nurse needs to understand the psychological state of the cancer patient, cancer pain, cancer pain treatment, deleterious effects of unrelieved cancer pain and patient's socio cultural background. She needs to understand that there are two types of pain, nociceptive and neuropathic pains and that 80% of the cancer patients in pain could have 2 or more than 4 different pains at the same time. Nurses' role in controlling cancer pain include believing the patient, assessing pain, identifying the root of the problem, planning the care, administering medication, evaluating effectiveness, ensuring good pain control and individualizing treatment. It also includes nursing interventions such as giving tender nursing care, preventing pain, educating, advocating, communicating, comforting, supporting, and counseling the patient. The nurse must use both pharmacological and non pharmacological treatments to individualize treatment, know all the drugs that are used for the treatment of Cancer Pain, how these drugs relieve pain and what their side effects are. She must use the WHO guidelines to treat pain and must choose the right drug, right dose, given at the right times, with the right intervals and to the right patient. She must evaluate effectiveness of treatment, give PRN doses for breakthrough pain and recommend for specific changes. The role of the nurse is to anticipate the patient's pain needs, advocate for the patient for what feels appropriate for him within his cultural context and incorporate the patient's belief. The nurse can physically relieve pain by promoting comfort, support painful area, gentleness in handling the patient and use nursing treatments. The nurse can recommend physiotherapy, (TENS)/Acupuncture, Occupational therapy

  14. Acute Pain Service and multimodal therapy for postsurgical pain control: evaluation of protocol efficacy.

    PubMed

    Moizo, E; Berti, M; Marchetti, C; Deni, F; Albertin, A; Muzzolon, F; Antonino, A

    2004-11-01

    The institution of a postoperative Acute Pain Control Service is mandatory to improve the control of pain induced by surgical injury. Treatment of postoperative pain may be achieved using a combination of analgesic agents and techniques, reducing the incidence of side effects owing to the lower doses of the individual drugs. In 1997 we established an Acute Pain Service (APS) at the San Raffaele Hospital in Milan. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of our APS both in terms of treatment protocols and organisational issues. In this prospective observational study we included 592 patients undergoing abdominal, gynecological, or orthopedic surgery with severe expected pain. According to general guidelines on pain treatment, the patients were assigned to different treatment protocols based on the kind of operation. All protocols were based on the multimodal therapy, with the association of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), opioids and regional anesthesia techniques. During the first 48 h of the postoperative period we recorded vital signs, level of pain and occurrence of any side effect. Our analgesic protocols proved to be effective and safe (low incidence of side effects) for every surgery. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was higher in patients receiving patient-controlled morphine than that with continuous epidural or nerve block. After lower abdominal surgery, pain at movement at 24 h was significantly lower in the epidural group than in the Patient Control Analgesia group. Nausea and vomiting, numbness and paresthesias at the lower limbs were higher in gynecological patients. A larger percentage of orthopedic patients in the epidural group reported numbness and paresthesias at the lower limbs in comparison with patients receiving continuous peripheral nerve block. In agreement with previous literature, this study confirmed that a multimodal approach to pain treatment provides an adequate control of

  15. Does menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), exercise or a combination of both, improve pain and function in post-menopausal women with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS)? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ganderton, Charlotte; Semciw, Adam; Cook, Jill; Pizzari, Tania

    2016-06-16

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is pathology in the gluteus medius and minimus tendons and trochanteric bursa that causes debilitating tendon pain and dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Limited evidence in clinical studies suggests hormone changes after menopause may have a negative effect on tendon. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) and exercise therapy in reducing pain and dysfunction associated with GTPS in post-menopausal women. One hundred and sixteen post-menopausal women will be recruited and randomised to receive one of two exercise programs (sham or targeted intervention exercise) and transdermal creams (MHT cream containing oestradiol 50mcg and norethisterone acetate 140mcg or placebo cream). Interventions will be 12-weeks in duration and outcomes will be examined at baseline, 12-weeks and 52-weeks. The primary outcome measure will be the VISA-G questionnaire and secondary outcomes measures will include three hip pain and function questionnaires (Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, Lateral Hip Pain questionnaire), a global change in symptom questionnaire (using a 15-point Likert scale) and a quality of life measure (AQoL-8D questionnaire). Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. This study is the first randomised controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of menopausal hormone therapy therapy alone, and with the combination of exercise therapy, to treat pain and dysfunction associated with GTPS. This study has been pragmatically designed to ensure that the interventions in this study can be integrated into policy and clinical practice if found to be effective in the treatment of GTPS in post-menopausal women. If successful, there is potential for this treatment regimen to be explored in future studies of other persistent tendon conditions in the post-menopausal population. Australian New

  16. Pain control: mastery through group experience.

    PubMed

    Herman, E; Baptiste, S

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a group program which is part of the therapeutic management of out-patients with chronic pain at the multidisciplinary Pain Clinic in Hamilton, Ontario (McMaster Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital). The programme seeks to assist chronic pain sufferers in developing more adaptive coping styles. Groups of 12--14 patients meet for 9 weeks, 3 h/week, under the co-leadership of a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist with backgrounds in psychology and psychiatry. Seventy-five patients with diverse aetiologies of chronic pain have completed these "pain control classes". Outcome was assessed on the basis of several parameters. Results indicate a considerable reduction in depression, pain perception and analgesic intake. Conversely, employment figures increased from 20 to 48% after completion of the program. 21% were considered failures. Significant variables differentiating successes from failures were sex, marital status, work incentive, employment and absence of litigation or Workmen's Compensation claims.

  17. Transdermal nicotine patch failed to improve postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Turan, Alparslan; White, Paul F; Koyuncu, Onur; Karamanliodlu, Beyhan; Kaya, Gaye; Apfel, Christian C

    2008-09-01

    A single 3 mg intranasal dose of nicotine has been reported to have analgesic properties. We designed placebo-controlled study to test the hypothesis that transdermal nicotine (TDN) administered over a 3-day period would decrease postoperative pain and opioid analgesic usage and improve the recovery process after lower abdominal surgery. Ninety-seven patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy procedures were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: (1) control group received inert (sham) patches 1 h before and for 2 days after surgery, or the (2) nicotine group received TDN 30 (21 mg nicotine) patches 1 h before induction of anesthesia and for two additional days after surgery. The anesthetic technique was identical in both groups, and the postoperative assessments included verbal rating scales for pain and sedation, IV patient-controlled analgesia morphine usage, quality of recovery assessment, recovery of bowel function, resumption of normal activities, and patient satisfaction with their pain management. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1 and 3 mo after the operation to assess late recovery events. Postoperative patient-controlled analgesia morphine usage and pain scores while supine or sitting up, intraoperative fentanyl use, oral analgesic consumption, return of bowel sounds, and passage of flatus did not differ between the two groups. Although ambulation and hospitalization times, as well as quality of recovery scores, did not differ, resumption of oral intake was delayed in the nicotine group. Discharge eligibility scores were higher in the nicotine group at 48 and 72 h compared with the control group, but the time to return to work was 19 days in both treatment groups. Perioperative administration of a high-dose TDN patch did not improve postoperative pain control or decrease the analgesic requirement after pelvic gynecological surgery. Despite delayed resumption of oral intake, more patients in the nicotine group were ready for discharge at

  18. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them.

  19. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  20. Education and Visual Information Improves Effectiveness of Ultrasound-Guided Local Injections on Shoulder Pain and Associated Anxiety Level: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Karkucak, Murat; Cilesizoglu, Nurce; Capkin, Erhan; Can, Ipek; Batmaz, Ibrahim; Kerimoglu, Servet; Onder, Mustafa Avni; Karaca, Adem; Ayar, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Local injections are widely used in patients with a painful shoulder. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible impact of patients' visual information on the effectiveness of ultrasound (US)-guided local injections on anxiety levels and shoulder pain. A total of 151 patients, scheduled for local injection owing to shoulder pain, were randomly assigned into two groups in a consecutive order. Patients in group I (n = 72) were provided information related to US findings and allowed to watch the procedures from the monitor, whereas patients in group II (n = 79) received the injection only without any collaboration. Data were collected from both groups immediately before and after injections through visual analog scale and questionnaire (the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI] forms 1 and 2). US-guided local injections provided significant improvement of anxiety and pain in both groups, irrespective of providing visual information. Group I and group II comparisons with respect to the visual analog scale, STAI 1, and STAI 2 yielded significant difference only for postinjection STAI 2 in group I (P = 0.006). Intragroup comparisons revealed significant differences between preinjection and postinjection values (group I: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.001; STAI form 2, P = 0.002; group II: visual analog scale, P = 0.001; STAI form 1, P = 0.002; STAI form 2, P = 0.042). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of postinjection satisfaction levels from the procedures (P = 0.824). Performing US-guided shoulder injections with patient visual information provides positive contributions to coping with pain and anxiety. In particular, the patient collaboration-based US-guided injections have positive consequences on patients' long-standing "trait-anxiety" levels.

  1. Ultralow Dose of Naloxone as an Adjuvant to Intrathecal Morphine Infusion Improves Perceived Quality of Sleep but Fails to Alter Persistent Pain: A Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Block, Linda; Lundborg, Christopher; Bjersing, Jan; Dahm, Peter; Hansson, Elisabeth; Biber, Björn

    2015-11-01

    This randomized, cross-over, double-blind, controlled study of continuous intrathecal morphine administration in patients with severe, long-term pain addresses whether the supplementation of low doses of naloxone in this setting is associated with beneficial clinical effects. All of the study subjects (n=11) provided informed consent and were recruited from a subset of patients who were already undergoing long-term treatment with continuous intrathecal morphine because of difficult-to-treat pain. The patients were (in a randomized order) also given intrathecal naloxone (40 ng/24 h or 400 ng/24 h). As control, the patients' ordinary dose of morphine without any additions was used. The pain (Numeric Rating Scale, NRS) during activity, perceived quality of sleep, level of activity, and quality of life as well as the levels of several proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the blood were assessed. The prestudy pain (NRS during activity) in the study group ranged from 3 to 10. A total of 64% of the subjects reported improved quality of sleep during treatment with naloxone at a dose of 40 ng per 24 hours as compared with 9% with sham treatment (P=0.024). Although not statistically significant, pain was reduced by 2 NRS steps or more during supplemental treatment with naloxone in 36% of subjects when using the 40 ng per 24 hours dose and in 18% of the subjects when using naloxone 400 ng per 24 hours dose. The corresponding percentage among patients receiving unaltered treatment was 27%. To conclude, the addition of an ultralow dose of intrathecal naloxone (40 ng/24 h) to intrathecal morphine infusion in patients with severe, persistent pain improved perceived quality of sleep. We were not able to show any statistically significant effects of naloxone on pain relief, level of activity, or quality of life.

  2. Is duloxetine's effect on painful physical symptoms in depression an indirect result of improvement of depressive symptoms? Pooled analyses of three randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Harada, Eiji; Tokuoka, Hirofumi; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Funai, Jumpei; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Ossipov, Michael H; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-03-01

    In treating Major Depressive Disorder with associated painful physical symptoms (PPS), the effect of duloxetine on PPS has been shown to decompose into a direct effect on PPS and an indirect effect on PPS via depressive symptoms (DS) improvement. To evaluate the changes in relative contributions of the direct and indirect effects over time, we analyzed pooled data from 3 randomized double-blind studies comparing duloxetine 60 mg/d with placebo in patients with major depressive disorder and PPS. Changes from baseline in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total and Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form average pain score were assessed over 8 weeks. Path analysis examined the (1) direct effect of treatment on PPS and/or indirect effect on PPS via DS improvement and (2) direct effect of treatment on DS and/or indirect effect on DS via PPS improvement. At week 1, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS (75.3%) was greater than the indirect effect through DS improvement (24.7%) but became less (22.6%) than the indirect effect (77.4%) by week 8. Initially, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS was markedly greater than its indirect effect, whereas later the indirect effect predominated. Conversely, at week 1, the direct effect of treatment on DS (46.4%) was less than the indirect effect (53.6%), and by week 8 it superseded (62.6%) the indirect effect (37.4%). Thus, duloxetine would relieve PPS directly in the initial phase and indirectly via improving DS in the later phase.

  3. Effectiveness of knowledge translation interventions to improve cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Greta G; Olivo, Susan Armijo; Biondo, Patricia D; Stiles, Carla R; Yurtseven, Ozden; Fainsinger, Robin L; Hagen, Neil A

    2011-05-01

    Cancer pain is prevalent, yet patients do not receive best care despite widely available evidence. Although national cancer control policies call for education, effectiveness of such programs is unclear and best practices are not well defined. To examine existing evidence on whether knowledge translation (KT) interventions targeting health care providers, patients, and caregivers improve cancer pain outcomes. A systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to evaluate primary studies that examined effects of KT interventions on providers and patients. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Five studies reported interventions targeting health care providers, four focused on patients or their families, one study examined patients and their significant others, and 16 studies examined patients only. Seven quantitative comparisons measured the statistical effects of interventions. A significant difference favoring the treatment group in least pain intensity (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44, 1.42) and in usual pain/average pain (95% CI: 0.13, 0.74) was observed. No other statistical differences were observed. However, most studies were assessed as having high risk of bias and failed to report sufficient information about the intervention dose, quality of educational material, fidelity, and other key factors required to evaluate effectiveness of intervention design. Trials that used a higher dose of KT intervention (characterized by extensive follow-up, comprehensive educational program, and higher resource allocation) were significantly more likely to have positive results than trials that did not use this approach. Further attention to methodological issues to improve educational interventions and research to clarify factors that lead to better pain control are urgently needed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; ramadurai, gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief. PMID:26732690

  5. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; Ramadurai, Gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief.

  6. Comparison of Two Multimodal Pain Regimens Used for Postoperative Pain Control in Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, Alexander H; Smith, Beth P; Perricelli, Brett C

    Postoperative pain control following total joint arthroplasty results in improved patient mobilization, participation in physical therapy, and potentially reduced hospital costs. It was hypothesized that using a multimodal pain protocol focusing on periarticular injections including liposomal bupivacaine would have improved results when compared with a parenteral opioid-based regimen. The results showed a decrease in length of stay and rate of discharge to skilled nursing facilities with the implementation of a novel multimodal pain protocol. Furthermore, there was no change in patient satisfaction before and after the execution of the new protocol. It was concluded that using a multimodal pain protocol based on periarticular injections can lead to decreased length of stay and a decrease in transfer to skilled nursing facilities without a change in patient satisfaction.

  7. Competing effects of pain and fear of pain on postural control in low back pain?

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Masood; Heidari, Elham; Mostamand, Javid; Negahban, Hossein; van Dieen, Jaap H

    2014-12-01

    A cross-sectional, observational study. To determine whether pain and fear of pain have competing effects on postural sway in patients with low back pain (LBP). Competing effects of pain and pain-related fear on postural control can be proposed as the likely explanation for inconsistent results regarding postural sway in the LBP literature. We hypothesized that although pain might increase postural sway, fear of pain might reduce sway through an increased cognitive effort or increased cocontraction to restrict body movement. The cognitive strategy would be less effective under dual-task conditions and the cocontraction strategy was expected to be less effective when standing on a narrow base of support surface. Postural sway was measured in combined conditions of base of support (full and narrow) and cognitive loading (single and dual tasks) in 3 experimental groups with current LBP, recent LBP, and no LBP. Sway amplitude, path length, mean power frequency, and sample entropy were extracted from center-of-pressure data. The current-LBP group and recent-LBP group reported significantly different levels of pain, but similar levels of pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia. The current-LBP group tended to display larger sway amplitudes in the anteroposterior direction compared with the other 2 groups. Mean power frequency values in mediolateral direction were lower in patients with the current LBP compared with recent LBP. Smaller sample entropy was found in the current-LBP group than the other groups in most experimental conditions, particularly when standing on a narrow base of support. Alterations of postural sway are mostly mediated by pain but not pain-related fear. LBP tends to increase sway amplitude, which seems to be counteracted by increased effort invested in postural control leading to decreased frequency and increased regularity of sway particularly under increased task demands. Cross-sectional study.

  8. Improvement in pain severity category in clinical trials of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Bruce; Argoff, Charles E; Clair, Andrew; Emir, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI). Approval was based on clinical trial data demonstrating statistically significant differences in pain scores versus placebo. However, statistically significant pain relief may not always equate to clinically meaningful pain relief. To further characterize the clinical benefit of pregabalin, this analysis examined shifts in pain severity categories in patients with FM, DPN/PHN (pooled in this analysis), and SCI treated with pregabalin. Methods Data were pooled from 23 placebo-controlled trials in patients with FM (1,623 treated with pregabalin, 937 placebo), DPN/PHN (2,867 pregabalin, 1,532 placebo), or SCI (181 pregabalin, 175 placebo). Pain scores were assessed on an 11-point numeric rating scale and categorized as mild (0 to <4), moderate (4 to <7), or severe (7 to 10). Only patients with mean score ≥4 at baseline were randomized to treatment. The percentage of patients shifting pain category from baseline to endpoint for pregabalin and placebo was analyzed using a modified ridit transformation with the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel procedure. Results A higher proportion of patients shifted to a less severe pain category at endpoint with pregabalin compared with placebo. With flexible-dose pregabalin, the percentage of patients improving from: severe to mild (pregabalin versus placebo) was 15.8 versus 13.4 in FM patients, 36.0 versus 16.6 in DPN/PHN patients, 14.3 versus 7.7 in SCI patients; severe to moderate was 28.7 versus 28.2 in FM patients, 32.5 versus 28.2 in DPN/PHN patients, 35.7 versus 28.2 in SCI patients; and moderate to mild was 38.3 versus 26.4 in FM patients, 59.5 versus 41.4 in DPN/PHN patients, 38.6 versus 27.2 in SCI patients. Conclusion Compared with placebo, pregabalin is more often associated with clinically

  9. Measuring Pain as the 5th Vital Sign Does Not Improve Quality of Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Mularski, Richard A; White-Chu, Foy; Overbay, Devorah; Miller, Lois; Asch, Steven M; Ganzini, Linda

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND To improve pain management, the Veterans Health Administration launched the “Pain as the 5th Vital Sign” initiative in 1999, requiring a pain intensity rating (0 to 10) at all clinical encounters. OBJECTIVE To measure the initiative's impact on the quality of pain management. DESIGN We retrospectively reviewed medical records at a single medical center to compare providers' pain management before and after implementing the initiative and performed a subgroup analysis of patients reporting substantial pain (≥4) during a postimplementation visit. PARTICIPANTS Unique patient visits selected from all 15 primary care providers of a general medicine outpatient clinic. MEASUREMENTS We used 7 process indicators of quality pain management, based on appropriately evaluating and treating pain, to assess 300 randomly selected visits before and 300 visits after implementing the pain initiative. RESULTS The quality of pain care was unchanged between visits before and after the pain initiative (P >.05 for all comparisons): subjective provider assessment (49.3% before, 48.7% after), pain exam (26.3%, 26.0%), orders to assess pain (11.7%, 8.3%), new analgesic (8.7%, 11.0%), change in existing analgesics (6.7%, 4.3%), other pain treatment (11.7%, 13.7%), or follow-up plans (10.0%, 8.7%). Patients (n =79) who reported substantial pain often did not receive recommended care: 22% had no attention to pain documented in the medical record, 27% had no further assessment documented, and 52% received no new therapy for pain at that visit. CONCLUSIONS Routinely measuring pain by the 5th vital sign did not increase the quality of pain management. Patients with substantial pain documented by the 5th vital sign often had inadequate pain management. PMID:16808744

  10. Improvement of spinal non-viral IL-10 gene delivery by D-mannose as a transgene adjuvant to control chronic neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Peri-spinal subarachnoid (intrathecal; i.t.) injection of non-viral naked plasmid DNA encoding the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 (pDNA-IL-10) suppresses chronic neuropathic pain in animal models. However, two sequential i.t. pDNA injections are required within a discrete 5 to 72-hour period for prolonged efficacy. Previous reports identified phagocytic immune cells present in the peri-spinal milieu surrounding the i.t injection site that may play a role in transgene uptake resulting in subsequent IL-10 transgene expression. Methods In the present study, we aimed to examine whether factors known to induce pro-phagocytic anti-inflammatory properties of immune cells improve i.t. IL-10 transgene uptake using reduced naked pDNA-IL-10 doses previously determined ineffective. Both the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, and the hexose sugar, D-mannose, were factors examined that could optimize i.t. pDNA-IL-10 uptake leading to enduring suppression of neuropathic pain as assessed by light touch sensitivity of the rat hindpaw (allodynia). Results Compared to dexamethasone, i.t. mannose pretreatment significantly and dose-dependently prolonged pDNA-IL-10 pain suppressive effects, reduced spinal IL-1β and enhanced spinal and dorsal root ganglia IL-10 immunoreactivity. Macrophages exposed to D-mannose revealed reduced proinflammatory TNF-α, IL-1β, and nitric oxide, and increased IL-10 protein release, while IL-4 revealed no improvement in transgene uptake. Separately, D-mannose dramatically increased pDNA-derived IL-10 protein release in culture supernatants. Lastly, a single i.t. co-injection of mannose with a 25-fold lower pDNA-IL-10 dose produced prolonged pain suppression in neuropathic rats. Conclusions Peri-spinal treatment with D-mannose may optimize naked pDNA-IL-10 transgene uptake for suppression of allodynia, and is a novel approach to tune spinal immune cells toward pro-phagocytic phenotype for improved non-viral gene therapy. PMID:24884664

  11. Pain and functional improvement effects of methylene blue injection on the soft tissue around fusion site after traumatic thoracolumbar fixation: A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Yazdanpanah, Hamed; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Farrokhi, Farnaz; Mesbahi, Amir Reza

    2016-11-01

    Fractures of the thoracolumbar spine can cause pain, long-term reductions in quality of life (QOL), and neural deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methylene blue (MB) on preventing postoperative pain and improving QOL in patients with throracolumbar fractures undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation. Fifty patients underwent standard posterior pedicular screw fixation for stabilization of the thoracolumbar fractures: 25 received 1ml of MB solution at a concentration of 0.5% and 25 received normal saline on the soft tissue around fusion site. Primary outcomes were the control of pain, evaluated at 48h, 2 and 6 months after surgery with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS), and the improvement of QOL, assessed 2 and 6 months postoperatively by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire. The mean VAS scores for pain were significantly lower in the MB group compared with the control group at 2 months (1.30±0.45 vs. 2.60±1.19, P<0.001) and 6 months (1.17±0.37 vs. 1.60±0.87; P=0.028) after treatment. At 2 months after the surgery, the mean ODI score was significantly lower in the MB-treated patients than the control group (20.4±10.92 vs. 34.8±15.11; P=0.001). The ODI score in the MB-treated patients was better than the control group at 6 months after the surgery (12.2±11.66 vs. 20.8±11.14; P=0.016). A single dose of MB on the soft tissue around fusion site shows promising results in terms of safety, reduction of postoperative pain, and functional results when compared with placebo 6 months after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Translation research in long-term care: improving pain management in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Katherine R; Fink, Regina; Vojir, Carol; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Evelyn; Clark, Lauren; Scott, Jill; Martinez, Ruby; Vincent, Deborah; Mellis, B Karen

    2004-01-01

    Pain prevalence in nursing homes remains high, with multiple resident, staff, and physician barriers presenting serious challenges to its improvement. The study aims were to (1) develop and test a multifaceted, culturally competent intervention to improve nursing home pain practices; (2) improve staff, resident, and physician knowledge and attitudes about pain and its management; (3) improve actual pain practices in nursing homes; and (4) improve nursing home policies and procedures related to pain. A multifaceted, culturally competent intervention was developed and tested in six Colorado nursing homes, with another six nursing homes serving as control sites. Both educational and behavioral change strategies were employed. The intervention was successful in improving the percentage of residents reporting constant pain in the treatment homes. Contextual factors (implementation of Medicare's Nursing Home Compare report card) appeared to exert a positive influence on pain documentation. There was no reduction in the percentage of residents reporting pain or reporting moderate/severe pain. Multiple challenges to quality improvement exist in nursing homes. Turnover of nursing staff reduced actual exposure to the intervention, and turnover of directors of nursing influenced constancy of message and overall facility stability. Residents often failed to report their pain, and physicians were reluctant to alter their prescribing practices. Any intervention to improve pain management in nursing homes must target explicitly the residents, nursing home staff, and primary care physicians. Implementation strategies need to accommodate the high turnover rates among staff, as well as the changes among the nursing home leadership. Pain is a complex problem in the nursing home setting. Multiple factors must be considered in both the design and implementation of interventions to improve pain practices and reduce pain prevalence in nursing homes.

  13. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Sandy M; Babl, Franz E; McCarthy, Michelle; Tancharoen, Chasari; Lee, Katherine J; Oakley, Ed

    2011-11-21

    Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic), ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia.20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation.The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring hospital admission and length of emergency department stay

  14. A double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial of topical 2% viscous lidocaine in improving oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Painful infectious mouth conditions are a common presentation to emergency departments. Although self limiting, painful ulcerative lesions and inflamed mucosa can decrease oral intake and can lead to dehydration. Oral analgesia is of limited efficacy and is often refused by the patient. Despite widespread use of oral 2% viscous lidocaine for many years, there is little evidence for its efficacy as an analgesic and in aiding oral intake in children with painful infectious mouth conditions. This study aims to establish the effectiveness of 2% viscous lidocaine in increasing oral intake in these children by comparing it with placebo. Methods/Design This study is a randomised double-blind placebo controlled trial of children between 6 months and 8 years of age with painful infectious mouth conditions defined as gingivostomatitis (herpetic or non herpetic), ulcerative pharyngitis, herpangina and hand foot and mouth disease as assessed by the treating clinician in association with a history of poor oral fluid intake. It will be conducted at a single tertiary paediatric emergency department in Melbourne Australia. 20 patients have already been randomised to receive 2% lidocaine or placebo in a pilot study to determine the sample size in a preplanned adaptive design. A further 80 patients will be randomised to receive either 2% lidocaine or placebo. The placebo agent is identical to lidocaine in terms of appearance, flavour and smell. All clinical and research staff involved, patients and their parents will be blinded to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint is the amount of fluid ingested by each child, expressed in ml/kg, within 60 minutes from the time of administration of the study mixture. Secondary endpoints are the proportion of patients ingesting 5 ml/kg and 10 ml/kg at 30 and 60 minutes after drug administration and the incidence of adverse events. Longer term outcomes will include the proportion of patients requiring hospital admission and length

  15. Improving Pain Relief in Elder Patients (I-PREP): An Emergency Department Education and Quality Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Teresita M; Howell, Michael D; Cursio, John F; Wong, Alexandra; Dale, William

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a novel combined education and quality improvement (QI) program for management of pain in older adults in the emergency department (ED). Controlled pre/postintervention examination. An academic urban ED seeing 60,000 adult visits annually. Individuals aged 65 and older experiencing moderate to severe pain. Linked standardized education and continuous QI for multidisciplinary staff in an urban, academic ED from January 2012 to January 2014. Pain intensity, percentage receiving and time to pain assessment and reassessment, percentage receiving and time to delivery of analgesic. The percentage of participants with final pain score of 4 or less (out of 10) increased 47.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 41.8-53.2%). Median decrease in pain intensity improved significantly, from 0.0 to 5.0 points (P < .001). Median final pain score decreased from 7.0 to 4.0 points (P < .001). The percentage of participants with any pain improvement increased 43.7% (95% CI = 37.1-50.3%, P < .001). Pain reassessments increased significantly (from 51.9% to 82.5%, P < .001). The percentage receiving analgesics increased significantly (from 64.1% to 84.8%, P < .001). After the intervention, participants had 3.1 (95% CI = 2.1-4.4, P < .001) greater odds of receiving analgesics and 4.7 (95% CI = 3.5-6.5, P < .001) greater odds of documented pain reassessment. The I-PREP intervention substantially improved pain management in older adults in the ED with moderate to severe musculoskeletal or abdominal pain. Significant reductions in pain intensity were achieved, the timing of pain assessments and reassessments was improved, and analgesics were delivered faster. Tightly linking education to targeted QI improved pain management of older adults in the ED. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  17. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  18. Significant improvements in pain after a six-week physiotherapist-led exercise and education intervention, in patients with osteoarthritis awaiting arthroplasty, in South Africa: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Saw, M M; Kruger-Jakins, T; Edries, N; Parker, R

    2016-05-27

    A major challenge facing those with late stage osteoarthritis is delayed surgery due to waiting lists. In South Africa patients wait years for a hip/knee arthroplasty. Affected patients require effective management to address their pain, especially while awaiting surgery. Existing literature is mostly available from high income countries exploring effects of interventions during short waiting periods. Research is warranted in low income countries where long waiting periods are common. This study explored the effects of a six-week physiotherapist-led exercise and education intervention on pain in this population. A randomised controlled trial was performed at two public hospitals in South Africa. Ethical approval and informed consent was obtained. 74 participants from arthroplasty waiting lists were randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 35) or control group (n = 39). The intervention included six physiotherapist-led group-based sessions (two hours/week of education, exercise and relaxation). The control group received usual care. Data collection was conducted by blinded physiotherapists at baseline, week six, 12 and month six. The primary outcome was pain, measured by the Brief Pain Inventory. Additionally, participants completed an open-ended questionnaire at month six, to gain insight regarding the intervention. Analysis was by intention to treat using two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey comparisons. Answers to subjective questions were analysed according to common themes that emerged. The intervention group had significant improvements compared with the control group with moderate to large effect sizes (ES) on pain severity [week 6: p < 0.01, ES = 0.94, 95 % CI (0.45,1.41), month 6: p = 0.02. ES = 0.74, 95 % CI (0.26,1.2)] and moderate to large effects on pain interference [week 6: p < 0.01, ES = 1.2, 95 % CI (0.70,1.69), week 12: p = 0.04, ES = 0.68, 95 % CI (0.20,1.14), month 6: p < 0.01, ES = 0

  19. Inferior alveolar nerve blocks for postoperative pain control after mandibular distraction with osteotomies in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Krodel, David J; Belvis, Dawn; Suresh, Santhanam

    2014-06-01

    We describe the use of inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs) for postoperative pain control for a neonate undergoing mandibular distraction and osteotomies. In this case, bilateral IANBs were effective in keeping low pain scores as assessed on the neonatal infant pain scale (NIPS) and the amount of opioid and adjuvant analgesics used. The blocks were assessed to have lasted approximately 24 h making serial blocks for pain control logistically feasible. Additionally, pain control was improved throughout the period of distractor advancement (approximately 7 days). We propose the routine use of this regional technique for improved pain control after this procedure in neonates and suggest that improved pain control may facilitate earlier extubation in this challenging population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Compared to Usual Care for Pain Relief of Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard D.; Gunzler, Douglas D.; Bennett, Maria E.; Chae, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to establish the efficacy of single-lead, 3-week peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapy for pain reduction in stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegic shoulder pain. Design Single-site, pilot, randomized controlled trial for adults with chronic shoulder pain after stroke. Participants were randomized to receive a 3-week treatment of single-lead PNS or usual care (UC). The primary outcome was the worst pain in the last week (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 3) measured at baseline, and weeks 1,4, 12, and 16. Secondary outcomes included pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory, Short Form question 9), pain measured by the ShoulderQ Visual Graphic Rating Scales; and health-related quality of life (SF-36v2). Results Twenty-five participants were recruited, 13 to PNS and 12 to UC. There was a significantly greater reduction in pain for the PNS group compared to controls, with significant differences at 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Both PNS and UC were associated with significant improvements in pain interference and physical health related quality of life. Conclusions Short-term PNS is a safe and efficacious treatment for shoulder pain. Pain reduction is greater than compared to UC and is maintained for at least 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24355994

  1. Combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone improves bowel function in patients receiving opioids for moderate-to-severe non-malignant chronic pain: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Löwenstein, O; Leyendecker, P; Hopp, M; Schutter, U; Rogers, P D; Uhl, R; Bond, S; Kremers, W; Nichols, T; Krain, B; Reimer, K

    2009-03-01

    This randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group multicentre study assessed the impact of a total daily dose of 60-80 mg oral oxycodone prolonged-release (PR)/naloxone PR (OXN PR) as fixed-ratio combination for patients with opioid-induced constipation (OIC) having moderate-to-severe, non-malignant pain. During pre-randomisation patients receiving opioids for moderate-to-severe non-malignant pain were converted to oxycodone PR (OXY PR) and titrated to an effective analgesic dose. During randomisation 265 patients on a stable OXY PR dose (60-80 mg/day) and with OIC were included in the full analysis population to receive OXN PR or OXY PR alone. Primary outcome was improvement in symptoms of constipation as measured by the Bowel Function Index (BFI). Secondary/exploratory outcomes examined analgesic efficacy and other bowel function parameters. After 4 weeks of treatment, patients receiving OXN PR showed a significant improvement in bowel function compared with those in the OXY PR group (-14.9; 95% CI: -17.9, -11.9; p<0.0001) as measured by BFI which was seen after only 1 week of treatment continuing to the end of the study. After 4 weeks of treatment, patients receiving OXN PR had a median number of 3.0 complete spontaneous bowel movements (CSBM) per week compared with only 1.0 for OXY PR alone. Laxative intake was lower in the OXN PR than the OXY PR group. Furthermore, improvements in bowel function were achieved without loss of analgesic efficacy; pain intensity scores were comparable between the groups and consistent for duration of the study. Most frequently reported adverse events were consistent with those reported for opioid analgesics; no new or unexpected adverse reactions attributable to OXN PR used in higher doses were observed. This study shows that the fixed-ratio combination of OXN PR is superior to OXY PR alone in terms of bowel function, while providing effective equivalent analgesia.

  2. Associations between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis and improvements with etanercept therapy.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Zack, Debra J; Li, Wenzhi; Stewart, V Michelle; Koenig, Andrew S

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationships between inflammation, nocturnal back pain and fatigue in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and the impact of 12 weeks' etanercept treatment versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Data were combined from four clinical trials for patients with AS who received at least one dose of etanercept, sulfasalazine or placebo and had at least one postbaseline assessment value. Linear regression was performed (controlling for site, protocol and demographics), to explore the relationship between inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]), nocturnal back pain (visual analog scale [VAS] 0-100 mm) and fatigue (VAS 0-100 mm Bath AS Disease Activity Index fatigue item). Out of 1283 patients (etanercept, n = 867; sulfasalazine, n = 187; placebo, n = 229), improvement in nocturnal back pain was a significant predictor of improvement in fatigue. Significant correlations were found between nocturnal back pain and fatigue, but not CRP levels. Etanercept provided significantly greater pain/fatigue improvement than sulfasalazine or placebo. Improvements in nocturnal back pain and fatigue had weak relationships with improvement in inflammation (CRP level). AS patients treated with etanercept demonstrated superior improvement in nocturnal back pain and fatigue versus sulfasalazine or placebo. Decrease in nocturnal back pain can improve fatigue. Assessing treatment response using CRP levels alone may be misleading without also examining patient-reported outcomes such as back pain and fatigue.

  3. Sensitisation of spinal cord pain processing in medication overuse headache involves supraspinal pain control.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, A; Serrao, M; Sandrini, G; Burstein, R; Sances, G; Rossi, P; Bartolo, M; Pierelli, F; Nappi, G

    2010-03-01

    Medication overuse could interfere with the activity of critical brain regions involved in the supraspinal control of pain signals at the trigeminal and spinal level, leading to a sensitisation phenomenon responsible for chronic pain. We hypothesised that medication-overuse headache (MOH) patients might display abnormal processing of pain stimuli at the spinal level and defective functioning of the diffuse noxious inhibitory controls. We tested 31 MOH patients before (bWT) and after (aWT) standard inpatient withdrawal treatment, 28 episodic migraine (EM) patients and 23 healthy control subjects. We measured the threshold, the area and the temporal summation threshold (TST) of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex before, during and after activation of the diffuse noxious inhibitory controls by means of the cold pressor test. A significantly lower TST was found in both the MOH (bWT and aWT) and the EM patients compared with the controls, and in the MOH patients bWT compared with both the MOH patients aWT and the EM patients. In the MOH bWT patients the cold pressor test induced a TST increase significantly lower than that found in the MOH aWT, EM and control groups. Abnormal spinal cord pain processing and a decrease of the antinociceptive activity of the supraspinal structures in MOH patients can be hypothesised. These abnormalities could, in part, be related to the medication overuse, given that the withdrawal treatment was related to an improvement in the neurophysiological findings.

  4. Improving Pain Management and Long-Term Outcomes Following High-Energy Orthopaedic Trauma (Pain Study).

    PubMed

    Castillo, Renan C; Raja, Srinivasa N; Frey, Katherine P; Vallier, Heather A; Tornetta, Paul; Jaeblon, Todd; Goff, Brandon J; Gottschalk, Allan; Scharfstein, Daniel O; OʼToole, Robert V

    2017-04-01

    Poor pain control after orthopaedic trauma is a predictor of physical disability and numerous negative long-term outcomes. Despite increased awareness of the negative consequences of poorly controlled pain, analgesic therapy among hospitalized patients after orthopaedic trauma remains inconsistent and often inadequate. The Pain study is a 3 armed, prospective, double-blind, multicenter randomized trial designed to evaluate the effect of standard pain management versus standard pain management plus perioperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or pregabalin in patients of ages 18-85 with extremity fractures. The primary outcomes are chronic pain, opioid utilization during the 48 hours after definitive fixation and surgery for nonunion in the year after fixation. Secondary outcomes include preoperative and postoperative pain intensity, adverse events and complications, physical function, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. One year treatment costs are also compared between the groups.

  5. Associations between pain control self-efficacy, self-efficacy for communicating with physicians, and subsequent pain severity among cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jerant, Anthony; Franks, Peter; Kravitz, Richard L

    2011-11-01

    Coaching patients to be more active in health encounters may improve communication with physicians but does not necessarily improve health outcomes. We explored this discrepancy by examining relationships between self-efficacy for communicating with physicians and pain control self-efficacy and subsequent pain severity among cancer patients participating in a coaching trial. We analyzed data from 244 English-speaking adults with various cancer types reporting significant pain, recruited from 49 oncology physicians' offices. Mixed model linear regression examined relationships between post-intervention communication self-efficacy and pain control self-efficacy and subsequent pain severity over 12 weeks. Post-intervention pain control self-efficacy (but not communication self-efficacy) was significantly related to subsequent pain severity: a one standard deviation increase was associated with a 0.19 point decrease (95% confidence interval=-0.33, -0.04; p=0.01) in pain severity over time, approximately 25% of the effect size of the influence of post-intervention pain on subsequent pain. Among cancer patients enrolled in a coaching trial, post-intervention pain control self-efficacy, but not communication self-efficacy, was significantly related to subsequent pain severity. Identifying behavioral mediators of cancer pain severity may lead to coaching interventions that are more effective in improving cancer pain control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive and emotional control of pain and its disruption in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, M Catherine; Ceko, Marta; Low, Lucie A

    2013-07-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent health problems in our modern world, with millions of people debilitated by conditions such as back pain, headache and arthritis. To address this growing problem, many people are turning to mind-body therapies, including meditation, yoga and cognitive behavioural therapy. This article will review the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain by cognitive and emotional states - important components of mind-body therapies. It will also examine the accumulating evidence that chronic pain itself alters brain circuitry, including that involved in endogenous pain control, suggesting that controlling pain becomes increasingly difficult as pain becomes chronic.

  7. Cognitive and emotional control of pain and its disruption in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, M. Catherine; Čeko, Marta; Low, Lucie A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent health problems in our modern world, with millions of people debilitated by conditions such as back pain, headache and arthritis. To address this growing problem, many people are turning to mind–body therapies, including meditation, yoga and cognitive behavioural therapy. This article will review the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain by cognitive and emotional states — important components of mind–body therapies. It will also examine the accumulating evidence that chronic pain itself alters brain circuitry, including that involved in endogenous pain control, suggesting that controlling pain becomes increasingly difficult as pain becomes chronic. PMID:23719569

  8. Pain education to prevent chronic low back pain: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hübscher, Markus; Lee, Hopin; Skinner, Ian W; Nicholas, Michael K; Henschke, Nicholas; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Blyth, Fiona M; Main, Chris J; Hush, Julia M; Pearce, Garry; McAuley, James H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Of those patients who present to primary care with acute LBP, 40% continue to report symptoms 3 months later and develop chronic LBP. Although it is possible to identify these patients early, effective interventions to improve their outcomes are not available. This double-blind (participant/outcome assessor) randomised controlled trial will investigate the efficacy of a brief educational approach to prevent chronic LBP in ‘at-risk’ individuals. Methods/analysis Participants will be recruited from primary care practices in the Sydney metropolitan area. To be eligible for inclusion participants will be aged 18–75 years, with acute LBP (<4 weeks’ duration) preceded by at least a 1 month pain-free period and at-risk of developing chronic LBP. Potential participants with chronic spinal pain and those with suspected serious spinal pathology will be excluded. Eligible participants who agree to take part will be randomly allocated to receive 2×1 h sessions of pain biology education or 2×1 h sessions of sham education from a specially trained study physiotherapist. The study requires 101 participants per group to detect a 1-point difference in pain intensity 3 months after pain onset. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of chronic LBP, disability, pain intensity, depression, healthcare utilisation, pain attitudes and beliefs, global recovery and recurrence and are measured at 1 week post-intervention, and at 3, 6 and 12 months post LBP onset. Ethics/dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the University of New South Wales Human Ethics Committee in June 2013 (ref number HC12664). Outcomes will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conference meetings. Trial registration number https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12612001180808 PMID:24889854

  9. Specific Physician Orders Improve Pain Detection and Pain Reports in Nursing Home Residents: Preliminary Data

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Todd B.; Misra, Sumathi; Habermann, Ralf C.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Bruehl, Stephen P.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Newhouse, Paul A.; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that many pain nursing home residents is poorly managed, reasons for this poor management remain unanswered. Aims The aim of this study was to determine if specific order sets related to pain assessment would improve pain management in nursing home (NH) residents. Outcomes included observed nurse pain assessment queries and resident reports of pain. Design Pre-test / post-test. Setting 240-bed for-profit nursing home in the mid-southern region of the United States. Subjects 43 nursing home residents capable of self-consent. Methods Medical chart abstraction during a two-week (14-day) period prior to the implementation of specific order sets for pain assessment (intervention) and a two-week (14-day) period following the intervention. Trained research assistants observed medication administration passes and performed subject interviews after each medication pass. One month after intervention implementation, one additional day of observations was conducted to determine data reliability. Results Nurses were observed to ask residents about pain more frequently, and nurses continued to ask about pain at higher rates one month after the intervention was discontinued. The proportion of residents who reported pain also significantly increased in response to increased nurse queries (e.g., “Do you have any pain right now?”), which underscores the importance of nurses directly asking residents about pain. Notably 70% of this long-stay NH population only told the nurses about their pain symptoms when asked directly. Conclusions Findings uncover that using specific pain order sets seems to improve the detection of pain, which should be a routine part of nursing assessment. PMID:26259882

  10. Sodium oxybate relieves pain and improves function in fibromyalgia syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Russell, I Jon; Perkins, A Thomas; Michalek, Joel E

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of sodium oxybate for management of the symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Patients with FMS (according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria) were randomized, after discontinuing their prestudy medications for FMS, to receive 4.5 gm or 6 gm of sodium oxybate or matching placebo once per night for 8 weeks. The primary outcome variable (POV) was a composite score for changes from baseline in 3 coprimary self-report measures: patient's pain rating (in daily electronic diaries) on a visual analog scale (PVAS), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) score, and the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGI-C). A beneficial response rate for the POV composite score was defined as >or=20% improvement in the PVAS and FIQ scores plus a rating of "much better" or "very much better" on the PGI-C. Secondary measures included subjective sleep outcomes (on the Jenkins Scale for Sleep) and quality-of-life measures. The analyses were based on an intent-to-treat (ITT) population. The ITT population included 188 patients with FMS, 78% of whom completed the trial. Significant benefit was observed with both dosages of sodium oxybate, according to changes in the POV and subjective sleep quality. Improvements in the PVAS score were significantly correlated with sleep outcomes. Sodium oxybate was well tolerated overall; dose-related nausea (improved the symptoms of FMS. Further study of sodium oxybate as a novel therapeutic option for FMS is warranted.

  11. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. An educational intervention to improve pain assessment in preverbal children.

    PubMed

    Vael, Aimee; Whitted, Kelli

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric nurses often use an inappropriate tool to assess pain in children younger than 36 months of age. This intervention intended to improve the nursing practice of assessing pain in preverbal (less than 36 months of age) children. Pain assessment frequency and use of a pain assessment pediatric tool use was evaluated pre- and post-intervention via a retrospective chart review and a survey of pediatric nurses. Parametric and non-parametric statistical tests were used to determine significant differences between pre- and post-intervention data for both approaches. The chart review data showed a significant increase in the number of times pain was assessed and documented post-educational intervention. Similarly, the survey data analysis showed a significant post-intervention increase in the use of a pain assessment tool and that most nurses used the FLACC pain assessment tool when assessing pain in preverbal children. Educating staff nurses about the use of an appropriate pain assessment scale altered practice and improved the frequency of pain assessment of preverbal children.

  13. Preoperative pain management education: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Katherine F

    2015-06-01

    The management of pain is one of the greatest clinical challenges for nurses who care for patients during the postoperative period. It can be even more challenging for patients who must manage their own pain after discharge from the health care facility. Research shows that postoperative pain continues to be undermanaged despite decades of education and evidence-based guidelines. Ineffective management of postoperative pain can negatively impact multiple patient outcomes. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to evaluate the effectiveness of a preoperative pain management patient education intervention on improving patients' postoperative pain management outcomes. The project was conducted with patients undergoing same-day laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an outpatient general surgery service at a teaching institution. Patients in the intervention and comparison groups completed the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire-Revised during their first postoperative clinic visit 2 weeks after surgery. Results showed that patients who received the preoperative education intervention reported less severe pain during the first 24 hours postoperatively, experienced fewer and less severe pain medication side effects, returned to normal activities sooner, and used more nonpharmacologic pain management methods postoperatively compared with those who did not receive the education. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A comprehensive yoga programs improves pain, anxiety and depression in chronic low back pain patients more than exercise: an RCT.

    PubMed

    Tekur, P; Nagarathna, R; Chametcha, S; Hankey, Alex; Nagendra, H R

    2012-06-01

    Previously, outpatient Yoga programs for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) lasting several months have been found to reduce pain, analgesic requirement and disability, and improve spinal mobility. This study evaluated changes in pain, anxiety, depression and spinal mobility for CLBP patients on short-term, residential Yoga and physical exercise programs, including comprehensive yoga lifestyle modifications. A seven day randomized control single blind active study in an residential Holistic Health Centre in Bangalore, India, assigned 80 patients (37 female, 43 male) with CLBP to yoga and physical exercise groups. The Yoga program consisted of specific asanas and pranayamas for back pain, meditation, yogic counselling, and lectures on yoga philosophy. The control group program included physical therapy exercises for back pain, and matching counselling and education sessions. Group×time interactions (p<0.05) and between group differences (p<0.05) were significant in all variables. Both groups' scores on the numerical rating scale for pain reduced significantly, 49% in Yoga (p<0.001, ES=1.62), 17.5% in controls (p=0.005, ES=0.67). State anxiety (STAI) reduced 20.4% (p<0.001, ES=0.72) and trait anxiety 16% (p<0.001, ES=1.09) in the yoga group. Depression (BDI) decreased in both groups, 47% in yoga (p<0.001, ES=0.96,) and 19.9% in controls (p<0.001, ES=0.59). Spinal mobility ('Sit and Reach' instrument) improved in both groups, 50%, in yoga (p<0.001, ES=2.99) and 34.6% in controls (p<0.001, ES=0.81). Seven days intensive residential Yoga program reduces pain, anxiety, and depression, and improves spinal mobility in patients with CLBP more effectively than physiotherapy exercises. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Process optimization by central control of acute pain therapy: implementation of standardized treatment concepts and central pain management in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Erlenwein, J; Stüder, D; Lange, J-P; Bauer, M; Petzke, F; Przemeck, M

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to describe the effects of standardization and central control of the processes involved in postoperative pain management from patient and employee perspectives. Patients (n = 282/307) and respective hospital staff (n = 149/119) evaluated the processes, the quality of postoperative pain management and result parameters 3 months before and 12 months after the introduction of standardization of the postoperative pain therapy process using a set of standardized questionnaires. Pain level and the waiting period for an analgesic partially decreased and a higher subjective effectiveness of medication was achieved in patients after the standardization. Patients felt that the pain was taken more seriously and contacted the staff for additional medication more frequently. From an employee viewpoint the quality of care and individual competence and ability to treat pain increased after the introduction of standardization. Pain assessment was improved and employees rated their knowledge and education level as higher than before the intervention. Patients with pre-existing chronic pain and patients with special regional therapy benefited only partially after the introduction and an increase in pain intensity was even observed. The quality of care was improved by standardization of the postoperative pain management. The legal and practical ability of the nursing stuff to administer pain medication within well-defined margins reduced the dependence on the ward doctor and at the same time patient pain levels. Patients received analgesics more quickly and experienced increased effectiveness. These results should be an incentive to reconsider the importance of the organization of postoperative pain management, because the quality of care with all potential medical and economic advantages, can be easily optimized by such simple mechanisms. They also show that the quality assessment of acute pain and the selection of appropriate indicators

  16. Cross-cultural conceptions of pain and pain control

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Pain is a ubiquitous feature of the human experience. This paper presents an anthropology of pain. Anthropology is defined as the cross-cultural and comparative study of human behavior. Pain can be acute and episodic, and pain can be constant and uninterrupted. Acute pain, lasting for minutes or hours, is reported at some time by virtually all adults and by most juveniles and is indicated by the cries and facial expressions of toddlers and infants. This universality of pain as a part of the human condition has been established by the research of many biological, physical, and social scientists. Ethnographers, physicians, and public health experts describe pain complaints for a variety of modern, industrial societies and traditional, undeveloped societies. Pain is the most frequent complaint brought to the offices of physicians in North America, and it is a focus of attention in the literate medical traditions of China, India, and Islamic cultures. Hence, the study of pain and the cultural perceptions of pain are prominent foci of anthropologists. Given that the goal of medicine is to offer medical care to all people who seek it, the practice of modern medicine may be assisted by an exploration of the possibility of cultural differences in medical beliefs and practices in the multiethnic and racially diverse patient populations today. PMID:16333427

  17. Pain management improves care and revenue: an interview with ProCare Systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, F N; Walsh, C

    2000-01-01

    As provider and managed care organizations continue to look for better ways to control costs and improve patient outcomes, disease management programs are getting an increasing share of their attention. One often-over-looked area with significant potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance revenues is pain management. It has been estimated that at least 40 percent of senior citizens suffer from chronic pain, and as the population ages, the number of chronic pain sufferers will only increase. Pain management companies have been forming to meet the current and future demand for comprehensive pain management programs. One such company is ProCare Systems, a single-specialty physician practice management company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. HFM spoke with Fred N. Davis, MD, president and cofounder of ProCare Systems, and Cyndy Walsh, ProCare System's CEO, about pain management programs and the patient care and financial impact they can effect.

  18. Testing the feasibility of a knowledge translation intervention designed to improve chiropractic care for adults with neck pain disorders: study protocol for a pilot cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dhopte, Prakash; Ahmed, Sara; Mayo, Nancy; French, Simon; Quon, Jeffrey A; Bussières, André

    2016-01-01

    Neck pain in adults is common and a leading cause of physical disability. Recently, a guideline was developed for the management of non-specific neck pain (NSNP) with an aim to improve the quality of the delivery of chiropractic care. One key guideline recommendation is to undertake multimodal care for patients with NSNP. The aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of implementing a multifaceted knowledge translation intervention by promoting the use of multimodal care by chiropractors managing patients with NSNP. The design is a cluster-randomized controlled pilot and feasibility trial. Chiropractors in private practice in Canada will be approached to participate in the study. Thirty consenting chiropractors will be randomized to receive either a theory-based educational intervention in the experimental group or simply a printed copy of the guideline in the control group. Each chiropractor will recruit five neck pain patients (a total of 150 patients) into the study. Development of the multifaceted intervention was informed by the results of a related qualitative study based on the Theoretical Domains Framework and consists of a series of three webinars, two online case scenarios, a self-management video on Brief Action Planning, and a printed copy of the practice guideline. Primary feasibility outcomes for both chiropractors and patients include rates of (1) recruitment, (2) retention, and (3) adherence to the intervention. A checklist of proxy measures embedded within patient encounter forms will be used to assess chiropractors' compliance with guideline recommendations (e.g. exercise and self-care prescriptions) at study onset and at 3 months. Secondary outcomes include scores of behavioural constructs (level of knowledge and self-efficacy) for recommended multimodal care. Clinical outcomes include pain intensity and neck pain-specific disability. Analyses from this study will focus on generating point estimates and corresponding 95

  19. Neural Correlates of Maladaptive Pain Behavior in Chronic Neck Pain - A Single Case Control fMRI Study.

    PubMed

    Beinert, Konstantin; Mouthon, Audrey; Keller, Martin; Mouthon, Michael; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Taube, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Chronic neck pain patients display functional impairments like decreased range of motion, decreased strength, and reduced sensorimotor function. In patients without structural damage, the reason for the persistence of pain is not well understood. Therefore, it is assumed that in chronic pain states, memory processes play an important role. We have now detected and tested a patient that might help us to better understand the neural correlates of maladaptive pain expectation/memory. This patient displays chronic neck pain and restricted unilateral motion of the cervical spine to the left. However, when the patient is distracted, she can perform head rotations without experiencing pain and without restricting her range of movement. Based on this observation, we asked her to imagine movements shown in a video: conscious, non-distracted head rotations (pain-provoking) versus distracted head rotations (pain-free) and compared these results with an age and gender matched control volunteer. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed distinct brain activation patterns that depended on the side of rotation (pain-free versus painful side) and the kind of movement (distracted versus non-distracted head rotation). Interestingly, brain areas related to the processing of pain such as primary somatosensory cortex, thalamus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, prefrontal cortex, and posterior cingulate cortex were always more strongly activated in the non-distracted condition and when turning to the left. The age and gender matched control volunteer displayed no comparable activation of pain centers. In the patient, maladaptive pain behavior and the activity of pain-related brain areas during imagined head rotations were task-specific, indicating that the activation and/or recall of pain memories were context-dependent. These findings are important not only to improve the understanding of the neural organization of maladaptive

  20. Interpreting Pain Symptoms and How Pain Affects Neuromuscular Control in DancersIf I'm in Pain, How Should I Train?

    PubMed

    Claus, Andrew P; Macdonald, David A

    2017-03-01

    This review draws from leading research on pain neuroscience and control of posture and movement to help inform rehabilitation approaches and when it may or may not be prudent to "dance through" pain. Control of posture and movement is frequently distorted by pain perception, and that may not be altered even when the pain is resolved. It is important to exclude serious systemic disease or major tissue injury with severe, unremitting, or persistent symptoms before focusing on movement-based rehabilitation. Both specific exercises (contraction of specific muscles and use of movement techniques) and general exercises (which promote strength, power, endurance, and flexibility) can help to manage individuals with persistent pain problems. Training control of posture and movement can improve motor skills and tissue integrity and also normalize perception of sensory stimuli from the peripheral nervous system in the brain. A framework for planning such training can be considered in terms of progression of load, complexity, and context.

  1. Institutionalizing pain management: the Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Dahl, June L; Gordon, Deb; Ward, Sandra; Skemp, Marty; Wochos, Sarah; Schurr, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Clinical practice and quality improvement (QI) guidelines for acute postoperative pain management have been developed to address the well-documented problem of undertreatment of postoperative pain. The Post-Operative Pain Management Quality Improvement Project (the POP Project) was initiated to determine whether an intervention designed to support hospitals in the development of QI efforts would lead to improvements in structures, processes, and outcomes consistent with recommended guidelines. A nationwide sample of 233 hospitals joined the project. The intervention consisted of written resource materials accompanied by support services that included an e-mail list server, a resource Web page, and assistance from POP Project staff via telephone. Data regarding critical structures, processes (practice patterns), and patient outcomes were collected at baseline before the intervention began and at follow-up 12 to 18 months later. Results showed a statistically significant increase from baseline (45%) to follow-up (72%) in the presence of structural elements that are critical to improving pain management. There were statistically significant improvements in practices including documented use of pain rating scales, decreased use of intramuscular opioids, and increased use of nonpharmacologic strategies. Patient survey data showed no change in pain outcomes. Evaluation data showed that 70% of hospitals were very or extremely satisfied with their participation in the POP Project and 90% of them planned to continue efforts to improve pain management after the POP Project ended. Further research is needed to determine how to translate the excellent results obtained for structure and process into meaningful outcomes for patients.

  2. Controllability and hippocampal activation during pain expectation in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    González-Roldán, Ana María; Bomba, Isabelle C; Diesch, Eugen; Montoya, Pedro; Flor, Herta; Kamping, Sandra

    2016-12-01

    To examine the role of perceived control in pain perception, fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls participated in a reaction time experiment under different conditions of pain controllability. No significant differences between groups were found in pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings. However, during the expectation of uncontrollable pain, patients compared to controls showed higher hippocampal activation. In addition, hippocampal activity during the pain expectation period predicted activation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), precuneus and hippocampus during pain stimulation in fibromyalgia patients. The increased activation of the hippocampus during pain expectation and subsequent activation of the PCC/precuneus during the lack of control phase points towards an influence of pain perception through heightening of alertness and anxiety responses to pain in fibromyalgia patients.

  3. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  4. Relationship between pain relief and improvements in patient function/quality of life in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy or postherpetic neuralgia treated with pregabalin.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron; Emir, Birol; Cheung, Raymond; Whalen, Ed

    2013-05-01

    In patients with chronic pain due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), pregabalin treatment results in pain relief and improved patient function/quality of life (QoL). Few studies, however, have examined the exact relationship between pain relief and improvements in patient function/QoL. It is unclear, for example, whether pregabalin has a direct independent effect on patient function/QoL or whether improvements in function/QoL are an indirect consequent of pain relief. To determine whether improvements in function/QoL in response to pregabalin treatment are related to the extent of pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain due to DPN or PHN and to determine whether pregabalin has a direct independent effect on patient function/QoL that is distinct from its effects on pain. Data from 11 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for the treatment of DPN or PHN were pooled for this analysis. Changes in patient function/QoL scores were plotted according to the extent of pain relief to assess whether greater levels of pain relief were associated with greater improvement in function/QoL. A novel mediation analysis was used to asses to what extent the effects of pregabalin on function/QoL scores are a direct treatment effect as opposed to an indirect effect mediated through improvements in pain or sleep. Moderate-to-substantial pain relief (a ≥30% decrease in pain) in response to pregabalin treatment was associated with significant (P < 0.05) improvements in 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores (used to assess patient function/QoL). In many patients, greatest improvement in SF-36 scores was reported by patients achieving ≥50% decrease in pain. Analysis of Patient Global Impression of Change scores revealed a similar trend, where >80% of patients who achieved substantial pain relief also reported their status as much or very much improved. A substantial direct pregabalin treatment effect was

  5. Randomized controlled pilot study: pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with neck and low back pain before and after traditional East Asian "gua sha" therapy.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Wübbeling, Klaus; Lüdtke, Rainer; Cramer, Holger; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2012-01-01

    Gua Sha is a traditional East Asian healing technique where the body surface is "press-stroked" with a smooth-edged instrument to raise therapeutic petechiae that last 2-5 days. The technique is traditionally used in the treatment of both acute and chronic neck and back pain. This study aimed to measure the effects of Gua Sha therapy on the pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds of patients with chronic neck pain (CNP) and chronic low back pain (CLBP). A total of 40 patients with either CNP or CLBP (mean age 49.23 ± 10.96 years) were randomized to either a treatment group (TG) or a waiting list control group (WLC). At baseline assessment (T1), all patients rated their pain on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Patients' pressure pain thresholds (PPT) at a site of maximal pain (pain-maximum) and an adjacent (pain-adjacent) site were also established. The treatment group then received a single Gua Sha treatment. Post-intervention measurements were taken for both groups at T2, seven days after baseline assessment (T1), using the same VAS and PPT measurements in precisely the same locations as at T1. Final analysis were conducted with 21 patients with CNP and 18 patients with CLBP. The study groups were equally distributed with regard to randomization. Patients in both the CNP and the CLBP treatment groups reported pain reduction (p < 0.05) and improved health status from their one Gua Sha treatment, as compared to the waiting list group. Pain sensitivity improved in the TG in CNP, but not in CLBP patients, possibly due to higher pressure sensitivity in the neck area. No adverse events were reported. These results suggest that Gua Sha may be an effective treatment for patients with chronic neck and low back pain. Further study of Gua Sha is warranted.

  6. Intrauterine lidocaine for pain control during laminaria insertion: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Rebecca J; Liberty, Abigail

    2014-12-01

    To determine if intrauterine administration of 5 cc of 2% lidocaine in addition to paracervical block reduces pain during laminaria insertion, when compared with paracervical block and saline placebo. This was a randomized, double blind placebo-controlled trial. Women presenting for abortion by dilation and evacuation (D&E) at 14-24 weeks gestational age were randomized to receive an intrauterine instillation of either 5 mL of 2% lidocaine or 5 mL of normal saline, in addition to standard paracervical block with 20 cc of 0.25% bupivacaine. Our primary outcome was self-reported pain scores on a 100mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) immediately following laminaria insertion. Secondary outcome was self-reported VAS pain score indicating the maximum level of pain experienced during the 24-48-h interval between laminaria insertion and D&E procedure. Seventy-two women were enrolled, and data for 67 women were analyzed, only two of whom were more than 21 weeks on gestation. The range of pain scores at both time points was large (1-90 mm at laminaria insertion; 0-100mm in laminaria-D&E interval). Mean pain scores were not different between treatment groups at laminaria insertion, (33 vs. 32, p=.8) or in the laminaria - D&E interval (43 vs. 44, p=.9). Intrauterine administration of 5 cc of 2% lidocaine in addition to paracervical block did not reduce pain with laminaria insertion when compared to paracervical block with saline placebo. Intrauterine lidocaine combined with paracervical block does not improve pain control at laminaria insertion when compared with paracervical block and saline placebo. Wide variation in pain scores and persistent pain after laminaria insertion suggests patient would benefit from more effective methods of pain control at laminaria insertion and during the post-laminaria interval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Easing Opioid Dose May Improve Pain and Quality of Life Slowly lowering the drug amount also ... at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. He said, "Identifying effective non-opioid approaches to ...

  8. GPS Control Segment Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    Systems Center GPS Control Segment Improvements Mr. Tim McIntyre GPS Product Support Manager GPS Ops Support and Sustainment Division Peterson...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...DATE 29 APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GPS Control Segment Improvements 5a. CONTRACT

  9. Relationship between pain relief, reduction in pain-associated sleep interference, and overall impression of improvement in patients with postherpetic neuralgia treated with extended-release gabapentin.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neel; Bucior, Iwona; Bujanover, Shay; Shah, Rajiv; Gulati, Amitabh

    2016-04-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) interferes with patients' quality of life, and disturbed sleep is a prevalent complaint. Pain-associated sleep interference in turn enhances pain and/or reduces pain tolerance. Therefore, reducing sleep interference by pain, in addition to pain control, may improve patient care. To address this notion, we characterized relationships among changes in pain intensity, sleep interference, and overall impression of improvement in PHN patients treated with gastroretentive gabapentin (G-GR). Patients with PHN (n = 556) received G-GR 1,800 mg once-daily in two phase 3 and one phase 4 study. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) were completed at baseline and the end of study. Patients' Global Impression of Change (PGIC) was completed at the end of study. Regression analyses examined relationships between VAS, BPI sleep interference by pain, and PGIC. At the end of treatment, 53.7 and 63.2 % of patients reported a ≥ 30 % reduction in VAS and BPI pain-associated sleep interference (BPISI) respectively; 46.3 % reported feeling "Much" or "Very Much" improved on the PGIC. There were positive correlations between the percent reductions in VAS and BPISI; both correlated with PGIC improvements. Percent changes in VAS and BPISI were significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0082, respectively), and were independent predictors of feeling "Much" or "Very Much" improved on the PGIC. Reductions in pain intensity and in BPISI were correlated, and both also correlated with overall impression of improvement for patients with PHN treated with G-GR. Both pain relief and improvement BPISI independently predicted improvement in PGIC. For optimal patient care, clinicians should consider reducing the impact of pain on quality of sleep as well as overall pain reduction. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00335933 , NCT00636636 , NCT01426230.

  10. Improved Evaluation of Postoperative Pain After Photorefractive Keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Renato; Horovitz, Roberto Novaes Campello; Torricelli, Andre Augusto Miranda; Mukai, Adriana; Bechara, Samir Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative pain remains an important limiting factor to the selection of photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). There is a consensus in neurology pain research that pain should be evaluated as a multidimensional concept, which differs from current practice in ophthalmology. The purpose of this paper was to validate the use of multidimensional questionnaires, such as the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), to provide an improved analysis of pain after PRK and to better describe its temporal profile. This prospective study included 43 eyes of 43 myopic patients who underwent unilateral PRK. After surgery, usual pain treatment was administered. All of the participants responded to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the BPI and the MPQ 1, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after surgery. The internal consistency was evaluated, different postoperative periods were compared, and convergent validity was assessed using correlation testing. The Cronbach alpha test showed high internal consistency for each of the questionnaire subscales. Patients reported higher postoperative pain values at the first measurement of the VAS (4.93 ± 2.38), MPQ-pain rating index (26.95 ± 10.58), BPI-pain severity index (14.53 ± 7.36), and BPI-pain interference index (22.30 ± 15.13). Almost all of the scales and subscales showed a statistically significant direct correlation with the VAS at all of the evaluation periods. This study validated the utility of multidimensional questionnaires to expand the assessment of the PRK postoperative pain profile, including intensity and other qualitative aspects.

  11. Tobacco control in patients treated for chronic pain: a survey of pain fellowship program directors.

    PubMed

    Kadimpati, Sandeep; Hoelzer, Bryan C; Hooten, W Michael; Warner, David O

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have established the relationship between tobacco use and pain severity among patients suffering from chronic pain. Unfortunately, many physicians feel underprepared to counsel patients on smoking cessation. The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes, beliefs, and practices of pain medicine fellowship directors in regard to tobacco control interventions and trainee education. Program directors of ACGME-accredited pain medicine fellowships were surveyed via a web-based form to assess current practices in tobacco intervention and to gauge interest in incorporating tobacco control into their current fellowship training curriculum. Of the respondents, the majority indicated that they frequently asking their patients about tobacco use and advise them to quit. In addition, most agreed that presenting tobacco control is a responsibility of pain physicians. However, few consistently provided any assistance with quitting. Finally, the majority of program directors felt that pain medicine fellowships should include tobacco control training and were interested in incorporating an educational module about smoking and pain into their training program. This survey of pain medicine fellowship program directors indicates that although smoking cessation interventions are not being consistently applied in academic pain practices, there is a strong interest in doing so. Furthermore, the majority of program directors recognized the importance of incorporating tobacco control training into pain medicine fellowships. This recognition may provide an opportunity to develop a web-based training module that could be easily incorporated into the upcoming milestones in pain medicine training. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  12. Pain Control in the Presence of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Lumermann, Leandro; Zhu, Richard; Kodumudi, Gopal; Elhassan, Amir O; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction is present in a significant proportion of the population in the USA and worldwide. Drug addiction can occur with the abuse of many types of substances including cocaine, marijuana, stimulants, alcohol, opioids, and tranquilizers. There is a high likelihood that clinicians will encounter patients with substance abuse disorders on a regular basis with the prevalence of the use of illicit substances and the high rate of abuse of prescription drugs. The use of abuse deterrent formulations of prescription opioid agents, pill counts, and urine drug abuse screenings are all useful strategies. Optimum pain management of patients with addiction in the outpatient and inpatient setting is essential to minimize pain states. Careful selection of medications and appropriate oversight, including drug agreements, can reduce drug-induced impairments, including sleep deficits and diminished physical, social, and sexual functioning. This review, therefore, discusses the prevalence of illicit and prescription drug addiction, the challenges of achieving optimum pain control, and the therapeutic approaches to be considered in this challenging population. More research is warranted to develop improved therapies and routes of treatments for optimum pain relief and to prevent the development of central sensitization, chronic pain, and impaired physical and social functioning in patients with drug addiction.

  13. Pain Control and Parent Mental Health Among Pediatric Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Andrew; Tollefson, Ashley; Hickey, Patricia; Bares, Jennifer; Zhang, Lei

    2017-03-01

    Pain control remains a problem for hospitalized children, with more than half experiencing ongoing pain. Pain in turn negatively affects child quality of life. To clarify the relationship between inpatient pain control and parent and child psychological factors, we tested the hypotheses that pain control is worse in the context of higher child executive function problems, lower parent mindfulness, and higher parent mental health symptoms. We conducted an observational study of stable pediatric inpatients' (n = 81; mean age = 10.5 [SD 4.7]; 55% male) nurse-recorded pain scores; physical health and executive function; and parental cognitive-affective mindfulness and mental health. Linear mixed models examined associations between these variables and changes in pain scores over time, adjusting for covariates. After adjusting for child age, child gender, and parent educational status, both time (β = -.23, P = .003) and baseline pain (β = .43, P < .001) were related to pain control. After adjusting for demographics, time, and baseline pain, both parental anxiety (β = .11, P < .001) and depression (β = .12, P < .001) were significantly related to pain control. Child pain control worsened with higher parent anxiety and depression. The results highlight the importance of offering mental health resources to distressed parents of hospitalized children in pain. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Controlling pain and reducing misuse of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Kotalik, Jaro

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To help family physicians achieve an ethical balance in their opioid prescribing practices. Quality of evidence MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published between 1985 and 2011. Most available evidence was level III. Main message It is essential to follow practice guidelines when prescribing opioids, except when another course of action is demonstrably justified. In addition, when considering the appropriateness of an opioid prescription, with its many ethical implications, the decision can be usefully guided by the application of the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. As well, it is essential to keep current about legal and regulatory changes and provincial electronic registries of opioid prescriptions. Conclusion Physicians need to ensure that their patients’ pain is properly assessed and managed. Reaching optimal pain control might necessitate prescribing opioids. But the obligation to provide pain relief needs to be balanced with an equally important responsibility not to expose patients to risk of addiction and not to create opportunities for drug diversion, trafficking, and the addiction of others. Basic ethical principles can provide a framework to help physicians make ethically appropriate decisions about opioid prescribing. PMID:22611604

  15. Control Beliefs, Coping Efforts, and Adjustment to Chronic Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mark P.; Karoly, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Examined adaptation to chronic pain in 118 patients. Control appraisals, ignoring pain, using coping self-statements, and increasing activities were positively related to psychological functioning. Control appraisals, diverting attention, ignoring pain, and using coping self-statements were positively related to activity level for patients…

  16. Bunion: Strengthening Foot Muscles to Reduce Pain and Improve Mobility.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Foot pain discourages physical activity, and less activity harms overall health. Bunion, extra bone and tissue at the base of the big toe, is a frequent cause of foot pain. More than 64 million Americans have bunions that can lead to painful walking. Bunions affect some 35% of women over the age of 65. Bunions can be removed by surgery, which can reduce pain and improve your ability to walk and exercise, but up to 15% of bunions return. Weak muscles may play a role in bunion-related pain and movement problems. In a review of prior research and commentary on this topic published in the July 2016 issue of JOSPT, the author identifies muscle-strengthening exercises that may help people with bunions. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):606. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0504.

  17. Effects of off-axis elliptical training on reducing pain and improving knee function in individuals with patellofemoral pain

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Liang-Ching; Lee, Song Joo; Yang, Aaron J.; Ren, Yupeng; Press, Joel M.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether an off-axis elliptical training program reduces pain and improves knee function in individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP). Design Controlled laboratory study, pre-test-post-test. Setting University rehabilitation center. Participants Twelve adult subjects with PFP. Interventions Subjects with PFP completed an exercise program consisting of 18 sessions of lower extremity off-axis training using a custom-made elliptical trainer that allows frontal-plane sliding and transverse-plane pivoting of the footplates. Main Outcome Measures Changes in knee pain and function post-training and 6 weeks following training were evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Lower extremity off-axis control was assessed by pivoting and sliding instability, calculated as the root mean square (RMS) of the footplate pivoting angle and sliding distance during elliptical exercise. Subjects’ single-leg hop distance and proprioception in detecting lower extremity pivoting motion were also evaluated. Results Subjects reported significantly greater KOOS and IKDC scores (increased by 12–18 points) and hop distance (increased by 0.2 m) following training. A significant decrease in the pivoting and sliding RMS was also observed following training. Additionally, subjects with PFP demonstrated improved pivoting proprioception when tested under a minimum-weight-bearing position. Conclusions An off-axis elliptical training program was effective in enhancing lower extremity neuromuscular control on the frontal and transverse planes, reducing pain and improving knee function in persons with PFP. PMID:25591131

  18. Clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Control over pain and pain coping strategies are associated with pain intensity as well as psychological status and subjective disability in patients experiencing pain. The present study assessed the clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis using mediation analysis. Methods Sixty-two patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (median age, 70 years; 34 men, 28 women) were evaluated before surgery. The pain intensity and area, psychological status/subjective disability (Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire), and control over pain/pain coping strategies (Coping Strategies Questionnaire) were assessed. Mediation analysis, which consisted of serial regression analyses, mainly tested whether (1) control over pain/pain coping strategies were predicted by pain characteristics and (2) control over pain/pain coping strategies predicted psychological status/subjective disability after controlling for pain characteristics. Results Control over pain was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.33; p = 0.01); moreover, it predicted walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.31; p = 0.01) and social function (0.38; p = 0.00) after controlling for pain intensity. Although increasing activity level, one pain coping strategy, was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.30; p = 0.02), it did not predict walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.07; p = 0.53) or social function (0.13; p = 0.33) when considering pain intensity. Conclusions In this cohort, mediation analysis demonstrated that pain intensity did not directly affect perceived walking ability or social function, but did affect control over pain; moreover, control over pain affected walking ability and social function. Clinical relevance These findings are useful for a deep understanding of the relationships between pain and

  19. Pain and anxiety control in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cetrullo, N; Cocchi, S; Guadagni, M G; Piana, G

    2004-01-01

    The most recent pain and anxiety control techniques employed in patients with Down syndrome are described in relation to how cooperative the patient is and what assessment is made of his or her general condition. The growing deinstitutionalization of these patients and the growing social opportunities for them are matched by an increasing demand for dental treatment. Down syndrome is thus one of the disabilities with which the dentist is most likely to come into contact in his own surgery. Pain control is one of the keys to building the relationship between physician and patient and obtaining patient compliance in the conviction that only regular controls can maintain the oral health of these patients. A local anaesthetic, combined when possible with psychological techniques, remains the approach of choice and only a level of compliance that is really wanting or the need to carry out numerous operations in a single session should lead the dentist to choose conscious sedation or a general anaesthetic. The choice of technique, however, should take into account any systemic disease present, such as congenital heart and neurological diseases, bearing in mind that conscious or deep sedation and general anaesthesia should only be adopted in a hospital environment and require the presence of an anaesthesiologist.

  20. The impact of an educational pain management booklet intervention on postoperative pain control after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Bjørnnes, Ann Kristin; Parry, Monica; Lie, Irene; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Watt-Watson, Judy; Rustøen, Tone; Stubhaug, Audun; Leegaard, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Relevant discharge information about the use of analgesic medication and other strategies may help patients to manage their pain more effectively and prevent postoperative persistent pain. To examine patients' pain characteristics, analgesic intake and the impact of an educational pain management booklet intervention on postoperative pain control after cardiac surgery. Concerns about pain and pain medication prior to surgery will also be described. From March 2012 to September 2013, 416 participants (23% women) were consecutively enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. The intervention group received usual care plus an educational booklet at discharge with supportive telephone follow-up on postoperative day 10, and the control group received only usual care. The primary outcome was worst pain intensity (The Brief Pain Inventory - Short Form). Data about pain characteristics and analgesic use were collected at 2 weeks and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months post-surgery. General linear mixed models were used to determine between-group differences over time. Twenty-nine percent of participants reported surgically related pain at rest and 9% reported moderate to severe pain at 12 months post-surgery. Many participants had concerns about pain and pain medication, and analgesic intake was insufficient post-discharge. No statistically significant differences between the groups were observed in terms of the outcome measures following surgery. Postoperative pain and inadequate analgesic use were problems for many participants regardless of group allocation, and the current intervention did not reduce worst pain intensity compared with control. Further examination of supportive follow-up monitoring and/or self-management strategies post-discharge is required.

  1. Hydrotherapy management of low back pain: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Freeman, J

    1995-01-01

    An audit of 81 patients referred to hydrotherapy for low back pain was carried out over 12 months. The audit recorded response to hydrotherapy in terms of area of pain; intensity of pain; range of motion and ability to perform activities of daily living; treatment frequency and duration; and hydrotherapy program content. Results showed a highly significant beneficial response (t(67) = 9.2, p < 0.001). Changes to the hydrotherapy service resulting from the study include improved documentation; standardised assessment; re-worked hydrotherapy program; and regular assessment of patients within planned time-frames. Copyright © 1995 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  2. Hydromorphone levels and pain control in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Goodman, H; Erle, H; Gray, G; Lorenzo, B; Leipzig, R M; Meyer, B R; Drayer, D E

    1988-10-01

    To better understand the use of narcotic analgesics, the hydromorphone concentration was measured in serum samples from 43 patients with chronic severe pain who were receiving this drug. At the time of blood sampling, pain intensity, mood, and cognitive performance were assessed. There was large individual variation in the dose-drug level relationship. Seven patients with bone or soft tissue pain and drug levels of greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml had good pain control, whereas 10 did not. None of 15 patients with levels less than 4 ng/ml had pain control, despite drug doses similar to those given patients with higher levels. Thus 60% of the patients without control of their pain had hydromorphone levels below the lowest level that produced pain control. No patient with pain from nerve infiltration or compression had good pain control, irrespective of the drug level or dose. Poor mood correlated with high pain intensity and low drug level. Impaired cognitive performance was not related to drug level. Knowing that there is a low concentration of narcotic in the blood of a patient with chronic severe pain who is receiving high drug doses and who shows lack of both efficacy and side effects may reassure health care professionals that further narcotic dosage escalation is appropriate.

  3. Implementation of a Hydrotherapy Protocol to Improve Postpartum Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Batten, Meghann; Stevenson, Eleanor; Zimmermann, Deb; Isaacs, Christine

    2017-03-01

    A growing number of women are seeking alternatives to traditional pharmacologic pain management during birth. While there has been an extensive array of nonpharmacologic options developed for labor, there are limited offerings in the postpartum period. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement a hydrotherapy protocol in the early postpartum period to improve pain management for women choosing a nonmedicated birth. The postpartum hydrotherapy protocol was initiated in a certified nurse-midwife (CNM) practice in an urban academic medical center. All women who met criteria were offered a 30-minute warm water immersion bath at one hour postpartum. Pain scores were assessed prior to the bath, at 15 minutes after onset, and again at the conclusion (30 minutes). Women who completed the bath were also asked to complete a brief survey on their experience with postpartum hydrotherapy. In women who used the bath (N = 45), there was a significant reduction in pain scores (P < .001) between the onset of the bath and scores at both 15 minutes and 30 minutes. There was no significant difference between pain scores at 15 minutes and 30 minutes (P = .97). Of those women who completed a survey (n = 43), 97.7% reported both that the bath reduced their pain and improved their birth experience. One hundred percent reported they would use it again in another birth. This project demonstrated successful implementation of a hydrotherapy protocol as an alternative or adjunct to medication for early postpartum pain management that significantly reduced pain and improved the birth experience for those who used it. It offers a nonpharmacologic alternative where there have traditionally been limited options. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  4. [Control of postoperative pain in children undergoing hypospadias surgery: quasi-experimental controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Festini, Filippo; Dini, Donata; Neri, Cinzia; Neri, Stella

    2008-01-01

    Hypospadias is one of the most common congenital anomalies occurring in approximately (1/300) male births. If it is not surgically corrected the consequences may negatively impact on quality of life in adolescents. The surgery is very invasive and the post-operative phase very painful. To improve the control of post-operative pain, continuous analgesia via epidural catheter was implemented. To compare the effectiveness in controlling pain of two different regimens: continuous epidural catheter infusion vs oral and rectal non-steroidal pain-killers. Comparative study on children undergoing hypospadias surgery. Group A (catheter) was treated with continuous postoperative analgesia via epidural catheter and Group B (scheduled times) with rectal and oral analgesics at scheduled times and on demand, after caudal block. In both groups nurses measured pain with VAS and FLACC scales (score from 0 to 10) for 72 hours after surgery. 41 children were studied (average age 64.1 months, SD 47.3), with 332 post-operative pain recordings (Group A n = 161, Group B n = 171). Mean pain score of Group A was 0.13 (SD 0.3) and 0.45 (SD 0.8) in group B, p = 0.006. The median duration of the epidural catheter was 65 hours, mean 51.8 hours (SD 24.3). During the 1st post-operative medication, the mean pain score in Group A was 1.2 (SD 1.4), and 3.2 (SD 1.8) in group B, p = 0.003. In group A the number of pain scores indicating pain (> 0) where 3.1% while in group B were 10.5%, p = 0.0007. In children undergoing hypospadias surgery, post-operative analgesia with continuous epidural catheter infusion seems to offer a better analgesic coverage than the traditional oral/rectal analgesic treatment at scheduled times and on demand.

  5. Improving physician-patient communication about cancer pain with a tailored education-coaching intervention.

    PubMed

    Street, Richard L; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education-coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients' questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians' communication. Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians' information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile.

  7. Pain education to prevent chronic low back pain: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Traeger, Adrian C; Moseley, G Lorimer; Hübscher, Markus; Lee, Hopin; Skinner, Ian W; Nicholas, Michael K; Henschke, Nicholas; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Blyth, Fiona M; Main, Chris J; Hush, Julia M; Pearce, Garry; McAuley, James H

    2014-06-02

    Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Of those patients who present to primary care with acute LBP, 40% continue to report symptoms 3 months later and develop chronic LBP. Although it is possible to identify these patients early, effective interventions to improve their outcomes are not available. This double-blind (participant/outcome assessor) randomised controlled trial will investigate the efficacy of a brief educational approach to prevent chronic LBP in 'at-risk' individuals. Participants will be recruited from primary care practices in the Sydney metropolitan area. To be eligible for inclusion participants will be aged 18-75 years, with acute LBP (<4 weeks' duration) preceded by at least a 1 month pain-free period and at-risk of developing chronic LBP. Potential participants with chronic spinal pain and those with suspected serious spinal pathology will be excluded. Eligible participants who agree to take part will be randomly allocated to receive 2×1 h sessions of pain biology education or 2×1 h sessions of sham education from a specially trained study physiotherapist. The study requires 101 participants per group to detect a 1-point difference in pain intensity 3 months after pain onset. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of chronic LBP, disability, pain intensity, depression, healthcare utilisation, pain attitudes and beliefs, global recovery and recurrence and are measured at 1 week post-intervention, and at 3, 6 and 12 months post LBP onset. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of New South Wales Human Ethics Committee in June 2013 (ref number HC12664). Outcomes will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at international conference meetings. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12612001180808. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  8. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p < .006) postintervention. HCAHPS scores (3-month average) for items reflecting patient satisfaction improved from 70.2 ± 9.5 to 73.9 ± 6.0. APS-POQ-R scores did not change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks.

  9. Evaluation of the pain resource nurse role: a resource for improving pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Lynn; Ellis, Jacqueline A; Rowley, Betty

    2004-03-01

    Pain resource nurses (PRNs), who act as pain management coaches or mentors for their colleagues, can contribute to effective pain management. The PRN's role has not been well evaluated in the context of pediatric nursing. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the PRN's role in a pediatric setting and, more specifically, to describe the role in terms of the activities PRNs engage in, the challenges they face, and the supports that help them fulfill their role. This research was part of an evaluation of the implementation of a comprehensive pain management program in a pediatric hospital. Focus groups were conducted with 18 PRNs six months after implementation of the PRN role. The essence of the role is to provide support for best-practice pain management to nurses and the multidisciplinary team. The PRNs described seven components of their role and specific strategies to operationalize their role. In addition, the PRNs faced challenges, including feeling disappointed when their expectations for better pain management were not met, experiencing difficulty fitting the activities into their busy workdays, facilitating their colleagues' improved pain management without also alienating them, and maintaining their enthusiasm and energy for the role. Pediatric nursing staff can effectively fill the role of the PRN. The role is multifaceted, and maintaining the role required commitment and enthusiasm on the part of the nurses, as well as commitment by their related institutions.

  10. Special issues in pain control during terminal illness.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    Pain control is still a prime concern in managing patients with terminal illnesses, such as AIDS and cancer. I review some special issues that confront family physicians providing such care. Issues include common blocks to good pain management, understanding different types of pain, and the appropriate use of adjunct analgesic drugs and therapies. PMID:7539651

  11. Are the changes in postural control associated with low back pain caused by pain interference?

    PubMed

    Moseley, G Lorimer; Hodges, Paul W

    2005-01-01

    Voluntary limb movements are associated with involuntary and automatic postural adjustments of the trunk muscles. These postural adjustments occur prior to movement and prevent unwanted perturbation of the trunk. In low back pain, postural adjustments of the trunk muscles are altered such that the deep trunk muscles are consistently delayed and the superficial trunk muscles are sometimes augmented. This alteration of postural adjustments may reflect disruption of normal postural control imparted by reduced central nervous system resources available during pain, so-called "pain interference," or reflect adoption of an alternate postural adjustment strategy. We aimed to clarify this by recording electromyographic activity of the upper (obliquus externus) and lower (transversus abdominis/obliquus internus) abdominal muscles during voluntary arm movements that were coupled with painful cutaneous stimulation at the low back. If the effect of pain on postural adjustments is caused by pain interference, it should be greatest at the onset of the stimulus, should habituate with repeated exposure, and be absent immediately when the threat of pain is removed. Sixteen patients performed 30 forward movements of the right arm in response to a visual cue (control). Seventy trials were then conducted in which arm movement was coupled with pain ("pain trials") and then a further 70 trials were conducted without the pain stimulus ("no pain trials"). There was a gradual and increasing delay of transversus abdominis/obliquus internus electromyograph and augmentation of obliquus externus during the pain trials, both of which gradually returned to control values during the no pain trials. The results suggest that altered postural adjustments of the trunk muscles during pain are not caused by pain interference but are likely to reflect development and adoption of an alternate postural adjustment strategy, which may serve to limit the amplitude and velocity of trunk excursion caused by

  12. Percutaneous-guided pain control: exploiting the neural basis of pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Adolph, Michael D; Benedetti, Costantino

    2006-03-01

    The gastroenterologist deals frequently with painful conditions and suffering patients. Performing regular pain assessments and applying basic pain medicine principles will augment the care of patients in pain. Percutaneous-guided pain therapy techniques play a role in the multidisciplinary approach to pain medicine. Systemic opioid analgesia is the primary means of controlling cancer pain. However, 10% to 15% of cancer patients may need additional interventions to control pain. Sympathetic ganglion nerve blocks with neurolytic agents such as alcohol or phenol are reserved mostly for cancer pain. The efficacy and safety of these tools are validated by several decades of clinical application and published studies. Although the procedures are operator-dependent, in the hands of experienced clinicians, patients achieve sustained relief in the majority of cases. Although these techniques have been attempted in some benign conditions,such as chronic pancreatitis, with limited success, studies of newer imaging localization techniques such as endoscopic ultrasonography may expand future indications. Patients of the gastroenterologist who experience malignant abdominal pain may benefit from referral for percutaneous-guided pain control techniques.

  13. Pain control after third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Seymour, R A; Walton, J G

    1984-12-01

    The ideal agent for use after third molar surgery should alleviate pain, reduce swelling and trismus to a minimum, promote healing and have no unwanted effects. Of course, such an agent does not exist. For relief of pain, analgesics are the obvious choice. Where possible, an analgesic with additional anti-inflammatory properties should be used. There seems little to choose between aspirin, 1000 mg; diflunisal, 500 mg; ibuprofen, 400 mg and zomepirac sodium, 50 mg. In the subject allergic to aspirin and aspirin-like compounds, then paracetamol is the poor alternative. Surprisingly, the efficacy of most of the opioids in post-operative third molar pain is poor, and these drugs alone cannot be recommended for this purpose. Long-acting local anaesthetic solutions may be of value in some situations where extreme pain is likely to be a feature in the immediate post-operative period. However, there are no strict criteria for identifying such cases pre-operatively. Recent work on the use of corticosteroids would suggest that these drugs may be of value in reducing post-operative sequelae. Their future in dentistry in this rôle appears interesting and promising, and worthy of further study. Antihistamines and enzymes have been shown to be of little value, and the fact that these agents now receive little attention is evidence in its own right. The use of locally applied antimicrobials has been shown to be of little value in third molar surgery. In any case, their use is probably contraindicated because of the risk of sensitising the patient. The studies reviewed have not pointed to the effectiveness of the routine use of systemic antimicrobials in preventing or reducing postoperative sequelae after removal of impacted third molars in normal circumstances. Particular conditions, for example in patients susceptible to infection, may benefit by the use of prophylactic antimicrobials. However, each case must be judged on its individual merits, bearing in mind the attendant

  14. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  15. Does the use of a brief cryotherapy intervention with analgesic administration improve pain management after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Wittig-Wells, Deborah; Johnson, Ifeya; Samms-McPherson, Jacqueline; Thankachan, Soosan; Titus, Bobina; Jacob, Ani; Higgins, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies have evaluated only the prolonged use of cryotherapy as a nonpharmacologic pain intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute application of cryotherapy at the time pain medication was given after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) provided better pain relief than analgesic drugs alone. A pretest, posttest, randomized controlled trial study design with crossover was used to evaluate the effects of cryotherapy on postoperative pain and satisfaction with pain management. A convenience sample of postoperative knee replacement patients constituted participants in the study. Two sequential episodes of pain requiring analgesic administration were studied in each patient, one with a 30-minute cryotherapy application and the other without cryotherapy. Dependent variables were changes in pain (posttest minus pretest) and level of satisfaction with pain management. Data were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance, with p < .05 considered significant. During two sequential treatments for postoperative pain, a total of 29 TKA patients received analgesic medication administration alone for one pain episode and analgesic medication administration with a brief cryotherapy administration for the other pain episode. No significant difference between the two treatments was found for changes in pain scores after the treatments or patient satisfaction with pain management (p > .05). The order in which the treatments were provided was found to be significant (p = .02) for scores on patient satisfaction with pain management, with cryotherapy as the treatment for the second pain episode having higher scores than when delivered for the first pain episode. Sixty minutes after analgesic administration with or without cryotherapy, average pain scores remained greater than 7. In TKA patients, the short-term application of cryotherapy with analgesic medication administration did not significantly decrease pain or improve patient

  16. Beep Tones Attenuate Pain following Pavlovian Conditioning of an Endogenous Pain Control Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Scheuren, Raymonde; Anton, Fernand; Erpelding, Nathalie; Michaux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have been associated with pain reduction through associative learning. We investigated the influence of Pavlovian conditioning on HNCS-induced pain inhibition in 32 healthy subjects by using a differential conditioning paradigm in which two different acoustic stimuli were either repeatedly paired or unpaired with HNCS. Series of noxious electrical pulse trains delivered to the non-dominant foot served as test stimuli. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC)-like effects were induced by concurrent application of tonic HNCS (immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water). Subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings and electromyographic recordings of the facial corrugator muscle and the nocifensive RIII flexion reflex were used to measure changes in pain sensitivity. HNCS induced significant pain and reflex inhibitions. In the post-conditioning phase, only the paired auditory cue was able to significantly reduce pain perceptions and corrugator muscle activity. No conditioned effect could be observed in RIII reflex responses. Our results indicate that the functional state of endogenous pain control systems may depend on associative learning processes that, like in the present study, may lead to an attenuation of pain perception. Similar albeit opposite conditioning of pain control mechanisms may significantly be involved in the exacerbation and chronification of pain states. PMID:24551138

  17. Beep tones attenuate pain following Pavlovian conditioning of an endogenous pain control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Scheuren, Raymonde; Anton, Fernand; Erpelding, Nathalie; Michaux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have been associated with pain reduction through associative learning. We investigated the influence of Pavlovian conditioning on HNCS-induced pain inhibition in 32 healthy subjects by using a differential conditioning paradigm in which two different acoustic stimuli were either repeatedly paired or unpaired with HNCS. Series of noxious electrical pulse trains delivered to the non-dominant foot served as test stimuli. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC)-like effects were induced by concurrent application of tonic HNCS (immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water). Subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings and electromyographic recordings of the facial corrugator muscle and the nocifensive RIII flexion reflex were used to measure changes in pain sensitivity. HNCS induced significant pain and reflex inhibitions. In the post-conditioning phase, only the paired auditory cue was able to significantly reduce pain perceptions and corrugator muscle activity. No conditioned effect could be observed in RIII reflex responses. Our results indicate that the functional state of endogenous pain control systems may depend on associative learning processes that, like in the present study, may lead to an attenuation of pain perception. Similar albeit opposite conditioning of pain control mechanisms may significantly be involved in the exacerbation and chronification of pain states.

  18. Tooth extraction, bleeding and pain control.

    PubMed

    Al-Bahlani, S; Sherriff, A; Crawford, P J

    2001-10-01

    Local anaesthesia is used routinely in dental surgery; it is effective in both pain control and--through the vasoconstrictors often contained within it--the reduction of bleeding. The extraction of deciduous teeth under general anaesthesia is often carried out without these local effects. There are no previous studies to investigate the combined effect of local anaesthesia with general anaesthesia on blood loss and pain control. A randomised, controlled clinical trial was carried out with one hundred children aged 3-5 years. Ethical approval and informed consent were obtained. Surface anaesthetic cream (EMLA) was placed on the hand into which the intravenous access was to be placed. One to two ml of blood was taken at the time of induction as a baseline of the patient's level of haematin pigment. Children in the experimental group were given one quarter of a cartridge (0.5 ml) of local anaesthetic containing epinephrine (1:80,000) in each quadrant before tooth extraction; all blood in swabs, suction equipment and disposables was collected and digested with NaOH. The children were observed for 11 minutes post-operatively for any signs of distress. Total blood loss was calculated by comparison of the baseline sample and the shed blood digests. This study showed that using local anaesthesia for dental extractions under general anaesthesia was associated with decreased blood loss (p = 0.001). The second finding--which has not been reported before--was that this use of local anaesthesia was shown to cause distress to this age group of children upon recovery from the general anaesthetic (p <0.0001). The use of local anaesthetic in this situation provided a useful reduction in post-operative bleeding. However, its use was associated with greater post-operative distress.

  19. Pain control following inguinal herniorrhaphy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F; Nicol, Andrea L; Amid, Parviz K; Chen, David C

    2014-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries performed worldwide. With the success of modern hernia repair techniques, recurrence rates have significantly declined, with a lower incidence than the development of chronic postherniorrhaphy inguinal pain (CPIP). The avoidance of CPIP is arguably the most important clinical outcome and has the greatest impact on patient satisfaction, health care utilization, societal cost, and quality of life. The etiology of CPIP is multifactorial, with overlapping neuropathic and nociceptive components contributing to this complex syndrome. Treatment is often challenging, and no definitive treatment algorithm exists. Multidisciplinary management of this complex problem improves outcomes, as treatment must be individualized. Current medical, pharmacologic, interventional, and surgical management strategies are reviewed. PMID:24920934

  20. Nominal group technique: a brainstorming tool for identifying areas to improve pain management in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Peña, Adolfo; Estrada, Carlos A; Soniat, Debbie; Taylor, Benjamin; Burton, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Pain management in hospitalized patients remains a priority area for improvement; effective strategies for consensus development are needed to prioritize interventions. To identify challenges, barriers, and perspectives of healthcare providers in managing pain among hospitalized patients. Qualitative and quantitative group consensus using a brainstorming technique for quality improvement-the nominal group technique (NGT). One medical, 1 medical-surgical, and 1 surgical hospital unit at a large academic medical center. Nurses, resident physicians, patient care technicians, and unit clerks. Responses and ranking to the NGT question: "What causes uncontrolled pain in your unit?" Twenty-seven health workers generated a total of 94 ideas. The ideas perceived contributing to a suboptimal pain control were grouped as system factors (timeliness, n = 18 ideas; communication, n = 11; pain assessment, n = 8), human factors (knowledge and experience, n = 16; provider bias, n = 8; patient factors, n = 19), and interface of system and human factors (standardization, n = 14). Knowledge, timeliness, provider bias, and patient factors were the top ranked themes. Knowledge and timeliness are considered main priorities to improve pain control. NGT is an efficient tool for identifying general and context-specific priority areas for quality improvement; teams of healthcare providers should consider using NGT to address their own challenges and barriers. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. Differential effects of two virtual reality interventions: distraction versus pain control.

    PubMed

    Loreto-Quijada, Desirée; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Nieto, Rubén; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Olga; Ferrer-García, Marta; Saldaña, Carmina; Fusté-Escolano, Adela; Liutsko, Liudmila

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that virtual reality (VR) pain distraction is effective at improving pain-related outcomes. However, more research is needed to investigate VR environments with other pain-related goals. The main aim of this study was to compare the differential effects of two VR environments on a set of pain-related and cognitive variables during a cold pressor experiment. One of these environments aimed to distract attention away from pain (VRD), whereas the other was designed to enhance pain control (VRC). Participants were 77 psychology students, who were randomly assigned to one of the following three conditions during the cold pressor experiment: (a) VRD, (b) VRC, or (c) Non-VR (control condition). Data were collected regarding both pain-related variables (intensity, tolerance, threshold, time perception, and pain sensitivity range) and cognitive variables (self-efficacy and catastrophizing). Results showed that in comparison with the control condition, the VRC intervention significantly increased pain tolerance, the pain sensitivity range, and the degree of time underestimation. It also increased self-efficacy in tolerating pain and led to a reduction in reported helplessness. The VRD intervention significantly increased the pain threshold and pain tolerance in comparison with the control condition, but it did not affect any of the cognitive variables. Overall, the intervention designed to enhance control seems to have a greater effect on the cognitive variables assessed. Although these results need to be replicated in further studies, the findings suggest that the VRC intervention has considerable potential in terms of increasing self-efficacy and modifying the negative thoughts that commonly accompany pain problems.

  2. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: priorities for change.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Winfried; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Fletcher, Dominique; Huygen, Frank; Morlion, Bart; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pérez, Antonio Montes; Pergolizzi, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Poor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive adequate pain management. However, evidence suggests this is not currently the case; between 10% and 50% of patients develop chronic pain after various common operations, and one recent US study recorded >80% of patients experiencing post-operative pain. At the first meeting of the acute chapter of the Change Pain Advisory Board, key priorities for improving post-operative pain management were identified in four different areas. Firstly, patients should be more involved in decisions regarding their own treatment, particularly when fateful alternatives are being considered. For this to be meaningful, relevant information should be provided so they are well informed about the various options available. Good physician/patient communication is also essential. Secondly, better professional education and training of the various members of the multidisciplinary pain management team would enhance their skills and knowledge, and thereby improve patient care. Thirdly, there is scope for optimizing treatment. Examples include the use of synergistic analgesia to target pain at different points along pain pathways, more widespread adoption of patient-controlled analgesia, and the use of minimally invasive rather than open surgery. Fourthly, organizational change could provide similar benefits; introducing acute pain services and increasing their availability towards the 24 hours/day ideal, greater adherence to protocols, increased use of patient-reported outcomes, and greater receptivity to technological advances would all help to enhance performance and increase patient satisfaction. It must be acknowledged that implementing these recommendations would incur a considerable cost that purchasers of

  3. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  4. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L; Rutledge, Thomas

    2010-08-20

    Adiposis dolorosa (AD) is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in adipose tissue (lipedema and lymphedema), and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude Conditioning™ (CVAC™) process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20-40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6-193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03), and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36-490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039), in average (P = 0.002), highest (P = 0.029), lowest (P = 0.04), and current pain severity (P = 0.02) on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049). There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders.

  5. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Karen L; Rutledge, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Adiposis dolorosa (AD) is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in adipose tissue (lipedema and lymphedema), and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude Conditioning™ (CVAC™) process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20–40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6–193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03), and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36–490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039), in average (P = 0.002), highest (P = 0.029), lowest (P = 0.04), and current pain severity (P = 0.02) on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049). There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders. PMID:21197318

  6. Improving Emergency Providers’ Attitudes Towards Sickle Cell Patients in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Aditi; Haywood, Carlton; Beach, Mary Catherine; Guidera, Mark; Lanzkron, Sophie; Valenzuela-Araujo, Doris; Rothman, Richard E.; Dugas, Andrea Freyer

    2015-01-01

    Background Provider biases and negative attitudes are recognized barriers to optimal pain management in sickle cell disease, particularly in the emergency department (ED). Measures This prospective cohort measures pre- and post-intervention provider attitudes towards patients with sickle pain crises using a validated survey instrument. Intervention ED providers viewed an eight-minute online video that illustrated challenges in sickle cell pain management, perspectives of patients and providers as well as misconceptions and stereotypes of which to be wary. Outcomes Ninety-six ED providers were enrolled. Negative attitude scoring decreased, with a mean difference -11.5 from baseline, and positive attitudes improved, with a mean difference +10. Endorsement of red-flag behaviors similarly decreased (mean difference -12.8). Results were statistically significant and sustained on repeat testing three months post-intervention. Conclusions/Lessons Learned Brief video-based educational interventions can improve emergency provider attitudes towards patients with sickle pain crises, potentially curtailing pain crises early, improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction scores. PMID:26596878

  7. American pain society recommendations for improving the quality of acute and cancer pain management: American Pain Society Quality of Care Task Force.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Debra B; Dahl, June L; Miaskowski, Christine; McCarberg, Bill; Todd, Knox H; Paice, Judith A; Lipman, Arthur G; Bookbinder, Marilyn; Sanders, Steve H; Turk, Dennis C; Carr, Daniel B

    2005-07-25

    The American Pain Society (APS) set out to revise and expand its 1995 Quality Improvement Guidelines for the Treatment of Acute Pain and Cancer Pain and to facilitate improvements in the quality of pain management in all care settings. Eleven multidisciplinary members of the APS with expertise in quality improvement or measurement participated in the update. Five experts from organizations that focus on health care quality reviewed the final recommendations. MEDLINE and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched (1994-2004) to identify articles on pain quality measurement and quality improvement published after the development of the 1995 guidelines. The APS task force revised and expanded recommendations on the basis of the systematic review of published studies. The more than 3000 members of the APS were invited to provide input, and the 5 experts provided additional comments. The task force synthesized reviewers' comments into the final set of recommendations. The recommendations specify that all care settings formulate structured, multilevel systems approaches (sensitive to the type of pain, population served, and setting of care) that ensure prompt recognition and treatment of pain, involvement of patients and families in the pain management plan, improved treatment patterns, regular reassessment and adjustment of the pain management plan as needed, and measurement of processes and outcomes of pain management. Efforts to improve the quality of pain management must move beyond assessment and communication of pain to implementation and evaluation of improvements in pain treatment that are timely, safe, evidence based, and multimodal.

  8. Bevacizumab for Treatment-Refractory Pain Control in Neurofibromatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Recht, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic pain is a well-known morbidity associated with neurofibromatosis (NF) for which better therapies are needed. Surgery, radiation, and pain medications have been utilized, but often fail to relieve debilitating pain. One patient at our institution was noted to have near complete resolution of pain after treatment with bevacizumab for progressive neurologic deficit associated with NF2, suggesting its potential as an effective pain control method. We aim to better characterize the use of bevacizumab for pain control in this subset of patients.  Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 38 NF patients treated at our institution.   Results: Of the 38 total NF patients, we found that 63% reported chronic pain, with 18% reporting chronic opiate usage. Nine patients with chronic pain were considered for bevacizumab treatment and five went on to receive infusions. Of these patients, four out of five had previous surgical debulking and two out of five had previous radiation for attempted pain control. One patient had a lesion not amenable to surgery or radiation. Patients received a median of 13 cycles of bevacizumab, and four out of five patients reported a decrease in subjective pain. All patients that had pain relief had a relapse of pain symptoms when the dose was reduced or infusions were paused. Seventy-five percent were able to decrease opiate use. No major complications were noted. All five patients have elected to continue infusions for pain control.  Conclusion: Bevacizumab was, in general, well tolerated and should be considered as a treatment option in NF patients with chronic pain refractory or not amenable to surgical decompression and debulking, radiation, and pain medication.   PMID:28123914

  9. Neck muscle vibration can improve sensorimotor function in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Beinert, Konstantin; Keller, Martin; Taube, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    People with neck pain display a diminished joint position sense and disturbed postural control, which is thought to be a result of impaired somatosensory afferent activity and/or integration. Afferent processing can be artificially manipulated by vibration and was shown to reduce motor performance in healthy subjects. However, the effect of vibration on sensorimotor function in neck pain patients is scarcely investigated. To assess the effect of neck muscle vibration on joint position sense and postural control in neck pain subjects and healthy controls. Case control study. Thirteen neck pain patients and 10 healthy controls participated in the present study. Cervical joint position sense and dynamic and static postural stability. Short-term, targeted neck muscle vibration with 100 Hz was applied after baseline measurement. Vibration had opposite effects in patients and healthy subjects. Patients showed improved joint position sense (p<.01) and reduced dynamic postural sway (p<.05) after vibration, whereas vibration resulted in reduced joint position sense acuity (p<.05) and a nonsignificant increase in postural sway in healthy controls. This is the first study showing an improved motor performance after neck muscle vibration in patients with neck pain. Thus, vibration may be used to counteract sensorimotor impairment of the cervical spine. Potential underlying mechanisms are discussed. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Low-dose vaporized cannabis significantly improves neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling medium-dose (3.53%), low-dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being visual analog scale pain intensity. Psychoactive side effects and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed-effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the 2 active dose groups' results (P > .7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo versus low-dose, 2.9 for placebo versus medium-dose, and 25 for medium- versus low-dose. As these NNTs are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1 to 2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. The analgesia obtained from a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1.29%) in patients, most of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite conventional treatments, is a clinically significant outcome. In general, the effect sizes on cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. [Analysing heart rate variability to improve the monitoring of pain].

    PubMed

    Butruille, Laura; De Jonckheere, Julien; Jeanne, Mathieu; Tavernier, Benoît; Logier, Régis

    2016-12-01

    An innovative technique based on the analysis of instantaneous heart rate variability helps to improve the prevention and management of pain and discomfort. Simple to implement, this non-invasive technique is based on the continuous recording of the electrocardiograph signal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Randomized trial of a DVD intervention to improve readiness to self-manage joint pain.

    PubMed

    Elander, James; Robinson, Georgina; Morris, John

    2011-10-01

    A DVD (digital video disk) intervention to increase readiness to self-manage joint pain secondary to hemophilia was informed by a 2-phase, motivational-volitional model of readiness to self-manage pain, and featured the personal experiences of individuals with hemophilia. The DVD was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in which 108 men with hemophilia completed measures of readiness to self-manage pain (Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire) before and 6 months after receiving the DVD plus information booklet (n=57) or just the booklet (n=51). The effect of the DVD was assessed by comparing changes in Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire scores (precontemplation, contemplation, and action/maintenance) between groups. The impact on pain coping, pain acceptance, and health-related quality of life was tested in secondary analyses. Repeated-measures analysis of variance, including all those with complete baseline and follow-up data regardless of use of the intervention, showed a significant, medium-sized, group×time effect on precontemplation, with reductions among the DVD group but not the booklet group. Significant use×time effects showed that benefits in terms of contemplation and action/maintenance were restricted to those who used the interventions at least once. The results show that low-intensity interventions in DVD format can improve the motivational impact of written information, and could be used to help prepare people with chronic pain for more intensive self-management interventions. The findings are consistent with a 2-phase, motivational-volitional model of pain self-management, and provide the first insights to our knowledge of readiness to self-manage pain in hemophilia. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Pain management in surgical wards. Quality and solutions for improvement in the early postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Gross, T; Pretto, M; Aeschbach, A; Marsch, S

    2002-08-01

    Following guidelines pain levels should not exceed a score of 3 on the visual analog scale (VAS 1-10). We were interested in the actual surgical pain management of the postoperative period and the potential influences of a nurse-controlled intravenous morphine administration (NCA) on its quality. Interventional study: interview of patients and nursing staff and examination of records concerning pain treatment following surgery. The interviews were conducted with 110 patients before and 125 patients after the intervention program. Before the intervention, one-half of the patients noted that they were never asked about their pain intensity within the first 24 h after surgery. Only 42% of the records showed at least one VAS documentation. Every fourth individual experienced a pain intensity > 3 without having received a supplementary pain medication. Following the morphine intervention program, documentation of pain scores increased significantly (72%; p < 0.0001) and more patients were familiar with the VAS (64% vs 46%; p < 0.0004). Median maximum as well as actual pain at the time of the interview decreased by one point (VAS). The percentage of patients whose supplementary pain prescription was totally used showed a significant increase (p = 0.035). Following morphine administration, no single individual complained about an undue waiting time in comparison to 15% of patients previously. Even though the morphine intervention project caused more work for the nursing staff, 75% of the personnel were convinced that the procedure was worth this investment. This data revealed a relevant deficiency of surgical pain management. Already basic instructions on pain management can significantly improve this treatment. Assigning additional authority to the nursing staff, such as a nurse-based intravenous opioid administration, can significantly raise the motivation of the personnel as well as the satisfaction of the patients involved.

  14. Randomized controlled trial of benzocaine versus placebo spray for pain relief at hysterosalpingogram.

    PubMed

    Bachman, E A; Senapati, S; Sammel, M D; Kalra, S K

    2014-06-01

    Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study assessed whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, parity, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea and/or chronic pelvic pain. Median change in pain score from baseline to procedure was 50.6mm (-7.4 to 98.8mm) in the benzocaine group and 70.4mm (19.8 to 100mm) in the placebo group. There was no difference between groups after adjusting for history of dysmenorrhoea. There was no difference in resolution of pain in benzocaine versus placebo groups at 5 min post procedure--median pain score difference -11.1 (-90.1 to 18.5) versus -37.0 (-100 to 1.2)--or at 30 min post procedure. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment and did not correlate with pain score during the procedure (rho=0.005). The use of benzocaine spray does not significantly improve pain relief during HSG nor does it hasten resolution of pain post HSG. Of interest, patient satisfaction was not correlated with pain. Many women experience pain during hysterosalpingogram (HSG), which is a test used to evaluate the uterine cavity and fallopian tube. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study to assess whether the use of benzocaine spray during HSG is associated with reduced pain as compared with placebo. Thirty women presenting for HSG were enrolled and randomized to either benzocaine or saline spray. Treatment groups were similar in age, race, previous pregnancies, pre-procedure oral analgesic use and history of dysmenorrhoea (painful periods) and/or chronic pelvic pain. There was no difference in pain scores or resolution of pain between the two groups. Satisfaction scores did not differ by treatment group

  15. Effects of whole body cryo-chamber therapy on pain in patients with chronic low back pain: a prospective double blind randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nugraha, B; Günther, J T; Rawert, H; Siegert, R; Gutenbrunner, C

    2015-04-01

    It is believed that treatment with low temperature can reduce pain perception in chronic pain patients, including chronic low back pain patients. To evaluate the effects of a two-week repeated intervention of -67 °C cryo-chamber in patients with chronic low back pain. A prospective randomized double blind study design. Hospital-based outpatients department Outpatients with chronic low back pain. Comparing intervention group (-67 °C) with higher temperature (-5 °C) which was supposed as a control group in a cryo-chamber. Similar effectiveness in pain reduction in both intervention and control groups Cryochamber therapy with -67 °C is not superior to (sham cryo chamber) with -5 °C. Cryo chambers therapy show positive effect by improving pain. For the treatment, -5 °C seems to be sufficient for these patients.

  16. Impact of an Electronic Pain and Opioid Risk Assessment Program: Are There Improvements in Patient Encounters and Clinic Notes?

    PubMed

    Butler, Stephen F; Zacharoff, Kevin L; Charity, Sadaf; Black, Ryan A; Chung, Emma; Barreveld, Antje; Clark, Molly S; Jamison, Robert N

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive electronic self-report assessment, called PainCAS(®) (Clinical Assessment System), was developed and implemented in three clinics. PainCAS captures demographic information, pain assessment, quality-of-life variables, and contains validated, electronic versions of screeners for risk of aberrant opioid-related behaviors (the SOAPP and COMM). This investigation sought to determine the impact of PainCAS on documentation of pain and opioid risk evaluations. Exploratory hypotheses examined changes in the content of the patient-provider interaction and any impact on outcome. In study 1, chart reviews were conducted between pain patients who completed the electronic program (N = 89) and controls who represented standard of care (N = 120). In study 2, two groups of chronic pain patients (treatment-as-usual Control condition = 75, PainCAS Experimental condition = 72) were interviewed after completing their index clinic visit and completed mailed questionnaires 3 months later. Results revealed significantly more key, pain-relevant chart elements documented in charts of patients who completed the PainCAS than those using a traditional paper questionnaire (Study 1; <0.001). In Study 2, the Experimental group reported more discussion about legal issues, substance use history, and medication safety compared with the Control group (p < 0.05). Satisfaction questionnaire responses supported provider and patient perceived benefit from using PainCAS. However, as expected, no differences were found between conditions on outcome measures of pain, mood, and function. Results indicate that use of the PainCAS electronic pain assessment improves documentation of chart elements in clinic notes and is associated with increased discussion of key, pain-relevant topics during the clinical visit. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Collaborative care for pain results in both symptom improvement and sustained reduction of pain and depression

    PubMed Central

    Thielke, Stephen; Corson, Kathryn; Dobscha, Steven K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traditional analytic approaches may oversimplify the mechanisms by which interventions effect change. Transition probability models can quantify both symptom improvement and sustained reduction in symptoms. We sought to quantify transition probabilities between higher and lower states for four outcome variables, and to compare two treatment arms with respect to these transitions. Method Secondary analysis of a year-long collaborative care intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain in veterans. Forty-two clinicians were randomized to intervention or treatment as usual (TAU), with 401 patients nested within clinician. The outcome variables, pain intensity, pain interference, depression, and disability scores, were dichotomized (lower/higher). Probabilities of symptom improvement (transitioning from higher to lower) or sustained reduction (remaining lower) were compared between intervention and TAU groups at 0–3, 3–6 and 6–12 month intervals. General estimating equations quantified the effect of the intervention on transitions. Results In adjusted models, the intervention group showed about 1.5 times greater odds of both symptom improvement and sustained reduction compared to TAU, for all the outcomes except disability. Conclusions Despite no formal relapse prevention program, intervention patients were more likely than TAU patients to experience continued relief from depression and pain. Collaborative care interventions may provide benefits beyond just symptom reduction. PMID:25554014

  18. Pain and anxiety control in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1993-10-01

    The management of pain and anxiety form the backbone of contemporary dental practice. The past decades have seen the introduction of a significant number of promising new techniques, drugs and equipment designed to aid the dental professional in the quest for a more pain-free and fear-free dental practice. This paper presents a brief look at these drugs and techniques.

  19. Opioid peptides in peripheral pain control.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Anna; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2011-01-01

    Opioids have a long history of therapeutic use as a remedy for various pain states ranging from mild acute nociceptive pain to unbearable chronic advanced or end-stage disease pain. Analgesia produced by classical opioids is mediated extensively by binding to opioid receptors located in the brain or the spinal cord. Nevertheless, opioid receptors are also expressed outside the CNS in the periphery and may become valuable assets in eliciting analgesia devoid of shortcomings typical for the activation of their central counterparts. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides that participate in the formation, transmission, modulation and perception of pain signals offers numerous opportunities for the development of new analgesics. Novel peptidic opioid receptor analogs, which show limited access through the blood brain barrier may support pain therapy requiring prolonged use of opioid drugs.

  20. Improvement in Anxiety and Pain After Whole Body Whirlpool Hydrotherapy Among Patients With Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the Whirlpool hydrotherapy on pain and anxiety in chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients, compared to the conventional hydrocollator pack therapy. Methods Forty-one subjects who have MPS in the upper trapezius muscles without depression were recruited. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the whirlpool therapy group whose bodies were immersed in a whirlpool bath at 34℃-36℃ for 30 minutes; the hydrocollator group who took a 30-minute application of a standard hot hydrocollator pack. Patients in both groups received therapy three days a week for 2 weeks and underwent several evaluations at baseline and after treatment. The variables we analyzed during evaluations were as follows: the primary outcome we considered was pain severity using a visual analogue scale. And the secondary outcomes examined included anxiety using the Korean version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and quality of life (QoL) using the Korean version of the World Health Organization QoL Assessment, Brief Form. All follow-up values were compared with the baseline values. Results The baseline parameters did not show significant differences between two groups. And after 2-week treatment, both groups revealed significant improvement in anxiety levels and QoL, as well as in pain. However, the improvement on pain (p=0.002) and anxiety (p=0.010) was significantly greater in the whirlpool group, compared to the hydrocollator group. Conclusion The whirlpool hydrotherapy can be used as a more effective therapeutic method to reduce pain and anxiety in chronic MPS patients without depression. PMID:24020034

  1. [Cannabinoids in the control of pain].

    PubMed

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Tartari, Stefano; Piva, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been used since remotes ages as a herbal remedy. Only recently the medical community highlighted the pharmacological scientific bases of its effects. The most important active principle, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was identified in the second half of the last century, and subsequently two receptors were identified and cloned: CB1 that is primarily present in the central nervous system, and CB2 that is present on the cells of the immune system. Endogenous ligands, called endocannabinoids, were characterized. The anandamide was the first one to be discovered. The effectiveness of the cannabinoids in the treatment of nausea and vomit due to anti-neoplastic chemotherapy and in the wasting-syndrome during AIDS is recognized. Moreover, the cannabinoids are analgesic, and their activity is comparable to the weak opioids. Furthermore, parallels exist between opioid and cannabinoid receptors, and evidence is accumulating that the two systems sometimes may operate synergistically. The interest of the pharmaceutical companies led to the production of various drugs, whether synthetic or natural derived. The good ratio between the polyunsatured fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6 of the oil of Cannabis seeds led to reduction of the phlogosis and an improvement of the pain symptoms in patients with chronic musculo-skeletal inflammation.

  2. Nurse practitioners can effectively deliver pain coping skills training to osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Joan E; Keefe, Francis J; Bruckenthal, Patricia; Junghaenel, Doerte U; Schneider, Stefan; Schwartz, Joseph E; Kaell, Alan T; Caldwell, David S; McKee, Daphne; Reed, Shelby; Gould, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    A multisite, randomized, controlled clinical effectiveness trial was conducted for osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain of the knee or hip. Adult health nurse practitioners provided a 10-session intervention, pain coping skills training (PCST), in patients' doctors' offices (N=129 patients); the control group received usual care (N=127 patients). Primary outcomes assessed at baseline, posttreatment, 6-month follow-up, and 12-month follow-up were: pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, use of coping strategies, and quality of life. Secondary measures included fatigue, social functioning, health satisfaction, and use of pain medication. Methods favoring external validity, consistent with pragmatic, effectiveness research, were utilized. Primary ITT and secondary per-protocol analyses were conducted. Attrition was within the expected range: 11% at posttreatment and 29% at 12-month follow-up; rates did not differ between groups. Omnibus ITT analyses across all assessment points indicated significant improvement for the PCST group compared with the control group for pain intensity, physical functioning, psychological distress, use of pain coping strategies, and self-efficacy, as well as fatigue, satisfaction with health, and reduced use of pain medication. Treatment effects were robust to covariates (demographics and clinical sites). Trends in the outcomes across the assessments were examined. All outcomes, except for self-efficacy, were maintained through the 12-month follow-up; effects for self-efficacy degraded over time. Per-protocol analyses did not yield greater effect sizes. Comparisons of PCST patients who were more vs less treatment adherent suggested greater effectiveness for patients with high adherence. Results support the effectiveness of nurse practitioner delivery of PCST for chronic osteoarthritis pain.

  3. Post-operative pain control after tonsillectomy: dexametasone vs tramadol.

    PubMed

    Topal, Kubra; Aktan, Bulent; Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Gozeler, Mustafa Sitki

    2017-06-01

    Tramadol was found to be more effective than dexamethasone in post-operative pain control, with long-lasting relief of pain. This study aimed to compare the effects of pre-operative local injections of tramadol and dexamethasone on post-operative pain, nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent tonsillectomy. Sixty patients between 3-13 years of age who were planned for tonsillectomy were included in the study. Patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 was the control group. Patients in Group 2 received 0.3 mg/kg Dexamethasone and Group 3 received 0.1 mg/kg Tramadol injection to the peritonsillary space just before the operation. Patients were evaluated for nausea, vomiting, and pain. When the control and the dexamethasone groups were compared; there were statistically significant differences in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, whereas there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at other hours. When the control and tramadol groups were compared, there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at all intervals. When tramadol and dexamethasone groups were compared, there was no statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 15 and 30 min, 1 and 2 h, whereas there was a statistically significant difference in pain scores at post-operative 6 and 24 h.

  4. Corticosteroid transdermal delivery significantly improves arthritis pain and functional disability.

    PubMed

    Iannitti, Tommaso; McDermott, Michael F; Laurino, Carmen; Malagoli, Andrea; Palmieri, Beniamino

    2017-02-01

    Arthritis is characterized by pain and functional limitation affecting the patients' quality of life. We performed a clinical study to investigate the efficacy of a betamethasone valerate medicated plaster (Betesil) in improving pain and functional disability in patients with arthritis and osteoarthritis. We enrolled 104 patients affected by osteoarthritis (n = 40) or arthritis (n = 64) in different joints. Patients received diclofenac sodium cream (2 g, four times a day) or a 2.25-mg dose of Betesil applied to the painful joint every night before bedtime for 10 days. Pain and functional disability were assessed, by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores. Redness was assessed by clinical inspection, and edema by the "fovea sign" method. C-reactive protein (CRP) was also measured; CRP can be used to cost-effectively monitor the pharmacological treatment efficacy and is increased during the acute-phase response, returning to physiological values after tissue recovery and functional restoration. All measurements were at baseline and at 10-day follow-up. At 10-day follow-up, a greater improvement in VAS and WOMAC pain and WOMAC stiffness and functional limitation scores from baseline was observed in patients treated with Betesil compared with diclofenac (all p < 0.01). At 10-day follow-up, improvement in redness, edema, and CRP levels from baseline was also greater in patients treated with Betesil compared with diclofenac (all p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of transdermal delivery of betamethasone valerate in patients affected by arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  5. Trunk motor control deficits in acute and subacute low back pain are not associated with pain or fear of movement.

    PubMed

    Sung, Won; Abraham, Mathew; Plastaras, Christopher; Silfies, Sheri P

    2015-08-01

    movement were assessed with Pearson correlations. Patients' postural control in the eyes-closed condition (p=.02) and movement precision (p=.04) were significantly impaired compared with healthy controls, with moderate-to-large group difference effect sizes. These trunk motor control impairments were not significantly associated with the patients self-reported pain characteristics and fear of movement. Patients with clinical identification of trunk MCIs demonstrated decreased trunk motor control, suggesting that impairments in proprioception, motor output, or central processing occur early in the back pain episode. This information may help to guide interventions to address these specific limitations, improving delivery of care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trunk Motor Control Deficits in Acute and Subacute Low Back Pain are Not Associated with Pain or Fear of Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Won; Abraham, Mathew; Plastaras, Christopher; Silfies, Sheri P.

    2015-01-01

    study was provided by the National Institutes of Health (xxxxxxx; $xxx,000), with no study specific conflicts of interest to report. Results Patients’ postural control in the eyes closed condition (P=.02) and movement precision (P=.04) were significantly impaired compared to healthy controls, with moderate to large group difference effect sizes. These trunk motor control impairments were not significantly associated with the patients self-reported pain characteristics and fear of movement. Conclusions Patients with clinical identification of trunk MCI demonstrated decreased trunk motor control, suggesting impairments in proprioception, motor output, or central processing occur early in the back pain episode. This information may help to guide interventions to address these specific limitations, improving delivery of care. PMID:25862508

  7. Pain Management in Cancer Patients Using a Mobile App: Study Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Mihir; Flanagan, Clare; Searl, Meghan; Traeger, Lara; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of effective medications and clinical guidelines for pain management, pain control is suboptimal in a sizeable proportion of patients with cancer pain. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend a comprehensive and multimodal approach for management of cancer pain. We developed a mobile phone application, ePAL, based on clinical guidelines to empower patients for cancer pain management by prompting regular pain assessments and coaching for self-management. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a multidimensional mobile phone-based pain management application, ePAL, on controlling cancer pain and improving quality of life in patients with cancer pain being treated at an academic palliative care clinic. Methods The study will be implemented as a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with 110 adult patients with CP who own a mobile phone over a follow-up period of two months. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving ePAL and usual care or to a control group receiving only usual care. The brief pain inventory will be used to assess our primary outcome which is pain intensity. We will also evaluate the effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes which include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, quality of life, adherence to analgesic medications, barriers to pain control, anxiety and patient engagement. Instruments that will be used in evaluating secondary outcomes include the Brief Pain Inventory, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Barriers Questionnaire-II, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue. The intention-to-treat approach will be used to evaluate outcomes. Our primary outcome, pain intensity, measured longitudinally over eight weeks, will be assessed by

  8. Low Level Laser Therapy Versus Pharmacotherapy in Improving Myofascial Pain Disorder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Mortazavi, Hamed; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Moradi Abbasabadi, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) lead to masticatory muscle pain, jaw movement disability and limitation in mouth opening. Pain is the chief complaint in 90% of the TMD patients which leads to disability and severe socioeconomic costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) compared to pharmacotherapy with NSAIDs (naproxen) in myofascial pain disorder syndrome (MPDS). In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 40 MPDS patients were divided into two groups. One group received naproxen 500 mg bid for 3 weeks as treatment modality and also had placebo laser sessions. The other group received active laser (diode 810 nm CW) as treatment and placebo drug. Pain intensity was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) and maximum painless mouth opening was also measured as a functional index every session and at 2 months follow up. Data was collected and analyzed with SPSS software. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Low level laser caused significant reduction in pain intensity (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in mouth opening. In naproxen group neither pain intensity nor maximum mouth opening had significant improvement. Pain relief, in subjective VAS was observed in third session in LLLT group, but did not occur in naproxen group. Maximum mouth opening increased significantly in laser group compared to the naproxen group from the eighth session. Treatment with LLLT caused a significant improvement in mouth opening and pain intensity in patients with MPDS. Similar improvement was not observed in naproxen group.

  9. Low Level Laser Therapy Versus Pharmacotherapy in Improving Myofascial Pain Disorder Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Mortazavi, Hamed; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Moradi Abbasabadi, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) lead to masticatory muscle pain, jaw movement disability and limitation in mouth opening. Pain is the chief complaint in 90% of the TMD patients which leads to disability and severe socioeconomic costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) compared to pharmacotherapy with NSAIDs (naproxen) in myofascial pain disorder syndrome (MPDS). Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 40 MPDS patients were divided into two groups. One group received naproxen 500 mg bid for 3 weeks as treatment modality and also had placebo laser sessions. The other group received active laser (diode 810 nm CW) as treatment and placebo drug. Pain intensity was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) and maximum painless mouth opening was also measured as a functional index every session and at 2 months follow up. Data was collected and analyzed with SPSS software. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Low level laser caused significant reduction in pain intensity (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in mouth opening. In naproxen group neither pain intensity nor maximum mouth opening had significant improvement. Pain relief, in subjective VAS was observed in third session in LLLT group, but did not occur in naproxen group. Maximum mouth opening increased significantly in laser group compared to the naproxen group from the eighth session. Conclusion: Treatment with LLLT caused a significant improvement in mouth opening and pain intensity in patients with MPDS. Similar improvement was not observed in naproxen group. PMID:27330698

  10. Laser acupuncture reduces pain in pediatric kidney biopsies: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oates, Aris; Benedict, Kelly A; Sun, Karen; Brakeman, Paul R; Lim, Jessica; Kim, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate laser acupuncture (LA) as an adjuvant therapy in pain management during percutaneous kidney biopsy procedure in children and adolescents. This prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial enrolled patients aged 7 to 26 years admitted to a children's hospital for percutaneous kidney biopsy. Patients received LA to treatment points (acupuncture group) or sham points (control group) before the procedure. The laser delivered a dose of 42 J/cm over 10 acupoints. Patients and parents rated the pain during and after the biopsy, and change in pain scores were calculated for each patient. Anxiety, vital signs, sedation medication, and patient's biopsy experience were secondary outcomes. Sixty-nine treatments (33 in the acupuncture group and 36 in the control group) were eligible for analysis. Patients in the acupuncture group reported a significantly improved change in the pain score after the biopsy compared with the controls (0.8 vs -0.5, P = 0.044). Patients in the acupuncture group had a statistically significant decrease in procedure vital signs including heart rate (-1.8 vs 5.6, P = 0.043) and respiratory rate (-2.4 vs 0.4, P = 0.045) when compared with controls. Parents also perceived a correspondingly greater improvement in their child's pain for those in the acupuncture group compared with the controls (2.3 vs 0.3, P = 0.04). Adjunctive LA significantly improved pain after pediatric percutaneous kidney biopsies.

  11. Written pain neuroscience education in fibromyalgia: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Ittersum, Miriam W; van Wilgen, C Paul; van der Schans, Cees P; Lambrecht, Luc; Groothoff, Johan W; Nijs, Jo

    2014-11-01

    Mounting evidence supports the use of face-to-face pain neuroscience education for the treatment of chronic pain patients. This study aimed at examining whether written education about pain neuroscience improves illness perceptions, catastrophizing, and health status in patients with fibromyalgia. A double-blind, multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial with 6-month follow-up was conducted. Patients with FM (n = 114) that consented to participate were randomly allocated to receive either written pain neuroscience education or written relaxation training. Written pain neuroscience education comprised of a booklet with pain neuroscience education plus a telephone call to clarify any difficulties; the relaxation group received a booklet with relaxation education and a telephone call. The revised illness perception questionnaire, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire were used as outcome measures. Both patients and assessors were blinded. Repeated-measures analyses with last observation carried forward principle were performed. Cohen's d effect sizes (ES) were calculated for all within-group changes and between-group differences. The results reveal that written pain neuroscience education does not change the impact of FM on daily life, catastrophizing, or perceived symptoms of patients with FM. Compared with written relaxation training, written pain neuroscience education improved beliefs in a chronic timeline of FM (P = 0.03; ES = 0.50), but it does not impact upon other domains of illness perceptions. Compared with written relaxation training, written pain neuroscience education slightly improved illness perceptions of patients with FM, but it did not impart clinically meaningful effects on pain, catastrophizing, or the impact of FM on daily life. Face-to-face sessions of pain neuroscience education are required to change inappropriate cognitions and perceived health in patients with FM.

  12. Pain Ratings, Psychological Functioning and Quantitative EEG in a Controlled Study of Chronic Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stefan; Naranjo, José Raúl; Brenneisen, Christina; Gundlach, Julian; Schultz, Claudia; Kaube, Holger; Hinterberger, Thilo; Jeanmonod, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Several recent studies report the presence of a specific EEG pattern named Thalamocortical Dysrhythmia (TCD) in patients with severe chronic neurogenic pain. This is of major interest since so far no neuroscientific indicator of chronic pain could be identified. We investigated whether a TCD-like pattern could be found in patients with moderate chronic back pain, and we compared patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain components. We furthermore assessed the presence of psychopathology and the degree of psychological functioning and examined whether the strength of the TCD-related EEG markers is correlated with psychological symptoms and pain ratings. Design Controlled clinical trial with age and sex matched healthy controls. Methods Spontaneous EEG was recorded in 37 back pain patients and 37 healthy controls. Results We were not able to observe a statistically significant TCD effect in the EEG data of the whole patient group, but a subsample of patients with evidence for root damage showed a trend in this direction. Pain patients showed markedly increased psychopathology. In addition, patients' ratings of pain intensity within the last 1 to 12 months showed strong correlations with EEG power, while psychopathology was correlated to the peak frequency. Conclusion Out of several possible interpretations the most likely conclusion is that only patients with severe pain as well as root lesions with consecutive thalamic deafferentation develop the typical TCD pattern. Our primary method of defining ‘neuropathic pain’ could not reliably determine if such a deafferentation was present. Nevertheless the analysis of a specific subsample as well as correlations between pain ratings, psychopathology and EEG power and peak frequency give some support to the TCD concept. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00744575 PMID:22431961

  13. Effectiveness of multimodal pain management after bipolar hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Jin-Yun; Woo, Young-Cheol; Lee, Jae-Sung; Jang, Eui-Chan

    2013-02-20

    Appropriate pain management affects outcome after hip fracture surgery. Although multimodal pain management is commonly used for pain control for patients undergoing elective surgery, few studies have evaluated its use in those undergoing hip fracture surgery. This prospective randomized study was designed to determine the clinical value of multimodal pain management with preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular multimodal drug injections in patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty. Of eighty-two cognitively intact elderly patients about to undergo bipolar hemiarthroplasty after a hip fracture, forty-three were randomly assigned to receive preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections (Group I) and thirty-nine were assigned to not receive preemptive medication and injections (Group II). These two groups were compared with regard to the pain level on postoperative days one, four, and seven; at discharge; and when they started walking and standing exercises. Total amounts of fentanyl used, the frequency of use of patient-controlled analgesia, patient satisfaction at discharge, and perioperative complications were recorded. Group I had a lower pain level than Group II on postoperative days one and four, but no intergroup difference in pain level was observed on postoperative day seven. The total amount of fentanyl used and the frequency of use of patient-controlled analgesia were also lower in Group I. Patient satisfaction at discharge was higher in Group I. No significant intergroup differences were found in the times until the patients walked or performed standing exercises or in the complications. Multimodal pain management provides additional pain relief until the fourth postoperative day, improves patient satisfaction at discharge, and reduces total narcotic consumption for postoperative pain management after hip hemiarthroplasty for hip fractures.

  14. Aqueous acupuncture for postoperative pain--a matched controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; Lu, S N; Lai, C T; Jean, J Y; Hsiao, C L; Hsu, P T

    1991-09-01

    The analgesic effects of acupuncture are well-documented. Aqueous acupuncture, or point injection, is a conveniently modified modern acupuncture method. This matched controlled trial was carried out to evaluate the effects of aqueous acupuncture in postoperative pain control. A total of 12 patients were selected as age-, sex- and operative-style-matched controls. In treating group, 2 to 5 ml of 20% glucose solution was injected into Ho-Ku (LI 4) and Yang-Ling-Chuan (GB 34) when patients had regained conciousness from operation anesthesia. The pain intensity were recorded as score system included verbal, sleep disturbance and use of narcotics. In comparisons with the control group, the intensity of postoperative pain, and the amounts and frequency of narcotics used were significantly lower in the study group, especially for the first 12 postoperative hours. Aqueous acupuncture is a convenient and effective procedure in postoperative pain control.

  15. Percutaneous Cervical Sympathetic Block for Pain Control after Internal Carotid Artery Dissection. A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Omar; Khan, Asif A.; Herial, Nabeel A.; Aytac, Emrah; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Medical treatment of cranio-cervical pain can be suboptimal in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection. We report the use of cervical sympathetic block for treatment of pain in two patients with ICA dissection. Case Reports A 58-year-old man and a 43-year-old woman presented with severe cranio-cervical pain associated with left and right ICA dissection confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral angiography. Due to suboptimal control of pain with medical treatment, cervical sympathetic block was performed under fluoroscopic guidance using 20 ml of bupivacaine injected lateral to the posterior aspect of sixth vertebral body in both patients. On self-reported pain scale, the 58-year-old man reported improvement in pain intensity from 8/10 pain to 0/10 within 1 h of blockade. The patient remained relatively pain free for the 24-h post blockade. Mild recurrence of pain was noted on Day 2. The 43-year-old woman reported improvement in pain intensity from 6/10 pain to 0/10 within 1 h of blockade. The patient remained pain free for five days with recurrence to previous intensity. Conclusion Cervical sympathetic blockade in patients with ICA dissection may be an effective option in the event of suboptimal pain control with medical treatment; however, the technique may be limited due to relatively short duration of action. PMID:28243349

  16. Child attention to pain and pain tolerance are dependent upon anxiety and attention control: An eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, L C; Lau, J Y F; Mueller, S C; Eccleston, C; Fox, E; Bosmans, M; Vervoort, T

    2017-02-01

    Pain is common and can be debilitating in childhood. Theoretical models propose that attention to pain plays a key role in pain outcomes, however, very little research has investigated this in youth. This study examined how anxiety-related variables and attention control interacted to predict children's attention to pain cues using eye-tracking methodology, and their pain tolerance on the cold pressor test (CPT). Children aged 8-17 years had their eye-gaze tracked whilst they viewed photographs of other children displaying painful facial expressions during the CPT, before completing the CPT themselves. Children also completed self-report measures of anxiety and attention control. Findings indicated that anxiety and attention control did not impact children's initial fixations on pain or neutral faces, but did impact how long they dwelled on pain versus neutral faces. For children reporting low levels of attention control, higher anxiety was associated with less dwell time on pain faces as opposed to neutral faces, and the opposite pattern was observed for children with high attention control. Anxiety and attention control also interacted to predict pain outcomes. For children with low attention control, increasing anxiety was associated with anticipating more pain and tolerating pain for less time. This is the first study to examine children's attention to pain cues using eye-tracking technology in the context of a salient painful experience. Data suggest that attention control is an important moderator of anxiety on multiple outcomes relevant to young people's pain experiences. This study uses eye tracking to study attention to pain cues in children. Attention control is an important moderator of anxiety on attention bias to pain and tolerance of cold pressor pain in youth. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  17. Soft Tissue Mobilization and PNF Improve Range of Motion and Minimize Pain Level in Shoulder Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Al Dajah, Salameh Bweir

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of soft tissue mobilization and PNF on pain level, and shoulder ROM in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with painful and limited glenohumeral ROM activities were selected. The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=15), which received treatment consisting of soft tissues mobilization and the PNF technique. The control group received an ultrasound treatment. Pain level, glenohumeral external rotation and overhead reach were measured before and after the intervention in groups. [Results] The experimental group showed a significant reduction in pain level in comparison with the control group. The values for Shoulder external rotation showed a significant improvement. The mean value for overhead reach in the experimental group significantly increased. [Conclusion] The combination of soft tissue mobilization for the subscapularis for 7 minutes and 5 repetitions of the contract-relax PNF technique for the shoulder internal rotator muscles followed by 5 repetitions of a PNF facilitated abduction and external rotation diagonal pattern was found to be effective in reducing pain and improving glenohumeral external rotation and overhead reach during a single intervention session. PMID:25435705

  18. Fat grafting for alleviating persistent pain after breast cancer treatment: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Juhl, Alexander A; Karlsson, Páll; Damsgaard, Tine E

    2016-09-01

    Persistent pain is a common side effect of breast cancer treatment, affecting 24-52% of women after mastectomy. Recent studies have described analgesic effects of fat grafting in various settings. We aimed to investigate whether fat grafting had an analgesic effect on persistent pain after mastectomy and whether fat grafting had a remodeling effect on the mastectomy scar. This study was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomized to either receive fat grafting to the pain-afflicted area around the missing breast or a control group without any intervention. A total of 18 unilaterally mastectomized women with persistent pain ≥3 on the numerical rating scale were enrolled. Patients were examined at the baseline and at 3 and 6 months by using the DoloTest(®), visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, neuropathic pain symptom inventory, and patient and observer scar assessment scale. A total of 15 patients were analyzed (fat grafted n = 8, control n = 7). The average amount of grafted fat was 71 ± 24.6 mL. Fat grafting showed a significant improvement in the pain as measured on the VAS pain scale (p = 0.001) with an average reduction of 54.9% and as measured on the neuropathic pain symptom inventory (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a significant improvement was observed in health-related quality of life (p = 0.007) and the quality of the scar (p < 0.001). This is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effect of fat grafting. Fat grafting is a safe and effective technique for alleviating persistent pain after mastectomy. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Time control, catecholamines and back pain among young nurses.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone; Semmer, Norbert K; Gerber, Hans

    2002-12-01

    This study had two objectives. First, it addressed concern with the contribution of work stressors and resources to the development of back pain, over and above the influence of biomechanical work factors. Second, using recent models about the role of the sympathetic-adrenal medullar system in musculoskeletal problems as its basis, it tested whether low-back pain is associated with higher levels of catecholamines. Altogether 114 nurses filled out a questionnaire in their first year of practice and again one year later. In addition, in a subsample of 24 nurses studied intensively at follow-up, urinary catecholamines were assessed at noon, before the end of work, in the evening, and at corresponding times on a day off. Daily stressful experiences and daily mood were also recorded. With control for baseline pain, biomechanical workload, and other potentially confounding variables, time control at the beginning of the study predicted low-back pain a year later. In the subsample, the epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were higher in those reporting more frequent episodes of back pain, the largest differences occurring at the end of work. In addition, control over stressful events at work was lower in this group. Time control is a risk factor for low-back pain among nurses beyond the influence of physical work load. Low control at work may increase the activity of the sympathetic-adrenal medullar system, which seems to play an important role in the development of musculoskeletal pain.

  20. Incobotulinum Toxin-A Improves Post-Surgical and Post-Radiation Pain in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Rezvan; Mittal, Shivam Om; Radmand, Reza; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients who undergo surgery or radiation can develop persistent focal pain at the site of radiation or surgery. Twelve patients who had surgery or radiation for local cancer and failed at least two analgesic medications for pain control were prospectively enrolled in a research protocol. Patients were injected up to 100 units of incobotulinum toxin A (IncoA) intramuscularly or subcutaneously depending on the type and location of pain (muscle cramp or neuropathic pain). Two patients passed away, one dropped out due to a skin reaction and another patient could not return for the follow up due to his poor general condition. All remaining 8 subjects (Age 31–70, 4 female) demonstrated significant improvement of Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (3 to 9 degrees, average 3.9 degrees) and reported significant satisfaction in Patients’ Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC) (7 out of 8 reported the pain as much improved). Three of the 8 patients reported significant improvement of quality of life. PMID:26771640

  1. State policy affecting pain management: recent improvements and the positive impact of regulatory health policies.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Aaron M; Maurer, Martha A; Joranson, David E

    2005-10-01

    Criteria-driven policy analysis resources from the University of Wisconsin Pain and Policy Studies Group (PPSG) evaluated drug control and professional practice policies that can influence use of controlled substances for pain management, and documented changes over a 3-year period. Additional research was needed to determine the extent of change, the types of messages contained in the policies, and what has contributed to changing policy content. Four research aims guided this study: (1) evaluate change between 2000 and 2003 of state policy that can affect pain relief, (2) describe content differences for statutes, regulations, guidelines, and policy statements, (3) evaluate differences between policies specific to pain management and policies governing general healthcare practice, and (4) compare content of policies specific to pain management created by healthcare regulatory boards to those created by state legislatures. Results showed that more current policies, especially policies regulating health professionals, tend to encourage pain management and avoid language that restricts professional decision-making and patient treatment. In addition, pain policies from healthcare regulatory boards were generally less restrictive than statutes or policies that govern general healthcare practice. These findings suggest that the positive policy change results primarily from state medical, pharmacy, and nursing boards adopting policies promoting pain management and the use of opioids, while containing few if any restrictions. Despite this improvement, further progress can be made when states continue to abrogate additional restrictions or clinically obsolete provisions from policies. PPSG policy evaluations provide guidance to lawmakers, healthcare regulators, and clinicians who are striving to achieve balanced policy, an attainable but redoubtable goal, to benefit patient care.

  2. MPC improves reformer control

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.S.; Noh, K.K.; Yi, S.; Kim, J.S.; Song, H.K.; Hyun, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    A model predictive control strategy was applied to a synthesis gas reformer of Samsung-BP Chemicals in Korea that produces carbon monoxide and hydrogen from naphtha. A strongly endothermic reaction occurs in a catalytic reformer, and reformer outlet temperature is considered to have the most significant effect on product composition. The newly developed reformer is known to be a cost-effective process operating at high reaction temperatures and low steam-to-carbon ratio, but its drawback is temperature control difficulty due to the use of offgas as a part of the fuel. Without smooth control of the reformer outlet temperature, stable operation of the downstream separation units cannot be expected. Therefore, it is a great challenge to apply a model predictive control technique for tight control of reformer outlet temperature. The paper describes model predictive control, the process advanced control project, computer system architecture, analysis of operating condition, control structure, sampling rate, and disturbance estimation.

  3. Pregabalin Improves Pain Scores in Patients with Fibromyalgia Irrespective of Comorbid Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E; Emir, Birol; Whalen, Ed; Ortiz, Marie; Pauer, Lynne; Clair, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder with patients frequently suffering from comorbid conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Data on how FM patients with comorbid OA respond to recommended therapies (such as pregabalin) could help their treatment. This was a pooled exploratory analysis of three randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of pregabalin in FM patients to assess the impact of comorbid OA on the response to pregabalin. Patients were divided into those with and without comorbid OA. Difference in change in least squares (LS) mean pain score at endpoint (assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scale, controlled for baseline pain score) with pregabalin (300 mg/day and 450 mg/day) vs placebo was assessed. Changes in Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) responders and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) total score were also assessed. There were 1665 patients in the analysis set (558, placebo; 552, pregabalin 300 mg/day; 555, pregabalin 450 mg/day), including 296 with comorbid OA. Pregabalin 450 mg/day significantly improved the LS mean (95% confidence interval) difference in pain score vs placebo in patients with (0.99 [0.44, 1.55], P < 0.001), and without (0.64 [0.39, 0.89], P < 0.001) OA. Improvements with pregabalin 300 mg/day with (0.31 [-0.25, 0.86], P = 0.276) and without (0.51 [0.25, 0.76], P < 0.001) OA were not consistently significant. Improvements in PGIC and FIQ total score were observed in patients with and without comorbid OA. FM patients with or without comorbid OA respond to treatment with pregabalin 450mg/day with significant improvements in pain intensity scores. These data could provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating these patients. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Open-label placebo treatment in chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Cláudia; Caetano, Joaquim Machado; Cunha, Lidia; Rebouta, Paula; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Kirsch, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This randomized controlled trial was performed to investigate whether placebo effects in chronic low back pain could be harnessed ethically by adding open-label placebo (OLP) treatment to treatment as usual (TAU) for 3 weeks. Pain severity was assessed on three 0- to 10-point Numeric Rating Scales, scoring maximum pain, minimum pain, and usual pain, and a composite, primary outcome, total pain score. Our other primary outcome was back-related dysfunction, assessed on the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire. In an exploratory follow-up, participants on TAU received placebo pills for 3 additional weeks. We randomized 97 adults reporting persistent low back pain for more than 3 months' duration and diagnosed by a board-certified pain specialist. Eighty-three adults completed the trial. Compared to TAU, OLP elicited greater pain reduction on each of the three 0- to 10-point Numeric Rating Scales and on the 0- to 10-point composite pain scale (P < 0.001), with moderate to large effect sizes. Pain reduction on the composite Numeric Rating Scales was 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.0-2.0) in the OLP group and 0.2 (−0.3 to 0.8) in the TAU group. Open-label placebo treatment also reduced disability compared to TAU (P < 0.001), with a large effect size. Improvement in disability scores was 2.9 (1.7-4.0) in the OLP group and 0.0 (−1.1 to 1.2) in the TAU group. After being switched to OLP, the TAU group showed significant reductions in both pain (1.5, 0.8-2.3) and disability (3.4, 2.2-4.5). Our findings suggest that OLP pills presented in a positive context may be helpful in chronic low back pain. PMID:27755279

  5. Sleep outcomes in youth with chronic pain participating in a randomized controlled trial of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain management

    PubMed Central

    Fales, Jessica; Palermo, Tonya M.; Law, Emily F.; Wilson, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are commonly reported in youth with chronic pain. We examined whether online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management would impact youth’s sleep. Subjective sleep quality and actigraphic sleep were evaluated in 33 youth (M=14.8 years; 70% female) with chronic pain participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of online-CBT. The Internet treatment condition (n=17) received 8-10 weeks of online-CBT + standard care and the wait-list control condition (n=16) continued with standard care. Although pain improved with online-CBT, no changes were observed in sleep outcomes. Shorter pre-treatment sleep duration was associated with less improvement in post-treatment functioning. Findings underscore the need for further development in psychological therapies to more intensively target sleep loss in youth with chronic pain. PMID:24484373

  6. Sleep outcomes in youth with chronic pain participating in a randomized controlled trial of online cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain management.

    PubMed

    Fales, Jessica; Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Wilson, Anna C

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are commonly reported in youth with chronic pain. We examined whether online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management would impact youth's sleep. Subjective sleep quality and actigraphic sleep were evaluated in 33 youth (M = 14.8 years; 70% female) with chronic pain participating in a larger randomized controlled trial of online-CBT. The Internet treatment condition (n = 17) received 8-10 weeks of online-CBT + standard care, and the wait-list control condition (n = 16) continued with standard care. Although pain improved with online-CBT, no changes were observed in sleep outcomes. Shorter pretreatment sleep duration was associated with less improvement in posttreatment functioning. Findings underscore the need for further development in psychological therapies to more intensively target sleep loss in youth with chronic pain.

  7. Pain and motor control: From the laboratory to rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Paul W

    2011-04-01

    Movement is changed in pain and is the target of clinical interventions. Yet the understanding of the physiological basis for movement adaptation in pain remains limited. Contemporary theories are relatively simplistic and fall short of providing an explanation for the variety of permutations of changes in movement control identified in clinical and experimental contexts. The link between current theories and rehabilitation is weak at best. New theories are required that both account for the breadth of changes in motor control in pain and provide direction for development and refinement of clinical interventions. This paper describes an expanded theory of the motor adaptation to pain to address these two issues. The new theory, based on clinical and experimental data argues that: activity is redistributed within and between muscles rather than stereotypical inhibition or excitation of muscles; modifies the mechanical behaviour in a variable manner with the objective to "protect" the tissues from further pain or injury, or threatened pain or injury; involves changes at multiple levels of the motor system that may be complementary, additive or competitive; and has short-term benefit, but with potential long-term consequences due to factors such as increased load, decreased movement, and decreased variability. This expanded theory provides guidance for rehabilitation directed at alleviating a mechanical contribution to the recurrence and persistence of pain that must be balanced with other aspects of a multifaceted intervention that includes management of psychosocial aspects of the pain experience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle injections with lidocaine improve resting fatigue and pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland; Kizer, Taylor; Robinson, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) complain of long-lasting fatigue and pain which are not relieved by rest and worsened by physical exertion. Previous research has implicated metaboreceptors of muscles to play an important role for chronic fatigue and pain. Therefore, we hypothesized that blocking impulse input from deep tissues with intramuscular lidocaine injections would improve not only the pain but also fatigue of CFS patients. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 58 CFS patients received 20 mL of 1% lidocaine (200 mg) or normal saline once into both trapezius and gluteal muscles. Study outcomes included clinical fatigue and pain, depression, and anxiety. In addition, mechanical and heat hyperalgesia were assessed and serum levels of lidocaine were obtained after the injections. Results Fatigue ratings of CFS patients decreased significantly more after lidocaine compared to saline injections (p = 0.03). In contrast, muscle injections reduced pain, depression, and anxiety (p < 0.001), but these changes were not statistically different between lidocaine and saline (p > 0.05). Lidocaine injections increased mechanical pain thresholds of CFS patients (p = 0.04) but did not affect their heat hyperalgesia. Importantly, mood changes or lidocaine serum levels did not significantly predict fatigue reductions. Conclusion These results demonstrate that lidocaine injections reduce clinical fatigue of CFS patients significantly more than placebo, suggesting an important role of peripheral tissues for chronic fatigue. Future investigations will be necessary to evaluate the clinical benefits of such interventions. PMID:28721090

  9. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment.

    PubMed

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-09-23

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without radicular symptoms and cervicogenic headache (CGH) at immediate- to long-term follow-up. When appropriate, to assess the influence of treatment characteristics (i.e. technique, dosage), methodological quality, symptom duration and subtypes of neck disorder on treatment outcomes. Review authors searched the following computerised databases to November 2014 to identify additional studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov, checked references, searched citations and contacted study authors to find relevant studies. We updated this search in June 2015, but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) undertaken to assess whether manipulation or mobilisation improves clinical outcomes for adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain. Two review authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, assessed risk of bias and applied Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods (very low, low, moderate, high quality). We calculated pooled risk ratios (RRs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs). We included 51 trials (2920 participants, 18 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus control; 34 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus another treatment, 1 trial had two comparisons). Cervical manipulation versus inactive control: For subacute and chronic neck pain, a single manipulation (three trials, no meta

  10. Hypnosis for reduction of background pain and pain anxiety in men with burns: A blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Jafarizadeh, Hossein; Lotfi, Mojgan; Ajoudani, Fardin; Kiani, Arezou; Alinejad, Vahid

    2017-08-08

    'Background pain' and 'pain anxiety' are among the numerous problems of patients with burns. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been used to reduce background pain and pain anxiety. This study compared the effectiveness of hypnosis and 'neutral hypnosis' (as a placebo in the control group) in decreasing the background burn pain and pain anxiety of adult male survivors with burns. This is a blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled study. Sixty men with burns were included in the minimisation method (30 individuals in the intervention group and 30 individuals in the control group). Four hypnotherapy sessions were performed every other day for each participant in the intervention group. Four neutral hypnosis sessions were performed every other day in the control group. Burn pain and pain anxiety of the patients in both groups were measured at the end of the second and fourth sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. There was no significant difference between the groups in the reduction in background pain intensity. There was a significant reduction in background pain quality and pain anxiety in the intervention group during the four hypnosis sessions. After two hypnotherapy sessions, a significant reduction was observed in the level of background pain quality and pain anxiety of participants. Hypnosis is effective in reducing background pain quality and pain anxiety of men with burns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  12. Emotion regulatory function of parent attention to child pain and associated implications for parental pain control behaviour.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Sütterlin, Stefan; Caes, Line; Moors, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the function of parental attention to child pain in regulating parental distress and pain control behaviour when observing their child performing a painful (cold pressor) task (CPT); we also studied the moderating role of parental state anxiety. Participants were 62 schoolchildren and one of their parents. Parental attention towards or away from child pain (ie, attend to pain vs avoid pain) was experimentally manipulated during a viewing task pairing unfamiliar children's neutral and pain faces. Before and after the viewing task, parental distress regulation was assessed by heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). In a subsequent phase, parents observed their own child perform a CPT task, allowing assessment of parental pain control behaviour (indexed by latency to stop their child's CPT performance) and parental distress, which was assessed via self-report before and after observation of child CPT performance. Eye tracking during the viewing task and self-reported attention to own child's pain confirmed successful attention manipulation. Further, findings indicated that the effect of attentional strategy on parental emotion regulation (indexed by HR, self-report) and pain control behaviour depended on parents' state anxiety. Specifically, whereas low anxious parents reported more distress and demonstrated more pain control behaviour in the Attend to Pain condition, high anxious parents reported more distress and showed more pain control behaviour in the Avoid Pain condition. This inverse pattern was likewise apparent in physiological distress indices (HR) in response to the initial viewing task. Theoretical/clinical implications and further research directions are discussed.

  13. Use of dexmedetomidine for pain control

    PubMed Central

    Grosu, Irina

    2010-01-01

    For many years, clonidine, an α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) agonist, has been widely used as an analgesic adjuvant in perioperative conditions and pain therapy. Dexmedetomidine (DMET) is currently the most potent α2-AR agonist available and was first approved as a sedative agent for use in the intensive care unit. However, DMET has recently been investigated for its analgesic effects and has the potential to become an alternative to clonidine. PMID:21283652

  14. Does McKenzie therapy improve outcomes for back pain?

    PubMed

    Busanich, Brian M; Verscheure, Susan D

    2006-01-01

    What is the clinical evidence base for McKenzie therapy in management of back pain? Studies were identified using a computer-based literature search of 7 databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, CINAHL, PEDro, the Cochrane Register of Clinical Trials (CENTRAL), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Search terms included McKenzie therapy, McKenzie treatment, and McKenzie method. Studies published before September 2003 were eligible. To be included in the review, each study had to fulfill the following criteria: (1) the study was a randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trial, (2) the subjects' primary complaint was nonspecific low back pain or neck pain with or without radiation to the extremities, (3) the authors investigated the efficacy of the McKenzie method/McKenzie treatment in comparison with no treatment, sham treatment, or another treatment, (4) individualized patient treatment and treatment were specified according to McKenzie principles, and (5) the authors reported at least one of the outcome measures of pain, disability, quality of life, work status, global perceived effect, medication use, medical visits, or recurrence. Studies were included with no language restriction and with subjects of all age groups, of either sex, and with any duration of symptoms. Studies were excluded if subjects had any of the following spinal conditions: cauda equina syndrome, cord compression, infection, fracture, neoplasm, inflammatory disease, pregnancy, any form of headache, whiplash-associated disorders, vertigo/dizziness, or vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Data were independently extracted from each study by 2 investigators using a standardized data extraction form. The standardized data extraction form and experience level of the investigators were not included in the review. In studies with more than 2 treatment groups, the treatment contrast of more relevance to current Australian physiotherapy was selected. Data were also extracted for short-, intermediate

  15. Virtual Reality for Management of Pain in Hospitalized Patients: Results of a Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Vartan C; Mosadeghi, Sasan; Howard, Amber R; Lopez, Mayra; Dupuy, Taylor; Reid, Mark; Martinez, Bibiana; Ahmed, Shahzad; Dailey, Francis; Robbins, Karen; Rosen, Bradley; Fuller, Garth; Danovitch, Itai; IsHak, Waguih; Spiegel, Brennan

    2017-03-29

    Improvements in software and design and reduction in cost have made virtual reality (VR) a practical tool for immersive, three-dimensional (3D), multisensory experiences that distract patients from painful stimuli. The objective of the study was to measure the impact of a onetime 3D VR intervention versus a two-dimensional (2D) distraction video for pain in hospitalized patients. We conducted a comparative cohort study in a large, urban teaching hospital in medical inpatients with an average pain score of ≥3/10 from any cause. Patients with nausea, vomiting, dementia, motion sickness, stroke, seizure, and epilepsy and those placed in isolation were excluded. Patients in the intervention cohort viewed a 3D VR experience designed to reduce pain using the Samsung Gear Oculus VR headset; control patients viewed a high-definition, 2D nature video on a 14-inch bedside screen. Pre- and postintervention pain scores were recorded. Difference-in-difference scores and the proportion achieving a half standard deviation pain response were compared between groups. There were 50 subjects per cohort (N=100). The mean pain reduction in the VR cohort was greater than in controls (-1.3 vs -0.6 points, respectively; P=.008). A total of 35 (65%) patients in the VR cohort achieved a pain response versus 40% of controls (P=.01; number needed to treat=4). No adverse events were reported from VR. Use of VR in hospitalized patients significantly reduces pain versus a control distraction condition. These results indicate that VR is an effective and safe adjunctive therapy for pain management in the acute inpatient setting; future randomized trials should confirm benefit with different visualizations and exposure periods. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02456987; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02456987 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6pJ1P644S).

  16. Virtual Reality for Management of Pain in Hospitalized Patients: Results of a Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghi, Sasan; Lopez, Mayra; Dupuy, Taylor; Reid, Mark; Martinez, Bibiana; Ahmed, Shahzad; Dailey, Francis; Robbins, Karen; Rosen, Bradley; Fuller, Garth; Danovitch, Itai; IsHak, Waguih

    2017-01-01

    Background Improvements in software and design and reduction in cost have made virtual reality (VR) a practical tool for immersive, three-dimensional (3D), multisensory experiences that distract patients from painful stimuli. Objective The objective of the study was to measure the impact of a onetime 3D VR intervention versus a two-dimensional (2D) distraction video for pain in hospitalized patients. Methods We conducted a comparative cohort study in a large, urban teaching hospital in medical inpatients with an average pain score of ≥3/10 from any cause. Patients with nausea, vomiting, dementia, motion sickness, stroke, seizure, and epilepsy and those placed in isolation were excluded. Patients in the intervention cohort viewed a 3D VR experience designed to reduce pain using the Samsung Gear Oculus VR headset; control patients viewed a high-definition, 2D nature video on a 14-inch bedside screen. Pre- and postintervention pain scores were recorded. Difference-in-difference scores and the proportion achieving a half standard deviation pain response were compared between groups. Results There were 50 subjects per cohort (N=100). The mean pain reduction in the VR cohort was greater than in controls (−1.3 vs −0.6 points, respectively; P=.008). A total of 35 (65%) patients in the VR cohort achieved a pain response versus 40% of controls (P=.01; number needed to treat=4). No adverse events were reported from VR. Conclusions Use of VR in hospitalized patients significantly reduces pain versus a control distraction condition. These results indicate that VR is an effective and safe adjunctive therapy for pain management in the acute inpatient setting; future randomized trials should confirm benefit with different visualizations and exposure periods. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02456987; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02456987 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6pJ1P644S) PMID:28356241

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Core Strengthening Exercises in Helicopter Crewmembers with Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Yvonne; Currier, Linda; Plante, Timothy W; Schubert Kabban, Christine M; Tvaryanas, Anthony P

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if five core strengthening exercises would decrease pain severity and related disability in U.S. Air Force helicopter aircrew members with low back pain. The study was a randomized control group repeated measures design. The experimental manipulation consisted of a set of five core strengthening exercises performed 4 d/wk for 12 wk. Self-reported pain severity and disability were ascertained at baseline and 12 wk using the Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) and Modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index (MODI), respectively. The NPRS was used to ascertain both daily pain (NPRS(daily)) and in-flight pain (NPRS(flight)). Self-reported improvement or deterioration in low back pain was measured using the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRCS). There were 12 subjects enrolled and 5 were randomized to the intervention group. The mean NPRS(flight) score decreased 1.8 points vs. increasing 0.1 points during the trial for the intervention and control groups, respectively. The mean MODI score decreased 4.8 points vs. increasing 1.7 points during the trial for the intervention and control groups, respectively. The mean GRCS score at the end of the trial was 4.0 vs. 0 for the intervention and control groups, respectively. There was no difference between groups in terms of mean NPRS(daily) scores. Core strengthening exercises were effective in reducing in-flight pain and led to a reduction in pain symptoms and disability over the 12-wk study period as compared to those subjects who maintained their regular exercise regimen.

  18. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  19. Psychotherapy With Somatosensory Stimulation for Endometriosis-Associated Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Karin; Schweizer-Arau, Annemarie; Limmer, Anna; Preibisch, Christine; Popovici, Roxana M; Lange, Isabel; de Oriol, Barbara; Beissner, Florian

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate whether psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation is effective for the treatment of pain and quality of life in patients with endometriosis-related pain. Patients with a history of endometriosis and chronic pelvic pain were randomized to either psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation (ie, different techniques of acupuncture point stimulation) or wait-list control for 3 months, after which all patients were treated. The primary outcome was brain connectivity assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Prespecified secondary outcomes included pain on 11-point numeric rating scales (maximal and average global pain, pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dyspareunia) and physical and mental quality of life. A sample size of 30 per group was planned to compare outcomes in the treatment group and the wait-list control group. From March 2010 through March 2012, 67 women (mean age 35.6 years) were randomly allocated to intervention (n=35) or wait-list control (n=32). In comparison with wait-list controls, treated patients showed improvements after 3 months in maximal global pain (mean group difference -2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] -3.4 to -0.8; P=.002), average global pain (-2.5, 95% CI -3.5 to -1.4; P<.001), pelvic pain (-1.4, 95% CI -2.7 to -0.1; P=.036), dyschezia (-3.5, 95% CI -5.8 to -1.3; P=.003), physical quality of life (3.8, 95% CI 0.5-7.1, P=.026), and mental quality of life (5.9, 95% CI 0.6-11.3; P=.031); dyspareunia improved nonsignificantly (-1.8, 95% CI -4.4 to 0.7; P=.150). Improvements in the intervention group remained stable at 6 and 24 months, and control patients showed comparable symptom relief after delayed intervention. Psychotherapy with somatosensory stimulation reduced global pain, pelvic pain, and dyschezia and improved quality of life in patients with endometriosis. After 6 and 24 months, when all patients were treated, both groups showed stable improvements. ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01321840.

  20. A Quality Improvement Collaborative Program for Neonatal Pain Management in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yokoo, Kyoko; Funaba, Yuuki; Fukushima, Sayo; Fukuhara, Rie; Uchida, Mieko; Aiba, Satoru; Doi, Miki; Nishimura, Akira; Hayakawa, Masahiro; Nishimura, Yutaka; Oohira, Mitsuko

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neonatal pain management guidelines have been released; however, there is insufficient systematic institutional support for the adoption of evidence-based pain management in Japan. Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a collaborative quality improvement program on the implementation of pain management improvements in Japanese neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Methods: Seven Japanese level III NICUs participated in a neonatal pain management quality improvement program based on an Institute for Healthcare Improvement collaborative model. The NICUs developed evidence-based practice points for pain management and implemented these over a 12-month period. Changes were introduced through a series of Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, and throughout the process, pain management quality indicators were tracked as performance measures. Jonckheere's trend test and the Cochran-Armitage test for trend were used to examine the changes in quality indicator implementations over time (baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months). Findings: Baseline pain management data from the 7 sites revealed substantial opportunities for improvement of pain management, and testing changes in the NICU setting resulted in measurable improvements in pain management. During the intervention phase, all participating sites introduced new pain assessment tools, and all sites developed electronic medical record forms to capture pain score, interventions, and infant responses to interventions. Implications for Practice: The use of collaborative quality improvement techniques played a key role in improving pain management in the NICUs. Implications for Research: Collaborative improvement programs provide an attractive strategy for solving evidence-practice gaps in the NICU setting. PMID:28114148

  1. Peer volunteers in an integrative pain management program for frail older adults with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common among the older population. A literature review on pain management program showed that exercise, yoga, massage therapy, Tai Chi, and music therapy could significantly reduce pain. In spite of the proven benefits of pain management programs, these intervention programs were effective only in the short term, and older adults would resume their old habits. It has been suggested that interventions comprising some type of social support have great potential to increase the participation of older adults. Therefore, we propose the inclusion of peer volunteers in an integrated pain management program to relieve pain among frail older adults. This study aims to explore the effectiveness of an integrated pain management program supplemented with peer volunteers in improving pain intensity, functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, and the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods among frail older adults with chronic pain. Methods/Design We intend to recruit 30 nursing home residents and 30 peer volunteers from the Institute of Active Ageing in Hong Kong in a group trial for an 8-week group-based integrated pain management program. There will be 16 sessions, with two 1-hour sessions each week. The primary outcome will be pain levels, while secondary outcomes will be assessed according to functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods, and through a questionnaire for volunteers. Discussion In view of the high prevalence of chronic pain among older adults and its adverse impacts, it is important to provide older adults with tools to control their pain. We propose the use of peer volunteers to enhance the effects of an integrated pain management program. It is expected that pain can be reduced and improvements can be achieved among older adults in the areas of physical activity, functional mobility, loneliness levels

  2. EFFECTIVENESS OF DRY NEEDLING, STRETCHING, AND STRENGTHENING TO REDUCE PAIN AND IMPROVE FUNCTION IN SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC LATERAL HIP AND THIGH PAIN: A RETROSPECTIVE CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Pavkovich, Ron

    2015-08-01

    noted. Subjects reported improved sleep and functional mobility, which were commensurate with their different age ranges and initial reported limitations in mobility. The results of this case series show promising outcomes for the use of dry needling in the treatment of chronic lateral hip and thigh pain. Further controlled clinical trials are recommended to determine the effectiveness of adding dry needling as compared to other interventions for chronic lateral hip and thigh pain. Level 4.

  3. Effects of Patient Controlled Analgesia Hydromorphone during Acute Painful Episodes in Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Eufemia; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2008-01-01

    The use of hydromorphone is increasing but little is known about its effects during painful episodes in adolescents with sickle cell disease. This pilot study examined the intensity, location, and quality of pain and evaluated the amount of relief and side effects from PCA hydromorphone during acute painful episodes in five adolescents with sickle cell disease. Data suggest that hydromorphone may provide a better alternative than morphine, the most commonly prescribed opioid in patients with sickle cell disease. Hydromorphone may provide improved pain control and recovery from acute painful episodes in patients with sickle cell disease.

  4. Randomized controlled trial of intravenous acetaminophen for postcesarean delivery pain control.

    PubMed

    Altenau, Brie; Crisp, Catrina C; Devaiah, C Ganga; Lambers, Donna S

    2017-09-01

    Cesarean delivery is a common surgery in the United States, with 1.3 million performed during 2009.(1) Obstetricians must balance the growing concern with opioid abuse, dependence, and side effects with optimal postoperative pain control. Intravenous acetaminophen may represent an additional method to decrease the reliance on opioid medications and improve postoperative pain following cesarean delivery. The objective of the study was to determine whether the administration of intravenous acetaminophen following routine scheduled cesarean delivery would decrease the need for narcotic medications to control postoperative pain. This was an institutional review board-approved, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, registered on clinicaltrials.gov (number 02046382). Women scheduled to undergo cesarean delivery with regional anesthesia at term were recruited. All perioperative and postpartum care was standardized via study order sets. Study patients were given all medications in a standardized manner receiving either acetaminophen 1000 mg intravenously or 100 mL saline (placebo) every 8 hours for 48 hours for a total of 6 doses. The pharmacy prepared intravenous acetaminophen and saline in identical administration bags labeled study drug to ensure blinding. The initial dose of study drug was given within 60 minutes of skin incision. Quantity of breakthrough and scheduled analgesic medications and self-reported pain levels on the Faces Pain Scale (0-10) before and after study drug administration were collected. Patient demographics were extracted from the chart. Power calculation determined that 45 patients per arm were required to detect a 30% reduction in postcesarean narcotic requirement with 80% power and a significance level of P = .05. A total of 133 patients were consented for the study. Twenty-nine were excluded and 104 patients completed the study: 57 received intravenous acetaminophen and 47 received placebo. There were no differences in baseline

  5. Time to onset of neuropathic pain reduction: A retrospective analysis of data from nine controlled trials of pregabalin for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Griesing, Teresa; Emir, Birol; Young, James P

    2010-01-01

    These retrospective analyses of daily mean pain scores from nine placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin at 150, 300, or 600 mg/day (pregabalin, n = 1205; placebo, n = 772) examined time to significant reduction of pain during the first 2 weeks of treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy and postherpetic neuralgia. Time to onset of reduction in pain-defined as the first day for which patients treated with pregabalin had significant reductions (P < 0.05) in mean pain score compared with the placebo group for that day and the subsequent day-was calculated for all treatment groups demonstrating statistically significant reduction in pain at trial end point. The time to a 1-point or greater improvement in mean pain score was measured for each patient who was a responder at end point (30% or greater improvement in mean pain score). In seven of the nine trials (representing 11 of 14 pregabalin arms), significant reduction in pain was achieved at end point. The time to onset for reduction in pain was treatment Day 1 or 2 in nine of these successful treatment arms. Individual responder analysis confirmed that responders in the pregabalin groups reported a 1-point or greater pain reduction earlier than responders in placebo groups (P < 0.0001). However, this analysis is not a direct estimate of the likelihood that an individual patient would experience noticeable pain relief by the end of the second day. Overall, for patients who will respond to pregabalin, statistically significant and sustained reduction of pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and posttherapeutic neuralgia occurs early, usually by the end of 2 days of pregabalin treatment.

  6. Locus of control patterns in headaches and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Franco, Luis; López-Jiménez, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Locus of control (LOC) is related to the impact of headaches and chronic pain; however, literature evidence regarding LOC is not always consistent. Several authors consider this to be due, in part, to the separate interpretation of LOC factors, during which the interaction among them is ignored. In 1982, Wallston and Wallston proposed eight possible LOC health patterns depending on whether the individual scored high or low in each of three dimensions. OBJECTIVE: To identify these LOC patterns in patients with headaches and chronic pain, and to validate them in terms of their association with a selection of the main pain indicators. METHODS: A total of 228 individuals were recruited at three public centres in Seville, Spain. Participants completed a semistructured clinical interview and several questionnaires assessing psychological variables related to pain. The main statistical analyses used were two-step cluster analysis and ANCOVA. RESULTS: The six-cluster solution was optimal. The patterns observed coincided with: the believer in control; the yea-sayer; the pure chance; the pure internal; the pure professional; and the nay-sayer clusters. The double external or type VI clusters were not observed. Clusters could be classified from the best to the worst adjustment to chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the empirical validity of the theoretical model of LOC patterns proposed in 1982 by Wallston and Wallston among a chronic pain population. The analysis of patterns provides more accurate information regarding the adjustment to pain compared with analysis of the LOC factors separately. PMID:23936894

  7. Control of Pain After Tonsillectomy in Children: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Grace X; Tunkel, David E

    2017-09-01

    The relief of pain after tonsillectomy in children remains challenging and even controversial. While the need for pain control after this surgery is understood, recent debate has centered around the risks of opioids in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and the possible increases in posttonsillectomy hemorrhage with the use of alternative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We discuss the multiple facets of posttonsillectomy pain control in children. A variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions used before, during, and after surgery are reviewed, presenting the evidence for efficacy and possible adverse effects. We also review the various surgical techniques used in tonsillectomy with a focus on reducing postoperative pain. Clinicians should understand effective methods of analgesia after tonsillectomy in children, and know the potential consequences of each option. Caution should be employed when using opioids, particularly in young children with severe OSAS. Although large studies of NSAID use have shown effective pain management without an increase in posttonsillectomy bleeding frequency, the potential for more severe bleeding events has been debated. Cold dissection techniques lead to less pain, but hot techniques remain popular, with less intraoperative blood loss and shorter operative time. Partial (intracapsular) tonsillectomy seems to reduce pain as well.

  8. Effects of Pain Acceptance and Pain Control Strategies on Physical Impairment in Individuals with Chronic Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vowles, Kevin E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Gross, Richard T.; McDaniel, Michael L.; Mouse, Angela; Bates, Mick; Gallimore, Paula; McCall, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic pain are effective. There is a need, however, to understand the processes involved in determining how these treatments contribute to behavior change. Control and acceptance strategies represent two potentially important processes involved in treatment, although they differ significantly in approach. Results from…

  9. Effects of Pain Acceptance and Pain Control Strategies on Physical Impairment in Individuals with Chronic Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vowles, Kevin E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Gross, Richard T.; McDaniel, Michael L.; Mouse, Angela; Bates, Mick; Gallimore, Paula; McCall, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic pain are effective. There is a need, however, to understand the processes involved in determining how these treatments contribute to behavior change. Control and acceptance strategies represent two potentially important processes involved in treatment, although they differ significantly in approach. Results from…

  10. Nicotinic modulation of descending pain control circuitry.

    PubMed

    Umana, Iboro C; Daniele, Claire A; Miller, Brooke A; Abburi, Chandrika; Gallagher, Keith; Brown, Meghan A; Mason, Peggy; McGehee, Daniel S

    2017-10-01

    Along with the well-known rewarding effects, activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) can also relieve pain, and some nicotinic agonists have analgesic efficacy similar to opioids. A major target of analgesic drugs is the descending pain modulatory pathway, including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Although activating nAChRs within this circuitry can be analgesic, little is known about the subunit composition and cellular effects of these receptors, particularly within the vlPAG. Using electrophysiology in brain slices from adult male rats, we examined nAChR effects on vlPAG neurons that project to the RVM. We found that 63% of PAG-RVM projection neurons expressed functional nAChRs, which were exclusively of the α7-subtype. Interestingly, the neurons that express α7 nAChRs were largely nonoverlapping with those expressing μ-opioid receptors (MOR). As nAChRs are excitatory and MORs are inhibitory, these data suggest distinct roles for these neuronal classes in pain modulation. Along with direct excitation, we also found that presynaptic nAChRs enhanced GABAergic release preferentially onto neurons that lacked α7 nAChRs. In addition, presynaptic nAChRs enhanced glutamatergic inputs onto all PAG-RVM projection neuron classes to a similar extent. In behavioral testing, both systemic and intra-vlPAG administration of the α7 nAChR-selective agonist, PHA-543,613, was antinociceptive in the formalin assay. Furthermore, intra-vlPAG α7 antagonist pretreatment blocked PHA-543,613-induced antinociception via either administration method. Systemic administration of submaximal doses of the α7 agonist and morphine produced additive antinociceptive effects. Together, our findings indicate that the vlPAG is a key site of action for α7 nAChR-mediated antinociception.

  11. Groin pain following hip resurfacing: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    McArthur, John R; Costa, Matthew; Griffin, Damian R; Krikler, Steven J; Parsons, Nicholas; Foguet, Pedro R

    2011-01-01

    We compared 47 patients with groin pain following hip resurfacing to a matched control group. Functional scores and plain radiographs were assessed along with measurement of whole blood cobalt and chromium by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Symptomatic patients underwent ultrasound scan of the affected hip. Mean functional outcomes were poor in those with pain and good in the control group. Groin pain was associated with valgus stem positioning and lower neck:head ratio (relatively narrow neck) (p=0.03, p=0.04 respectively). We classified patients with groin pain into two groups: biological and mechanical. The biological group had soft tissue abnormalities on USS and higher levels of cobalt and chromium (p=0.04, p=0.05 respectively). The mechanical group had normal USS, lower metal ion levels and more retroverted femoral components (p=0.01).

  12. The relationship between adolescents' pain catastrophizing and attention bias to pain faces is moderated by attention control.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Lauren C; Vervoort, Tine; Eccleston, Christopher; Fox, Elaine; Jacobs, Konrad; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; Lau, Jennifer Y F

    2015-07-01

    This study considered the attentional functioning of adolescents with varying levels of pain catastrophizing. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and attention bias to pain facial expressions. Furthermore, drawing on dual process models in the context of pain, we investigated the moderating role of attention control on this relationship. Adolescents (N = 73; age, 16-18 years) performed a dot-probe task in which facial expressions of pain and neutral expressions were presented for 100 milliseconds and 1250 milliseconds. Participants also completed self-report pain catastrophizing and attention control measures. We found that although there was no main effect of pain catastrophizing on attention bias towards pain faces, attention control did significantly moderate this relationship. Further analysis revealed that lower levels of attention control were significantly associated with increasing attentional vigilance towards pain faces only within high catastrophizing adolescents. In addition, we found that poorer attention control was related to increased attention bias for pain faces (regardless of pain catastrophizing level) when these faces were presented for relatively longer durations (ie, 1250 milliseconds) but not for short durations (ie, 100 milliseconds). This study supports a dual process model of attentional processes in pain, thus replicating previous findings within the psychopathology literature but extending them to the study of pain. Theoretical and clinical implications of our findings are discussed.

  13. Use of the PREPARE (PREhabilitation, Physical Activity and exeRcisE) program to improve outcomes after lumbar fusion surgery for severe low back pain: a study protocol of a person-centred randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lotzke, Hanna; Jakobsson, Max; Brisby, Helena; Gutke, Annelie; Hägg, Olle; Smeets, Rob; den Hollander, Marlies; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Lundberg, Mari

    2016-08-18

    Following lumbar fusion surgery, a successful outcome is empirically linked to effective rehabilitation. While rehabilitation is typically postoperative, the phase before surgery - termed prehabilitation - is reportedly an ideal time to prepare the patient. There are presently no guidelines for prehabilitation before lumbar fusion surgery. Physical activity has well-known health benefits, and staying physically active despite pain is a major principle in non-pharmacological chronic low back pain treatment. Psychological factors such as fear of movement, pain catastrophizing and low self-efficacy are known to be barriers to staying active. No studies have investigated prehabilitation protocols that promote physical activity and target psychological risk factors before lumbar fusion surgery. The aim of our proposed randomised controlled trial is to investigate whether patients who undergo lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative disc disease experience better functioning with a physiotherapeutic prehabilitation program (PREPARE) based on a cognitive behavioural approach compared to conventional care. We will recruit 110 patients between 18-70 years of age with degenerative disc disease who are waiting for lumbar fusion surgery. These patients will be randomly assigned to receive either PREPARE or conventional care. PREPARE uses a person-centred perspective and focuses on promoting physical activity and targeting psychological risk factors before surgery. The primary outcome will be disability measured using the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0. Secondary outcomes will include functioning (patient-reported and performance-based), physical activity (accelerometer), health-related quality of life, back and leg pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, self-efficacy, depression, anxiety, satisfaction with treatment results and health economic factors. Data will be collected at baseline (preoperatively) after the intervention (preoperatively), 3 and 8 weeks, 3, 6

  14. Transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment for patients with shoulder pain booked for surgery: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Taverner, Murray; Loughnan, Terence

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder pain is the third most common musculoskeletal problem and accounts for 5% of general practitioner consultations. Although many treatments are described, there is no consensus on optimal treatment and up to 40% of patients still have pain 12 months after initially seeking help for pain. Previously, the effect of transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment (TCPRFT) was evaluated in a retrospective audit that showed good pain relief for a mean 395 days and justified this randomized sham controlled trial. In this study, 51 patients entered into a randomized double-blinded, placebo controlled study of TCPRFT. Patients were assessed at 4 and 12 weeks by a blinded observer and compared with baseline. We observed sustained reductions in pain at night, pain with activity, and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks with active but not sham TCPRFT. The 25 subjects who received active treatment showed statistically significant reductions of 24/100 in pain at night and 20/100 of pain with activity at 4 weeks and 18/100 and 19/100, respectively, at 12 weeks from baseline. Statistically significant lower Brief Pain Inventory pain and function scores (4 and 12 weeks), improved pain self-efficacy (4 weeks), Oxford Shoulder scores (12 weeks), and internal rotation (12 weeks) were seen. Pain at both rest and shoulder elevation were not improved by active treatment. No complications were seen. This study of a simple, low risk, outpatient treatment confirms the findings of our earlier study of TCPRFT for knee pain and shoulder pain audit that transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment may help some people with painful shoulders.

  15. Peer mentorship to promote effective pain management in adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Allen, Laura B; Tsao, Jennie C I; Hayes, Loran P; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2011-05-22

    This protocol is for a study of a new program to improve outcomes in children suffering from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia, recurrent headache, or recurrent abdominal pain. Although teaching active pain self-management skills through cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or a complementary program such as hypnotherapy or yoga has been shown to improve pain and functioning, children with low expectations of skill-building programs may lack motivation to comply with therapists' recommendations. This study will develop and test a new manualized peer-mentorship program which will provide modeling and reinforcement by peers to other adolescents with chronic pain (the mentored participants). The mentorship program will encourage mentored participants to engage in therapies that promote the learning of pain self-management skills and to support the mentored participants' practice of these skills. The study will examine the feasibility of this intervention for both mentors and mentored participants, and will assess the preliminary effectiveness of this program on mentored participants' pain and functional disability. This protocol will recruit adolescents ages 12-17 with chronic pain and randomly assign them to either peer mentorship or a treatment-as-usual control group. Mentored participants will be matched with peer mentors of similar age (ages 14-18) who have actively participated in various treatment modalities through the UCLA Pediatric Pain Program and have learned to function successfully with a chronic pain disorder. The mentors will present information to mentored participants in a supervised and monitored telephone interaction for 2 months to encourage participation in skill-building programs. The control group will receive usual care but without the mentorship intervention. Mentored and control subjects' pain and functioning will be assessed at 2 months (end of intervention for mentored participants) and at 4 month follow-up to see if improvements

  16. Peer mentorship to promote effective pain management in adolescents: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This protocol is for a study of a new program to improve outcomes in children suffering from chronic pain disorders, such as fibromyalgia, recurrent headache, or recurrent abdominal pain. Although teaching active pain self-management skills through cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or a complementary program such as hypnotherapy or yoga has been shown to improve pain and functioning, children with low expectations of skill-building programs may lack motivation to comply with therapists' recommendations. This study will develop and test a new manualized peer-mentorship program which will provide modeling and reinforcement by peers to other adolescents with chronic pain (the mentored participants). The mentorship program will encourage mentored participants to engage in therapies that promote the learning of pain self-management skills and to support the mentored participants' practice of these skills. The study will examine the feasibility of this intervention for both mentors and mentored participants, and will assess the preliminary effectiveness of this program on mentored participants' pain and functional disability. Methods This protocol will recruit adolescents ages 12-17 with chronic pain and randomly assign them to either peer mentorship or a treatment-as-usual control group. Mentored participants will be matched with peer mentors of similar age (ages 14-18) who have actively participated in various treatment modalities through the UCLA Pediatric Pain Program and have learned to function successfully with a chronic pain disorder. The mentors will present information to mentored participants in a supervised and monitored telephone interaction for 2 months to encourage participation in skill-building programs. The control group will receive usual care but without the mentorship intervention. Mentored and control subjects' pain and functioning will be assessed at 2 months (end of intervention for mentored participants) and at 4 month follow-up to

  17. Shoe Orthotics for the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; Duarte, Manuel; Freels, Sally

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of shoe orthotics with and without chiropractic treatment for chronic low back pain compared with no treatment. Randomized controlled trial. Integrative medicine teaching clinic at a university. Adult subjects (N=225) with symptomatic low back pain of ≥3 months were recruited from a volunteer sample. Subjects were randomized into 1 of 3 treatment groups (shoe orthotic, plus, and waitlist groups). The shoe orthotic group received custom-made shoe orthotics. The plus group received custom-made orthotics plus chiropractic manipulation, hot or cold packs, and manual soft tissue massage. The waitlist group received no care. The primary outcome measures were change in perceived back pain (numerical pain rating scale) and functional health status (Oswestry Disability Index) after 6 weeks of study participation. Outcomes were also assessed after 12 weeks and then after an additional 3, 6, and 12 months. After 6 weeks, all 3 groups demonstrated significant within-group improvement in average back pain, but only the shoe orthotic and plus groups had significant within-group improvement in function. When compared with the waitlist group, the shoe orthotic group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in pain (P<.0001) and function (P=.0068). The addition of chiropractic to orthotics treatment demonstrated significantly greater improvements in function (P=.0278) when compared with orthotics alone, but no significant difference in pain (P=.3431). Group differences at 12 weeks and later were not significant. Six weeks of prescription shoe orthotics significantly improved back pain and dysfunction compared with no treatment. The addition of chiropractic care led to higher improvements in function. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Perspectives on Intravenous Oxycodone for Control of Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Seow-Choen, Francis; Wexner, Steven D; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Raffa, Robert B; Taylor, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Intravenous (IV) analgesia has particular advantages in the immediate postoperative period. For example, IV administration results in a faster onset of pain relief and results in more predictable pharmacokinetics than does administration by other routes. It also allows for convenient dosing before or during surgery, permitting the initiation of effective analgesia in the early phase of the postoperative period. In addition, when patients are able to tolerate oral intake, they can be switched from IV to oral dosing based on maintaining the predictable analgesia established by the IV route. IV morphine is widely used for the control of postoperative pain, but there is a trend toward the use of oxycodone. Oxycodone (which may be mediated partly through kappa- as well as mu-opioid receptors) offers several potential advantages. Published studies comparing IV oxycodone to other IV opioids for postsurgical pain report that oxycodone is a safe and effective analgesic. Some studies show that IV oxycodone may be associated with greater pain control, fewer or less severe adverse events, and faster onset of action, although the results are not consistent across all studies. Oxycodone has been reported to be safe in the geriatric and other special populations when adequate clinical adjustments are made. Thus, the clinical reports and oxycodone's pharmacologic profile make intravenous oxycodone a potentially important "new" old drug for postoperative pain control. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Long-term efficacy of resilient appliance therapy in TMD pain patients: a randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Håkan; Vallon, D; Ekberg, E C

    2011-10-01

    The aim was to investigate long-term efficacy of a resilient appliance in patients with pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A randomised, controlled trial was performed in 80 recruited TMD pain patients. They were randomly allocated to one of two groups: treatment with a resilient appliance or treatment with a hard, palatal, non-occluding appliance. The primary treatment outcome was judged positive when patients' characteristic pain intensity decreased by at least 30%. Additional treatment outcomes were physical functioning, emotional functioning and headache. At the 12-month follow-up 50% of the patients in the treatment group and 42% in the control group had a 30% reduction of characteristic pain intensity, when calculated in an intent-to-treat analysis. Jaw function improved in both groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Emotional functioning improved in both groups at the 6-month follow-up; an improvement concerning grade of depression was found in the control group at 12 months. Headache decreased in both groups at both follow-ups. There were no statistically significant differences found regarding primary and additional outcomes between groups at the 6- and 12-months follow-up. There was no statistically significant difference between the resilient appliance and the non-occluding control appliance in reducing TMD pain, physical functioning, emotional functioning and headache in a 12 months perspective.

  20. Control of Pain in the Rheumatic Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, F. Dudley

    1968-01-01

    Pain may be attacked in the rheumatic diseases (1) centrally, with drugs ranging in efficiency from those which are potentially addictive and under the Dangerous Drugs Act (e.g., pethidine) and are therefore rarely used, down to simple analgesics such as paracetamol; (2) peripherally, by local action, whether it be by applications of heat or cold, by injections of local anaesthetics or anti-inflammatory agents, or by surgery; (3) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory non-analgesic agents taken systemically, such as the corticosteroids; and (4) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic agents taken systemically, such as aspirin. The exact sites of action of the pyrazoles, indomethacin, the anthranilic compounds, and other anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic drugs are as yet uncertain, but along with these methods of attacking the pain-producing areas help must also be given to the distressed mind behind the joints. Faith in the future, cheerfulness, freedom from depression, and the development of a philosophy to deal with the uncertainties of the disease are essential. It has been said that you don't have to be a doctor to treat uncomplicated lobar pneumonia: anybody with a bottle of penicillin in his hands holds the cure. It is the incurable diseases that are really worth treating, and that make demands on the physician. To quote Tuker: “My last word is this. Whoever has the care of a sorely stricken arthritic must encourage him to fulfil himself intellectually and spiritually, and to achieve—no matter what, but to achieve, so that he may nightly lay himself down on his bed of pain looking forward happily to the morrow's task, mind centred upon it, no matter what it is; sticking in stamps, research into anything you like, dabbling with pastel or water colours, writing chatty letters to friends. Anything at all, but let it be for him the most pressing thing of the day, and let him believe that you think it is. Help him and let him live, live

  1. Design of the integrative medical group visits randomized control trial for underserved patients with chronic pain and depression.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Paula; Lestoquoy, Anna Sophia; Gergen-Barnett, Katherine; Penti, Brian; White, Laura F; Saper, Robert; Fredman, Lisa; Stillman, Sarah; Lily Negash, N; Adelstein, Pamela; Brackup, Ivy; Farrell-Riley, Christine; Kabbara, Karim; Laird, Lance; Mitchell, Suzanne; Bickmore, Timothy; Shamekhi, Ameneh; Liebschutz, Jane M

    2017-03-01

    Given the public health crisis of opioid overprescribing for pain, there is a need for evidence-based non pharmacological treatment options that effectively reduce pain and depression. We aim to examine the effectiveness of the Integrative Medical Group Visits (IMGV) model in reducing chronic pain and depressive symptoms, as well as increasing pain self-management. This paper details the study design and implementation of an ongoing randomized controlled trial of the IMGV model as compared to primary care visits. The research aims to determine if the IMGV model is effective in achieving: a) a reduction in self-reported pain and depressive symptoms and 2) an improvement in the self-management of pain, through increasing pain self-efficacy and reducing use of self-reported pain medication. We intend to recruit 154 participants to be randomized in our intervention, the IMGV model (n=77) and to usual care (n=77). Usual care of chronic pain through pharmacological treatment has mixed evidence of efficacy and may not improve quality of life or functional status. We aim to conduct a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the IMGV model as compared to usual care in reducing self-reported pain and depressive symptoms as well as increasing pain management skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Motor control and low back pain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Roussel, N; De Kooning, M; Schutt, A; Mottram, S; Truijen, S; Nijs, J; Daenen, L

    2013-02-01

    Professional dancers suffer a high incidence of injuries, especially to the spine and lower extremities. There is a lack of experimental research addressing low back pain (LBP) in dancers. The aim of this study is to compare lumbopelvic motor control, muscle extensibility and sacroiliac joint pain between dancers with and without a history of LBP. 40 pre-professional dancers (mean age of 20.3 years) underwent a clinical test battery, consisting of an evaluation of lumbopelvic motor control, muscle extensibility, generalized joint hypermobility, and sacroiliac joint pain provocation tests. Also self-reported measurements and standardized questionnaires were used. 41% of the dancers suffered from LBP during at least 2 consecutive days in the previous year. Only one dancer suffered from sacroiliac joint pain. Compared to dancers without a history of LBP, dancers with a history of LBP showed poorer lumbopelvic motor control (p<0.05). No differences in muscle extensibility or joint hypermobility were observed between dancers (p>0.05). Despite their young age, pre-professional dancers suffer from LBP frequently. Sacroiliac joint pain, generalized joint hypermobility or muscle extensibility appears unrelated to LBP in dancers. Motor control is decreased in those with a history of LBP. Further research should examine whether motor control is etiologically involved in LBP in dancers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Health locus of control and self-efficacy predict back pain rehabilitation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keedy, Nicole H; Keffala, Valerie J; Altmaier, Elizabeth M; Chen, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic back pain treatments have generally been costly and/or ineffective despite advances in medical technology. Patient selection and factors intrinsic to patients, including beliefs and behaviors, have been increasingly looked upon as possible predictive factors for success following multidisciplinary intervention for chronic back pain. The current study investigated the value of using patients' perceived control over health changes (health locus of control) and their perceived ability to engage in pain management behaviors (pain-related self-efficacy) to predict physical and mental health outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 61 patients who completed a two-week multidisciplinary chronic back pain rehabilitation program at our institution between 2007 and 2009. Patient demographics were identified and categorized. Pre- and post-intervention functional surveys, including the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Form C, Chronic Pain Self-Efficacy Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Version 2, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Oswestry Disability Index Version 2, were used to evaluate benefit from back pain intervention and to examine patient factors that may predict physical and mental health outcomes. Participants included 28 males and 33 females, ages 28 to 72, completing chronic back pain rehabilitation. Locus of control, self-efficacy, and physical and mental health demonstrated treatment-related changes, with notable improvements in physical and mental health. Regression analyses examined the value of pre-treatment health locus of control and pain-related self-efficacy as predictors of physical and mental health one month following treatment. Higher internal and lower doctor health locus of control, and higher self-efficacy at baseline predicted higher lift scores one month after treatment (p <. 05; p <. 01; p <. 01, respectively). Higher baseline self-efficacy also predicted better physical functioning (p <. 01) and lower disability (p <. 01

  4. Patient training in cancer pain management using integrated print and video materials: a multisite randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Syrjala, Karen L; Abrams, Janet R; Polissar, Nayak L; Hansberry, Jennifer; Robison, Jeanne; DuPen, Stuart; Stillman, Mark; Fredrickson, Marvin; Rivkin, Saul; Feldman, Eric; Gralow, Julie; Rieke, John W; Raish, Robert J; Lee, Douglas J; Cleeland, Charles S; DuPen, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Standard guidelines for cancer pain treatment routinely recommend training patients to reduce barriers to pain relief, use medications appropriately, and communicate their pain-related needs. Methods are needed to reduce professional time required while achieving sustained intervention effectiveness. In a multisite, randomized controlled trial, this study tested a pain training method versus a nutrition control. At six oncology clinics, physicians (N=22) and nurses (N=23) enrolled patients (N=93) who were over 18, with cancer diagnoses, pain, and a life expectancy of at least six months. Pain training and control interventions were matched for materials and method. Patients watched a video followed by about 20 minutes of manual-standardized training with an oncology nurse focused on reviewing the printed material and adapted to individual concerns of patients. A follow-up phone call after 72 hours addressed individualized treatment content and pain communication. Assessments at baseline, one, three, and six months included barriers, the Brief Pain Inventory, opioid use, and physician and nurse ratings of their patients’ pain. Trained versus control patients reported reduced barriers to pain relief (P<.001), lower usual pain (P=.03), and greater opioid use (P<.001). No pain training patients reported severe pain (>6 on a 0–10 scale) at one-month outcomes (P=.03). Physician and nurse ratings were closer to patients’ ratings of pain for trained versus nutrition groups (P=.04, P<.001 respectively). Training efficacy was not modified by patient characteristics. Using video and print materials, with brief individualized training, effectively improved pain management over time for cancer patients of varying diagnostic and demographic groups. PMID:18093738

  5. The effect of a manual therapy knee protocol on osteoarthritic knee pain: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Henry; Ward, Graham; Hoskins, Wayne; Hardy, Katie

    2008-12-01

    them (intervention mean 7.0; control mean 3.4), felt it decreased their knee symptoms such as crepitus (intervention mean 6.0; control mean 3.4) and improved their knee mobility (intervention mean 6.4; control mean 3.4) and their ability to perform general activities (intervention mean 6.5; control mean 3.8). Importantly the MIMG Knee Protocol intervention group reported no adverse reactions during treatment. A short-term manual therapy knee protocol significantly reduced pain suffered by participants with osteoarthritic knee pain and resulted in improvements in self-reported knee function immediately after the end of the 2 week treatment period.

  6. The effect of a manual therapy knee protocol on osteoarthritic knee pain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Henry; Ward, Graham; Hoskins, Wayne; Hardy, Katie

    2008-01-01

    the intervention had helped them (intervention mean 7.0; control mean 3.4), felt it decreased their knee symptoms such as crepitus (intervention mean 6.0; control mean 3.4) and improved their knee mobility (intervention mean 6.4; control mean 3.4) and their ability to perform general activities (intervention mean 6.5; control mean 3.8). Importantly the MIMG Knee Protocol intervention group reported no adverse reactions during treatment. Conclusions A short-term manual therapy knee protocol significantly reduced pain suffered by participants with osteoarthritic knee pain and resulted in improvements in self-reported knee function immediately after the end of the 2 week treatment period. PMID:19066697

  7. Does an online psychological intervention improve self-efficacy and disability in people also receiving Multimodal Manual Therapy for chronic low back pain compared to Multimodal Manual Therapy alone? Design of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Petrozzi, M John; Leaver, Andrew; Jones, Mairwen K; Ferreira, Paulo H; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Mackey, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Various interventions are available for the treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP), including Manual Therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the addition of an internet-based CBT program leads to better outcomes in patients who are treated with multimodal manual therapy for chronic LBP. A randomized controlled trial comparing a combined intervention, consisting of internet-based CBT utilising MoodGYM plus multimodal manual therapy, to multimodal manual therapy alone for patients with chronic LBP. Multimodal manual therapy will be delivered by experienced chiropractors and physiotherapists. Treatment sessions will consist of a combination of joint and soft tissue mobilisation; spinal manipulation as well as muscle and fascia massage; education and reassurance; and rehabilitative exercise prescription. In total, 108 adult participants will be recruited from multiple chiropractic and physiotherapy private practices in Australia. Participants older than 18 years of age and diagnosed with chronic non-specific LBP will be included in the trial, where chronic LBP is defined as continuous or fluctuating pain for a minimum of three months. The Keele STarT Back screening tool will be used to screen for potential participants who are in the medium risk category. The primary outcomes are self efficacy and disability measured by the Patient Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) respectively. Secondary outcome measures will assess pain, catastrophising, depression, anxiety, stress and work ability. Participants will be randomly allocated into one of two groups. Both groups will receive an upper limit of 12 multimodal manual therapy sessions over a period of 8 weeks. The intervention group will also receive five weeks of MoodGYM covering five modules in total. Assessment will be conducted at pre-treatment, post-treatment 8- and follow-up at 26- and 52 weeks. In addition

  8. Oral infections and orofacial pain in Alzheimer's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Souza Rolim, Thaís; Fabri, Gisele Maria Campos; Nitrini, Ricardo; Anghinah, Renato; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Siqueira, José Tadeu T; Cestari, José Augusto Ferrari; de Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan T

    2014-01-01

    Dental infections are frequent and have recently been implicated as a possible risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite a lack of studies investigating orofacial pain in this patient group, dental conditions are known to be a potential cause of pain and to affect quality of life and disease progression. To evaluate oral status, mandibular function and orofacial pain in patients with mild AD versus healthy subjects matched for age and gender. Twenty-nine patients and 30 control subjects were evaluated. The protocol comprised a clinical questionnaire and dental exam, research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index, and included a full periodontal evaluation. AD signs and symptoms as well as associated factors were evaluated by a trained neurologist. A higher prevalence of orofacial pain (20.7%, p < 0.001), articular abnormalities in temporomandibular joints (p < 0.05), and periodontal infections (p = 0.002) was observed in the study group compared to the control group. Orofacial pain and periodontal infections were more frequent in patients with mild AD than in healthy subjects. Orofacial pain screening and dental and oral exams should be routinely performed in AD patients in order to identify pathological conditions that need treatment thus improving quality of life compromised due to dementia.

  9. Contributions of mood, pain catastrophizing, and cold hyperalgesia in acute and chronic low back pain: a comparison with pain-free controls.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Markus; Moloney, Niamh; Rebbeck, Trudy; Traeger, Adrian; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to elucidate the peripheral and central mechanisms that underlie changes in pain sensitivity associated with low back pain (LBP). However, it remains unclear to what degree peripheral and central changes contribute to the generation and maintenance of LBP. The aim of this study was to compare thermal pain sensitivity, measured using QST, in participants with acute LBP, chronic LBP, and pain-free controls. Participant groups with acute LBP (N=20), chronic LBP (N=30), and pain-free controls (N=30) were assessed by thermal QST. The unique contributions of pain-related psychological and QST variables to predict membership to the acute and chronic pain groups were also determined. We found that participants with chronic LBP demonstrated significantly lower cold pain threshold (CPT) in the primary area of pain (low back) as well as in an area anatomically remote from the primary area of pain (forearm) when compared with controls. Participants with acute LBP did not show significantly elevated pain sensitivity. CPT at the remote site was a significant independent predictor of membership to the chronic pain group, after the adjustment for mood and pain catastrophizing. CPT explained 8% of the total variance of 46% related to group membership. We found evidence for localized and generalized cold hyperalgesia in chronic, but not acute LBP. We might speculate that hyperalgesia develops as a consequence of long-lasting LBP, but prospective studies are needed to confirm this assumption.

  10. The effects of the CORE programme on pain at rest, movement-induced and secondary pain, active range of motion, and proprioception in female office workers with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Eun-Hye; Cho, Hwi-young

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the effects of the CORE programme on pain at rest, movement-induced pain, secondary pain, active range of motion, and proprioception deficits in female office workers with chronic low back pain. Randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation clinics. A total of 53 participants with chronic low back pain were randomized into the CORE group and the control group. CORE group participants underwent the 30-minute CORE programme, five times per week, for eight weeks, with additional use of hot-packs and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, while the control group used only hot-packs and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Participants were evaluated pretest, posttest, and two months after the intervention period to measure resting and movement-induced pain, pressure pain as secondary pain, active range of pain-free motion, and trunk proprioception. Pain intensity at rest (35.6 ±5.9 mm) and during movement (39.4 ±9.1 mm) was significantly decreased in the CORE group following intervention compared with the control group. There were significant improvements in pressure pain thresholds (quadratus lumborum: 2.2 ±0.7 kg/cm(2); sacroiliac joint: 2.0 ±0.7 kg/cm(2)), active range of motion (flexion: 30.8 ±14.3°; extension: 6.6 ±2.5°), and proprioception (20° flexion: 4.3 ±2.4°; 10° extension: 3.1 ±2.0°) in the CORE group following intervention (all p < 0.05). These improvements were maintained at the two-month follow-up. The control group did not show significant improvements in any measured parameter. The CORE programme is an effective intervention for reducing pain at rest and movement-induced pain, and for improving the active range of motion and trunk proprioception in female office workers with chronic low back pain. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. The Effect of 2 Different Exercise Programs on Pain Intensity and Muscle Dimensions in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Narjess; Mohseni Bandpei, Mohammad A; Mosallanezhad, Zahra; Rahgozar, Mahdi; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2017-07-21

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 2 exercise programs combined with electrotherapy on pain intensity and lumbar stabilizer muscles dimensions in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed with 41 patients with chronic LBP. Participants were randomly allocated into 2 groups: an experimental group (n = 20) received stabilization exercises plus electrotherapy, and a control group (n = 21) received routine exercises plus electrotherapy. Pain intensity, using a visual analog scale, and muscle dimensions of both right and left transverse abdominis and lumbar multifidus muscles, using rehabilitative ultrasonography, were assessed before and immediately after 4 weeks of intervention. Significant improvement was identified after interventions on pain intensity and muscle size measurements in both groups (P < .01 in all instances). The only exception was the right-side lumbar multifidus cross-sectional area of the control group, which was not statistically significant (P = .081). No significant differences were found between the 2 exercise groups on pain intensity and muscle dimensions (P > .05 in all instances). The results of this study suggest that a combination of electrotherapy with either routine or stabilization exercise programs may improve pain intensity and muscle dimensions in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Examining the Time to Improvement of Sleep Interference With Pregabalin in Patients With Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Knapp, Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to be a safe, effective treatment for neuropathic pain associated with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) or postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), with average time to reduction in pain of 2 days. Pain-related sleep interference is commonly reported in both painful DPN and PHN. These post hoc analyses examined the time to improvement in sleep with pregabalin in patients with painful DPN or PHN, measured by reduction in daily sleep interference (DSI) scores on an 11-point numeric rating scale. A total of 4527 patients from 16 placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for treatment of painful DPN or PHN were included in the analysis. In these trials, there were a total of 16 pregabalin treatment arms for painful DPN (75-600 mg/d), 10 for PHN (150-600 mg/d), and 3 for painful DPN/PHN (150-600 mg/d). Time to improvement in DSI scores was calculated for all treatment arms that demonstrated statistically significant reductions in DSI scores during the first 14 days of treatment compared with placebo (23 of 29; 79.3%) and was defined as the first day DSI scores for that day and the following day were significantly lower than placebo (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) time to improvement in DSI scores was 1.6 (1.3) days. Sustained improvement (≥1-point improvement in mean DSI score) was seen significantly earlier for pregabalin DSI responders than patients receiving placebo. These findings demonstrate that statistically significant and sustained improvement in sleep occurs rapidly (within 1 day for some patients) in response to treatment with pregabalin.

  13. The influence of cold pack on labour pain relief and birth outcomes: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shirvani, Marjan Ahmad; Ganji, Zhila

    2014-09-01

    (1) To evaluate the influence of local cold on severity of labour pain and (2) to identify the effect of local cold on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Fear of labour pain results in an increase in pain and duration of labour, maternal discontent and demand for caesarean section. Regarding maternal and foetal complications of analgesic medications, the attention to application of nonpharmacological methods including cold therapy is increased. Randomised controlled trial. Sixty-four pregnant women, at initiation of active phase of labour, were allocated randomly to cold therapy and control groups (n = 64). Null parity, term pregnancy, presence of single foetus, cephalic presentation and completing informed consent were considered as inclusion criteria. Administration of analgesic and anaesthesia, foetal distress, skin lesions in regions of cold therapy and high-risk pregnancy provided exclusion criteria. Cold pack was applied over abdomen and back, for 10 minutes every 30 minutes during first phase of labour. Additionally, cold pack was placed over perineum, for 5 minutes every 15 minutes during second phase. Pain severity was assessed based on the visual analogue scale. The two groups were not significantly different considering demographic data, gestational age, foetal weight, rupture of membranes and primary severity of pain. Degree of pain was lower in cold therapy group during all parts of active phase and second stage. Duration of all phases was shorter in cold therapy group in all phases. Foetal heart rate, perineal laceration, type of birth, application of oxytocin and APGAR score were not significantly different between two groups. Labour pain is probably reduced based on gate theory using cold. Pain control by cold maybe improves labour progression without affecting mother and foetus adversely. Local cold therapy could be included in labour pain management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Acupuncture for Improving Chronic Back Pain, Osteoarthritis and Headache.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Karen J; Coeytaux, Remy R

    2009-05-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conduct a critical review of the literature on acupuncture for chronic back pain, osteoarthritis and headache. METHODS: Review of meta-analyses, systematic reviews and some well-conducted, recent studies. RESULTS: Overall, acupuncture appears superior to no treatment or usual care for persons with chronic back pain, osteoarthritis, or headache. However, these findings vary depending on the specific outcome and the follow-up period. The magnitude of the effect varies, but is consistent with a small to moderate effect size in most cases. Moreover, acupuncture is not clearly superior to sham acupuncture, although the latter is a controversial control group. Acupuncture has a favorable safety profile, with relatively few side effects and serious ones quite rare. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture is a cost effective treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that acupuncture is a reasonable therapeutic option, but not the clear therapy of choice for any of these conditions. Acupuncture may be especially valuable for patients who prefer it to other options or are concerned about using analgesic medications.

  15. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  16. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  17. Laparoscopic uterosacral nerve ablation for alleviating chronic pelvic pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Jane; Gray, Richard; Hills, Robert K; Latthe, Pallavi; Buckley, Laura; Gupta, Janesh; Selman, Tara; Adey, Elizabeth; Xiong, Tengbin; Champaneria, Rita; Lilford, Richard; Khan, Khalid S

    2009-09-02

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition with a major effect on health-related quality of life, work productivity, and health care use. Operative interruption of nerve trunks in the uterosacral ligaments by laparoscopic uterosacral nerve ablation (LUNA) is a treatment option for patients with chronic pelvic pain. To assess the effectiveness of LUNA in patients with chronic pelvic pain. Randomized controlled trial of 487 women with chronic pelvic pain lasting longer than 6 months without or with minimal endometriosis, adhesions, or pelvic inflammatory disease, who were recruited to the study by consultant gynecological surgeons from 18 UK hospitals between February 1998 and December 2005. Follow-up was conducted by questionnaires mailed at 3 and 6 months and at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years. Bilateral LUNA or laparoscopy without pelvic denervation (no LUNA); participants were blinded to the treatment allocation. The primary outcome was pain, which was assessed by a visual analogue scale. Data concerning the 3 types of pain (noncyclical pain, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia) were analyzed separately as was the worst pain level experienced from any of these 3 types of pain. The secondary outcome was health-related quality of life, which was measured using a generic instrument (EuroQoL EQ-5D and EQ-VAS). After a median follow-up of 69 months, there were no significant differences reported on the visual analogue pain scales for the worst pain (mean difference between the LUNA group and the no LUNA group, -0.04 cm [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.33 to 0.25 cm]; P = .80), noncyclical pain (-0.11 cm [95% CI, -0.50 to 0.29 cm]; P = .60), dysmenorrhea (-0.09 cm [95% CI, -0.49 to 0.30 cm]; P = .60), or dyspareunia (0.18 cm [95% CI, -0.22 to 0.62 cm]; P = .40). No differences were observed between the LUNA group and the no LUNA group for quality of life. Among women with chronic pelvic pain, LUNA did not result in improvements in pain, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, or quality of life

  18. Pain intensity attenuates movement control of the lumbar spine in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Bauer, C M; Rast, F M; Ernst, M J; Oetiker, S; Meichtry, A; Kool, J; Rissanen, S M; Suni, J H; Kankaanpää, M

    2015-12-01

    Pain intensity attenuates muscular activity, proprioception, and tactile acuity, with consequent changes of joint kinematics. People suffering from low back pain (LBP) frequently show movement control impairments of the lumbar spine in sagittal plane. This cross-sectional, observational study investigated if the intensity of LBP attenuates lumbar movement control. The hypothesis was that lumbar movement control becomes more limited with increased pain intensity. The effect of LBP intensity, measured with a numeric rating scale (NRS), on lumbar movement control was tested using three movement control tests. The lumbar range of motion (ROM), the ratio of lumbar and hip ROM as indicators of direction specific movement control, and the recurrence and determinism of repetitive lumbar movement patterns were assessed in ninety-four persons suffering from LBP of different intensity and measured with an inertial measurement unit system. Generalized linear models were fitted for each outcome. Lumbar ROM (+ 0.03°, p = 0.24) and ratio of lumbar and hip ROM (0.01, p = 0.84) were unaffected by LBP intensity. Each one point increase on the NRS resulted in a decrease of recurrence and determinism of lumbar movement patterns (-3.11 to -0.06, p ⩽ 0.05). Our results indicate changes in movement control in people suffering from LBP. Whether decreased recurrence and determinism of lumbar movement patterns are intensifiers of LBP intensity or a consequence thereof should be addressed in a future prospective study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus improves pain in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pellaprat, Jean; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Canivet, Cindy; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Radji, Fatai; Arbus, Christophe; Gerdelat, Angélique; Chaynes, Patrick; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2014-06-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), chronic pain is a common symptom which markedly affects the quality of life. Some physiological arguments proposed that Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN-DBS) could improve pain in PD. We investigated in 58 PD patients the effect of STN-DBS on pain using the short McGill Pain Questionnaire and other pain parameters such as the Bodily discomfort subscore of the Parkinson's disease Questionnaire 39 and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale section II (UPDRS II) item 17. All pain scores were significantly improved 12 months after STN-DBS. This improvement was not correlated with motor improvement, depression scores or L-Dopa reduction. STN-DBS induced a substantial beneficial effect on pain in PD, independently of its motor effects and mood status of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Astrid; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD) have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM), conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173) were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak) was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal), and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6) for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6) for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1) for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a history of neck trauma, nor

  1. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in patients with chronic shoulder pain: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that is often chronic or recurrent. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause shoulder pain and are prevalent in patients with shoulder pain. However, few studies have focused on MTrP therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of multimodal treatment of MTrPs in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Methods A single-assessor, blinded, randomized, controlled trial was conducted. The intervention group received comprehensive treatment once weekly consisting of manual compression of the MTrPs, manual stretching of the muscles and intermittent cold application with stretching. Patients were instructed to perform muscle-stretching and relaxation exercises at home and received ergonomic recommendations and advice to assume and maintain good posture. The control group remained on the waiting list for 3 months. The Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score (primary outcome), Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (VAS-P), Global Perceived Effect (GPE) scale and the number of muscles with MTrPs were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks in the intervention group and compared with those of a control group. Results Compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement (P < 0.05) on the DASH after 12 weeks (mean difference, 7.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.2 to 14.2), on the VAS-P1 for current pain (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 2.6 to 25.0), on the VAS-P2 for pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 10.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 19.7) and VAS-P3 most severe pain in the past 7 days (mean difference, 13.8; 95% CI, 0.8 to 28.4). After 12 weeks, 55% of the patients in the intervention group reported improvement (from slightly improved to completely recovered) versus 14% in the control group. The mean number of muscles with active MTrPs decreased in the intervention group compared with the control group (mean difference, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). Conclusions The

  2. Remote kinematic training for patients with chronic neck pain: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sarig Bahat, Hilla; Croft, Kate; Carter, Courtney; Hoddinott, Anna; Sprecher, Elliot; Treleaven, Julia

    2017-10-10

    To evaluate short- and intermediate-term effects of kinematic training (KT) using virtual reality (VR) or laser in patients with chronic neck pain. A randomised controlled trial with three arms (laser, VR, control) to post-intervention (N = 90), and two arms (laser or VR) continuing to 3 months follow-up. Home training intervention was provided during 4 weeks to VR and laser groups while control group waited. Primary outcome measures included neck disability index (NDI), global perceived effect (GPE), and cervical motion velocity (mean and peak). Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity (VAS), health status (EQ5D), kinesiophobia (TSK), range, smoothness, and accuracy of neck motion as measured by the neck VR system. Measures were taken at baseline, immediately post-training, and 3 months later. Ninety patients with neck pain were randomised to the trial, of which 76 completed 1 month follow-up, and 56 the 3 months follow-up. Significant improvements were demonstrated in NDI and velocity with good effect sizes in intervention groups compared to control. No within-group changes were presented in the control group, compared to global improvements in intervention groups. Velocity significantly improved at both time points in both groups. NDI, VAS, EQ5D, TSK and accuracy significantly improved at both time points in VR and in laser at 3 months evaluation in all but TSK. GPE scores showed 74-84% of participants perceived improvement and/or were satisfied. Significant advantages to the VR group compared to laser were found in velocity, pain intensity, health status and accuracy at both time points. The results support home kinematic training using VR or laser for improving disability, neck pain and kinematics in the short and intermediate term with an advantage to the VR group. The results provide directions for future research, use and development. ACTRN12615000231549.

  3. Pain control in horses: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, L C; Robertson, S A

    2014-07-01

    Currently, approaches to pain control in horses are a mixture of art and science. Recognition of overt pain behaviours, such as rolling, kicking at the abdomen, flank watching, lameness or blepharospasm, may be obvious; subtle signs of pain can include changes in facial expression or head position, location in the stall and response to palpation or human interaction. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e. phenylbutazone, flunixin meglumine and firocoxib), opioids (i.e. butorphanol, morphine and buprenorphine) and α2 -adrenergic agonists (i.e. xylazine, detomidine, romifidine and medetomidine) are the most commonly used therapeutic options. Multimodal therapy using constant-rate infusions of lidocaine, ketamine and/or butorphanol has gained popularity for severe pain in hospitalised cases. Drugs targeting neuropathic pain, such as gabapentin, are increasingly used for conditions such as laminitis. Optimal strategies for management of pain are based upon severity and chronicity, including special considerations for use of intra-articular or epidural delivery and therapy in foals. Strategies that aim to mitigate adverse effects associated with use of various analgesic agents are briefly discussed.

  4. Multimodal pain management in total knee arthroplasty: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lamplot, Joseph D; Wagner, Eric R; Manning, David W

    2014-02-01

    We analyze the effects of a multimodal analgesic regimen on postoperative pain, function, adverse effects and satisfaction compared to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Thirty-six patients undergoing TKA were randomized to receive either (1) periarticular injection before wound closure (30cc 0.5% bupivacaine, 10mg MSO4, 15 mg ketorolac) and multimodal analgesics (oxycodone, tramadol, ketorolac; narcotics as needed) or (2) hydromorphone PCA. Preoperative and postoperative data were collected for VAS pain scores, time to physical therapy milestones, hospital stay length, patient satisfaction, narcotic consumption and medication-related adverse effects. The multimodal group had lower VAS scores, fewer adverse effects, lower narcotic usage, higher satisfaction scores and earlier times to physical therapy milestones. Multimodal pain management protocol decreases narcotic usage, improves pain scores, increases satisfaction and enhances early recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutmeg extracts for painful diabetic neuropathy: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Motilal, Shastri; Maharaj, Rohan G

    2013-04-01

    Current treatment strategies for painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) include oral medications, which are costly and may have adverse effects. Topical therapies have been used for PDN with some benefit. Nutmeg has certain properties that may be effective in ameliorating neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was to determine whether topical nutmeg extracts can reduce pain or improve the quality of life in PDN sufferers. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. It was conducted at a primary care center in Trinidad, Caribbean. Seventy-four (74) diabetic subjects who met criteria for painful neuropathy were recruited. Participants were randomized to receive either topical nutmeg extracts (NEMM; mace oil [2%], nutmeg oil [14%], methyl salicylate [6%], menthol [6%], and coconut oil) or placebo (MM; methyl salicylate [6%], menthol [6%], coconut oil, and alcohol). Outcome measures of pain and quality of life were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory for Diabetic Painful Neuropathy and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. An intention-to-treat analysis was done for 24 male and 50 female subjects (30-85 years) with an average duration of diabetes of 11 years. Significant reductions in worst and average pain scores were seen within each group (p ≤ 0.001). Similarly significant reductions were also noted for interference with walking, sleep, and mood scores as well as burning, pins and needles, and tingling scores within each group (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between both groups after 4 weeks for any outcome measure. In this trial topical, nutmeg extracts did not add to the improvements observed in PDN symptoms during 4 weeks treatment with preparations containing menthol and methyl salicylate. Further research designed to test the individual components of the topical therapies used in this study may clarify their benefit.

  6. Sustained Pain Reduction Through Affective Self-awareness in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Lumley, Mark A.; Stracks, John S.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Affect and how it is regulated plays a role in pain perception, maintenance of pain, and its resolution. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated an innovative affective self-awareness (ASA) intervention, which was designed to reduce pain and improve functioning in individuals with fibromyalgia. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS Forty-five women with fibromyalgia were randomized to a manualized ASA intervention (n = 24) or wait-list control (n = 21). The intervention began with a one-time physician consultation, followed by 3 weekly, 2-h group sessions based upon a mind-body model of pain. Sessions focused on structured written emotional disclosure and emotional awareness exercises. Outcomes in both conditions were measured by a blinded assessor at baseline, post-intervention, and 6-month follow-up. MEASURES The primary outcome was pain severity (Brief Pain Inventory); secondary outcomes included tender-point threshold and physical function (SF-36 Physical Component Summary). Intent-to-treat analyses compared groups on outcomes using analysis of covariance and on the proportion of patients achieving ≥30% and ≥50% pain reduction at 6 months. RESULTS Adjusting for baseline scores, the intervention group had significantly lower pain severity (p < 0.001), higher self-reported physical function (p < 0.001), and higher tender-point threshold (p = 0.02) at 6 months compared to the control group. From baseline to 6 months, 45.8% of the ASA intervention group had ≥30% reduction in pain severity, compared to none of the controls (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The affective self-awareness intervention improved pain, tenderness, and self-reported physical function for at least 6 months in women with fibromyalgia compared to wait-list control. This study suggests the value of interventions targeting emotional processes in fibromyalgia, although further studies should evaluate the efficacy of this intervention relative to active

  7. Improving pain care through implementation of the Stepped Care Model at a multisite community health center

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Daren R; Zlateva, Ianita; Coman, Emil N; Khatri, Khushbu; Tian, Terrence; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treating pain in primary care is challenging. Primary care providers (PCPs) receive limited training in pain care and express low confidence in their knowledge and ability to manage pain effectively. Models to improve pain outcomes have been developed, but not formally implemented in safety net practices where pain is particularly common. This study evaluated the impact of implementing the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management (SCM-PM) at a large, multisite Federally Qualified Health Center. Methods The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework guided the implementation of the SCM-PM. The multicomponent intervention included: education on pain care, new protocols for pain assessment and management, implementation of an opioid management dashboard, telehealth consultations, and enhanced onsite specialty resources. Participants included 25 PCPs and their patients with chronic pain (3,357 preintervention and 4,385 postintervention) cared for at Community Health Center, Inc. Data were collected from the electronic health record and supplemented by chart reviews. Surveys were administered to PCPs to assess knowledge, attitudes, and confidence. Results Providers’ pain knowledge scores increased to an average of 11% from baseline; self-rated confidence in ability to manage pain also increased. Use of opioid treatment agreements and urine drug screens increased significantly by 27.3% and 22.6%, respectively. Significant improvements were also noted in documentation of pain, pain treatment, and pain follow-up. Referrals to behavioral health providers for patients with pain increased by 5.96% (P=0.009). There was no significant change in opioid prescribing. Conclusion Implementation of the SCM-PM resulted in clinically significant improvements in several quality of pain care outcomes. These findings, if sustained, may translate into improved patient outcomes. PMID:27881926

  8. Radiofrequency treatment relieves chronic knee osteoarthritis pain: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Jong; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Song, Jun-Gol; Leem, Jeong-Gil; Kang, Yong-Up; Park, Pyong-Hwan; Shin, Jin-Woo

    2011-03-01

    Chronic osteoarthritis (OA) pain of the knee is often not effectively managed with current non-pharmacological or pharmacological treatments. Radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy is a therapeutic alternative for chronic pain. We investigated whether RF neurotomy applied to articular nerve branches (genicular nerves) was effective in relieving chronic OA knee joint pain. The study involved 38 elderly patients with (a) severe knee OA pain lasting more than 3 months, (b) positive response to a diagnostic genicular nerve block and (c) no response to conservative treatments. Patients were randomly assigned to receive percutaneous RF genicular neurotomy under fluoroscopic guidance (RF group; n=19) or the same procedure without effective neurotomy (control group; n=19). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oxford knee scores, and global perceived effect on a 7-point scale were measured at baseline and at 1, 4, and 12weeks post-procedure. VAS scores showed that the RF group had less knee joint pain at 4 (p<0.001) and 12 (p<0.001) weeks compared with the control group. Oxford knee scores showed similar findings (p<0.001). In the RF group, 10/17 (59%), 11/17 (65%) and 10/17 (59%) achieved at least 50% knee pain relief at 1, 4, and 12 weeks, respectively. No patient reported a post-procedure adverse event during the follow-up period. RF neurotomy of genicular nerves leads to significant pain reduction and functional improvement in a subset of elderly chronic knee OA pain, and thus may be an effective treatment in such cases. Further trials with larger sample size and longer follow-up are warranted. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. To predict sufentanil requirement for postoperative pain control using a real-time method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Duan, Guangyou; Guo, Shanna; Ying, Ying; Huang, Penghao; Zhang, Mi; Li, Ningbo; Zhang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative identification of individual sensitivity to opioid analgesics could improve the quality of postoperative analgesia. We explored the feasibility and utility of a real-time assessment of sufentanil sensitivity in predicting postoperative analgesic requirement. Our primary study included 111 patients who underwent measurements of pressure and quantitative pricking pain thresholds before and 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion. Pain intensity was assessed during the first 24-hour postsurgery, and patients who reported inadequate levels of analgesia were excluded from the study. The sufentanil requirement for patient-controlled analgesia was recorded, and a subsequent exploratory study of 20 patients facilitated the interpretation of the primary study results. In the primary study, experimental pain thresholds increased (P < 0.001) 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion, and the percent change in pricking pain threshold was positively associated with sufentanil requirement at 12 and 24 hours after surgery (β = 0.318, P = 0.001; and β = 0.335, P = 0.001). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed that patients with a change in pricking pain threshold >188% were >50% likely to require more sufentanil for postoperative pain control. In the exploratory study, experimental pain thresholds significantly decreased after the operation (P < 0.001), and we observed a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between the percent change in pricking pain threshold before and after surgery. Preoperative detection of individual sensitivity to sufentanil via the above described real-time method was effective in predicting postoperative sufentanil requirement. Thus, percent change in pricking pain threshold might be a feasible predictive marker of postoperative analgesia requirement. PMID:27336880

  10. Schedule-induced masseter EMG in facial pain subjects vs. no-pain controls.

    PubMed

    Gramling, S E; Grayson, R L; Sullivan, T N; Schwartz, S

    1997-02-01

    Empirical reports suggest that oral habits (e.g., teeth clenching) may be behavioral mediators linking stress to muscle hyperreactivity and the development of facial pain. Another report suggests that excessive behavioral adjuncts develop in conjunction with fixed-time stimulus presentation. The present study assessed the extent to which the oral habits exhibited by facial pain patients are schedule-induced. Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) symptomatology (n = 15) and pain-free controls (n = 15) participated in a 4-phase experiment (adaptation, baseline, task, recovery) designed to elicit schedule-induced behaviors. Self-report of oral habits and negative affect were recorded after each phase. Objective measures of oral habits were obtained via behavioral observation and masseter EMG recordings. Results revealed that negative arousal significantly increased during the fixed-time (FT) task and was also associated with increased oral habits among the TMD subjects. Moreover, 40% of the TMD subjects and none of the controls exhibited a pattern of EMG elevations in the early part of the inter-stimulus interval that met a strict criteria for scheduled-induced behavior per se. Taken together, these results suggest that the TMD subjects were engaging in schedule-induced oral habits. The adjunctive behavior literature seems to provide a plausible explanation as to how oral habits develop and are maintained in TMD patients, despite their painful consequences.

  11. The Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Family Intervention and Standard Pediatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Conducted controlled clinical trial involving 44 children with recurrent abdominal pain randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral family intervention (CBFI) or standard pediatric care (SPC). Both treatments resulted in significant improvements on measures of pain intensity and pain behavior. CBFI group had higher rate of complete elimination of…

  12. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP.

  13. Upward pulling plus exercise improves scapulocostal pain and scapular position

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of upward pulling combined with shoulder retraction (upward pulling plus exercise) on scapulocostal pain and scapular position. [Subject and Methods] A 22-year-old woman with severe pain in the right and left scapulocostal areas. The horizontal distance from the inferior angle to the spinal process was measured. The tester assessed scapulocostal pain after stretching and massage. The tester assessed pain after upward pulling plus exercise. [Results] Left and right scapulocostal pain reduced to 2/10 after the upward pulling plus exercise. The horizontal distance from the inferior angle to the spinal process also decreased. [Conclusion] Upward pulling plus exercise might be recommended as a primary therapeutic approach to treat scapulocostal pain or scapulocostal syndrome. PMID:27942162

  14. Qigong versus exercise versus no therapy for patients with chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rendant, Daniel; Pach, Daniel; Lüdtke, Rainer; Reisshauer, Anett; Mietzner, Anna; Willich, Stefan N; Witt, Claudia M

    2011-03-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To evaluate whether qigong is more effective than no treatment and not inferior to exercise therapy. Lifetime prevalence of chronic neck pain is close to 50%. Qigong is often used by patients, although, the evidence is still unclear. Patients (aged 20-60 years) with chronic neck pain (visual analog scale, VAS ≥ 40 mm) were randomized to 1) qigong or 2) exercise therapy (18 sessions over 6 months) or 3) waiting list (no treatment). At baseline and after 3 and 6 months, patients completed standardized questionnaires assessing neck pain (VAS), neck pain and disability, and quality of life (Short Form SF-36 questionnaire, SF-36). The primary endpoint was average pain in the last 7 days on VAS at 6-month follow-up. Statistical analysis included generalized estimation equation models adjusted for baseline values and patient expectation. A total of 123 patients (aged 46 ± 11 years, 88% women) suffering from chronic neck pain for 3.2 (SD ± 1.6) years were included. After 6 months, a significant difference was seen between the qigong and waiting list control groups (VAS mean difference: -14 mm [95%CI = -23.1 to -5.4], P = 0.002). Mean improvements in the exercise group were comparable to those in the qigong group (difference between groups -0.7 mm [CI = -9.1 to 7.7]) but failed to show statistical significance (P = 0.092). Neck pain and disability, and SF-36 results also yielded superiority of qigong over no treatment and similar results in the qigong and exercise therapy groups. Qigong was more effective than no treatment in patients with chronic neck pain. Further studies could be designed without waiting list control and should use a larger sample to clarify the value of qigong compared to exercise therapy.

  15. Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Gilhooly, D; McGarvey, B; O'Mahony, H; O'Connor, T C

    2011-02-08

    A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient's visual analogue scale pain score from 10/10 to 5/10 at rest and 10/10 to 7/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.

  16. A performance improvement prescribing guideline reduces opioid prescriptions for emergency department dental pain patients.

    PubMed

    Fox, Timothy R; Li, James; Stevens, Sandra; Tippie, Tracy

    2013-09-01

    In an effort to reduce prescription opioid abuse originating from our institution, we implement and measure the effect of a prescribing guideline on the rate of emergency department (ED) opioid prescriptions written for patients presenting with dental pain, a complaint previously associated with drug-seeking behavior. After implementing a departmental guideline on controlled substance prescriptions, we performed a structured before-and-after chart review of dental pain patients aged 16 and older. Before the guideline, the rate of opioid prescription was 59% (302/515). After implementation, the rate was 42% (65/153). The absolute decrease in rates was 17% (95% confidence interval 7% to 25%). Additionally, in comparing the 12-month period before and after implementation, the dental pain visit rate decreased from 26 to 21 per 1,000 ED visits (95% confidence interval of decrease 2 to 9 visits/1,000). A performance improvement program involving a departmental prescribing guideline was associated with a reduction in the rate of opioid prescriptions and visits for ED patients presenting with dental pain. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Microwave diathermy for treating nonspecific chronic neck pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Andrade Ortega, Juan Alfonso; Cerón Fernández, Encarnación; García Llorent, Rosario; Ribeiro González, Marisa; Delgado Martínez, Alberto Damián

    2014-08-01

    Although the use of deep heat therapy is widespread, there is scant literature available on its effectiveness in treating back or neck pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of microwave diathermy to treat nonspecific chronic neck pain. The study was designed as a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The patient sample consisted of 149 patients with nonspecific chronic neck pain in a hospital of the Andalusian Public Health Care System, Spain The study outcome measures are as follows: at baseline, pain intensity (using a visual analogue scale), disability (Neck Disability Index), and health-related quality of life (36-item short form health survey [SF-36]); at 3 weeks, baseline measures and patients' perceived overall outcome and satisfaction with the treatment; and at 6 months, 3-week measures, therapeutic co-interventions, and adherence to exercises. Patients were allocated randomly to three groups. The first group received continuous microwave diathermy, the second group was administered pulsed microwaves, and the third group (the control group) received unplugged microwaves. All three groups received the same general treatment: range of motion, isometric exercises, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The three groups had reduced pain and disability, and improvement was seen in some dimensions of the SF-36. However, there were no differences found in any of the parameters measured among the three therapeutic groups. Microwave diathermy does not provide additional benefit to a treatment regimen of chronic neck pain that already involves other treatment approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PAIN OUT: an international acute pain registry supporting clinicians in decision making and in quality improvement activities.

    PubMed

    Zaslansky, Ruth; Rothaug, Judith; Chapman, Richard C; Backström, Ragnar; Brill, Silviu; Engel, Christoph; Fletcher, Dominique; Fodor, Lucian; Funk, Peter; Gordon, Debra; Komann, Marcus; Konrad, Christoph; Kopf, Andreas; Leykin, Yigal; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Puig, Margarita; Rawal, Narinder; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Taylor, Rod S; Ullrich, Kristin; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Meissner, Winfried

    2014-12-01

    Management of post-operative pain is unsatisfactory worldwide. An estimated 240 million patients undergo surgery each year. Forty to 60% of these patients report clinically significant pain. Discrepancy exists between availability of evidence-based medicine (EBM)-derived knowledge about management of perioperative pain and increased implementation of related practices versus lack of improvement in patient-reported outcomes (PROs). We aimed to assist health care providers to optimize perioperative pain management by developing and validating a medical registry that measures variability in care, identifies best pain management practices and assists clinicians in decision making. PAIN OUT was established from 2009 to 2012 with funding from the European Commission. It now continues as a self-sustaining, not-for-profit project, targeting health care professionals caring for patients undergoing surgery. The growing registry includes data from 40 898 patients, 60 hospitals and 17 countries. Collaborators upload data (demographics, clinical, PROs) from patients undergoing surgery in their hospital/ward into an Internet-based portal. Two modules make use of the data: (1) online, immediate feedback and benchmarking compares PROs across sites while offline analysis permits in-depth analysis; and (2) the case-based clinical decision support system offers practice-based treatment recommendations for individual patients; it is available now as a prototype. The Electronic Knowledge Library provides succinct summaries on perioperative pain management, supporting knowledge transfer and application of EBM. PAIN OUT, a large, growing international registry, allows use of 'real-life' data related to management of perioperative pain. Ultimately, comparative analysis through audit, feedback and benchmarking will improve quality of care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Imagery and Verbal Counseling Methods in Stress Inoculation Training for Pain Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.; Shumate, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Pleasant imagery relieves pain and may account for much of the effectiveness of stress inoculation training. Women who used imagery controlled their pain better; women who did not use imagery had longer tolerance when they heard pain conceptualized as a multistage process. Self-instruction did not affect pain control. (Author)

  20. Continuous intra-articular infusion anesthesia for pain control after total knee arthroplasty: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a great challenge. The management of pain in the immediate postoperative period is one of the most critical aspects to allow speedier rehabilitation and reduce the risk of postoperative complications. Recently, periarticular infiltration anesthesia has become popular, but the outcome is controversial. Some studies have shown transient effects, “rebound pain”, or no effectiveness in pain control. Continuous intra-articular infusion technique has been introduced to improve these transient effects, but more clinical studies are needed. Furthermore, the potential risk of early periprosthetic joint infection is causing concerning. We plan to compare continuous intra-articular infusion anesthesia with epidural infusion anesthesia after TKA to assess the effectiveness of this technique in reducing pain, in improving postoperative function, and to look at the evidence for risk of early infection. Methods/design This trial is a randomized, controlled study. Patients (n = 214) will be randomized into two groups: to receive continuous intra-articular infusion anesthesia (group C); and epidural infusion anesthesia (group E). For the first 3 postoperative days, pain at rest, active range of motion (A-ROM), rescue analgesia and side effects will be recorded. At 3-month and 6-month follow-up, A-ROM, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and synovial fluid cell count and culture will be analyzed. Discussion The results from this study will provide clinical evidence on the efficacy of a continuous intra-articular infusion technique in reducing pain, postoperative functional improvement and safety. It will be the first randomized controlled trial to investigate infection risk with local anesthesia after TKA. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: ChiCTR-TRC-13003999 PMID:24958315

  1. Radiation mechanisms of pain control in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Gorgulho, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic pain condition that was clinically recognized centuries ago. Nevertheless, the pathological mechanism(s) involved in the development of classical trigeminal neuralgia is still largely based on the theory of peripheral versus central nervous system origin. Limitations of both hypotheses are discussed. Evidence of radiation effects in the electrical conduction of peripheral nerves is reviewed. Results of experimental studies using modern and current radiosurgery techniques and doses are also brought to discussion in an attempt to elucidate the radiation mechanisms involved in the conduction block of excessive sensory information triggering pain attacks. Clinical features and prognostic factors associated with pain control, recurrence, and facial numbness in patients submitted to surgical procedures for classical trigeminal neuralgia are discussed in the context of the features related to the pathogenesis of this condition. Studies focusing on the electrophysiology properties of partially demyelinated trigeminal nerves submitted to radiosurgery are vital to truly advance our current knowledge in the field. PMID:22826806

  2. Effects of far-infrared irradiation on myofascial neck pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Hung; Leung, Ting-Kai; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Lai, Ming-Jun; Lai, Wen-Fu; Chen, Shih-Ching

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative efficacy of irradiation using a device containing a far-infrared emitting ceramic powder (cFIR) for the management of chronic myofascial neck pain compared with a control treatment. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. The study comprised 48 patients with chronic, myofascial neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to the experimental group or the control (sham-treatment) group. The patients in the experimental group wore a cFIR neck device for 1 week, and the control group wore an inert neck device for 1 week. Quantitative measurements based on a visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring of pain, a sleep quality assessment, pressure-pain threshold (PPT) testing, muscle tone and compliance analysis, and skin temperature analysis were obtained. Both the experimental and control groups demonstrated significant improvement in pain scores. However, no statistically significant difference in the pain scores was observed between the experimental and control groups. Significant decreases in muscle stiffness in the upper regions of the trapezius muscles were reported in the experimental group after 1 week of treatment. Short-term treatment using the cFIR neck device partly reduced muscle stiffness. Although the differences in the VAS and PPT scores for the experimental and control groups were not statistically significant, the improvement in muscle stiffness in the experimental group warrants further investigation of the long-term effects of cFIR treatment for pain management.

  3. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  4. Effectiveness of submucosal dexamethasone to control postoperative pain & swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases.

  5. Safety of liposome extended-release bupivacaine for postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Juan; Kamar, Nawal; Melibary, Somayah; Quevedo, Eduardo; Bergese, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Ideal postoperative pain management requires a multidisciplinary approach in combination with a variety of dosage regimens. Approximately 21-30% of patients experience moderate to severe pain in the postoperative period, which may have a significant impact on recovery rate, standard of living, psychological health, and postoperative complications. Analysis of the incidence and characterization of reported adverse effects with DepoFoam bupivacaine compared to conventional bupivacaine or placebo. A systematic review of prospective studies on the use of DepoFoam versus bupivacaine or placebo was performed in order to answer the clinically relevant question: is DepoFoam a safer formulation in place of bupivacaine single injection or continuous local infusion techniques for postoperative pain management? Inclusion criteria required randomized, controlled, double-blind trials in patients 18 years old or older, single dose used for postoperative pain control, and a primary procedure performed. Six studies fitted the inclusion criteria for analysis, DepoFoam bupivacaine used in therapeutic doses was well-tolerated, had a higher safety margin, and showed a favorable safety profile compared to bupivacaine and control groups. Extended drug delivery system DepoFoam bupivacaine is a promising drug formulation that may significantly improve postoperative care and pain control in surgical patients.

  6. The Effectiveness of Oral Corticosteroids for Management of Lumbar Radiating Pain: Randomized, Controlled Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungguk; Kim, Jaejung; Oh, Taebum

    2016-01-01

    Background Although both pregabalin and gabapentin are known to be useful for treating lumbar radiating pain and reducing the incidence of surgery, the oral corticosteroids sometimes offer a dramatic effect on severe radiating pain despite the lack of scientific evidence. Methods A total of 54 patients were enrolled among 703 patients who complained of lumbar radiating pain. Twenty patients who received an oral corticosteroid was classified as group A and 20 patients who received the control drugs (pregabalin or gabapentin) as group B. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Revised Roland Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ), Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire, lumbar radiating pain, objective patient satisfaction, and objective improvement of patients or physicians were assessed at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after medication. Results No difference in the sex ratio and age was observed between the groups (p = 0.70 and p = 0.13, respectively). Group A showed greater improvement in radiating pain after 2, 6, and 12 weeks than group B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were observed between the groups in satisfaction at the beginning and 12 weeks after taking the medication (p = 0.062 and p = 0.061, respectively) and in objective improvement of patients and physicians (p = 0.657 and p = 0.748, respectively). Group A was less disabled and had greater physical health scores than group B (p = 0.014 and p = 0.017, respectively). Conclusions Oral corticosteroids for the treatment of lumbar radiating pain can be more effective in pain relief than gabapentin or pregabalin. The satisfaction of patients and physicians with the drug and objective improvement status were not inferior to that with gabapentin or pregabalin. PMID:27583108

  7. Randomized clinical trial of the effectiveness of a self-care intervention to improve cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, Christine; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Schumacher, Karen; Paul, Steven M; Tripathy, Debu; Koo, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This randomized clinical trial tested the effectiveness of the PRO-SELF Pain Control Program compared with standard care in decreasing pain intensity scores, increasing appropriate analgesic prescriptions, and increasing analgesic intake in oncology outpatients with pain from bone metastasis. Patients were randomly assigned to the PRO-SELF intervention (n = 93) or standard care (n = 81). Patients in the standard care arm were seen by a research nurse three times and were called three times by phone between the home visits. PRO-SELF group patients were seen by specially trained intervention nurses and received a psychoeducational intervention, were taught how to use a pillbox, and were given written instructions on how to communicate with their physician about unrelieved pain and the need for changes in their analgesic prescriptions. Patients were coached during two follow-up home visits and three phone calls on how to improve their cancer pain management. Pain intensity scores decreased significantly from baseline (all P <.0001) in the PRO-SELF group (ie, least pain, 28.4%; average pain, 32.5%; and worst pain, 27.0%) compared with the standard care group (ie, least increased by 14.6%, average increased by 1.9%, and worst decreased by 1.2%). The percentage of patients in the PRO-SELF group with the most appropriate type of analgesic prescription increased significantly from 28.3% to 37.0% (P =.008) compared with a change from 29.6% to 32.5% in the standard care group. The use of a psychoeducational intervention that incorporates nurse coaching within the framework of self-care can improve the management of cancer pain.

  8. Hypnosis can reduce pain in hospitalized older patients: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ardigo, Sheila; Herrmann, François R; Moret, Véronique; Déramé, Laurence; Giannelli, Sandra; Gold, Gabriel; Pautex, Sophie

    2016-01-15

    Chronic pain is a common and serious health problem in older patients. Treatment often includes non pharmacological approaches despite a relatively modest evidence base in this population. Hypnosis has been used in younger adults with positive results. The main objective of this study was to measure the feasibility and efficacy of hypnosis (including self hypnosis) in the management of chronic pain in older hospitalized patients. A single center randomized controlled trial using a two arm parallel group design (hypnosis versus massage). Inclusion criteria were chronic pain for more than 3 months with impact on daily life activities, intensity of > 4; adapted analgesic treatment; no cognitive impairment. Brief pain inventory was completed. Fifty-three patients were included (mean age: 80.6 ± 8.2--14 men; 26 hypnosis; 27 massage. Pain intensity decreased significantly in both groups after each session. Average pain measured by the brief pain index sustained a greater decrease in the hypnosis group compared to the massage group during the hospitalisation. This was confirmed by the measure of intensity of the pain before each session that decreased only in the hypnosis group over time (P = 0.008). Depression scores improved significantly over the time only in the hypnosis group (P = 0.049). There was no effect in either group 3 months post hospitals discharge. Hypnosis represents a safe and valuable tool in chronic pain management of hospitalized older patients. In hospital interventions did not provide long term post discharge relief. ISRCTN15615614; registered 2/1/2015.

  9. Improvement of chronic back pain or failed back surgery with vitamin D repletion: a case series.

    PubMed

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews 6 selected cases of improvement/resolution of chronic back pain or failed back surgery after vitamin D repletion in a Canadian family practice setting. Pub Med was searched for articles on chronic back pain, failed back surgery, and vitamin D deficiency. Chronic low back pain and failed back surgery may improve with repletion of vitamin D from a state of deficiency/insufficiency to sufficiency. Vitamin D insufficiency is common; repletion of vitamin D to normal levels in patients who have chronic low back pain or have had failed back surgery may improve quality of life or, in some cases, result in complete resolution of symptoms.

  10. Back Strength Predicts Walking Improvement in Obese, Older Adults With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather K.; Vincent, Kevin R.; Seay, Amanda N.; Conrad, Bryan P.; Hurley, Robert W.; George, Steven Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of 4 months of isolated lumbar resistance exercise and total body resistance exercise on walking performance in obese, older adults with chronic low back pain. A secondary analysis examined whether responsiveness to training modulated walking improvement. Design Randomized, controlled trial. Setting Research laboratory affiliated with tertiary care facility. Methods and Intervention Participants (N = 49; 60–85 years) were randomized into a 4-month resistance exercise intervention (TOTRX), lumbar extensor exercise intervention (LEXT), or a control group (CON). Main Outcome Measurements Walking performance, maximal low back strength and leg strength, and average resting and low back pain severity score (from an 11-point numerical pain rating scale; NRSpain) were collected at baseline and month 4. Results The TOTRX and LEXT improved lumbar extensor strength relative to CON and the TOTRX (P < .05). NRSpain scores at month 4 were lowest in the TOTRX group compared with the LEXT and CON groups, respectively (2.0 ± 1.7 points vs 3.7 ± 2.6 points and 4.6 ± 2.4 points; P < .006). A total of 53% and 67% of participants in the TOTRX and LEXT groups were responders who made lumbar extensor strength gains that achieved ≥20% greater than baseline values. Although the TOTRX demonstrated the greatest improvement in walking endurance among the intervention groups, this did not reach significance (10.1 ± 12.2% improvement in TOTRX vs 7.4 ± 30.0% LEXT and −1.7 ± 17.4% CON; P = .11). Gait speed increased most in the TOTRX (9.0 ± 13.5%) compared with the LEXT and CON groups (P < .05). The change in lumbar extensor strength explained 10.6% of the variance of the regression model for the change in walking endurance (P = .024). Conclusions The use of LEXT and TOTRX produced similar modest improvements in patients’ walking endurance. Lumbar extensor strength gain compared with leg strength gain is a moderate but important contributor to

  11. Tactile acuity training for patients with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain can disrupt the cortical representation of a painful body part. This disruption may play a role in maintaining the individual’s pain. Tactile acuity training has been used to normalise cortical representation and reduce pain in certain pain conditions. However, there is little evidence for the effectiveness of this intervention for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The primary aim of this study was to inform the development of a fully powered randomised controlled trial (RCT) by providing preliminary data on the effect of tactile acuity training on pain and function in individuals with CLBP. The secondary aim was to obtain qualitative feedback about the intervention. Methods In this mixed-methods pilot RCT 15 individuals were randomised to either an intervention (tactile acuity training) or a placebo group (sham tactile acuity training). All participants received 3 sessions of acuity training (intervention or sham) from a physiotherapist and were requested to undertake daily acuity home training facilitated by an informal carer (friend/relative). All participants also received usual care physiotherapy. The primary outcome measures were pain (0-100visual analogue scale (VAS)) and function (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ)). Participants and their informal carers were invited to a focus group to provide feedback on the intervention. Results The placebo group improved by the greatest magnitude for both outcome measures, but there was no statistically significant difference (Mean difference (95%CI), p-value) between groups for change in pain (25.6 (-0.7 to 51.9), p = 0.056) or function (2.2 (-1.6 to 6.0), p = 0.237). Comparing the number of individuals achieving a minimally clinically significant improvement, the placebo group had better outcomes for pain with all participants achieving ≥30% improvement compared to only a third of the intervention group (6/6 vs. 3/9, p = 0.036). Qualitatively, participants reported that

  12. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  13. A Prospective Multicentre Study to Improve Postoperative Pain: Identification of Potentialities and Problems.

    PubMed

    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Kutschar, Patrick; Nestler, Nadja; Osterbrink, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Many studies still indicate insufficient pain management after surgery, e.g., in patients after small- or medium-size operations. Yet it is still uncertain if postoperative pain based on patient-related outcomes can be improved by implementing guideline-related programmes in a multicentre approach. Adult patients in six hospitals in one German city were included in this prospective study. Data collection took place twice in each hospital, once before and once after implementation of concepts and in-house training. Pain and pain-related aspects were assessed one day after surgery and compared between the pre- and post-test group including subgroup analysis of certain surgical procedures by using Student's t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests (alphatwo-tailed = 0.05). Overall, pain at rest and during movement was slightly lower after the intervention. Significant changes were observed after thoracic surgery, small joint surgery and other minor surgical procedures. The rather moderate decrease in pain likely relates to a reasonable pre-existing pain management and to detached improvements in certain patient subgroups. Interestingly, specific analyses revealed significantly lower post-test pain as compared to pre-test pain only in patients without pre-existing chronic pain. Side effects related to pain medication were significantly lower after intervention. Our data show, for the first time, benefits of a perioperative teaching programme in a multicentre approach. Pain ratings improved mainly in specific subgroups of patients, e.g., small surgical procedures and patients without preoperative pain. Thus, general improvement is possible but special attention should be paid to the group of patients with preoperative pain.

  14. A Prospective Multicentre Study to Improve Postoperative Pain: Identification of Potentialities and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Kutschar, Patrick; Nestler, Nadja; Osterbrink, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Many studies still indicate insufficient pain management after surgery, e.g., in patients after small- or medium-size operations. Yet it is still uncertain if postoperative pain based on patient-related outcomes can be improved by implementing guideline-related programmes in a multicentre approach. Adult patients in six hospitals in one German city were included in this prospective study. Data collection took place twice in each hospital, once before and once after implementation of concepts and in-house training. Pain and pain-related aspects were assessed one day after surgery and compared between the pre- and post-test group including subgroup analysis of certain surgical procedures by using Student’s t-tests, Mann-Whitney U tests and chi-square tests (alphatwo-tailed = 0.05). Overall, pain at rest and during movement was slightly lower after the intervention. Significant changes were observed after thoracic surgery, small joint surgery and other minor surgical procedures. The rather moderate decrease in pain likely relates to a reasonable pre-existing pain management and to detached improvements in certain patient subgroups. Interestingly, specific analyses revealed significantly lower post-test pain as compared to pre-test pain only in patients without pre-existing chronic pain. Side effects related to pain medication were significantly lower after intervention. Our data show, for the first time, benefits of a perioperative teaching programme in a multicentre approach. Pain ratings improved mainly in specific subgroups of patients, e.g., small surgical procedures and patients without preoperative pain. Thus, general improvement is possible but special attention should be paid to the group of patients with preoperative pain. PMID:26600464

  15. Pain Management in Long-Term Care Communities: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Reid, M C; O’Neil, Kevin W.; Dancy, JaNeen; Berry, Carolyn A.; Stowell, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is underrecognized and undertreated in the long-term care (LTC) setting. To improve the management of pain for LTC residents, the authors implemented a quality improvement (QI) initiative at one LTC facility. They conducted a needs assessment to identify areas for improvement and designed a 2-hour educational workshop for facility staff and local clinicians. Participants were asked to complete a survey before and after the workshop, which showed significant improvement in their knowledge of pain management and confidence in their ability to recognize and manage residents’ pain. To measure the effectiveness of the QI initiative, the authors performed a chart review at baseline and at 3 and 8 months after the workshop and evaluated relevant indicators of adequate pain assessment and management. The post-workshop chart reviews showed significant improvement in how consistently employees documented pain characteristics (ie, location, intensity, duration) in resident charts and in their use of targeted pain assessments for residents with cognitive dysfunction. The proportion of charts that included a documented plan for pain assessment was high at baseline and remained stable throughout the study. Overall, the findings suggest a QI initiative is an effective way to improve pain care practices in the LTC setting. PMID:25949232

  16. Calcium channel modulation as a target in chronic pain control.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Montagut-Bordas, Carlota; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2017-03-20

    Neuropathic pain remains poorly treated for large numbers of patients, and little progress has been made in developing novel classes of analgesics. To redress this issue, ziconotide (Prialt™) was developed and approved as a first-in-class synthetic version of ω-conotoxin MVIIA, a peptide blocker of Cav 2.2 channels. Unfortunately, the impracticalities of intrathecal delivery, low therapeutic index and severe neurological side effects associated with ziconotide have restricted its use to exceptional circumstances. Ziconotide exhibits no state or use-dependent block of Cav 2.2 channels; activation state-dependent blockers were hypothesized to circumvent the side effects of state-independent blockers by selectively targeting high-frequency firing of nociceptive neurones in chronic pain states, thus alleviating aberrant pain but not affecting normal sensory transduction. Unfortunately, numerous drugs, including state-dependent calcium channel blockers, have displayed efficacy in preclinical models but have subsequently been disappointing in clinical trials. In recent years, it has become more widely acknowledged that trans-aetiological sensory profiles exist amongst chronic pain patients and may indicate similar underlying mechanisms and drug sensitivities. Heterogeneity amongst patients, a reliance on stimulus-evoked endpoints in preclinical studies and a failure to utilize translatable endpoints, all are likely to have contributed to negative clinical trial results. We provide an overview of how electrophysiological and operant-based assays provide insight into sensory and affective aspects of pain in animal models and how these may relate to chronic pain patients in order to improve the bench-to-bedside translation of calcium channel modulators. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Balance ability and postural stability among patients with painful shoulder disorders and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In therapeutic settings, patients with shoulder pain often exhibit deficient coordinative abilities in their trunk and lower extremities. The aim of the study was to investigate 1) if there is a connection between shoulder pain and deficits in balance ability and postural stability, 2) if pain intensity is related to balance ability and postural stability, and 3) if there is a connection between body mass index (BMI) and balance ability and postural stability. Methods In this case–control study, patients (n = 40) with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) were matched with a healthy controls (n = 40) and were compared with regard to their balance ability and postural stability. Outcome parameters were postural stability, balance ability and symmetry index which were measured using the S3-Check system. In addition, the influence of shoulder pain intensity and BMI on the outcome parameters was analysed. Results Patients with shoulder pain showed significantly worse results in measurements of postural stability right/left (p < 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) as well as balance ability right/left (p = 0.01) and front/back (p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. There were no significant group differences with regard to symmetry index. However, there was a significant (p < 0.01) symmetry shift towards the affected side within the shoulder pain group. There was no correlation between pain intensity and measurements of balance ability or postural stability. Likewise, no correlation between BMI and deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability was established. Conclusions Patients with pathological shoulder pain (> 4 months) have deficiencies in balance ability and postural stability; however the underlying mechanisms for this remain unclear. Neither pain intensity nor BMI influenced the outcome parameters. Patients with shoulder pain shift their weight to the affected side. Further research is needed to determine if

  19. The effectiveness of essential oils for patients with neck pain: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ou, Ming-Chiu; Lee, Yu-Fei; Li, Chih-Ching; Wu, Shyi-Kuen

    2014-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of aromatic essential oils on neck pain. Sixty participants with a history of neck pain and Neck Disability Index (NDI) score >10% were selected and randomly divided into control and experimental groups. Motion analysis laboratory at Hungkuang University. For the experimental group, the intervention included 3% concentration cream composed of four essential oils: marjoram, black pepper, lavender, and peppermint. For the control group, only an unscented cream was provided. For 4 weeks, all patients applied 2 g cream directly to the affected area daily after showering or bathing. Assessment was performed by using a visual analogue scale (VAS), NDI, pressure pain threshold (PPT) evaluated with a pressure meter, and neck-joint range evaluated with Motion Analysis System (MAS). A t-test statistical analysis by SPSS statistical software indicated that VAS scores improved significantly for both groups (p<0.05). In addition, the experimental group had improved pain tolerance in the left upper trapezius (mean±standard deviation, 2.96±2.54) and right upper trapezius (2.88±2.90) as measured by the PPT. According to the NDI, the experimental group also showed significant improvement (p=0.02). Comparison of MAS values before and after the intervention showed significant improvement in the 10 motion areas in the experimental group. This finding suggests that the experimental group had better results than the control group. The essential oil cream developed in this study can be used to improve neck pain. This study appears to be the first to quantify this by using PPT and MAS.

  20. The effectiveness of a multidisciplinary pain management programme managing chronic pain on pain perceptions, health-related quality of life and stages of change--A non-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dysvik, Elin; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Stokkeland, Ragnhild; Natvig, Gerd Karin

    2010-07-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been useful in the treatment of chronic pain conditions for many years. Given the increasing number of persons with chronic pain and associated psychosocial problems, the development and implementation of effective interventions based on CBT is warranted. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of a multidisciplinary pain management programme on health-related quality of life (HRQL), as measured by the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), pain perception as measured by the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and readiness-to-change as measured by the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ). A pretest-post-test quasi-experimental design, with waiting list controls and baseline and post-test measures, was used. The study was conducted in the rehabilitation unit of a university hospital. Of 117 people suffering from chronic pain, 113 completed the 8-week multidisciplinary pain management programme. The patients were consecutive referrals. Inclusion criteria were: adults (18-67 years), pain lasting over 6 months, motivation and no ongoing litigation. Exclusion criteria were affected by major mental disorders or major medical conditions requiring treatment. The intervention was based on a cognitive behavioural approach. Therapeutic dialogues and training, combined with physical activity, were provided to a fixed plan, including homework. The programme has several features that directly address psychosocial aspects of chronic pain. Statistical and clinical significance are considered. The findings suggest that this programme has the potential to improve HRQL, reduce pain intensity and interference, and contribute to improvement in readiness-to-change. Statistically significant results are supplemented by results showing their clinical significance. Improvements in HRQL, pain-related disability, and readiness-to-change suggest that the vicious cycle of chronic pain may be alleviated by our programme. As we see it, effective

  1. Is self-efficacy and catastrophizing in pain-related disability mediated by control over pain and ability to decrease pain in whiplash-associated disorders?

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Anne; Sandborgh, Maria; Johansson, Ann-Christin

    2017-05-01

    Pain perception is influenced by several cognitive and behavioral factors of which some identified as mediators are important in pain management. We studied the mediating role of control over pain and ability to decrease pain in relation to functional self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and pain-related disability in patients with Whiplash-Associated Disorders, (WAD). Further, if the possible mediating impact differs over time from acute to three and 12 months after an accident, cross-sectional and prospective design was used, and 123 patients with WAD were included. Regression analyses were conducted to examine the mediating effect. The results showed that control over pain and ability to decrease pain were not mediators between self-efficacy, catastrophizing, and disability. Self-efficacy had a larger direct effect on pain-related disability compared to catastrophizing. Thus, healthcare staff should give priority to increase patients' self-efficacy, decrease catastrophic thinking, and have least focus on control over pain or ability to decrease pain.

  2. Does walking improve disability status, function, or quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Belinda J; Walters, Julie; Ferrar, Katia

    2016-06-01

    To establish the effectiveness of walking alone and walking compared to other non-pharmacological management methods to improve disability, quality of life, or function in adults with chronic low back pain. A systematic search of the following databases was undertaken: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Pedro, SportDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The following keywords were used: 'back pain' or 'low back pain' or 'chronic low back pain' and 'walk*' or 'ambulation' or 'treadmill*' or 'pedometer*' or 'acceleromet*' or 'recreational' and 'disability' or 'quality of life' or 'function*'. Primary research studies with an intervention focus that investigated walking as the primary intervention compared to no intervention or any other non-pharmacological method in adults with chronic low back pain (duration >3 months). Seven randomised controlled trials involving 869 participants were included in the review. There was no evidence that walking was more effective than other management methods such as usual care, specific strength exercises, medical exercise therapy, or supervised exercise classes. One study found over-ground walking to be superior to treadmill walking, and another found internet-mediated walking to be more beneficial than non-internet-mediated walking in the short term. There is low quality evidence to suggest that walking is as effective as other non-pharmacological management methods at improving disability, function, and quality of life in adults with chronic low back pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The effect of dry needling on the radiating pain in subjects with discogenic low-back pain: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudzadeh, Ashraf; Rezaeian, Zahra Sadat; Karimi, Abdolkarim; Dommerholt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disk herniation is the most common cause of radiating low back pain (LBP) in subjects under 60 years of age. The present study aims to compare the effect of dry needling (DN) and a standard conservative approach on the pain and function in subjects with discogenic radiating LBP. Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight subjects with discogenic radicular LBP were screened and randomized into control (Standard physical therapy, n = 29) and experimental group (Standard physical therapy and DN, n = 29). Radiating pain intensity and disability were measured using visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability indices at baseline, at the end of treatment and 2 months after the last intervention session. The changes in pain intensity and disability were studied using a 3 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance considering time as the within-subject factor and group as the between-subject. Results: Pain intensity and disability scores decreased significantly in both experimental and control groups (experimental group: VAS = 37.24, Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] =28.48, control group: VAS = 45.5, ODI = 32.96), following the intervention. The change continued during the follow-up period (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Pain and disability improvement, however, were more significant in experimental group, both in post intervention (experimental group: VAS = 25.17, ODI = 22.17, control group: VAS = 42.4, ODI = 30.27) (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively) and follow-up measures (P = 0.006 and P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusion: Both intervention strategies seem to significantly improve pain and disability immediately following intervention, where the improvement continued during 2 months after the last active intervention. Therefore, supplementary DN application may enhance the effect of the standard intervention considerably. PMID:28163732

  4. The effect of dry needling on the radiating pain in subjects with discogenic low-back pain: A randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh, Ashraf; Rezaeian, Zahra Sadat; Karimi, Abdolkarim; Dommerholt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Disk herniation is the most common cause of radiating low back pain (LBP) in subjects under 60 years of age. The present study aims to compare the effect of dry needling (DN) and a standard conservative approach on the pain and function in subjects with discogenic radiating LBP. Fifty-eight subjects with discogenic radicular LBP were screened and randomized into control (Standard physical therapy, n = 29) and experimental group (Standard physical therapy and DN, n = 29). Radiating pain intensity and disability were measured using visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability indices at baseline, at the end of treatment and 2 months after the last intervention session. The changes in pain intensity and disability were studied using a 3 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance considering time as the within-subject factor and group as the between-subject. Pain intensity and disability scores decreased significantly in both experimental and control groups (experimental group: VAS = 37.24, Oswestry Disability Index [ODI] =28.48, control group: VAS = 45.5, ODI = 32.96), following the intervention. The change continued during the follow-up period (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Pain and disability improvement, however, were more significant in experimental group, both in post intervention (experimental group: VAS = 25.17, ODI = 22.17, control group: VAS = 42.4, ODI = 30.27) (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively) and follow-up measures (P = 0.006 and P = 0.002, respectively). Both intervention strategies seem to significantly improve pain and disability immediately following intervention, where the improvement continued during 2 months after the last active intervention. Therefore, supplementary DN application may enhance the effect of the standard intervention considerably.

  5. Effectiveness of myofascial release in the management of plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ajimsha, M S; Binsu, D; Chithra, S

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that stretching of the calf musculature and the plantar fascia are effective management strategies for plantar heel pain (PHP). However, it is unclear whether myofascial release (MFR) can improve the outcomes in this population. To investigate whether myofascial release (MFR) reduces the pain and functional disability associated with plantar heel pain (PHP) in comparison with a control group receiving sham ultrasound therapy (SUST). Randomized, controlled, double blinded trial. Nonprofit research foundation clinic in India. Sixty-six patients, 17 men and 49 women with a clinical diagnosis of PHP were randomly assigned into MFR or a control group and given 12 sessions of treatment per client over 4 weeks. The Foot Function Index (FFI) scale was used to assess pain severity and functional disability. The primary outcome measure was the difference in FFI scale scores between week 1 (pretest score), week 4 (posttest score), and follow-up at week 12 after randomization. Additionally, pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the affected gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and over the calcaneus, by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation. The simple main effects analysis showed that the MFR group performed better than the control group in weeks 4 and 12 (P<0.001). Patients in the MFR and control groups reported a 72.4% and 7.4% reduction, respectively, in their pain and functional disability in week 4 compared with that in week 1, which persisted as 60.6% in the follow-up at week 12 in the MFR group compared to the baseline. The mixed ANOVA also revealed significant group-by-time interactions for changes in PPT over the gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and the calcaneus (P<0.05). This study provides evidence that MFR is more effective than a control intervention for PHP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pre-emptive and multi-modal perioperative pain management may improve quality of life in patients undergoing spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Ho; Park, Jin-Oh; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Park, Moon-Soo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Park, Sangun; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Ko, Su-Kyoung; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Compared to an abundance of data on surgical techniques for degenerative spine conditions and the outcomes thereof, little is available to guide optimal perioperative pain management after spinal surgery. The aim of this study was to survey patterns of perioperative pain management after spinal surgery and to investigate the effects of perioperative pain management, such as pre-emptive analgesia and multi-modal postoperative pain management, on acute postoperative satisfaction, pain reduction, and health-related quality of life in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Non-blind multicenter prospective observational clinical series. Seventeen tertiary hospitals (14 hospitals attached to medical colleges and 3 general hospitals). Pain management protocols of 393 patients (153 men, 240 women; mean age of 67 years, ranging from 21 to 91 years) from 17 tertiary hospitals after spinal surgery for degenerative spine disease were evaluated using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 79 (20%) patients received pre-emptive analgesics, which included cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, with or without administration of anticonvulsants, immediately before surgery at the time of antibiotic prophylaxis. Postoperative pain was managed mainly by multi-modal therapy (363 cases, 92%), along with various combinations of patient controlled anesthesia (PCA), conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), COX-2 inhibitors, and narcotics. Self-reported levels of pain were not significantly different among postoperative multiple modalities of pain management, but were different significantly for pre-emptive pain management regimens (P < 0.05, independent t-test). The number of patients that reported the self-administrative use of PCA was higher in the no pre-emptive pain management group compared to the pre-emptive group (P < 0.05). In regards to EQ-5D usual activity, depression/anxiety and self-care improved significantly in the pre-emptive pain management group when

  7. Changes in pain intensity and health related quality of life with Iyengar yoga in nonspecific chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, Gopal S; Inbasekaran, Dipika; Khuman, Ratan; Devi, Surbala; Shanmugananth; Jagannathan, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific chronic low back (nCLBP) pain is prevalent among adult population and often leads to functional limitations, psychological symptoms, lower quality of life (QOL), and higher healthcare costs. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Iyengar yoga therapy on pain intensity and health related quality of life (HRQOL) with nCLBP. Aim of the Study: To compare the effect of Iyengar yoga therapy and conventional exercise therapy on pain intensity and HRQOL in nonspecific chronic low back pain. Materials and Methods: Experimental study with random sampling technique. Subjects/Intervention: Sixty subjects who fulfilled the selection criteria were randomly assigned to Iyengar yoga (yoga group, n = 30) and control group (exercise group, n = 30). Participants completed low back pain evaluation form and HRQOL-4 questionnaire before their intervention and again 4 weeks and 6 month later. Yoga group underwent 29 yogic postures training and exercise group had undergone general exercise program for 4 weeks. Statistics: Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze group differences over time, while controlling for baseline differences. Results: Patients in both groups experienced significant reduction in pain and improvement in HRQOL. In visual analogue scale (VAS) yoga group showed reduction of 72.81% (P = 0.001) as compared to exercise group 42.50% (P = 0.001). In HRQOL, yoga group showed reduction of 86.99% (P = 0.001) as compared to exercise group 67.66% (P = 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that Iyengar yoga provides better improvement in pain reduction and improvement in HRQOL in nonspecific chronic back pain than general exercise. PMID:25035607

  8. Integrating the concept of pain interference into pain management.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Undertreatment of pain is a significant problem. Nursing pain assessments have been identified as an area for improvement. This concept analysis sought to examine the use of pain interference as a measurement to assist pain management practices. Existing literature including the term pain interference was reviewed for the years 2000-2010. Pain interference is a common outcome measurement in clinical research. It is not well differentiated from other pain concepts in routine nursing pain assessments, nor consistently defined in research articles. Pain interference has been linked to quality of pain management and recommended as a standard of pain measurement. It aligns with current and emerging theories in pain and symptom control. Further exploration is needed to determine whether integrating this concept into nursing practice will result in improved patient pain experiences. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of exposure in vivo for patients with spinal pain reporting fear of work-related activities.

    PubMed

    Linton, Steven J; Boersma, Katja; Jansson, Markus; Overmeer, Thomas; Lindblom, Karin; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2008-08-01

    Pain-related fear is related to disability in persistent pain conditions. Exposure treatment has been reported to be of great benefit in replicated single case experiments. To evaluate the effects of exposure in vivo on fear and function in patients with persistent pain and work disability. We recruited 46 patients suffering from long-term back pain and reduced function, who also were deemed fearful according to standardized measures. Participants were randomized into either an exposure plus usual treatment or waiting list control plus usual treatment group. After the waiting period the control group crossed over and received the exposure treatment. Between group comparisons showed a significantly better result for the exposure group on function, but not for fear or pain and effect sizes were modest (function=.6; fear=.4; pain=.1). When the control group crossed over to treatment significant treatment effects were noted for fear and function. For all patients treated, the pre to post-treatment effect sizes were large (function=.7; fear=1.1; pain=.9). There were 12 dropouts (8 in exposure and 4 in the control) during the first treatment phase and an additional 4 when the control group crossed over to exposure. Compared to a group receiving usual treatment and waiting for exposure, the exposure in vivo group demonstrated a significantly larger improvement on function. Overall exposure had moderate effects on function, fear and pain intensity. We conclude that exposure may be important in treatment, but is not recommended as a "stand alone" adjunct to usual treatment.

  10. Quality improvement in the door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients presenting without chest pain.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Fennessy, Michelle M; O'Connor, Anne M; Mulliken, Robert A; Lee, Linda; Nathan, Sandeep; Nichols, Jearlyn; Lopez, John J

    2012-05-01

    To assess a quality improvement initiative aimed at minimizing door-to-balloon (DTB) times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients presenting without chest pain. Timely percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is the cornerstone of STEMI care. The absence of chest pain delays PCI. Improvements in DTB times may need to focus on atypical presentation patients. We compared DTB times on all STEMI patients admitted through the emergency department who underwent PCI before (Phase I; October 2004-June 2007) and after (Phase II; July 2007-October 2009) the quality improvement effort, which mandated rapid electrocardiogram (ECG) triage for an expanded list of presenting symptoms. In Phase I (69 patient, 60 with chest pain), patients with chest pain had a shorter mean time to first ECG (ECG Interval) by 32.0 min (P < 0.01) and nonsignificantly faster mean DTB time by 42.0 min (P = 0.07) compared to patients who presented without chest pain. In Phase II (62 patients, 56 with chest pain) compared to Phase I, mean ECG interval decreased by 44 min (P = 0.02) and mean DTB time by 99 min (P = 0.01) in patients without chest pain, eliminating the differences in ECG intervals between typical and atypical presentations (12 min vs. 11 min, P = 0.91). Multivariable analysis controlling for on/off hours and patient characteristics confirmed these findings. A simple modification of emergency room ECG triage protocol, which expands indications for rapid ECG performance, was successful in improving rapid reperfusion for patients with STEMI presenting without chest pain. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Improving dust and methane control

    SciTech Connect

    Cecala, A.; Organiscak, J.; Jankowski, R.

    1987-10-01

    The Bureau of Mines has evaluated a number of techniques for controlling dust and methane during the headgate cutout of retreating longwall sections that use antitropal ventilation (headgate to tailgate). Some of these techniques are effective for both methane and dust control, while others are effective for only one or the other. The techniques include the gob curtain, the walkway curtain, stageloader-crusher control and the wing curtain. Each improves the health and safety of workers and is economically feasible in hardware cost, setup cost and maintenance.

  12. Improving dust and methane control

    SciTech Connect

    Cecala, A.; Organiseak, J.; Jankowski, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a number of techniques for controlling dust and methane during the headgate cutout of retreating longwall sections that use antitropal ventilation (headgate to tailgate). Some of these techniques are effective for both methane and dust control, while others are effective for only one or the other. The techniques include the gob curtain, the walkway curtain, stage-loader-crusher control, and the wing curtain. Each improves the health and safety of workers and is economically feasible in hardware cost, setup cost, and maintenance.

  13. Improving dust and methane control

    SciTech Connect

    Cecala, A.B.; Organiscak, A.; Jankowski, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper evaluates a number of techniques for controlling dust and methane during the headgate cutout of retreating longwall sections that use antitropal ventilation (headgate to tailgate). Some of these techniques are effective for both methane and dust control, while others are effective for only one or the other. The techniques include the gob curtain, the walkway curtain, stageloader-crusher control, and the wing curtain. Each improves the health and safety of workers and is economically feasible in hardware cost, setup cost, and maintenance. By combining various of these techniques, mine operators can substantially reduce the dust and methane concentrations at the shearer and ensure the health and safety of longwall workers.

  14. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of Kinesio taping application for acute non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Bayram; Güzel, Rengin; Sakallı, Hakan

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effect of Kinesio taping application in acute non-specific low back pain. A randomized controlled clinical trial. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic. A total of 109 patients with acute low back pain were randomized into either Kinesio taping (n = 54) or control (n = 55) groups. The intervention group was treated with information and reassurance plus Kinesio taping, while the control group received merely information and reassurance. All participants were allowed to use as-needed doses of paracetamol. Kinesio tape was applied to the most painful area of the low back for a total of 12 days. Worst pain and disability were assessed at baseline, after the 12-day intervention, and at four weeks follow-up. During the first 12 days, participants filled in a pain diary consisting of a numeric rating scale and recorded the number of paracetamol tablets consumed daily. Disability was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index. After 12 days of intervention, pain intensity and the Oswestry Disability Index improved significantly in both groups; the improvements were significantly superior in the Kinesio taping group (p = 0.003, p = 0.011). The Kinesio taping group reached pain control earlier (sixth day vs. 12th day) and consumed less paracetamol. At the fourth week, although pain intensity was significantly more reduced in the Kinesio taping group (p = 0.015), there were no differences with regard to disability. Kinesio taping provided significant improvements in pain and disability; thus, it can be used as a complementary method in acute non-specific low back pain. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Self-management support intervention to control cancer pain in the outpatient setting: a randomized controlled trial study protocol.

    PubMed

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Courtens, Annemie M; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2015-05-19

    gathered continuously over the study period and focus on recruitment, reach, dose delivered and dose received. The proposed study will provide insight into the effectiveness of the self-management support intervention delivered by nurses to outpatients with uncontrolled cancer pain. Study findings will be used to empower patients and health professionals to improve cancer pain control. NCT02333968 December 29, 2014.

  17. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces exercise-induced perceived pain and improves endurance exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Astokorki, Ali H Y; Mauger, Alexis R

    2017-03-01

    Muscle pain is a natural consequence of intense and prolonged exercise and has been suggested to be a limiter of performance. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current (IFC) have been shown to reduce both chronic and acute pain in a variety of conditions. This study sought to ascertain whether TENS and IFC could reduce exercise-induced pain (EIP) and whether this would affect exercise performance. It was hypothesised that TENS and IFC would reduce EIP and result in an improved exercise performance. In two parts, 18 (Part I) and 22 (Part II) healthy male and female participants completed an isometric contraction of the dominant bicep until exhaustion (Part I) and a 16.1 km cycling time trial as quickly as they could (Part II) whilst receiving TENS, IFC, and a SHAM placebo in a repeated measures, randomised cross-over, and placebo-controlled design. Perceived EIP was recorded in both tasks using a validated subjective scale. In Part I, TENS significantly reduced perceived EIP (mean reduction of 12%) during the isometric contraction (P = 0.006) and significantly improved participants' time to exhaustion by a mean of 38% (P = 0.02). In Part II, TENS significantly improved (P = 0.003) participants' time trial completion time (~2% improvement) through an increased mean power output. These findings demonstrate that TENS can attenuate perceived EIP in a healthy population and that doing so significantly improves endurance performance in both submaximal isometric single limb exercise and whole-body dynamic exercise.

  18. The Effects of Tai Chi and Neck Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Stumpe, Christoph; Fehr, Johannes; Cramer, Holger; Cheng, Ying Wu; Wayne, Peter M; Rampp, Thomas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to test the efficacy of Tai Chi for treating chronic neck pain. Subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group Tai Chi or conventional neck exercises with weekly sessions of 75 to 90 minutes, or a wait-list control. The primary outcome measure was pain intensity (visual analogue scale). Secondary outcomes included pain on movement, functional disability, quality of life, well-being and perceived stress, postural and interoceptive awareness, satisfaction, and safety. Altogether, 114 participants were included (91 women, 49.4 ± 11.7 years of age). After 12 weeks Tai Chi participants reported significantly less pain compared with the wait list group (average difference in mm on the visual analogue scale: -10.5; 95% confidence interval, -20.3 to -.9; P = .033). Group differences were also found for pain on movement, functional disability, and quality of life compared with the wait list group. No differences were found for Tai Chi compared with neck exercises. Patients' satisfaction with both exercise interventions was high, and only minor side effects were observed. Tai Chi was more effective than no treatment in improving pain in subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Because Tai Chi is probably as effective as neck exercises it may be considered a suitable alternative to conventional exercises for those with a preference toward Tai Chi. This article presents results of a randomized controlled trial comparing Tai Chi, conventional neck exercises, and no treatment for chronic nonspecific neck pain. Results indicate that Tai Chi exercises and conventional neck exercises are equally effective in improving pain and quality of life therefore representing beneficial interventions for neck pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. YOGA FOR CHRONIC LOW BACK PAIN IN A PREDOMINANTLY MINORITY POPULATION: A PILOT RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Robert B.; Sherman, Karen J.; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.; Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest yoga may be effective for chronic low back pain; however, trials targeting minorities have not been conducted. Primary Study Objectives Assess the feasibility of studying yoga in a predominantly minority population with chronic low back pain. Collect preliminary data to plan a larger powered study. Study Design Pilot randomized controlled trial. Setting Two community health centers in a racially diverse neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. Participants Thirty English-speaking adults (mean age 44 years, 83% female, 83% racial/ethnic minorities; 48% with incomes ≤$30000) with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. Interventions Standardized series of weekly hatha yoga classes for 12 weeks compared to a waitlist usual care control. Outcome Measures Feasibility measured by time to complete enrollment, proportion of racial/ethnic minorities enrolled, retention rates, and adverse events. Primary efficacy outcomes were changes from baseline to 12 weeks in pain score (0=no pain to 10=worst possible pain) and back-related function using the modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (0–23 point scale, higher scores reflect poorer function). Secondary efficacy outcomes were analgesic use, global improvement, and quality of life (SF-36). Results Recruitment took 2 months. Retention rates were 97% at 12 weeks and 77% at 26 weeks. Mean pain scores for yoga decreased from baseline to 12 weeks (6.7 to 4.4) compared to usual care, which decreased from 7.5 to 7.1 (P=.02). Mean Roland scores for yoga decreased from 14.5 to 8.2 compared to usual care, which decreased from 16.1 to 12.5 (P=.28). At 12 weeks, yoga compared to usual care participants reported less analgesic use (13% vs 73%, P=.003), less opiate use (0% vs 33%, P=.04), and greater overall improvement (73% vs 27%, P=.03). There were no differences in SF-36 scores and no serious adverse events. Conclusion A yoga study intervention in a predominantly minority population with

  20. Low back pain and kidney mobility: local osteopathic fascial manipulation decreases pain perception and improves renal mobility.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, P; Bongiorno, D; Vitturini, C

    2012-07-01

    mm, Std. Dev. 1.14) compared with the findings in patients with LBP (1.52 mm, Std. Dev. 0.79). b) The ANOVA test at repeated measures showed a significant difference (p-value < 0.0001) between pre- to post-RD values of the Experimental group compared with those found in the Control. c) A significant difference (p-value < 0.0001) between pre- to post-SF-MPQ results was found in the Experimental cohort compared with those obtained in the Control. People with non-specific LBP present with a reduced range of kidney mobility compared to the findings in asymptomatic individuals. Osteopathic manipulation is shown to be an effective manual approach towards improvement of kidney mobility and reduction of pain perception over the short-term, in individuals with non-specific LBP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises for nonspecific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Guangmin; Liu, Yuanmei

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises on nonspecific low back pain. In the prospective study, ninety-two participants with nonspecific low back pain were divided into experimental and control group at random, and 46 in each. The experimental group were treated using Chinese massage combined with core stability exercises, while the control group were treated using Chinese massage alone. The two groups were evaluated using visual analog scale and Oswestry disability index at baseline, immediately after two and eight weeks. In addition, the recurrence rate of nonspecific low back pain was evaluated one year after the last intervention. Two weeks after treatment, both VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in two groups (p<0.05), when compared with the values before treatment, but no difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Eight weeks later, the VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly in both groups (p<0.05); at the same time, both VAS and ODI scores were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the experimental group than those in the control group. At the final follow-up, five cases recurred in the experimental group and nineteen cases in the control group, the control group has a significantly higher recurrence rate (p<0.05). Core stability exercises can improve the therapeutic effect of Chinese massage in treating nonspecific low back pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Virtual Reality Game for Chronic Pain Management: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weina; Choo, Amber; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Squire, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Although Virtual Reality (VR) applications have been shown to reduce many forms of acute pain, such research of VR applications and their effects on chronic pain is still at its infancy. In this study, we designed a VR game Cryoslide, and examined its analgesic effect on chronic pain patients, its end users, in a clinical setting. In this randomized, controlled crossover clinical study of 20 chronic pain patients, Cryoslide significantly reduced perceived pain compared to the baseline and the control group. The results demonstrate that Cryoslide can be effectively used as an analgesic intervention for chronic pain management to lessen pain intensity during short-term symptom spikes.

  3. Improvement of pain-related self-management for cancer patients through a modular transitional nursing intervention: a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Patrick; Kuss, Oliver; Schmidt, Heike; Bauer, Alexander; Kitzmantel, Maria; Jordan, Karin; Krasemann, Susann; Landenberger, Margarete

    2014-04-01

    Patients' self-management skills are affected by their knowledge, activities, and attitudes toward pain management. This trial aimed to test the Self Care Improvement through Oncology Nursing (SCION)-PAIN program, a multimodular structured intervention to reduce patients' barriers to self-management of cancer pain. Two hundred sixty-three patients with diagnosed malignancy, pain>3 days, and average pain > or = 3/10 participated in a cluster-randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients on the intervention wards received, in addition to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic pain management, and discharge management. The intervention was conducted by specially trained cancer nurses and included components of patient education, skills training, and counseling. Starting with admission, patients received booster sessions every third day and one follow-up telephone counseling session within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group received standard care. Primary end point was the group difference in patient-related barriers to self-management of cancer pain (Barriers Questionnaire-BQ II) 7 days after discharge. The SCION-PAIN program resulted in a significant reduction of patient-related barriers to pain management 1 week after discharge from the hospital: mean difference on BQ II was -0.49 points (95% confidence interval -0.87 points to -0.12 points; P=0.02). Furthermore, patients showed improved adherence to pain medication; odds ratio 8.58 (95% confidence interval 1.66-44.40; P=0.02). A post hoc analysis indicated reduced average and worst pain intensity as well as improved quality of life. This trial reveals the positive impact of a nursing intervention to improve patients' self-management of cancer pain.

  4. A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Two Multimodal Analgesic Techniques in Patients Predicted to Have Severe Pain After Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jessica L; Harris, Lynnette C; Eisenach, James C; Pan, Peter H

    2016-04-01

    Improved pain control after cesarean delivery remains a challenging objective. Poorly treated acute pain following delivery is associated with an increased risk of chronic pain and depression. This study was conducted to determine whether the addition of systemic acetaminophen and an increased dose of intrathecal morphine would further reduce acute pain. The primary outcome was pain intensity with movement at 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary measures included persistent pain and depression at 8 weeks. Seventy-four parturients scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia that were predicted to be above the 80th percentile for evoked pain intensity based on a 3-item preoperative screening questionnaire were enrolled. Patients in the intervention group received 300 mcg spinal morphine and 1 gram acetaminophen every 6 hours for 24 hours postoperatively. Patients in the control group received 150 mcg spinal morphine and placebo tablets. All patients received scheduled ibuprofen by mouth and IV morphine patient-controlled analgesia. At 24 hours, patients rated their pain intensity with movement, at rest, on average, and worst score using a visual analog scale for pain (100-mm unmarked line). The presence of persistent pain and depression was assessed at 8 weeks using the Edinburgh postpartum depression survey. Providing a higher dose of spinal morphine combined with systemic acetaminophen to patients predicted to be at high risk for severe post-cesarean delivery pain significantly reduced evoked pain scores with movement at 24 hours (mean ± SD: 46 ± 25 mm in control group versus 31 ±17 mm in intervention group, P = 0.009; 95% confidence interval for the difference between means: 4 mm, 26 mm). There was no difference in the incidence of persistent pain (13% (4/30) in control group versus 10% (3/30) in intervention group, P > 0.99), or depression at 8 weeks postoperatively (10% (3/30) in control group versus 13% (4/30) in intervention group, P > 0

  5. Pain control by melatonin: Physiological and pharmacological effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Pain and anxiety are the most common neurological responses to many harmful or noxious stimuli and their management clinically is often challenging. Many of the frequently used morphine-based drugs, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen, while efficient for treating pain, lead to patients suffering from several unwanted side effects. Melatonin, produced from the pineal body is a hormone of darkness, is involved in the control of circadian rhythms, and exerts a number of pharmacological effects. Melatonin mediates its actions through MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors on the cell membrane and also through RZR/ROR nuclear orphan receptors. Chronic pain syndromes are often associated with the desynchronization of circadian and biological rhythms, which also cause disturbances in the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin-mediated analgesic effects seem to involve β-endorphins, GABA receptor, opioid receptors and the nitric oxide-arginine pathway. The effectiveness of melatonin as an analgesic and anxiolytic agent has been demonstrated in various animal models of pain and this led to the use of melatonin clinically in different pathological conditions and also in patients undergoing surgery. Melatonin was found to be effective in many of these cases as an anxiolytic and analgesic agent, indicating its clinical application. PMID:27698681

  6. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwi-joong; Yoon, Jung-won; Park, Ji-hye; Cho, Chong-kwan; Yoo, Hwa-seung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP) treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae) to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases) with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection) of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain. PMID:25780711

  7. A randomized controlled trial of gabapentin for chronic low back pain with and without a radiating component.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, J Hampton; Slater, Mark A; Capparelli, Edmund V; Patel, Shetal M; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony; Abramson, Ian S; Wallace, Mark S; Funk, Stephen D; Rutledge, Thomas R; Wetherell, Julie L; Matthews, Scott C; Zisook, Sidney; Garfin, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Gabapentin is prescribed for analgesia in chronic low back pain, yet there are no controlled trials supporting this practice. This randomized, 2-arm, 12-week, parallel group study compared gabapentin (forced titration up to 3600 mg daily) with inert placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in pain intensity from baseline to the last week on treatment measured by the Descriptor Differential Scale; the secondary outcome was disability (Oswestry Disability Index). The intention-to-treat analysis comprised 108 randomized patients with chronic back pain (daily pain for ≥6 months) whose pain did (43%) or did not radiate into the lower extremity. Random effects regression models which did not impute missing scores were used to analyze outcome data. Pain intensity decreased significantly over time (P < 0.0001) with subjects on gabapentin or placebo, reporting reductions of about 30% from baseline, but did not differ significantly between groups (P = 0.423). The same results pertained for disability scores. In responder analyses of those who completed 12 weeks (N = 72), the proportion reporting at least 30% or 50% reduction in pain intensity, or at least "Minimal Improvement" on the Physician Clinical Global Impression of Change did not differ significantly between groups. There were no significant differences in analgesia between participants with radiating (n = 46) and nonradiating (n = 62) pain either within or between treatment arms. There was no significant correlation between gabapentin plasma concentration and pain intensity. Gabapentin appears to be ineffective for analgesia in chronic low back pain with or without a radiating component.

  8. Repetitive peripheral magnetic neurostimulation of multifidus muscles combined with motor training influences spine motor control and chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Massé-Alarie, Hugo; Beaulieu, Louis-David; Preuss, Richard; Schneider, Cyril

    2017-03-01

    The study tested whether combining repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (RPMS) and motor training of the superficial multifidus muscle (MF) better improved the corticomotor control of spine than training alone in chronic low back pain (CLBP). Twenty-one participants with CLBP were randomly allocated to [RPMS+training] and [Sham+training] groups for three sessions (S1-S3) over a week where MF was stimulated before training (volitional contraction). Training was also home-practiced twice a day. Changes were tested at S1 and S3 for anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of MF and semi-tendinosus (ST), MF EMG activation, cortical motor plasticity (transcranial magnetic stimulation) and pain/disability. The RPMS group showed immediate decrease of pain at S1, then improvement of MF activation, ST APA, M1 facilitation, and pain/disability at S3. Changes were larger when brain excitability was lower at baseline. Disability index remained improved one month later. Combining RPMS with training of MF in CLBP impacted motor planning, MF and lumbopelvic spine motor control and pain/disability one week after the onset of protocol. Brain plasticity might have favoured motor learning and improved daily lumbopelvic spine control without pain generation. Clinically, RPMS impacted the function by improving the gains beyond those reached by training alone in CLBP. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Moxibustion for pain relief in patients with primary dysmenorrhea: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Linna; Lao, Lixing; Chen, Jiao; Yu, Siyi; Yu, Zheng; Tang, Hongzhi; Yi, Ling; Wu, Xi; Yang, Jie; Liang, Fanrong

    2017-01-01

    Background Though moxibustion is frequently used to treat primary dysmenorrhea in China, relevant evidence supporting its effectiveness is still scanty. Methods This study was a pragmatic randomized, conventional drug controlled, open-labeled clinical trial. After initial screen, 152 eligible participants were averagely randomized to receive two different treatment strategies: Moxibustion and conventional drugs. Participants and practitioners were not blinded in this study. The duration of each treatment was 3 months. The primary outcome was pain relief measured by the Visual Analogue Scale. The menstrual pain severity was recorded in a menstrual pain diary. Results 152 eligible patients were included but only 133 of them eventually completed the whole treatment course. The results showed that the menstrual pain intensity in experimental group and control group was reduced from 6.38±1.28 and 6.41±1.29, respectively, at baseline, to 2.54±1.41 and 2.47±1.29 after treatment. The pain reduction was not significantly different between these two groups (P = 0.76), however; the pain intensity was significantly reduced relative to baseline for each group (P<0.01). Three months after treatment, the effectiveness of moxibustion sustained and started to be superior to the drug’s effect (-0.87, 95%CI -1.32 to -0.42, P<0.01). Secondary outcome analyses showed that moxibustion was as effective as drugs in alleviating menstrual pain-related symptoms. The serum levels of pain mediators, such as PGF2α, OT, vWF, β-EP, PGE2, were significantly improved after treatment in both groups (P<0.05). No adverse events were reported in this trial. Conclusions Both moxibustion and conventional drug showed desirable merits in managing menstrual pain, given their treatment effects and economic costs. This study as a pragmatic trial only demonstrates the effectiveness, not the efficacy, of moxibustion for menstrual pain. It can’t rule out the effect of psychological factors during

  10. Therapeutic Education in Improving Cancer Pain Management: A Synthesis of Available Studies.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Virginie; Delorme, Claire; Grach, Marie-Christine; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Hureau, Magalie

    2016-07-01

    This literature review aims to synthesize available studies and to update findings in order to obtain a current, comprehensive estimate of the benefits of pain education. Forty-four original articles obtained from the PubMed database were analyzed to investigate which protocols could be most effective in improving pain management. Recent studies indicate a growing interest in evaluating patients' skills and attitudes; these include satisfaction with cancer pain treatment, patient-reported improvement, and patient participation-all of which could be dependable benchmarks for evaluating the effectiveness of educational programs. Besides pain measurement, recent studies advance support for the importance of assessing newly developed outcome criteria. In this sense, patients' active participation and decision making in their pain management are probably the most relevant goals of pain education. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The effects of standardized trauma training on prehospital pain control: have pain medication administration rates increased on the battlefield?

    PubMed

    Bowman, W Joseph; Nesbitt, Michael E; Therien, Sean P

    2012-08-01

    The US Military has served in some of the most austere locations in the world. In this ever-changing environment, units are organized into smaller elements operating in very remote areas. This often results in longer evacuation times, which can lead to a delay in pain management if treatment is not initiated in the prehospital setting. Early pain control has become an increasingly crucial military prehospital task and must be controlled from the pain-initiating event. The individual services developed their standardized trauma training based on the recommendations by Frank Butler and the Defense Health Board Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care. This training stresses evidence-based treatment modalities, including pain control, derived from casualty injury analysis. Inadequate early pain control may lead to multiple acute and potentially chronic effects. These effects encompass a wide range from changes in blood pressure to delayed wound healing and posttraumatic stress disorder. Therefore, it is essential that pain be addressed in the prehospital environment. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective Joint Theater Trauma Registry comparative study evaluating whether standardized trauma training increased prehospital pain medication administration between 2007 and 2009. These years were selected on the basis of mandatory training initiation dates and available Joint Theater Trauma Registry records. Records were analyzed for all US prehospital trauma cases with documented pain medication administration from Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom for the specified years. Data analysis revealed 232 patients available for review (102 for 2007 and 130 for 2009). A statistically significant prehospital pain treatment increase was noted, from 3.1% in 2007 to 6.7% in 2009 (p < 0.0005; 95% confidence interval, 2.39-4.93). Standardized trauma training has increased the administration of prehospital pain medication and the

  12. Interventions to improve the management of pain in emergency departments: systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sampson, F C; Goodacre, S W; O'Cathain, A

    2014-10-01

    Pain management in emergency departments (ED) is often inadequate despite the availability of effective analgesia, with many patients receiving insufficient and untimely analgesia. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify interventions that could improve pain management in the ED. We systematically searched seven databases for studies reporting pain management outcomes after intervention to change professional practice to improve pain management in the ED, compared with pain management before or without intervention. Data was synthesised using principles of narrative synthesis. We identified 43 relevant studies, including 40 uncontrolled before-and-after studies. Interventions included implementation of guidelines and protocols, educational interventions, pain scoring tools and changes in nursing roles, with many multifaceted interventions incorporating two or more of these elements. Interventions aimed to improve assessment and documentation of pain, knowledge and awareness of pain management and reduce time to analgesia. Due to the high probability of bias in study design and significant variation between studies, it was not possible to estimate the overall effectiveness of interventions, or identify which had the greatest impact. Intervention to improve pain management was reported to have some positive impact in most studies, but these findings may be explained by limitations in study design. Many interventions reported improvements in pain management, but current evidence is insufficient to recommend any for widespread adoption. In order to improve pain management we need to understand more about the theory underlying interventions, the context in which interventions work, and develop interventions based on this stronger theoretical understanding. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury: an exploratory analysis of pregabalin clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sadosky, Alesia; Parsons, Bruce; Emir, Birol; Nieshoff, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing relationships between pain relief and function can inform patient management decisions. This analysis explored graphically the relationship between pain relief and functional improvement in patients with neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury in two clinical trials of pregabalin. This was a post hoc analysis of two randomized, double-blind, clinical trials in patients who were treated with pregabalin (n=181) or placebo (n=172) for neuropathic pain associated with spinal cord injury. The bivariate relationship between percent pain relief and absolute change in the functional outcomes with placebo and pregabalin was evaluated graphically using scatter plots, and loess curves illustrated the extent of the relationship between pain and function. Linear trend analysis evaluated the statistical significance of these relationships using Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT)-based thresholds of pain reduction (<15%, 15% <30%, 30% to <50%, and ≥50%). Outcome measures included modified Brief Pain Inventory pain interference with function in one of the studies and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (an 11-point Numeric Rating Scale) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for the pooled studies. Data ellipses showed a shift with pregabalin relative to placebo toward greater improvement with increasing pain relief for all outcome measures except HADS. Loess curves suggested a relationship between increased pain relief and improved function except for HADS, with the clearest relationship observed for sleep. Linear trend analysis showed significant relationships between pain and Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (P<0.0001) and between pain and function on the modified Brief Pain Inventory Interference Index and most individual items (P<0.05). Greater functional improvements were generally achieved at higher levels of clinically significant pain reduction. Pregabalin resulted in shifts

  14. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for comorbid insomnia and osteoarthritis pain in primary care: the lifestyles randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Michael V; McCurry, Susan M; Shortreed, Susan M; Balderson, Benjamin H; Baker, Laura D; Keefe, Francis J; Rybarczyk, Bruce D; Von Korff, Michael

    2013-06-01

    To assess whether older persons with osteoarthritis (OA) pain and insomnia receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain and insomnia (CBT-PI), a cognitive-behavioral pain coping skills intervention (CBT-P), and an education-only control (EOC) differed in sleep and pain outcomes. Double-blind, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 9-month follow-up. Group Health and University of Washington, 2009 to 2011. Three hundred sixty-seven older adults with OA pain and insomnia. Six weekly group sessions of CBT-PI, CBT-P, or EOC delivered in participants' primary care clinics. Primary outcomes were insomnia severity and pain severity. Secondary outcomes were actigraphically measured sleep efficiency and arthritis symptoms. CBT-PI reduced insomnia severity (score range 0-28) more than EOC (adjusted mean difference = -1.89, 95% confidence interval = -2.83 to -0.96; P < .001) and CBT-P (adjusted mean difference = -2.03, 95% CI = -3.01 to -1.04; P < .001) and improved sleep efficiency (score range 0-100) more than EOC (adjusted mean difference = 2.64, 95% CI = 0.44-4.84; P = .02). CBT-P did not improve insomnia severity more than EOC, but improved sleep efficiency (adjusted mean difference = 2.91, 95% CI = 0.85-4.97; P = .006). Pain severity and arthritis symptoms did not differ between the three arms. A planned analysis in participants with severe baseline pain revealed similar results. Over 9 months, CBT of insomnia was effective for older adults with OA pain and insomnia. The addition of CBT for insomnia to CBT for pain alone improved outcomes. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of hypnosis compared with biofeedback for adults with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, G; Rintala, D H; Jensen, M P; Fukui, T; Smith, D; Williams, W

    2015-02-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is common and results in significant costs to individuals, families and society. Although some research supports the efficacy of hypnosis for CLBP, we know little about the minimum dose needed to produce meaningful benefits, the roles of home practice and hypnotizability on outcome, or the maintenance of treatment benefits beyond 3 months. One hundred veterans with CLBP participated in a randomized, four-group design study. The groups were (1) an eight-session self-hypnosis training intervention without audio recordings for home practice; (2) an eight-session self-hypnosis training intervention with recordings; (3) a two-session self-hypnosis training intervention with recordings and brief weekly reminder telephone calls; and (4) an eight-session active (biofeedback) control intervention. Participants in all four groups reported significant pre- to post-treatment improvements in pain intensity, pain interference and sleep quality. The hypnosis groups combined reported significantly more pain intensity reduction than the control group. There was no significant difference among the three hypnosis conditions. Over half of the participants who received hypnosis reported clinically meaningful (≥ 30%) reductions in pain intensity, and they maintained these benefits for at least 6 months after treatment. Neither hypnotizability nor amount of home practice was associated significantly with treatment outcome. The findings indicate that two sessions of self-hypnosis training with audio recordings for home practice may be as effective as eight sessions of hypnosis treatment. If replicated in other patient samples, the findings have important implications for the application of hypnosis treatment for chronic pain management. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  16. Using TENS for pain control: the state of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Carol GT; Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmacological intervention that activates a complex neuronal network to reduce pain by activating descending inhibitory systems in the central nervous system to reduce hyperalgesia. The evidence for TENS efficacy is conflicting and requires not only description but also critique. Population-specific systemic reviews and meta-analyses are emerging, indicating both HF and LF TENS being shown to provide analgesia, specifically when applied at a strong, nonpainful intensity. The purpose of this article is to provide a critical review of the latest basic science and clinical evidence for TENS. Additional research is necessary to determine if TENS has effects specific to mechanical stimuli and/or beyond reduction of pain and will improve activity levels, function and quality of life. PMID:24953072

  17. Motivational interviewing and exercise programme for community-dwelling older persons with chronic pain: a randomised controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Vong, Sinfia K S; Tang, Shuk Kwan

    2013-07-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an integrated motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme on pain, physical and psychological function, quality of life, self-efficacy, and compliance with exercise for community-dwelling older persons with chronic pain. Chronic pain is common among older persons. Indeed, motivation for managing pain is poor, and may cause negative consequences. Motivational interviewing maybe effective in treating chronic pain. Single-blinded randomised control study. Older persons with chronic pain (n = 56) were recruited from two elderly community centres. They were blinded from the group allocation. The programme was conducted by an motivational interviewing-trained physiotherapist and registered nurses. Participants in the experimental group received an 8-week integrated motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme, while the control group received regular activities in the centre. Motivational interviewing used open-ended questions to encourage participants to express and recognise their pain and behaviours and professional feedback was given accordingly. Pain intensity, pain self-efficacy, anxiety, happiness, depression, mobility and quality of life were measured before and after the motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme. Attendance and compliance rate of the programme was calculated in the experimental group. Significant improvements in pain intensity, pain self-efficacy, anxiety, happiness and mobility after the motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme (all p < 0.05) for experimental group, while no significant improvement in control group except on the happiness scale. Regarding group differences in the outcome measures, the change scores on pain intensity, state anxiety and depression were significantly better in the experimental group. Motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme is effective in improving pain, physical mobility, psychological well-being and self

  18. Short-term improvement in insomnia symptoms predicts long-term improvements in sleep, pain, and fatigue in older adults with comorbid osteoarthritis and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Michael V; McCurry, Susan M; Shortreed, Susan M; Baker, Laura D; Rybarczyk, Bruce D; Keefe, Francis J; Von Korff, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In a primary care population of 367 older adults (aged ⩾60 years) with osteoarthritis (OA) pain and insomnia, we examined the relationship between short-term improvement in sleep and long-term sleep, pain, and fatigue outcomes through secondary analyses of randomized controlled trial data. Study participants, regardless of experimental treatment received, were classified either as improvers (⩾30% baseline to 2-month reduction on the Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) or as nonimprovers. After controlling for treatment arm and potential confounders, improvers showed significant, sustained improvements across 18 months compared with nonimprovers in pain severity (P<0.001, adjusted mean difference=-0.51 [95% CI: -0.80, -0.21), arthritis symptoms (P<0.001, 0.63 [0.26, 1.00]), and fear avoidance (P=0.009, -2.27 [-3.95, -0.58]) but not in catastrophizing or depression. Improvers also showed significant, sustained improvements in ISI (P<0.001, -3.03 [-3.74, -2.32]), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Total (P<0.001, -1.45 [-1.97, -0.93]) and general sleep quality (P<0.001, -0.28 [-0.39, -0.16]) scores, Flinders Fatigue Scale (P<0.001, -1.99 [-3.01, -0.98]), and Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep Scale (P=0.037, -2.44 [-4.74, -0.15]), but no improvements on the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. We conclude that short-term (2-month) improvements in sleep predicted long-term (9- and 18-month) improvements for multiple measures of sleep, chronic pain, and fatigue. These improvements were not attributable to nonspecific benefits for psychological well-being, such as reduced depression. These findings are consistent with benefits of improved sleep for chronic pain and fatigue among older persons with osteoarthritis pain and comorbid insomnia if robust improvements in sleep are achieved and sustained. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01142349. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  19. Improvement in Automatic Postural Coordination Following Alexander Technique Lessons in a Person With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. Case Description The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. Outcomes The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Discussion Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain–associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain. [Cacciatore TW, Horak FB, Henry SM. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander Technique lessons in a person with low back pain. PMID:15921477

  20. [Back school: a simple way to improve pain and postural behaviour].

    PubMed

    Jordá Llona, M; Pérez Bocanegra, E; García-Mifsud, M; Jimeno Bernad, R; Ortiz Hernández, R; Castells Ayuso, P

    2014-08-01

    Non-specific back pain in children and adolescents has a high prevalence. The aim of this study is to show a Juvenile Back School (JBS) programme and its results in our hospital. A total of 139 patients referred to a Juvenile Back School for advice due to of pain, deformity or back asymmetry were included in a prospective observational study. age, gender, pain, correct postures, sports activities, adherence to JBS and appreciation of these parameters by their parents. VARIABLES were measured with a numerical pain scale and with a survey completed in the first session and 3 months after finishing the JBS. A total of 119 patients finished the study (78 female and 41 male).The average was 13.97±2.29 years (9-20). Three months after JBS, the median pain intensity was reduced from 3 to 0 (P<.0001). There was an improvement in patient postures from 21% to 83% (P<.0001). Patients did not increase their sport activity after the JBS, although its regular practice was linked with pain improvement after JBS (P<.02).Performing exercises did not lead to a decrease in pain. There was a poor correlation between parents and children in the evaluation of post-JBS pain. A back school programme could probably contribute to reduce non-specific back pain and improve postural behaviour in young people. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Autonomic status and pain profile in patients of chronic low back pain and following electro acupuncture therapy: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Nilima; Thakur, Manisha; Tandon, Om Prakash; Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Arora, Shobha; Bhattacharya, Neena

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a syndrome characterized by several neurophysiological changes including that of the autonomic nervous system. Chronic low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem and is a frequent reason for using unconventional therapies especially acupuncture. This study was conducted to evaluate the autonomic status and pain profile in chronic LBP patients and to observe the effect of electro acupuncture therapy. Chronic LBP patients (n=60) were recruited from the Department of Orthopaedics, GTB Hospital, Delhi. Age and sex matched healthy volunteers were selected as controls (n=30). Following a written consent, LBP patients were randomly allocated into two study groups - Group A received 10 sittings of electro acupuncture, on alternate days, at GB and UB points selected for back pain, while the Group B received a conventional drug therapy in the form of oral Valdecoxib together with supervised physiotherapy. Controls were assessed once while the patients were assessed twice, before and after completion of the treatment program (3 weeks). The autonomic status was studied with non-invasive cardiovascular autonomic function tests which included E: I ratio, 30:15 ratio, postural challenge test and sustained handgrip test. Pain intensity was measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the global perceived effect (GPE). Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measure's ANOVA with Tukey's test. Pain patients showed a significantly reduced vagal tone and increased sympathetic activity as compared to the controls (P<0.05 to P<0.001 in different variables). Following treatment, both the study groups showed a reduction in vagal tone together with a decrease in the sympathetic activity. There was also a considerable relief of pain in both groups, however, the acupuncture group showed a better response (P<0.01). We conclude that there is autonomic dysfunction in chronic LBP patients. Acupuncture effectively relieves the pain and improves the autonomic status and

  2. Preemptive intraarticular tramadol for pain control after arthroscopic knee surgery.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Bilge; Babacan, Avni; Arslan, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intraarticular (ia) bupivacaine and tramadol injection and preemptive intraarticular tramadol in providing pain control after arthroscopic knee surgery. Following local research ethics committee approval, 60 patients were assigned in a randomized manner into three groups: Group I received ia 20 ml of 0.25 % bupivacaine at the end of the operation, Group II received ia 20 ml of 0.25 % bupivacaine and 100 mg of tramadol at the end of the operation and Group III received ia 100 mg of tramadol diluted in 20 ml of saline solution 30 minutes before skin inscision and 20 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine at the end of the operation as well. Analgesic duration, total analgesic consumption and postoperative VAS pain scores recorded at rest and with movement were significantly lower and patient satisfaction was significantly higher in Group II and III, compared to Group I. Total analgesic consumption and the number of patients requiring supplementary analgesics were significantly lower in the preemptive tramadol group compared to the postoperative tramadol group. In conclusion, preemptive ia tramadol provided effective and reliable pain control after artroscopic knee surgeries and may be preferred to postoperative administration.

  3. Automated Pressure-Controlled Discography in Patients Undergoing Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Discogenic Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Kyu; Shin, Dong Ah; Kim, Hyoung Ihl; Yi, Seong; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Keung Nyun; Yoon, Do Heum

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) with or without automated pressure-controlled discography (APCD) before the procedure. Patients (n = 36) who underwent ALIF for lumbar discogenic back pain between 2008 and 2013 and were followed for more than 6 months were enrolled in this study. APCD was performed to identify discogenic back pain. Preoperative x-rays, computed tomography images, and magnetic resonance images were obtained. The intervertebral disc height, type of Modic change, grade of disc degeneration, and fusion rate were determined. Additionally, the presence or absence of high-intensity zone and vacuum disc were checked preoperatively. Clinical evaluation was performed by visual analog scale (0 = no pain, 10 = worst pain imaginable), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey before surgery and every 6 months postoperatively. The average patient age was 53.3 years (range, 31-73 years). The mean follow-up durations were 19.7 months. Seventeen patients (the APCD-ALIF group) underwent ALIF after APCD, and 19 patients underwent ALIF without APCD. The APCD-ALIF group had significantly improved clinical outcomes compared with the control group (visual analog scale score 1.8 ± 1.6 vs. 3.3 ± 2.4; P = 0.039: ODI score 6.7 ± 6.3 vs. 12.1 ± 6.8; P = 0.019). The surgical improvement rate was significantly associated with ODI score (P = 0.005). The results of this study confirm that APCD aids surgical outcomes of ALIF in patients with suspected lumbar discogenic pain. We recommend performing APCD before ALIF to confirm lumbar discogenic pain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. [Manual trigger point therapy of shoulder pain : Randomized controlled study of effectiveness].

    PubMed

    Sohns, S; Schnieder, K; Licht, G; von Piekartz, H

    2016-12-01

    Although chronic shoulder pain is highly prevalent and myofascial trigger points (mTrP) are thought to be found in the majority of patients with shoulder complaints, the influence on the pain mechanism remains unclear. There are only very few controlled clinical studies on the effects of manual trigger point compression therapy. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared the short-term effects of manual trigger point compression therapy (n = 6) with manual sham therapy (n = 6) in patients with unilateral shoulder pain due to myofascial syndrome (MFS). The measurement data were collected before and after two sessions of therapy. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) of mTrP and symmetrically located points on the asymptomatic side were measured together with neutral points in order to detect a potential unilateral or generalized hyperalgesia. Additionally, the pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at rest and during movement and the neck disability index (NDI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaires were also completed and evaluated. Both treatment modalities led to a significant improvement; however, the manual trigger point compression therapy was significantly more effective in comparison to sham therapy, as measured by different parameters. The significant improvement of PPT values in the interventional group even at sites that were not directly treated, indicates central mechanisms in pain threshold modulation induced by manual compression therapy. The weaker but still measurable effects of sham therapy might be explained by the sham modality being a hands on technique or by sufficient stimulation of the trigger point region during the diagnostics and PPT measurements.

  5. Postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for pelvic endometriosis-related pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Leerasiri, Pichai

    2012-03-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of a postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for relieving pelvic pain in patients with endometriosis. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in 55 patients with endometriosis and moderate-to-severe dysmenorrhea (visual analog scale, greater than 50 mm) undergoing laparoscopic conservative surgery. After surgery, patients were randomized to a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (n=28) or expectant management (n=27) group. Primary outcome was the change of dysmenorrhea visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes included changes of pelvic pain and dyspareunia visual analog scale, Short Form-36 score, and adverse effects. The two groups were comparable in age, body mass index, parity, and baseline pain scores. At 12 months, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had a significantly lower median value of dysmenorrhea and noncyclic pelvic pain score. Compared with the control group, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had greater reduction in dysmenorrhea visual analog scale (-81.0 compared with -50.0 mm, P=.006) and pelvic pain visual analog scale (-48.5 compared with -22.0 mm, P=.038) but a comparable reduction in dyspareunia visual analog scale (-15.0 compared with -19.0 mm, P=.831). Two patients in levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group (7.4%) and nine in the expectant management group (39.1%) had recurrent dysmenorrhea within 1 year postoperatively (P=.014). Number-needed-to-treat to prevent one case with recurrent dysmenorrhea within the first year was three cases. The Short Form-36 scores improved in the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group but did not change in the expectant management group. There was no serious adverse event during the study period. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is effective and well accepted for long-term therapy after conservative surgery for patients with moderate to severe pain related to

  6. Postoperative continuous paravertebral anesthetic infusion for pain control in posterior cervical spine surgery: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Elder, James B; Hoh, Daniel J; Liu, Charles Y; Wang, Michael Y

    2010-03-01

    Patients who undergo posterior cervical spinal fusion procedures frequently experience significant postoperative pain. Use of a local anesthetic continuous infusion pump after surgery may improve these outcome variables. After posterior cervical spine fusion procedures, 25 consecutive patients received continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine into the subfascial aspects of the wound via an elastomeric pump. Data were collected prospectively by third party assessment using standard nursing protocols. This included numeric pain scores and opiate use over the first 4 postoperative days (PODs), length of hospitalization, and complications. In a retrospective analysis, we compared each study patient to a control patient who did not receive the continuous infusion of bupivacaine. Demographic variables and surgical procedure were similar among matched cases. Patients receiving continuous local anesthetic infusion used significantly less narcotics (P < .05) during the first 4 PODs: 24.4% on day 1, 34.1% on day 2, 53.5% on day 3, and 58.1% on day 4. A lower average pain score was observed among study patients on each POD (P < .05): 31.5% less on day 1, 13.0% on day 2, 24.0% on day 3, and 35.7% on day 4. Patients with the infusion device were discharged home earlier (POD 4.9 versus 6.7; P = .024) and demonstrated improvement in time to ambulation, first bowel movement, and discontinuation of the patient-controlled analgesia machine. No complications were associated with the device. Patients with the local anesthetic continuous infusion device required less narcotics and reported lower pain scores than control patients on each of the first 4 PODs. These results suggest that continuous infusion of local anesthetic into the paravertebral tissue during the immediate postoperative period is a safe and effective technique that achieves lower pain scores and narcotic use and improves multiple postoperative outcome variables.

  7. Vertical heterophoria and postural control in nonspecific chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Matheron, Eric; Kapoula, Zoï

    2011-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to test postural control during quiet standing in nonspecific chronic low back pain (LBP) subjects with vertical heterophoria (VH) before and after cancellation of VH; also to compare with healthy subjects with, and without VH. Fourteen subjects with LBP took part in this study. The postural performance was measured through the center of pressure displacements with a force platform while the subjects fixated on a target placed at either 40 or 200 cm, before and after VH cancellation with an appropriate prism. Their postural performance was compared to that of 14 healthy subjects with VH and 12 without VH (i.e. vertical orthophoria) studied previously in similar conditions. For LBP subjects, cancellation of VH with a prism improved postural performance. With respect to control subjects (with or without VH), the variance of speed of the center of pressure was higher, suggesting more energy was needed to stabilize their posture in quiet upright stance. Similarly to controls, LBP subjects showed higher postural sway when they were looking at a target at a far distance than at a close distance. The most important finding is that LBP subjects with VH can improve their performance after prism-cancellation of their VH. We suggest that VH reflects mild conflict between sensory and motor inputs involved in postural control i.e. a non optimal integration of the various signals. This could affect the performance of postural control and perhaps lead to pain. Nonspecific chronic back pain may results from such prolonged conflict.

  8. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Nicholas A. D.C.

    2010-05-31

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  9. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Nicholas A.

    2010-05-01

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p = 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  10. Efficacy of acupunture in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomised, sham controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Nilay; Ozcan, Emel; Sezen, Kasim; Karatas, Omer; Issever, Halim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electroacupuncture and sham acupuncture in the treatment of patients with chronic neck pain. 31 patients with chronic neck pain were included in a randomised, controlled trial. Electric stimulation was given for 30 minutes at low frequency (1-4Hz), pulse width of 200 micros, interrupted wave form. Of the 29 patients who completed the therapy, 13 were assigned to conventional acupuncture and 16 to sham acupuncture groups, receiving 3 sessions a week for a total of 10 sessions, each lasting for 30 minutes. Patients were evaluated before and after therapy and 3 months later by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the bodily pain subscale of the Short Form Health Survey-36 scale. The treating physician was different from the evaluating physician who, like the patient, was blinded. VAS scores in both groups significantly reduced after therapy and at 3 months post-therapy, but the difference between groups was not significant. In respect of bodily pain, there was a significant improvement in the acupuncture group after therapy (P<0.01). Stimulation of conventional acupuncture points was not generally superior to needling ofnonspecific points on the neck, and both treatments were associated with improvement of symptoms. Needles inserted into the neck are likely to be an inappropriate sham control for acupuncture.

  11. Results of a Pilates exercise program in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Valenza, M C; Rodríguez-Torres, J; Cabrera-Martos, I; Díaz-Pelegrina, A; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, M E; Castellote-Caballero, Y

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of a Pilates exercise program on disability, pain, lumbar mobility, flexibility and balance in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Randomized controlled trial. University laboratory. A total of 54 patients with chronic non-specific low back pain. Patients were randomly allocated to an experimental group ( n=27) included in a Pilates exercise program or to a control group ( n=27) receiving information in a form of a leaflet. Disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and Oswestry Disability Index), current, average and pain at it least and at its worst (Visual Analogue Scales), lumbar mobility (modified Shober test), flexibility (finger-to-floor test) and balance (single limb stance test) were measured at baseline and after the intervention. A between-group analysis showed significant differences in the intervention group compared to the control group for both disability scores, the Rolland-Morris questionnaire (mean change±standard deviation of 5.31±3.37 and 2.40±6.78 respectively and between-groups mean difference of 3.2 ± 4.12, p=0.003) and the Oswestry Disability Index ( p<0.001), current pain ( p=0.002) and pain at it least ( p=0.033), flexibility (0.032) and balance (0.043). An 8-week Pilates exercise program is effective in improving disability, pain, flexibility and balance in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain.

  12. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of eszopiclone for the treatment of insomnia in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Goforth, Harold W; Preud'homme, Xavier A; Krystal, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    Insomnia, which is very common in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP), has long been viewed as a pain symptom that did not merit specific treatment. Recent data suggest that adding insomnia therapy to pain-targeted treatment should improve outcome; however, this has not been empirically tested in LBP or in any pain condition treated with a standardized pain medication regimen. We sought to test the hypothesis that adding insomnia therapy to pain-targeted treatment might improve sleep and pain in LBP. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, 1-mo trial. Duke University Medical Center Outpatient Sleep Clinic. Fifty-two adult volunteers with LBP of at least 3 mo duration who met diagnostic criteria for insomnia (mean age: 42.5 y; 63% females). Subjects were randomized to eszopiclone (ESZ) 3 mg plus naproxen 500 mg BID or matching placebo plus naproxen 500 mg twice a day. ESZ SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVED TOTAL SLEEP TIME (MEAN INCREASE: ESZ, 95 min; placebo, 9 min) (primary outcome) and nearly all sleep measures as well as visual analog scale pain (mean decrease: ESZ, 17 mm; placebo, 2 mm) (primary pain outcome), and depression (mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale improvement ESZ, 3.8; placebo, 0.4) compared with placebo. Changes in pain ratings were significantly correlated with changes in sleep. The addition of insomnia-specific therapy to a standardized naproxen pain regimen significantly improves sleep, pain, and depression in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). The findings indicate the importance of administering both sleep and pain-directed therapies to patients with LBP in clinical practice and provide strong evidence that improving sleep disturbance may improve pain. clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00365976.

  13. Management of Neuropathic Chronic Pain with Methadone Combined with Ketamine: A Randomized, Double Blind, Active-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Godoy, Maria C; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Silva, Mariane A; Menezes, Mirian S; Caumo, Wolnei; Ferreira, Juliano

    2017-03-01

    Methadone and ketamine are used in neuropathic pain management. However, the benefits of both drugs association are uncertain in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our primary objective was test the hypothesis that oral methadone combined with oral ketamine is more effective than oral methadone or ketamine alone in reducing neuropathic pain. We conducted a randomized, double blind, active-controlled parallel-group clinical trial. Forty-two patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional therapy were randomly assigned to receive oral methadone (n = 14), ketamine (n = 14), or methadone plus ketamine (n = 14) over a 3-month period. During these 90 days, we observed pain scores using a visual analogical scale (VAS), allodynia, burning/shooting pain, and some side effects. All treatments were effective in reducing pain scores by at least 40%. However, a significant improvement in pain was observed only in the ketamine alone group compared with both the methadone or methadone/ketamine groups. No significant differences were observed among the treatment groups for the reduction of burning or shooting pain, while ketamine alone was more effective than methadone or methadone/ketamine for the reduction of allodynia. Formal assessment for awareness of the allocation was not performed, some co-intervention bias may have occurred, our results could be only relevant to the patient population investigated and the use of VAS as the primary outcome detect changes in pain intensity but not to assess neuropathic pain symptoms. This study indicates that ketamine was better than methadone or methadone/ketamine for treating neuropathic pain.Key words: Multimodal analgesia, refractory pain, NMDA receptor, opioid.

  14. Ketorolac for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Lynn L.; Ward, Kristy K.; Mody, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intramuscular ketorolac compared to placebo saline injection for pain control with intrauterine device (IUD) placement. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients received ketorolac 30mg or placebo saline intramuscular injection 30 minutes prior to IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement on a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 2.0cm difference (α=0.05) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included pain with study drug injection, speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and at 5 and 15 minutes after IUD placement. Results A total of 67 women participated in the study, 33 in the ketorolac arm and 34 in the placebo arm. There were no differences in baseline demographics including age, BMI, and race. There were no differences in median pain scores for IUD placement in the placebo versus ketorolac groups (5.2cm vs 3.6cm, p=0.99). There was a decrease in median pain scores at 5 minutes (2.2cm vs 0.3cm, p=<0.001) and 15 minutes (1.6cm vs 0.1cm, p=<0.001) after IUD placement but no difference for all other time points. Nulliparous participants (n=16, 8 per arm) had a decrease in pain scores with IUD placement (8.1cm vs 5.4cm, p=0.02). In this study, 22% of participants in the placebo group and 18% in the ketorolac group reported injection pain was as painful as IUD placement. Conclusions Ketorolac does not reduce pain with IUD placement but does reduce pain at 5 and 15 minutes after placement. PMID:26241253

  15. Ketorolac for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Lynn L; Ward, Kristy K; Mody, Sheila K

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate intramuscular ketorolac compared with placebo saline injection for pain control with intrauterine device (IUD) placement. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients received 30 mg ketorolac or placebo saline intramuscular injection 30 minutes before IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement on a 10-cm visual analog scale. Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 2.0-cm difference (α=0.05) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included pain with study drug injection, speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and at 5 and 15 minutes after IUD placement. A total of 67 women participated in the study, 33 in the ketorolac arm and 34 in the placebo arm. There were no differences in baseline demographics including age, body mass index, and race. There were no differences in median pain scores for IUD placement in the placebo compared with ketorolac groups (5.2 compared with 3.6 cm, P=.99). There was a decrease in median pain scores at 5 minutes (2.2 compared with 0.3 cm, P≤.001) and 15 minutes (1.6 compared with 0.1 cm, P≤.001) after IUD placement but no difference for all other time points. Nulliparous participants (n=16, eight per arm) had a decrease in pain scores with IUD placement (8.1 compared with 5.4 cm, P=.02). In this study, 22% of participants in the placebo group and 18% in the ketorolac group reported injection pain was as painful as IUD placement. Ketorolac does not reduce pain with IUD placement but does reduce pain at 5 and 15 minutes after placement. ClinicalTrials.gov; www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01664559. I.

  16. Precision control of trunk movement in low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Willigenburg, Nienke W; Kingma, Idsart; Hoozemans, Marco J M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-02-01

    Motor control is challenged in tasks with high precision demands. In such tasks, signal-dependent neuromuscular noise causes errors and proprioceptive feedback is required for optimal performance. Pain may affect proprioception, muscle activation patterns and resulting kinematics. Therefore, we investigated precision control of trunk movement in 18 low back pain (LBP) patients and 13 healthy control subjects. The subjects performed a spiral-tracking task requiring precise trunk movements, in conditions with and without disturbance of proprioception by lumbar muscle vibration. Tracking task performance and trunk muscle electromyography were recorded. In conditions without lumbar muscle vibration, tracking errors were 27.1% larger in LBP patients compared to healthy controls. Vibration caused tracking errors to increase by 10.5% in healthy controls, but not in LBP patients. These results suggest that reduced precision in LBP patients might be explained by proprioceptive deficits. Ratios of antagonistic over agonistic muscle activation were similar between groups. Tracking errors increased trunk inclination, but no significant relation between tracking error and agonistic muscle activation was found. Tracking errors did not decrease when antagonistic muscle activation increased, so, neither healthy subjects nor LBP patients appear to counteract trunk movement errors by increasing co-contraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Improved Acuity and Dexterity but Unchanged Touch and Pain Thresholds following Repetitive Sensory Stimulation of the Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Rebecca; Kattenstroth, Jan-Christoph; Kalisch, Tobias; Dinse, Hubert R.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroplasticity underlies the brain's ability to alter perception and behavior through training, practice, or simply exposure to sensory stimulation. Improvement of tactile discrimination has been repeatedly demonstrated after repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS) of the fingers; however, it remains unknown if such protocols also affect hand dexterity or pain thresholds. We therefore stimulated the thumb and index finger of young adults to investigate, besides testing tactile discrimination, the impact of rSS on dexterity, pain, and touch thresholds. We observed an improvement in the pegboard task where subjects used the thumb and index finger only. Accordingly, stimulating 2 fingers simultaneously potentiates the efficacy of rSS. In fact, we observed a higher gain of discrimination performance as compared to a single-finger rSS. In contrast, pain and touch thresholds remained unaffected. Our data suggest that selecting particular fingers modulates the efficacy of rSS, thereby affecting processes controlling sensorimotor integration. PMID:22315693

  18. A randomized controlled trial to assess the pain associated with the debond of orthodontic fixed appliances

    PubMed Central

    Mangnall, Louise A R; Dietrich, Thomas; Scholey, John M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine patient experience of pain during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances, expectations of pain during debond and whether biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond decreases pain experience. Design: Multicentre randomized controlled trial. Setting: Three UK hospital based orthodontic departments: Mid-Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Dental Hospital and University Hospital of North Staffordshire. Materials and methods: Ninety patients were randomly allocated to either the control (n = 45) or wafer group (n = 45). A visual analogue scale-based questionnaire was completed pre-debond to determine pain experience during treatment and expectations of pain during debond. The appliances were debonded and those in the wafer group bit on a soft acrylic wafer. A second questionnaire was completed post-debond to assess the pain experienced. Results: Biting on an acrylic wafer significantly reduced the pain experienced when debonding the posterior teeth (P≤0·05). Thirty-nine per cent found the lower anterior teeth the most painful. The expected pain was significantly greater than that actually experienced (P≤0·0001). Greater pain during treatment correlated with increased expectations and increased actually experienced pain (P≤0·0001). Conclusions: Biting on a soft acrylic wafer during debond of the posterior teeth reduces the pain experienced. The lower anterior teeth are the most painful. The pain expected is significantly greater than actually experienced. Patients who had greater pain during treatment expected and experienced greater pain at debond. PMID:24009318

  19. Effects of hamstring stretch with pelvic control on pain and work ability in standing workers.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyun-Il; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2016-11-21

    Hamstring tightness induces posterior pelvic tilt and decreased lumbar lordosis, which can result in low back painOBJECTIVE: We investigated effects of hamstring stretch with pelvic control on pain and work ability in standing workers. One hundred adult volunteers from a standing workers were randomly assigned to pelvic control hamstring stretching (PCHS) (n = 34), general hamstring stretching (GHS) (n = 34), control (n = 32) groups. The control group was performed self-home exercise. All interventions were conducted 3 days per week for 6 weeks, and included in the hamstring stretching and lumbopelvic muscle strengthening. Outcomes were evaluated through the visual analog scale (VAS), straight leg raise test (SLR), sit and reach test (SRT), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and work ability index (WAI). Significant difference in VAS, SLR, SRT, ODI, and WAI were found in the PCHS and GHS groups. The control group was a significant difference only in ODI. The PCHS group showed a greater difference than the GHS group and control group in VAS, SLR, SRT, and ODI. The pelvic control hamstring stretch exercise would be more helpful in back pain reduction and improvement of work ability in an industrial setting.

  20. Stretch exercises increase tolerance to stretch in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Law, Roberta Y W; Harvey, Lisa A; Nicholas, Michael K; Tonkin, Lois; De Sousa, Maria; Finniss, Damien G

    2009-10-01

    Stretch is commonly prescribed as part of physical rehabilitation in pain management programs, yet little is known about its effectiveness. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effects of a 3-week stretch program on muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A within-subject design was used, with one leg of each participant randomly allocated to an experimental (stretch) condition and the other leg randomly allocated to a control (no-stretch) condition. Thirty adults with pain of musculoskeletal origin persisting for at least 3 months were recruited from patients enrolled in a multidisciplinary pain management program at a hospital in Sydney, Australia. The hamstring muscles of the experimental leg were stretched daily for 1 minute over 3 weeks; the control leg was not stretched. This intervention was embedded within a pain management program and supervised by physical therapists. Primary outcomes were muscle extensibility and stretch tolerance, which were reflected by passive hip flexion angles measured with standardized and nonstandardized torques, respectively. Initial measurements were taken before the first stretch on day 1, and final measurements were taken 1 to 2 days after the last stretch. A blinded assessor was used for testing. Stretch did not increase muscle extensibility (mean between-group difference in hip flexion was 1 degrees , 95% confidence interval=-2 degrees to 4 degrees ), but it did improve stretch tolerance (mean between-group difference in hip flexion was 8 degrees , 95% confidence interval=5 degrees to 10 degrees ). Three weeks of stretch increases tolerance to the discomfort associated with stretch but does not change muscle extensibility in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  1. A comparison of coping strategies in patients with fibromyalgia, chronic neuropathic pain, and pain-free controls.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, Sidsel; Schultz, Rikke; Brødsgaard, Inger; Moore, Rod; Jensen, Troels S; Vase Toft, Lene; Bach, Flemming W; Rosenberg, Raben; Gormsen, Lise

    2016-12-01

    Patients suffering from chronic pain may benefit from learning adaptive coping strategies. Consensus on efficient strategies for this group of patients is, however, lacking, and previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The present study has examined coping strategies in two distinctly different groups of chronic pain patients and a group of healthy controls. Thirty neuropathic pain (NP) patients, 28 fibromyalgia (FM) patients, and 26 pain-free healthy controls completed the Coping Strategy Questionnaire (CSQ-48/27) and rated their daily pain. The results showed that FM and NP patients did not cope differently with pain. The only difference between the groups was that FM patients felt more in control of their pain than NP patients. Both patient groups used more maladaptive/passive coping strategies, but surprisingly also more adaptive/active coping strategies than healthy controls. However, FM patients with high levels of passive strategies felt less in control than FM patients with low levels of passive strategies. This was not seen in NP patients. An important implication for clinical practice is therefore that passive coping strategies should be restructured into active ones, especially for FM patients. Otherwise, the same psychological treatment model can be applied to both groups since they use similar coping styles.

  2. Visual distraction alone for the improvement of colonoscopy-related pain and satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Uchiyama, Shiori; Sakai, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Nonaka, Takashi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of a relaxing visual distraction alone on patient pain, anxiety, and satisfaction during colonoscopy. METHODS: This study was designed as an endoscopist-blinded randomized controlled trial with 60 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent elective colonoscopy at Yokohama City University Hospital, Japan. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 watched a silent movie using a head-mounted display, while group 2 only wore the display. All of the colonoscopies were performed without sedation. We examined pain, anxiety, and the satisfaction of patients before and after the procedure using questionnaires that included the Visual Analog Scale. Patients were also asked whether they would be willing to use the same method for a repeat procedure. RESULTS: A total of 60 patients were allocated to two groups. Two patients assigned to group 1 and one patient assigned to group 2 were excluded after the randomization. Twenty-eight patients in group 1 and 29 patients in group 2 were entered into the final analysis. The groups were similar in terms of gender, age, history of prior colonoscopy, and pre-procedural anxiety score. The two groups were comparable in terms of the cecal insertion rate, the time to reach the cecum, the time needed for the total procedure, and vital signs. The median anxiety score during the colonoscopy did not differ significantly between the two groups (median scores, 20 vs 24). The median pain score during the procedure was lower in group 1, but the difference was not significant (median scores, 24.5 vs 42). The patients in group 1 reported significantly higher median post-procedural satisfaction levels, compared with the patients in group 2 (median scores, 89 vs 72, P = 0.04). Nearly three-quarters of the patients in group 1 wished to use the same method for repeat procedures, and the difference in rates between the two groups was statistically significant (75.0% vs 48.3%, P = 0.04). Patients with greater

  3. Visual distraction alone for the improvement of colonoscopy-related pain and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Uchiyama, Shiori; Sakai, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Nonaka, Takashi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-04-21

    To evaluate the effect of a relaxing visual distraction alone on patient pain, anxiety, and satisfaction during colonoscopy. This study was designed as an endoscopist-blinded randomized controlled trial with 60 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent elective colonoscopy at Yokohama City University Hospital, Japan. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 watched a silent movie using a head-mounted display, while group 2 only wore the display. All of the colonoscopies were performed without sedation. We examined pain, anxiety, and the satisfaction of patients before and after the procedure using questionnaires that included the Visual Analog Scale. Patients were also asked whether they would be willing to use the same method for a repeat procedure. A total of 60 patients were allocated to two groups. Two patients assigned to group 1 and one patient assigned to group 2 were excluded after the randomization. Twenty-eight patients in group 1 and 29 patients in group 2 were entered into the final analysis. The groups were similar in terms of gender, age, history of prior colonoscopy, and pre-procedural anxiety score. The two groups were comparable in terms of the cecal insertion rate, the time to reach the cecum, the time needed for the total procedure, and vital signs. The median anxiety score during the colonoscopy did not differ significantly between the two groups (median scores, 20 vs 24). The median pain score during the procedure was lower in group 1, but the difference was not significant (median scores, 24.5 vs 42). The patients in group 1 reported significantly higher median post-procedural satisfaction levels, compared with the patients in group 2 (median scores, 89 vs 72, P = 0.04). Nearly three-quarters of the patients in group 1 wished to use the same method for repeat procedures, and the difference in rates between the two groups was statistically significant (75.0% vs 48.3%, P = 0.04). Patients with greater levels of anxiety before

  4. Effects of noxious stimulation and pain expectations on neuromuscular control of the spine in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Henchoz, Yves; Tétreau, Charles; Abboud, Jacques; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Alterations of the neuromuscular control of the lumbar spine have been reported in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). During trunk flexion and extension tasks, the reduced myoelectric activity of the low back extensor musculature observed during full trunk flexion is typically absent in patients with chronic LBP. To determine whether pain expectations could modulate neuromuscular responses to experimental LBP to a higher extent in patients with chronic LBP compared with controls. A cross-sectional, case-control study. Twenty-two patients with nonspecific chronic LBP and 22 age- and sex-matched control participants. Trunk flexion-extension tasks were performed under three experimental conditions: innocuous heat, noxious stimulation with low pain expectation, and noxious stimulation with high pain expectation. Noxious stimulations were delivered using a contact heat thermode applied on the skin of the lumbar region (L4-L5), whereas low or high pain expectations were induced by verbal and visual instructions. Surface electromyography of erector spinae at L2-L3 and L4-L5, as well as lumbopelvic kinematic variables were collected during the tasks. Pain was evaluated using a numerical rating scale. Pain catastrophizing, disability, anxiety, and fear-avoidance beliefs were measured using validated questionnaires. Two-way mixed analysis of variance revealed that pain was significantly different among the three experimental conditions (F2,84=317.5; p<.001). Increased myoelectric activity of the low back extensor musculature during full trunk flexion was observed in the high compared with low pain expectations condition at the L2-L3 level (F2,84=9.5; p<.001) and at the L4-L5 level (F2,84=3.7; p=.030). At the L4-L5 level, this effect was significantly more pronounced for the control participants compared with patients with chronic LBP (F2,84=3.4; p=.045). Pearson correlation analysis revealed that increased lumbar muscle activity in full flexion induced by

  5. Inhibitory effect of bisphosphonate on osteoclast function contributes to improved skeletal pain in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Iba, Kousuke; Sasaki, Koichi; Chiba, Hironori; Kanaya, Kumiko; Kawamata, Tomoyuki; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio; Sasaki, Muneteru; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate skeletal pain associated with osteoporosis and to examine the inhibitory effect of bisphosphonate (BP) on pain in an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model. We evaluated skeletal pain in OVX mice through an examination of pain-like behavior as well as immunohistochemical findings. In addition, we assessed the effects of alendronate (ALN), a potent osteoclast inhibitor, on those parameters. The OVX mice showed a decrease in the pain threshold value, and an increase in the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in laminae I-II of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Alendronate caused an increase in the pain threshold value and inhibited c-Fos expression. The serum level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, a marker of osteoclast activity, was significantly negatively correlated with the pain threshold value. Furthermore, we found that an antagonist of the transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily member 1, which is an acid-sensing nociceptor, improved pain-like behavior in OVX mice. These results indicated that the inhibitory effect of BP on osteoclast function might contribute to an improvement in skeletal pain in osteoporosis patients.

  6. Yoga Therapy for Abdominal Pain-Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith J; Ockeloen, Lize E; Hilbink, Mirrian; Benninga, Marc A; Deckers-Kocken, Judith M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare effects of 10 weeks of yoga therapy (YT) and standard medical care (SMC) on abdominal pain and quality of life (QoL) in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Sixty-nine patients, ages 8 to 18 years, with AP-FGIDs, were randomized to SMC complemented with YT or SMC alone. YT is a mixture of yoga poses, meditation, and relaxation exercises and was given once a week in group sessions. SMC consisted of education, reassurance, dietary advice, and fibers/mebeverine, if necessary. Pain intensity (pain intensity score [PIS] 0-5) and frequency (pain frequency score [PFS] 0-4) were scored in a pain diary, and QoL was measured with KIDSCREEN-27. Follow-up was 12 months. Treatment response was defined as ≥50% reduction of weekly pain scores. At 1-year follow-up, treatment response was accomplished in 58% of the YT group and in 29% of the control group (P = 0.01); no significant differences for other time points were found. YT, and not SMC, resulted in a significant reduction of PIS (P < 0.01) and PFS (P < 0.01) after 12 months. During the study, however, YT was not significantly superior compared with SMC. Subanalyses for time points demonstrated a significant greater reduction of PIS at 12 months in favor of YT. No differences were found for QoL. YT was more effective in the reduction of reported monthly school absence (P = 0.03). At 1-year follow-up, YT in addition to standard care was superior compared with SMC according to treatment success, PIS, and reduction of school absence. YT, however, was not significantly more effective in improving PFS or QoL, compared with SMC.

  7. Postural control in nurses with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Ratzon, Navah Z; Froom, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common in nurses, but it is unclear if the pain is associated with measurements of postural control. Objective measurements of function might be useful in the evaluation of patients with LBP in order to evaluate and predict disability, and in the study of the pathophysiology of chronic LBP. In a cross-sectional study, we measured the number of postural adjustments, and degree of posterior-lateral sway in 81 nurses, using a computerized postural sway four-platter measurement system. There were 41 (56.6%) nurses who complained of LBP at the time of testing, and another 12 (14.8%) with a past history of LBP. Nurses with LBP consistently used more postural adjustments to keep their balance (p<0.003), and in some positions postural adjustments were positively associated with the degree of past and present pain. LBP was not significantly associated with the degree of lateral sway. Nurses either with present or a past history of LBP use an increased number of postural adjustments to maintain balance. Studies are warranted to determine if postural testing can predict the development of LBP or aid in determining appropriate preventive measures.

  8. Hormones in pain modulation and their clinical implications for pain control: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyin; Zhang, Jinyuan; Wang, Xiangrui

    2016-07-01

    Recently, more and more studies have found that pain generation, transmission and modulation are under hormonal regulation. Indeed, hormonal dysregulation is a common component of chronic pain syndromes. Studies have attempted to determine whether the relationship between the pain and its perception and hormones is a causative relationship and how these processes interrelate. This review summarizes and analyzes the current experimental data and provides an overview of the studies addressing these questions. The relationship between pain perception and endocrine effects suggests that hormones can be used as important biomarkers of chronic pain syndromes and/or be developed into therapeutic agents in the fight against pain.

  9. Change in pain, disability and influence of fear-avoidance in a work-focused intervention on neck and back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gunn Hege; Myhre, Kjersti; Leivseth, Gunnar; Sandvik, Leiv; Lau, Bjørn; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Røe, Cecilie

    2015-04-21

    Neck and back pain are among the most common causes of prolonged disability, and development of interventions with effect on pain, disability and return to work is important. Reduction of fear avoidance might be one mechanism behind improvement after interventions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in pain and disability at the 12-month follow-up of patients with neck and back pain treated with a work-focused intervention compared to patients treated with standard interventions, and the influence of improvement fear avoidance beliefs during the interventions on pain, disability and return to work at 12-month follow-up. 413 employed patients with back or neck pain referred to secondary care, and sick-listed between 4 weeks and 12 months, were randomized to a work-focused rehabilitation or control interventions. Follow-up was conducted 4 and 12 months after inclusion. The groups were compared (independent sample t-test) regarding differences in disability scores (Oswestry disability index/neck disability index) and pain (numeric rating scale) from baseline to 12-month follow-up. Changes in fear avoidance beliefs (FABQ) from baseline to 4 month follow-up were calculated, and the association between this change and return to work, pain and disability at 12 months were tested in stepwise multiple logistic regression models. Pain and, disability scores decreased to in both the work-focused and control intervention to 12-month follow-up, and there were no significant differences between the groups. FABQ decreased similarly in both groups to 4 month follow-up. The logistic regression model revealed an association between a reduced FABQ work score at 4 months and return to work within one year (adjusted OR 3.60, 95% CI 1.19 to 10.88). Reduced FABQ physical activity score at 4 months was associated with decreased disability after 12 months (adjusted OR (3.65. 95% CI 1.43 to 9.28). Short work-focused rehabilitation had the same effect on pain and disability

  10. Pain.

    PubMed

    Melzack, Ronald; Katz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Pain has many valuable functions. It often signals injury or disease, generates a wide range of adaptive behaviors, and promotes healing through rest. Despite these beneficial aspects of pain, there are negative features that challenge our understanding of the puzzle of pain, including persistent phantom limb pain after amputation or total spinal cord transection. Pain is a personal, subjective experience influenced by cultural learning, the meaning of the situation, attention, and other psychological variables. Pain processes do not begin with the stimulation of receptors. Rather, injury or disease produces neural signals that enter an active nervous system that (in the adult organism) is the substrate of past experience, culture, and a host of other environmental and personal factors. These brain processes actively participate in the selection, abstraction, and synthesis of information from the total sensory input. Pain is not simply the end product of a linear sensory transmission system; it is a dynamic process that involves continuous interactions among complex ascending and descending systems. The neuromatrix theory guides us away from the Cartesian concept of pain as a sensation produced by injury, inflammation, or other tissue pathology and toward the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience produced by multiple influences. These influences range from the existing synaptic architecture of the neuromatrix-which is determined by genetic and sensory factors-to influences from within the body and from other areas in the brain. Genetic influences on synaptic architecture may determine-or predispose toward-the development of chronic pain syndromes. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1201 For further resources related to this art