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  1. Pain control.

    PubMed

    Boey, W K

    1991-01-01

    There are two components to the perception of pain; the 'sensory' and the 'reactive'. Psychological factors control the latter. Pain research is rapidly advancing: the discovery of endorphins and opioid receptors, the appreciation of the psychological component of pain and the multidisciplinary approach to chronic pain are major advances. Pain can be classified as acute or chronic. Acute pain is easy to diagnose, the cause of pain obvious and the treatment logical, chronic pain has a greater psychological component, is difficult to diagnose and treatment is often empirical. Methods of pain control include drugs, injection techniques, electro stimulation, non invasive therapies, denervation procedures and palliative procedures. A multidisciplinary approach and a combination of methods is necessary to treat chronic pain. Spinal opioids, radiofrequency thermocoagulation, intrapleural bupivacaine, cryoanalgesia and patient controlled analgesia are recent advances in pain control. However, most pain can be controlled adequately with simple methods; what is essential is the interest and commitment of the physician towards achieving optimum therapeutics. PMID:1674199

  2. A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

  3. Postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Lovich-Sapola, Jessica; Smith, Charles E; Brandt, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Prevention and control of postoperative pain are essential. Inadequate treatment of postoperative pain continues to be a major problem after many surgeries and leads to worse outcomes, including chronic postsurgical pain. Optimal management of postoperative pain requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of pain, methods available to reduce pain, invasiveness of the procedure, and patient factors associated with increased pain, such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and neuroticism. Use of a procedure-specific, multimodal perioperative pain management provides a rational basis for enhanced postoperative pain control, optimization of analgesia, decrease in adverse effects, and improved patient satisfaction.

  4. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients.

  5. Acidosis and Formaldehyde Secretion as a Possible Pathway of Cancer Pain and Options for Improved Cancer Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Shaw, D Graeme; Han, Bo; Fang, Josephine Y; Nimni, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of cancer pain in patients with cancer is high. The majority of efforts are spent on research in cancer treatment, but only a small fraction focuses on cancer pain. Pain in cancer patients, viewed predominantly as a secondary issue, is considered to be due to the destruction of tissues, compression of the nerves, inflammation, and secretion of biological mediators from the necrotic tumor mass. As a result, opioid drugs have remained as the primary pharmacological therapy for cancer pain for the past hundred years. This report reviews evidence that cancer pain may be produced by the metabolic effects of two byproducts of cancer-high acidity in the cancer microenvironment and the secretion of formaldehyde and its metabolites. We propose the research and development of therapeutic approaches for preemptive, short- and long-term management of cancer pain using available drugs or nutraceutical agents that can suppress or neutralize lactic acid production in combination with formaldehyde scavengers. We believe this approach may not only improve cancer pain control but may also enhance the quality of life for patients. PMID:26368037

  6. Krill Oil Improves Mild Knee Joint Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Minoru; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Sekigawa, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Krill oil is an edible oil extracted from krill, a small red-colored crustacean found in the Antarctic Ocean. The administration of krill oil is reported to mitigate inflammation in patients with cardiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. However, the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain has not yet been determined. Objective To assess the effect of krill oil on mild knee pain. Design A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of fifty adults (38–85 years old) with mild knee pain attending the Fukushima Orthopedic Clinic (Tochigi, Japan) between September 2014 and March 2015. Interventions Participants were randomized to receive 2 g per day of either krill oil or an identical placebo for 30 days. Outcomes The primary outcome was improvement in subjective symptoms of knee pain as assessed by the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure (JKOM) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA). Secondary outcomes included blood and urine biochemical parameters. Results Both the placebo and krill oil groups showed significant improvements in the questions in the JKOM and JOA questionnaires after administration. After the intervention, krill oil group showed more improvements than placebo group in two questions regarding the pain and stiffness in knees in JKOM. Controlling for age, sex, weight, and smoking and drinking habits, krill oil significantly mitigated knee pain in sleeping (P < 0.001), standing (P < 0.001) and the range of motion of both right and left knees (both P = 0.011) compared to placebo. Krill oil administration raised plasma EPA (P = 0.048) and EPA/AA ratio (P = 0.003). Conclusion This study indicates that krill oil administration (2 g/day, 30 days) improved the subjective symptoms of knee pain in adults with mild knee pain. Trial registration UMIN-CTR; ID UMIN000014413 PMID:27701428

  7. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  8. Postoperative Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Veerabhadram; Cellini, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The effective relief of pain is of the utmost importance to anyone treating patients undergoing surgery. Pain relief has significant physiological benefits; hence, monitoring of pain relief is increasingly becoming an important postoperative quality measure. The goal for postoperative pain management is to reduce or eliminate pain and discomfort with a minimum of side effects. Various agents (opioid vs. nonopioid), routes (oral, intravenous, neuraxial, regional) and modes (patient controlled vs. “as needed”) for the treatment of postoperative pain exist. Although traditionally the mainstay of postoperative analgesia is opioid based, increasingly more evidence exists to support a multimodal approach with the intent to reduce opioid side effects (such as nausea and ileus) and improve pain scores. Enhanced recovery protocols to reduce length of stay in colorectal surgery are becoming more prevalent and include multimodal opioid sparing regimens as a critical component. Familiarity with the efficacy of available agents and routes of administration is important to tailor the postoperative regimen to the needs of the individual patient. PMID:24436674

  9. Retrospective analysis of quality improvement when using liposome bupivacaine for postoperative pain control

    PubMed Central

    King, Nicole M; Quiko, Albin S; Slotto, James G; Connolly, Nicholas C; Hackworth, Robert J; Heil, Justin W

    2016-01-01

    Background/objective Liposome bupivacaine, a prolonged-release bupivacaine formulation, recently became available at the Naval Medical Center San Diego (NMCSD); before availability, postsurgical pain for large thoracic/abdominal procedures was primarily managed with opioids with/without continuous thoracic epidural (CTE) anesthesia. This retrospective chart review was part of a clinical quality initiative to determine whether postsurgical outcomes improved after liposome bupivacaine became available. Methods Data from patients who underwent laparotomy, sternotomy, or thoracotomy at NMCSD from May 2013 to May 2014 (after liposome bupivacaine treatment became available) were compared with data from patients who underwent these same procedures from December 2011 to May 2012 (before liposome bupivacaine treatment became available). Collected data included demographics, postoperative pain control methods, opioid consumption, perioperative pain scores, and lengths of intensive care unit and overall hospital stays. Results Data from 182 patients were collected: 88 pre-liposome bupivacaine (laparotomy, n=52; sternotomy, n=26; and thoracotomy, n=10) and 94 post-liposome bupivacaine (laparotomy, n=49; sternotomy, n=31; and thoracotomy, n=14) records. Mean hospital stay was 7.0 vs 5.8 days (P=0.009) in the pre- and post-liposome bupivacaine groups, respectively, and mean highest reported postoperative pain score was 7.1 vs 6.2 (P=0.007), respectively. No other significant between-group differences were observed for the overall population. In the laparotomy subgroup, there was a reduction in the proportion of patients who received CTE anesthesia post-liposome bupivacaine (22% [11/49] vs 35% [18/52] pre-liposome bupivacaine). Conclusion Surgeons and anesthesiologists have changed the way they manage postoperative pain since the time point that liposome bupivacaine was introduced at NMCSD. Our findings suggest that utilization of liposome bupivacaine may be a useful alternative

  10. Effectiveness of a clinical intervention in improving pain control in outpatients with cancer treated by radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, Isabelle . E-mail: isabelle.vallieres@mail.chuq.qc.ca; Aubin, Michele; Blondeau, Lucie; Simard, Serge; Giguere, Anik

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of a multicomponent clinical intervention to reduce pain in outpatients with cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients were randomly assigned to receive either a clinical intervention including an information session, the use of a pain diary, and the possibility to contact a physician to adjust the pain medication, or the usual treatment of pain by the staff radiation oncologist. All patients reported their average and worst pain levels at baseline and 2 and 3 weeks after the start of the intervention. Results: The study groups were similar with respect to their baseline characteristics and pain levels at randomization. After 3 weeks, the average and worst pain experienced by patients randomized to the clinical intervention group was significantly inferior to the average pain experienced by patients in the control group (2.9/10 vs. 4.4/10 and 4.2/10 vs. 5.5/10, respectively). Results showed that the experimental group patients decreased their pain levels more than the control group patients did over time. Conclusion: An intervention including patient education, a pain diary, and defining a procedure for therapeutic adjustments can be effective to improve pain relief in outpatients with cancer.

  11. Clinical utility of far-infrared therapy for improvement of vascular access blood flow and pain control in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Jeong; Cho, Eun Hee; Jo, Hye Min; Min, Changwook; Ji, Young Sok; Park, Moo Yong; Kim, Jin Kuk; Hwang, Seung Duk

    2015-01-01

    Background Maintenance of a well-functioning vascular access and minimal needling pain are important goals for achieving adequate dialysis and improving the quality of life in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Far-infrared (FIR) therapy may improve endothelial function and increase access blood flow (Qa) and patency in HD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of FIR therapy on Qa and patency, and needling pain in HD patients. Methods This prospective clinical trial enrolled 25 outpatients who maintained HD with arteriovenous fistula. The other 25 patients were matched as control with age, sex, and diabetes. FIR therapy was administered for 40 minutes during HD 3 times/wk and continued for 12 months. The Qa was measured by the ultrasound dilution method, whereas pain was measured by a numeric rating scale at baseline, then once per month. Results One patient was transferred to another facility, and 7 patients stopped FIR therapy because of an increased body temperature and discomfort. FIR therapy improved the needling pain score from 4 to 2 after 1 year. FIR therapy increased the Qa by 3 months and maintained this change until 1 year, whereas control patients showed the decrease in Qa. The 1-year unassisted patency with FIR therapy was not significantly different from control. Conclusion FIR therapy improved needling pain. Although FIR therapy improved Qa, the unassisted patency was not different compared with the control. A larger and multicenter study is needed to evaluate the effect of FIR therapy. PMID:27069856

  12. Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine Provides Improved Pain Control for the Correction of Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Daniel; Bertucci, Vince; Solish, Nowell

    2016-08-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres in a carrier gel (CaHA; Radiesse®: Merz North America, Inc., Raleigh, NC) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for subdermal implantation for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds (NLFs). Lidocaine is often mixed with injectable dermal fillers to reduce injection pain. A new formulation of CaHA has been developed with the convenience of integral 0.3% lidocaine, CaHA (+).
    This multicenter, split-face, double-blind study randomized subjects to receive treatment with CaHA (+) in one NLF and CaHA without lidocaine in the contralateral NLF. The pain level for each NLF was evaluated immediately following the injection using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and every 15 minutes for 60 minutes plus follow-up visits. Additional endpoints included aesthetic outcomes and subject preference. All subjects (N=102) received treatment.
    CaHA (+) treatment resulted in a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain ratings immediately after injection compared with CaHA. The mean difference in VAS scores for pain was -4.41 (P<0.0001). In 90% of subjects, the VAS scores were ≥2.0 cm lower for the CaHA (+)-treated NLF. A significant reduction in pain ratings throughout the first hour after injection was observed with CaHA (+) compared with CaHA (P<0.0001). Both treatment groups achieved significant aesthetic improvement; however, the pain differential resulted in a subject-reported preference for CaHA (+). CaHA (+) with integral lidocaine significantly reduces pain and is as effective as CaHA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1005-1010.

  13. Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine Provides Improved Pain Control for the Correction of Nasolabial Folds.

    PubMed

    Schachter, Daniel; Bertucci, Vince; Solish, Nowell

    2016-08-01

    Calcium hydroxylapatite microspheres in a carrier gel (CaHA; Radiesse®: Merz North America, Inc., Raleigh, NC) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for subdermal implantation for the correction of moderate-to-severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds (NLFs). Lidocaine is often mixed with injectable dermal fillers to reduce injection pain. A new formulation of CaHA has been developed with the convenience of integral 0.3% lidocaine, CaHA (+).
    This multicenter, split-face, double-blind study randomized subjects to receive treatment with CaHA (+) in one NLF and CaHA without lidocaine in the contralateral NLF. The pain level for each NLF was evaluated immediately following the injection using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), and every 15 minutes for 60 minutes plus follow-up visits. Additional endpoints included aesthetic outcomes and subject preference. All subjects (N=102) received treatment.
    CaHA (+) treatment resulted in a statistically and clinically significant reduction in pain ratings immediately after injection compared with CaHA. The mean difference in VAS scores for pain was -4.41 (P<0.0001). In 90% of subjects, the VAS scores were ≥2.0 cm lower for the CaHA (+)-treated NLF. A significant reduction in pain ratings throughout the first hour after injection was observed with CaHA (+) compared with CaHA (P<0.0001). Both treatment groups achieved significant aesthetic improvement; however, the pain differential resulted in a subject-reported preference for CaHA (+). CaHA (+) with integral lidocaine significantly reduces pain and is as effective as CaHA.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):1005-1010. PMID:27538003

  14. Paravertebral Block: An Improved Method of Pain Control in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. McCowan, Timothy C.; DeValdenebro, Miguel; Wright, Lonnie B.; Workman, James L.; Culp, William C.

    2006-12-15

    Background and Purpose. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage remains a painful procedure in many cases despite the routine use of large amounts of intravenous sedation. We present a feasibility study of thoracic paravertebral blocks in an effort to reduce pain during and following the procedure and reduce requirements for intravenous sedation. Methods. Ten consecutive patients undergoing biliary drainage procedures received fluoroscopically guided paravertebral blocks and then had supplemental intravenous sedation as required to maintain patient comfort. Levels T8-T9 and T9-T10 on the right were targeted with 10-20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sedation requirements and pain levels were recorded. Results. Ten biliary drainage procedures in 8 patients were performed for malignancy in 8 cases and for stones in 2. The mean midazolam use was 1.13 mg IV, and the mean fentanyl requirement was 60.0 {mu}g IV in the block patients. Two episodes of hypotension, which responded promptly to volume replacement, may have been related to the block. No serious complications were encountered. The mean pain score when traversing the chest wall, liver capsule, and upon entering the bile ducts was 0.1 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 1 patient reporting a pain level of 1 and 9 reporting 0. The mean peak pain score, encountered when manipulating at the common bile duct level or when addressing stones there, was 5.4 and ranged from 0 to 10. Conclusions. Thoracic paravertebral block with intravenous sedation supplementation appears to be a feasible method of pain control during biliary interventions.

  15. A 13-Weeks Mindfulness Based Pain Management Program Improves Psychological Distress in Patients with Chronic Pain Compared with Waiting List Controls

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Vægter, Henrik Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eradication of pain is seldom an option in chronic pain management. Hence, mindfulness meditation has become popular in pain management. Objective: This pilot study compared the effect of a 13-weeks cognitive behavioural therapy program with integrated mindfulness meditation (CBTm) in patients with chronic non-malignant pain with a control condition. It was hypothesised that the CBTm program would reduce pain intensity and psychological distress compared to the control condition and that level of mindfulness and acceptance both would be associated with the reduction in pain intensity and psychological distress. Methods: A case-control design was used and data were collected from a convenience sample of 70 patients with chronic non-malignant pain. Fifty patients were consecutively recruited to the CBTm intervention and 20 patients matched waiting list controls. Assessments of clinical pain and psychological distress were performed in both groups at baseline and after 13 weeks. Results: The CBTm program reduced depression, anxiety and pain-catastrophizing compared with the control group. Increased level of mindfulness and acceptance were associated with change in psychological distress with the exception of depression, which was only associated with change in level of mindfulness. Surprisingly, changes in level of mindfulness did not correlate with changes in acceptance. Conclusions: The results indicate that different mechanisms are targeted with cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness. The finding that changes in level of mindfulness did not correlate with changes in acceptance may indicate that acceptance is not a strict prerequisite for coping with pain related distress. PMID:27708686

  16. High-Intensity Strength Training Improves Function of Chronically Painful Muscles: Case-Control and RCT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Christoffer H.; Skotte, Jørgen H.; Suetta, Charlotte; Søgaard, Karen; Saltin, Bengt; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    Aim. This study investigates consequences of chronic neck pain on muscle function and the rehabilitating effects of contrasting interventions. Methods. Women with trapezius myalgia (MYA, n = 42) and healthy controls (CON, n = 20) participated in a case-control study. Subsequently MYA were randomized to 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 16), or a reference group without physical training (REF, n = 8). Participants performed tests of 100 consecutive cycles of 2 s isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of shoulder elevation followed by 2 s relaxation at baseline and 10-week follow-up. Results. In the case-control study, peak force, rate of force development, and rate of force relaxation as well as EMG amplitude were lower in MYA than CON throughout all 100 MVC. Muscle fiber capillarization was not significantly different between MYA and CON. In the intervention study, SST improved all force parameters significantly more than the two other groups, to levels comparable to that of CON. This was seen along with muscle fiber hypertrophy and increased capillarization. Conclusion. Women with trapezius myalgia have lower strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the trapezius muscle than healthy controls. High-intensity strength training effectively improves strength capacity during repetitive MVC of the painful trapezius muscle. PMID:24707475

  17. Melatonin analgesia is associated with improvement of the descending endogenous pain-modulating system in fibromyalgia: a phase II, randomized, double-dummy, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ). Conclusion Melatonin increased the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulating system as assessed by the reduction on NPS(0-10) during the CPM-TASK. Melatonin alone or associated with amitriptyline was better than amitriptyline alone in improving pain on the VAS, whereas its association with amitriptyline produced only marginal additional clinical effects on FIQ and PPT. Trial registration Current controlled trail is registered at clinical trials.gov upon under number NCT02041455. Registered January 16, 2014. PMID:25052847

  18. Pain relativity in motor control.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, I T; Seymour, B; Vlaev, I; Trommershäuser, J; Dolan, R J; Chater, N

    2010-06-01

    Motivational theories of pain highlight its role in people's choices of actions that avoid bodily damage. By contrast, little is known regarding how pain influences action implementation. To explore this less-understood area, we conducted a study in which participants had to rapidly point to a target area to win money while avoiding an overlapping penalty area that would cause pain in their contralateral hand. We found that pain intensity and target-penalty proximity repelled participants' movement away from pain and that motor execution was influenced not by absolute pain magnitudes but by relative pain differences. Our results indicate that the magnitude and probability of pain have a precise role in guiding motor control and that representations of pain that guide action are, at least in part, relative rather than absolute. Additionally, our study shows that the implicit monetary valuation of pain, like many explicit valuations (e.g., patients' use of rating scales in medical contexts), is unstable, a finding that has implications for pain treatment in clinical contexts.

  19. Pain relativity in motor control.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, I T; Seymour, B; Vlaev, I; Trommershäuser, J; Dolan, R J; Chater, N

    2010-06-01

    Motivational theories of pain highlight its role in people's choices of actions that avoid bodily damage. By contrast, little is known regarding how pain influences action implementation. To explore this less-understood area, we conducted a study in which participants had to rapidly point to a target area to win money while avoiding an overlapping penalty area that would cause pain in their contralateral hand. We found that pain intensity and target-penalty proximity repelled participants' movement away from pain and that motor execution was influenced not by absolute pain magnitudes but by relative pain differences. Our results indicate that the magnitude and probability of pain have a precise role in guiding motor control and that representations of pain that guide action are, at least in part, relative rather than absolute. Additionally, our study shows that the implicit monetary valuation of pain, like many explicit valuations (e.g., patients' use of rating scales in medical contexts), is unstable, a finding that has implications for pain treatment in clinical contexts. PMID:20435952

  20. Improving cancer pain management in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Within Malaysia's otherwise highly accessible public healthcare system, palliative medicine is still an underdeveloped discipline. Government surveys have shown that opioid consumption in Malaysia is dramatically lower than the global average, indicating a failure to meet the need for adequate pain control in terminally ill patients. Indeed, based on daily defined doses, only 24% of patients suffering from cancer pain receive regular opioid analgesia. The main barriers to effective pain control in Malaysia relate to physicians' and patients' attitudes towards the use of opioids. In one survey of physicians, 46% felt they lacked knowledge to manage patients with severe cancer pain, and 64% feared effects such as respiratory depression. Fear of addiction is common amongst patients, as is confusion regarding the legality of opioids. Additional barriers include the fact that no training in palliative care is given to medical students, and that smaller clinics often lack facilities to prepare and stock cheap oral morphine. A number of initiatives aim to improve the situation, including the establishment of palliative care departments in hospitals and implementation of post-graduate training programmes. Campaigns to raise public awareness are expected to increase patient demand for adequate cancer pain relief as part of good care.

  1. Fentanyl Patches to Supplement Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Blocks for Improving Pain Control After Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hwang; Kang, Chan; Hwang, Deuk-Soo; Hwang, Jung-Mo; Shin, Byung-Kon

    2016-01-01

    The analgesic effects of preoperative ultrasound-guided nerve blocks wear off after about 12 hours, leaving some patients in substantial pain. Transdermal fentanyl concentrations peak at 12 to 24 hours after application and maintain this concentration for approximately 72 hours. We sought to determine whether combining the use of a transdermal fentanyl patch with either a sciatic or femoral-sciatic nerve block would improve pain control in patients undergoing foot and/or ankle surgery. Consecutive patients in the no-patch control group (n = 104) were enrolled from July 2011 to October 2011, and those in the treatment group (n = 232) were enrolled from November 2011 to May 2012 and received a transdermal patch (4.125 mg/7.5 cm(2) releasing 25 μg of fentanyl per hour) applied to their chest postoperatively. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale at 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome measure was the number of requests for additional postoperative pain medication. Additional postoperative analgesia was requested by 49 of the 104 control patients (47.1%) and 63 of the 232 treated patients (27.1%; p = .002). The mean pain scores were also lower in the treatment group, with a statistically significant difference (p < .05) at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Thus, patients receiving a fentanyl patch combined with an ultrasound-guided nerve block required less supplemental analgesia to maintain adequate pain control than did those receiving a nerve block alone. In conclusion, a fentanyl patch is a useful adjunct to an ultrasound-guided nerve block in foot and ankle surgery.

  2. Parenting in the context of chronic pain: A controlled study of parents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Anna C.; Fales, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to describe what adults with chronic pain experience in their role as parents, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methods. The first aim is to compare parents with chronic pain to parents without chronic pain on perceptions of their adolescent’s pain, parental response to pain, and catastrophizing beliefs about pain. The study also examined predictors of parental protective behaviors, and examined whether these associations differed by study group. Methods Parents with chronic pain (n=58) and parents without chronic pain (n=72) participated, and completed questionnaire measures of pain characteristics and pain interference, as well as measures of parental catastrophizing and protective pain responses. Parents with chronic pain also completed a structured interview about their experience of being a parent. Interview responses were videotaped and subsequently coded for content. Results Compared to controls, parents with chronic pain endorsed more pain in their adolescents, and were more likely to catastrophize about their adolescent’s pain and respond with protective behaviors. Parent’s own pain interference and the perception of higher pain in their adolescent was associated with increased protective parenting in the chronic pain group. Qualitative coding revealed a number of areas of common impact of chronic pain on parenting. Discussion Chronic pain impacts everyday parenting activities and emotions, and impacts pain-specific parent responses that are known to be related to increased pain and pain catastrophizing in children and adolescents. Parents with chronic pain might benefit from interventions that address potential parenting difficulties, and might improve outcomes for their children. PMID:25232862

  3. Improving pain management: breaking down the invisible barrier.

    PubMed

    Mann, E; Redwood, S

    There is compelling evidence that despite growing research into the complex neurophysiology of pain, the development of acute pain services, increasing educational interest in pain management and the proliferation of literature, many patients continue to suffer from unrelieved acute pain while in hospital. Educational efforts to bring about a change in practice have been relatively unsuccessful or slow to have real impact. Although it is still recognized that poor knowledge of pain control by all healthcare professionals is the major barrier to improving pain management, contemporary studies show that other, more subtle barriers can just as effectively inhibit a timely and effective response to patients' reports of pain. These barriers are not just the ones created by poor knowledge, myth and misconception; the most powerful barriers to change may be the invisible institutional barriers that can be entrenched within hospital policies and nursing rituals.

  4. Breakthrough pain in patients with controlled or uncontrolled pain: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Antonio; Gentili, Marta; Baciarello, Marco; Lazzari, Marzia; Marzi, Rossella; Palombo, Elisa; Sabato, Alessandro F; Fanelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breakthrough pain (BTP) is traditionally defined as a pain exacerbation in patients with chronic controlled pain. However, this definition has recently been challenged. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of unsatisfactory control in patients with chronic cancer pain, and investigate the frequency and intensity of BTP episodes. METHODS: A total of 665 patients with chronic cancer pain attending 21 pain therapy units in Italy were evaluated for baseline pain intensity and number of BTP episodes over a 30-day period. All patients started, continued or modified treatment for BTP at enrollment, according to medical judgment. RESULTS: The number of BTP events was higher in patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, although the intensity and duration of episodes were similar. In patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, the number of events decreased with time and reached values comparable with those reported in patients with controlled pain. Both the intensity of the pain and the duration of the BTP events exhibited similar values in the two groups at all time points, following increased monitoring and the prescription of analgesic medication. CONCLUSION: Patients with uncontrolled baseline pain experienced BTP flares with higher frequency, but similar intensity and duration with respect to patients with controlled pain at baseline. Notably, a close follow-up and adequate management of the BTP episodes led to an improvement of BTP in the observed patients. PMID:24945289

  5. Study protocol: Improving patient choice in treating low back pain (IMPACT - LBP): A randomised controlled trial of a decision support package for use in physical therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a common and costly condition. There are several treatment options for people suffering from back pain, but there are few data on how to improve patients' treatment choices. This study will test the effects of a decision support package (DSP), designed to help patients seeking care for back pain to make better, more informed choices about their treatment within a physiotherapy department. The package will be designed to assist both therapist and patient. Methods/Design Firstly, in collaboration with physiotherapists, patients and experts in the field of decision support and decision aids, we will develop the DSP. The work will include: a literature and evidence review; secondary analysis of existing qualitative data; exploration of patients' perspectives through focus groups and exploration of experts' perspectives using a nominal group technique and a Delphi study. Secondly, we will carry out a pilot single centre randomised controlled trial within NHS Coventry Community Physiotherapy. We will randomise physiotherapists to receive either training for the DSP or not. We will randomly allocate patients seeking treatment for non specific low back pain to either a physiotherapist trained in decision support or to receive usual care. Our primary outcome measure will be patient satisfaction with treatment at three month follow-up. We will also estimate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention, and assess the value of conducting further research. Discussion Informed shared decision-making should be an important part of any clinical consultation, particularly when there are several treatments, which potentially have moderate effects. The results of this pilot will help us determine the benefits of improving the decision-making process in clinical practice on patient satisfaction. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46035546 PMID:21352528

  6. Do photographic images of pain improve communication during pain consultations?

    PubMed Central

    Padfield, Deborah; Zakrzewska, Joanna M; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Visual images may facilitate the communication of pain during consultations. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether photographic images of pain enrich the content and/or process of pain consultation by comparing patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of the consultation experience. METHODS: Photographic images of pain previously co-created by patients with a photographer were provided to new patients attending pain clinic consultations. Seventeen patients selected and used images that best expressed their pain and were compared with 21 patients who were not shown images. Ten clinicians conducted assessments in each condition. After consultation, patients and clinicians completed ratings of aspects of communication and, when images were used, how they influenced the consultation. RESULTS: The majority of both patients and clinicians reported that images enhanced the consultation. Ratings of communication were generally high, with no differences between those with and without images (with the exception of confidence in treatment plan, which was rated more highly in the image group). However, patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of communication were inversely related only in consultations with images. Methodological shortcomings may underlie the present findings of no difference. It is also possible that using images raised patients’ and clinicians’ expectations and encouraged emotional disclosure, in response to which clinicians were dissatisfied with their performance. CONCLUSIONS: Using images in clinical encounters did not have a negative impact on the consultation, nor did it improve communication or satisfaction. These findings will inform future analysis of behaviour in the video-recorded consultations. PMID:25996763

  7. Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin; Pélerin, Fanny; Maudet, Corinne; Housez, Béatrice; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Jüsten, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort. Probiotics have been reported to benefit IBS symptoms but the level of benefit remains quite unclear. Objective This study was designed to assess the benefit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms. Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial has been performed in 379 subjects with diagnosed IBS. Subjects were randomly supplemented with the probiotics (1000 mg) or placebo for 12 weeks. Questionnaires (gastrointestinal symptoms, stools, wellbeing, and quality of life) were completed. Primary endpoint was percentage of responders defined as having a 50% decrease in the weekly average “intestinal pain/discomfort score” for at least 4 out of the last 8 weeks of the study. Results There was no overall benefit of S. cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms and wellbeing in the study population. Moreover, S. cerevisiae I-3856 was not statistically significant predictor of the responder status of the subjects (p > 0.05). Planned subgroup analyses showed significant effect in the IBS-C subjects: improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher in active group, compared to placebo, on abdominal pain/discomfort and bloating throughout the study and at the end of the supplementation. Conclusions In this study, S. cerevisiae I-3856 at the dose of 1000 mg per day does not improve intestinal pain and discomfort in general IBS patients. However, it seems to have an effect in the subgroup with constipation which needs further studies to confirm (NCT01613456 in ClinicalTrials.gov registry). PMID:27403301

  8. Glucosamine-containing supplement improves locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, Noriyuki; Ono, Yoshiko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Moritani, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a glucosamine-containing supplement to improve locomotor functions in subjects with knee pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study was conducted for 16 weeks in 100 Japanese subjects (age, 51.8±0.8 years) with knee pain. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the two supplements containing 1) 1,200 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride, 60 mg of chondroitin sulfate, 45 mg of type II collagen peptides, 90 mg of quercetin glycosides, 10 mg of imidazole peptides, and 5 μg of vitamin D per day (GCQID group, n=50) or 2) a placebo (placebo group, n=50). Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Measure, visual analog scale score, normal walking speed, and knee-extensor strength were measured to evaluate the effects of the supplement on knee-joint functions and locomotor functions. Results In subjects eligible for efficacy assessment, there was no significant group × time interaction, and there were improvements in knee-joint functions and locomotor functions in both groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups. In subjects with mild-to-severe knee pain at baseline, knee-extensor strength at week 8 (104.6±5.0% body weight vs 92.3±5.5% body weight, P=0.030) and the change in normal walking speed at week 16 (0.11±0.03 m/s vs 0.05±0.02 m/s, P=0.038) were significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group. Further subgroup analysis based on Kellgren–Lawrence (K–L) grade showed that normal walking speed at week 16 (1.36±0.05 m/s vs 1.21±0.02 m/s, P<0.05) was significantly greater in the GCQID group than in the placebo group in subjects with K–L grade I. No adverse effect of treatment was identified in the safety assessment. Conclusion In subjects with knee pain, GCQID supplementation was effective for relieving knee pain and improving locomotor functions. PMID:26604721

  9. Overview of Total Knee Arthroplasty and Modern Pain Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Lacey Giambelluca; Fox, M Patricia; Dasa, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative pain management of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains a challenge for physicians and anesthesiologists. Reducing postoperative pain is an essential component of patient satisfaction, functional outcomes, and hospital length of stay. Multimodal pain management regimens have been demonstrated to be superior to monotherapy in achieving adequate pain control, as well as an effective method of limiting side effects of analgesics. In the present investigation, we present literature published over the last year relating to new advancements in perioperative pain management for TKA. While it is widely accepted that methods including peripheral nerve blocks and local anesthetic injections are essential to pain protocols, there is still conflicting evidence over what modalities provide superior relief. The incorporation of cryoneurolysis preoperatively is a new modality which has been incorporated and has been shown to improve pain control in patients undergoing TKA.

  10. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  11. Pain neurophysiology education improves cognitions, pain thresholds, and movement performance in people with chronic whiplash: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Truijen, Steven; Craps, Julie; Van den Keybus, Nick; Paul, Lorna

    2011-01-01

    Chronic whiplash is a debilitating condition characterized by increased sensitivity to painful stimuli, maladaptive illness beliefs, inappropriate attitudes, and movement dysfunctions. Previous work in people with chronic low back pain and chronic fatigue syndrome indicates that pain neurophysiology education is able to improve illness beliefs and attitudes as well as movement performance. This single-case study (A-B-C design) with six patients with chronic whiplash associated disorders (WAD) was aimed at examining whether education about the neurophysiology of pain is accompanied by changes in symptoms, daily functioning, pain beliefs, and behavior. Periods A and C represented assessment periods, while period B consisted of the intervention (pain neurophysiology education). Results showed a significant decrease in kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia), the passive coping strategy of resting (Pain Coping Inventory), self-rated disability (Neck Disability Index), and photophobia (WAD Symptom List). At the same time, significantly increased pain pressure thresholds and improved pain-free movement performance (visual analog scale on Neck Extension Test and Brachial Plexus Provocation Test) were established. Although the current results need to be verified in a randomized, controlled trial, they suggest that education about the physiology of pain is able to increase pain thresholds and improve pain behavior and pain-free movement performance in patients with chronic WAD.

  12. Sex, drugs and pain control

    PubMed Central

    Brings, Victoria E; Zylka, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    A study finds that pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice is differentially dependent on microglia and T cells, and describes a sex-specific response to microglia-targeted pain treatments. PMID:26216458

  13. Psychophysical pain control during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Herod, E L

    1995-01-01

    A case of a patient with multiple allergies to local anesthesia and who required extraction of a maxillary canine is reported. The patient used her psychophysical capabilities to control the pain and anxiety associated with the surgery. A discussion of psychophysical pain control is presented.

  14. Psychophysical pain control during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Herod, E L

    1995-01-01

    A case of a patient with multiple allergies to local anesthesia and who required extraction of a maxillary canine is reported. The patient used her psychophysical capabilities to control the pain and anxiety associated with the surgery. A discussion of psychophysical pain control is presented. PMID:8940584

  15. Hypnosis as an intervention for pain control.

    PubMed

    Cotanch, P H; Harrison, M; Roberts, J

    1987-09-01

    The use of formal hypnosis and/or positive, comforting suggestions to patients for control of pain, fear, and anxiety is simple and effective. In addition, it is easy to learn and teach to patients. Spiegel states that hypnosis, a group of techniques long associated with fantasies of loss of control, is ironically very helpful in actually enhancing patients' sense of control. The clinicians daring to become proficient in the use of hypnotic trance must begin with a conscious effort to abandon all negative suggestions such as "Do you have pain?"; "How much do you hurt?"; and "Move your bad leg." Simultaneously, a conscious effort is made to increase the use of the following positive suggestions: "How comfortable are you going to be tonight?" "Your hand feels so soft and warm"; "It is important to move this leg." These communication skills are best learned from clinicians skilled in hypnotherapeutic techniques. Simultaneously, it is important to become familiar with the works of Erikson and Barber. The American Society of Clinical Hypnosis will provide information about the national organizations and state hypnosis societies that offer approved workshops, conferences, and training opportunities. Hypnosis as analgesia surely provides rest, relaxation, and comfort for patients without the negative side effects of other analgesics. In addition, the ultimate benefit of hypnotic analgesia lies in enabling patients to potentiate their inner strength, resulting in improved self-esteem and self-control. PMID:3649798

  16. Correlates of Improvement in Multidisciplinary Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mark P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Chronic pain patients (n=94) completed measures of physical and psychological functioning, health care utilization, pain beliefs, and use of pain coping strategies at admission and three to six months after inpatient pain treatment. Improved functioning and decreased health care use were associated with changes in both beliefs and cognitive coping…

  17. Pain control: mastery through group experience.

    PubMed

    Herman, E; Baptiste, S

    1981-02-01

    This paper describes a group program which is part of the therapeutic management of out-patients with chronic pain at the multidisciplinary Pain Clinic in Hamilton, Ontario (McMaster Division, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital). The programme seeks to assist chronic pain sufferers in developing more adaptive coping styles. Groups of 12--14 patients meet for 9 weeks, 3 h/week, under the co-leadership of a physiotherapist and an occupational therapist with backgrounds in psychology and psychiatry. Seventy-five patients with diverse aetiologies of chronic pain have completed these "pain control classes". Outcome was assessed on the basis of several parameters. Results indicate a considerable reduction in depression, pain perception and analgesic intake. Conversely, employment figures increased from 20 to 48% after completion of the program. 21% were considered failures. Significant variables differentiating successes from failures were sex, marital status, work incentive, employment and absence of litigation or Workmen's Compensation claims.

  18. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them. PMID:27045524

  19. Pain facilitation and pain inhibition during conditioned pain modulation in fibromyalgia and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Marchand, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Although fibromyalgia (FM) is associated with a deficit in inhibitory conditioned pain modulation (CPM), the discriminative power of CPM procedures is unknown. Moreover, the high intersubject heterogeneity in CPM responses in FM raises the possibility that a sizeable subgroup of these patients may experience pain facilitation during CPM, but the phenomenon has not been explicitly studied. To address these issues, 96 patients with FM and 71 healthy controls were recruited. Thermal stimuli were used to measure pain thresholds. Pain inhibition was elicited using a tonic thermal test (Peltier thermode) administered before and after activation of CPM mechanisms using a cold pressor test. Thermal pain thresholds were lower in patients with FM than in healthy controls. Pain ratings during the cold pressor test were higher in patients with FM, relative to controls. The CPM inhibitory efficacy was lower in patients with FM than in controls. The CPM procedure had good specificity (78.9%) but low sensitivity (45.7%), whereas a composite pain index had good sensitivity (75.0%) and specificity (78.9%). Finally, the rate of patients with FM who reported pain facilitation during the CPM procedure was found to be significantly increased compared with that of controls (41.7% vs 21.2%). The good discriminative power of the composite pain index highlights the need for further validation studies using mechanistically relevant psychophysical procedures in FM. The low sensitivity of the CPM procedure, combined with the large proportion of patients with FM experiencing pain facilitation during CPM, strongly suggests that endogenous pain inhibition mechanisms are deeply impaired in patients with FM, but only in a subgroup of them.

  20. Enhancing cancer pain control regimens through patient education.

    PubMed

    Rimer, B; Levy, M H; Keintz, M K; Fox, L; Engstrom, P F; MacElwee, N

    1987-12-01

    The problem of cancer-related pain afflicts millions of people annually. The study described here was aimed at improving cancer patients' pain control through a planned patient education program. A randomized clinical trial with a Solomon Four-Group design was used to assess the effectiveness of a patient education intervention consisting of nurse counseling and printed materials. The sample included 230 cancer patients. One month later, patients in the experimental group were more likely to have taken their pain medicine on the correct schedule and to have taken the correct dosage. The experimental group also was significantly less likely to report stopping the medicine when they felt better. In addition, they were significantly less worried about tolerance and addiction to pain medicines. Forty-four percent of the experimental group compared to 24% of the control group reported no or mild pain at the posttest. PMID:10315745

  1. Pain control during fixed orthodontic appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Polat, Omur; Karaman, Ali Ihya

    2005-03-01

    The control of pain during orthodontic treatment is of great interest to both clinicians and patients. However, there has been limited research into the control of this pain, and there is no standard of care for controlling this discomfort. This prospective study determines the pain sequelae in fixed orthodontic treatment and evaluates comparatively the analgesic effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the control of this pain. One hundred and fifty orthodontic patients who were to have teeth bonded in at least one arch were randomly assigned to one of six groups: (1) placebo/placebo, (2) ibuprofen/ibuprofen, (3) flurbiprofen/flurbiprofen, (4) acetaminophen/acetaminophen, (5) naproxen sodium/naproxen sodium, and (6) aspirin/aspirin. The pain evaluations were made during chewing, biting, fitting the front teeth, and fitting the back teeth using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) for seven days. All the analgesics succeeded in decreasing the pain levels compared with the placebo group. However, naproxen sodium and aspirin groups showed the lowest pain values, and the acetaminophen group showed VAS results similar to those of the two analgesics.

  2. Parents who catastrophize about their child's pain prioritize attempts to control pain.

    PubMed

    Caes, Line; Vervoort, Tine; Eccleston, Christopher; Goubert, Liesbet

    2012-08-01

    How parents respond to their child in pain is critically important to how both parent and child attempt to cope with pain. We examined the influence of parental catastrophic thinking about child pain on their prioritization for pain control. Using a vignette methodology, parents reported, in response to different pain scenarios, on their imagined motivation for 2 competing goals: to control their child's pain (ie, pain control) or to encourage their child's participation in daily activities (ie, activity engagement). The effects of parent gender, pain intensity, and duration on parental goal priority were also explored. Findings indicated that higher levels of parental catastrophic thoughts were associated with the parents prioritizing child pain control over activity engagement. This effect was significantly moderated by pain duration. Specifically, pain control was more of a priority for those high in catastrophic thinking when the pain was more acute. In contrast, parental catastrophic thoughts had no effect on the pain control strategy favored by parents in situations with longer-lasting pain. Furthermore, independently of parental catastrophic thoughts, heightened priority for pain control was observed in highly intense and chronic pain situations. Moreover, in highly intense pain, priority for pain control was stronger for mothers compared with fathers. Theoretical and clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  3. Improvement in pain severity category in clinical trials of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Bruce; Argoff, Charles E; Clair, Andrew; Emir, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI). Approval was based on clinical trial data demonstrating statistically significant differences in pain scores versus placebo. However, statistically significant pain relief may not always equate to clinically meaningful pain relief. To further characterize the clinical benefit of pregabalin, this analysis examined shifts in pain severity categories in patients with FM, DPN/PHN (pooled in this analysis), and SCI treated with pregabalin. Methods Data were pooled from 23 placebo-controlled trials in patients with FM (1,623 treated with pregabalin, 937 placebo), DPN/PHN (2,867 pregabalin, 1,532 placebo), or SCI (181 pregabalin, 175 placebo). Pain scores were assessed on an 11-point numeric rating scale and categorized as mild (0 to <4), moderate (4 to <7), or severe (7 to 10). Only patients with mean score ≥4 at baseline were randomized to treatment. The percentage of patients shifting pain category from baseline to endpoint for pregabalin and placebo was analyzed using a modified ridit transformation with the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel procedure. Results A higher proportion of patients shifted to a less severe pain category at endpoint with pregabalin compared with placebo. With flexible-dose pregabalin, the percentage of patients improving from: severe to mild (pregabalin versus placebo) was 15.8 versus 13.4 in FM patients, 36.0 versus 16.6 in DPN/PHN patients, 14.3 versus 7.7 in SCI patients; severe to moderate was 28.7 versus 28.2 in FM patients, 32.5 versus 28.2 in DPN/PHN patients, 35.7 versus 28.2 in SCI patients; and moderate to mild was 38.3 versus 26.4 in FM patients, 59.5 versus 41.4 in DPN/PHN patients, 38.6 versus 27.2 in SCI patients. Conclusion Compared with placebo, pregabalin is more often associated with clinically

  4. Refusing analgesics: using continuous improvement to improve pain management on a surgical ward.

    PubMed

    Carr, Eloise C J

    2002-11-01

    Despite advances in pain control many patients experience moderate to severe pain whilst in hospital. Contributory factors include inadequate assessment and documentation of pain, as well as patient and professional misconceptions. A 28-bedded surgical ward in a District General Hospital in the South of England was the setting for the project. A small preliminary audit of pain on this ward indicated that some patients experienced postoperative pain, which was not effectively controlled. A 'continuous improvement' framework was used to increase understanding of the problem and identify an aim for the project, which was to reduce the number of patients refusing analgesics when offered by nurses. An audit to ascertain how many patients refused analgesia revealed that, of 133 patients offered, 93 (70%) refused. Using the 'Model for Improvement' (Langley et al., 1996) a number of changes were introduced, including a patient information sheet, regular documented pain assessment and an innovative staff education programme. To evaluate if the changes in practice had been successful, further audit data were collected from 167 patients. Sixty-three (44%) accepted analgesics, indicating a significant decrease in the number refusing (P = 0.005). This small project demonstrated that continuous improvement methodology can improve the management of pain and quality of care for patients. Such an approach brings practitioner and patient into meaningful understanding and offers solutions which are realistic, achievable and sustainable over time. Despite finite resources and increased pressure on staff it is possible to motivate people when they feel they have ownership and change is meaningful. Continuous improvement methods offer an exciting, feasible, patient-centred approach to improving care. PMID:12427179

  5. Control of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J

    1989-03-01

    Almost three quarters of patients with cancer have severe pain, from invasion of the cancer itself, from effects of therapy, or from causes unrelated to the cancer (but often exacerbated by it). With the proper pain-management strategy, however, pain can be controlled in most patients. The analgesic ladder for pain control, promoted by the World Health Organization, begins with a nonnarcotic agent, progresses to a weak narcotic plus a nonnarcotic, and finally reaches a strong narcotic. Adjuvant agents, which increase the analgesic potency of the drug being used, may be added at any level. The most common reasons for inadequate pain control in cancer patients are incorrect narcotic dosing and incorrect switching from one narcotic to another and from one route of administration to another. Factors that influence pain management (eg, fear, anxiety, sleep disturbance) should be treated as well with appropriate medications, behavioral therapy, counseling, hypnosis, and other supportive techniques. These points are illustrated in the case report (see box, page 328).

  6. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  7. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:27313363

  8. Bedside charting of pain levels in hospitalized patients with cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, R L; Delafield, J P; Hays, R D; Drazin, R; Conolly, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite advances in the technology of cancer pain assessment and control, cancer pain often remains undertreated even in hospital settings. To determine whether a graphical display of cancer patients' pain levels might improve their treatment, the investigators conducted a randomized controlled trial. Patients assigned to the intervention group (N = 40) had periodic pain assessments by study staff, who graphically recorded their reported pain-intensity levels on bedside wall charts. Control group patients (N = 38) had periodic pain assessments by study staff but did not have this information displayed. The results failed to show a significant beneficial effect of the intervention on pain control, sleep, cancer-related symptoms, or analgesic dosing, but confidence intervals were broad. More research is needed to improve the quality of care for inpatients with cancer-related pain. PMID:8907138

  9. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Pierik, Jorien G J; Berben, Sivera A; IJzerman, Maarten J; Gaakeer, Menno I; van Eenennaam, Fred L; van Vugt, Arie B; Doggen, Carine J M

    2016-07-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre-post intervention study was performed as part of the prospective PROTACT follow-up study. During the pre- (15 months, n = 504) and post-period (6 months, n = 156) patients' self-reported pain intensity and pain treatment were registered. Analgesic provision in patients with moderate to severe pain (NRS ≥4) improved from 46.8% to 68.0%. Over 10% of the patients refused analgesics, resulting into an actual analgesic administration increase from 36.3% to 46.1%. Median time to analgesic decreased from 10 to 7 min (P < 0.05), whereas time to opioids decreased from 37 to 15 min (P < 0.01). Mean pain relief significantly increased to 1.56 NRS-points, in patients who received analgesic treatment even up to 2.02 points. The protocol appeared to lead to an increase in analgesic administration, shorter time to analgesics and a higher clinically relevant pain relief. Despite improvements, suffering moderate to severe pain at ED discharge was still common. Protocol adherence needs to be studied in order to optimize pain management. PMID:26968352

  10. Cognitive and emotional control of pain and its disruption in chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Bushnell, M. Catherine; Čeko, Marta; Low, Lucie A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent health problems in our modern world, with millions of people debilitated by conditions such as back pain, headache and arthritis. To address this growing problem, many people are turning to mind–body therapies, including meditation, yoga and cognitive behavioural therapy. This article will review the neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain by cognitive and emotional states — important components of mind–body therapies. It will also examine the accumulating evidence that chronic pain itself alters brain circuitry, including that involved in endogenous pain control, suggesting that controlling pain becomes increasingly difficult as pain becomes chronic. PMID:23719569

  11. Improvement of pain and function after arthroscopy and arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goudot, P; Jaquinet, A R; Hugonnet, S; Haefliger, W; Richter, M

    2000-02-01

    In 1993 and 1994, 720 patients with pain in the temporo-mandibular joint area were examined and treated. The authors describe their therapeutic protocol. Sixty-two patients were not relieved by conservative nonsurgical therapy and were treated by arthroscopy or arthrocentesis. In both groups the differences in functional result and in pain control were analysed. Results show that both arthroscopy and lavage are useful in improving function and diminishing pain. Arthroscopy shows better results for functional treatment whereas arthrocentesis and arthroscopy show similar results in pain control.

  12. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment.

  13. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  14. Pain management improves care and revenue: an interview with ProCare Systems.

    PubMed

    Davis, F N; Walsh, C

    2000-01-01

    As provider and managed care organizations continue to look for better ways to control costs and improve patient outcomes, disease management programs are getting an increasing share of their attention. One often-over-looked area with significant potential to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance revenues is pain management. It has been estimated that at least 40 percent of senior citizens suffer from chronic pain, and as the population ages, the number of chronic pain sufferers will only increase. Pain management companies have been forming to meet the current and future demand for comprehensive pain management programs. One such company is ProCare Systems, a single-specialty physician practice management company based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. HFM spoke with Fred N. Davis, MD, president and cofounder of ProCare Systems, and Cyndy Walsh, ProCare System's CEO, about pain management programs and the patient care and financial impact they can effect.

  15. [How to control postoperative pain: intravenous route].

    PubMed

    Occella, P; Vivaldi, F

    2003-12-01

    Intravenous administration of analgesic drugs is one of the most common ways to control post-operative pain. It can be used in almost all kinds of surgical interventions and particularly those of medium and high complexity. Besides, when other techniques are contraindicated because of clinical and/or managing problems, intravenous way finds its best application. Among analgesic drugs NSAID (ketorolac) and opioids (tramadol, morphine, buprenorphine) are most frequently used. As to administration techniques, elastomeric pump is, according to personal experience, a simple-to-manage, practical and precise device with lower cost respect to other administration set. Elastomeric pump is a single use reservoir that allows continuous administration of drugs with a uniform pre-set infusion speed. Finally, guide-lines, showing pre-load and infusion doses of analgesic drugs, based on pain intensity, are presented. PMID:14663417

  16. Smoked cannabis for chronic neuropathic pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Mark A.; Wang, Tongtong; Shapiro, Stan; Robinson, Ann; Ducruet, Thierry; Huynh, Thao; Gamsa, Ann; Bennett, Gary J.; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic neuropathic pain affects 1%–2% of the adult population and is often refractory to standard pharmacologic treatment. Patients with chronic pain have reported using smoked cannabis to relieve pain, improve sleep and improve mood. Methods Adults with post-traumatic or postsurgical neuropathic pain were randomly assigned to receive cannabis at four potencies (0%, 2.5%, 6% and 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol) over four 14-day periods in a crossover trial. Participants inhaled a single 25-mg dose through a pipe three times daily for the first five days in each cycle, followed by a nine-day washout period. Daily average pain intensity was measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale. We recorded effects on mood, sleep and quality of life, as well as adverse events. Results We recruited 23 participants (mean age 45.4 [standard deviation 12.3] years, 12 women [52%]), of whom 21 completed the trial. The average daily pain intensity, measured on the 11-point numeric rating scale, was lower on the prespecified primary contrast of 9.4% v. 0% tetrahydrocannabinol (5.4 v. 6.1, respectively; difference = 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–1.4). Preparations with intermediate potency yielded intermediate but nonsignificant degrees of relief. Participants receiving 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol reported improved ability to fall asleep (easier, p = 0.001; faster, p < 0.001; more drowsy, p = 0.003) and improved quality of sleep (less wakefulness, p = 0.01) relative to 0% tetrahydrocannabinol. We found no differences in mood or quality of life. The most common drug-related adverse events during the period when participants received 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol were headache, dry eyes, burning sensation in areas of neuropathic pain, dizziness, numbness and cough. Conclusion A single inhalation of 25 mg of 9.4% tetrahydrocannabinol herbal cannabis three times daily for five days reduced the intensity of pain, improved sleep and was well tolerated. Further long

  17. Acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of pain control on leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, J; Kokalj, A

    2014-03-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of NSAIDs on leg stiffness of patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Twenty-eight eligible male athletes (aged 39.1 ± 10.3 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were treated with etoricoxib (120 mg oral once daily) during 7 days. Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), and leg stiffness were evaluated pre- and post- anti-inflammatory treatment. Results of this study showed that over the 7-day treatment period, etoricoxib provided significant relief of Achilles tendon pain (VAS) compared to that experienced at baseline: 54.5 ± 21.6 and 24.5 ± 24.8, respectively (p<0.001). Leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week NSAID therapy: LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.97 ± 0.1; (p=0.02). In conclusion, findings of this study demonstrated that patients suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy increased their leg stiffness of the affected side after oral anti-inflammatory therapy. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may contribute to improve capabilities associated with high performance like leg stiffness. PMID:24583548

  18. Pain Control in the Presence of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Lumermann, Leandro; Zhu, Richard; Kodumudi, Gopal; Elhassan, Amir O; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction is present in a significant proportion of the population in the USA and worldwide. Drug addiction can occur with the abuse of many types of substances including cocaine, marijuana, stimulants, alcohol, opioids, and tranquilizers. There is a high likelihood that clinicians will encounter patients with substance abuse disorders on a regular basis with the prevalence of the use of illicit substances and the high rate of abuse of prescription drugs. The use of abuse deterrent formulations of prescription opioid agents, pill counts, and urine drug abuse screenings are all useful strategies. Optimum pain management of patients with addiction in the outpatient and inpatient setting is essential to minimize pain states. Careful selection of medications and appropriate oversight, including drug agreements, can reduce drug-induced impairments, including sleep deficits and diminished physical, social, and sexual functioning. This review, therefore, discusses the prevalence of illicit and prescription drug addiction, the challenges of achieving optimum pain control, and the therapeutic approaches to be considered in this challenging population. More research is warranted to develop improved therapies and routes of treatments for optimum pain relief and to prevent the development of central sensitization, chronic pain, and impaired physical and social functioning in patients with drug addiction. PMID:27068665

  19. Control Beliefs, Coping Efforts, and Adjustment to Chronic Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Mark P.; Karoly, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Examined adaptation to chronic pain in 118 patients. Control appraisals, ignoring pain, using coping self-statements, and increasing activities were positively related to psychological functioning. Control appraisals, diverting attention, ignoring pain, and using coping self-statements were positively related to activity level for patients…

  20. Optimizing pain control through the use of implantable pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ilias, Wilfried; Todoroff, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Intrathecal therapy represents an effective and well established treatment of nonmalignant as well as malignant pain. Devices available include mechanical constant flow pumps as well as electronic variable flow pumps with patient-controlled bolus release. The latter provide faster dose finding, individual pain control, and good acceptance by patients. New technologies such as membrane pumps and rechargeable devices are expected to be developed to clinical perfection. The available drugs for intrathecal therapy are listed according to the polyanalgesic consensus on intrathecal therapy. The integration of remote patient-controlled analgesia into electronic implantable devices, and the peptide analgesic ziconotide, have significantly improved intrathecal therapy. Complications include infections, catheter ruptures or disconnections, catheter granulomas, and technical dysfunctions. Further possibilities for optimizing intrathecal therapy include development of new drugs, drug side effects, catheter and pump technologies, and surgical techniques. PMID:22915907

  1. Automated Internet-based pain coping skills training to manage osteoarthritis pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rini, Christine; Porter, Laura S; Somers, Tamara J; McKee, Daphne C; DeVellis, Robert F; Smith, Meredith; Winkel, Gary; Ahern, David K; Goldman, Roberta; Stiller, Jamie L; Mariani, Cara; Patterson, Carol; Jordan, Joanne M; Caldwell, David S; Keefe, Francis J

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) places a significant burden on worldwide public health because of the large and growing number of people affected by OA and its associated pain and disability. Pain coping skills training (PCST) is an evidence-based intervention targeting OA pain and disability. To reduce barriers that currently limit access to PCST, we developed an 8-week, automated, Internet-based PCST program called PainCOACH and evaluated its potential efficacy and acceptability in a small-scale, 2-arm randomized controlled feasibility trial. Participants were 113 men and women with clinically confirmed hip or knee OA and associated pain. They were randomized to a group completing PainCOACH or an assessment-only control group. Osteoarthritis pain, pain-related interference with functioning, pain-related anxiety, self-efficacy for pain management, and positive and negative affect were measured before intervention, midway through the intervention, and after intervention. Findings indicated high acceptability and adherence: 91% of participants randomized to complete PainCOACH finished all 8 modules over 8 to 10 weeks. Linear mixed models showed that, after treatment, women who received the PainCOACH intervention reported significantly lower pain than that in women in the control group (Cohen d = 0.33). Intervention effects could not be tested in men because of their low pain and small sample size. Additionally, both men and women demonstrated increases in self-efficacy from baseline to after intervention compared with the control group (d = 0.43). Smaller effects were observed for pain-related anxiety (d = 0.20), pain-related interference with functioning (d = 0.13), negative affect (d = 0.10), and positive affect (d = 0.24). Findings underscore the value of continuing to develop an automated Internet-based approach to disseminate this empirically supported intervention.

  2. Hydromorphone levels and pain control in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Goodman, H; Erle, H; Gray, G; Lorenzo, B; Leipzig, R M; Meyer, B R; Drayer, D E

    1988-10-01

    To better understand the use of narcotic analgesics, the hydromorphone concentration was measured in serum samples from 43 patients with chronic severe pain who were receiving this drug. At the time of blood sampling, pain intensity, mood, and cognitive performance were assessed. There was large individual variation in the dose-drug level relationship. Seven patients with bone or soft tissue pain and drug levels of greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml had good pain control, whereas 10 did not. None of 15 patients with levels less than 4 ng/ml had pain control, despite drug doses similar to those given patients with higher levels. Thus 60% of the patients without control of their pain had hydromorphone levels below the lowest level that produced pain control. No patient with pain from nerve infiltration or compression had good pain control, irrespective of the drug level or dose. Poor mood correlated with high pain intensity and low drug level. Impaired cognitive performance was not related to drug level. Knowing that there is a low concentration of narcotic in the blood of a patient with chronic severe pain who is receiving high drug doses and who shows lack of both efficacy and side effects may reassure health care professionals that further narcotic dosage escalation is appropriate.

  3. Improvement of complex regional pain syndrome after plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Blaes, F; Dharmalingam, B; Tschernatsch, M; Feustel, A; Fritz, T; Kohr, D; Singh, P; Kaps, M; Szalay, G

    2015-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a severe complication following trauma that is associated with vasomotor, sudomotor and sensory disturbances in an affected limb or region of the body. The exact physiopathology is not fully understood yet. Recently, autoantibody findings suggested an immune-mediated physiopathology of the disease. We here describe two otherwise treatment-resistant patients with complex regional pain syndrome and high-titre beta2 adrenergic receptor autoantibodies, who did respond to plasmapheresis. Both patients showed strong improvement of pain and autonomic symptoms measured by impairment level sum score.

  4. Beep tones attenuate pain following Pavlovian conditioning of an endogenous pain control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Scheuren, Raymonde; Anton, Fernand; Erpelding, Nathalie; Michaux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Heterotopic noxious counter-stimulation (HNCS) is commonly used to study endogenous pain control systems. The resulting pain inhibition is primarily based on spinal cord-brainstem loops. Recently, functional imaging studies have shown that limbic structures like the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala are also implicated. Since these structures are involved in learning processes, it is possible that the HNCS-induced pain inhibition may depend on specific cues from the environment that have been associated with pain reduction through associative learning. We investigated the influence of Pavlovian conditioning on HNCS-induced pain inhibition in 32 healthy subjects by using a differential conditioning paradigm in which two different acoustic stimuli were either repeatedly paired or unpaired with HNCS. Series of noxious electrical pulse trains delivered to the non-dominant foot served as test stimuli. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC)-like effects were induced by concurrent application of tonic HNCS (immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water). Subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings and electromyographic recordings of the facial corrugator muscle and the nocifensive RIII flexion reflex were used to measure changes in pain sensitivity. HNCS induced significant pain and reflex inhibitions. In the post-conditioning phase, only the paired auditory cue was able to significantly reduce pain perceptions and corrugator muscle activity. No conditioned effect could be observed in RIII reflex responses. Our results indicate that the functional state of endogenous pain control systems may depend on associative learning processes that, like in the present study, may lead to an attenuation of pain perception. Similar albeit opposite conditioning of pain control mechanisms may significantly be involved in the exacerbation and chronification of pain states.

  5. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile.

  6. Effects of Acute Low Back Pain on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min Kyun; Lee, Sang Sook

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the changes in static and dynamic postural control after the development of acute low back pain. Methods Thirty healthy right-handed volunteers were divided into three groups; the right back pain group, the left back pain group, and the control group. 0.5 mL of 5% hypertonic saline was injected into L4-5 paraspinal muscle for 5 seconds to cause muscle pain. The movement of the center of gravity (COG) during their static and dynamic postural control was measured with their eyes open and with their eyes closed before and 2 minutes after the injection. Results The COGs for the healthy adults shifted to the right quadrant and the posterior quadrant during their static and dynamic postural control test (p<0.05). The static and dynamic instability index while they had their eyes closed was significantly increased than when they had their eyes open with and without acute back pain. After pain induction, their overall and anterior/posterior instability was increased in both the right back pain group and the left back pain group during the static postural control test (p<0.05). A right deviation and a posterior deviation of the COG still remained, and the posterior deviation was greater in the right back pain group (p<0.05). Conclusion The static instability, particularly the anterior/posterior instability was increased in the presence of acute low back pain, regardless of the visual information and the location of pain. PMID:23526750

  7. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  8. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: priorities for change.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Winfried; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Fletcher, Dominique; Huygen, Frank; Morlion, Bart; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pérez, Antonio Montes; Pergolizzi, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Poor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive adequate pain management. However, evidence suggests this is not currently the case; between 10% and 50% of patients develop chronic pain after various common operations, and one recent US study recorded >80% of patients experiencing post-operative pain. At the first meeting of the acute chapter of the Change Pain Advisory Board, key priorities for improving post-operative pain management were identified in four different areas. Firstly, patients should be more involved in decisions regarding their own treatment, particularly when fateful alternatives are being considered. For this to be meaningful, relevant information should be provided so they are well informed about the various options available. Good physician/patient communication is also essential. Secondly, better professional education and training of the various members of the multidisciplinary pain management team would enhance their skills and knowledge, and thereby improve patient care. Thirdly, there is scope for optimizing treatment. Examples include the use of synergistic analgesia to target pain at different points along pain pathways, more widespread adoption of patient-controlled analgesia, and the use of minimally invasive rather than open surgery. Fourthly, organizational change could provide similar benefits; introducing acute pain services and increasing their availability towards the 24 hours/day ideal, greater adherence to protocols, increased use of patient-reported outcomes, and greater receptivity to technological advances would all help to enhance performance and increase patient satisfaction. It must be acknowledged that implementing these recommendations would incur a considerable cost that purchasers of

  9. Pain control following inguinal herniorrhaphy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F; Nicol, Andrea L; Amid, Parviz K; Chen, David C

    2014-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries performed worldwide. With the success of modern hernia repair techniques, recurrence rates have significantly declined, with a lower incidence than the development of chronic postherniorrhaphy inguinal pain (CPIP). The avoidance of CPIP is arguably the most important clinical outcome and has the greatest impact on patient satisfaction, health care utilization, societal cost, and quality of life. The etiology of CPIP is multifactorial, with overlapping neuropathic and nociceptive components contributing to this complex syndrome. Treatment is often challenging, and no definitive treatment algorithm exists. Multidisciplinary management of this complex problem improves outcomes, as treatment must be individualized. Current medical, pharmacologic, interventional, and surgical management strategies are reviewed. PMID:24920934

  10. [Pain assessment and training: the impact on pain control after cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Silva, Magda Aparecida Dos Santos; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos; Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da

    2013-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of training and the application of a form for the systematized assessment of pain control after cardiac surgery on pain intensity and supplementary use of morphine. Three patient groups underwent a non-randomized clinical trial with standardized analgesic prescription. In Group I, the nursing staff did not receive specific training regarding the assessment and management of pain, and patients were treated following the established protocol of the institution. In Groups II and III, the nursing staff received targeted training. In Group II the nursing staff used a form for the systematized assessment of pain, which was not used in Group III. Group II presented a lower intensity of pain and greater consumption of supplementary morphine compared to Groups I and II. Training associated with the systematized assessment form increased the chance of identifying pain and influenced nurses' decision-making process, thus promoting pain relief among patients.

  11. Periodontal Probe Improves Exams, Alleviates Pain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Dentists, comedian Bill Cosby memorably mused, tell you not to pick your teeth with any sharp metal object. Then you sit in their chair, and the first thing they grab is an iron hook!" Conventional periodontal probing is indeed invasive, uncomfortable for the patient, and the results can vary greatly between dentists and even for repeated measurements by the same dentist. It is a necessary procedure, though, as periodontal disease is the most common dental disease, involving the loss of teeth by the gradual destruction of ligaments that hold teeth in their sockets in the jawbone. The disease usually results from an increased concentration of bacteria in the pocket, or sulcus, between the gums and teeth. These bacteria produce acids and other byproducts, which enlarge the sulcus by eroding the gums and the periodontal ligaments. The sulcus normally has a depth of 1 to 2 millimeters, but in patients with early stages of periodontal disease, it has a depth of 3 to 5 millimeters. By measuring the depth of the sulcus, periodontists can have a good assessment of the disease s progress. Presently, there are no reliable clinical indicators of periodontal disease activity, and the best available diagnostic aid, periodontal probing, can only measure what has already been lost. A method for detecting small increments of periodontal ligament breakdown would permit earlier diagnosis and intervention with less costly and time-consuming therapy, while overcoming the problems associated with conventional probing. The painful, conventional method for probing may be destined for the archives of dental history, thanks to the development of ultrasound probing technologies. The roots of ultrasound probes are in an ultrasound-based time-of-flight technique routinely used to measure material thickness and length in the Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Laboratory at Langley Research Center. The primary applications of that technology have been for corrosion detection and bolt tension

  12. Preemptive peritonsillar infiltration with bupivacaine in combination with tramadol improves pediatric post-tonsillectomy pain better than using bupivacaine or tramadol alone: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Naghibi, Khosrou; Attari, Mohammadali; Soltani, Mojtaba; Amoushahi, Mahsa; Sadeghipanah, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post-tonsillectomy pain is one of the most common problems after anesthesia, therefore use of a good anesthesia technique with minimum side effect is an important aim. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of peritonsillar infiltration of bupivacaine, tramadol and combination of bupivacaine-tramadol in post-tonsillectomy pain. Materials and Methods: In a double blind trial 120 ASA I and II children condidated for tonsillectomy were randomized into four groups: Peritonsillar infiltration with bupivacaine 1 mg/kg in Group B, tramadol 2 mg/kg in Group T, combination of bupivacaine-tramadol in Group BT and saline in Group C was done. Results: Until 60 minutes in the recovery room, control of pain in the first three groups were better than Group C (P < 0.05) and in the third group it was better than others. Four hours after surgery, control of pain was better in the second and third groups in comparison to Groups B and Group C (P <0.05) and was better in the third group in comparison to the second group. Then, 24 hours after that, only in the group III the control of pain was effective (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this study we showed that peritonsillar infiltration with combination of bupivacain-tramadol provided less post surgery pain compared with infiltration of bupivacaine and tramadol alone in adenotonsillectomy of children. PMID:26322280

  13. Pain and anxiety control in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1993-10-01

    The management of pain and anxiety form the backbone of contemporary dental practice. The past decades have seen the introduction of a significant number of promising new techniques, drugs and equipment designed to aid the dental professional in the quest for a more pain-free and fear-free dental practice. This paper presents a brief look at these drugs and techniques.

  14. Control of pain motivation by cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    Zimbardo, P G; Cohen, A R; Weisenberg, M; Dworkin, L; Firestone, I

    1966-01-14

    Responses by humans to painful electric shocks are significantly modified at subjective, behavioral, and physiological levels by verbal manipulations of degree of choice and justification for further exposure to the aversive stimuli. Pain perception, learning, and galvanic skin resistance are altered under these conditions of "cognitive dissonance," as they are by reductions in voltage intensity.

  15. [Quality improvement in acute pain management in Germany].

    PubMed

    Meißner, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, different quality management approaches in postoperative pain management have been established. In this context, quality is distinguished into structure quality (e.g. personnel and equipment resources), process quality (e. g. standardized treatment schemes) and outcome quality (e.g. pain intensity, side effects, satisfaction). While guidelines and recommendations help to set up evidence based structures and processes and offer support for decision making, benchmark projects offer insights in real life conditions. By use of feedback and benchmarking tools, they can be used for outcome-oriented quality improvement. Certification projects assess compliance with or achievement of defined quality criteria on the basis of predefined structure, process, and outcome parameter.

  16. Improvement in Anxiety and Pain After Whole Body Whirlpool Hydrotherapy Among Patients With Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the Whirlpool hydrotherapy on pain and anxiety in chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients, compared to the conventional hydrocollator pack therapy. Methods Forty-one subjects who have MPS in the upper trapezius muscles without depression were recruited. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the whirlpool therapy group whose bodies were immersed in a whirlpool bath at 34℃-36℃ for 30 minutes; the hydrocollator group who took a 30-minute application of a standard hot hydrocollator pack. Patients in both groups received therapy three days a week for 2 weeks and underwent several evaluations at baseline and after treatment. The variables we analyzed during evaluations were as follows: the primary outcome we considered was pain severity using a visual analogue scale. And the secondary outcomes examined included anxiety using the Korean version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and quality of life (QoL) using the Korean version of the World Health Organization QoL Assessment, Brief Form. All follow-up values were compared with the baseline values. Results The baseline parameters did not show significant differences between two groups. And after 2-week treatment, both groups revealed significant improvement in anxiety levels and QoL, as well as in pain. However, the improvement on pain (p=0.002) and anxiety (p=0.010) was significantly greater in the whirlpool group, compared to the hydrocollator group. Conclusion The whirlpool hydrotherapy can be used as a more effective therapeutic method to reduce pain and anxiety in chronic MPS patients without depression. PMID:24020034

  17. Knee Muscle Forces during Walking and Running in Patellofemoral Pain Patients and Pain-Free Controls

    PubMed Central

    Besier, Thor F.; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2009-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n=27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n=16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p=0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (p<0.05). These results suggest that some patellofemoral pain patients might experience greater joint contact forces and joint stresses than pain-free subjects. PMID:19268945

  18. [Cannabinoids in the control of pain].

    PubMed

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Tartari, Stefano; Piva, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been used since remotes ages as a herbal remedy. Only recently the medical community highlighted the pharmacological scientific bases of its effects. The most important active principle, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was identified in the second half of the last century, and subsequently two receptors were identified and cloned: CB1 that is primarily present in the central nervous system, and CB2 that is present on the cells of the immune system. Endogenous ligands, called endocannabinoids, were characterized. The anandamide was the first one to be discovered. The effectiveness of the cannabinoids in the treatment of nausea and vomit due to anti-neoplastic chemotherapy and in the wasting-syndrome during AIDS is recognized. Moreover, the cannabinoids are analgesic, and their activity is comparable to the weak opioids. Furthermore, parallels exist between opioid and cannabinoid receptors, and evidence is accumulating that the two systems sometimes may operate synergistically. The interest of the pharmaceutical companies led to the production of various drugs, whether synthetic or natural derived. The good ratio between the polyunsatured fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6 of the oil of Cannabis seeds led to reduction of the phlogosis and an improvement of the pain symptoms in patients with chronic musculo-skeletal inflammation. PMID:19388223

  19. Trunk Motor Control Deficits in Acute and Subacute Low Back Pain are Not Associated with Pain or Fear of Movement

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Won; Abraham, Mathew; Plastaras, Christopher; Silfies, Sheri P.

    2015-01-01

    study was provided by the National Institutes of Health (xxxxxxx; $xxx,000), with no study specific conflicts of interest to report. Results Patients’ postural control in the eyes closed condition (P=.02) and movement precision (P=.04) were significantly impaired compared to healthy controls, with moderate to large group difference effect sizes. These trunk motor control impairments were not significantly associated with the patients self-reported pain characteristics and fear of movement. Conclusions Patients with clinical identification of trunk MCI demonstrated decreased trunk motor control, suggesting impairments in proprioception, motor output, or central processing occur early in the back pain episode. This information may help to guide interventions to address these specific limitations, improving delivery of care. PMID:25862508

  20. Gabapentin improves Cold-pressor Pain Responses in Methadone-maintained Patients

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy; Kehoe, Priscilla; Sinha, Karabi; Torrington, Matt A.; Ling, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Individuals on methadone maintenance for the treatment of addiction (MM) are demonstrated to be hyperalgesic to cold-pressor pain in comparison to matched controls and ex-opioid addicts, a finding described as clinical evidence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Interestingly, opioids induce hyperalgesia via many of the same neuro-inflammatory and central sensitization processes that occur with the development of neuropathic pain. Evaluated in this study was the efficacy of a key pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain, gabapentin (GPN), to reverse OIH in MM patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double blind conditions, changes in cold-pressor pain threshold and tolerance following a five-week trial of GPN (titrated to 2400mg/day) were evaluated at peak and trough methadone plasma levels in a well-characterized MM sample. Drug abstinence was encouraged via an escalating payment schedule, and compliance monitored via pill counts and GPN plasma levels; entered into the analyses were only those subjects compliant and abstinent throughout the study (approx 45%). Utilizing change scores from baseline, significant improvements in cold-pressor pain threshold and pain tolerance were observed at both peak and trough methadone levels (p < 0.05). Notably, drop-out rates due to medication side effects were low (2%) and the medication was well-tolerated. These results support that GPN, as prescribed for the treatment of neuropathic pain, is effective in decreasing OIH in patients who are abstinent and stable in methadone treatment. PMID:20163921

  1. Written pain neuroscience education in fibromyalgia: a multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Ittersum, Miriam W; van Wilgen, C Paul; van der Schans, Cees P; Lambrecht, Luc; Groothoff, Johan W; Nijs, Jo

    2014-11-01

    Mounting evidence supports the use of face-to-face pain neuroscience education for the treatment of chronic pain patients. This study aimed at examining whether written education about pain neuroscience improves illness perceptions, catastrophizing, and health status in patients with fibromyalgia. A double-blind, multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial with 6-month follow-up was conducted. Patients with FM (n = 114) that consented to participate were randomly allocated to receive either written pain neuroscience education or written relaxation training. Written pain neuroscience education comprised of a booklet with pain neuroscience education plus a telephone call to clarify any difficulties; the relaxation group received a booklet with relaxation education and a telephone call. The revised illness perception questionnaire, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire were used as outcome measures. Both patients and assessors were blinded. Repeated-measures analyses with last observation carried forward principle were performed. Cohen's d effect sizes (ES) were calculated for all within-group changes and between-group differences. The results reveal that written pain neuroscience education does not change the impact of FM on daily life, catastrophizing, or perceived symptoms of patients with FM. Compared with written relaxation training, written pain neuroscience education improved beliefs in a chronic timeline of FM (P = 0.03; ES = 0.50), but it does not impact upon other domains of illness perceptions. Compared with written relaxation training, written pain neuroscience education slightly improved illness perceptions of patients with FM, but it did not impart clinically meaningful effects on pain, catastrophizing, or the impact of FM on daily life. Face-to-face sessions of pain neuroscience education are required to change inappropriate cognitions and perceived health in patients with FM.

  2. Patient-controlled modalities for acute postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, Christine

    2005-08-01

    Although numerous clinical practice guidelines for pain management have been published throughout the last 12 years, inadequate pain relief remains a significant health care issue. Several patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) modalities are currently available for the treatment of acute postoperative pain, including intravenous (IV) PCA, epidural (PCEA), and oral PCA. Although PCEA and IV PCA are both commonly used modalities, IV PCA is considered the standard of care for postoperative pain management. Limitations of this modality do exist, however. Consequently, noninvasive PCA systems are under development to circumvent many of these limitations, including the fentanyl hydrochloride patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS); (IONSYS Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ) and a number of patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) delivery systems. The objective of this article is to review the PCA modalities currently in use and to discuss those in development for the treatment of acute postoperative pain.

  3. Soft Tissue Mobilization and PNF Improve Range of Motion and Minimize Pain Level in Shoulder Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Al Dajah, Salameh Bweir

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of soft tissue mobilization and PNF on pain level, and shoulder ROM in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with painful and limited glenohumeral ROM activities were selected. The subjects were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n=15), which received treatment consisting of soft tissues mobilization and the PNF technique. The control group received an ultrasound treatment. Pain level, glenohumeral external rotation and overhead reach were measured before and after the intervention in groups. [Results] The experimental group showed a significant reduction in pain level in comparison with the control group. The values for Shoulder external rotation showed a significant improvement. The mean value for overhead reach in the experimental group significantly increased. [Conclusion] The combination of soft tissue mobilization for the subscapularis for 7 minutes and 5 repetitions of the contract-relax PNF technique for the shoulder internal rotator muscles followed by 5 repetitions of a PNF facilitated abduction and external rotation diagonal pattern was found to be effective in reducing pain and improving glenohumeral external rotation and overhead reach during a single intervention session. PMID:25435705

  4. Incobotulinum Toxin-A Improves Post-Surgical and Post-Radiation Pain in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Rezvan; Mittal, Shivam Om; Radmand, Reza; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    Cancer patients who undergo surgery or radiation can develop persistent focal pain at the site of radiation or surgery. Twelve patients who had surgery or radiation for local cancer and failed at least two analgesic medications for pain control were prospectively enrolled in a research protocol. Patients were injected up to 100 units of incobotulinum toxin A (IncoA) intramuscularly or subcutaneously depending on the type and location of pain (muscle cramp or neuropathic pain). Two patients passed away, one dropped out due to a skin reaction and another patient could not return for the follow up due to his poor general condition. All remaining 8 subjects (Age 31–70, 4 female) demonstrated significant improvement of Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (3 to 9 degrees, average 3.9 degrees) and reported significant satisfaction in Patients’ Global Impression of Change scale (PGIC) (7 out of 8 reported the pain as much improved). Three of the 8 patients reported significant improvement of quality of life. PMID:26771640

  5. Gabapentin attenuates neuropathic pain and improves nerve myelination after chronic sciatic constriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Câmara, Carlos C; Araújo, Celina V; de Sousa, Kalina Kelma Oliveira; Brito, Gerly A C; Vale, Mariana L; Raposo, Ramon da Silva; Mendonça, Fabiana Evaristo; Mietto, Bruno S; Martinez, Ana Maria B; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2015-10-21

    Gabapentin (GBP) is an anti-convulsive drug often used as analgesic to control neuropathic pain. This study aimed at evaluating oral GBP treatment (30, 60, 120 mg/kg, 60 min prior to chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve (CCSN) along 15-day treatment post-injury, 12 h/12 h) by monitoring spontaneous and induced-pain behaviors in Wistar rats on 5th and 15th days post-injury during early neuropathic events. CCSN animals receiving saline were used as controls. Another aim of this study was to evaluate GBP effects on myelin basic protein (MBP) on the 5th and 15th days post-injury and nerve morphology by transmission electron microscopy to address nerve regeneration. On the 5th and 15th days, GBP (60 mg/kg) reduced neuropathic pain behaviors (scratching and biting) in the ipsilateral paw and alleviated mechanical allodynia in comparison with the neuropathic saline group. GBP significantly increased climbing and rearing behaviors in CCSN and CCSN-free animals suggesting increased motor activity rather than sedation. We found three-fold significant increase in MBP expression by western blots on the 15th day when compared to controls. In addition, GPB (60 mg/kg) improved nerve axonal, fiber and myelin area 15 days post-surgery. In conclusion, GBP alleviated mechanical and thermal allodynia and spontaneous pain-related behaviors and improved later nerve morphology. Our findings suggest that GBP improve nerve remyelination after chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve.

  6. Control of neuropathic pain by immune cells and opioids.

    PubMed

    Machelska, Halina

    2011-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a compilation of somatosensory, cognitive and emotional alterations developing following nerve injuries. Such pain often outlasts the initial cause and becomes a disease of its own that challenges its management. The actions of currently used anticonvulsants, antidepressants and opioids are hampered by serious central nervous system adverse effects, which preclude their sufficient dosing and long-term use. Conversely, selective activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons has the advantage of pain relieve without central side effects. Considerable number of animal studies supports analgesic effects of exogenously applied opioids acting at peripheral opioid receptors in neuropathic conditions. In contrast to currently highlighted pain-promoting properties of neuroimmune interactions associated with neuropathy, recent findings suggest that opioid peptide-containing immune cells that accumulate at damaged nerves can also locally alleviate pain. Future aims include the exploration of opioid receptor signaling in injured nerves and of leukocytic opioid receptor function in pain modulation, development of approaches selectively delivering opioids and opioid-containing cells to injured tissues and investigation of interactions between exogenous and leukocyte-derived opioids. These efforts should lay a foundation for efficient and safe control of neuropathic pain. This article comprehensively analyzes the consequences of nerve injury on the expression of peripheral opioid receptors and peptides, and the impact of these changes on opioid analgesia, critically discussing positive and negative findings. Further focus is on a dual character of immune responses in the control of painful neuropathies.

  7. Emotion regulatory function of parent attention to child pain and associated implications for parental pain control behaviour.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina; Sütterlin, Stefan; Caes, Line; Moors, Agnes

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the function of parental attention to child pain in regulating parental distress and pain control behaviour when observing their child performing a painful (cold pressor) task (CPT); we also studied the moderating role of parental state anxiety. Participants were 62 schoolchildren and one of their parents. Parental attention towards or away from child pain (ie, attend to pain vs avoid pain) was experimentally manipulated during a viewing task pairing unfamiliar children's neutral and pain faces. Before and after the viewing task, parental distress regulation was assessed by heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). In a subsequent phase, parents observed their own child perform a CPT task, allowing assessment of parental pain control behaviour (indexed by latency to stop their child's CPT performance) and parental distress, which was assessed via self-report before and after observation of child CPT performance. Eye tracking during the viewing task and self-reported attention to own child's pain confirmed successful attention manipulation. Further, findings indicated that the effect of attentional strategy on parental emotion regulation (indexed by HR, self-report) and pain control behaviour depended on parents' state anxiety. Specifically, whereas low anxious parents reported more distress and demonstrated more pain control behaviour in the Attend to Pain condition, high anxious parents reported more distress and showed more pain control behaviour in the Avoid Pain condition. This inverse pattern was likewise apparent in physiological distress indices (HR) in response to the initial viewing task. Theoretical/clinical implications and further research directions are discussed.

  8. Supporting Staff to Identify Residents in Pain: A Controlled Pretest-Posttest Study in Residential Aged Care.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Clint; Haydon, Deborah; Wollin, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Practical strategies are needed to improve pain awareness among aged care staff and promote a systematic approach to pain identification using evidence-based tools. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a pain identification tool for use by nursing and nonprofessional staff in residential aged care facilities (RACFs). A controlled pretest-posttest intervention design was conducted in two RACFs in Brisbane, Australia. Completed surveys were returned by 216 staff and 74 residents at baseline and 218 staff and 94 residents at 3-month follow-up. Chart audits were conducted on 308 residents at baseline and 328 at follow-up. Groups were compared on: (1) staff knowledge and attitudes regarding pain, perceived confidence and skills for pain assessment, and perceived quality of pain management; (2) frequency of pain assessments and use of pain interventions; and (3) residents' perceptions of the quality of pain management. Both groups had high knowledge scores and reported high levels of confidence, skills, and perceived quality of pain management at baseline and follow-up. The intervention group showed significant improvement in routine pain assessment and use of nonpharmacological pain interventions. However, due to unexpected changes in control group conditions, both groups increased episodic pain assessment. Overall, staff believed the intervention was clinically useful and fostered a team approach to pain assessment. We found the introduction of pain identification resources with implementation strategies to support frontline staff was partially effective in improving staff and resident outcomes. Nonetheless, our findings confirm the need for change and importance of translational pain research in RACFs. PMID:26700721

  9. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  10. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  11. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed.

  12. Peer volunteers in an integrative pain management program for frail older adults with chronic pain: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is common among the older population. A literature review on pain management program showed that exercise, yoga, massage therapy, Tai Chi, and music therapy could significantly reduce pain. In spite of the proven benefits of pain management programs, these intervention programs were effective only in the short term, and older adults would resume their old habits. It has been suggested that interventions comprising some type of social support have great potential to increase the participation of older adults. Therefore, we propose the inclusion of peer volunteers in an integrated pain management program to relieve pain among frail older adults. This study aims to explore the effectiveness of an integrated pain management program supplemented with peer volunteers in improving pain intensity, functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, and the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods among frail older adults with chronic pain. Methods/Design We intend to recruit 30 nursing home residents and 30 peer volunteers from the Institute of Active Ageing in Hong Kong in a group trial for an 8-week group-based integrated pain management program. There will be 16 sessions, with two 1-hour sessions each week. The primary outcome will be pain levels, while secondary outcomes will be assessed according to functional mobility, physical activity, loneliness levels, happiness levels, the use of non-pharmacological pain-relieving methods, and through a questionnaire for volunteers. Discussion In view of the high prevalence of chronic pain among older adults and its adverse impacts, it is important to provide older adults with tools to control their pain. We propose the use of peer volunteers to enhance the effects of an integrated pain management program. It is expected that pain can be reduced and improvements can be achieved among older adults in the areas of physical activity, functional mobility, loneliness levels

  13. New approaches to pain control in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmedzai, S

    1997-07-01

    Pain affects most patients with malignant disease, and the prevalence of severe pain increases in the advanced stages of the condition. One in 5 patients with cancer has uncontrolled pain, even after 10 years of the use of the World Health Organization programme for cancer pain control and its 'three-step ladder' for the rational use of analgesics including morphine. Morphine has long been the 'gold standard' for the treatment of severe cancer pain. However, its side-effects, particularly sedation, cognitive impairment and myoclonus at high doses, have provoked the use of 'opioid rotation' to alternatives such as methadone and hydromorphone. The new 72-h transdermal patch for fentanyl also offers advantages of reduced side-effects and increased convenience over oral morphine. Intravenous strontium-89 and bisphosphonate therapy are effective for both short- and long-term control of metastatic bone pain. The spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is important in modulating the plasticity of the central nervous system and in aggravating chronic pain through the phenomenon of 'wind-up'. The NMDA antagonist ketamine, an anaesthetic, can be used at low doses for the management of refractory and neuropathic pains. Among adjuvant drugs, ketorolac has emerged as a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Palliative care is gaining acceptance as a new discipline in healthcare. Its strategic role is being reviewed as an adjunct to cancer therapy at all stages and its use is no longer confined to the terminal phase of disease after curative treatment has failed. Pain control and other aspects of symptom control are, therefore, viewed as an integral part of cancer management.

  14. Effects of Pain Acceptance and Pain Control Strategies on Physical Impairment in Individuals with Chronic Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vowles, Kevin E.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Gross, Richard T.; McDaniel, Michael L.; Mouse, Angela; Bates, Mick; Gallimore, Paula; McCall, Cindy

    2007-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for chronic pain are effective. There is a need, however, to understand the processes involved in determining how these treatments contribute to behavior change. Control and acceptance strategies represent two potentially important processes involved in treatment, although they differ significantly in approach. Results from…

  15. Locus of control patterns in headaches and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Franco, Luis; López-Jiménez, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Locus of control (LOC) is related to the impact of headaches and chronic pain; however, literature evidence regarding LOC is not always consistent. Several authors consider this to be due, in part, to the separate interpretation of LOC factors, during which the interaction among them is ignored. In 1982, Wallston and Wallston proposed eight possible LOC health patterns depending on whether the individual scored high or low in each of three dimensions. OBJECTIVE: To identify these LOC patterns in patients with headaches and chronic pain, and to validate them in terms of their association with a selection of the main pain indicators. METHODS: A total of 228 individuals were recruited at three public centres in Seville, Spain. Participants completed a semistructured clinical interview and several questionnaires assessing psychological variables related to pain. The main statistical analyses used were two-step cluster analysis and ANCOVA. RESULTS: The six-cluster solution was optimal. The patterns observed coincided with: the believer in control; the yea-sayer; the pure chance; the pure internal; the pure professional; and the nay-sayer clusters. The double external or type VI clusters were not observed. Clusters could be classified from the best to the worst adjustment to chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the empirical validity of the theoretical model of LOC patterns proposed in 1982 by Wallston and Wallston among a chronic pain population. The analysis of patterns provides more accurate information regarding the adjustment to pain compared with analysis of the LOC factors separately. PMID:23936894

  16. Effect of relaxation exercises on controlling postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Sacide Yildizeli; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the effect of relaxation exercises on controlling postoperative pain in patients who have undergone upper abdominal surgery. This is a cross-sectional and crossover study conducted on 60 patients who underwent upper abdominal surgery between October 2006 and June 2007, in the General Surgery Department, Health and Research Practice Center, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey. We assessed the patients' pain levels before and after the relaxation exercises. Patients' personal information forms were used to collect data, and pain levels were determined using the verbal pain scale. We used the Wilcoxon T test, nonparametric Spearman correlation analysis, and nominal by interval eta analysis to assess the data, percentage, and frequency analyses. Pain levels were found to be reduced after the relaxation exercises compared with the levels before the relaxation exercises (z = -5.497; p < .001). Relaxation exercises, a nonpharmacologic method, are effective in reducing postoperative pain and should therefore be included in a regimen to control postoperative pain in patients who have undergone upper abdominal surgery.

  17. Transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment for patients with shoulder pain booked for surgery: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Taverner, Murray; Loughnan, Terence

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder pain is the third most common musculoskeletal problem and accounts for 5% of general practitioner consultations. Although many treatments are described, there is no consensus on optimal treatment and up to 40% of patients still have pain 12 months after initially seeking help for pain. Previously, the effect of transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment (TCPRFT) was evaluated in a retrospective audit that showed good pain relief for a mean 395 days and justified this randomized sham controlled trial. In this study, 51 patients entered into a randomized double-blinded, placebo controlled study of TCPRFT. Patients were assessed at 4 and 12 weeks by a blinded observer and compared with baseline. We observed sustained reductions in pain at night, pain with activity, and functional improvement at 4 and 12 weeks with active but not sham TCPRFT. The 25 subjects who received active treatment showed statistically significant reductions of 24/100 in pain at night and 20/100 of pain with activity at 4 weeks and 18/100 and 19/100, respectively, at 12 weeks from baseline. Statistically significant lower Brief Pain Inventory pain and function scores (4 and 12 weeks), improved pain self-efficacy (4 weeks), Oxford Shoulder scores (12 weeks), and internal rotation (12 weeks) were seen. Pain at both rest and shoulder elevation were not improved by active treatment. No complications were seen. This study of a simple, low risk, outpatient treatment confirms the findings of our earlier study of TCPRFT for knee pain and shoulder pain audit that transcutaneous pulsed radiofrequency treatment may help some people with painful shoulders.

  18. Motor control and low back pain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Roussel, N; De Kooning, M; Schutt, A; Mottram, S; Truijen, S; Nijs, J; Daenen, L

    2013-02-01

    Professional dancers suffer a high incidence of injuries, especially to the spine and lower extremities. There is a lack of experimental research addressing low back pain (LBP) in dancers. The aim of this study is to compare lumbopelvic motor control, muscle extensibility and sacroiliac joint pain between dancers with and without a history of LBP. 40 pre-professional dancers (mean age of 20.3 years) underwent a clinical test battery, consisting of an evaluation of lumbopelvic motor control, muscle extensibility, generalized joint hypermobility, and sacroiliac joint pain provocation tests. Also self-reported measurements and standardized questionnaires were used. 41% of the dancers suffered from LBP during at least 2 consecutive days in the previous year. Only one dancer suffered from sacroiliac joint pain. Compared to dancers without a history of LBP, dancers with a history of LBP showed poorer lumbopelvic motor control (p<0.05). No differences in muscle extensibility or joint hypermobility were observed between dancers (p>0.05). Despite their young age, pre-professional dancers suffer from LBP frequently. Sacroiliac joint pain, generalized joint hypermobility or muscle extensibility appears unrelated to LBP in dancers. Motor control is decreased in those with a history of LBP. Further research should examine whether motor control is etiologically involved in LBP in dancers.

  19. Control of Pain in the Rheumatic Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, F. Dudley

    1968-01-01

    Pain may be attacked in the rheumatic diseases (1) centrally, with drugs ranging in efficiency from those which are potentially addictive and under the Dangerous Drugs Act (e.g., pethidine) and are therefore rarely used, down to simple analgesics such as paracetamol; (2) peripherally, by local action, whether it be by applications of heat or cold, by injections of local anaesthetics or anti-inflammatory agents, or by surgery; (3) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory non-analgesic agents taken systemically, such as the corticosteroids; and (4) peripherally, by anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic agents taken systemically, such as aspirin. The exact sites of action of the pyrazoles, indomethacin, the anthranilic compounds, and other anti-inflammatory-analgesic-antipyretic drugs are as yet uncertain, but along with these methods of attacking the pain-producing areas help must also be given to the distressed mind behind the joints. Faith in the future, cheerfulness, freedom from depression, and the development of a philosophy to deal with the uncertainties of the disease are essential. It has been said that you don't have to be a doctor to treat uncomplicated lobar pneumonia: anybody with a bottle of penicillin in his hands holds the cure. It is the incurable diseases that are really worth treating, and that make demands on the physician. To quote Tuker: “My last word is this. Whoever has the care of a sorely stricken arthritic must encourage him to fulfil himself intellectually and spiritually, and to achieve—no matter what, but to achieve, so that he may nightly lay himself down on his bed of pain looking forward happily to the morrow's task, mind centred upon it, no matter what it is; sticking in stamps, research into anything you like, dabbling with pastel or water colours, writing chatty letters to friends. Anything at all, but let it be for him the most pressing thing of the day, and let him believe that you think it is. Help him and let him live, live

  20. Analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Ashwini; Bhargava, Darpan; Gupta, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the clinical safety of acetaminophen over other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, this clinical trial was formulated to assess the analgesic efficacy of acetaminophen for controlling postextraction dental pain when compared to commonly prescribed ibuprofen. Aim: The aim was to assess the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol/acetaminophen in postextraction dental pain. Settings and Design: Double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients requiring bilateral maxillary and mandibular premolar extraction for their orthodontic treatment were included in the study to evaluate the efficacy of acetaminophen in controlling postextraction dental pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Unpaired t-test. Results and Conclusions: Clinically, both the postoperative analgesics exerted similar pain control with minor variations of recorded visual analog scale scores by the patients in both the groups. It may be concluded from the findings of this study that paracetamol at a dosage of 500 mg thrice a day (1.5 g) is sufficient to achieve reliable pain control following exodontia provided the surgical trauma caused to the investing tissues is minimal. PMID:25593867

  1. Balneotherapy for chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kesiktas, Nur; Karakas, Sinem; Gun, Kerem; Gun, Nuran; Murat, Sadiye; Uludag, Murat

    2012-10-01

    A large number of treatments were used for patients with chronic low back pain. Frequent episodes have been reported very high. Although balneotherapy was found effective in this disease, there are not well-designed studies. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of balneotherapy versus physical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain. Exercise was added to both treatment programs. Sixty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. Physical modalities plus exercise were applied to group 1, and group 2 was received balneotherapy plus exercise for ten sessions. The following parameters were measured: visual analogue scale at rest and movement for pain, paracetamol dose, manual muscle test for lumber muscles, modified Schoeber' test, Oswestry disability index, and Short-Form 36 at the beginning and end of the therapies and at the 3 months follow-up. The statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS 10.0 program. Both groups achieved significant improvements within themselves. But balneotherapy groups were improved at back extensor muscle test (P < 0.05), modified Schoeber's test (P < 0.03), Oswestry disability index, and the some scores of SF 36 (energy vitality, social function, role limitations related to physical problems, and general health P < 0.05). Balneotherapy combined with exercise therapy had advantages than therapy with physical modalities plus exercise in improving quality of life and flexibility of patients with chronic low back pain.

  2. Neck pain: manipulating the upper back helps lessen pain and improve neck motion.

    PubMed

    2011-09-01

    Neck pain is very common. In the United States, between 30% and 50% of people suffer from an aching neck each year. Although neck pain can be caused by injury, most of this pain results from more gradual stresses, such as particular sitting, standing, or work postures, lifting patterns, or sleeping positions. Typical neck pain can also cause headaches, pain between your shoulders, or a feeling of knots in your neck and upper back muscles. Although manual therapy, sometimes called "manipulation," is a common treatment for many types of spine pain, some people are uncomfortable having their necks manipulated. Recently, though, researchers have tested the benefits of a thrust manipulation of the upper back to treat neck pain. A study published in the September 2011 issue of JOSPT provides new insight and an evidence-based summary of the benefits of manipulating the upper back to ease and eliminate neck pain.

  3. Expose or protect? A randomized controlled trial of exposure in vivo vs pain-contingent treatment as usual in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Marlies; Goossens, Mariëlle; de Jong, Jeroen; Ruijgrok, Joop; Oosterhof, Jan; Onghena, Patrick; Smeets, Rob; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2016-10-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) highly affects patients' ability to perform daily life activities. Pain-related fear might be a key target to reduce disability in chronic pain. Current treatments aiming at reducing pain show little improvements on pain and disability, whereas novel exposure-based treatments targeting pain-related fears have shown to be promising. We conducted a randomized controlled trial (N = 46) comparing exposure in vivo (EXP) with pain-contingent treatment as usual (TAU), for CRPS-I patients with at least moderate levels of pain-related fear. Primary outcome is self-reported disability, for upper and lower extremity, respectively. Secondary outcomes are self-reported pain-intensity, pain-catastrophizing, perceived harmfulness of physical activity, and health-related quality of life. Pretreatment to posttreatment and pretreatment to 6-month follow-up change scores were tested using randomization-based inference. EXP was superior to TAU in reducing upper extremity disability from pretreatment to posttreatment (between-group difference, 1.082; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.563-1.601; P < 0.001) and from pretreatment to 6-month follow-up (1.303; 95% CI, 0.917-1.690; P < 0.001). EXP was superior in reducing lower extremity disability from pretreatment to 6-month follow-up (3.624; 95% CI, 0.467-6.781; P = 0.02), but not from pretreatment to posttreatment (3.055; 95% CI, -0.018 to 6.128; P = 0.054). All secondary outcomes significantly favored EXP pretreatment to posttreatment, as well as pretreatment to 6-month follow-up. Exposure to daily activities shows to be more effective than a protective pain-contingent TAU in reducing self-reported disability in daily life of CRPS-I patients with at least moderate levels of pain-related fear.

  4. Altered motor control patterns in whiplash and chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Astrid; Vasseljen, Ottar

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent whiplash associated disorders (WAD) have been associated with alterations in kinesthetic sense and motor control. The evidence is however inconclusive, particularly for differences between WAD patients and patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain. The aim of this study was to investigate motor control deficits in WAD compared to chronic non-traumatic neck pain and healthy controls in relation to cervical range of motion (ROM), conjunct motion, joint position error and ROM-variability. Methods Participants (n = 173) were recruited to three groups: 59 patients with persistent WAD, 57 patients with chronic non-traumatic neck pain and 57 asymptomatic volunteers. A 3D motion tracking system (Fastrak) was used to record maximal range of motion in the three cardinal planes of the cervical spine (sagittal, frontal and horizontal), and concurrent motion in the two associated cardinal planes relative to each primary plane were used to express conjunct motion. Joint position error was registered as the difference in head positions before and after cervical rotations. Results Reduced conjunct motion was found for WAD and chronic neck pain patients compared to asymptomatic subjects. This was most evident during cervical rotation. Reduced conjunct motion was not explained by current pain or by range of motion in the primary plane. Total conjunct motion during primary rotation was 13.9° (95% CI; 12.2–15.6) for the WAD group, 17.9° (95% CI; 16.1–19.6) for the chronic neck pain group and 25.9° (95% CI; 23.7–28.1) for the asymptomatic group. As expected, maximal cervical range of motion was significantly reduced among the WAD patients compared to both control groups. No group differences were found in maximal ROM-variability or joint position error. Conclusion Altered movement patterns in the cervical spine were found for both pain groups, indicating changes in motor control strategies. The changes were not related to a history of neck trauma, nor

  5. Pain control in horses: what do we really know?

    PubMed

    Sanchez, L C; Robertson, S A

    2014-07-01

    Currently, approaches to pain control in horses are a mixture of art and science. Recognition of overt pain behaviours, such as rolling, kicking at the abdomen, flank watching, lameness or blepharospasm, may be obvious; subtle signs of pain can include changes in facial expression or head position, location in the stall and response to palpation or human interaction. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e. phenylbutazone, flunixin meglumine and firocoxib), opioids (i.e. butorphanol, morphine and buprenorphine) and α2 -adrenergic agonists (i.e. xylazine, detomidine, romifidine and medetomidine) are the most commonly used therapeutic options. Multimodal therapy using constant-rate infusions of lidocaine, ketamine and/or butorphanol has gained popularity for severe pain in hospitalised cases. Drugs targeting neuropathic pain, such as gabapentin, are increasingly used for conditions such as laminitis. Optimal strategies for management of pain are based upon severity and chronicity, including special considerations for use of intra-articular or epidural delivery and therapy in foals. Strategies that aim to mitigate adverse effects associated with use of various analgesic agents are briefly discussed. PMID:24645799

  6. Improving Nursing Home Staff Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Katherine R.; Fink, Regina; Pepper, Ginny; Hutt, Eveyln; Vojir, Carol P.; Scott, Jill; Clark, Lauren; Mellis, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Effective pain management remains a serious problem in the nursing home setting. Barriers to achieving optimal pain practices include staff knowledge deficits, biases, and attitudes that influence assessment and management of the residents' pain. Design and Methods: Twelve nursing homes participated in this intervention study: six…

  7. Auricular Acupressure for Managing Postoperative Pain and Knee Motion in Patients with Total Knee Replacement: A Randomized Sham Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-hua; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Ho, Shungtai; Tsay, Shiow-luan; Lin, Kuan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postoperative pain management remains a significant challenge for all healthcare providers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to examine the adjuvant effects of auricular acupressure on relieving postoperative pain and improving the passive range of motion in patients with total knee replacement (TKR). Method. Sixty-two patients who had undergone a TKR were randomly assigned to the acupressure group and the sham control group. The intervention was delivered three times a day for 3 days. A visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were used to assess pain intensity. Pain medication consumption was recorded, and the knee motion was measured using a goniometer. Results. The patients experienced a moderately severe level of pain postoperatively (VAS 58.66 ± 20.35) while being on the routine PCA. No differences were found in pain scores between the groups at all points. However, analgesic drug usage in the acupressure group patients was significantly lower than in the sham control group (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI, age, and pain score. On the 3rd day after surgery, the passive knee motion in the acupressure group patients was significantly better than in the sham control group patients (P < 0.05), controlling for BMI. Conclusion. The application of auricular acupressure at specific therapeutic points significantly reduces the opioid analgesia requirement and improves the knee motion in patients with TKR. PMID:22844334

  8. To predict sufentanil requirement for postoperative pain control using a real-time method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhao; Duan, Guangyou; Guo, Shanna; Ying, Ying; Huang, Penghao; Zhang, Mi; Li, Ningbo; Zhang, Xianwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Preoperative identification of individual sensitivity to opioid analgesics could improve the quality of postoperative analgesia. We explored the feasibility and utility of a real-time assessment of sufentanil sensitivity in predicting postoperative analgesic requirement. Our primary study included 111 patients who underwent measurements of pressure and quantitative pricking pain thresholds before and 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion. Pain intensity was assessed during the first 24-hour postsurgery, and patients who reported inadequate levels of analgesia were excluded from the study. The sufentanil requirement for patient-controlled analgesia was recorded, and a subsequent exploratory study of 20 patients facilitated the interpretation of the primary study results. In the primary study, experimental pain thresholds increased (P < 0.001) 5 minutes after sufentanil infusion, and the percent change in pricking pain threshold was positively associated with sufentanil requirement at 12 and 24 hours after surgery (β = 0.318, P = 0.001; and β = 0.335, P = 0.001). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed that patients with a change in pricking pain threshold >188% were >50% likely to require more sufentanil for postoperative pain control. In the exploratory study, experimental pain thresholds significantly decreased after the operation (P < 0.001), and we observed a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between the percent change in pricking pain threshold before and after surgery. Preoperative detection of individual sensitivity to sufentanil via the above described real-time method was effective in predicting postoperative sufentanil requirement. Thus, percent change in pricking pain threshold might be a feasible predictive marker of postoperative analgesia requirement. PMID:27336880

  9. Can pain be managed through the Internet? A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bender, Jacqueline L; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Diorio, Caroline; Englesakis, Marina; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2011-08-01

    Given the increasing penetration and health care related use of the Internet, we examined the evidence on the impact of Internet-based interventions on pain. A search of Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library was conducted for literature published from 1990 to 2010 describing randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Internet-based interventions on patients with pain of any kind. Of 6724 citations, 17 articles were included. The studies evaluated the effects of interventions that provided cognitive and behavioral therapy, moderated peer support programs, or clinical visit preparation or follow-up support on 2503 people in pain. Six studies (35.3%) received scores associated with high quality. Most cognitive and behavioral therapy studies showed an improvement in pain (n=7, 77.8%), activity limitation (n=4, 57.1%) and costs associated with treatment (n=3, 100%), whereas effects on depression (n=2, 28.6%) and anxiety (n=2, 50%) were less consistent. There was limited (n=2 from same research group) but promising evidence that Internet-based peer support programs can lead to improvements in pain intensity, activity limitation, health distress and self-efficacy; limited (n=4 from same research group) but promising evidence that social networking programs can reduce pain in children and adolescents; and insufficient evidence on Internet-based clinical support interventions. Internet-based interventions seem promising for people in pain, but it is still unknown what types of patients benefit most. More well-designed studies with diverse patient groups, active control conditions, and a better description of withdrawals are needed to strengthen the evidence concerning the impact of Internet-based interventions on people in pain.

  10. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating Lateral Branch Radiofrequency Denervation for Sacroiliac Joint Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Steven P.; Hurley, Robert W.; Buckenmaier, Chester C.; Kurihara, Connie; Morlando, Benny; Dragovich, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint pain is a challenging condition accounting for approximately 20% of cases of chronic low back pain. Currently, there are no effective long-term treatment options for sacroiliac joint pain. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 28 patients with injection-diagnosed sacroiliac joint pain. Fourteen patients received L4-5 primary dorsal rami and S1-3 lateral branch radiofrequency denervation using cooling-probe technology following a local anesthetic block, and 14 patients received the local anesthetic block followed by placebo denervation. Patients who failed to respond to placebo injections crossed over and were treated with radiofrequency denervation using conventional technology. Results One, 3 and 6-months post-procedure, 11 (79%), 9 (64%) and 8 (57%) of radiofrequency treated patients experienced ≥ 50% pain relief and significant functional improvement. In contrast, only 2 (14%) patients in the placebo group experienced significant improvement at their 1-month follow-up, and none experienced benefit 3-months post-procedure. In the crossover group (n=11), 7 (64%), 6 (55%) and 4 (36%) patients experienced improvement 1, 3 and 6-months post-procedure. One year after treatment, only 2 (14%) patients in the treatment group continued to demonstrate persistent pain relief. Conclusions These results provide preliminary evidence that L4 and L5 primary dorsal rami and S1-3 lateral branch radiofrequency denervation may provide intermediate-term pain relief and functional benefit in selected patients with suspected sacroiliac joint pain. Larger studies are needed to confirm our results, and determine the optimal candidates and treatment parameters for this poorly understood disorder. PMID:18648237

  11. The Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Family Intervention and Standard Pediatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Conducted controlled clinical trial involving 44 children with recurrent abdominal pain randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral family intervention (CBFI) or standard pediatric care (SPC). Both treatments resulted in significant improvements on measures of pain intensity and pain behavior. CBFI group had higher rate of complete elimination of…

  12. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. Materials and methods The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Results Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07–0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Conclusion Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP.

  13. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. Materials and methods The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Results Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07–0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Conclusion Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP. PMID:27695359

  14. Manual therapy followed by specific active exercises versus a placebo followed by specific active exercises on the improvement of functional disability in patients with chronic non specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    found in remaining outcomes. Conclusions This study confirmed the immediate analgesic effect of MT over ST. Followed by specific active exercises, it reduces significantly functional disability and tends to induce a larger decrease in pain intensity, compared to a control group. These results confirm the clinical relevance of MT as an appropriate treatment for CNSLBP. Its neurophysiologic mechanisms at cortical level should be investigated more thoroughly. Trial registration Trial registration number: NCT01496144 PMID:22925609

  15. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  16. Improving the Treatment and Assessment of Moderate and Severe Pain in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Janeway Children's Hospital previously enacted a number of measures to improve pain management for patients in its emergency department (ED). While improvements were demonstrated, rates for the timely assessment and treatment of pain remain below standards of care. Objectives. The study objectives are to investigate the impact of the previous attempts to improve the treatment of pain and to explore ways to further improve pain management in the ED. Methods. Key informant interviews and a focus group were conducted with nurses, physicians, and parents whose children were identified as having severe pain. Results. Interviews were conducted with 31 parents or children, 9 physicians, and 8 nurses. The focus group was attended by 15 nurses. Previous initiatives were viewed as improvements. Continued barriers include difficulties in accurately capturing the level of pain, issues in treating pain for specific types of patients, and inadequacy in addressing patients in severe pain. Conclusion. Changes in pain treatment protocols can result in positive impacts but are likely insufficient on their own to achieve desired standards of care. Consistent measurement and engagement with staff can identify additional opportunities for improving pain management within an ED setting. PMID:27672348

  17. Improving the Treatment and Assessment of Moderate and Severe Pain in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Janeway Children's Hospital previously enacted a number of measures to improve pain management for patients in its emergency department (ED). While improvements were demonstrated, rates for the timely assessment and treatment of pain remain below standards of care. Objectives. The study objectives are to investigate the impact of the previous attempts to improve the treatment of pain and to explore ways to further improve pain management in the ED. Methods. Key informant interviews and a focus group were conducted with nurses, physicians, and parents whose children were identified as having severe pain. Results. Interviews were conducted with 31 parents or children, 9 physicians, and 8 nurses. The focus group was attended by 15 nurses. Previous initiatives were viewed as improvements. Continued barriers include difficulties in accurately capturing the level of pain, issues in treating pain for specific types of patients, and inadequacy in addressing patients in severe pain. Conclusion. Changes in pain treatment protocols can result in positive impacts but are likely insufficient on their own to achieve desired standards of care. Consistent measurement and engagement with staff can identify additional opportunities for improving pain management within an ED setting.

  18. Rituximab Downregulates Gene Expression Associated with Cell Proliferation, Survival, and Proteolysis in the Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Link between High Baseline Autophagy-Related ULK1 Expression and Improved Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Tchetina, Elena V.; Pivanova, Anastasya N.; Markova, Galina A.; Lukina, Galina V.; Aleksandrova, Elena N.; Aleksankin, Andrey P.; Makarov, Sergey A.; Kuzin, Aleksandr N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To clarify molecular mechanisms for the response to rituximab in a longitudinal study. Methods. Peripheral blood from 16 RA patients treated with rituximab for a single treatment course and 26 healthy controls, blood and knee articular cartilages from 18 patients with long-standing RA, and cartilages from 14 healthy subjects were examined. Clinical response was assessed using ESR, ACPA, CRP, RF, DAS28 levels, CD19+ B-cell counts, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing scores. Protein expression in PBMCs was quantified using ELISA. Gene expression was performed with quantitative real-time PCR. Results. A decrease (p < 0.05) in DAS28, ESR, and CRP values after rituximab treatment was associated with the downregulation of MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression in the peripheral blood to levels found in healthy subjects. MMP-9 expression remained significantly higher compared to controls although decreased (p < 0.05) versus baseline. A negative correlation between baseline ULK1 gene expression and the number of tender joints at the end of follow-up was observed. Conclusions. The response to rituximab was associated with decreased MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression compared to healthy subjects. Residual increased expression in MMP-9, IFNα, and COX2 might account for remaining inflammation and pain. High baseline ULK1 gene expression indicates a good response in respect to pain. PMID:27057353

  19. Rituximab Downregulates Gene Expression Associated with Cell Proliferation, Survival, and Proteolysis in the Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Link between High Baseline Autophagy-Related ULK1 Expression and Improved Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Pivanova, Anastasya N; Markova, Galina A; Lukina, Galina V; Aleksandrova, Elena N; Aleksankin, Andrey P; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To clarify molecular mechanisms for the response to rituximab in a longitudinal study. Methods. Peripheral blood from 16 RA patients treated with rituximab for a single treatment course and 26 healthy controls, blood and knee articular cartilages from 18 patients with long-standing RA, and cartilages from 14 healthy subjects were examined. Clinical response was assessed using ESR, ACPA, CRP, RF, DAS28 levels, CD19+ B-cell counts, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing scores. Protein expression in PBMCs was quantified using ELISA. Gene expression was performed with quantitative real-time PCR. Results. A decrease (p < 0.05) in DAS28, ESR, and CRP values after rituximab treatment was associated with the downregulation of MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression in the peripheral blood to levels found in healthy subjects. MMP-9 expression remained significantly higher compared to controls although decreased (p < 0.05) versus baseline. A negative correlation between baseline ULK1 gene expression and the number of tender joints at the end of follow-up was observed. Conclusions. The response to rituximab was associated with decreased MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression compared to healthy subjects. Residual increased expression in MMP-9, IFNα, and COX2 might account for remaining inflammation and pain. High baseline ULK1 gene expression indicates a good response in respect to pain. PMID:27057353

  20. Effectiveness of Submucosal Dexamethasone to Control Postoperative Pain & Swelling in Apicectomy of Maxillary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shahzad Ali; Khan, Irfanullah; Shah, Humera Shahzad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of submucosal dexamethasone injection to control postoperative pain and swelling in apicectomy of maxillary anterior teeth. Methods A randomized, controlled trial comprising 60 adult patients (68.3% male, 31.7% female) with no local or systemic problems was conducted. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was given 4mg dexamethasone injection perioperatively. Group B (control group) was treated conventionally without any steroid injection. Postoperative pain and swelling was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). Objective measurements of facial pain and swelling were performed daily up to six days postoperatively. Results Dexamethasone group showed significant reduction in pain and swelling postoperatively compared with the control. Conclusion Submucosal dexamethasone 4mg injection is an effective therapeutic strategy for swift and comfortable improvement after surgical procedure and has a significant effect on reducing postoperative pain and swelling. The treatment offers a simple, safe, painless, noninvasive and cost effective therapeutic option for moderate and severe cases. PMID:23267293

  1. Safety of liposome extended-release bupivacaine for postoperative pain control

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Juan; Kamar, Nawal; Melibary, Somayah; Quevedo, Eduardo; Bergese, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ideal postoperative pain management requires a multidisciplinary approach in combination with a variety of dosage regimens. Approximately 21–30% of patients experience moderate to severe pain in the postoperative period, which may have a significant impact on recovery rate, standard of living, psychological health, and postoperative complications. Objective: Analysis of the incidence and characterization of reported adverse effects with DepoFoam bupivacaine compared to conventional bupivacaine or placebo. Methods: A systematic review of prospective studies on the use of DepoFoam versus bupivacaine or placebo was performed in order to answer the clinically relevant question: is DepoFoam a safer formulation in place of bupivacaine single injection or continuous local infusion techniques for postoperative pain management? Inclusion criteria required randomized, controlled, double-blind trials in patients 18 years old or older, single dose used for postoperative pain control, and a primary procedure performed. Results: Six studies fitted the inclusion criteria for analysis, DepoFoam bupivacaine used in therapeutic doses was well-tolerated, had a higher safety margin, and showed a favorable safety profile compared to bupivacaine and control groups. Conclusion: Extended drug delivery system DepoFoam bupivacaine is a promising drug formulation that may significantly improve postoperative care and pain control in surgical patients. PMID:24817851

  2. The Effectiveness of Oral Corticosteroids for Management of Lumbar Radiating Pain: Randomized, Controlled Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungguk; Kim, Jaejung; Oh, Taebum

    2016-01-01

    Background Although both pregabalin and gabapentin are known to be useful for treating lumbar radiating pain and reducing the incidence of surgery, the oral corticosteroids sometimes offer a dramatic effect on severe radiating pain despite the lack of scientific evidence. Methods A total of 54 patients were enrolled among 703 patients who complained of lumbar radiating pain. Twenty patients who received an oral corticosteroid was classified as group A and 20 patients who received the control drugs (pregabalin or gabapentin) as group B. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Revised Roland Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ), Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire, lumbar radiating pain, objective patient satisfaction, and objective improvement of patients or physicians were assessed at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after medication. Results No difference in the sex ratio and age was observed between the groups (p = 0.70 and p = 0.13, respectively). Group A showed greater improvement in radiating pain after 2, 6, and 12 weeks than group B (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). No differences were observed between the groups in satisfaction at the beginning and 12 weeks after taking the medication (p = 0.062 and p = 0.061, respectively) and in objective improvement of patients and physicians (p = 0.657 and p = 0.748, respectively). Group A was less disabled and had greater physical health scores than group B (p = 0.014 and p = 0.017, respectively). Conclusions Oral corticosteroids for the treatment of lumbar radiating pain can be more effective in pain relief than gabapentin or pregabalin. The satisfaction of patients and physicians with the drug and objective improvement status were not inferior to that with gabapentin or pregabalin. PMID:27583108

  3. Role of cryoanalgesia in the control of pain after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Roxburgh, J C; Markland, C G; Ross, B A; Kerr, W F

    1987-04-01

    Thoracotomy causes severe postoperative pain, which is difficult to manage since the use of systemic analgesics often causes respiratory depression. Cryoanalgesia of the intercostal nerves has been advocated as an effective means of local analgesia without serious side effects. A prospective randomised blind trial to investigate the efficacy of the technique was carried out. A total of 53 patients undergoing thoracotomy were allocated to either the trial or a control group. At thoracotomy the surgeon was informed of the patient's trial allocation. The trial group received one minute of direct cryotherapy to at least five intercostal nerves related to the incision. All patients received methadone via the lumbar epidural route in a dose calculated according to their weight. A linear analogue assessment of postoperative pain was made by the patients as soon as they were sufficiently awake. An independent record of all postoperative analgesia was kept. After discharge from hospital further assessments were made at least six weeks after operation. Statistical analysis of the scores of postoperative pain and analgesic consumption showed that there was no significant difference between the trial and the control group. There was, however, a suggestion of an increase in the long term morbidity, although these figures were not amenable to statistical analysis. Thus is has not been possible to demonstrate a role for cryoanalgesia in the control of post thoracotomy pain. PMID:3303430

  4. Role of cryoanalgesia in the control of pain after thoracotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Roxburgh, J C; Markland, C G; Ross, B A; Kerr, W F

    1987-01-01

    Thoracotomy causes severe postoperative pain, which is difficult to manage since the use of systemic analgesics often causes respiratory depression. Cryoanalgesia of the intercostal nerves has been advocated as an effective means of local analgesia without serious side effects. A prospective randomised blind trial to investigate the efficacy of the technique was carried out. A total of 53 patients undergoing thoracotomy were allocated to either the trial or a control group. At thoracotomy the surgeon was informed of the patient's trial allocation. The trial group received one minute of direct cryotherapy to at least five intercostal nerves related to the incision. All patients received methadone via the lumbar epidural route in a dose calculated according to their weight. A linear analogue assessment of postoperative pain was made by the patients as soon as they were sufficiently awake. An independent record of all postoperative analgesia was kept. After discharge from hospital further assessments were made at least six weeks after operation. Statistical analysis of the scores of postoperative pain and analgesic consumption showed that there was no significant difference between the trial and the control group. There was, however, a suggestion of an increase in the long term morbidity, although these figures were not amenable to statistical analysis. Thus is has not been possible to demonstrate a role for cryoanalgesia in the control of post thoracotomy pain. PMID:3303430

  5. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  6. Improving pain management practice. A medical center moves beyond education to document and manage patient care.

    PubMed

    Super, A

    1996-01-01

    In 1993 nurses at Providence/ Portland Medical Center, Portland, OR, initiated a quality improvement project to assess pain levels in the facility's inpatients. A convenience sample in April 1993 showed an average pain intensity of 6.30 on a 0-10 scale (where O equals no pain and 10 is the worst pain imaginable). With the nursing administrator's support, pain management nurses presented a four-hour course in the basics of pain assessment and intervention to more than 850 nurses and 100 other professionals. In August 1993 nurses found that the intensity of patient pain had dropped to 5.70 on the 0-10 scale. Still dissatisfied with this situation, the nurses proceeded with a three-pronged approach to improve the medical center's quality of pain management: making the problem visible by better documentation and communication about pain; making an institutional commitment to pain management, including establishing pain management quality improvement as the medical center's first patient outcome institutional objective; eliciting the endorsement of influential committees. In August 1994 a random sample revealed patient pain had decreased to 3.21. The next step focused on empowering patients and families through education (e.g., revising the booklet on patient rights and responsibilities, posting signs in rooms encouraging patients to report pain) and clearing up myths and misconceptions through inservices and posters. A sampling in November 1995 showed that the average pain intensity of inpatients had been reduced to 2.32. Plans for continuous quality improvement interventions will further enhance patient comfort and recovery. PMID:10159177

  7. Pain Management in Long-Term Care Communities: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Cary; O’Neil, Kevin W.; Dancy, JaNeen; Berry, Carolyn A.; Stowell, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is underrecognized and undertreated in the long-term care (LTC) setting. To improve the management of pain for LTC residents, the authors implemented a quality improvement (QI) initiative at one LTC facility. They conducted a needs assessment to identify areas for improvement and designed a 2-hour educational workshop for facility staff and local clinicians. Participants were asked to complete a survey before and after the workshop, which showed significant improvement in their knowledge of pain management and confidence in their ability to recognize and manage residents’ pain. To measure the effectiveness of the QI initiative, the authors performed a chart review at baseline and at 3 and 8 months after the workshop and evaluated relevant indicators of adequate pain assessment and management. The post-workshop chart reviews showed significant improvement in how consistently employees documented pain characteristics (ie, location, intensity, duration) in resident charts and in their use of targeted pain assessments for residents with cognitive dysfunction. The proportion of charts that included a documented plan for pain assessment was high at baseline and remained stable throughout the study. Overall, the findings suggest a QI initiative is an effective way to improve pain care practices in the LTC setting. PMID:25949232

  8. Pain phenotype as a predictor for drug response in painful polyneuropathy-a retrospective analysis of data from controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Holbech, Jakob V; Bach, Flemming W; Finnerup, Nanna B; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2016-06-01

    The drugs available for treatment of neuropathic pain have somewhat disappointing efficacy with many patients left with limited or no effect. Individualized treatment based on phenotype according to presumed underlying pain mechanism(s) has been proposed to improve outcomes. We report a retrospective analysis of phenotype-specific effects of several neuropathic pain drugs, which were studied in a series of crossover, placebo-controlled, clinical trials. The data originate from 7 trials with similar design and outcome recordings, which all had a thorough baseline registration of symptoms, signs, and quantitative sensory testing. The latter was used to phenotype patients into subgroups reflecting presumed pain mechanisms. There were a total of 361 patient records distributed over treatments with 4 antidepressants and 4 anticonvulsants. Five of the drugs reduced total pain significantly compared with placebo. Only a few phenotype-specific differences in total pain reduction were found within the investigated drugs. Thus, imipramine reduced total pain 1.84 (CI: 0.02-3.67) and pregabalin 0.81 (CI: -0.67 to 2.29) in patients with than without gain of sensory function. Pregabalin showed a better effect in patients with preserved large fiber function with a mean difference in total pain reduction 1.31 (CI: 0.15-2.47). No phenotype-specific effects were found for venlafaxine, escitalopram, oxcarbazepine, valproic acid, levetiracetam, or St. John's wort. Thus, this post hoc analysis of 8 drugs with mainly nonselective actions on neuropathic pain mechanisms found limited usefulness of sensory phenotyping in pain as the basis for individualized treatment. PMID:27007067

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for orthodontic pain control: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Jian, F; Chen, J; Ye, N S; Huang, Y H; Wang, S; Huang, R H; Pei, J; Liu, P; Zhang, L; Zhao, Z H; Chen, Q M; Lai, W L; Lin, Y F

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for patients who experienced pain during orthodontic treatment. The baseline characteristics were assessed via questionnaires and oral examinations. Four hundred and fifty eligible individuals were recruited and randomized by computer-generated block randomization into three groups: cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (n = 150), ibuprofen intervention (n = 150), and no intervention (control; n = 150). Primary outcomes were the change from baseline in pain intensity measured with 100-mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores at 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 30 days after initial archwire placement. Outcomes assessment was blinded and followed the intention-to-treat principle. One hundred forty-three (95.30%), 145 (96.70%), and 141 (94.00%) individuals in the cognitive behavioral therapy, the ibuprofen, and the control groups, respectively, completed the one-month follow-up evaluations. Those in the cognitive behavioral therapy group showed a greater decrease in mean VAS scores than did those in the control group over the previous five time-points (p < 0.001). Cognitive behavioral therapy was shown to be effective in pain control during the initial stage of orthodontic treatment. The study registration number was ChiCTR-TRC-00000556.

  10. Improvement of pain-related self-management for cancer patients through a modular transitional nursing intervention: a cluster-randomized multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Patrick; Kuss, Oliver; Schmidt, Heike; Bauer, Alexander; Kitzmantel, Maria; Jordan, Karin; Krasemann, Susann; Landenberger, Margarete

    2014-04-01

    Patients' self-management skills are affected by their knowledge, activities, and attitudes toward pain management. This trial aimed to test the Self Care Improvement through Oncology Nursing (SCION)-PAIN program, a multimodular structured intervention to reduce patients' barriers to self-management of cancer pain. Two hundred sixty-three patients with diagnosed malignancy, pain>3 days, and average pain > or = 3/10 participated in a cluster-randomized trial on 18 wards in 2 German university hospitals. Patients on the intervention wards received, in addition to standard pain treatment, the SCION-PAIN program consisting of 3 modules: pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic pain management, and discharge management. The intervention was conducted by specially trained cancer nurses and included components of patient education, skills training, and counseling. Starting with admission, patients received booster sessions every third day and one follow-up telephone counseling session within 2 to 3 days after discharge. Patients in the control group received standard care. Primary end point was the group difference in patient-related barriers to self-management of cancer pain (Barriers Questionnaire-BQ II) 7 days after discharge. The SCION-PAIN program resulted in a significant reduction of patient-related barriers to pain management 1 week after discharge from the hospital: mean difference on BQ II was -0.49 points (95% confidence interval -0.87 points to -0.12 points; P=0.02). Furthermore, patients showed improved adherence to pain medication; odds ratio 8.58 (95% confidence interval 1.66-44.40; P=0.02). A post hoc analysis indicated reduced average and worst pain intensity as well as improved quality of life. This trial reveals the positive impact of a nursing intervention to improve patients' self-management of cancer pain.

  11. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwi-joong; Yoon, Jung-won; Park, Ji-hye; Cho, Chong-kwan; Yoo, Hwa-seung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP) treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae) to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases) with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ─ 20 mL injection) of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain. PMID:25780711

  12. Pain control by melatonin: Physiological and pharmacological effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Pain and anxiety are the most common neurological responses to many harmful or noxious stimuli and their management clinically is often challenging. Many of the frequently used morphine-based drugs, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen, while efficient for treating pain, lead to patients suffering from several unwanted side effects. Melatonin, produced from the pineal body is a hormone of darkness, is involved in the control of circadian rhythms, and exerts a number of pharmacological effects. Melatonin mediates its actions through MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors on the cell membrane and also through RZR/ROR nuclear orphan receptors. Chronic pain syndromes are often associated with the desynchronization of circadian and biological rhythms, which also cause disturbances in the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin-mediated analgesic effects seem to involve β-endorphins, GABA receptor, opioid receptors and the nitric oxide-arginine pathway. The effectiveness of melatonin as an analgesic and anxiolytic agent has been demonstrated in various animal models of pain and this led to the use of melatonin clinically in different pathological conditions and also in patients undergoing surgery. Melatonin was found to be effective in many of these cases as an anxiolytic and analgesic agent, indicating its clinical application. PMID:27698681

  13. Pain control by melatonin: Physiological and pharmacological effects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia; Huang, Wen-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Pain and anxiety are the most common neurological responses to many harmful or noxious stimuli and their management clinically is often challenging. Many of the frequently used morphine-based drugs, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen, while efficient for treating pain, lead to patients suffering from several unwanted side effects. Melatonin, produced from the pineal body is a hormone of darkness, is involved in the control of circadian rhythms, and exerts a number of pharmacological effects. Melatonin mediates its actions through MT1/MT2 melatonin receptors on the cell membrane and also through RZR/ROR nuclear orphan receptors. Chronic pain syndromes are often associated with the desynchronization of circadian and biological rhythms, which also cause disturbances in the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin-mediated analgesic effects seem to involve β-endorphins, GABA receptor, opioid receptors and the nitric oxide-arginine pathway. The effectiveness of melatonin as an analgesic and anxiolytic agent has been demonstrated in various animal models of pain and this led to the use of melatonin clinically in different pathological conditions and also in patients undergoing surgery. Melatonin was found to be effective in many of these cases as an anxiolytic and analgesic agent, indicating its clinical application.

  14. Effectiveness of femoral nerve blockade for pain control after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Victor M; Fallis, Wendy M; Slonowsky, Dean; Kwarteng, Kwadwo; Yeung, Colin K L

    2006-10-01

    Control of postoperative pain is a major concern for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to investigate pain control and opioid use, as well as length of stay, ambulation time, antiemetic use, and degree of mobilization for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, comparing those receiving femoral nerve block (FNB) to those receiving no femoral nerve block. Using retrospective patient record data, 133 subjects from an acute care community hospital in western Canada were split into three groups: no FNB (control group, n = 49), single-shot FNB (n = 33), and continuous FNB (n = 51). There was a statistically significant improvement in pain control on day of surgery for the FNB group compared with the no-FNB group, and reduction in opioid usage on days 0, 1, and 2 in the continuous FNB group compared with the no-FNB and single-shot group. Also noted was a statistically significant reduction in antiemetic use in the FNB compared with the no-FNB group on the day after surgery. This study is in accordance with earlier studies that support continuous FNB as an effective method for achieving postoperative pain control and reducing opioid use for patients undergoing TKA.

  15. Improving patient outcomes through advanced pain management techniques in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Dalury, David F; Emerson, Roger H; Hawkins, Richard J; Joshi, Girish P; Stulberg, Bernard N

    2013-10-01

    Pain following orthopedic surgery is common and often suboptimally managed, with many patients reporting acute moderate to severe pain following surgery. Opioids are often used to manage this pain, yet this can result in significant side effects and complications, including constipation, nausea, vomiting, respiratory distress, and other central nervous system issues. Multimodal therapy that includes surgical site infiltration with extended release local anesthetic has been seen as a new way to minimize this pain for patients, which can result in improved quality of life and shorter length of hospital stay. This article examines the use of bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL®; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California), a non-opioid product for pain management. Liposomal bupivacaine uses DepoFoam® technology that allows for the extended release of injected drugs. When used as the foundation of a multimodal regimen, it is effective in reducing postsurgical pain for up to 72 hours while reducing the need for opioids for pain relief.

  16. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked to follow a low-fat, plant-based diet, with weekly classes for support in following the prescribed diet, and to take a vitamin B12 supplement. The control group was asked to take the same vitamin B12 supplement, but received no other intervention. At baseline, midpoint and 20 weeks, clinical, laboratory and questionnaire data were collected. Questionnaires included an analog ‘worst pain' scale, Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, global impression scale, Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Neuropathy Total Symptom Score, a weekly pain diary and Norfolk Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results: After 20 weeks, body weight change with the intervention was −6.4 kg (95% confidence interval (CI) −9.4 to −3.4, P<0.001) in an effect size analysis. Electrochemical skin conductance in the foot improved by an average of 12.4 microseimens (95% CI 1.2–23.6, P=0.03) with the intervention in an effect size analysis. The between-group difference in change in pain, as measured by the McGill pain questionnaire, was −8.2 points (95% CI −16.1 to −0.3, P=0.04). Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument questionnaire score change was −1.6 points (95% CI −3.0 to −0.2, P=0.03). Conclusions: Improvements were seen in some clinical and pain measures. This pilot study suggests the potential value of a plant-based diet intervention, including weekly support classes, for treating painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26011582

  17. Normalization of Pain-Evoked Neural Responses Using Spontaneous EEG Improves the Performance of EEG-Based Cross-Individual Pain Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yanru; Huang, Gan; Tu, Yiheng; Tan, Ao; Hung, Yeung Sam; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    An effective physiological pain assessment method that complements the gold standard of self-report is highly desired in pain clinical research and practice. Recent studies have shown that pain-evoked electroencephalography (EEG) responses could be used as a readout of perceived pain intensity. Existing EEG-based pain assessment is normally achieved by cross-individual prediction (i.e., to train a prediction model from a group of individuals and to apply the model on a new individual), so its performance is seriously hampered by the substantial inter-individual variability in pain-evoked EEG responses. In this study, to reduce the inter-individual variability in pain-evoked EEG and to improve the accuracy of cross-individual pain prediction, we examined the relationship between pain-evoked EEG, spontaneous EEG, and pain perception on a pain EEG dataset, where a large number of laser pulses (>100) with a wide energy range were delivered. Motivated by our finding that an individual's pain-evoked EEG responses is significantly correlated with his/her spontaneous EEG in terms of magnitude, we proposed a normalization method for pain-evoked EEG responses using one's spontaneous EEG to reduce the inter-individual variability. In addition, a nonlinear relationship between the level of pain perception and pain-evoked EEG responses was obtained, which inspired us to further develop a new two-stage pain prediction strategy, a binary classification of low-pain and high-pain trials followed by a continuous prediction for high-pain trials only, both of which used spontaneous-EEG-normalized magnitudes of evoked EEG responses as features. Results show that the proposed normalization strategy can effectively reduce the inter-individual variability in pain-evoked responses, and the two-stage pain prediction method can lead to a higher prediction accuracy. PMID:27148028

  18. Vitamin D Supplementation for Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain in Non-Western Immigrants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schreuder, Ferdinand; Bernsen, Roos M. D.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Many non-Western immigrants report musculoskeletal pains that are hard to treat. We studied the effect of high-dose vitamin D3 on nonspecific persistent musculoskeletal complaints in vitamin D–deficient non-Western immigrants and assessed correlation of pain patterns with benefit. METHODS We conducted a semi-crossover randomized controlled trial between February 2008 and February 2010 in primary care in 84 non-Western immigrants visiting their general practitioner for nonspecific musculoskeletal pain. At baseline, patients were randomized to placebo or vitamin D (150,000 IU vitamin D3 orally); at week 6, patients in the original vitamin D group were randomized a second time to receive vitamin D (again) or to switch to placebo, whereas patients in the original placebo group were all switched to vitamin D. The main outcome was self-assessed change in pain after the first 6 weeks. RESULTS Patients in the vitamin D group were significantly more likely than their counterparts in the placebo group to report pain relief 6 weeks after treatment (34.9% vs 19.5%, P = .04). The former were also more likely to report an improved ability to walk stairs (21.0% vs 8.4%, P = .008). Pain pattern was not correlated with the success of treatment. In a nonsignificant trend, patients receiving vitamin D over 12 weeks were more likely to have an improvement than patients receiving it over 6 weeks. CONCLUSIONS There is a small positive effect 6 weeks after high-dose vitamin D3 on persistent nonspecific musculoskeletal pain. Future research should focus on longer follow-up, higher supplementation doses, and mental health. PMID:23149532

  19. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Nicholas A. D.C.

    2010-05-31

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  20. Reduction Of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain With Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT): A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Pressure Algometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Nicholas A.

    2010-05-01

    Cranial Laser Reflex Technique (CLRT) is a novel method involving a brief low level laser stimulation of specific cranial reflex points to reduce musculoskeletal pain. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the immediate effects of CLRT with a sham treatment on chronic musculoskeletal pain using pressure algometry in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods: Fifty-seven (57) volunteers with various musculoskeletal pains gave informed consent and were randomly allocated to either the CLRT treatment or sham group. Painful trigger points and/or tender spinal joints were found in each patient. Using a digital algometer, the pain/pressure threshold (PPT) was determined and a pain rating was given using a numerical pain scale from 0-10. CLRT or a sham treatment was performed with a 50 mW, 840 nm laser, for a maximum of 20 seconds to the each cranial reflex. The initial pressure (PPT) was immediately delivered to the same spot, and the pain rated again. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in pain scores between CLRT and sham groups immediately following treatment. Improvement was reported in 95% of the treatment group, with 59% reporting an improvement of 2 points or greater. The average change in pain scores in the treatment group was 2.6 points (p = 0.000) versus negligible change (p= 0.4) for the control group. Conclusion: The results show that CLRT is effective at immediately reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Further studies are needed with additional outcome measures to.

  1. Improvement in Automatic Postural Coordination Following Alexander Technique Lessons in a Person With Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Timothy W; Horak, Fay B; Henry, Sharon M

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose The relationship between abnormal postural coordination and back pain is unclear. The Alexander Technique (AT) aims to improve postural coordination by using conscious processes to alter automatic postural coordination and ongoing muscular activity, and it has been reported to reduce low back pain. This case report describes the use of the AT with a client with low back pain and the observed changes in automatic postural responses and back pain. Case Description The client was a 49-year-old woman with a 25-year history of left-sided, idiopathic, lumbrosacral back pain. Automatic postural coordination was measured using a force plate during horizontal platform translations and one-legged standing. Outcomes The client was tested monthly for 4 months before AT lessons and for 3 months after lessons. Before lessons, she consistently had laterally asymmetric automatic postural responses to translations. After AT lessons, the magnitude and asymmetry of her responses and balance improved and her low back pain decreased. Discussion Further research is warranted to study whether AT lessons improve low back pain–associated abnormalities in automatic postural coordination and whether improving automatic postural coordination helps to reduce low back pain. [Cacciatore TW, Horak FB, Henry SM. Improvement in automatic postural coordination following Alexander Technique lessons in a person with low back pain. PMID:15921477

  2. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System.

    PubMed

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery.

  3. Hydroalcoholic Extract of Ferulago angulata Improves Memory and Pain in Brain Hypoperfusion Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mirzapour, Sahar; Rafieirad, Maryam; Rouhi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral ischemia causes some disorders in behavioral patterns, including memory disorders and pain, which is due to the production of free radicals. Ferulago angulata, known in Iran as chavir, contains some bioactive compounds having antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of two weeks oral administration of hydroalcoholic extract of F. angulate (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) on pain as well as active and passive avoidance memories after permanent, bilateral common carotid artery occlusion or cerebral ischemia/hypoperfusion in male adult rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 35 male rats were randomly allocated to test and control groups. To make animal model of permanent cerebral hypoperfusion/ischemia, carotid arteries were ligatured as upper and lower and cut bilaterally. Results: It was found that the administration of 400 mg/kg hydroalcoholic extract of F. angulate for two weeks after brain hypoperfusion ischemia increased the passive avoidance memory (P < 0.001) and latency time of painful tail reflex significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Ferulago angulata extract, because of its antioxidant activities, is probably capable of removing free radicals and oxidant substances from brain and thus it can improve behavioral disorders in brain hypoperfusion ischemia model. PMID:25866714

  4. Thoracic sympathetic block for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I: a double-blind randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Roberto de Oliveira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Yeng, Lin Tchia; Cantara, Mirlene Gardin; Faria, Viviane Gentil; Liggieri, Victor; Loduca, Adrianna; Müller, Barbara Maria; Souza, Andrea C M S; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi

    2014-11-01

    Pain relief in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) remains a major challenge, in part due to the lack of evidence-based treatment trials specific for this condition. We performed a long-term randomized, double-blinded active-control study to evaluate the efficacy of thoracic sympathetic block (TSB) for upper limb type I CRPS. The study objective was to evaluate the analgesic effect of TSB in CRPS. Patients with CRPS type I were treated with standardized pharmacological and physical therapy and were randomized to either TSB or control procedure as an add-on treatment. Clinical data, pain intensity, and interference (Brief Pain Inventory), pain dimensions (McGill Pain Questionnaire [MPQ]), neuropathic characteristics (Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI]), mood, upper limb function (Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand), and quality of life were assessed before, and at 1 month and 12 months after the procedure. Thirty-six patients (19 female, 44.7 ± 11.1 years of age) underwent the procedure (17 in the TSB group). Average pain intensity at 1 month was not significantly different after TSB (3.5 ± 3.2) compared to control procedure (4.8 ± 2.7; P=0.249). At 12 months, however, the average pain item was significantly lower in the TSB group (3.47 ± 3.5) compared to the control group (5.86 ± 2.9; P=0.046). Scores from the MPQ, evoked-pain symptoms subscores (NPSI), and depression scores (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were significantly lower in the TSB group compared to the control group at 1 and at 12 months. Other measurements were not influenced by the treatment. Quality of life was only slightly improved by TSB. No major adverse events occurred. Larger, multicentric trials should be performed to confirm these original findings.

  5. Ketorolac for Pain Control With Intrauterine Device Placement: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Lynn L.; Ward, Kristy K.; Mody, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intramuscular ketorolac compared to placebo saline injection for pain control with intrauterine device (IUD) placement. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients received ketorolac 30mg or placebo saline intramuscular injection 30 minutes prior to IUD placement. The primary outcome was pain with IUD placement on a 10cm visual analog scale (VAS). Sample size was calculated to provide 80% power to show a 2.0cm difference (α=0.05) in the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included pain with study drug injection, speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and at 5 and 15 minutes after IUD placement. Results A total of 67 women participated in the study, 33 in the ketorolac arm and 34 in the placebo arm. There were no differences in baseline demographics including age, BMI, and race. There were no differences in median pain scores for IUD placement in the placebo versus ketorolac groups (5.2cm vs 3.6cm, p=0.99). There was a decrease in median pain scores at 5 minutes (2.2cm vs 0.3cm, p=<0.001) and 15 minutes (1.6cm vs 0.1cm, p=<0.001) after IUD placement but no difference for all other time points. Nulliparous participants (n=16, 8 per arm) had a decrease in pain scores with IUD placement (8.1cm vs 5.4cm, p=0.02). In this study, 22% of participants in the placebo group and 18% in the ketorolac group reported injection pain was as painful as IUD placement. Conclusions Ketorolac does not reduce pain with IUD placement but does reduce pain at 5 and 15 minutes after placement. PMID:26241253

  6. Pain Perception and Stabilometric Parameters in People With Chronic Low Back Pain After a Pilates Exercise Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Various exercise interventions, such as Pilates exercises and traditional physical therapy methods, are employed to decrease low back pain (LBP). Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is distinct from LBP, however, as the distribution of pain is restricted to the region between the costal margin and the inferior gluteal. The aim of our randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a program of Pilates exercises on pain perception and stabilometric parameters in patients with NSLBP.Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated, using a 1:1 scheme, to either the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG). The EG completed a 14-week program of Pilates exercises, performed thrice per week under the supervision of an exercise specialist, while the CG was managed with a social program only. Measures of posturography and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain perception were obtained at baseline (T0) and after the 14 weeks of intervention (T)1.Posturography measures improved for patients in the EG, with both eyes open and eyes closed (P < 0.05). There were no statistical differences in posturography in the CG. ODI decreased significantly in both groups over the 14 weeks of the study protocol: EG, T0, 13.7 ± 5.0 compared with T1, 6.5 ± 4.0 (P < 0.001); and CG, T0, 10.7 ± 7.8 compared with T1, 8.4 ± 7.8 (P < 0.01). A greater extent of reduction in pain was achieved in the EG.The Pilates exercise program yielded improvements in pain and posturography outcomes. Our study also confirms the applicability of posturography in evaluating postural instability in patients with NSLBP. Due to our relatively small study group, future studies would be necessary to confirm our findings.

  7. Pain Perception and Stabilometric Parameters in People With Chronic Low Back Pain After a Pilates Exercise Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Patti, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Messina, Giuseppe; Montalto, Maria Alessandra; Bellafiore, Marianna; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Iovane, Angelo; Palma, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Various exercise interventions, such as Pilates exercises and traditional physical therapy methods, are employed to decrease low back pain (LBP). Nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP) is distinct from LBP, however, as the distribution of pain is restricted to the region between the costal margin and the inferior gluteal. The aim of our randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a program of Pilates exercises on pain perception and stabilometric parameters in patients with NSLBP.Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated, using a 1:1 scheme, to either the experimental group (EG) or control group (CG). The EG completed a 14-week program of Pilates exercises, performed thrice per week under the supervision of an exercise specialist, while the CG was managed with a social program only. Measures of posturography and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) for pain perception were obtained at baseline (T0) and after the 14 weeks of intervention (T)1.Posturography measures improved for patients in the EG, with both eyes open and eyes closed (P < 0.05). There were no statistical differences in posturography in the CG. ODI decreased significantly in both groups over the 14 weeks of the study protocol: EG, T0, 13.7 ± 5.0 compared with T1, 6.5 ± 4.0 (P < 0.001); and CG, T0, 10.7 ± 7.8 compared with T1, 8.4 ± 7.8 (P < 0.01). A greater extent of reduction in pain was achieved in the EG.The Pilates exercise program yielded improvements in pain and posturography outcomes. Our study also confirms the applicability of posturography in evaluating postural instability in patients with NSLBP. Due to our relatively small study group, future studies would be necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:26765419

  8. Visual distraction alone for the improvement of colonoscopy-related pain and satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Shotaro; Higurashi, Takuma; Uchiyama, Shiori; Sakai, Eiji; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Nonaka, Takashi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of a relaxing visual distraction alone on patient pain, anxiety, and satisfaction during colonoscopy. METHODS: This study was designed as an endoscopist-blinded randomized controlled trial with 60 consecutively enrolled patients who underwent elective colonoscopy at Yokohama City University Hospital, Japan. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 watched a silent movie using a head-mounted display, while group 2 only wore the display. All of the colonoscopies were performed without sedation. We examined pain, anxiety, and the satisfaction of patients before and after the procedure using questionnaires that included the Visual Analog Scale. Patients were also asked whether they would be willing to use the same method for a repeat procedure. RESULTS: A total of 60 patients were allocated to two groups. Two patients assigned to group 1 and one patient assigned to group 2 were excluded after the randomization. Twenty-eight patients in group 1 and 29 patients in group 2 were entered into the final analysis. The groups were similar in terms of gender, age, history of prior colonoscopy, and pre-procedural anxiety score. The two groups were comparable in terms of the cecal insertion rate, the time to reach the cecum, the time needed for the total procedure, and vital signs. The median anxiety score during the colonoscopy did not differ significantly between the two groups (median scores, 20 vs 24). The median pain score during the procedure was lower in group 1, but the difference was not significant (median scores, 24.5 vs 42). The patients in group 1 reported significantly higher median post-procedural satisfaction levels, compared with the patients in group 2 (median scores, 89 vs 72, P = 0.04). Nearly three-quarters of the patients in group 1 wished to use the same method for repeat procedures, and the difference in rates between the two groups was statistically significant (75.0% vs 48.3%, P = 0.04). Patients with greater

  9. Assessing experimental visceral pain in dairy cattle: A pilot, prospective, blinded, randomized, and controlled study focusing on spinal pain proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rialland, P; Otis, C; de Courval, M-L; Mulon, P-Y; Harvey, D; Bichot, S; Gauvin, D; Livingston, A; Beaudry, F; Hélie, P; Frank, D; Del Castillo, J R E; Troncy, E

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have verified the validity of behavioral and physiological methods of pain assessment in cattle. This prospective, blinded, randomized controlled experimental study aimed to validate different methods of pain assessment during acute and chronic (up to 21 d postintervention) conditions in dairy cattle, in response to 3 analgesic treatments for traumatic reticuloperitonitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and mechanical sensitization were measured as indicators of centralized pain. Proteomics in the CSF were examined to detect specific (to pain intensity) and sensitive (responsive to analgesia) markers. Recordings of spontaneous behavior with video analysis, telemetered motor activity, pain scales, electrodermal activity, and plasma cortisol concentration were quantified at regular intervals. Cows were assigned to group 1 (n=4, standard control receiving aspirin), group 2 (n=5, test group receiving preemptive tolfenamic acid), or group 3 (n=3, positive control receiving preemptive multimodal analgesia composed of epidural morphine, plus tolfenamic acid and butorphanol). Rescue analgesia was administered as needed. Generalized estimating equations tested group differences and the influence of rescue analgesia on the measurements. All 3 groups demonstrated a long-term decrease in a CSF protein identified as transthyretin. The decrease in transthyretin expression inversely correlated with the expected level of analgesia (group 1<2<3). Moreover, in group 1, CSF noradrenaline decreased long term, cows were hypersensitive to mechanical stimulation, and they demonstrated signs of discomfort with higher motor activity and "agitation while lying" recorded from video analysis. Decreased "feeding behavior," observer-reported pain scales, electrodermal activity, and plasma cortisol concentration were inconsistent to differentiate pain intensity between groups. In summary, changes in CSF biomarkers and mechanical sensitization reflected modulation of central

  10. Patient-reported improvements in health are maintained 2 years after completing a short course of cognitive behaviour therapy, exercise or both treatments for chronic widespread pain: long-term results from the MUSICIAN randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Marcus; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham; McBeth, John; Lovell, Karina; Keeley, Phil; Hannaford, Philip C; Symmons, Deborah P M; MacDonald, Ross I R; Woby, Steve; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The MUSICIAN study has previously shown short-term benefit but only marginal cost-effectiveness for two non-pharmacological interventions for chronic widespread pain (CWP). We wished to determine their long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods A 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial based in primary care in the UK. People were eligible if they were aged ≥25 years with CWP for which they had consulted their general practitioner. The interventions were a 6-month telephone cognitive behaviour therapy (tCBT) and/or a tailored exercise programme, in comparison to usual care. The primary outcome was patient-reported change in health. Results 884 persons were eligible, 442 were randomised and 81.7% were followed up 24 months post-treatment. In comparison to usual care (positive outcome 12.8%), tCBT (35.4%; OR 3.7 95% CI (1.8 to 8.0)), exercise (29.3%; OR 2.8 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) and both interventions (31.2%; OR 3.1 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) were significantly more effective. There was only a small decrease in effectiveness over time for individual and combined treatments. Those with more intense/disabling pain, higher distress and those who exhibited passive coping at baseline were more likely to have a positive outcome with tCBT than persons without these characteristics. tCBT was associated with the greatest increase in quality of life and lowest costs. Cost per quality adjusted life year was £3957–£5917 depending on method of analysis. Conclusions A short course of tCBT for people with CWP was effective long-term and was highly cost-effective. Exercise was also effective but delivered positive outcome for fewer patients at greater cost, and there was no advantage for patients receiving both interventions. Trial registration number ISRCTN67013851. PMID:26509056

  11. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: −17.9 mm VAS, 95%CI −29.2 to −6.6; PM: −19.7, 95%CI −32.2 to −7.2; PaDi: −1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI −2.5 to −0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  12. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  13. Traditional Chinese Medications for Knee Osteoarthritis Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Zhan, Hongsheng; Marszalek, Jolanta; Chung, Mei; Lin, Xun; Zhang, Min; Pang, Jian; Wang, Chenchen

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medication (TCM) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We conducted the first systematic review of the best quantitative and qualitative evidence currently available in order to evaluate the effectiveness of TCM in relieving pain in knee OA. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using three English and four Chinese biomedical databases from their inception through March 1, 2015. We included randomized controlled trials of TCM for knee OA with intervention durations of at least two weeks. The effects of TCM on pain and other clinical symptoms were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). The total effectiveness rate, which was used to assess overall pain, physical performance and wellness, was also measured. Two researchers independently extracted data on study design, population characteristics, duration, intervention, outcomes, risk of bias, and primary results. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis when appropriate. We also explored factors that could explain the heterogeneity by conducting subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Twenty-three studies, totaling 2362 subjects, met the eligibility criteria. Treatments were formulated with an average of 8 Chinese herbs and were prescribed based on the traditional Chinese diagnostic method of syndrome differentiation. The mean treatment duration was seven weeks, with oral administration occurring one to three times a day. Compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and intra-articular hyaluronate injections, 18 of the studies showed significantly improved VAS pain scores (Mean Difference [MD] [Formula: see text] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.94; [Formula: see text]), six of the studies showed significantly improved WOMAC pain subscale scores (MD [Formula: see text] 2.23; 95% CI, 0.56 to 3.91; [Formula: see text]), and 16 of the trials

  14. Early maladaptive schema factors, chronic pain and depressiveness: a study with 271 chronic pain patients and 331 control participants.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Tom; Saariaho, Anita; Karila, Irma; Joukamaa, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain and depression are coexisting entities with high simultaneous prevalence. Both are linked with early adversities. Early maladaptive schemas (EMS) can be seen as a reflection of these adversities. EMSs extensively indicate underlying psychic patterns and provide a good opportunity to detect covert processes and psychic shapes (latent factors), which create the basis of how people rate their schemas. The purpose of this study was to explore these latent, higher order schema factors (SF) and to find out how they are associated with pain intensity or depression in chronic pain patients and a control sample. The study subjects consisted of 271 first-visit pain patients and 331 control participants. Sociodemographic and pain data were gathered by questionnaire; 18 EMSs were measured with the Young Schema Questionnaire (short form) and depressiveness was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory, Version II. Exploratory factor and regression analyses were used. The chronic pain patient group showed two SFs. The first SF showed a shameful, defective, socially isolated, failure, emotionally inhibited, deprived, submissive and resigned pattern. The second SF showed a demanding, approval seeking, self-sacrificing and punitive pattern. SF1 predicted more than half of the depressiveness in the pain patient sample. A three-factor structure was found in the control sample, and SFs 1 and 3 together predicted almost one-third of depressiveness. The pain patient and the control groups had a different, higher order factor structure. We assume that SF1 in the pain patients reflected a rather serious, undefined early psychic trauma and was also associated with their depressiveness. PMID:21210495

  15. Comprehensive care of pain: Developing systems and tools to improve patient care and resident education.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Julie; Devlin, Kwanza; Krohn, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Chronic non-cancer pain is a common condition associated with tremendous risk for morbidity and mortality. In many settings, the management of chronic non-cancer pain by primary care providers, although customary, can be difficult due to inadequate training and conflicts between patient expectations and best practices. Resident physicians, faculty, and staff of this family medicine residency program developed a comprehensive chronic pain management program to address these issues while improving patient outcomes. The program was aligned with evidence-based chronic non-cancer pain management strategies yet tailored to the needs of the providers and patients and the strengths of the clinic. In the end, the societal demand for improved chronic non-cancer pain management resulted in a massive curricular and clinical practice overhaul for this residency program. PMID:27497454

  16. Can we improve parents’ management of their children’s postoperative pain at home?

    PubMed Central

    Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Twycross, Alison; Mifflin, Katherine; Archibald, Karen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thousands of children undergo surgery each year, and a shift toward same-day surgeries and decreased lengths of hospital stay results in parents being increasingly responsible for their child’s postoperative care. Recent studies have tested interventions designed to improve parent management of their children’s postoperative pain at home, but progress in this area has been limited by a lack of synthesis of these findings. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of interventions aimed at improving parent management of children’s postoperative pain at home. METHODS: Articles evaluating interventions to improve management of their children’s postoperative pain were identified using a library scientist-designed search strategy applied in EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Two independent raters assessed each study for eligibility and extracted data. RESULTS: Of the 147 articles identified for the review, eight met the inclusion criteria. Interventions included pain education, training in pain assessment, education on distraction, instruction in around-the-clock dosing and nurse coaching. Overall, results of comparisons of pain intensity and analgesic administration were modest. The intervention with the largest effect size was instruction in around-the-clock dosing, either alone or in combination with nurse coaching. Results of studies investigating pain assessment, pain education and distraction trials revealed small to medium effect sizes. CONCLUSIONS: Results of trials investigating interventions to improve parent management of their children’s postoperative pain at home were modest. Future studies should further examine barriers and facilitators to pain management to design more effective interventions. PMID:25106030

  17. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  18. Does mindfulness improve outcomes in patients with chronic pain? Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Fathima L Marikar; Mercer, Stewart W; Atherton, Rachel J; Clague, Fiona; Keen, Andrew; Scott, Neil W; Bond, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic pain and its associated distress and disability are common reasons for seeking medical help. Patients with chronic pain use primary healthcare services five times more than the rest of the population. Mindfulness has become an increasingly popular self-management technique. Aim To assess the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for patients with chronic pain. Design and setting Systematic review and meta-analysis including randomised controlled trials of mindfulness-based interventions for chronic pain. There was no restriction to study site or setting. Method The databases MEDLINE®, Embase, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Index to Theses were searched. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened iteratively against inclusion criteria of: randomised controlled trials of mindfulness-based intervention; patients with non-malignant chronic pain; and economic, clinical, or humanistic outcome reported. Included studies were assessed with the Yates Quality Rating Scale. Meta-analysis was conducted. Results Eleven studies were included. Chronic pain conditions included: fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic musculoskeletal pain, failed back surgery syndrome, and mixed aetiology. Papers were of mixed methodological quality. Main outcomes reported were pain intensity, depression, physical functioning, quality of life, pain acceptance, and mindfulness. Economic outcomes were rarely reported. Meta-analysis effect sizes for clinical outcomes ranged from 0.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.05 to 0.30) (depression) to 1.32 (95% CI = −1.19 to 3.82) (sleep quality), and for humanistic outcomes 0.03 (95% CI = −0.66 to 0.72) (mindfulness) to 1.58 (95% CI = −0.57 to 3.74) (pain acceptance). Studies with active, compared with inactive, control groups showed smaller effects. Conclusion There is limited evidence for effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for patients with chronic pain. Better-quality studies are required. PMID

  19. Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bablis, Peter; Pollard, Henry; Bonello, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S); levator scapulae region (LS); sternocleidomastoid region (SCM) and temporomandibular region (TMJ). For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables) using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10) had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P < 0.001). Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly improved when

  20. [Controlled release oxycodone--a new option in the treatment of severe and very severe pain. Review of studies on neuropathic, physical activity-related and postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Stiehl, M

    2004-08-01

    Opioids are used not only in the treatment of cancer pain, but also pain of non-malignant genesis. In recent years, the efficacy of controlled release (CR) oxycodone in the treatment of the above-mentioned types of pain has been investigated in a number of clinical studies. The present article reviews the clinical studies that have been already published. Thanks to its outstanding pharmacological and pharmacodynamic properties, CR oxycodone is fast acting and brings about long lasting pain relief, coupled with benefits for physical and mental activities. This results in a significant quality-of-life improvement. Oral therapy with CR oxycodone is safe and can be precisely controlled. Since there are no clinical relevant metabolites, there is no danger of accumulation in patients with renal infarction due to these metabolites. Side effects are those typical for opioids, and are readily manageable. CR oxycodone is a good alternative in the treatment of non-cancer pain and can be recommended as first-line treatment for the above-mentioned indications. PMID:16739361

  1. A decade of improvement in pain education and clinical practice in developing countries: IASP initiatives.

    PubMed

    Bond, Michael

    2012-05-01

    1. Epidemiological studies, in the late 1990s and early 2000s, on the extent of pain in the community of western countries revealed a prevalence of around 18%, with significant effects on work and social activities despite 30 years of pain education programmes. 2. A survey by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Developing Countries on the extent of pain education and clinical training, and the barriers to them, was published as report in 2007 and confirmed significant deficiencies and problems in all areas. 3. An IASP Developing Countries Taskforce was established in 2002 to facilitate improvements in pain education and management in developing countries through a grants support programme for bottom-up projects from developing country members. 4. Clinical training posts in centres in Thailand, South America and South Africa have been established to improve the clinical training of pain clinicians and, through them, to develop pain services in their countries of origin in which services are poorly developed or absent. 5. There has been a major surge in the demand for and development of programmes and clinical training in developing countries since 2002, reflected in greatly increased local activity in various regions of the world. 6. Based on the ethical/moral belief that pain treatment is a human right, the IASP has recently increased its levels of advocacy to support this belief. PMID:26516474

  2. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control. PMID:26228573

  3. Bioreactor control improves bioprocess performance.

    PubMed

    Simutis, Rimvydas; Lübbert, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The performance of bioreactors is not only determined by productivity but also by process quality, which is mainly determined by variances in the process variables. As fluctuations in these quantities directly affect the variability in the product properties, combatting distortions is the main task of practical quality assurance. The straightforward way of reducing this variability is keeping the product formation process tightly under control. Purpose of this keynote is to show that there is enough evidence in literature showing that the performance of the fermentation processes can significantly be improved by feedback control. Most of the currently used open loop control procedures can be replaced by relatively simple feedback techniques. It is shown by practical examples that such a retrofitting does not require significant changes in the well-established equipment. Feedback techniques are best in assuring high reproducibility of the industrial cultivation processes and thus in assuring the quality of their products. Many developments in supervising and controlling industrial fermentations can directly be taken over in manufacturing processes. Even simple feedback controllers can efficiently improve the product quality. It's the time now that manufacturers follow the developments in most other industries and improve process quality by automatic feedback control.

  4. Incidence of vertical phoria on postural control during binocular vision: what perspective for prevention to nonspecific chronic pain management?

    PubMed

    Matheron, Eric; Kapoula, Zoï

    2015-01-01

    Vertical heterophoria (VH) is the latent vertical misalignment of the eyes when the retinal images are dissociated, vertical orthophoria (VO) when there is no misalignment. Studies on postural control, during binocular vision in upright stance, reported that healthy subjects with small VH vs. VO are less stable, but the experimental cancellation of VH with an appropriate prism improves postural stability. The same behavior was recorded in nonspecific chronic back pain subjects, all with VH. It was hypothesized that, without refraction problems, VH indicates a perturbation of the somaesthetic cues required in the sensorimotor loops involved in postural control and the capacity of the CNS to optimally integrate these cues, suggesting prevention possibilities. Sensorimotor conflict can induce pain and modify sensory perception in some healthy subjects; some nonspecific pain or chronic pain could result from such prolonged conflict in which VH could be a sign, with new theoretical and clinical implications.

  5. Is it better to have controlled and lost than never to have controlled at all? An experimental investigation of control over pain.

    PubMed

    Crombez, Geert; Eccleston, Christopher; De Vlieger, Petra; Van Damme, Stefaan; De Clercq, Armand

    2008-07-31

    Trying to control pain is a common human goal. But little is know about what happens when one loses control over pain. This paper reports an experiment with 74 healthy volunteers, half of whom were given control over a pain stimulus and subsequently lost control, and half of whom never had control over the pain. This study investigates whether having had control and lost it would result in a more unpleasant pain experience, more fear about impending pain, a heightened vigilance to pain, and greater interference on a secondary task. Participants in the experimental group first learned to avoid a painful stimulus by correctly responding to a card sorting task, but later on lost control over the painful stimulus. In the yoked comparison group, participants had no control over the painful stimulus from the beginning. Results indicated that losing control over pain and, relatedly, attempting to control uncontrollable pain have significant costs such as a higher fear of the impending pain stimulus and retarded performance on a secondary task. When attempts to avoid pain are blocked, individuals persist in their avoidance attempts, try harder, and narrow their focus of attention upon the problem to be solved. These findings are discussed within the context of a dual process model of coping with uncontrollable adverse events [Brandtstädter J, Renner G. Tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment: explication and age-related analysis of assimilative and accommodative strategies of coping. Psychol Aging 1990;5:58-67] and possible mechanisms for perseverance with ineffective solutions.

  6. Renal Artery Embolization Controls Intractable Pain in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Seong Tai; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Kim, Choon-Yul; Chang, Yoon Sik

    1999-09-15

    A 65-year-old man with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) and chronic renal failure suffered from intractable abdominal pain and distension for 2 weeks. Meperidine infusion did not alleviate his pain. However, pain and abdominal distension were successfully controlled by embolization of both renal arteries.

  7. Effects of the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity and Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Peter; Gard, Gunvor; Eriksson, Margareta K

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions with a focus on behavior change have been used for pain management, but studies of Web-based interventions integrated in clinical practice are lacking. To emphasize the development of cognitive skills and behavior, and to increase activity and self-care in rehabilitation, the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity (Web-BCPA) was developed and added to multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR). Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of MMR in combination with the Web-BCPA compared with MMR among persons with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary health care on pain intensity, self-efficacy, and copying, as part of a larger collection of data. Web-BCPA adherence and feasibility, as well as treatment satisfaction, were also investigated. Methods A total of 109 participants, mean age 43 (SD 11) years, with persistent pain in the back, neck, shoulder, and/or generalized pain were recruited to a randomized controlled trial with two intervention arms: (1) MMR+WEB (n=60) and (2) MMR (n=49). Participants in the MMR+WEB group self-guided through the eight modules of the Web-BCPA: pain, activity, behavior, stress and thoughts, sleep and negative thoughts, communication and self-esteem, solutions, and maintenance and progress. Data were collected with a questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were pain intensity (Visual Analog Scale), self-efficacy to control pain and to control other symptoms (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale), general self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), and coping (two-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire; CSQ). Web-BCPA adherence was measured as minutes spent in the program. Satisfaction and Web-BCPA feasibility were assessed by a set of items. Results Of 109 participants, 99 received the allocated intervention (MMR+WEB: n=55; MMR: n=44); 88 of 99 (82%) completed the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with a sample

  8. Hypnosis as a treatment of chronic widespread pain in general practice: A randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Grøndahl, Jan Robert; Rosvold, Elin Olaug

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypnosis treatment in general practice is a rather new concept. This pilot study was performed to evaluate the effect of a standardized hypnosis treatment used in general practice for patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). Methods The study was designed as a randomized control group-controlled study. Sixteen patients were randomized into a treatment group or a control group, each constituting eight patients. Seven patients in the treatment group completed the schedule. After the control period, five of the patients in the control group also received treatment, making a total of 12 patients having completed the treatment sessions. The intervention group went through a standardized hypnosis treatment with ten consecutive therapeutic sessions once a week, each lasting for about 30 minutes, focusing on ego-strengthening, relaxation, releasing muscular tension and increasing self-efficacy. A questionnaire was developed in order to calibrate the symptoms before and after the 10 weeks period, and the results were interpolated into a scale from 0 to 100, increasing numbers representing increasing suffering. Data were analyzed by means of T-tests. Results The treatment group improved from their symptoms, (change from 62.5 to 55.4), while the control group deteriorated, (change from 37.2 to 45.1), (p = 0,045). The 12 patients who completed the treatment showed a mean improvement from 51.5 to 41.6. (p = 0,046). One year later the corresponding result was 41.3, indicating a persisting improvement. Conclusion The study indicates that hypnosis treatment may have a positive effect on pain and quality of life for patients with chronic muscular pain. Considering the limited number of patients, more studies should be conducted to confirm the results. Trial Registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov and released 27.08.07 Reg nr NCT00521807 Approval Number: 05032001. PMID:18801190

  9. Randomized trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared with a pain education control for low-literacy rural people with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Beverly E; Day, Melissa A; Burns, John; Kuhajda, Melissa C; Gaskins, Susan W; Sweeney, Kelly; McConley, Regina; Ward, L Charles; Cabbil, Chalanda

    2011-12-01

    Chronic pain is a common and costly experience. Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) are efficacious for an array of chronic pain conditions. However, the literature is based primarily on urban (white) samples. It is unknown whether CBT works in low-socioeconomic status (SES) minority and nonminority groups. To address this question, we conducted a randomized controlled trial within a low-SES, rural chronic pain population. Specifically, we examined the feasibility, tolerability, acceptability, and efficacy of group CBT compared with a group education intervention (EDU). We hypothesized that although both interventions would elicit short- and long-term improvement across pain-related outcomes, the cognitively-focused CBT protocol would uniquely influence pain catastrophizing. Mixed design analyses of variance were conducted on the sample of eligible participants who did not commence treatment (N=26), the intention-to-treat sample (ITT; N=83), and the completer sample (N=61). Factors associated with treatment completion were examined. Results indicated significantly more drop-outs occurred in CBT. ITT analyses showed that participants in both conditions reported significant improvement across pain-related outcomes, and a nonsignificant trend was found for depressed mood to improve more in CBT than EDU. Results of the completer analyses produced a similar pattern of findings; however, CBT produced greater gains on cognitive and affect variables than EDU. Treatment gains were maintained at 6-month follow-up (N=54). Clinical significance of the findings and the number of treatment responders is reported. Overall, these findings indicate that CBT and EDU are viable treatment options in low-SES minority and nonminority groups. Further research should target disseminating and sustaining psychosocial treatment options within underserved populations.

  10. Management of acute Achilles tendinopathy: effect of etoricoxib on pain control and leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Kokalj, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Tendinopathies are a major cause of disability in the athletic population; the main purpose of the treatment of these injuries is to reduce pain and improve function promptly. The objective of this randomized, active comparator controlled, blinded study was to evaluate etoricoxib efficacy in pain control and leg stiffness in athletes suffering acute unilateral Achilles tendinopathy. Fifty-six eligible male athletes (mean age 37.5 ± 11.0 y) suffering acute Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to receive either etoricoxib 120 mg oral once daily (n=28) or diclofenac 100 mg oral once daily (n=28). Pain (100-mm visual analogue scale-VAS), analgesic effect (percentage of 100-mm VAS reduction), satisfaction with pain management (PGART), and leg stiffness (LSR) were evaluated after one week of anti-inflammatory treatment. Over the 7-day treatment period, both etoricoxib and diclofenac provided significantly relief of Achilles tendon pain compared to that experienced at baseline (mean VAS 26.7 ± 2.2 and 56.4 ± 1.8, respectively; p<.001). Analgesic effect averaged 53.7 ± 38.1% (etoricoxib= 56.4% and diclofenac 50.6%, p=0.64). Patients referred high level of satisfaction with anti-inflammatory treatment (PGART = 2.0 ± 1.3), while leg stiffness showed a significant improvement after one-week therapy (LSR 0.89 ± 0.1 vs. 0.95 ± 0.1; p=0.038). PGART and LSR values within etoricoxib and diclofenac groups were not significant (p=0.46, and p=0.37, respectively). Both drugs were generally well tolerated; patients receiving etoricoxib reported significantly less side effects than those in the diclofenac group (0% and 14,2%, respectively, p=0.037). Etoricoxib is clinically effective in treatment of acute Achilles tendinopathy providing a magnitude of effect comparable to that of diclofenac with fewer side effects. Effective control of tendon pain in the acute phase of such sports-related injuries may be helpful to reduce morbidity and improve capabilities associated with high

  11. Kyphoplasty Increases Vertebral Height, Decreases Both Pain Score and Opiate Requirements While Improving Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B.; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E.; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures. PMID:24165285

  12. Kyphoplasty increases vertebral height, decreases both pain score and opiate requirements while improving functional status.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures.

  13. Kyphoplasty increases vertebral height, decreases both pain score and opiate requirements while improving functional status.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Reda; Bolash, Robert B; Shroll, Joshua; Costandi, Shrif; Dalton, Jarrod E; Sanghvi, Chirag; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral compression fractures can result from advanced osteoporosis, or less commonly from metastatic or traumatic insults to the vertebral column, and result in disabling pain and decreased functional capacity. Various vertebral augmentation options including kyphoplasty aim at preventing the sequelae of pain and immobility that can develop as the result of the vertebral fractures. The mechanism for pain relief following kyphoplasty is not entirely understood, and the restoration of a portion of the lost vertebral height is a subject of debate. We retrospectively reviewed radiographic imaging, pain relief, analgesic intake and functional outcomes in 67 consecutive patients who underwent single- or multilevel kyphoplasty with the primary goal of quantifying the restoration of lost vertebral height. We observed a mean of 45% of the lost vertebral height restored postprocedurally. Secondarily, kyphoplasty was associated with significant decreases in pain scores, daily morphine consumption and improvement in patient-reported functional measures. PMID:24165285

  14. Work-related outcomes in randomised placebo-controlled pain trials: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic painful conditions have an important influence on the ability to work. Work-related outcomes, however, are not commonly reported in publications on trials investigating the treatment of chronic painful conditions. We aim to provide an overview of the reporting of work-related outcomes in such trials and investigate the relationship between work-related outcomes and pain outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed with the aim of identifying randomised placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating treatments for chronic painful conditions or rheumatic diseases that also reported on work-related outcomes. Methodological study quality was assessed with the Oxford Quality Scale (OQS). Meta-analyses were conducted for the outcomes of interference with work and number of patients with at least 30% reduction in pain intensity (30% pain responders). The correlation between work-related and pain outcomes was investigated with regression analyses. Results We included 31 publications reporting on 27 datasets from randomised placebo-controlled trials (with a total of 11,434 study participants) conducted in chronic painful or rheumatic diseases and reporting on work-related outcomes. These 31 publications make up only about 0.2% of all publications on randomised placebo-controlled trials in such conditions. The methodological quality of the included studies was high; only nine studies scored less than four (out of a maximum five) points on the OQS. Sixteen different work-related outcomes were reported on in the studies. Of 25 studies testing for the statistical significance of changes in work-related outcomes over the course of the trials, 14 (56%) reported a significant improvement; the others reported non-significant changes. Eight studies reported data on both interference with work and 30% pain responders: meta-analyses demonstrated similar, statistically significant improvements in both these outcomes with active therapy

  15. A Study to Inform the Design of a National Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial to Evaluate If Reducing Serum Phosphate to Normal Levels Improves Clinical Outcomes including Mortality, Cardiovascular Events, Bone Pain, or Fracture in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Ramya; Kalra, Philip A.; Brenchley, Paul; Hurst, Helen; Hutchison, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    Background. Retrospective, observational studies link high phosphate with mortality in dialysis patients. This generates research hypotheses but does not establish “cause-and-effect.” A large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of about 3000 patients randomised 50 : 50 to lower or higher phosphate ranges is required to answer the key question: does reducing phosphate levels improve clinical outcomes? Whether such a trial is technically possible is unknown; therefore, a study is necessary to inform the design and conduct of a future, definitive trial. Methodology. Dual centre prospective parallel group study: 100 dialysis patients randomized to lower (phosphate target 0.8 to 1.4 mmol/L) or higher range group (1.8 to 2.4 mmol/L). Non-calcium-containing phosphate binders and questionnaires will be used to achieve target phosphate. Primary endpoint: percentage successfully titrated to required range and percentage maintained in these groups over the maintenance period. Secondary endpoints: consent rate, drop-out rates, and cardiovascular events. Discussion. This study will inform design of a large definitive trial of the effect of phosphate on mortality and cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. If phosphate lowering improves outcomes, we would be reassured of the validity of this clinical practice. If, on the other hand, there is no improvement, a reassessment of resource allocation to therapies proven to improve outcomes will result. Trial Registration Number. This trial is registered with ISRCTN registration number ISRCTN24741445. PMID:26366297

  16. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium for sickle cell pain crisis in children.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, David C; Scott, J Paul; Badaki-Makun, Oluwakemi; Darbari, Deepika S; Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Airewele, Gladstone E; Ellison, Angela M; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mahajan, Prashant; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Casper, T Charles; Cook, Lawrence J; Dean, J Michael; Leonard, Julie; Hulbert, Monica L; Powell, Elizabeth C; Liem, Robert I; Hickey, Robert; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Hillery, Cheryl A; Nimmer, Mark; Panepinto, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium, a vasodilator, anti-inflammatory, and pain reliever, could alter the pathophysiology of sickle cell pain crises. We hypothesized that intravenous magnesium would shorten length of stay, decrease opioid use, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) for pediatric patients hospitalized with sickle cell pain crises. The Magnesium for Children in Crisis (MAGiC) study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous magnesium vs normal saline placebo conducted at 8 sites within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN). Children 4 to 21 years old with hemoglobin SS or Sβ(0) thalassemia requiring hospitalization for pain were eligible. Children received 40 mg/kg of magnesium or placebo every 8 hours for up to 6 doses plus standard therapy. The primary outcome was length of stay in hours from the time of first study drug infusion, compared using a Van Elteren test. Secondary outcomes included opioid use and HRQL. Of 208 children enrolled, 204 received the study drug (101 magnesium, 103 placebo). Between-group demographics and prerandomization treatment were similar. The median interquartile range (IQR) length of stay was 56.0 (27.0-109.0) hours for magnesium vs 47.0 (24.0-99.0) hours for placebo (P = .24). Magnesium patients received 1.46 mg/kg morphine equivalents vs 1.28 mg/kg for placebo (P = .12). Changes in HRQL before discharge and 1 week after discharge were similar (P > .05 for all comparisons). The addition of intravenous magnesium did not shorten length of stay, reduce opioid use, or improve quality of life in children hospitalized for sickle cell pain crisis. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01197417.

  17. Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; CORRÊA, Ana Silvia da Mota; LAURIS, José Roberto Pereira; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia. Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey’s and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%. Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly. Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device’s design. PMID:26200526

  18. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of intravenous magnesium for sickle cell pain crisis in children

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J. Paul; Badaki-Makun, Oluwakemi; Darbari, Deepika S.; Chumpitazi, Corrie E.; Airewele, Gladstone E.; Ellison, Angela M.; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Mahajan, Prashant; Sarnaik, Sharada A.; Casper, T. Charles; Cook, Lawrence J.; Dean, J. Michael; Leonard, Julie; Hulbert, Monica L.; Powell, Elizabeth C.; Liem, Robert I.; Hickey, Robert; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Nimmer, Mark; Panepinto, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium, a vasodilator, anti-inflammatory, and pain reliever, could alter the pathophysiology of sickle cell pain crises. We hypothesized that intravenous magnesium would shorten length of stay, decrease opioid use, and improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) for pediatric patients hospitalized with sickle cell pain crises. The Magnesium for Children in Crisis (MAGiC) study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of intravenous magnesium vs normal saline placebo conducted at 8 sites within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN). Children 4 to 21 years old with hemoglobin SS or Sβ0 thalassemia requiring hospitalization for pain were eligible. Children received 40 mg/kg of magnesium or placebo every 8 hours for up to 6 doses plus standard therapy. The primary outcome was length of stay in hours from the time of first study drug infusion, compared using a Van Elteren test. Secondary outcomes included opioid use and HRQL. Of 208 children enrolled, 204 received the study drug (101 magnesium, 103 placebo). Between-group demographics and prerandomization treatment were similar. The median interquartile range (IQR) length of stay was 56.0 (27.0-109.0) hours for magnesium vs 47.0 (24.0-99.0) hours for placebo (P = .24). Magnesium patients received 1.46 mg/kg morphine equivalents vs 1.28 mg/kg for placebo (P = .12). Changes in HRQL before discharge and 1 week after discharge were similar (P > .05 for all comparisons). The addition of intravenous magnesium did not shorten length of stay, reduce opioid use, or improve quality of life in children hospitalized for sickle cell pain crisis. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01197417. PMID:26232172

  19. Shoulder pain: a comparison of wheelchair basketball players with trunk control and without trunk control.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Necmiye Un; Comert, Esra; Ozengin, Nuriye

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare shoulder pain between wheelchair basketball players with trunk control and wheelchair basketball players without trunk control. Players were evaluated according the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) classification system. The study group comprised 60 wheelchair basketball players, who were rated according to the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation classification system. Players were divided into two groups according to their trunk control. Study participants completed an anonymous survey that included demographic data, medical history data, and the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups based on the number of years of wheelchair use, active sport years, weekly working hours, and weekly training hours (p> 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between wheelchair basketball players with trunk control and wheelchair basketball players with trunk control with respect to the duration of their disability, the daily number of transfers made to wheelchair, and Performance Corrected Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (PC-WUSPI) score (p< 0.05). The total PC-WUSPI score was higher among players without trunk control (p< 0.05). Study findings suggest that the shoulder pain of wheelchair basketball players must be analyzed. Trunk stabilization is the key factor affecting the function of the shoulder and is of primary importance for appropriate loading of the shoulder joint's many forms of articulation.

  20. Pain Reduction in Myofascial Pain Syndrome by Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Combined with Standard Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakrajai, Piyaraid; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Jensen, Mark P.; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Auvichayapat, Narong; Tunkamnerdthai, Orathai; Keeratitanont, Keattichai; Auvichayapat, Paradee

    2014-01-01

    Background Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in the shoulder is among the most prevalent pain problems in the middle-aged population worldwide. Evidence suggests that peripheral and central sensitization may play an important role in the development and maintenance of shoulder MPS. Given previous research supporting the potential efficacy of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for modulating pain-related brain activity in individuals with refractory central pain, we hypothesized that anodal tDCS when applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) combined with standard treatment will be more effective for reducing pain in patients with MPS than standard treatment alone. Method Study participants were randomized to receive either (1) standard treatment with 5-consecutive days of 1 mA anodal tDCS over M1 for 20 min or (2) standard treatment plus sham tDCS. Measures of pain intensity, shoulder passive range of motion, analgesic medication use, and self-reported physical functioning were administered before treatment and again at post-treatment and 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-week follow-up. Results Thirty-one patients with MPS were enrolled. Participants assigned to the active tDCS condition reported significantly more pre- to post-treatment reductions in pain intensity that were maintained at 1-week post-treatment, and significant improvement in shoulder adduction PROM at 1-week follow-up than participants assigned to the sham tDCS condition. Conclusion 5 consecutive days of anodal tDCS over M1 combined with standard treatment appears to reduce pain intensity, and may improve PROM, faster than standard treatment alone. Further tests of the efficacy and duration of effects of tDCS in the treatment of MPS are warranted. PMID:25373724

  1. Acupuncture, counselling or usual care for depression and comorbid pain: secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hopton, A; MacPherson, H; Keding, A; Morley, S

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression with comorbid pain is associated with a poor response to various treatments. The objective in this secondary analysis was to determine whether patients reporting pain have different depression and pain outcomes over time in response to acupuncture, counselling or usual care. Methods Self-reported ratings of depression and pain from 755 patients in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of acupuncture (302) or counselling (302) compared to usual care alone (151) are described and analysed using a series of regression models and analysis of covariance. Patient-reported outcomes of Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 for depression, SF36 bodily pain and EQ-5D, all at baseline, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Results At baseline, 755 patients reported EQ-5D pain categories; 384 (50.9%) reported moderate-to-extreme pain. Controlling for baseline depression, a linear regression model showed that the presence of pain at baseline was associated with poorer depression outcomes at 3 months mean difference=−1.16, (95% CI 0.12 to 2.2). Participants with moderate-to-extreme pain at baseline did better at 3 months if they received acupuncture (mean reduction in Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) from baseline=6.0, 95% CI 5.0 to 7.1 and a mean reduction in SF-36 bodily pain=11.2, (95% CI 7.1 to 15.2) compared to improvements for those who received counselling (4.3, 95% CI 3.3 to 5.4; 7.6, 95% CI 3.6 to 11.6) or usual care (2.7, 95% CI 1.50 to 4.0: 7.2, 95% CI 2.3 to 12.1). In comparison, no notable differences were seen between treatment arms within the no pain comparator group. Conclusions Patients with depression and pain at baseline recovered less well from treatment over 3 months than those with depression and no pain. Reductions in both depression and pain were most marked in the acupuncture group, followed by the counselling group and then the usual care group. PMID:24793257

  2. Outcomes of prolotherapy in chondromalacia patella patients: improvements in pain level and function.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Ross A; Sprague, Ingrid Schaefer

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of prolotherapy in resolving pain, stiffness, and crepitus, and improving physical activity in consecutive chondromalacia patients from February 2008 to September 2009. Sixty-nine knees that received prolotherapy in 61 patients (33 female and 36 male) who were 18-82 years old (average, 47.2 years) were enrolled. Patients received 24 prolotherapy injections (15% dextrose, 0.1% procaine, and 10% sarapin) with a total of 40 cc in the anterior knee. At least 6 weeks after their last prolotherapy session, patients provided self-evaluation of knee pain upon rest, activities of daily living (ADL) and exercise, range of motion (ROM), stiffness, and crepitus. Symptom severity, sustained improvement of symptoms, number of pain pills needed, and patient satisfaction before treatment and improvement after treatment were recorded. Following prolotherapy, patients experienced statistically significant decreases in pain at rest, during ADL, and exercise. Stiffness and crepitus decreased after prolotherapy, and ROM increased. Patients reported improved walking ability and exercise ability after prolotherapy. For daily pain level, ROM, daily stiffness, crepitus, and walking and exercise ability, sustained improvement of over 75% was reported by 85% of patients. Fewer patients required pain medication. No side effects of prolotherapy were noted. The average length of time from last prolotherapy session was 14.7 months (range, 6 months to 8 years). Only 3 of 16 knees were still recommended for surgery after prolotherapy. Prolotherapy ameliorates chondromalacia patella symptoms and improves physical ability. Patients experience long-term improvement without requiring pain medications. Prolotherapy should be considered a first-line, conservative therapy for chondromalacia patella. PMID:24596471

  3. Placebo improves pleasure and pain through opposite modulation of sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Wessberg, Johan; Eikemo, Marie; Liljencrantz, Jaquette; Endestad, Tor; Olausson, Håkan; Leknes, Siri

    2013-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is often conceptualized as a reward mechanism. However, by targeting only negative experiences, such as pain, placebo research may tell only half the story. We compared placebo improvement of painful touch (analgesia) with placebo improvement of pleasant touch (hyperhedonia) using functional MRI and a crossover design. Somatosensory processing was decreased during placebo analgesia and increased during placebo hyperhedonia. Both placebo responses were associated with similar patterns of activation increase in circuitry involved in emotion appraisal, including the pregenual anterior cingulate, medial orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, accumbens, and midbrain structures. Importantly, placebo-induced coupling between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and periaqueductal gray correlated with somatosensory decreases to painful touch and somatosensory increases to pleasant touch. These findings suggest that placebo analgesia and hyperhedonia are mediated by activation of shared emotion appraisal neurocircuitry, which down- or up-regulates early sensory processing, depending on whether the expectation is reduced pain or increased pleasure. PMID:24127578

  4. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Lee-Mei; Lin, Li-Mei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lai, Hui-Ling; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT. PMID:27073404

  5. The Effectiveness of Cupping Therapy on Relieving Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lee-Mei; Lin, Li-Mei; Chen, Chien-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Lai, Hui-Ling; Peng, Tai-Chu

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of cupping therapy (CT) in changes on skin surface temperature (SST) for relieving chronic neck and shoulder pain (NSP) among community residents. A single-blind experimental design constituted of sixty subjects with self-perceived NSP. The subjects were randomly allocated to two groups. The cupping group received CT at SI 15, GB 21, and LI 15 acupuncture points, and the control group received no intervention. Pain was assessed using the SST, visual analog scale (VAS), and blood pressure (BP). The main results were SST of GB 21 acupuncture point raised from 30.6°C to 32.7°C and from 30.7°C to 30.6°C in the control group. Neck pain intensity (NPI) severity scores were reduced from 9.7 to 3.6 in the cupping group and from 9.7 to 9.5 in the control group. The SST and NPI differences between the groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). One treatment of CT is shown to increase SST. In conjunction with the physiological effect the subjective experience of NSP is reduced in intensity. Further studies are required to improve the understanding and potential long-term effects of CT. PMID:27073404

  6. A modern neuroscience approach to chronic spinal pain: combining pain neuroscience education with cognition-targeted motor control training.

    PubMed

    Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; Cagnie, Barbara; Roussel, Nathalie A; Dolphens, Mieke; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-05-01

    Chronic spinal pain (CSP) is a severely disabling disorder, including nontraumatic chronic low back and neck pain, failed back surgery, and chronic whiplash-associated disorders. Much of the current therapy is focused on input mechanisms (treating peripheral elements such as muscles and joints) and output mechanisms (addressing motor control), while there is less attention to processing (central) mechanisms. In addition to the compelling evidence for impaired motor control of spinal muscles in patients with CSP, there is increasing evidence that central mechanisms (ie, hyperexcitability of the central nervous system and brain abnormalities) play a role in CSP. Hence, treatments for CSP should address not only peripheral dysfunctions but also the brain. Therefore, a modern neuroscience approach, comprising therapeutic pain neuroscience education followed by cognition-targeted motor control training, is proposed. This perspective article explains why and how such an approach to CSP can be applied in physical therapist practice.

  7. A Lipid Gate for the Peripheral Control of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Andrea G.; Seybold, Virginia; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in injured and inflamed tissues produce a number of proalgesic lipid-derived mediators, which excite nociceptive neurons by activating selective G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels. Recent work has shown that these proalgesic factors are counteracted by a distinct group of lipid molecules that lower nociceptor excitability and attenuate nociception in peripheral tissues. Analgesic lipid mediators include endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids), lipid-amide agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, and products of oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids via cytochrome P450 and other enzyme pathways. Evidence indicates that these lipid messengers are produced and act at different stages of inflammation and the response to tissue injury, and may be part of a peripheral gating mechanism that regulates the access of nociceptive information to the spinal cord and the brain. Growing knowledge about this peripheral control system may be used to discover safer medicines for pain. PMID:25392487

  8. Effect of local anaesthetic infiltration on chronic postsurgical pain after total hip and knee replacement: the APEX randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Wylde, Vikki; Lenguerrand, Erik; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Beswick, Andrew D.; Marques, Elsa; Noble, Sian; Horwood, Jeremy; Pyke, Mark; Dieppe, Paul; Blom, Ashley W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) are usually effective at relieving pain; however, 7% to 23% of patients experience chronic postsurgical pain. These trials aimed to investigate the effect of local anaesthetic wound infiltration on pain severity at 12 months after primary THR or TKR for osteoarthritis. Between November 2009 and February 2012, 322 patients listed for THR and 316 listed for TKR were recruited into a single-centre double-blind randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive local anaesthetic infiltration and standard care or standard care alone. Participants and outcomes assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was pain severity on the WOMAC Pain Scale at 12 months after surgery. Analyses were conducted using intention-to-treat and per-protocol approaches. In the hip trial, patients in the intervention group had significantly less pain at 12 months postoperative than patients in the standard care group (differences in means: 4.74; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-8.54; P = 0.015), although the difference was not clinically significant. Post hoc analysis found that patients in the intervention group were more likely to have none to moderate pain than severe pain at 12 months than those in the standard care group (odds ratio: 10.19; 95% CI: 2.10-49.55; P = 0.004). In the knee trial, there was no strong evidence that the intervention influenced pain severity at 12 months postoperative (difference in means: 3.83; 95% CI: −0.83 to 8.49; P = 0.107). In conclusion, routine use of infiltration could be beneficial in improving long-term pain relief for some patients after THR. PMID:25659070

  9. The Efficacy of Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Improving Function in People with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kurklinsky, Svetlana; Perez, Rachel B; Lacayo, Elke R; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the efficacy of interdisciplinary rehabilitation for improving function in people with chronic pain. Design. Retrospective Chart Review. Setting. The Pain Rehabilitation Center (PRC) at a medical center. Participants. Individuals admitted to the PRC. Interventions. The PRC operates a 3-week outpatient program that utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat people with chronic pain. The main treatment elements include physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and medication management. Physical therapy groups focus on moderate exercise despite symptoms. Occupational therapists teach moderation, time management, and activity modification. CBT groups, led by a pain psychologist, address the psychosocial comorbidities of chronic pain. Medical staff oversee the tapering of opiate analgesics and other symptom targeted treatments. This integrated approach is indicated when conventional treatments have been ineffective. Outcome Measures. The objective outcome was the 6-minute walk test (6 mWT) distance. The subjective outcomes were performance (COPM-PER) and satisfaction (COPM-SAT) as measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Results. Average 6 mWT distances improved by 39% from 375 m to 523 m. Average COPM-PER scores increased from 3.4 to 7.5. Average COPM-SAT scores increased from 2.4 to 7.5. Conclusions. Comprehensive interdisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation can significantly improve function in people with chronic pain. PMID:27242925

  10. The Efficacy of Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation for Improving Function in People with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kurklinsky, Svetlana; Perez, Rachel B.; Lacayo, Elke R.; Sletten, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the efficacy of interdisciplinary rehabilitation for improving function in people with chronic pain. Design. Retrospective Chart Review. Setting. The Pain Rehabilitation Center (PRC) at a medical center. Participants. Individuals admitted to the PRC. Interventions. The PRC operates a 3-week outpatient program that utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to treat people with chronic pain. The main treatment elements include physical therapy, occupational therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and medication management. Physical therapy groups focus on moderate exercise despite symptoms. Occupational therapists teach moderation, time management, and activity modification. CBT groups, led by a pain psychologist, address the psychosocial comorbidities of chronic pain. Medical staff oversee the tapering of opiate analgesics and other symptom targeted treatments. This integrated approach is indicated when conventional treatments have been ineffective. Outcome Measures. The objective outcome was the 6-minute walk test (6 mWT) distance. The subjective outcomes were performance (COPM-PER) and satisfaction (COPM-SAT) as measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Results. Average 6 mWT distances improved by 39% from 375 m to 523 m. Average COPM-PER scores increased from 3.4 to 7.5. Average COPM-SAT scores increased from 2.4 to 7.5. Conclusions. Comprehensive interdisciplinary outpatient rehabilitation can significantly improve function in people with chronic pain. PMID:27242925

  11. BRIEF REPORT: Failure of an Electronic Medical Record Tool to Improve Pain Assessment Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Saigh, Orit; Triola, Marc M; Link, R Nathan

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To comply with pain management standards, Bellevue Hospital in New York City implemented a mandatory computerized pain assessment screen (PAS) in its electronic medical record (EMR) system for every outpatient encounter. We assessed provider acceptance of the instrument and examined whether the intervention led to increased documentation of pain-related diagnoses or inquiries. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey; a pre-and posthistorically controlled observational study. SUBJECTS AND MEASUREMENTS The utility of the computerized tool to medicine housestaff and attendings was assessed by an anonymous survey. We conducted an electronic chart review comparing all adult primary care patient encounters over a 2-day period 6 months prior to implementation of the PAS and on 2 days 6 months after its implementation. RESULTS Forty-seven percent of survey respondents felt that the computerized assessment tool was “somewhat difficult” or “very difficult” to use. The majority of respondents (79%) felt the tool did not change their pain assessment practice. Of 265 preintervention patients and 364 postintervention patients seen in the clinic, 42% and 37% had pain-related diagnoses, respectively (P=.29). Pain inquiry by the physician was noted for 49% of preintervention patients and 44% of the postintervention patients (P=.26). In 55% of postintervention encounters, there was discordance between the pain documentation using the PAS tool and the free text section of the medical note. CONCLUSION A mandatory computerized pain assessment tool did not lead to an increase in pain-related diagnoses and may have hindered the documentation of pain assessment because of the perceived burden of using the application. PMID:16606379

  12. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cui, J Z; Geng, Z S; Zhang, Y H; Feng, J Y; Zhu, P; Zhang, X B

    2016-03-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water injection (ISWI) is used for relief of low back pain during labor, acute attacks of urolithiasis, chronic neck and shoulder pain following whiplash injuries, and chronic myofascial pain syndrome. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of ISWI for relief of acute low back pain (aLBP). A total of 68 patients (41 females and 27 males) between 18 and 55 years old experiencing aLBP with moderate to severe pain (scores ≥5 on an 11-point visual analogue scale [VAS]) were recruited and randomly assigned to receive either ISWIs (n=34) or intracutaneous isotonic saline injections (placebo treatment; n=34). The primary outcome was improvement in pain intensity using the VAS at 10, 45, and 90 min and 1 day after treatment. The secondary outcome was functional improvement, which was assessed using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) 1 day after treatment. The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the ISWI group than in the control group at 10, 45, and 90 min, and 1 day after injection (P<0.05, t-test). The mean increment in PSFS score of the ISWI group was 2.9±2.2 1 day after treatment, while that in the control group was 0.9±2.2. Our study showed that ISWI was effective for relieving pain and improving function in aLBP patients at short-term follow-up. ISWI might be an alternative treatment for aLBP patients, especially in areas where medications are not available, as well as in specific patients (e.g., those who are pregnant or have asthma), who are unable to receive medications or other forms of analgesia because of side effects. PMID:26840703

  13. Effects of intracutaneous injections of sterile water in patients with acute low back pain: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cui, J.Z.; Geng, Z.S.; Zhang, Y.H.; Feng, J.Y.; Zhu, P.; Zhang, X.B.

    2016-01-01

    Intracutaneous sterile water injection (ISWI) is used for relief of low back pain during labor, acute attacks of urolithiasis, chronic neck and shoulder pain following whiplash injuries, and chronic myofascial pain syndrome. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of ISWI for relief of acute low back pain (aLBP). A total of 68 patients (41 females and 27 males) between 18 and 55 years old experiencing aLBP with moderate to severe pain (scores ≥5 on an 11-point visual analogue scale [VAS]) were recruited and randomly assigned to receive either ISWIs (n=34) or intracutaneous isotonic saline injections (placebo treatment; n=34). The primary outcome was improvement in pain intensity using the VAS at 10, 45, and 90 min and 1 day after treatment. The secondary outcome was functional improvement, which was assessed using the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) 1 day after treatment. The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the ISWI group than in the control group at 10, 45, and 90 min, and 1 day after injection (P<0.05, t-test). The mean increment in PSFS score of the ISWI group was 2.9±2.2 1 day after treatment, while that in the control group was 0.9±2.2. Our study showed that ISWI was effective for relieving pain and improving function in aLBP patients at short-term follow-up. ISWI might be an alternative treatment for aLBP patients, especially in areas where medications are not available, as well as in specific patients (e.g., those who are pregnant or have asthma), who are unable to receive medications or other forms of analgesia because of side effects. PMID:26840703

  14. Short-Term Effect of Laser Acupuncture on Lower Back Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Ku, Boncho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Lee, Yu Jung; Kang, Jae Hui; Heo, Hyun; Choi, Hyo-Joon; Lee, Jun-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This trial was performed to investigate the efficacy of laser acupuncture for the alleviation of lower back pain. Methods. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Fifty-six participants were randomly assigned to either the laser acupuncture group (n = 28) or the sham laser acupuncture group (n = 28). Participants in both groups received three treatment sessions over the course of one week. Thirteen acupuncture points were selected. The visual analogue scale for pain, pressure pain threshold, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Euro-Quality-of-Life Five Dimensions questionnaire (Korean version) were used to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture treatment on lower back pain. Results. There were no significant differences in any outcome between the two groups, although the participants in both groups showed a significant improvement in each assessed parameter relative to the baseline values. Conclusion. Although there was no significant difference in outcomes between the two groups, the results suggest that laser acupuncture can provide effective pain alleviation and can be considered an option for relief from lower back pain. Further studies using long-term intervention, a larger sample size, and rigorous methodology are required to clarify the effect of laser acupuncture on lower back pain. PMID:26516333

  15. Internet-based guided self-help intervention for chronic pain based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Veehof, Martine M; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2015-02-01

    Acceptance-based psychological interventions can potentially minimize the burden of chronic pain. This randomized controlled trial evaluated an internet-delivered, guided self-help intervention based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). A total of 238 chronic pain sufferers from the general population were randomly allocated to either ACT (n = 82), an internet-based control condition Expressive Writing (n = 79) or a waiting list condition (n = 77). Participants completed measures at baseline, posttreatment (3 months) and at a 3-month follow-up. At follow-up, ACT participants had improved in pain interference in daily life (primary outcome) compared to participants in Expressive Writing (Cohen's d = .47), but not compared to waiting list participants (p value = .11). Those who adhered to the ACT-intervention (48%) did improve significantly compared to waiting list participants (d = .49). ACT-participants also showed superior improvement on depression, pain intensity, psychological inflexibility and pain catastrophizing (d: .28-.60). Significant clinical improvement was present. Especially, 28% of ACT-participants showed general clinically relevant improvement in pain interference, as well as in pain intensity and depression (vs. Expressive Writing and waiting list 5%). Given these findings, internet-based ACT programs may be a promising treatment modality for chronic pain.

  16. Balancing the focus: art and music therapy for pain control and symptom management in hospice care.

    PubMed

    Trauger-Querry, B; Haghighi, K R

    1999-01-01

    Pain and symptom management are a major part of hospice care. Literature and direct experience suggest that pain can be resistant if psychological, emotional, or spiritual issues are not addressed. This article explains how art and music therapies can work in conjunction with traditional medical treatment of pain control in the hospice setting. The process of pain modulation through the use of art and music interventions is diagrammed and described. Brief clinical examples demonstrate the use of art and music therapies for pain reduction with a variety of hospice patients. Information regarding appropriate education and training necessary for art and music therapists to practice in their field is presented.

  17. A Multifaceted Approach to Improve the Availability and Accessibility of Opioids for the Treatment of Cancer Pain in Serbia: Results From the International Pain Policy Fellowship (2006-2012) and Recommendations for Action.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Snezana M; Maurer, Martha A; Ryan, Karen M; Popovic, Ivana; Husain, S Asra; Cleary, James F; Scholten, Willem

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Serbia, and at least 14,000-16,000 patients experience moderate-to-severe cancer pain every year. Cancer pain relief has been impeded by inadequate availability of opioid analgesics and barriers to their accessibility. In 2006, a Serbian oncologist was selected as an International Pain Policy Fellow. The fellow identified barriers to opioid availability in Serbia and implemented an action plan to address the unavailability of oral morphine, attitudinal and knowledge barriers about opioids, and barriers in the national opioid control policy, in collaboration with the government, local partners, and international experts, including those from the World Health Organization. Collaborative efforts resulted in availability of immediate-release oral morphine, registration of controlled-release hydromorphone, and reimbursement of oral methadone for cancer pain; numerous educational activities aimed at changing inadequate knowledge and negative attitudes toward opioids; recognition of opioids as essential medicines for palliative care in a new National Palliative Care Strategy; and recognition of the medical use of opioids as psychoactive-controlled substances for the relief of pain included in a new national law on psychoactive-controlled substances, and the development of recommendations for updating regulations on prescribing and dispensing opioids. An increase in opioid consumption at the institutional and national levels also was observed. This article outlines a multifaceted approach to improving access to strong opioids for cancer pain management and palliative care in a middle-income country and offers a potential road map to success. PMID:26988849

  18. Improvement in chronic low back pain in an obese patient with topiramate use.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anita; Kulkarni, Archana; Ramanujam, Vendhan; Zheng, Lu; Treacy, Erin

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate efficacy, benefit, and potential use of topiramate in treating obese patients with chronic low back pain. This is a case report from an outpatient academic pain multidisciplinary clinical center. The patient was a 30-year-old morbidly obese (body mass index [BMI]: 61.4 kg/m(2)) female suffering from chronic low back pain. With a known association between obesity and chronic low back pain, and a possible role of topiramate in treating both simultaneously, the patient was started on a therapeutic trial of topiramate. Over a period of a 12-week topiramate therapy, the patient experienced clinically meaningful and significant weight loss as well as improvement in her chronic low back pain and functionality. With more substantial evidence, pain physicians may start considering using topiramate in the multimodal management of obesity-related chronic low back pain based on their thoughtful consideration of the drug's efficacy and side effects and the patient's comorbidities and preferences.

  19. Improving patient outcomes through advanced pain management techniques in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Barrington, John W; Dalury, David F; Emerson, Roger H; Hawkins, Richard J; Joshi, Girish P; Stulberg, Bernard N

    2013-10-01

    Pain following orthopedic surgery is common and often suboptimally managed, with many patients reporting acute moderate to severe pain following surgery. Opioids are often used to manage this pain, yet this can result in significant side effects and complications, including constipation, nausea, vomiting, respiratory distress, and other central nervous system issues. Multimodal therapy that includes surgical site infiltration with extended release local anesthetic has been seen as a new way to minimize this pain for patients, which can result in improved quality of life and shorter length of hospital stay. This article examines the use of bupivacaine liposome injectable suspension (EXPAREL®; Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Diego, California), a non-opioid product for pain management. Liposomal bupivacaine uses DepoFoam® technology that allows for the extended release of injected drugs. When used as the foundation of a multimodal regimen, it is effective in reducing postsurgical pain for up to 72 hours while reducing the need for opioids for pain relief. PMID:24911371

  20. Improving Pain Management at the Nursing Education Level: Evaluating Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Latchman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Unmanaged pain is a prevalent problem faced by many cancer patients. One part of this problem centers on a lack of emphasis on pain management in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. This study examined the knowledge and attitudes of 41 undergraduate nursing students regarding pain management. Students voluntarily completed a demographic data form, the Nurses’ Attitude Survey, and the Pain Management Principles Assessment Tool. A mean score of 19.4 out of a possible 31 was achieved on the knowledge test, whereas a mean score of 17.0 was achieved on the Nurses’ Attitude Survey. A weak-to-moderate relationship between knowledge and attitudes was found. Although students had positive attitudes regarding pain management, many still lacked the fundamental knowledge essential for adequately managing pain. The sample size was relatively small and not demographically diverse, but the response from the sample was sufficient to provide statistically meaningful data. In the quest to improve patient outcomes, these findings suggest the need to develop specific strategies to effectively teach undergraduate nursing students about pain management. PMID:25032029

  1. Physical function improvements and relief from fatigue and pain are associated with increased productivity at work and at home in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with certolizumab pegol

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Strand, Vibeke; Purcaru, Oana; Coteur, Geoffroy; Mease, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the association between improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain and improvements in productivity at work and at home in patients treated with certolizumab pegol (CZP) in combination with MTX. Methods. Physical function, fatigue and pain were assessed in two CZP clinical trials (Rheumatoid Arthritis PreventIon of structural Damage 1 and 2) using the HAQ-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) and Patient Assessment of Pain, with minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) defined as ≥0.22, ≥1 and ≥10 points, respectively. Work and home productivity were evaluated using the RA-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS-RA). The odds of achieving an HAQ-DI, FAS or pain ‘response’ at Week 12, defined as improvements ≥MCID, were compared between CZP and control groups. Improvements in productivity at Week 12 were compared between CZP-treated HAQ-DI, FAS or pain responders and non-responders. Results. The odds of achieving improvements ≥MCID were five times higher for pain, and two to three times higher for physical function and fatigue, in patients receiving CZP vs control. Per month, responders reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at work and reduced interference of RA with their work productivity than non-responders. Responders also reported significantly greater improvements in productivity at home and participation in family, social and leisure activities. Conclusions. This study demonstrated a clear association between patient-reported improvements in physical function, fatigue and pain, and improvements in productivity both at work and home. PMID:20547658

  2. Mobile-Web App to Self-Manage Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, A Blair; Russell, Holly; Manocchia, Michael; Mino, David E; Cox Glassen, Terri; Morgan, Rebecca; Gau, Jeff M; Ary, Dennis V

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonspecific low back pain (NLBP) is the diagnosis for individuals with back pain that has no underlying medical cause (eg, tumor, infection, fracture, herniated disc, spinal stenosis). The American College of Physicians (ACP) and American Pain Society (APS) recommend multidisciplinary treatments for NLBP that lasts more than 4 weeks. This approach, however, is impractical for many physicians to implement, and relatively few providers offer NLBP treatment that meets the joint ACP-APS guidelines. Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile-Web intervention called “FitBack” to help users implement self-tailored strategies to manage and prevent NLBP occurrences. Methods A total of 597 adults were recruited, screened, consented, and assessed online at baseline, at 2 months (T2), and at 4 months (T3). After baseline assessments, participants were randomized into three groups: FitBack intervention, alternative care group that received 8 emails urging participants to link to six Internet resources for NLBP, and control group. The FitBack group also received weekly email reminder prompts for 8 weeks plus emails to do assessments. The control group was only contacted to do assessments. Results Users of the FitBack program showed greater improvement compared to the control group in every comparison of the critical physical, behavioral, and worksite outcome measures at 4-month follow-up. In addition, users of the FitBack program performed better than the alternative care group on current back pain, behavioral, and worksite outcomes at 4-month follow-up. For example, subjects in the control group were 1.7 times more likely to report current back pain than subjects in the FitBack group; subjects in the alternative care group were 1.6 times more likely to report current back pain at 4-month follow-up. Further, the users of the FitBack program showed greater improvement compared to both the control and alternative care groups at 4-month follow-up on

  3. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Koo, Charles C; Lin, Ray S; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (-89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (-81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  4. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Charles C.; Lin, Ray S.; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (−89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (−81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  5. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Koo, Charles C; Lin, Ray S; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (-89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (-81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner.

  6. Inpatient-based intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment for highly impaired children with severe chronic pain: randomized controlled trial of efficacy and economic effects.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Tanja; Ruhe, Ann-Kristin; Schmidt, Pia; Hirsch, Jessica; Wager, Julia; Dobe, Michael; Krummenauer, Frank; Zernikow, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain, which can result in deleterious effects for the child, bears the risk of aggravation into adulthood. Intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment (IIPT) might be an effective treatment, given the advantage of consulting with multiple professionals on a daily basis. Evidence for the effectiveness of IIPT is scarce. We investigated the efficacy of an IIPT within a randomized controlled trial by comparing an intervention group (IG) (n=52) to a waiting-list control group (WCG) (n=52). We made assessments before treatment (PRE), immediately after treatment (POST), as well as at short-term (POST6MONTHS) and long-term (POST12MONTHS) follow-up. We determined a combined endpoint, improvement (pain intensity, disability, school absence), and investigated 3 additional outcome domains (anxiety, depression, catastrophizing). We also investigated changes in economic parameters (health care use, parental work absenteeism, subjective financial burden) and their relationship to the child's improvement. Results at POST showed that significantly more children in the IG than in the WCG were assigned to improvement (55% compared to 14%; Fisher P<.001; 95% confidence interval for incidence difference: 0.21% to 0.60%). Although immediate effects were achieved for disability, school absence, depression, and catastrophizing, pain intensity and anxiety did not change until short-term follow-up. More than 60% of the children in both groups were improved long-term. The parents reported significant reductions in all economic parameters. The results from the present study support the efficacy of the IIPT. Future research is warranted to investigate differences in treatment response and to understand the changes in economic parameters in nonimproved children.

  7. The disruptive effects of pain on complex cognitive performance and executive control.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Edmund; Moore, David J; Duggan, Geoffrey B; Payne, Stephen J; Eccleston, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Pain interferes and disrupts attention. What is less clear is how pain affects performance on complex tasks, and the strategies used to ensure optimal outcomes. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of pain on higher-order executive control processes involved in managing complex tasks. Sixty-two adult volunteers (40 female) completed two computer-based tasks: a breakfast making task and a word generation puzzle. Both were complex, involving executive control functions, including goal-directed planning and switching. Half of those recruited performed the tasks under conditions of thermal heat pain, and half with no accompanying pain. Whilst pain did not affect central performance on either task, it did have indirect effects. For the breakfast task, pain resulted in a decreased ability to multitask, with performance decrements found on the secondary task. However, no effects of pain were found on the processes thought to underpin this task. For the word generation puzzle, pain did not affect task performance, but did alter subjective accounts of the processes used to complete the task; pain affected the perceived allocation of time to the task, as well as switching perceptions. Sex differences were also found. When studying higher-order cognitive processes, pain-related interference effects are varied, and may result in subtle or indirect changes in cognition. PMID:24386168

  8. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  9. Radiofrequency ablation for chronic low back pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, Laura E; Soril, Lesley JJ; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Noseworthy, Tom; Steadman, Rodney; Tiwana, Simrandeep; Clement, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a procedure using heat to interrupt pain signals in spinal nerves, is an emerging treatment option for chronic low back pain. Its clinical efficacy has not yet been established. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of RFA for chronic low back pain associated with lumbar facet joints, sacroiliac joints, discogenic low back pain and the coccyx. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted. Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched up to August 2013. Abstracts and full-text articles were reviewed in duplicate. Included articles were sham-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs), assessed the efficacy of RFA, reported at least one month of follow-up and included participants who had experienced back pain for at least three months. Data were extracted in duplicate and quality was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Due to heterogeneity, as well as a lack of reported mean differences and SDs, meta-analysis was not possible using these data. RESULTS: The present systematic review retrieved 1063 abstracts. Eleven sham-controlled RCTs were included: three studies involving discogenic back pain; six studies involving lumbar facet joint pain; and two studies involving sacroiliac joint pain. No studies were identified assessing the coccyx. The evidence supports RFA as an efficacious treatment for lumbar facet joint and sacroiliac joint pain, with five of six and both of the RCTs demonstrating statistically significant pain reductions, respectively. The evidence supporting RFA for the treatment of discogenic pain is mixed. CONCLUSIONS: While the majority of the studies focusing on lumbar facet joints and sacroiliac joints suggest that RFA significantly reduces pain in short-term follow-up, the evidence base for discogenic low back pain is mixed. There is no RCT evidence for RFA for the coccyx. Future studies should examine the clinical significance of the achieved pain reduction

  10. Electro-acupuncture decreases postoperative pain and improves recovery in patients undergoing a supratentorial craniotomy.

    PubMed

    An, Li-Xin; Chen, Xue; Ren, Xiu-Jun; Wu, Hai-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to examine the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and recovery in patients after a supratentorial tumor resection. Eighty-eight patients requiring a supratentorial tumor resection were anesthetized with sevoflurane and randomly allocated to a no treatment group (Group C) or an EA group (Group A). After anesthesia induction, the patients in Group A received EA at LI4 and SJ5, at BL63 and LR3 and at ST36 and GB40 on the same side as the craniotomy. The stimulation was continued until the end of the operation. Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) was used for the postoperative analgesia. The postoperative pain scores, PONV, the degree of dizziness and appetite were recorded. In the first 6 hours after the operation, the mean total bolus, the effective times of PCIA bolus administrations and the VAS scores were much lower in the EA group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, the incidence of PONV and degree of dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head within the first 24 hours after the operation was much lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). In the EA group, more patients had a better appetite than did the patients in group C (51.2% vs. 27.5%) (p < 0.05). The use of EA in neurosurgery patients improves the quality of postoperative analgesia, promotes appetite recovery and decreases some uncomfortable sensations, such as dizziness and feeling of fullness in the head. PMID:25169910

  11. Sex Differences in How Erotic and Painful Stimuli Impair Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Jiaxin; Hung, Daisy L.; Tseng, Philip; Tzeng, Ovid J. L.; Muggleton, Neil G.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Witnessing emotional events such as arousal or pain may impair ongoing cognitive processes such as inhibitory control. We found that this may be true only half of the time. Erotic images and painful video clips were shown to men and women shortly before a stop signal task, which measures cognitive inhibitory control. These stimuli impaired…

  12. VIRTUAL REALITY HYPNOSIS FOR PAIN CONTROL IN A PATIENT WITH GLUTEAL HIDRADENITIS:A CASE REPORT().

    PubMed

    Soltani, Maryam; Teeley, Aubriana M; Wiechman, Shelley A; Jensen, Mark P; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the use of hypnotic analgesia induced through immersive three-dimensional computer-generated virtual reality, better known as virtual reality hypnosis (VRH), in the treatment of a patient with ongoing pain associated with gluteal hidradenitis, The patient participated in the study for two consecutive days white hospitalized at a regional trauma centre. At pretreatment, she reported severe pain intensity and unpleasantness as well as high levels of anxiety and nervousness. She was then administered two sessions of virtual reality hypnotic treatment for decreased pain and anxiety. The patient's ratings of 'time spent thinking about pain', pain intensity, 'unpleasantness of pain', and anxiety decreased from before to after each daily VRH session, as well as from Day One to Day Two. The findings indicate that VRH may benefit individuals with severe, ongoing pain from a chronic condition, and that a controlled clinical trial examining its efficacy is warranted. PMID:23205274

  13. The Clinical Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Reducing Pain for the Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting-Hao; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Shih; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chao, Chuang-Min; Hsiung, Nan-Hsing; Chi, Ching-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aromatherapy massage is an alternative treatment in reducing the pain of the cancer patients. This study was to investigate whether aromatherapy massage could improve the pain of the cancer patients. Methods. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for relevant randomized controlled trials without language limitations between 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2015 with a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The search terms included aromatherapy, essential oil, pain, ache, cancer, tumor, and carcinoma. There were 7 studies which met the selection criteria and 3 studies were eventually included among 63 eligible publications. Results. This meta-analysis included three randomized controlled trials with a total of 278 participants (135 participants in the massage with essential oil group and 143 participants in the control (usual care) group). Compared with the control group, the massage with essential oil group had nonsignificant effect on reducing the pain (standardized mean difference = 0.01; 95% CI [−0.23,0.24]). Conclusion. Aromatherapy massage does not appear to reduce pain of the cancer patients. Further rigorous studies should be conducted with more objective measures. PMID:26884799

  14. The Clinical Effects of Aromatherapy Massage on Reducing Pain for the Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Hao; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Shih; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chao, Chuang-Min; Hsiung, Nan-Hsing; Chi, Ching-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Aromatherapy massage is an alternative treatment in reducing the pain of the cancer patients. This study was to investigate whether aromatherapy massage could improve the pain of the cancer patients. Methods. We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library for relevant randomized controlled trials without language limitations between 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2015 with a priori defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The search terms included aromatherapy, essential oil, pain, ache, cancer, tumor, and carcinoma. There were 7 studies which met the selection criteria and 3 studies were eventually included among 63 eligible publications. Results. This meta-analysis included three randomized controlled trials with a total of 278 participants (135 participants in the massage with essential oil group and 143 participants in the control (usual care) group). Compared with the control group, the massage with essential oil group had nonsignificant effect on reducing the pain (standardized mean difference = 0.01; 95% CI [-0.23,0.24]). Conclusion. Aromatherapy massage does not appear to reduce pain of the cancer patients. Further rigorous studies should be conducted with more objective measures. PMID:26884799

  15. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of injected capsaicin for pain in Morton's neuroma.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Diamond, Eric; Schmidt, William K; Kelly, Margaret; Allen, Robert; Houghton, William; Brady, Kerrie L; Campbell, James N

    2016-06-01

    Intermetatarsal neuroma or Morton's neuroma is a painful condition of the foot resulting from an entrapment of the common digital nerve typically in the third intermetatarsal space. The pain can be severe and especially problematic with walking. Treatment options are limited and surgery may lead to permanent numbness in the toes. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of hot peppers, produces analgesia by inducing retraction of nociceptive afferents from the area of innervation and is effective in treating certain neuropathic pain disorders. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted to test the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of a single 0.1 mg dose of capsaicin vs placebo injected into the region of the neuroma. A total of 58 subjects diagnosed with Morton's neuroma with foot pain ≥4 (0-10 numerical pain rating scale) were injected with 2 mL of lidocaine into the intermetatarsal space proximal to the neuroma to provide local anesthesia. After 5 minutes, 0.1 mg capsaicin or placebo was injected into the intermetatarsal space containing the painful neuroma. Average foot pain was rated for 2 weeks before through 4 weeks after injection. At weeks 1 and 4, the decrease in pain was significantly greater in the subjects treated with capsaicin (P = 0.021 and P = 0.019, respectively). A trend toward significance was noted at weeks 2 and 3. Improvements in functional interference scores and reductions in oral analgesic use were also seen in the capsaicin-treated group. These findings suggest that injection of capsaicin is an efficacious treatment option for patients with painful intermetatarsal neuroma.

  16. A randomized, controlled trial of osteopathic manipulative treatment for acute low back pain in active duty military personnel

    PubMed Central

    Cruser, des Anges; Maurer, Douglas; Hensel, Kendi; Brown, Sarah K; White, Kathryn; Stoll, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute low back pain (ALBP) may limit mobility and impose functional limitations in active duty military personnel. Although some manual therapies have been reported effective for ALBP in military personnel, there have been no published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) in the military. Furthermore, current military ALBP guidelines do not specifically include OMT. Methods This RCT examined the efficacy of OMT in relieving ALBP and improving functioning in military personnel at Fort Lewis, Washington. Sixty-three male and female soldiers ages 18 to 35 were randomly assigned to a group receiving OMT plus usual care or a group receiving usual care only (UCO). Results The primary outcome measures were pain on the quadruple visual analog scale, and functioning on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Outcomes were measured immediately preceding each of four treatment sessions and at four weeks post-trial. Intention to treat analysis found significantly greater post-trial improvement in ‘Pain Now’ for OMT compared to UCO (P = 0·026). Furthermore, the OMT group reported less ‘Pain Now’ and ‘Pain Typical’ at all visits (P = 0·025 and P = 0·020 respectively). Osteopathic manipulative treatment subjects also tended to achieve a clinically meaningful improvement from baseline on ‘Pain at Best’ sooner than the UCO subjects. With similar baseline expectations, OMT subjects reported significantly greater satisfaction with treatment and overall self-reported improvement (P<0·01). Conclusion This study supports the effectiveness of OMT in reducing ALBP pain in active duty military personnel. PMID:23372389

  17. Pain and anxiety control: an online study guide.

    PubMed

    2008-05-01

    The Editorial Board of the Journal of Endodontics has developed a literature-based study guide of topical areas related to endodontics. This study guide is intended to give the reader a focused review of the essential endodontic literature and does not cite all possible articles related to each topic. Although citing all articles would be comprehensive, it would defeat the idea of a study guide. This section will cover pain theories and dentin hypersensitivity, referred pain, oral pain not of dental origin, barodontalgia, local anesthetics, long-acting local anesthetics, intrapulpal anesthesia, intraligamentary anesthesia, intraosseous anesthesia, inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia, Gow-Gates anesthesia technique, Vazirani-Akinosi anesthesia technique, second-division block anesthesia technique, endodontic postoperative pain, effect of occlusal adjustment on endodontic pain, paresthesia associated with periradicular pathosis, analgesics, sedation, and endodontic flare-ups.

  18. Dezocine for Preventing Postoperative Pain: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yu, LiNa; Yan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dezocine is considered to be an alternative medication for managing postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of this drug in this regard. Methods Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials (CENTRAL) were searched to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compare dezocine with placebo or dezocine with morphine on postoperative pain. The data were extracted and pooled using Mantel-Haenszel random effects model. Heterogeneity was tested using the I2 statistic with values >50% and Chi2 test with P ≤ 0.05 indicating obvious heterogeneity between the studies. Results Seven trials evaluating 665 patients were included. The number of patients with at least 50% pain relief was increased (N = 234; RR 3.04, 95% CI 2.27 to 4.08) and physician (N = 465; RR 2.84, 95% CI 1.66 to 4.84) and patient satisfaction (N = 390; RR 2.81, 95% CI 1.85 to 4.26) were improved following the administration of dezocine compared with the placebo. The effects of dezocine were similar to those of morphine in terms of the number of patients reporting at least 50% pain relief within 2–6 h after surgery (N = 235; RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.46) and physician (N = 234; RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.49) and patient (N = 158; RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.92) satisfaction. While, the number of patients with at least 50% pain relief within 0–1 h after surgery increased following dezocine compared with morphine treatment (N = 79; RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.77). There was no difference in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) following dezocine treatment compared with the placebo (N = 391; RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.42 to 2.68) or morphine treatment (N = 235; RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.14 to 2.93). Conclusion Dezocine is a promising analgesic for preventing postoperative pain, but further studies are required to evaluate its safety. PMID:26287536

  19. Chronic pain self-management for older adults: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN11899548

    PubMed Central

    Ersek, Mary; Turner, Judith A; Cain, Kevin C; Kemp, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common and frequently disabling problem in older adults. Clinical guidelines emphasize the need to use multimodal therapies to manage persistent pain in this population. Pain self-management training is a multimodal therapy that has been found to be effective in young to middle-aged adult samples. This training includes education about pain as well as instruction and practice in several management techniques, including relaxation, physical exercise, modification of negative thoughts, and goal setting. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of this therapy in older adult samples. Methods/Design This is a randomized, controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a pain self-management training group intervention, as compared with an education-only control condition. Participants are recruited from retirement communities in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and must be 65 years or older and experience persistent, noncancer pain that limits their activities. The primary outcome is physical disability, as measured by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are depression (Geriatric Depression Scale), pain intensity (Brief Pain Inventory), and pain-related interference with activities (Brief Pain Inventory). Randomization occurs by facility to minimize cross-contamination between groups. The target sample size is 273 enrolled, which assuming a 20% attrition rate at 12 months, will provide us with 84% power to detect a moderate effect size of .50 for the primary outcome. Discussion Few studies have investigated the effects of multimodal pain self-management training among older adults. This randomized controlled trial is designed to assess the efficacy of a pain self-management program that incorporates physical and psychosocial pain coping skills among adults in the mid-old to old-old range. PMID:15285783

  20. Role of the Cannabinoid System in Pain Control and Therapeutic Implications for the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Manzanares, J; Julian, MD; Carrascosa, A

    2006-01-01

    Cannabis extracts and synthetic cannabinoids are still widely considered illegal substances. Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that they may result useful to treat diverse diseases, including those related with acute or chronic pain. The discovery of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands, and the machinery for the synthesis, transport, and degradation of these retrograde messengers, has equipped us with neurochemical tools for novel drug design. Agonist-activated cannabinoid receptors, modulate nociceptive thresholds, inhibit release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and display synergistic effects with other systems that influence analgesia, especially the endogenous opioid system. Cannabinoid receptor agonists have shown therapeutic value against inflammatory and neuropathic pains, conditions that are often refractory to therapy. Although the psychoactive effects of these substances have limited clinical progress to study cannabinoid actions in pain mechanisms, preclinical research is progressing rapidly. For example, CB1mediated suppression of mast cell activation responses, CB2-mediated indirect stimulation of opioid receptors located in primary afferent pathways, and the discovery of inhibitors for either the transporters or the enzymes degrading endocannabinoids, are recent findings that suggest new therapeutic approaches to avoid central nervous system side effects. In this review, we will examine promising indications of cannabinoid receptor agonists to alleviate acute and chronic pain episodes. Recently, Cannabis sativa extracts, containing known doses of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, have granted approval in Canada for the relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis. Further double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic effectiveness of various cannabinoid agonists-based medications for controlling different types of pain. PMID:18615144

  1. Early maladaptive schemas in Finnish adult chronic pain patients and a control sample.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Tom Harri; Saariaho, Anita Sylvia; Karila, Irma Anneli; Joukamaa, Matti I

    2011-04-01

    Engel (1959) suggested that negative physical or emotional experiences in childhood predispose to the development of chronic pain. Studies have shown that physical and sexual abuse in early life is connected with chronic pain. Emotional adversities are much less studied causes contributing to the development of chronic pain and disability. Early emotional abuse, neglect, maltreatment and other adversities are deleterious childhood experiences which, according to Young's schema theory (1990), produce early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). The primary goal of this study was to examine whether early adversities were more common in chronic pain patients than in a control group. A total of 271 (53% women) first-visit chronic pain patients and 331 (86% women) control participants took part in the study. Their socio-demographic data, pain variables and pain disability were measured. To estimate EMSs the Young Schema Questionnaire was used. Chronic pain patients scored higher EMSs reflecting incapacity to perform independently, catastrophic beliefs and pessimism. The most severely disabled chronic pain patients showed an increase in all the EMSs in the Disconnection and Rejection schema domain, namely Abandonment/Instability, Mistrust/Abuse, Emotional Deprivation, Defectiveness/Shame and Social Isolation/Alienation EMSs. The results of the study suggested that chronic pain patients had suffered early emotional maltreatment. PMID:21054422

  2. Early maladaptive schemas in Finnish adult chronic pain patients and a control sample.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Tom Harri; Saariaho, Anita Sylvia; Karila, Irma Anneli; Joukamaa, Matti I

    2011-04-01

    Engel (1959) suggested that negative physical or emotional experiences in childhood predispose to the development of chronic pain. Studies have shown that physical and sexual abuse in early life is connected with chronic pain. Emotional adversities are much less studied causes contributing to the development of chronic pain and disability. Early emotional abuse, neglect, maltreatment and other adversities are deleterious childhood experiences which, according to Young's schema theory (1990), produce early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). The primary goal of this study was to examine whether early adversities were more common in chronic pain patients than in a control group. A total of 271 (53% women) first-visit chronic pain patients and 331 (86% women) control participants took part in the study. Their socio-demographic data, pain variables and pain disability were measured. To estimate EMSs the Young Schema Questionnaire was used. Chronic pain patients scored higher EMSs reflecting incapacity to perform independently, catastrophic beliefs and pessimism. The most severely disabled chronic pain patients showed an increase in all the EMSs in the Disconnection and Rejection schema domain, namely Abandonment/Instability, Mistrust/Abuse, Emotional Deprivation, Defectiveness/Shame and Social Isolation/Alienation EMSs. The results of the study suggested that chronic pain patients had suffered early emotional maltreatment.

  3. The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is a new treatment option for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. It has been evaluated in retrospective as well as in prospective studies and proven to be safe and possibly effective. This indicates that Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is now ready for clinical evaluation. The results of an earlier performed pilot study with an n = 1 design, in which 20 patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 were treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy, were used for the design and power calculation of the present study. After completion and evaluation of this phase III study, a multi-centre implementation study will be conducted. The aim of this study is to determine whether Pain Exposure Physical Therapy can improve functional outcomes in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Methods/design This study is designed as a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. 62 patients will be randomized with a follow-up of 9 months to demonstrate the expected treatment effect. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 is diagnosed in accordance with the Bruehl/International Association for the Study of Pain criteria. Conventional therapy in accordance with the Dutch guideline will be compared with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Primary outcome measure is the Impairment level SumScore, restricted version. Discussion This is the first randomized controlled study with single blinding that has ever been planned in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 and does not focus on a single aspect of the pain syndrome but compares treatment strategies based on completely different pathophysiological and cognitive theories. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00817128; National Trial Register NTR2090 PMID:22515496

  4. Unlearning chronic pain: A randomized controlled trial to investigate changes in intrinsic brain connectivity following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shpaner, Marina; Kelly, Clare; Lieberman, Greg; Perelman, Hayley; Davis, Marcia; Keefe, Francis J.; Naylor, Magdalena R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a complex physiological and psychological phenomenon. Implicit learning mechanisms contribute to the development of chronic pain and to persistent changes in the central nervous system. We hypothesized that these central abnormalities can be remedied with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Specifically, since regions of the anterior Default Mode Network (DMN) are centrally involved in emotional regulation via connections with limbic regions, such as the amygdala, remediation of maladaptive behavioral and cognitive patterns as a result of CBT for chronic pain would manifest itself as a change in the intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between these prefrontal and limbic regions. Resting-state functional neuroimaging was performed in patients with chronic pain before and after 11-week CBT (n = 19), as well as a matched (ages 19–59, both sexes) active control group of patients who received educational materials (n = 19). Participants were randomized prior to the intervention. To investigate the differential impact of treatment on intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC), we compared pre–post differences in iFC between groups. In addition, we performed exploratory whole brain analyses of changes in fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). The course of CBT led to significant improvements in clinical measures of pain and self-efficacy for coping with chronic pain. Significant group differences in pre–post changes in both iFC and fALFF were correlated with clinical outcomes. Compared to control patients, iFC between the anterior DMN and the amygdala/periaqueductal gray decreased following CBT, whereas iFC between the basal ganglia network and the right secondary somatosensory cortex increased following CBT. CBT patients also had increased post-therapy fALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the cerebellum. By delineating neuroplasticity associated with CBT-related improvements, these results add to mounting evidence

  5. Unlearning chronic pain: A randomized controlled trial to investigate changes in intrinsic brain connectivity following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shpaner, Marina; Kelly, Clare; Lieberman, Greg; Perelman, Hayley; Davis, Marcia; Keefe, Francis J; Naylor, Magdalena R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a complex physiological and psychological phenomenon. Implicit learning mechanisms contribute to the development of chronic pain and to persistent changes in the central nervous system. We hypothesized that these central abnormalities can be remedied with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Specifically, since regions of the anterior Default Mode Network (DMN) are centrally involved in emotional regulation via connections with limbic regions, such as the amygdala, remediation of maladaptive behavioral and cognitive patterns as a result of CBT for chronic pain would manifest itself as a change in the intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) between these prefrontal and limbic regions. Resting-state functional neuroimaging was performed in patients with chronic pain before and after 11-week CBT (n = 19), as well as a matched (ages 19-59, both sexes) active control group of patients who received educational materials (n = 19). Participants were randomized prior to the intervention. To investigate the differential impact of treatment on intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC), we compared pre-post differences in iFC between groups. In addition, we performed exploratory whole brain analyses of changes in fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). The course of CBT led to significant improvements in clinical measures of pain and self-efficacy for coping with chronic pain. Significant group differences in pre-post changes in both iFC and fALFF were correlated with clinical outcomes. Compared to control patients, iFC between the anterior DMN and the amygdala/periaqueductal gray decreased following CBT, whereas iFC between the basal ganglia network and the right secondary somatosensory cortex increased following CBT. CBT patients also had increased post-therapy fALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate and the cerebellum. By delineating neuroplasticity associated with CBT-related improvements, these results add to mounting evidence that CBT

  6. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls - a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. PMID:27022298

  7. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  8. Does Eccentric Exercise Reduce Pain and Improve Strength in Physically Active Adults With Symptomatic Lower Extremity Tendinosis? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wasielewski, Noah J; Kotsko, Kevin M

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To critically review evidence for the effectiveness of eccentric exercise to treat lower extremity tendinoses. Data Sources: Databases used to locate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included PubMed (1980–2006), CINAHL (1982–2006), Web of Science (1995–2006), SPORT Discus (1980–2006), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and the Cochrane Collaboration Database. Key words included tendon, tendonitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, exercise, eccentric, rehabilitation, and therapy. Study Selection: The criteria for trial selection were (1) the literature was written in English, (2) the research design was an RCT, (3) the study participants were adults with a clinical diagnosis of tendinosis, (4) the outcome measures included pain or strength, and (5) eccentric exercise was used to treat lower extremity tendinosis. Data Extraction: Specific data were abstracted from the RCTs, including eccentric exercise protocol, adjunctive treatments, concurrent physical activity, and treatment outcome. Data Synthesis: The calculated post hoc statistical power of the selected studies (n = 11) was low, and the average methodologic score was 5.3/10 based on PEDro criteria. Eccentric exercise was compared with no treatment (n = 1), concentric exercise (n = 5), an alternative eccentric exercise protocol (n = 1), stretching (n = 2), night splinting (n = 1), and physical agents (n = 1). In most trials, tendinosis-related pain was reduced with eccentric exercise over time, but only in 3 studies did eccentric exercise decrease pain relative to the control treatment. Similarly, the RCTs demonstrated that strength-related measures improved over time, but none revealed significant differences relative to the control treatment. Based on the best evidence available, it appears that eccentric exercise may reduce pain and improve strength in lower extremity tendinoses, but whether eccentric exercise is more effective than other forms of therapeutic exercise for the resolution

  9. Effect of a single session of ear acupuncture on pain intensity and postural control in individuals with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ushinohama, Andrea; Cunha, Bianca P.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.; Barela, Ana M. F.; de Freitas, Paulo B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Ear Acupuncture (EA) is a form of acupuncture in which needles are applied to the external ear and has been used in multiple painful conditions. Low back pain (LBP) is highly prevalent in active individuals and causes high economic burden to health systems worldwide. LBP affects the person’s ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a single session of EA on pain intensity and body sway during postural tasks. Method Eighty adults with LBP and pain intensity equal to or greater than 4 (0-10 scale) were randomly allocated (1:1) to EA group (EAG) or placebo group (PG). Initially, the level of pain intensity was assessed. Next, participants stood still on a force plate either with feet in parallel or in semi-tandem and with eyes open or closed. Then, the EAG was treated with EA for 20 min and the PG was treated with detuned ultrasound. After the treatment, pain intensity was assessed again and the postural test was repeated. Pain intensity was the primary outcome and center of pressure sway area and speed were the secondary outcomes measured. Results Results revealed that pain intensity decreased in both groups after treatment, but decreased more in the EAG. For postural control, no effect of treatment and no interaction between treatment and postural condition on body sway were found. Conclusion Those findings indicate that EA is better than placebo to reduce pain, but neither treatment has any effect on postural control. PMID:27556389

  10. Comparison of epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia for post-thoracotomy pain control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Yang, Ba-Xian; Wang, Jun

    2008-04-01

    Epidural analgesia is regarded as the gold method for controlling post-thoracotomy pain. Intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia can also produce satisfactory analgesic effects, but is suspected to increase the incidence of chronic pain. However, randomized controlled trials comparing these two methods for post-thoracotomy acute pain analgesic effects and chronic pain incidents have not been conducted previously. We studied 107 adult patients, allocated randomly to thoracic epidural bupivacaine and morphine or intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia. Acute pain scores and opioid-related side effects were evaluated for three postoperative days. Chronic pain information, including the incidence, severity, and allodynia-like pain, was acquired on the first, third, sixth and twelfth months postoperatively. There was no significant difference on numeral rating scales (NRS) at rest or on motion between the two groups during the three postoperative days. The patient satisfaction results were also similar between the groups. The side effects, especially mild pruritus, were reported more often in the epidural group. Both groups showed high incidence of chronic pain (42.1-72.1%), and no significance between the groups. The incidence of allodynia-like pain reported in cryo group was higher than that in Epidural group on any postoperative month, with significance on the sixth and the twelfth months postoperatively (P<0.05). More patients rated their chronic pain intensity on moderate and severe in cryo group and interfered with daily life (P<0.05). Both thoracic epidural analgesia and intercostal nerve cryoanalgesia showed satisfactory analgesia for post-thoracotomy acute pain. The incidence of post-thoracotomy chronic pain is high. Cryoanalgesia may be a factor that increases the incidence of neuropathic pain. PMID:17870625

  11. Efficacy of fentanyl transdermal patch in pain control after lower third molar surgery: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Vasovic, Miroslav; Andric, Miroslav; Todorovic, Ljubomir; Kokovic, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical removal of impacted lower third molars is a common oral surgical procedure, generally followed by moderate to severe postoperative pain. Transdermal drug delivery as a concept offers interesting possibilities for postoperative pain control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transdermal system with fentanyl in relieving pain following impacted lower third molar surgery. Material and Methods Seventeen patients with bilateral impacted lower third molars were included in this preliminary study. For postoperative pain control, patients randomly received a fentanyl patch plus placebo tablet after the first operation and regular (placebo) patch and an analgesic, after the second operation. Analgesia was evaluated during first 24 hours postoperatively according to patients’ reports about time of first pain appearance and additional analgesic consumption. Pain severity was rated using a 10 cm long visual analogue scale (VAS). Results Intensity of postoperative pain and postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly lower after the Fentanyl Transdermal System (FTS) was applied (p<0.05). Duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly higher with FTS when compared to control treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Based on the results of this preliminary study, transdermal system with fentanyl significantly reduced postoperative pain after third molar surgery. Key words:Analgesia, fentanyl, transdermal administration, third molar surgery, acute pain, postoperative care. PMID:27475691

  12. Sativex successfully treats neuropathic pain characterised by allodynia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Turo J; Serpell, Mick G; Hoggart, Barbara; Toomey, Peter J; Morlion, Bart J; Haines, Derek

    2007-12-15

    Cannabinoids are known to have analgesic properties. We evaluated the effect of oro-mucosal sativex, (THC: CBD), an endocannabinoid system modulator, on pain and allodynia, in 125 patients with neuropathic pain of peripheral origin in a five-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial. Patients remained on their existing stable analgesia. A self-titrating regimen was used to optimise drug administration. Sixty-three patients were randomised to receive sativex and 62 placebo. The mean reduction in pain intensity scores (primary outcome measure) was greater in patients receiving sativex than placebo (mean adjusted scores -1.48 points vs. -0.52 points on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (p=0.004; 95% CI: -1.59, -0.32). Improvements in Neuropathic Pain Scale composite score (p=0.007), sleep NRS (p=0.001), dynamic allodynia (p=0.042), punctate allodynia (p=0.021), Pain Disability Index (p=0.003) and Patient's Global Impression of Change (p<0.001) were similarly greater on sativex vs. placebo. Sedative and gastrointestinal side effects were reported more commonly by patients on active medication. Of all participants, 18% on sativex and 3% on placebo withdrew during the study. An open-label extension study showed that the initial pain relief was maintained without dose escalation or toxicity for 52 weeks. PMID:17997224

  13. The Effect of a Patellar Bandage on the Postural Control of Individuals with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Masullo, Cátia de Lourdes; Saad, Marcelo Camargo; Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora

    2014-01-01

    A patellar bandage is often used by individuals with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PPS) to reduce pain and the additional sensorial input improves proprioception of the knee joint. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of a patellar bandage on the postural control of individuals with and without PPS. [Subjects and Methods] An analysis was performed of variables of center of pressure (CoP) as recorded by a force plate. Information about the forces and moments in three directions was used to obtain the CoP. Thirty women participated in this study: 15 with PPS and 15 without PPS. All subjects performed 3 trials in a unipodal stance with and without a patellar bandage. The force plate data were used to calculate the following variables: CoP sway area, CoP displacement frequency, and CoP mean velocity for the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions. A the linear mixed effects model was used for statistical analysis. [Results] Postural sway was significantly reduced in individuals with PPS when a patellar bandage was applied. [Conclusion] Additional sensory input from a patellar bandage increase proprioceptive feedback and this could be related to the improvement in postural control of PPS subjects. PMID:24707108

  14. Water-friendly virtual reality pain control during wound care.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Patterson, David R; Magula, Jeff; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Zeltzer, Karen; Dagadakis, Stephen; Sharar, Sam R

    2004-02-01

    Recent research suggests that entering an immersive virtual environment can serve as a powerful nonpharmacologic analgesic for severe burn pain. The present case study describes an attempt to use water-friendly virtual reality (VR) technology with a burn patient undergoing wound care in a hydrotherapy tub. The patient was a 40-year-old male with 19% total body surface area deep flame/flash burns to his legs, neck, back, and buttocks. The virtual reality treatment decreased the patient's sensory and affective pain ratings and decreased the amount of time spent thinking about his pain during wound care. We believe that VR analgesia works by drawing attention away from the wound care, leaving less attention available to process incoming pain signals. The water-friendly VR helmet dramatically increases the number of patients with severe burns that could potentially be treated with VR (see http://www.vrpain.com).

  15. A commercialized dietary supplement alleviates joint pain in community adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled community trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of 8-weeks ingestion of a commercialized joint pain dietary supplement (InstaflexTM Joint Support, Direct Digital, Charlotte, NC) compared to placebo on joint pain, stiffness, and function in adults with self-reported joint pain. InstaflexTM is a joint pain supplement containing glucosamine sulfate, methylsufonlylmethane (MSM), white willow bark extract (15% salicin), ginger root concentrate, boswella serrata extract (65% boswellic acid), turmeric root extract, cayenne, and hyaluronic acid. Methods Subjects included 100 men and women, ages 50-75 years, with a history (>3 months) of joint pain, and were randomized to Instaflex™ or placebo (3 colored gel capsules per day for 8 weeks, double-blind administration). Subjects agreed to avoid the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and all other medications and supplements targeted for joint pain. Primary outcome measures were obtained pre- and post-study and included joint pain severity, stiffness, and function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities [WOMAC]), and secondary outcome measures included health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 or SF-36), systemic inflammation (serum C-reactive protein and 9 plasma cytokines), and physical function (6-minute walk test). Joint pain symptom severity was assessed bi-weekly using a 12-point Likert visual scale (12-VS). Results Joint pain severity was significantly reduced in Instaflex™ compared to placebo (8-week WOMAC, ↓37% versus ↓16%, respectively, interaction effect P = 0.025), with group differences using the 12-VS emerging by week 4 of the study (interaction effect, P = 0.0125). Improvements in ability to perform daily activities and stiffness scores in Instaflex™ compared to placebo were most evident for the 74% of subjects reporting knee pain (8-week WOMAC function score, ↓39% versus ↓14%, respectively, interaction effect P = 0.027; stiffness score, ↓30

  16. Local infiltration analgesia is not improved by postoperative intra-articular bolus injections for pain after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Karen V; Nikolajsen, Lone; Daugaard, Henrik; Andersen, Niels T; Haraldsted, Viggo; Søballe, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — The effect of postoperative intra-articular bolus injections after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that intra-articular bolus injections administered every 6 hours after surgery during the first 24 hours would significantly improve analgesia after THA. Patients and methods — 80 patients undergoing THA received high-volume local infiltration analgesia (LIA; 200 mg ropivacaine and 30 mg ketorolac) followed by 4 intra-articular injections with either ropivacaine (100 mg) and ketorolac (15 mg) (the treatment group) or saline (the control group). The intra-articular injections were combined with 4 intravenous injections of either saline (treatment group) or 15 mg ketorolac (control group). All patients received morphine as patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). The primary outcome was consumption of intravenous morphine PCA and secondary outcomes were consumption of oral morphine, pain intensity, side effects, readiness for hospital discharge, length of hospital stay, and postoperative consumption of analgesics at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results — There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups regarding postoperative consumption of intravenous morphine PCA. Postoperative pain scores during walking were higher in the treatment group from 24–72 hours after surgery, but other pain scores were similar between groups. Time to readiness for hospital discharge was longer in the treatment group. Other secondary outcomes were similar between groups. Interpretation — Postoperative intra-articular bolus injections of ropivacaine and ketorolac cannot be recommended as analgesic method after THA. PMID:26312445

  17. Endocannabinoid system: Role in depression, reward and pain control (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Depression and pain co-exist in almost 80% of patients and are associated with impaired health-related quality of life, often contributing to high mortality. However, the majority of patients who suffer from the comorbid depression and pain are not responsive to pharmacological treatments that address either pain or depression, making this comorbidity disorder a heavy burden on patients and society. In ancient times, this depression-pain comorbidity was treated using extracts of the Cannabis sativa plant, known now as marijuana and the mode of action of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active cannabinoid ingredient of marijuana, has only recently become known, with the identification of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2. Subsequent investigations led to the identification of endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, which exert cannabinomimetic effects through the CB1 and CB2 receptors, which are located on presynaptic membranes in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, respectively. These endocannabinoids are produced from membrane lipids and are lipohilic molecules that are synthesized on demand and are eliminated rapidly after their usage by hydrolyzing enzymes. Clinical studies revealed altered endocannabinoid signaling in patients with chronic pain. Considerable evidence suggested the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in eliciting potent effects on neurotransmission, neuroendocrine, and inflammatory processes, which are known to be deranged in depression and chronic pain. Several synthetic cannabinomimetic drugs are being developed to treat pain and depression. However, the precise mode of action of endocannabinoids on different targets in the body and whether their effects on pain and depression follow the same or different pathways, remains to be determined. PMID:27484193

  18. Endocannabinoid system: Role in depression, reward and pain control (Review).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Juan; Chen, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2016-10-01

    Depression and pain co-exist in almost 80% of patients and are associated with impaired health-related quality of life, often contributing to high mortality. However, the majority of patients who suffer from the comorbid depression and pain are not responsive to pharmacological treatments that address either pain or depression, making this comorbidity disorder a heavy burden on patients and society. In ancient times, this depression-pain comorbidity was treated using extracts of the Cannabis sativa plant, known now as marijuana and the mode of action of Δ9‑tetrahydrocannabinol, the active cannabinoid ingredient of marijuana, has only recently become known, with the identification of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2. Subsequent investigations led to the identification of endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, which exert cannabinomimetic effects through the CB1 and CB2 receptors, which are located on presynaptic membranes in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, respectively. These endocannabinoids are produced from membrane lipids and are lipohilic molecules that are synthesized on demand and are eliminated rapidly after their usage by hydrolyzing enzymes. Clinical studies revealed altered endocannabinoid signaling in patients with chronic pain. Considerable evidence suggested the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in eliciting potent effects on neurotransmission, neuroendocrine, and inflammatory processes, which are known to be deranged in depression and chronic pain. Several synthetic cannabinomimetic drugs are being developed to treat pain and depression. However, the precise mode of action of endocannabinoids on different targets in the body and whether their effects on pain and depression follow the same or different pathways, remains to be determined. PMID:27484193

  19. Electrical stimulation of the nervous system for pain control.

    PubMed

    Long, D M

    1978-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation appears to be a valid technique for the treatment of many pain states. Its use in chronic pain is limited and it appears to be much more likely to be effective in the relief of acute painful states. Nevertheless, since it provides a simple way to treat a significant number of patients whose pain would otherwise by intractable, it has been a valuable addition to the armamentarium of the physician dealing with chronic pain. Peripheral nerve stimulation is an excellent way to relieve pain of peripheral nerve injury origin and certain painful, poorly understood, vasopastic or reflex sympathetic states. Spinal cord stimulation has been revived by the advent of percutaneous stimulators. The technique is currently the best available for the treatment of the patient suffering from the chronic low back syndrome with severe arachnoiditis, for whom no definitive therapy is available. Brain stimulation has been relegated to therapy for pain of central nervous system origin. It is a most promising technique though its application appears to be limited at this point to a few specific problems. The seriousness of potential complications has kept it from being widely applicable to date. There is little information concerning the mechanism whereby these various techniques are effective. Transcutaneous and peripheral nerve stimulation might have their effect through peripheral mechanisms or through a gating mechanism in the posterior horn (Melzack and Wall 1965; Campbell and Taub 1973). Spinal cord stimulation could act through a retrograde effect upon a dorsal horn gate or have more central actions. Brain stimulation in the opiate receptor system may be effective through activation of this system. The mechanisms of action of stimulation in the sensory system centrally are certainly not well understood (Bloedel 1974).

  20. Contributions of myofascial pain in diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain. A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Palomares, Sara; Oliván-Blázquez, Bárbara; Arnal-Burró, Ana Mª; Mayoral-Del Moral, Orlando; Gaspar-Calvo, Elena; de-la-Torre-Beldarraín, Mª Luisa; López-Lapeña, Elena; Pérez-Benito, Marina; Ara-Loriente, Victoria; Romo-Calvo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy and subacromial impingement syndrome present complex patomechanical situations, frequent difficulties in clinical diagnosis and lack of effectiveness in treatment. Based on clinical experience, we have therefore considered the existence of another pathological entity as the possible origin of pain and dysfunction. The hypothesis of this study is to relate subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) with myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), since myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) cause pain, functional limitation, lack of coordination and alterations in quality of movement, even prior to a tendinopathy. MTrPs can coexist with any degenerative subacromial condition. If they are not taken into consideration, they could perpetuate and aggravate the problem, hindering diagnosis and making the applied treatments ineffective. The aims and methods of this study are related with providing evidence of the relationship that may exist between this condition and MPS in the diagnosis and treatment of rotator cuff tendonitis and/or SIS. Method/design A descriptive transversal study will be made to find the correlation between the diagnosis of SIS and rotator cuff tendonitis, positive provocation test responses, the existence of active MTrPs and the results obtained with ultrasonography (US) and Magnetic Renonance Imaging (MRI). A randomized double blinded clinical trial will be carried out in experimental conditions: A Protocolized treatment based on active and passive joint repositioning, stabilization exercises, stretching of the periarticular shoulder muscles and postural reeducation. B. The previously described protocolized treatment, with the addition of dry needling applied to active MTrPs with the purpose of isolating the efficacy of dry needling in treatment. Discussion This study aims to provide a new vision of shoulder pain, from the perspective of MPS. This syndrome can, by itself, account for shoulder pain and dysfunction, although it can

  1. Evaluating Resident Physicians' Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Regarding the Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Masoud; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Saadat-Niaki, Asadollah; Hoseini Khameneh, Seyed Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain has been one of the most debilitating symptoms of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate residents' knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding pain control in cancer patients. Methods In a descriptive study, 69 randomly selected third-year various residents practicing in teaching hospitals of Shahid Beheshti School of medicine participated in this study. They have provided their demographic characteristics and completed a questionnaire, based on their “knowledge”, “attitude” and “practice” regarding cancer pain and its management. Data analysis has performed using SPSS v.19. A p value of less than 0.05 has considered as significant. Results Obtained Data from 69 participants including 32 anesthesiology residents has included to our study. The average scores were 35.8±6.1 (ranging from 20 to 49) for the residents' attitude, 25.1±9.1 (ranging from 0 to 53) for their knowledge and 11.2±4.1 (ranging from 0 to 17) for their practice. The overall scores of the questions have related to attitude and knowledge were higher for residents of anesthesiology but the difference was not statistically significant (A: 37.1±4.9 vs. 34.7±6.8, p=0.106, K: 27.2±11.8 vs. 23.3±5.6, p=0.076). The average score for questions on physician' practice was significantly higher in residents of anesthesiology (P: 12.8±3.2 vs. 9.7±4.2, p=0.001). Conclusion In order to provide patients with adequate pain relief, it has seemed advisable for medical schools to focus on improving the educational curriculum and integrating it into clinical practice. PMID:25821565

  2. The Kinesio Taping Method for Myofascial Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Ting; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chou, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Many people continue suffering from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) clinically. Muscle spasm and block of blood circulation can be noticed in the taut bands. In the MTrP region, nociceptors can be sensitized by the peripheral inflammatory factors and contracture of fascia can also be induced. Traditional treatments of MPS include stretching therapy, thermal treatment, electrical stimulation, massage, manipulation, trigger points injection, acupuncture, and medicine. However, the pain syndrome may not be relieved even under multiple therapies. Recently, the Kinesio Taping (KT) method is popularly used in sports injuries, postoperative complications, and various pain problems, but little research is focused on MPS with KT method. In this paper, we review the research studies on the application to KT in treating MPS and other related issues. It appears that the KT application can elevate the subcutaneous space and then increase the blood circulation and lymph fluid drainage to reduce the chemical factors around the MTrP region. Therefore, it is suggested that KT method can be used as a regular treatment or added to the previous treatment for myofascial pain. PMID:26185522

  3. The efficacy of preemptive analgesia for postoperative pain control: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Penprase, Barbara; Brunetto, Elisa; Dahmani, Eman; Forthoffer, Jola Janaqi; Kapoor, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of preemptive analgesia is to reduce postoperative pain, contributing to a more comfortable recovery period and reducing the need for narcotic pain control. The efficacy of preemptive analgesia remains controversial. This systematic review of the literature evaluated the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and gabapentin as preemptive oral analgesics for surgical patients. Included articles were limited to studies of adult patients that compared the difference in postoperative pain between control and treatment groups. Of 40 studies reviewed, 14 met the inclusion criteria, including two on NSAIDs, four on COX-2 inhibitors, and eight on gabapentin. Research was predominantly conducted outside the United States. Gabapentin and COX-2 inhibitors were found to be the most effective preemptive analgesics for postoperative pain control. As part of a collaborative team, perioperative nurses and certified RN anesthetists are responsible for ongoing pain assessment and management for preemptive analgesic interventions.

  4. Virtual reality hypnosis pain control in the treatment of multiple fractures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Teeley, Aubriana M; Soltani, Maryam; Wiechman, Shelley A; Jensen, Mark P; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2012-01-01

    This case series evaluated the use of virtual reality hypnosis (VRH) for the treatment of pain associated with multiple fractures from traumatic injuries. VRH treatment was administered on 2 consecutive days, and pain and anxiety were assessed each day before and after VRH treatment as well as on Day 3, which was 24 hours after the second treatment session. Pain reduction from baseline to Day 3 was from 70% to 30%, despite opioid analgesic use remaining stable. The subjective pain reduction reported by patients was encouraging, and the results of this case series suggest the importance of further study of VRH with larger samples using randomized controlled trials. PMID:22443021

  5. Peripherally acting opioids and clinical implications for pain control.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Nalini; Smith, Howard S; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2011-01-01

    developing novel treatments for pain with improved side effect profiles.

  6. Pharmacological pain control for human immunodeficiency virus—infected adults with a history of drug dependence

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Bruce, R. Douglas; Barry, Declan T.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    Clinicians treating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with substance use disorders often face the challenge of managing patients' acute or chronic pain conditions while keeping in mind the potential dangers of prescription opiate dependence. In this clinical review, we critically appraise the existing data concerning barriers to appropriate treatment of pain among HIV-infected patients with substance use disorders. We then analyze published studies concerning the choice of pharmacological pain control regimens for acute and chronic pain conditions in HIV-infected patients, keeping in mind HIV-specific issues related to drug interactions and substance use disorders. We summarize this information in the form of flowcharts for physicians approaching HIV-infected patients who present with complaints of pain, providing evidence-based guidance for the structuring of pain management services and for addressing aberrant drug-taking behaviors. PMID:17481463

  7. Double-blind randomized controlled study of coblation tonsillotomy versus coblation tonsillectomy on postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Donne, A J; Nigam, A

    2003-12-01

    This double-blind randomized controlled trial of coblation tonsillotomy versus coblation tonsillectomy uses visual analogue scoring to compare the pain experienced in the 24h postoperative period. No statistically significant difference in pain is demonstrated in the group of 14 patients studied. Tonsillectomy is recommended over tonsillotomy.

  8. Empathic control through coordinated interaction of amygdala, theory of mind and extended pain matrix brain regions.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, Emile G; Jacoby, Nir; Saxe, Rebecca

    2015-07-01

    Brain regions in the "pain matrix", can be activated by observing or reading about others in physical pain. In previous research, we found that reading stories about others' emotional suffering, by contrast, recruits a different group of brain regions mostly associated with thinking about others' minds. In the current study, we examined the neural circuits responsible for deliberately regulating empathic responses to others' pain and suffering. In Study 1, a sample of college-aged participants (n=18) read stories about physically painful and emotionally distressing events during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), while either actively empathizing with the main character or trying to remain objective. In Study 2, the same experiment was performed with professional social workers, who are chronically exposed to human suffering (n=21). Across both studies activity in the amygdala was associated with empathic regulation towards others' emotional pain, but not their physical pain. In addition, psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis and Granger causal modeling (GCM) showed that amygdala activity while reading about others' emotional pain was preceded by and positively coupled with activity in the theory of mind brain regions, and followed by and negatively coupled with activity in regions associated with physical pain and bodily sensations. Previous work has shown that the amygdala is critically involved in the deliberate control of self-focused distress - the current results extend the central importance of amygdala activity to the control of other-focused empathy, but only when considering others' emotional pain. PMID:25913703

  9. Implementation of a nursing home quality improvement project to reduce resident pain: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; DeCrane, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Davila, Heather Wood; Arling, Greg

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of staff members working within nursing homes that successfully implemented a quality improvement project aimed at reducing resident pain. Interviews were conducted with 24 nursing home employees from within 8 facilities participating in the quality improvement project. Findings were organized using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Interdisciplinary communication, supportive leadership, training, and nursing assistant participation facilitated implementation. Increased documentation, resistance to change, and difficulty measuring outcomes were perceived challenges. PMID:25407787

  10. Randomized control trial of topical clonidine for treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M.; Kipnes, Mark S.; Stouch, Bruce C.; Brady, Kerrie L.; Kelly, Margaret; Schmidt, William K.; Petersen, Karin L.; Rowbotham, Michael C.; Campbell, James N.

    2012-01-01

    A length-dependent neuropathy with pain in the feet is a common complication of diabetes (painful diabetic neuropathy, PDN). It was hypothesized that pain may arise from sensitized-hyperactive cutaneous nociceptors, and that this abnormal signaling may be reduced by topical administration of the α2-adrenergic agonist, clonidine, to the painful area. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multi-center trial. Nociceptor function was measured by determining the painfulness of 0.1% topical capsaicin applied to the pre-tibial area of each subject for 30 minutes during screening. Subjects were then randomized to receive 0.1% topical clonidine gel (n=89) or placebo gel (n=90) applied t.i.d. to their feet for 12 weeks. The difference in foot pain at week 12 in relation to baseline, rated on a 0-10 numerical pain rating scale (NPRS), was compared between groups. Baseline NPRS was imputed for missing data for subjects who terminated the study early. The subjects treated with clonidine showed a trend toward decreased foot pain compared to the placebo-treated group (the primary endpoint; p=0.07). In subjects who felt any level of pain to capsaicin, clonidine was superior to placebo (p<0.05). In subjects with a capsaicin pain rating ≥2 (0-10, NPRS), the mean decrease in foot pain was 2.6 for active compared to 1.4 for placebo (p=0.01). Topical clonidine gel significantly reduces the level of foot pain in PDN subjects with functional (and possibly sensitized) nociceptors in the affected skin as revealed by testing with topical capsaicin. Screening for cutaneous nociceptor function may help distinguish candidates for topical therapy for neuropathic pain. PMID:22683276

  11. Pain reduction and financial incentives to improve glucose monitoring adherence in a community health center.

    PubMed

    Huntsman, Mary Ann H; Olivares, Faith J; Tran, Christina P; Billimek, John; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose is a critical component of diabetes management. However, patients often do not maintain the testing schedule recommended by their healthcare provider. Many barriers to testing have been cited, including cost and pain. We present a small pilot study to explore whether the use of financial incentives and pain-free lancets could improve adherence to glucose testing in a community health center patient population consisting largely of non-English speaking ethnic minorities with low health literacy. The proportion of patients lost to follow-up was 17%, suggesting that a larger scale study is feasible in this type of setting, but we found no preliminary evidence suggesting a positive effect on adherence by either financial incentives or pain-free lancets. Results from this pilot study will guide the design of larger-scale studies to evaluate approaches to overcome the variety of barriers to glucose testing that are present in disadvantaged patient populations. PMID:25486531

  12. Answering the call to address chronic pain in military service members and veterans: Progress in improving pain care and restoring health.

    PubMed

    Schoneboom, Bruce A; Perry, Susan M; Barnhill, William Keith; Giordano, Nicholas A; Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) in military and veteran populations mirrors the experience of chronic pain in America; however, these two populations have unique characteristics and comorbid conditions such as traumatic brain injuries, postconcussive syndrome, posttraumatic stress disorder, and behavioral health disorders that complicate the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain. Military members and veterans may also be stigmatized about their conditions and experience problems with integration back into healthy lifestyles and society as a whole following deployments and after military service. The military and veteran health care systems have made chronic pain a priority and have made substantial strides in addressing this condition through advances in practice, education, research, and health policy. Despite this progress, significant challenges remain in responding to the wide-spread problem of chronic pain. The purpose of this article is to: (a) examine the state of CNCP in military and veteran populations; (b) discuss progress made in pain practice, education, research, and health policy; and (c) examine research, evidence-based practice guidelines, and expert consensus reports that are foundational to advancing pain care and improving health for military service members and veterans with CNCP. In addition, recommendations are proposed to address this widespread health problem through the expanded use of advanced practice registered nurses, the implementation of models of care, and use of national resources to educate health care providers, support practice, and promote effective pain care. PMID:27427406

  13. Answering the call to address chronic pain in military service members and veterans: Progress in improving pain care and restoring health.

    PubMed

    Schoneboom, Bruce A; Perry, Susan M; Barnhill, William Keith; Giordano, Nicholas A; Wiltse Nicely, Kelly L; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) in military and veteran populations mirrors the experience of chronic pain in America; however, these two populations have unique characteristics and comorbid conditions such as traumatic brain injuries, postconcussive syndrome, posttraumatic stress disorder, and behavioral health disorders that complicate the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain. Military members and veterans may also be stigmatized about their conditions and experience problems with integration back into healthy lifestyles and society as a whole following deployments and after military service. The military and veteran health care systems have made chronic pain a priority and have made substantial strides in addressing this condition through advances in practice, education, research, and health policy. Despite this progress, significant challenges remain in responding to the wide-spread problem of chronic pain. The purpose of this article is to: (a) examine the state of CNCP in military and veteran populations; (b) discuss progress made in pain practice, education, research, and health policy; and (c) examine research, evidence-based practice guidelines, and expert consensus reports that are foundational to advancing pain care and improving health for military service members and veterans with CNCP. In addition, recommendations are proposed to address this widespread health problem through the expanded use of advanced practice registered nurses, the implementation of models of care, and use of national resources to educate health care providers, support practice, and promote effective pain care.

  14. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  15. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  16. The efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation on postural control in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-12-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: 15 patients received rehabilitation, on the basis of a specific tool to perform perceptive exercises [perceptive group (PG)], and 15 patients received a back school programme [back school group (BG)]. Both groups were assessed using stabilometry and the McGill Pain Questionnaire before and at the end of treatment. For the reference values of stabilometric parameters, 15 healthy individuals were enrolled. Significant reductions in sway length (P=0.019) and laterolateral sway velocity (P=0.038) were observed in the PG. The anteroposterior sway velocity was reduced in both the groups, but significantly only for BG (P=0.048). The percentage of sway length reduction was inversely and significantly correlated with the initial sway length value for PG (R=-0.708, P=0.003), but not for BG (R=-0.321, P=0.243). In the PG, the sagittal arrows and bi-acromial and bi-spinoiliac lines' angles were all significantly reduced. General pain relief was reported after treatment, without a significant difference (P=0.436). Our results suggest that a perceptive rehabilitation can improve the postural stability for the realignment of the trunk, controlling the back pain. The use of cognitive exercises may strengthen the usual rehabilitation of low back pain, avoiding the recurrence of symptoms.

  17. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis. PMID:27698603

  18. THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY FOR PAIN CONTROL IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Daniali, Seyde Shahrbanoo; Shahnazi, Hossein; Kazemi, Samira; Marzbani, Elnaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. The prevalence of it is increasing in our country too. The pain from disorders can affect quality of life. Several studies have pointed to the improvement of patients through educational intervention. This study attempted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention based on raising the awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with multiple sclerosis during 2015 under the coverage of Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). Materials and methods: This was a quasi-experimental study involving pre-test, post-test and randomized control group conducted on 100 patients with MS referred to the Isfahan MS Society (IMSS). The educational intervention group learned the pain management self-care lesson during 4 weekly sessions. The data were collected through a self-structured questionnaire with adequate validity and reliability, containing demographic data, awareness and self-efficacy of pain control. The data were assessed through descriptive and analytical tests assisted by SPSS 17. The significant level was considered as P<0.05. Results: Concerning the questionnaire, 96% of the items were responded. Most participants were women. The frequency distribution of demographic variables was not significantly different between the two pre-test groups. After the intervention, the mean score of knowledge and efficacy among patients in the intervention group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Educational interventions can improve awareness and self-efficacy for pain control among patients with MS. Therefore, such interventions can be designed to reduce physical and psychological complications following multiple sclerosis.

  19. The impact of baroreflex function on endogenous pain control: a microneurography study.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Gothje; Habig, Kathrin; Best, Christoph; Kaps, Manfred; Elam, Mikael; Birklein, Frank; Krämer, Heidrun H

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity to muscles [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), burst frequency (BF) and burst incidence (BI)] and different stress and somatosensory stimuli is still unclear. Eighteen healthy men (median age 28 years) underwent microneurography recordings from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was recorded during heat pain (HP) and cold pain (CP) alone as well as combined with different stress tasks (mental arithmetic, singing, giving a speech). An additional nine healthy men (median age 26 years) underwent the stimulation protocol with an additional control task (thermal pain combined with listening to music) to evaluate possible attentional confounders. MSNA was significantly increased by CP and HP. CP-evoked responses were smaller. The diastolic blood pressure followed the time course of MSNA while heart rate remained unchanged. The mental stress tasks further increased MSNA and were sufficient to reduce pain while the control task had no effect. MSNA activity correlated negatively with pain intensity and positively with analgesia. High blood pressure values were associated with lower pain intensity. Our study indicates an impact of central sympathetic drive on pain and pain control. PMID:26454007

  20. The impact of baroreflex function on endogenous pain control: a microneurography study.

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, Gothje; Habig, Kathrin; Best, Christoph; Kaps, Manfred; Elam, Mikael; Birklein, Frank; Krämer, Heidrun H

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity to muscles [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), burst frequency (BF) and burst incidence (BI)] and different stress and somatosensory stimuli is still unclear. Eighteen healthy men (median age 28 years) underwent microneurography recordings from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was recorded during heat pain (HP) and cold pain (CP) alone as well as combined with different stress tasks (mental arithmetic, singing, giving a speech). An additional nine healthy men (median age 26 years) underwent the stimulation protocol with an additional control task (thermal pain combined with listening to music) to evaluate possible attentional confounders. MSNA was significantly increased by CP and HP. CP-evoked responses were smaller. The diastolic blood pressure followed the time course of MSNA while heart rate remained unchanged. The mental stress tasks further increased MSNA and were sufficient to reduce pain while the control task had no effect. MSNA activity correlated negatively with pain intensity and positively with analgesia. High blood pressure values were associated with lower pain intensity. Our study indicates an impact of central sympathetic drive on pain and pain control.

  1. Improved pain relief after thoracotomy: use of cryoprobe and morphine infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, I A; Keenan, D J; Dundee, J W

    1981-01-01

    In a randomised controlled trial carried out during the first to days after thoracotomy patients who had had intercostal nerves frozen with a cryoprobe or were given morphine by continuous intravenous infusion had significant less pain at rest than patients given intramuscular morphine. Differences between the groups with respect to pain on movement and during physiotherapy were not significant. Pain was estimated using visual analogue scales, and an arc sine transformation was carried out on values obtained from these scales before comparison using an analysis of variance. The trial did not distinguish between the cryoprobe and infusion treatment. The simplicity of the cryoprobe had much to commend it, but in units without access to this equipment a small infusion pump offers a satisfactory alternative. PMID:6793183

  2. The impact of pain control on physical and psychiatric functions of cancer patients: a nation-wide survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Jen-Shi; Wu, Hung-Bo; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Huang, Ming-Lih; Wang, Cyuan-Jheng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Hwang, Wen-Li; Lu, Yin-Che; Chan, Chung-Huang; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of pain in cancer patients at different disease statuses, the impact of pain on physical and psychiatric functions of patients and the satisfaction of pain control of patients at outpatient clinic department in Taiwan. Methods Short form of the Brief Pain Inventory was used as the outcome questionnaire. Unselected patients of different cancers and different disease statuses at outpatient clinic department were included. The impacts of their current pain control on physical function, psychiatric function and the satisfaction of doctors were evaluated. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate whether the interference scale performed identically in the different analgesic ladders. The dependent variables were satisfaction toward physician and treatment. Results A total of 14 sites enrolled 2075 patients in the study. One thousand and fifty-one patients reported pain within the last 1 week. In patients whose diseases deteriorated, >60% of them need analgesics for pain control. Pain influenced physical and psychiatric functions of patients, especially in the deteriorated status. More than 80% of patients were satisfied about current pain control, satisfaction rate related to disease status, pain intensities and treatments for pain. Conclusion Our study found that different cancers at different statuses had pain at variable severity. Pain can influence physical and psychological functions significantly. More than 75% of subjects reported satisfaction over physician and pain management in outpatient clinic department patients with cancer pain in Taiwan. PMID:26292698

  3. Liposomal bupivacaine versus traditional periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bagsby, Deren T; Ireland, Phillip H; Meneghini, R Michael

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a novel liposomal bupivacaine to traditional peri-articular injection (PAI) in a multi-modal pain protocol for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective cohort study compared 85 consecutive patients undergoing TKA with a traditional PAI of ropivacaine, epinephrine and morphine to 65 patients with a liposomal bupivacaine PAI. After the initial 24h, inpatient self-reported pain scores were higher in the liposomal bupivacaine group compared to the traditional PAI group (P = 0.04) and a smaller percentage (16.9%) of patients in the liposomal bupivacaine group rated their pain as "mild" compared to the traditional group (47.6%). Liposomal bupivacaine PAI provided inferior pain control compared to the less expensive traditional PAI in a multi-modal pain control program in patients undergoing TKA.

  4. Patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged <40 years, it also affects people of all activity levels and ages.(1 2) Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  5. Trajectories of change during a randomized controlled trial of internet-delivered psychological treatment for adolescent chronic pain: how does change in pain and function relate?

    PubMed

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Zhou, Chuan; Holley, Amy Lewandowski; Logan, Deirdre; Tai, Gabrielle

    2015-04-01

    Although pain and function improve at immediate posttreatment for youth receiving cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain, limited data are available to understand changes that youth make during psychological treatment. We sought to characterize distinct trajectory patterns of change in pain and function to understand the temporal association of these changes during internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Weekly repeated assessments of pain and function were conducted during 8 weeks of treatment among 135 adolescents, aged 11 to 17 years, with chronic pain who were randomized to the cognitive behavioral intervention arm of an ongoing trial of internet-delivered CBT (Web-based management of adolescent pain; Web-MAP2). Using random-effects growth mixture models, we characterized pain and functional disability trajectories finding distinct trajectory groups indicating patterns of both linear and quadratic effects. Trajectories of change showed that some patients' pain and functional disability were improving, others worsened or changed minimally. Paired t tests compared the within-subject relative change rate in pain and function demonstrating similar change range for pain and function during the treatment period. There was no support for improvements in either pain or function to precede changes in the other domain. Findings may be useful in informing future studies of psychosocial treatments for pediatric chronic pain to consider how to target treatment strategies to distinct patient response profiles. This may lead to the development of intervention strategies that can both more effectively target children's pain and function during treatment and lead to sustained changes after treatment.

  6. Effect of pretreatment diclofenac sodium on postendodontic pain: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Malasiddappa; Hegde, Swaroop; Bhandi, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Effective management of endodontic pain represents a continuing challenge. Many of the dental professionals are facing significant problems associated with postendodontic pain. Hence, the postendodontic pain has to be prevented at its primary stage without waiting for its occurrence. This trial was carried out to evaluate the use of a preoperative, single oral dose of diclofenac sodium for the prevention and control of postendodontic pain. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients were randomly assigned to two groups, placebo and diclofenac sodium (100 mg). The medications were administered 30 min before the start of standard endodontic treatment. Postoperative pain was assessed after 6, 12, and 24 h by using a visual analog scale. Results: Postendodontic pain showed a statistically significant difference between both groups at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.05) and there was no significant difference at 24 h. Conclusion: Postendodontic pain was substantially reduced by preoperative administration of single oral dose of diclofenac sodium. It is thus possible to conclude that these favorable results might help to prevent postendodontic pain, especially in patients with a low pain threshold. PMID:26957785

  7. Traumeel S® for pain relief following hallux valgus surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In spite of recent advances in post-operative pain relief, pain following orthopedic surgery remains an ongoing challenge for clinicians. We examined whether a well known and frequently prescribed homeopathic preparation could mitigate post-operative pain. Method We performed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of the homeopathic preparation Traumeel S® in minimizing post-operative pain and analgesic consumption following surgical correction of hallux valgus. Eighty consecutive patients were randomized to receive either Traumeel tablets or an indistinguishable placebo, and took primary and rescue oral analgesics as needed. Maximum numerical pain scores at rest and consumption of oral analgesics were recorded on day of surgery and for 13 days following surgery. Results Traumeel was not found superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial, however a transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score favoring the Traumeel arm was observed on the day of surgery, a finding supported by a treatment-time interaction test (p = 0.04). Conclusions Traumeel was not superior to placebo in minimizing pain or analgesic consumption over the 14 days of the trial. A transient reduction in the daily maximum post-operative pain score on the day of surgery is of questionable clinical importance. Trial Registration This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. # NCT00279513 PMID:20380750

  8. Exploring relationships for visceral and somatic pain with autonomic control and personality.

    PubMed

    Paine, Peter; Kishor, Jessin; Worthen, Sian F; Gregory, Lloyd J; Aziz, Qasim

    2009-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) integrates afferent and motor activity for homeostatic processes including pain. The aim of the study was to compare hitherto poorly characterised relations between brainstem autonomic control and personality in response to visceral and somatic pain. Eighteen healthy subjects (16 females, mean age 34) had recordings during rest and pain of heart rate (HR), cardiac vagal tone (CVT), cardiac sensitivity to baroreflex (CSB), skin conductance level (SC), cardiac sympathetic index (CSI) and mean blood pressure (MBP). Visceral pain was induced by balloon distension in proximal (PB) and distal (DB) oesophagus and somatic pain by nail-bed pressure (NBP). Eight painful stimuli were delivered at each site and unpleasantness and intensity measured. Personality was profiled with the Big Five inventory. (1) Oesophageal intubation evoked "fight-flight" responses: HR and sympathetic (CSI, SC, MBP) elevation with parasympathetic (CVT) withdrawal (p<0.05). (2) Pain at all sites evoked novel parasympathetic/sympathetic co-activation with elevated HR but vasodepression (all p<0.05). (3) Personality traits correlated with slope of distal oesophageal pain-related CVT changes wherein more neurotic-introvert subjects had greater positive pain-related CVT slope change (neuroticism r 0.8, p<0.05; extroversion r -0.5, p<0.05). Pain-evoked heart rate increases were mediated by parasympathetic and sympathetic co-activation - a novel finding in humans but recently described in mammals too. Visceral pain-related parasympathetic change correlated with personality. ANS defence responses are nuanced and may relate to personality type for visceral pain. Clinical relevance of these findings warrants further exploration. PMID:19398272

  9. Rationale, design, and implementation protocol of the Dutch clinical practice guideline Pain in patients with cancer: a cluster randomised controlled trial with short message service (SMS) and interactive voice response (IVR)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One-half of patients with cancer have pain. In nearly one out of two cancer patients with pain, this was undertreated. Inadequate pain control still remains an important problem in this group of patients. Therefore, in 2008 a national, evidence-based multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline 'pain in patients with cancer' has been developed. Yet, publishing a guideline is not enough. Implementation is needed to improve pain management. An innovative implementation strategy, Short Message Service with Interactive Voice Response (SVS-IVR), has been developed and pilot tested. This study aims to evaluate on effectiveness of this strategy to improve pain reporting, pain measurement and adequate pain therapy. In addition, whether the active role of the patient and involvement of caregivers in pain management may change. Methods/design A cluster randomised controlled trial with two arms will be performed in six oncology outpatient clinics of hospitals in the Southeastern region of the Netherlands, with three hospitals in the intervention and three in the control condition. Follow-up measurements will be conducted in all hospitals to study the long-term effect of the intervention. The intervention includes training of professionals (medical oncologists, nurses, and general practitioners) and SMS-IVR to report pain in patients with cancer to improve pain reporting by patients, pain management by medical oncologists, nurses, and general practitioners, and decrease pain intensity. Discussion This innovative implementation strategy with technical tools and the involvement of patients, may enhance the use of the guideline 'pain in patients with cancer' for pain management. Short Message Service alerts may serve as a tool to support self-management of patients. Therefore, the SMS-IVR intervention may increase the feeling of having control over one's life. Trail registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2739 PMID:22142327

  10. Acute effects of single and multiple level thoracic manipulations on chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Puntumetakul, Rungthip; Suvarnnato, Thavatchai; Werasirirat, Phurichaya; Uthaikhup, Sureeporn; Yamauchi, Junichiro; Boucaut, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic spine manipulation has become a popular alternative to local cervical manipulative therapy for mechanical neck pain. This study investigated the acute effects of single-level and multiple-level thoracic manipulations on chronic mechanical neck pain (CMNP). Methods Forty-eight patients with CMNP were randomly allocated to single-level thoracic manipulation (STM) at T6–T7 or multiple-level thoracic manipulation (MTM), or to a control group (prone lying). Cervical range of motion (CROM), visual analog scale (VAS), and the Thai version of the Neck Disability Index (NDI-TH) scores were measured at baseline, and at 24-hour and at 1-week follow-up. Results At 24-hour and 1-week follow-up, neck disability and pain levels were significantly (P<0.05) improved in the STM and MTM groups compared with the control group. CROM in flexion and left lateral flexion were increased significantly (P<0.05) in the STM group when compared with the control group at 1-week follow-up. The CROM in right rotation was increased significantly after MTM compared to the control group (P<0.05) at 24-hour follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences in neck disability, pain level at rest, and CROM between the STM and MTM groups. Conclusion These results suggest that both single-level and multiple-level thoracic manipulation improve neck disability, pain levels, and CROM at 24-hour and 1-week follow-up in patients with CMNP. PMID:25624764

  11. The impact of including corticosteroid in a periarticular injection for pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S.; Wakui, M.; Hoshino, A.

    2016-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the benefit of using corticosteroid in periarticular injections for pain relief after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We carried out a double-blinded, randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of using corticosteroid in a periarticular injection to control pain after TKA. A total of 77 patients, 67 women and ten men, with a mean age of 74 years (47 to 88) who were about to undergo unilateral TKA were randomly assigned to have a periarticular injection with or without corticosteroid. The primary outcome was post-operative pain at rest during the first 24 hours after surgery, measured every two hours using a visual analogue pain scale score. The cumulative pain score was quantified using the area under the curve. The corticosteroid group had a significantly lower cumulative pain score than the no-corticosteroid group during the first 24 hours after surgery (mean area under the curve 139, 0 to 560, and 264, 0 to 1460; p = 0.024). The rate of complications, including surgical site infection, was not significantly different between the two groups up to one year post-operatively. The addition of corticosteroid to the periarticular injection significantly decreased early post-operative pain. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety of corticosteroid in periarticular injection. Take home message: The use of corticosteroid in periarticular injection offered better pain relief during the initial 24 hours after TKA. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:194–200. PMID:26850424

  12. Blocking the mineralocorticoid receptor improves effectiveness of steroid treatment for low back pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Localized inflammation of lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to low back pain. Local injections of corticosteroids used for low back pain are sometimes ineffective. Many corticosteroids activate not only the target glucocorticoid receptor (GR) but also the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which may have pro-inflammatory effects countering the effects of GR activation. Methods A low back pain model was implemented in rats (n = 6 -10 per group) by locally inflaming the L5 DRG. Sensory neuron excitability and mechanical hypersensitivity of the hind paws were measured. Tested steroids were applied locally to the inflamed DRG or orally. Results The selective MR blocker eplerenone reduced pain behaviors when given orally starting at the time of surgery, or starting 7 days later. The highly GR-selective agonist fluticasone, applied locally to the inflamed DRG, was much more effective in reducing mechanical hypersensitivity. The MR/GR agonist 6-α methylprednisolone, commonly injected for low back pain, reduced mechanical hypersensitivity when applied locally to the DRG, but was less effective than fluticasone. Its effectiveness was improved by combining it with local eplerenone. All tested steroids reduced hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory neurons (n = 71 – 220 cells per group) after inflammation, particularly abnormal spontaneous activity. Conclusions This preclinical study indicates the MR may play an important role in low back pain involving inflammation. Some MR effects may occur at the level of the sensory neuron. It may be useful to consider the action of clinically used steroids at the MR as well as at the GR. PMID:24781496

  13. [CT-controlled percutaneous lumbar discectomy in therapy of radicular pain].

    PubMed

    Lierz, P; Felleiter, P; Alo, K

    2005-03-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression using the Decompressor system is another treatment option for patients suffering from chronic discogenic leg pain. This is the first report on a patient undergoing this procedure under CT-control. A 49 year old man with radicular leg pain showed significant pain reduction after percutaneus decompression of a discal herniation at the L4/5 level. The new system enables qualitative and quantitative measures of the removed disc material. CT-control ensures exact positioning of the device. PMID:15770562

  14. Pain management experience at a central Taiwan medical center.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Shao-Lun; Hsieh, Yi-Jer

    2015-06-01

    Pain management is typically more developed in western countries compared to Asia. From the accreditation standard of the Joint Commission International (JCI), there is a broad scope for pain management. In 2008, our medical center established the pain management policy, and the goal is to be a pain-free medical facility. The Framework of Pain Management Policy including: 1. the rights of patients and family members 2. Employee education 3. Assessment of pain (screening, evaluating, monitoring) 4. Patient care of pain. After implementation of pain management program, the compliance of pain assessment, the analysis of pain score before and after pain management and the analysis of Pain Management Index (PMI), all showed improvement in pain management program. The consumption of opioids usage steadily increased from 2010 to 2014. The success of our pain management program implementation could be attributed to the clear pain management policy, the firm support of higher leadership, the cooperation of IT department, and the quality control.

  15. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stafne, Signe N; Hiller, Aud; Slørdahl, Stig A; Aamot, Inger-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01), and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03). Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease. PMID:26770781

  16. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  17. Motion style acupuncture treatment (MSAT) for acute low back pain with severe disability: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is widely-used to treat patients with low back pain, despite insufficient evidence of the technique's efficacy for acute back pain. Motion style acupuncture treatment (MSAT) is a non-traditional acupuncture treatment requiring a patient to exercise while receiving acupuncture. In Korea, MSAT is used to reduce musculoskeletal pain and improve functional status. The study aims to evaluate the effect of MSAT on acute low back pain with severe disability. Methods/Design This study is a multicenter, randomized, active-controlled trial with two parallel arms. Participants with acute low back pain and severe functional disability, defined as an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) value > 60%, will be randomly allocated to the acupuncture group and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) injection group. The acupuncture group will receive MSAT and the NSAID injection group will receive an intramuscular injection of diclofenac. All procedures will be limited to one session and the symptoms before and after treatment will be measured by assessors blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome will be measured at 30 minutes after treatment using the numerical rating scale (NRS) of low back pain while the patient is moving. Secondary outcomes will be measured at 30 minutes after treatment using the NRS of leg pain, ODI, patient global impression of change, range of motion (ROM) of the lumbar spine, and degrees of straight leg raising (SLR). Post-treatment follow-up will be performed to measure primary and secondary outcomes with the exception of ROM and SLR at 2, 4, and 24 weeks after treatment. Discussion The results of this trial will be discussed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01315561 PMID:22151475

  18. The Use of Wet Cupping for Persistent Nonspecific Low Back Pain: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    AlBedah, Abdullah; Elolemy, Ahmed; Hussein, Asim A.; AlQaed, Meshari; Al Mudaiheem, Abdullah; Abutalib, Raid A.; Bazaid, Faisal Mohamed; Bafail, Ahmad Saeed; Essa, AboBakr; Bakrain, Mohammed Yahia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of wet cupping therapy as a single treatment for persistent nonspecific low back pain (PNSLBP). Design: Randomized controlled trial comparing wet cupping versus no treatment in PNSLBP. Setting: Outpatient clinic in three secondary care hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Patients: Eighty eligible participants with PNSLBP for at least 3 months were randomly allocated to an intervention group (n=40) or to a control group (n=40). Interventions: Six wet cupping sessions within 2 weeks, each of which were done at two bladder meridian (BL) acupuncture points among BL23, BL24, and BL25. Only acetaminophen was allowed as a rescue treatment in both groups. Outcome measures: The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), McGill Present Pain Intensity (PPI), and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used as outcome measures. Numbers of acetaminophen tablets taken were compared at 4 weeks from baseline. Adverse events were recorded. Results: At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in the three outcome measures favoring the wet cupping group compared with the control group were seen: NRS score, 29.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.6–33.8) versus 57.9 (95% CI, 53.3–62.6), respectively; PPI score, 1.17 (95% CI, 0.96–1.4) versus 2.3 (95% CI, 2.1– 2.7); and ODQ score, 19.6 (95% CI, 16.5–22.7) versus 35.4 (95% CI, 32.3–38.5) (p=0.0001). This improvement continued for another 2 weeks after the end of the intervention. Acetaminophen was used less in the wet cupping group, but this difference was not statistically significant. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: Wet cupping is potentially effective in reducing pain and improving disability associated with PNSLBP at least for 2 weeks after the end of the wet cupping period. Placebo-controlled trials are needed. PMID:26069973

  19. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System.

    PubMed

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery. PMID:25525522

  20. Immediate Return to Ambulation and Improved Functional Capacity for Rehabilitation in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Early Implantation of a Spinal Cord Stimulation System

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Brandon Jesse; Naber, Jeremy Wingseng; McCallin, John Patrick; Lopez, Edward Michael; Guthmiller, Kevin Brant; Lautenschlager, Karl Alan; Lai, Tristan Toll; Hommer, Dean Harry; Marin, Gonzalez Raul

    2014-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain condition that is characterized by vasomotor, sensory, sudomotor, and motor symptoms. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been successfully utilized for the treatment of pain refractory to conventional therapies. We present a case of a previously highly functioning 54-year-old female who developed a rarely reported case of idiopathic CRPS of the right ankle which spontaneously occurred four months after an uncomplicated anterior cervical disc fusion. This condition resulted in severe pain and functional impairment that was unresponsive to pharmacological management. The patient's rehabilitation was severely stymied by her excruciating pain. However, with the initiation of spinal cord stimulation, her pain was adequately controlled allowing for progression to full unassisted ambulation, advancing functional capacity, and improving quality of life. This case report supports the concept that rapid progression to neuromodulation, rather than delays that occur due to attempts at serial sympathetic blocks, may better control symptoms leading allowing for a more meaningful recovery. PMID:25525522

  1. CaMKII Controls Whether Touch Is Painful

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongwei; Pan, Bin; Weyer, Andy; Wu, Hsiang-En; Meng, Jingwei; Fischer, Gregory; Vilceanu, Daniel; Light, Alan R.; Stucky, Cheryl; Rice, Frank L.; Hudmon, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The sensation of touch is initiated when fast conducting low-threshold mechanoreceptors (Aβ-LTMRs) generate impulses at their terminals in the skin. Plasticity in this system is evident in the process of adaption, in which a period of diminished sensitivity follows prior stimulation. CaMKII is an ideal candidate for mediating activity-dependent plasticity in touch because it shifts into an enhanced activation state after neuronal depolarizations and can thereby reflect past firing history. Here we show that sensory neuron CaMKII autophosphorylation encodes the level of Aβ-LTMR activity in rat models of sensory deprivation (whisker clipping, tail suspension, casting). Blockade of CaMKII signaling limits normal adaptation of action potential generation in Aβ-LTMRs in excised skin. CaMKII activity is also required for natural filtering of impulse trains as they travel through the sensory neuron T-junction in the DRG. Blockade of CaMKII selectively in presynaptic Aβ-LTMRs removes dorsal horn inhibition that otherwise prevents Aβ-LTMR input from activating nociceptive lamina I neurons. Together, these consequences of reduced CaMKII function in Aβ-LTMRs cause low-intensity mechanical stimulation to produce pain behavior. We conclude that, without normal sensory activity to maintain adequate levels of CaMKII function, the touch pathway shifts into a pain system. In the clinical setting, sensory disuse may be a critical factor that enhances and prolongs chronic pain initiated by other conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The sensation of touch is served by specialized sensory neurons termed low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs). We examined the role of CaMKII in regulating the function of these neurons. Loss of CaMKII function, such as occurred in rats during sensory deprivation, elevated the generation and propagation of impulses by LTMRs, and altered the spinal cord circuitry in such a way that low-threshold mechanical stimuli produced pain behavior. Because limbs

  2. The folly of effort: ironic effects in the mental control of pain.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, J D; Gaskovski, P; Bowers, K S

    1998-01-01

    During exposure to pain, participants who were engaged in hypnotic analgesia or stress inoculation provided pain reports every 5 s and 45 s, respectively. It was found that the frequency of pain reporting had a significant effect on participants' level of experienced pain. This finding is discussed in the context of important methodological implications for laboratory investigations of analgesia. Furthermore, preliminary evidence was obtained suggesting that high hypnotizables in hypnotic analgesia remained relatively undisrupted by frequent pain reporting. Based on Wegner's (1994) ironic process theory, it is argued that this pattern of results is inconsistent with theories of hypnosis that propose that hypnotized individuals intentionally engender responses while remaining unaware of their sustained, deliberate effort. The obtained pattern of results was, however, predicted from the dissociated control model of hypnosis (Bowers, 1990, 1992).

  3. The relationship of adult attachment to emotion, catastrophizing, control, threshold and tolerance, in experimentally-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Pamela J; Strong, Jenny; Feeney, Judith A

    2006-01-01

    Although insecure attachment has been associated with a range of variables linked with problematic adjustment to chronic pain, the causal direction of these relationships remains unclear. Adult attachment style is, theoretically, developmentally antecedent to cognitions, emotions and behaviours (and might therefore be expected to contribute to maladjustment). It can also be argued, however, that the experience of chronic pain increases attachment insecurity. This project examined this issue by determining associations between adult attachment characteristics, collected prior to an acute (coldpressor) pain experience, and a range of emotional, cognitive, pain tolerance, intensity and threshold variables collected during and after the coldpressor task. A convenience sample of 58 participants with no history of chronic pain was recruited. Results demonstrated that attachment anxiety was associated with lower pain thresholds; more stress, depression, and catastrophizing; diminished perceptions of control over pain; and diminished ability to decrease pain. Conversely, secure attachment was linked with lower levels of depression and catastrophizing, and more control over pain. Of particular interest were findings that attachment style moderated the effects of pain intensity on the tendency to catastrophize, such that insecurely attached individuals were more likely to catastrophize when reporting high pain intensity. This is the first study to link attachment with perceptions of pain in a pain-free sample. These findings cast anxious attachment as a vulnerability factor for chronic pain following acute episodes of pain, while secure attachment may provide more resilience.

  4. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as "low back pain", "older people", and "strengthening exercise". Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances.

  5. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as "low back pain", "older people", and "strengthening exercise". Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances. PMID:27293970

  6. Electrical stimulation as a treatment intervention to improve function, edema or pain following acute lateral ankle sprains: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Feger, Mark A; Goetschius, John; Love, Hailey; Saliba, Sue A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess whether electrical stimulation (ES), when used in conjunction with a standard treatment, can reduce levels of functional impairment, edema, and pain compared to a standard treatment alone, in patients following a lateral ankle sprain. We searched PubMed, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Medline (OVID) databases through June 2014 using the terms "ankle sprain or ankle sprains or ligament injury or ligamentous injury," and "electric stimulation or electric stimulation or electrotherapy." Our search identified four randomized control trials, of which, neuromuscular ES and high-voltage pulsed stimulation were the only two ES modalities utilized. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cohen's d for comparison between treatment groups. Three of four effect sizes for function had 95% CI that crossed zero. Twenty-four of the thirty-two effect sizes for edema had 95% CI that crossed zero. All effect sizes for pain had 95% CI that crossed zero. Therefore, the use of ES is not recommended as a means to improve function, reduce edema, or decrease pain in the treatment of acute lateral ankle sprains.

  7. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles.

    PubMed

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain.

  8. Experimental Muscle Pain Impairs the Synergistic Modular Control of Neck Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gizzi, Leonardo; Muceli, Silvia; Petzke, Frank; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    A motor task can be performed via different patterns of muscle activation that show regularities that can be factorized in combinations of a reduced number of muscle groupings (also referred to as motor modules, or muscle synergies). In this study we evaluate whether an acute noxious stimulus induces a change in the way motor modules are combined to generate movement by neck muscles. The neck region was selected as it is a region with potentially high muscular redundancy. We used the motor modules framework to assess the redistribution of muscular activity of 12 muscles (6 per side) in the neck region of 8 healthy individuals engaged in a head and neck aiming task, in non-painful conditions (baseline, isotonic saline injection, post pain) and after the injection of hypertonic saline into the right splenius capitis muscle. The kinematics of the task was similar in the painful and control conditions. A general decrease of activity was noted for the injected muscle during the painful condition together with an increase or decrease of the activity of the other muscles. Subjects did not adopt shared control strategies (motor modules inter subject similarity at baseline 0.73±0.14); the motor modules recorded during the painful condition could not be used to reconstruct the activation patterns of the control conditions, and the painful stimulus triggered a subject-specific redistribution of muscular activation (i.e., in some subjects the activity of a given muscle increased, whereas in other subjects it decreased with pain). Alterations of afferent input (i.e., painful stimulus) influenced motor control at a multi muscular level, but not kinematic output. These findings provide new insights into the motor adaptation to pain. PMID:26382606

  9. Considerations for improving assay sensitivity in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Burke, Laurie B; Farrar, John T; Gilron, Ian; Jensen, Mark P; Katz, Nathaniel P; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rowbotham, Michael C; Backonja, Misha-Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Bellamy, Nicholas; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Costello, Ann; Cowan, Penney; Fang, Weikai Christopher; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W; Junor, Roderick; Kerns, Robert D; Kerwin, Rosemary; Kopecky, Ernest A; Lissin, Dmitri; Malamut, Richard; Markman, John D; McDermott, Michael P; Munera, Catherine; Porter, Linda; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rice, Andrew S C; Sampaio, Cristina; Skljarevski, Vladimir; Sommerville, Kenneth; Stacey, Brett R; Steigerwald, Ilona; Tobias, Jeffrey; Trentacosti, Ann Marie; Wasan, Ajay D; Wells, George A; Williams, Jim; Witter, James; Ziegler, Dan

    2012-06-01

    A number of pharmacologic treatments examined in recent randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have failed to show statistically significant superiority to placebo in conditions in which their efficacy had previously been demonstrated. Assuming the validity of previous evidence of efficacy and the comparability of the patients and outcome measures in these studies, such results may be a consequence of limitations in the ability of these RCTs to demonstrate the benefits of efficacious analgesic treatments vs placebo ("assay sensitivity"). Efforts to improve the assay sensitivity of analgesic trials could reduce the rate of falsely negative trials of efficacious medications and improve the efficiency of analgesic drug development. Therefore, an Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials consensus meeting was convened in which the assay sensitivity of chronic pain trials was reviewed and discussed. On the basis of this meeting and subsequent discussions, the authors recommend consideration of a number of patient, study design, study site, and outcome measurement factors that have the potential to affect the assay sensitivity of RCTs of chronic pain treatments. Increased attention to and research on methodological aspects of clinical trials and their relationships with assay sensitivity have the potential to provide the foundation for an evidence-based approach to the design of analgesic clinical trials and expedite the identification of analgesic treatments with improved efficacy and safety.

  10. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis for Spine Support: Study for Pain Evaluation and Mobility Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K.; Papagelopoulos, Panagiotis; Kitsou, Maria; Oikonomopoulos, Nikolaos; Brountzos, Elias; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kelekis, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the efficacy-safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) as primary treatment in adult degenerative scoliosis. During the last 4 years, PV was performed in 18 adult patients (68 vertebral bodies) with back pain due to degenerative scoliotic spine. Under anaesthesia and fluoroscopy, direct access to most deformed vertebral bodies was obtained by 13G needles, and PMMA for vertebroplasty was injected. Scoliosis' inner arch was supported. Clinical evaluation included immediate and delayed studies of patient's general condition and neurological status. An NVS scale helped assessing pain relief, life quality, and mobility improvement. Comparing patients' scores prior to (mean value 8.06 ± 1.3 NVS units), the morning after (mean value 3.11 ± 1.2 NVS units), at 12 (mean value 1.67 ± 1.5 NVS units), and 24 months after vertebroplasty (mean value 1.67 ± 1.5 NVS units) treatment, patients presented a mean decrease of 6.39 ± 1.6 NVS units on terms of life quality improvement and pain relief (P = 0.000). Overall mobility improved in 18/18 (100%) patients. No complications were observed. During follow-up period (mean value 17.66 months), all patients underwent a mean of 1.3 sessions for facet joint and nerve root infiltrations. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in the inner arch seems to be an effective technique for supporting adult degenerative scoliotic spine. PMID:24260742

  11. Fast Synaptic Inhibition in Spinal Sensory Processing and Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Wildner, Hendrik; Yevenes, Gonzalo E.

    2013-01-01

    The two amino acids γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glycine mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in different CNS areas and serve pivotal roles in the spinal sensory processing. Under healthy conditions, they limit the excitability of spinal terminals of primary sensory nerve fibers and of intrinsic dorsal horn neurons through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and thereby facilitate the spatial and temporal discrimination of sensory stimuli. Removal of fast inhibition not only reduces the fidelity of normal sensory processing but also provokes symptoms very much reminiscent of pathological and chronic pain syndromes. This review summarizes our knowledge of the molecular bases of spinal inhibitory neurotransmission and its organization in dorsal horn sensory circuits. Particular emphasis is placed on the role and mechanisms of spinal inhibitory malfunction in inflammatory and neuropathic chronic pain syndromes. PMID:22298656

  12. Effects of being imitated on motor responses evoked by pain observation: exerting control determines action tendencies when perceiving pain in others.

    PubMed

    De Coster, Lize; Andres, Michael; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-14

    Brain-imaging research has shown that experiencing pain oneself and perceiving pain in others lead to a similar pattern of activation, suggesting that the latter is based on internal simulation of the observed pain. Further evidence for this idea stems from transcranial magnetic stimulation measuring corticospinal excitability (CSE). It has been demonstrated that our motor cortex is involved whenever we observe another person receiving painful stimulation to the hand (Avenanti et al., 2005). However, both decreases and increases of CSE have been described during pain observation, so the exact nature of these CSE changes has remained unclear so far. In the present study, we hypothesized that CSE changes are determined by the control that the observer has over the hand that receives painful stimulation. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the control over the observed hand using a paradigm in which participants' movements are being imitated by a hand on screen-giving them full control over the hand-or not. Consistent with previous results, we evidenced a decrease in CSE when participants experienced no control over the hand that received painful stimulation. In contrast, inducing control resulted in an increase in CSE. We conclude that exerting control over the observed hand leads to a completely altered action tendency. Whereas an anesthetic response is typically observed in the absence of control, increasing control induces motor facilitation reminiscent of preparation of an avoidance response. PMID:24828648

  13. Acupuncture for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We report on the design and implementation of a study protocol entitled Acupuncture randomised trial for post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain - a pilot study (ACUARP) designed to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy performed in the perioperative period on post anaesthetic recovery and postoperative pain. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomised controlled pilot trial with three arms and partial double blinding. We will compare (a) press needle acupuncture, (b) no treatment and (c) press plaster acupressure in a standardised anaesthetic setting. Seventy-five patients scheduled for laparoscopic surgery to the uterus or ovaries will be allocated randomly to one of the three trial arms. The total observation period will begin one day before surgery and end on the second postoperative day. Twelve press needles and press plasters are to be administered preoperatively at seven acupuncture points. The primary outcome measure will be time from extubation to ‘ready for discharge’ from the post anaesthesia care unit (in minutes). The ‘ready for discharge’ end point will be assessed using three different scores: the Aldrete score, the Post Anaesthetic Discharge Scoring System and an In-House score. Secondary outcome measures will comprise pre-, intra- and postoperative variables (which are anxiety, pain, nausea and vomiting, concomitant medication). Discussion The results of this study will provide information on whether acupuncture may improve patient post anaesthetic recovery. Comparing acupuncture with acupressure will provide insight into potential therapeutic differences between invasive and non-invasive acupuncture techniques. Trial registration NCT01816386 (First received: 28 October 2012) PMID:25047046

  14. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p < .05). Administration of pleasant, natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support.

  15. Isometric strength ratios of the hip musculature in females with patellofemoral pain: a comparison to pain-free controls.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Paula M C C; Sacramento, Sylvio N; Martin, RobRoy L; Fukuda, Thiago Y

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare hip agonist-antagonist isometric strength ratios between females with patellofemoral pain (PFP) syndrome and pain-free control group. One hundred and twenty females between 15 and 40 years of age (control group: n = 60; PFP group: n = 60) participated in the study. Hip adductor, abductor, medial rotator, lateral rotator, flexor, and extensor isometric strength were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. Comparisons in the hip adductor/abductor and medial/lateral rotator and flexor/extensor strength ratios were made between groups using independent t-tests. Group comparisons also were made between the anteromedial hip complex (adductor, medial rotator, and flexor musculature) and posterolateral hip complex (abductor, lateral rotator, and extensor musculature). On average, the hip adductor/abductor isometric strength ratio in the PFP group was 23% higher when compared with the control group (p = 0.01). The anteromedial/posterolateral complex ratio also was significantly higher in the PFP group (average 8%; p = 0.04). No significant group differences were found for the medial/lateral rotator ratio and flexor/extensor strength ratios. The results of this study demonstrate that females with PFP have altered hip strength ratios when compared with asymptomatic controls. These strength imbalances may explain the tendency of females with PFP to demonstrate kinematic tendencies that increase loading on the patellofemoral joint (i.e., dynamic knee valgus). PMID:23207884

  16. Increasing Steps/Day Predicts Improvement in Physical Function and Pain Interference in Adults with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kaleth, Anthony S.; Slaven, James E.; Ang, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the concurrent and predictive associations between the number of steps taken per day (steps/day) and clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods 199 adults with FM [mean age = 46.1 yr; 95% females] enrolled in a randomized clinical trial wore a hip-mounted accelerometer for 1 week and completed self-report measures of physical function [Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Physical Impairment (FIQ-PI), SF-36 physical component score (SF-36 PCS)], pain intensity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory; BPI), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8; PHQ-8) as part of their baseline and follow-up assessments. Associations of steps/day with self-report clinical measures were evaluated from baseline to week 12 using multivariate regression models adjusted for demographic and baseline covariates. Results Study participants were primarily sedentary, averaging 4,019 ± 1,530 steps/day. Our findings demonstrate a linear relationship between the change in steps/day and improvement in health outcomes for FM. Incremental increases on the order of 1,000 steps/day were significantly associated with (and predictive of) improvements in FIQ-PI, SF-36 PCS, BPI pain interference, and PHQ-8 (all p<0.05). Although higher step counts were associated with lower FIQ and BPI pain intensity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion Step counts is an easily obtained and understood objective measure of daily physical activity. An exercise prescription that includes recommendations to gradually accumulate at least 5,000 additional steps/day may result in clinically significant improvements in outcomes relevant to patients with FM. Future studies are needed to elucidate the dose-response relationship between steps/day and patient outcomes in FM. PMID:25049001

  17. Reduction mammoplasty improves body posture and decreases the perception of pain.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Remi; Detanico, Daniele; Vasconcellos, Roberta Pires; Schütz, Gustavo Ricardo; Dos Santos, Saray Giovana

    2013-01-01

    Women with hypertrophic breasts often experience body pain and posture problems, which tend to be reduced or even eliminated after reduction mammoplasty. The present study aimed to analyze the effects of reduction mammoplasty on anthropometric variables, body posture and pain in women with breast hypertrophy. Eleven women (mean [± SD] age 31.3±10.4 years) participated in the present study. Anthropometric variables, body posture and pain perception were evaluated pretest, and 60 (post60) and 90 (post90) days after reduction mammoplasty. Commercially available posture analysis software was used to analyze the following variables: acromial horizontal alignment (AHA), angle between acromial and anterior superior iliac spines (A-AAIS), vertical alignment of right (R) and left (L) trunk (VAT), vertical alignment of R and L body (VAB) and horizontal alignment of R and L pelvis (HAP). Descriptive statistics and ANOVA for repeated measures were used, and effect sizes (ES) were measured; the level of significance was set at P<0.05. There were no significant differences in anthropometric variables among the assessments. Only HAP-R showed a significant decrease; however, when analyzed, ES, VAT- L and HAP- L in post60, and VAT-R, VAT-L, HAP-R, HAP-L and VAB-L in post90 showed large ES after mammoplasty (ES>0.70). There were significant reductions in pain at post60 and post90 in the neck, cervical spine, back, shoulder and arm (P<0.05). Following mammoplasty, an improvement in body posture, primarily in the alignment of shoulders, trunk and pelvis, and a decrease in pain in the upper limbs and spine, were observed.

  18. Neural emotion regulation circuitry underlying anxiolytic effects of perceived control over pain.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Tim V; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within-subject designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neural and affective responses when participants were exposed to either uncontrollable or controllable stress, two groups of participants received an identical series of stressors (thermal pain stimuli). One group ("controllable") was led to believe they had behavioral control over the pain stimuli, whereas another ("uncontrollable") believed they had no control. Controllable pain was associated with decreased state anxiety, decreased activation in amygdala, and increased activation in nucleus accumbens. In participants who perceived control over the pain, reduced state anxiety was associated with increased functional connectivity between each of these regions and ventral lateral/ventral medial pFC. The location of pFC findings is consistent with regions found to be critical for the anxiolytic effects of perceived control in rodents. Furthermore, interactions observed between pFC and both amygdala and nucleus accumbens are remarkably similar to neural mechanisms of emotion regulation through reappraisal in humans. These results suggest that perceived control reduces negative affect through a general mechanism involved in the cognitive regulation of emotion.

  19. LPV Controller Interpolation for Improved Gain-Scheduling Control Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Fen; Kim, SungWan

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new gain-scheduling control design approach is proposed by combining LPV (linear parameter-varying) control theory with interpolation techniques. The improvement of gain-scheduled controllers can be achieved from local synthesis of Lyapunov functions and continuous construction of a global Lyapunov function by interpolation. It has been shown that this combined LPV control design scheme is capable of improving closed-loop performance derived from local performance improvement. The gain of the LPV controller will also change continuously across parameter space. The advantages of the newly proposed LPV control is demonstrated through a detailed AMB controller design example.

  20. The US Congressional "Decade on Pain Control and Research" 2001-2011: A Review.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Frank

    2015-09-01

    In 2000, the United States Congress proclaimed the decade commencing January 1, 2001, as the "Decade of Pain Control and Research." This review examines the progress, setbacks, and controversies in public policy, pain education, advocacy, ethics, and the law through this decade. Critical developments including the rise and fall of the consensus on the doctrine of balance in opioid policies, the respective roles of federal and state bodies, the surge of and response to the diversion and abuse of prescription medication, initiatives in education and advocacy, and reforms to state pain policies and laws shall be examined.

  1. Effect of Isometric Quadriceps Exercise on Muscle Strength, Pain, and Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of isometric quadriceps exercise on muscle strength, pain, and function in knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Outpatients (N=42, 21 per group; age range 40–65 years; 13 men and 29 women) with osteoarthritis of the knee participated in the study. The experimental group performed isometric exercises including isometric quadriceps, straight leg raising, and isometric hip adduction exercise 5 days a week for 5 weeks, whereas the control group did not performed any exercise program. The outcome measures or dependent variables selected for this study were pain intensity, isometric quadriceps strength, and knee function. These variables were measured using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), strength gauge device, and reduced WOMAC index, respectively. All the measurements were taken at baseline (week 0) and at the end of the trial at week 5. [Results] In between-group comparisons, the maximum isometric quadriceps strength, reduction in pain intensity, and improvement in function in the isometric exercise group at the end of the 5th week were significantly greater than those of the control group (p<0.05). [Conclusion] The 5-week isometric quadriceps exercise program showed beneficial effects on quadriceps muscle strength, pain, and functional disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. PMID:24926143

  2. Fake feedback on pain tolerance impacts proactive versus reactive control strategies.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Davide; Braem, Senne; Pourtois, Gilles; Brass, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that beliefs about one's own ability to execute a task influence task performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that beliefs about a specific self-control capacity, namely pain tolerance, modulate basic cognitive control processes. Participants received fake comparative social feedback that their ability to tolerate painful stimulations was either very poor or outstanding after which they performed an unrelated go/no-go task. Participants receiving low-tolerance feedback, relative to high-tolerance feedback, were less successful at inhibiting their responses and more influenced by previous trial conditions, as indicated by an increased slowdown following errors and more failed inhibitions following go-trials. These observations demonstrate a shift from a more proactive to a more reactive control mode. This study shows that providing feedback about one's own capacity to control impulsive reactions to painful stimulations directly influences low-level cognitive control dynamics.

  3. Fake feedback on pain tolerance impacts proactive versus reactive control strategies.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Davide; Braem, Senne; Pourtois, Gilles; Brass, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that beliefs about one's own ability to execute a task influence task performance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that beliefs about a specific self-control capacity, namely pain tolerance, modulate basic cognitive control processes. Participants received fake comparative social feedback that their ability to tolerate painful stimulations was either very poor or outstanding after which they performed an unrelated go/no-go task. Participants receiving low-tolerance feedback, relative to high-tolerance feedback, were less successful at inhibiting their responses and more influenced by previous trial conditions, as indicated by an increased slowdown following errors and more failed inhibitions following go-trials. These observations demonstrate a shift from a more proactive to a more reactive control mode. This study shows that providing feedback about one's own capacity to control impulsive reactions to painful stimulations directly influences low-level cognitive control dynamics. PMID:27149180

  4. Neural Emotion Regulation Circuitry Underlying Anxiolytic Effects of Perceived Control Over Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Tim V.; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within subjects-designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neural and affective responses when participants were exposed to either uncontrollable or controllable stress, two groups of participants received an identical series of stressors (thermal pain stimuli). One group (“controllable”) was led to believe they had behavioral control over the pain stimuli while another (“uncontrollable”) believed they had no control. Controllable pain was associated with decreased state anxiety, decreased activation in amygdala and increased activation in nucleus accumbens (NAcc). In participants who perceived control over the pain, reduced state anxiety was associated with increased functional connectivity between each of these regions and ventral lateral/ventral medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). The location of PFC findings is consistent with regions found to be critical for the anxiolytic effects of perceived control in rodents. Furthermore, interactions observed between PFC and both amygdala and NAcc are remarkably similar to neural mechanisms of emotion regulation through reappraisal in humans. These results suggest that perceived control reduces negative affect through a general mechanism involved in the cognitive regulation of emotion. PMID:25208742

  5. Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the control of pain.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Antonina S; Obara, Ilona; Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M; Tassorelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt, Stephen P

    2016-05-01

    Local injections of botulinum toxins have been reported to be useful not only for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain and migraine but also to cause long-lasting muscle paralysis, a potentially serious side effect. Recently, a botulinum A-based molecule ("BiTox") has been synthesized that retains neuronal silencing capacity without triggering muscle paralysis. In this study, we examined whether BiTox delivered peripherally was able to reduce or prevent the increased nociceptive sensitivity found in animal models of inflammatory, surgical, and neuropathic pain. Plasma extravasation and edema were also measured as well as keratinocyte proliferation. No motor deficits were seen and acute thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were unimpaired by BiTox injections. We found reduced plasma extravasation and inflammatory edema as well as lower levels of keratinocyte proliferation in cutaneous tissue after local BiTox injection. However, we found no evidence that BiTox was transported to the dorsal root ganglia or dorsal horn and no deficits in formalin-elicited behaviors or capsaicin or formalin-induced c-Fos expression within the dorsal horn. In contrast, Bitox treatment strongly reduced A-nociceptor-mediated secondary mechanical hyperalgesia associated with either complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced joint inflammation or capsaicin injection and the hypersensitivity associated with spared nerve injury. These results imply that although local release of neuromodulators from C-fibers was inhibited by BiTox injection, C-nociceptive signaling function was not impaired. Taken together with recent clinical data the results suggest that BiTox should be considered for treatment of pain conditions in which A-nociceptors are thought to play a significant role.

  6. Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the control of pain

    PubMed Central

    Mangione, Antonina S.; Obara, Ilona; Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M.; Tassorelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Local injections of botulinum toxins have been reported to be useful not only for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain and migraine but also to cause long-lasting muscle paralysis, a potentially serious side effect. Recently, a botulinum A-based molecule (“BiTox”) has been synthesized that retains neuronal silencing capacity without triggering muscle paralysis. In this study, we examined whether BiTox delivered peripherally was able to reduce or prevent the increased nociceptive sensitivity found in animal models of inflammatory, surgical, and neuropathic pain. Plasma extravasation and edema were also measured as well as keratinocyte proliferation. No motor deficits were seen and acute thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were unimpaired by BiTox injections. We found reduced plasma extravasation and inflammatory edema as well as lower levels of keratinocyte proliferation in cutaneous tissue after local BiTox injection. However, we found no evidence that BiTox was transported to the dorsal root ganglia or dorsal horn and no deficits in formalin-elicited behaviors or capsaicin or formalin-induced c-Fos expression within the dorsal horn. In contrast, Bitox treatment strongly reduced A-nociceptor-mediated secondary mechanical hyperalgesia associated with either complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-induced joint inflammation or capsaicin injection and the hypersensitivity associated with spared nerve injury. These results imply that although local release of neuromodulators from C-fibers was inhibited by BiTox injection, C-nociceptive signaling function was not impaired. Taken together with recent clinical data the results suggest that BiTox should be considered for treatment of pain conditions in which A-nociceptors are thought to play a significant role. PMID:26761389

  7. Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the control of pain.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Antonina S; Obara, Ilona; Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M; Tassorelli, Cristina; Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt, Stephen P

    2016-05-01

    Local injections of botulinum toxins have been reported to be useful not only for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain and migraine but also to cause long-lasting muscle paralysis, a potentially serious side effect. Recently, a botulinum A-based molecule ("BiTox") has been synthesized that retains neuronal silencing capacity without triggering muscle paralysis. In this study, we examined whether BiTox delivered peripherally was able to reduce or prevent the increased nociceptive sensitivity found in animal models of inflammatory, surgical, and neuropathic pain. Plasma extravasation and edema were also measured as well as keratinocyte proliferation. No motor deficits were seen and acute thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were unimpaired by BiTox injections. We found reduced plasma extravasation and inflammatory edema as well as lower levels of keratinocyte proliferation in cutaneous tissue after local BiTox injection. However, we found no evidence that BiTox was transported to the dorsal root ganglia or dorsal horn and no deficits in formalin-elicited behaviors or capsaicin or formalin-induced c-Fos expression within the dorsal horn. In contrast, Bitox treatment strongly reduced A-nociceptor-mediated secondary mechanical hyperalgesia associated with either complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced joint inflammation or capsaicin injection and the hypersensitivity associated with spared nerve injury. These results imply that although local release of neuromodulators from C-fibers was inhibited by BiTox injection, C-nociceptive signaling function was not impaired. Taken together with recent clinical data the results suggest that BiTox should be considered for treatment of pain conditions in which A-nociceptors are thought to play a significant role. PMID:26761389

  8. Strengthening of the Hip and Core Versus Knee Muscles for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Reed; Bolgla, Lori; Earl-Boehm, Jennifer E.; Emery, Carolyn; Hamstra-Wright, Karrie

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most common injury in running and jumping athletes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that incorporating hip and core strengthening (HIP) with knee-focused rehabilitation (KNEE) improves PFP outcomes. However, no randomized controlled trials have, to our knowledge, directly compared HIP and KNEE programs. Objective: To compare PFP pain, function, hip- and knee-muscle strength, and core endurance between KNEE and HIP protocols after 6 weeks of rehabilitation. We hypothesized greater improvements in (1) pain and function, (2) hip strength and core endurance for patients with PFP involved in the HIP protocol, and (3) knee strength for patients involved in the KNEE protocol. Design: Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting: Four clinical research laboratories in Calgary, Alberta; Chicago, Illinois; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Augusta, Georgia. Patients or Other Participants: Of 721 patients with PFP screened, 199 (27.6%) met the inclusion criteria (66 men [31.2%], 133 women [66.8%], age = 29.0 ± 7.1 years, height = 170.4 ± 9.4 cm, weight = 67.6 ± 13.5 kg). Intervention(s): Patients with PFP were randomly assigned to a 6-week KNEE or HIP protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): Primary variables were self-reported visual analog scale and Anterior Knee Pain Scale measures, which were conducted weekly. Secondary variables were muscle strength and core endurance measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. Results: Compared with baseline, both the visual analog scale and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale improved for patients with PFP in both the HIP and KNEE protocols (P < .001), but the visual analog scale scores for those in the HIP protocol were reduced 1 week earlier than in the KNEE group. Both groups increased in strength (P < .001), but those in the HIP protocol gained more in hip-abductor (P = .01) and -extensor (P = .01) strength and posterior core endurance (P = .05) compared with the KNEE group. Conclusions: Both the HIP and KNEE

  9. Glyceryl trinitrate ointment did not reduce pain after stapled hemorrhoidectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cross, Trent; Bartlett, Lynne; Mushaya, Chrispen; Ashour, Mohamed; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Medications, including topical 0.2% glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), can reduce anal spasm and pain after excisional hemorrhoidectomy. GTN after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was compared with routine postoperative management. Patients with symptomatic grade 3/4 hemorrhoids were recruited. After stapled hemorrhoidopexy, residual perianal skin tags were excised as appropriate. Those requiring double purse-string mucosectomy were excluded. Postoperative pain, pain duration, and complications were assessed. One hundred ten patients (74 men; mean age 50.6 years) were enrolled in the control group and 100 patients (57 men; mean age 49.8 years) in the GTN group. Maximum pain was higher in the GTN group (P  =  0.015). There were no differences between the two groups in residual perianal skin tags requiring excision, postoperative complications, recurrence rates, follow-up period, average pain, duration of pain, or satisfaction scores. Sixteen GTN patients were noncompliant due to side effects. None had persistent perianal skin tags. GTN did not reduce postoperative pain after stapled hemorrhoidectomy.

  10. Glyceryl Trinitrate Ointment Did Not Reduce Pain After Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Trent; Bartlett, Lynne; Mushaya, Chrispen; Ashour, Mohamed; Ho, Yik-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Medications, including topical 0.2% glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), can reduce anal spasm and pain after excisional hemorrhoidectomy. GTN after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was compared with routine postoperative management. Patients with symptomatic grade 3/4 hemorrhoids were recruited. After stapled hemorrhoidopexy, residual perianal skin tags were excised as appropriate. Those requiring double purse-string mucosectomy were excluded. Postoperative pain, pain duration, and complications were assessed. One hundred ten patients (74 men; mean age 50.6 years) were enrolled in the control group and 100 patients (57 men; mean age 49.8 years) in the GTN group. Maximum pain was higher in the GTN group (P  =  0.015). There were no differences between the two groups in residual perianal skin tags requiring excision, postoperative complications, recurrence rates, follow-up period, average pain, duration of pain, or satisfaction scores. Sixteen GTN patients were noncompliant due to side effects. None had persistent perianal skin tags. GTN did not reduce postoperative pain after stapled hemorrhoidectomy. PMID:23102076

  11. Endovanilloid control of pain modulation by the rostroventromedial medulla in an animal model of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Martins, D; Charrua, A; Piscitelli, F; Tavares, I; Morgado, C; Di Marzo, V

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of transient receptor vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels in pain modulation by the brain remains understudied. The rostroventromedial medulla (RVM) plays a key role in conveying to the spinal cord pain modulatory influences triggered in higher brain centres, with co-existence of inhibitory (antinociceptive) and facilitatory (pronociceptive) effects. In spite of some reports of TRPV1 expression in the RVM, it remains unknown if endovanilloid signalling plays a direct role in local pain modulation. Here we used a model of diabetic neuropathy, the streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rat, to study the role of endovanilloid signalling in RVM-mediated pain modulation during chronic pain. Four weeks after diabetes induction, the levels of TRPV1 mRNA and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), a crucial enzyme for endovanilloid catabolism, in the RVM of STZ-diabetic rats were higher than control. The RVM of STZ-diabetic rats presented decreased levels of several TRPV1 endogenous ligands, namely anandamide (AEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA). Administration of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) into the RVM decreased nociceptive behavioural responses in the inflammatory phase of the formalin test (phase 2). These findings suggest that diabetic neuropathy induces plastic changes of RVM endovanilloid signalling, indicating that TRPV1 may be a putative target for pain modulation in this chronic pain condition.

  12. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral treatment for adolescents with chronic pain and their parents: a randomized controlled multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Fales, Jessica; Bromberg, Maggie H; Jessen-Fiddick, Tricia; Tai, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Internet-delivered interventions are emerging as a strategy to address barriers to care for individuals with chronic pain. This is the first large multicenter randomized controlled trial of Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for pediatric chronic pain. Participants included were 273 adolescents (205 females and 68 males), aged 11 to 17 years with mixed chronic pain conditions and their parents, who were randomly assigned in a parallel-group design to Internet-delivered CBT (n = 138) or Internet-delivered Education (n = 135). Assessments were completed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. All data collection and procedures took place online. The primary analysis used linear growth models. Results demonstrated significantly greater reduction on the primary outcome of activity limitations from baseline to 6-month follow-up for Internet CBT compared with Internet education (b = -1.13, P = 0.03). On secondary outcomes, significant beneficial effects of Internet CBT were found on sleep quality (b = 0.14, P = 0.04), on reducing parent miscarried helping (b = -2.66, P = 0.007) and protective behaviors (b = -0.19, P = 0.001), and on treatment satisfaction (P values < 0.05). On exploratory outcomes, benefits of Internet CBT were found for parent-perceived impact (ie, reductions in depression, anxiety, self-blame about their adolescent's pain, and improvement in parent behavioral responses to pain). In conclusion, our Internet-delivered CBT intervention produced a number of beneficial effects on adolescent and parent outcomes, and could ultimately lead to wide dissemination of evidence-based psychological pain treatment for youth and their families.

  13. Quality Assessment of Randomized Control Trials Applied Psychotherapy for Chronic Pains in Iran: A Systematic Review of Domestic Trials

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Fakhrudin; Tavallaee, Abbas; Rahimi, Aboulfazl; Saburi, Amin; Saghafinia, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Context: Keeping in mind the burden of psychotherapy can play a crucial role concerning chronic pain (CP). Psychotherapy techniques are widely used to relief Chronic Pain (CP) worldwide. Appling psychotherapy needs to consider both individual and popular cultures. In addition to international requirements; nation-wide legitimacy should be regarded too. Psychological methods have provided a lot of articles in Iran, but they were neglected by the reviewers because the documents only have abstracts in English. The current study aimed to assess all Farsi Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) addressing psychotherapy to relieve chronic pains. Evidence Acquisition: Six nation-wide medical databases were investigated in 2012 using the keyword chronic pain in the Abstracts, systematically. Appling PICO question format (patient problem or population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes) all the interventional studies were reviewed for eligibility. Retrieving full text (in Farsi) and making the articles indistinguishable, two native reviewers assessed the quality of the articles independently using Jadad scale. Results: Inclusion criteria met 1542 abstracts. After refining and excluding, seventeen experimental studies were retrieved and evaluated. Mean quality score of Jadad was 1.53 ± 1.37 (median = 1.0). Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) was the dominant approach (11 out of 17) and the majority (6 out of 17 studies) of the treated cases was Low Back Pain (LBP). Patient-therapist gender adjustment has clearly reported in most of the studies, based on the requirements. Conclusions: Cognitive Behavior Therapy was more effective than the other psychotherapy approaches relieving chronic pain in the studies. Well-designed studies and comprehensive clarification of the studies demonstrating groups, intervention, follow-up and drop outs can improve the quality of the RCTs. PMID:25593723

  14. Sensory Re-Weighting in Human Bipedal Postural Control: The Effects of Experimentally-Induced Plantar Pain.

    PubMed

    Pradels, Antoine; Pradon, Didier; Hlavačková, Petra; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of experimentally-induced plantar pain on the displacement of centre of foot pressure during unperturbed upright stance in different sensory conditions of availability and/or reliability of visual input and somatosensory input from the vestibular system and neck. To achieve this goal, fourteen young healthy adults were asked to stand as still as possible in three sensory conditions: (1) No-vision, (2) Vision, and (3) No-vision - Head tilted backward, during two experimental conditions: (1) a No-pain condition, and (2) a condition when a painful stimulation was applied to the plantar surfaces of both feet (Plantar-pain condition). Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Results showed that (1) experimentally-induced plantar pain increased CoP displacements in the absence of vision (No-vision condition), (2) this deleterious effect was more accentuated when somatosensory information from the vestibular and neck was altered (No-vision - Head tilted backward condition) and (3) this deleterious effect was suppressed when visual information was available (Vision condition). From a fundamental point of view, these results lend support to the sensory re-weighting hypothesis whereby the central nervous system dynamically and selectively adjusts the relative contributions of sensory inputs (i.e. the sensory weightings) in order to maintain balance when one or more sensory channels are altered by the task (novel or challenging), environmental or individual conditions. From a clinical point of view, the present findings further suggest that prevention and treatment of plantar pain may be relevant for the preservation or improvement of balance control, particularly in situations (or individuals) in which information provided by the visual, neck proprioceptive and vestibular systems is unavailable or disrupted. PMID:23840337

  15. Sensory Re-Weighting in Human Bipedal Postural Control: The Effects of Experimentally-Induced Plantar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pradels, Antoine; Pradon, Didier; Hlavačková, Petra; Diot, Bruno; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effects of experimentally-induced plantar pain on the displacement of centre of foot pressure during unperturbed upright stance in different sensory conditions of availability and/or reliability of visual input and somatosensory input from the vestibular system and neck. To achieve this goal, fourteen young healthy adults were asked to stand as still as possible in three sensory conditions: (1) No-vision, (2) Vision, and (3) No-vision – Head tilted backward, during two experimental conditions: (1) a No-pain condition, and (2) a condition when a painful stimulation was applied to the plantar surfaces of both feet (Plantar-pain condition). Centre of foot pressure (CoP) displacements were recorded using a force platform. Results showed that (1) experimentally-induced plantar pain increased CoP displacements in the absence of vision (No-vision condition), (2) this deleterious effect was more accentuated when somatosensory information from the vestibular and neck was altered (No-vision – Head tilted backward condition) and (3) this deleterious effect was suppressed when visual information was available (Vision condition). From a fundamental point of view, these results lend support to the sensory re-weighting hypothesis whereby the central nervous system dynamically and selectively adjusts the relative contributions of sensory inputs (i.e. the sensory weightings) in order to maintain balance when one or more sensory channels are altered by the task (novel or challenging), environmental or individual conditions. From a clinical point of view, the present findings further suggest that prevention and treatment of plantar pain may be relevant for the preservation or improvement of balance control, particularly in situations (or individuals) in which information provided by the visual, neck proprioceptive and vestibular systems is unavailable or disrupted. PMID:23840337

  16. The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

  17. Pain biology education and exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Cormac G; Gray, Heather G; Newton, Mary; Granat, Malcolm H

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this single-blind pilot RCT was to investigate the effect of pain biology education and group exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Participants with CLBP were randomised to a pain biology education and group exercise classes group (EDEX) [n = 20] or a pain biology education only group (ED) [n = 18]. The primary outcome was pain (0-100 numerical rating scale), and self-reported function assessed using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, measured at pre-intervention, post-intervention and three month follow up. Secondary outcome measures were pain self-efficacy, pain related fear, physical performance testing and free-living activity monitoring. Using a linear mixed model analysis, there was a statistically significant interaction effect between time and intervention for both pain (F[2,49] = 3.975, p < 0.05) and pain self-efficacy (F[2,51] = 4.011, p < 0.05) with more favourable results for the ED group. The effects levelled off at the three month follow up point. In the short term, pain biology education alone was more effective for pain and pain self-efficacy than a combination of pain biology education and group exercise classes. This pilot study highlights the need to investigate the combined effects of different interventions.

  18. Systematic review of clinical trials of cervical manipulation: control group procedures and pain outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To characterize the types of control procedures used in controlled clinical trials of cervical spine manipulation and to evaluate the outcomes obtained by subjects in control groups so as to improve the quality of future clinical trials Methods A search of relevant clinical trials was performed in PubMed 1966-May 2010 with the following key words: "Chiropractic"[Mesh] OR "Manipulation, Spinal"[Mesh]) AND "Clinical Trial "[Publication Type]. Reference lists from these trials were searched for any additional trials. The reference lists of two prior studies, one review and one original study were also searched. Accepted reports were then rated for quality by 2 reviewers using the PEDro scale. Studies achieving a score of >50% were included for data extraction and analysis. Intra-group change scores on pain outcomes were obtained. For determining clinically important outcomes, a threshold of 20% improvement was used where continuous data were available; otherwise, an effect size of 0.30 was employed Results The PubMed search yielded 753 citations of which 13 were selected. Eight (8) other studies were identified by reviewing two systematic reviews and through reference searches. All studies scored >50% on the PEDro scale. There were 9 multi-session studies and 12 single-session studies. The most commonly used control procedure was "manual contact/no thrust". Four (4) studies used a placebo-control (patient blinded). For two of these studies with VAS data, the average change reported was 4.5 mm. For the other control procedures, variable results were obtained. No clinically important changes were reported in 57% of the paired comparisons, while, in 43% of these, changes which would be considered clinically important were obtained in the control groups. Only 15% of trials reported on post-intervention group registration. Conclusions Most control procedures in cervical manipulation trials result in small clinical changes, although larger changes are observed in

  19. Quality of sleep in patients with chronic low back pain: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Marty, M; Rozenberg, S; Duplan, B; Thomas, P; Duquesnoy, B; Allaert, F

    2008-06-01

    Animal experiments and studies in humans clearly show that the relation between pain (acute and chronic) and sleep quality is two-way: sleep disorders can increase pain, which in turn may cause sleep disorders. Sleep disorders and chronic low back pain are frequent health problems and it is unsurprising that the two can co-exist. This study was conducted to evaluate if sleep disorders and chronic pain associated are more frequently than one would expect. The objective of the study was to compare sleep quality in a population of patients with chronic low back pain and a control population. Sleep quality was assessed in 101 patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and in 97 sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI; score from 0 (no disorder) to 21]. The French version of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) was used to assess the impact of low back pain on patients' quality of life. This impact was taken as nil in the healthy controls. The patients with CLBP and the controls were comparable in age, sex, and height, but mean bodyweight was higher in the CLBP group (70.3 +/- 14.5 vs. 61.8 +/- 11.4 kg; P < 0.05). The patients with CLBP were also more frequently on sick leave than the controls (32.3%; n = 31 vs. 0.0% n = 0; P < 0.001). Coffee, tea, and cola intakes were comparable in the two groups. Patients with CLBP had statistically higher scores in all items of the PSQI than the healthy controls. The mean PSQI was 4.7 +/- 3.2 for the healthy controls and 10.9 +/- 7.9 for the patients with CLBP (P < 0.0001). Sleep disorders were greater when the impact of CLBP on daily life (the four aspects of the DPQ) was greater [P < 0.0001]). The sleep of the patients with CLBP was significantly altered compared with that of the healthy controls, in proportion to the impact of low back pain on daily life. Our findings do not indicate whether sleep disorders are a cause or a consequence of CLBP. PMID:18389288

  20. Randomized controlled trials of psychological therapies for management of chronic pain in children and adolescents: an updated meta-analytic review

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Tonya M.; Eccleston, Christopher; Lewandowski, Amy S.; Williams, Amanda C de C; Morley, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this meta-analytic review was to quantify the effects of psychological therapies for the management of chronic pain in youth. Specifically, in this review we updated previous systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials by including new trials, and by adding disability and emotional functioning to pain as treatment outcomes. Electronic searches of the Cochrane Register of Randomised Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PsycLIT, EMBASE, and the Social Sciences Citation Index were conducted from inception through August 2008. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed, and data extracted on the three primary outcomes of interest. Twenty-five trials including 1247 young people met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analytic findings demonstrated a large positive effect of psychological intervention on pain reduction at immediate post-treatment and follow-up in youth with headache, abdominal pain, and fibromyalgia. Small and non-significant effects were found for improvements in disability and emotional functioning, although there were limited data on these outcomes available in the included studies. Omnibus cognitive-behavioral therapy, relaxation therapy, and biofeedback all produced significant and positive effects on pain reduction. Studies directly comparing the effects of self-administered versus therapist-administered interventions found similar effects on pain reduction. Psychological therapies result in improvement in pain relief across several different pain conditions in children. Future trials are needed that incorporate non-pain outcome domains, that focus significant therapeutic content on reductions in disability, and that include extended follow up to better understand maintenance of treatment effects. PMID:19910118

  1. Coordinated Digital-Assisted Program Improved Door-to-Balloon Time for Acute Chest Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Jian; Xiang, Dingcheng; Qin, Weiyi; Zhou, Minwei; Tian, Yan; Wang, Mingyu; Yang, Jijiang; Gao, Qiang

    2016-05-25

    Emergency care for patients with chest pain can be a challenge in remote areas. Digital communication technology has the potential to improve outcomes by allowing early diagnosis and faster treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether implementation of a coordinated digital-assisted program (CDAP) for Chinese hospitals can reduce the door-to-balloon (D2B) time for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in acute chest pain patients in China. From March to December 2011, 609 patients (CDAP group) requiring an emergency response for acute chest pain were evaluated using this CDAP. The results were compared in terms of time interval reduction (including D2B) and economic indices with those of 528 patients (non-CDAP group) previously treated by conventional protocols after admission. We screened 154 and 127 eligible patients under PCI in the CDAP and non-CDAP groups, respectively. PCI patients achieved a D2B time < 90 minutes using CDAP (82.5 versus 26.0%, P < 0.001). CDAP reduced D2B time under PCI and reduced hospitalization lengths and costs (all P < 0.001). PMID:27150005

  2. New insights into the mechanisms of itch: are pain and itch controlled by distinct mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Itch and pain are closely related but distinct sensations. They share largely overlapping mediators and receptors, and itch-responding neurons are also sensitive to pain stimuli. Itch-mediating primary sensory neurons are equipped with distinct receptors and ion channels for itch transduction, including Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs), protease-activated receptors (PARs), histamine receptors, bile acid receptor (TGR5), toll-like receptors (TLRs), and transient receptor potential subfamily V1/A1 (TRPV1/A1). Recent progress has indicated the existence of an itch-specific neuronal circuitry. The MrgprA3-expressing primary sensory neurons exclusively innervate the epidermis of skin and their central axons connect with gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)-expressing neurons in the superficial spinal cord. Notably, ablation of MrgprA3-expressing primary sensory neurons or GRPR-expressing spinal cord neurons results in selective reduction in itch but not pain. Chronic itch results from dysfunction of the immune and nervous system and can manifest as neural plasticity, despite the fact that chronic itch is often treated by dermatologists. While differences between acute pain and acute itch are striking, chronic itch and chronic pain share many similar mechanisms, including peripheral sensitization (increased responses of primary sensory neurons to itch and pain mediators), central sensitization (hyperactivity of spinal projection neurons and excitatory interneurons), loss of inhibitory control in the spinal cord, and neuro-immune and neuro-glial interactions. Notably, painful stimuli can elicit itch in some chronic conditions (e.g., atopic dermatitis) and some drugs for treating chronic pain are also effective in chronic itch. Thus, itch and pain have more similarities in pathological and chronic conditions. PMID:23636773

  3. Chronic pain coping styles in patients with herniated lumbar discs and coexisting spondylotic changes treated surgically: Considering clinical pain characteristics, degenerative changes, disability, mood disturbances, and beliefs about pain control

    PubMed Central

    Misterska, Ewa; Jankowski, Roman; Głowacki, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain catastrophizing, appraisals of pain control, styles of coping, and social support have been suggested to affect functioning in patients with low back pain. We investigated the relation of chronic pain coping strategies to psychological variables and clinical data, in patients treated surgically due to lumbar disc herniation and coexisting spondylotic changes. Material/Methods The average age of study participants (n=90) was 43.47 years (SD 10.21). Patients completed the Polish versions of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 (PL-CPCI-42), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-PL), Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ-PL), Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire (BPCQ-PL), and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ-PL). Results In the PL-CPCI-42 results, resting, guarding and coping self-statements were frequently used as coping strategies (3.96 SD 1.97; 3.72 SD 1.72; 3.47 SD 2.02, respectively). In the CSQ-PL domains, catastrophizing and praying/hoping were frequently used as coping strategies (3.62 SD 1.19). The mean score obtained from the BDI-PL was 11.86 SD 7.23, and 12.70 SD 5.49 from the RMDQ-PL. BPCQ-PL results indicate that the highest score was in the subscale measuring beliefs that powerful others can control pain (4.36 SD 0.97). Exercise correlated significantly with beliefs about internal control of pain (rs=0.22). We identified associations between radiating pain and guarding (p=0.038) and between sports recreation and guarding (p=0.013) and task persistence (p=0.041). Conclusions Back pain characteristics, depressive mood, disability, and beliefs about personal control of pain are related to chronic LBP coping styles. Most of the variables related to advancement of degenerative changes were not associated with coping efforts. PMID:24370564

  4. Spatially Controlled Fe Isotope Variations at Torres del Paine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajos, N.; Lundstrom, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in mass-spectrometry have identified systematic trends of non-traditional stable isotope variation in igneous rocks with differentiation index. We present new Fe isotope data for the Torres del Paine igneous complex in southern Chile. The multi-composition pluton consists of a 1 km vertical exposure of homogenous granite overlying a contemporaneous and possibly cogenetic 0.5 km mafic gabbro suite. Whereas previous isotopic investigations do little to address variations across important magmatic contacts, this study focuses on a first-of-its-kind spatially dependent non-traditional stable isotope investigation of an igneous pluton. Samples were collected at Torres del Paine in spatially significant transects, focusing on major contacts between country rock, granite and mafic units. Results collected by bracketed double spike MC-ICP-MS (2s precision of ×0.03) show an increase in δ56Fe towards the high silica margins of the pluton with values as high as δ56Fe 0.36. Additionally, the data show a decrease in δ56Fe toward the mafic center of the pluton with δ56Fe values ranging from δ56Fe -0.05 to 0.18. Samples collected on the contact between the granite and mafic complex show intermediate values of δ56Fe= 0.18(×) 0.03. Country rock samples in contact with granite show an isotopically light signature of δ56Fe=0.04 (×) 0.03. Analysis of 50 samples in total show a trend of increasing δ56Fe with SiO2 content. The process responsible for Fe isotope variations remains debated but is suggested to reflect four mechanisms: (1) crustal assimilation, (2) fractional crystallization, (3) late stage fluid exsolution [1] and (4) thermal migration [3]. Preliminary results show that mechanisms #1 and #2 would produce isotopic signatures opposite of those seen at Torres del Paine and other plutonic rocks. Isotopically light Torres country rock samples reveal that assimilation of rocks would not produce the isotopically heavy granites seen at Torres. Based on

  5. [Pain control of bone and joint diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Soen, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The decline of multiple physiological processes, even in the absence of disease, combined should logically influence treatment options. Decreased gastric secretions, intestinal motility, and vitamin D receptors lead to loss of appetite, malnutrition. Increased arterial thickening and rigidity elevate cardiac risk, while decreased elasticity in the lungs potentially exacerbates breathing disorders. Memory impairment and cognitive decline progress as neurons become less resilient to stress over time. Reduced hepatic and renal blood flow limit metabolism and filtration, increasing the risk for accumulation of toxic substances. Physiologic changes, drug-drug interactions resulting from polypharmacy, and drug-disease interactions combine to make elderly patients more sensitive to the AEs of medications. Effective pain management in the elderly is challenging. The purpose of this review is to highlight the use of several treatment options for elderly patients. PMID:25509813

  6. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures.

  7. Reorganised motor control strategies of trunk muscles due to acute low back pain.

    PubMed

    Hirata, R P; Salomoni, S E; Christensen, S W; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed how the low back motor control strategies were affected by experimental pain. In twelve volunteers the right m. longissimus was injected by hypertonic and isotonic (control) saline. The pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS). Subjects were seated on a custom-designed chair including a 3-dimensional force sensor adjusted to the segmental height of T1. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from longissimus, multifidus, rectus abdominis, and external oblique muscles. Isometric trunk extensions were performed before, during, and after the saline injections at 5%, 10%, and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction force. Visual feedback of the extension force was provided whereas the tangential force components were recorded. Compared with isotonic saline, VAS scores were higher following hypertonic saline injections (P<.01). Experimental low back pain reduced the EMG activity bilaterally of the rectus abdominis muscles during contractions at 10% and 20% MVC (P<.01) although force accuracy and tangential force variability was not affected. Increased variability in the tangential force composition was found during pain compared with the non-painful condition (P<.05). The immediate adaptation to pain was sufficient to maintain the quality of the task performance; however the long-term consequence of such adaptation is unknown and may overload other structures. PMID:25879794

  8. Throat pain and pharyngeal packing: a controlled randomized double-blind comparison between gauze and tampons.

    PubMed

    Marais, J; Prescott, R J

    1993-10-01

    In order to determine whether patients having pharyngeal packing experience more or less post-operative throat pain when tampons were used, 80 patients were randomized into two groups to receive either gauze or tampon pharyngeal packing. A third control group of 40 patients were intubated but did not have any throat packs. Post-operative throat pain was subjectively rated at both 6 hours and at 24 hours by an independent observer. Thirty-eight per cent of patients had moderate or severe throat pain in the gauze group, whilst in the tampon and control groups these amounted to only 15% and 1% respectively. A significantly higher proportion of patients also had a moderate or severe sore throat at 24 hours in the former group. Intubation alone resulted in a sore throat post-operatively in 50% of patients, but 85% of those had a mild sore throat only. No differences in pain ratings in any group could be shown between men or women or between age groupings. Endotracheal intubation often causes post-operative throat pain which is exacerbated by the use of pharyngeal packing. The results presented suggest that tampons are a safe, effective alternative to gauze and result in less severe post-operative throat pain.

  9. Effects of Dry Flotation Restricted Environmental Stimulation on Hypnotizability and Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Darakjy, Jennifer; Barabasz, Marianne; Barabasz, Arreed

    2015-10-01

    The effects of dry flotation restricted environmental stimulation (REST) on hypnotizability and pain control were tested in lighted and unlighted conditions. Participants (N = 30, ages 18-30) were exposed to hypnosis maximizing (plateauing) experiences prior to the experiment. Participants were exposed to 6 hours of lighted REST (N = 10), 6 hours of unlighted REST (N = 10), or 6 hours of normal stimulation (N = 10). The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C) (Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962) and standardized ischemic pain tests were administered before and after the conditions and at a 2-week follow-up. Both REST groups shared significantly higher SHSS: C scores and significantly lower pain scores from pre-test to post-test and follow-up. The lighted REST group showed significantly higher SHSS: C scores and significantly lower pain scores than the unlighted REST group at post-test and follow-up. The findings supported Barabasz's (1982) theory of REST responding. PMID:26264543

  10. Effects of Dry Flotation Restricted Environmental Stimulation on Hypnotizability and Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Darakjy, Jennifer; Barabasz, Marianne; Barabasz, Arreed

    2015-10-01

    The effects of dry flotation restricted environmental stimulation (REST) on hypnotizability and pain control were tested in lighted and unlighted conditions. Participants (N = 30, ages 18-30) were exposed to hypnosis maximizing (plateauing) experiences prior to the experiment. Participants were exposed to 6 hours of lighted REST (N = 10), 6 hours of unlighted REST (N = 10), or 6 hours of normal stimulation (N = 10). The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS: C) (Weitzenhoffer & Hilgard, 1962) and standardized ischemic pain tests were administered before and after the conditions and at a 2-week follow-up. Both REST groups shared significantly higher SHSS: C scores and significantly lower pain scores from pre-test to post-test and follow-up. The lighted REST group showed significantly higher SHSS: C scores and significantly lower pain scores than the unlighted REST group at post-test and follow-up. The findings supported Barabasz's (1982) theory of REST responding.

  11. Problem-solving skills training for parents of children with chronic pain: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Bromberg, Maggie; Fales, Jessica; Eccleston, Christopher; Wilson, Anna C

    2016-06-01

    This pilot randomized controlled trial aimed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of parental problem-solving skills training (PSST) compared with treatment as usual on improving parental mental health symptoms, physical health and well-being, and parenting behaviors. Effects of parent PSST on child outcomes (pain, emotional, and physical functioning) were also examined. Participants included 61 parents of children aged 10 to 17 years with chronic pain randomized to PSST (n = 31) or treatment as usual (n = 30) groups. Parents receiving PSST participated in 4 to 6 individual sessions of training in problem-solving skills. Outcomes were assessed at pretreatment, immediately after treatment, and at a 3-month follow-up. Feasibility was determined by therapy session attendance, therapist ratings, and parent treatment acceptability ratings. Feasibility of PSST delivery in this population was demonstrated by high compliance with therapy attendance, excellent retention, high therapist ratings of treatment engagement, and high parent ratings of treatment acceptability. PSST was associated with posttreatment improvements in parental depression (d = -0.68), general mental health (d = 0.64), and pain catastrophizing (d = -0.48), as well as in child depression (d = -0.49), child general anxiety (d = -0.56), and child pain-specific anxiety (d = -0.82). Several effects were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Findings demonstrate that PSST is feasible and acceptable to parents of youths with chronic pain. Treatment outcome analyses show promising but mixed patterns of effects of PSST on parent and child mental health outcomes. Further rigorous trials of PSST are needed to extend these pilot results.

  12. Central sensitization and changes in conditioned pain modulation in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Juliana Barbosa; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Oliveira, Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Sluka, Kathleen A; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative sensory testing is widely used in human research to investigate the state of the peripheral and central nervous system contributions in pain processing. It is a valuable tool to help identify central sensitization and may be important in the treatment of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in local and segmental hypersensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and thirty healthy subjects were studied. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured from the lumbar region and over the tibialis anterior muscle (TA). A cold pressor test was used to assess the activation of conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and PPTs in the lumbar region were recorded 30 s after immersion of participant's foot in a bucket with cold water. People with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls at both the lumbar region [89.5 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 40.9-131.1 kPa] and TA [59.45 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 13.49-105.42 kPa]. During CPM, people with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls in lumbar region [118.6 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 77.9-159.2 kPa]. Women had significantly lower PPTs than men in both lumbar region [101.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 37.9-165.7 kPa] and over the TA [189.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 14.2-145.2 kPa]. There was no significant difference in PPTs in men between healthy controls and those with low back pain, suggesting the significant differences are mediated primarily by difference between women. PMID:25963754

  13. Central sensitization and changes in conditioned pain modulation in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Juliana Barbosa; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Oliveira, Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Sluka, Kathleen A; Liebano, Richard Eloin

    2015-08-01

    Quantitative sensory testing is widely used in human research to investigate the state of the peripheral and central nervous system contributions in pain processing. It is a valuable tool to help identify central sensitization and may be important in the treatment of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in local and segmental hypersensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and thirty healthy subjects were studied. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured from the lumbar region and over the tibialis anterior muscle (TA). A cold pressor test was used to assess the activation of conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and PPTs in the lumbar region were recorded 30 s after immersion of participant's foot in a bucket with cold water. People with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls at both the lumbar region [89.5 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 40.9-131.1 kPa] and TA [59.45 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 13.49-105.42 kPa]. During CPM, people with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls in lumbar region [118.6 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 77.9-159.2 kPa]. Women had significantly lower PPTs than men in both lumbar region [101.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 37.9-165.7 kPa] and over the TA [189.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 14.2-145.2 kPa]. There was no significant difference in PPTs in men between healthy controls and those with low back pain, suggesting the significant differences are mediated primarily by difference between women.

  14. Central sensitization and changes in conditioned pain modulation in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Barbosa; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Oliveira, Naiane Teixeira Bastos; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative sensory testing is widely used in human research to investigate the state of the peripheral and central nervous system contributions in pain processing. It is a valuable tool to help identify central sensitization and may be important in the treatment of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in local and segmental hypersensitivity and endogenous pain inhibition in people with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain and thirty healthy subjects were studied. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were measured from the lumbar region and over the tibialis anterior muscle (TA). A cold pressor test was used to assess the activation of conditioned pain modulation (CPM), and PPTs in the lumbar region were recorded 30 s after immersion of participant’s foot in a bucket with cold water. People with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls at both the lumbar region [89.5 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 40.9–131.1 kPa] and TA [59.45 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 13.49–105.42 kPa]. During CPM, people with chronic low back pain have significantly lower PPT than controls in lumbar region [118.6 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 77.9–159.2 kPa]. Women had significantly lower PPTs than men in both lumbar region [101.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 37.9–165.7 kPa] and over the TA [189.7 kPa (mean difference) 95 % CI 14.2–145.2 kPa]. There was no significant difference in PPTs in men between healthy controls and those with low back pain, suggesting the significant differences are mediated primarily by difference between women. PMID:25963754

  15. Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids.

    PubMed

    Rhodin, A; von Ehren, M; Skottheim, B; Grönbladh, A; Ortiz-Nieto, F; Raininko, R; Gordh, T; Nyberg, F

    2014-07-01

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported.

  16. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morone, Natalia E; Greco, Carol M; Weiner, Debra K

    2008-02-01

    The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were randomized to an 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program or to a wait-list control group. Baseline, 8-week and 3-month follow-up measures of pain, physical function, and quality of life were assessed. Eighty-nine older adults were screened and 37 found to be eligible and randomized within a 6-month period. The mean age of the sample was 74.9 years, 21/37 (57%) of participants were female and 33/37 (89%) were white. At the end of the intervention 30/37 (81%) participants completed 8-week assessments. Average class attendance of the intervention arm was 6.7 out of 8. They meditated an average of 4.3 days a week and the average minutes per day was 31.6. Compared to the control group, the intervention group displayed significant improvement in the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire Total Score and Activities Engagement subscale (P=.008, P=.004) and SF-36 Physical Function (P=.03). An 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program is feasible for older adults with CLBP. The program may lead to improvement in pain acceptance and physical function.

  17. Pain Scores Are Not Predictive of Pain Medication Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Suzanne; Chimhanda, Maryann; Sloan, Jayme; Anderson, Charles; Sinacore, James; Brubaker, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To compare Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores with overall postoperative pain medication requirements including cumulative dose and patterns of medication utilization and to determine whether VAS scores predict pain medication utilization. Methods. VAS scores and pain medication data were collected from participants in a randomized trial of the utility of phenazopyridine for improved pain control following gynecologic surgery. Results. The mean age of the 219 participants was 54 (range19 to 94). We did not detect any association between VAS and pain medication utilization for patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) or RN administered (intravenous or oral) medications. We also did not detect any association between the number of VAS scores recorded and mean pain scores. Conclusion. Postoperative VAS scores do not predict pain medication use in catheterized women inpatients following gynecologic surgery. Increased pain severity, as reflected by higher VAS scores, is not associated with an increase in pain assessment. Our findings suggest that VAS scores are of limited utility for optimal pain control. Alternative or complimentary methods may improve pain management. PMID:22110938

  18. Improving the translation of analgesic drugs to the clinic: animal models of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Percie du Sert, N; Rice, A S C

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain remains an area of considerable unmet clinical need. Research based on preclinical animal models has failed to deliver truly novel treatment options, questioning the predictive value of these models. This review addresses the shortcomings of rodent in vivo models commonly used in the field and highlights approaches which could increase their predictivity, including more clinically relevant assays, outcome measures and animal characteristics. The methodological quality of animal studies also needs to be improved. Low internal validity and incomplete reporting lead to a waste of valuable research resources and animal lives, and ultimately prevent an objective assessment of the true predictivity of in vivo models. PMID:24527763

  19. Intravenous Paracetamol Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia With Morphine for the Pain Management Following Diagnostic Knee Arthroscopy in Trauma Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Esmaeelijah, Aliakbar; Golzari, Samad; Keyhani, Sohrab; Maserrat, Azita; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Ardehali, Seyed Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most patients undergoing outpatient surgeries have the unpleasant experience of high level pain after surgery. Compared with open surgeries, arthroscopic procedures are less painful; however, inadequate pain management could be associated with significant concerns. Opioids alone or in combination with local anesthetics are frequently used for diminishing postoperative pain using intravenous or epidural infusion pumps. Despite morphine various disadvantages, it is commonly used for controlling pain after surgery. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare intravenous paracetamol and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine for the pain management following diagnostic knee arthroscopy in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: Sixty trauma patients who were scheduled to undergo knee arthroscopy were randomly divided into two groups. Patients immediately received intravenous infusion of 1 g paracetamol within 15 minutes after surgery and every 6 hours to 24 hours in the paracetamol group. The patient-controlled analgesia group received morphine through PCA infusion pump at 2 mL/h base rate and 1mL bolus every 15 minutes. Pain level, nausea and vomiting, and sedation were measured and recorded during entering the recovery, 15 and 30 minutes after entering the recovery, 2, 6, and 24 hours after starting morphine pump infusion in the morphine and paracetamol in the paracetamol groups. Results: There was no significant difference regarding the pain level at different times after entering the recovery between the two groups. No one from the paracetamol group developed drug complications. However, 22.3% in the PCA morphine suffered from postoperative nausea; there was a statistically significant difference regarding the sedation level, nausea, and vomiting at various times between the two groups. Conclusions: Intravenous administration of paracetamol immediately after knee arthroscopy improved postoperative pain, decreased analgesic administration

  20. The Integration of Negative Affect, Pain, and Cognitive Control in the Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shackman, Alexander J.; Salomons, Tim V.; Slagter, Heleen A.; Fox, Andrew S.; Winter, Jameel J.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Preface It has been argued that emotion, pain, and cognitive control are functionally segregated in distinct subdivisions of the cingulate cortex. But recent observations encourage a fundamentally different view. Imaging studies indicate that negative affect, pain, and cognitive control activate an overlapping region of dorsal cingulate, the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC). Anatomical studies reveal that aMCC constitutes a hub where information about reinforcers can be linked to motor centers responsible for expressing affect and executing goal-directed behavior. Computational modeling and other kinds of evidence suggest that this intimacy reflects control processes that are common to all three domains. These observations compel a reconsideration of dorsal cingulate’s contribution to negative affect and pain. PMID:21331082

  1. Patient-controlled epidural diamorphine for post-operative pain: verbal rating and visual analogue assessments of pain.

    PubMed

    Kunst, G; Chrubasik, S; Black, A M; Chrubasik, J; Schulte-Mönting, J; Alexander, J I

    1996-03-01

    Twenty-two patients were studied while receiving epidural analgesia with diamorphine after major lower abdominal surgery under combined regional and general anaesthesia. Epidural PCA began when the intraoperative epidural block with bupivacaine wore off enough for the patient to request treatment. It was started with 2 mg of diamorphine and continued with a reducible background infusion that was initially set at 0.2 mg h-1 and supplemented by on-demand doses of 0.2 mg, with a lockout time of 15 min. The patients received routine post-operative monitoring and care, with pain at rest being assessed on a four-point verbal rating scale (VRS, none, mild, moderate, severe) at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min from the start of ePCA, then hourly until 24 h and then 2-hourly until 48 h. VRS on coughing and a 10 cm visual analogue score (VAS) at rest and on coughing were recorded at the same times at 4 h, then 4 hourly until 24 h and then at 48 h, at which times, blood samples were also taken to measure morphine concentrations by radioimmunoassay. Analgesia started promptly and reached a maximum at between 30 and 45 min, accompanied by maximum sedation. Thereafter clinically acceptable analgesia was maintained without undue sedation for 48 h, though pain on coughing was less well controlled than pain at rest. After the initial loading dose of diamorphine, the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for further consumption were 3.7 to 17 mg (average 9.7) in the first 24 h and 2.1 to 12.9 mg (average 6.7 mg) in the second 24 h. The plasma morphine concentrations rose to a plateau by about 15 min, with concentrations within 95% CI from 0 to 11 ng mliters-1 (average 5 ng mliters-1. The VRS and VAS pain scores were analysed by a conservative approach that treated them as ordinal data, and by a parametric approach that treated them as interval data. Both approaches conveyed broadly similar information about the post-operative analgesia.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of an Internet-delivered family cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for children and adolescents with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Tonya M; Wilson, Anna C; Peters, Meaghan; Lewandowski, Amy; Somhegyi, Hannah

    2009-11-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions show promise for decreasing chronic pain in youth. However, the availability of CBT is limited by many factors including distance to major treatment centers and expense. This study evaluates a more accessible treatment approach for chronic pediatric pain using an Internet-delivered family CBT intervention. Participants included 48 children, aged 11-17 years, with chronic headache, abdominal, or musculoskeletal pain and associated functional disability, and their parents. Children were randomly assigned to a wait-list control group or an Internet treatment group. Primary treatment outcomes were pain intensity ratings (0-10 NRS) and activity limitations on the Child Activity Limitations Interview, both completed via an online daily diary. In addition to their medical care, the Internet treatment group completed 8 weeks of online modules including relaxation training, cognitive strategies, parent operant techniques, communication strategies, and sleep and activity interventions. Youth randomized to the wait-list control group continued with the current medical care only. Findings demonstrated significantly greater reduction in activity limitations and pain intensity at post-treatment for the Internet treatment group and these effects were maintained at the three-month follow-up. Rate of clinically significant improvement in pain was also greater for the Internet treatment group than for the wait-list control group. There were no significant group differences in parental protectiveness or child depressive symptoms post-treatment. Internet treatment was rated as acceptable by all children and parents. Findings support the efficacy and acceptability of Internet delivery of family CBT for reducing pain and improving function among children and adolescents with chronic pain.

  3. A Neurofeedback-Based Intervention to Reduce Post-Operative Pain in Lung Cancer Patients: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Chiara; Casiraghi, Monica; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery appears to be the treatment of choice for many lung cancers. Nevertheless, depending on the type of surgery, the chest area may be painful for several weeks to months after surgery. This painful state has multiple physical and psychological implications, including respiratory failure, inability to clear secretions by coughing, and even anxiety and depression that have negative effects on recovery. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of a neurofeedback-based intervention on controlling acute post-surgery pain and improving long-term recovery in patients who undergo thoracotomy for lung resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at an academic oncologic hospital. Methods This study will be based on a 2-parallel group randomized controlled trial design, intervention versus usual care, with multiple in-hospital assessments and 2 clinical, radiological, and quality of life follow-ups. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving a neurofeedback-based relaxation training and usual care, or to a control group receiving only usual care. Pain intensity is the primary outcome and will be assessed using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) in the days following the operation. Secondary outcomes will include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, daily opioid consumption, anxiety, patient engagement, blood test and chest x-ray results, and long-term clinical, radiological, and quality of life evaluations. Outcome measures will be repeatedly taken during hospitalization, while follow-up assessments will coincide with the follow-up visits. Pain intensity will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results We expect to have results for this study before the end of 2016. Conclusions The proposed innovative, neurofeedback- and relaxation-based approach to support post

  4. How is radiating leg pain defined in randomized controlled trials of conservative treatments in primary care? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-W C; Verwoerd, A J H; Maher, C G; Verhagen, A P; Pinto, R Z; Luijsterburg, P A J; Hancock, M J

    2014-04-01

    Many terms exist to describe radiating leg pain or symptoms associated with back pain (e.g., sciatica or radiculopathy) and it appears that these terms are used inconsistently. We examined the terms used to describe, and the eligibility criteria used to define, radiating leg pain in randomized controlled trials of conservative treatments, and evaluated how the eligibility criteria compared to an international pain taxonomy. Eligible studies were identified from two systematic reviews and an updated search of their search strategy. Studies were included if they recruited adults with radiating leg pain associated with back pain. Two independent reviewers screened the studies and extracted data. Studies were grouped according to the terms used to describe radiating leg pain. Thirty-one of the seventy-seven included studies used multiple terms to describe radiating leg pain; the most commonly used terms were sciatica (60 studies) and disc herniation (19 studies). Most studies that used the term sciatica included pain distribution in the eligibility criteria, but studies were inconsistent in including signs (e.g., neurological deficits) and imaging findings. Similarly, studies that used other terms to describe radiating leg pain used inconsistent eligibility criteria between studies and to the pain taxonomy, except that positive imaging findings were required for almost all studies that used disc herniation to describe radiating leg pain. In view of the varying terms to describe, and eligibility criteria to define, radiating leg pain, consensus needs to be reached for each of communication and comparison between studies.

  5. OPAL: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of opioid analgesia for the reduction of pain severity in people with acute spinal pain. Trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Day, Ric O; Billot, Laurent; Koes, Bart W; Maher, Chris G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain and neck pain are extremely prevalent and are responsible for an enormous burden of disease globally. Strong analgesics, such as opioid analgesics, are recommended by clinical guidelines for people with acute low back pain or neck pain who are slow to recover and require more pain relief. Opioid analgesics are widely and increasingly used, but there are no strong efficacy data supporting the use of opioid analgesics for acute low back pain or neck pain. Concerns regarding opioid use are further heightened by the risks of adverse events, some of which can be serious (eg, dependency, misuse and overdose). Methods and analysis OPAL is a randomised, placebo-controlled, triple-blinded trial that will investigate the judicious use of an opioid analgesic in 346 participants with acute low back pain and/or neck pain who are slow to recover. Participants will be recruited from general practice and randomised to receive the opioid analgesic (controlled release oxycodone plus naloxone up to 20 mg per day) or placebo in addition to guideline-based care (eg, reassurance and advice of staying active) for up to 6 weeks. Participants will be followed-up for 3 months for effectiveness outcomes. The primary outcome will be pain severity. Secondary outcomes will include physical functioning and time to recovery. Medication-related adverse events will be assessed and a cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted. We will additionally assess long-term use and risk of misuse of opioid analgesics for up to 12 months. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained. Trial results will be disseminated by publications and conference presentations, and via the media. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000775516: Pre-results. PMID:27558901

  6. Deletion of vanilloid receptor 1-expressing primary afferent neurons for pain control.

    PubMed

    Karai, Laszlo; Brown, Dorothy C; Mannes, Andrew J; Connelly, Stephen T; Brown, Jacob; Gandal, Michael; Wellisch, Ofer M; Neubert, John K; Olah, Zoltan; Iadarola, Michael J

    2004-05-01

    Control of cancer, neuropathic, and postoperative pain is frequently inadequate or compromised by debilitating side effects. Inhibition or removal of certain nociceptive neurons, while retaining all other sensory modalities and motor function, would represent a new therapeutic approach to control severe pain. The enriched expression of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1; also known as the vanilloid receptor, VR1) in nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia allowed us to test this concept. Administration of the potent TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) to neuronal perikarya induces calcium cytotoxicity by opening the TRPV1 ion channel and selectively ablates nociceptive neurons. This treatment blocks experimental inflammatory hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation in rats and naturally occurring cancer and debilitating arthritic pain in dogs. Sensations of touch, proprioception, and high-threshold mechanosensitive nociception, as well as locomotor function, remained intact in both species. In separate experiments directed at postoperative pain control, subcutaneous administration of RTX transiently disrupted nociceptive nerve endings, yielding reversible analgesia. In human dorsal root ganglion cultures, RTX induced a prolonged increase in intracellular calcium in vanilloid-sensitive neurons, while leaving other, adjacent neurons unaffected. The results suggest that nociceptive neuronal or nerve terminal deletion will be effective and broadly applicable as strategies for pain management. PMID:15124026

  7. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief. PMID:27512290

  8. Effects of yoga on chronic neck pain: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dol

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of yoga in the management of chronic neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] Five electronic databases were searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain. The trials were published in the English language between January 1966 and December 2015. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was used to assess the quality of the trials. [Results] Three trials were identified and included in this review. A critical appraisal was performed on the trials, and the result indicated a high risk of bias. A narrative description was processed because of the small number of RCTs. Neck pain intensity and functional disability were significantly lower in the yoga groups than in the control groups. [Conclusion] Evidence from the 3 randomly controlled trials shows that yoga may be beneficial for chronic neck pain. The low-quality result of the critical appraisal and the small number of trials suggest that high-quality RCTs are required to examine further the effects of yoga intervention on chronic neck pain relief. PMID:27512290

  9. Single-dose intrathecal analgesia to control labour pain

    PubMed Central

    Minty, R.G.; Kelly, Len; Minty, Alana; Hammett, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the safety and efficacy of single-dose spinal analgesia (intrathecal narcotics [ITN]) during labour. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched and the references of 2 systematic reviews and a meta-analysis were reviewed to find articles on obstetric analgesia and pain measurement. The 33 articles selected included 14 studies, 1 meta-analysis, and 2 systematic reviews, all providing level I evidence. MAIN MESSAGE The literature supports use of ITN as a safe and effective alternative to epidural anesthesia. The recent decrease in rates of episiotomies and use of forceps during deliveries means patients require less dense perineal anesthesia. The advantageof single-dose ITN is that fewer physicians and nurses are needed to administer it even though its safety and effectiveness are comparable with other analgesics. Use of ITN is associated with a shorter first stage of labour and more rapid cervical dilation. A combination of 2.5 mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 250 μg of morphine intrathecally usually provides a 4-hour window of acceptable analgesia for patients without complications not anticipating protracted labour. The evolution in dosing of ITN warrants a re-examination of its usefulness in modern obstetric practice. CONCLUSION Physicians practising modern obstetrics in rural and small urban centres might find single-dose ITN a useful alternative to parenteral or epidural analgesia for appropriately selected patients. PMID:17872679

  10. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part I, Patients Experiencing Pain in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Yang, EunMee; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life outcomes across all pain populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Sixty high quality and seven low quality studies were included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy effectively treats pain compared to sham [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −.44], no treatment (SMD = −1.14), and active (SMD = −0.26) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also beneficial for treating anxiety (SMD = −0.57) and health-related quality of life (SMD = 0.14). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, massage therapy, compared to no treatment, should be strongly recommended as a pain management option. Massage therapy is weakly recommended for reducing pain, compared to other sham or active comparators, and improving mood and health-related quality of life, compared to other active comparators. Massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option are discussed. PMID:27165971

  11. Feasibility of Articulated Arm Mounted Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Goggles for Adjunctive Pain Control During Occupational Therapy in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Walter J.; Ramirez, Maribel; Roberts, Linda; Seibel, Eric J.; Atzori, Barbara; Sharar, Sam R.; Patterson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For daily burn wound care and therapeutic physical therapy skin stretching procedures, powerful pain medications alone are often inadequate. This feasibility study provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment using very inexpensive (∼$400) wide field of view Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) goggles can elicit a strong illusion of presence and reduce pain during VR. The patient was an 11-year-old male with severe electrical and flash burns on his head, shoulders, arms, and feet (36 percent total body surface area (TBSA), 27 percent TBSA were third-degree burns). He spent one 20-minute occupational therapy session with no VR, one with VR on day 2, and a final session with no VR on day 3. His rating of pain intensity during therapy dropped from severely painful during no VR to moderately painful during VR. Pain unpleasantness dropped from moderately unpleasant during no VR to mildly unpleasant during VR. He reported going “completely inside the computer generated world”, and had more fun during VR. Results are consistent with a growing literature showing reductions in pain during VR. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, these preliminary results suggest that the Oculus Rift VR goggles merit more attention as a potential treatment for acute procedural pain of burn patients. Availability of inexpensive but highly immersive VR goggles would significantly improve cost effectiveness and increase dissemination of VR pain distraction, making VR available to many more patients, potentially even at home, for pain control as well as a wide range of other VR therapy applications. This is the first clinical data on PubMed to show the use of Oculus Rift for any medical application. PMID:24892204

  12. Feasibility of articulated arm mounted Oculus Rift Virtual Reality goggles for adjunctive pain control during occupational therapy in pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Meyer, Walter J; Ramirez, Maribel; Roberts, Linda; Seibel, Eric J; Atzori, Barbara; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2014-06-01

    For daily burn wound care and therapeutic physical therapy skin stretching procedures, powerful pain medications alone are often inadequate. This feasibility study provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment using very inexpensive (∼$400) wide field of view Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) goggles can elicit a strong illusion of presence and reduce pain during VR. The patient was an 11-year-old male with severe electrical and flash burns on his head, shoulders, arms, and feet (36 percent total body surface area (TBSA), 27 percent TBSA were third-degree burns). He spent one 20-minute occupational therapy session with no VR, one with VR on day 2, and a final session with no VR on day 3. His rating of pain intensity during therapy dropped from severely painful during no VR to moderately painful during VR. Pain unpleasantness dropped from moderately unpleasant during no VR to mildly unpleasant during VR. He reported going "completely inside the computer generated world", and had more fun during VR. Results are consistent with a growing literature showing reductions in pain during VR. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, these preliminary results suggest that the Oculus Rift VR goggles merit more attention as a potential treatment for acute procedural pain of burn patients. Availability of inexpensive but highly immersive VR goggles would significantly improve cost effectiveness and increase dissemination of VR pain distraction, making VR available to many more patients, potentially even at home, for pain control as well as a wide range of other VR therapy applications. This is the first clinical data on PubMed to show the use of Oculus Rift for any medical application.

  13. Feasibility of articulated arm mounted Oculus Rift Virtual Reality goggles for adjunctive pain control during occupational therapy in pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Meyer, Walter J; Ramirez, Maribel; Roberts, Linda; Seibel, Eric J; Atzori, Barbara; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2014-06-01

    For daily burn wound care and therapeutic physical therapy skin stretching procedures, powerful pain medications alone are often inadequate. This feasibility study provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment using very inexpensive (∼$400) wide field of view Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) goggles can elicit a strong illusion of presence and reduce pain during VR. The patient was an 11-year-old male with severe electrical and flash burns on his head, shoulders, arms, and feet (36 percent total body surface area (TBSA), 27 percent TBSA were third-degree burns). He spent one 20-minute occupational therapy session with no VR, one with VR on day 2, and a final session with no VR on day 3. His rating of pain intensity during therapy dropped from severely painful during no VR to moderately painful during VR. Pain unpleasantness dropped from moderately unpleasant during no VR to mildly unpleasant during VR. He reported going "completely inside the computer generated world", and had more fun during VR. Results are consistent with a growing literature showing reductions in pain during VR. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, these preliminary results suggest that the Oculus Rift VR goggles merit more attention as a potential treatment for acute procedural pain of burn patients. Availability of inexpensive but highly immersive VR goggles would significantly improve cost effectiveness and increase dissemination of VR pain distraction, making VR available to many more patients, potentially even at home, for pain control as well as a wide range of other VR therapy applications. This is the first clinical data on PubMed to show the use of Oculus Rift for any medical application. PMID:24892204

  14. Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Long distance running causes acute muscle damage resulting in inflammation and decreased force production. Endurance athletes use NSAIDs during competition to prevent or reduce pain, which carries the risk of adverse effects. Tart cherries, rich in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, may have a protective effect to reduce muscle damage and pain during strenuous exercise. This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on pain among runners in a long distance relay race. Methods The design was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Fifty-four healthy runners (36 male, 18 female; 35.8 ± 9.6 yrs) ran an average of 26.3 ± 2.5 km over a 24 hour period. Participants ingested 355 mL bottles of tart cherry juice or placebo cherry drink twice daily for 7 days prior to the event and on the day of the race. Participants assessed level of pain on a standard 100 mm Visual Analog Scale (VAS) at baseline, before the race, and after the race. Results While both groups reported increased pain after the race, the cherry juice group reported a significantly smaller increase in pain (12 ± 18 mm) compared to the placebo group (37 ± 20 mm) (p < .001). Participants in the cherry juice group were more willing to use the drink in the future (p < 0.001) and reported higher satisfaction with the pain reduction they attributed to the drink (p < 0.001). Conclusions Ingesting tart cherry juice for 7 days prior to and during a strenuous running event can minimize post-run muscle pain. PMID:20459662

  15. Advice for the management of low back pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Liddle, S Dianne; Gracey, Jacqueline H; Baxter, G David

    2007-11-01

    To synthesise the evidence relating to the effectiveness of advice, the relevance of its content and frequency, and to compare the advice being offered to acute, subacute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. A systematic review of Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) using advice, either alone or with another intervention. The QUOROM guidelines and the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group Guidelines for Systematic Reviews were followed throughout: methodological assessment identified RCTs of 'high' or 'medium' methodological quality, based on their inclusion of at least 50% of the specified internal validity criteria. Outcome measures were analysed based on five recommended core outcome domains; pain, work disability, back-specific function, generic health status and satisfaction with care. Relevant RCTs (n=56) were scored for methodological quality; 39 RCTs involving 7347 patients qualified for inclusion, based upon their methodological quality. Advice as an adjunct to exercise was most effective for improving pain, back-specific function and work disability in chronic LBP but, for acute LBP, was no more effective for improving these outcomes than simple advice to stay active. Advice as part of a back school was most effective for improving back-specific function in subacute LBP; these trials generally demonstrated long-term positive results. Advice as an adjunct to exercise was the most common form of treatment for acute and chronic LBP; advice as part of a back school was most commonly used for subacute LBP. Fifteen percent of acute LBP trials had a positive outcome, compared to 86% and 74% of subacute and chronic LBP trials respectively. A wide variety of outcome measures were used, making valid comparisons between treatment outcomes difficult. The advice provided to patients with LBP within RCTs varied considerably depending on symptom duration. The findings of this review have important implications for clinical practice, and for the design of further

  16. Rapid improvements in pain and quality of life are sustained after surgery for spinal metastases in a large prospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Choi, David; Fox, Zoe; Albert, Todd; Arts, Mark; Balabaud, Laurent; Bunger, Cody; Buchowski, Jacob Maciej; Coppes, Maarten Hubert; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael George; Harrop, James; Kawahara, Norio; Martin-Benlloch, Juan Anthonio; Massicotte, Eric Maurice; Mazel, Christian; Oner, Fetullah Cumhur; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Verlaan, Jorit Jan; Wang, Miao; Wang, Michael; Crockard, Hugh Alan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Metastatic spinal cancer is a common condition that may lead to spinal instability, pain and paralysis. In the 1980s, surgery was discouraged because results showed worse neurological outcomes and pain compared with radiotherapy alone. However, with the advent of modern imaging and spinal stabilisation techniques, the role of surgery has regained centre stage, though few studies have assessed quality of life and functional outcomes after surgery. Objective We investigated whether surgery provides sustained improvement in quality of life and pain relief for patients with symptomatic spinal metastases by analysing the largest reported surgical series of patients with epidural spinal metastases. Methods A prospective cohort study of 922 consecutive patients with spinal metastases who underwent surgery, from the Global Spine Tumour Study Group database. Pre- and post-operative EQ-5D quality of life, visual analogue pain score, Karnofsky physical functioning score, complication rates and survival were recorded. Results Quality of life (EQ-5D), VAS pain score and Karnofsky physical functioning score improved rapidly after surgery and these improvements were sustained in those patients who survived up to 2 years after surgery. In specialised spine centres, the technical intra-operative complication rate of surgery was low, however almost a quarter of patients experienced post-operative systemic adverse events. Conclusion Surgical treatment for spinal metastases produces rapid pain relief, maintains ambulation and improves good quality of life. However, as a group, patients with cancer are vulnerable to post-operative systemic complications, hence the importance of appropriate patient selection.

  17. Effects of Massage Therapy and Occlusal Splint Usage on Quality of Life and Pain in Individuals with Sleep Bruxism: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; El-Hage, Yasmin; Amaral, Ana Paula; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Politti, Fabiano; Kalil-Bussadori, Sandra; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the masticatory muscles and occlusal splint usage on quality of life and pain in individuals with sleep bruxism. Method: A randomized, controlled, blinded, clinical trial was conducted involving 78 volunteers aged 18 to 40 years with sleep bruxism. Quality of life and pain assessments were performed. Results: Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found on the physical functioning, general health state, vitality, role emotional and mental health subscales. A large effect size was found for all treatment protocols with regard to pain. The largest effect was found in the combined treatment group. Conclusions: The findings of the present study reveal that the occlusal splint usage alone led to improvements in components of quality of life among individuals with sleep bruxism. Moreover, both treatments (occlusal splint usage and massage therapy on the masticatory muscles) led to a reduction in pain. PMID:26733760

  18. A Novel Magnetic Stimulator Increases Experimental Pain Tolerance in Healthy Volunteers - A Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, Rudie; Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; van Wijhe, Marten; Aleman, André; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘complex neural pulse’TM (CNP) is a neuromodulation protocol employing weak pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF). A pioneering paper reported an analgesic effect in healthy humans after 30 minutes of CNP-stimulation using three nested whole head coils. We aimed to devise and validate a stimulator with a novel design entailing a multitude of small coils at known anatomical positions on a head cap, to improve applicability. The main hypothesis was that CNP delivery with this novel device would also increase heat pain thresholds. Twenty healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind, sham-controlled, crossover study. Thirty minutes of PEMF (CNP) or sham was applied to the head. After one week the other treatment was given. Before and after each treatment, primary and secondary outcomes were measured. Primary outcome was heat pain threshold (HPT) measured with thermal quantitative sensory testing. Other outcomes were warmth detection threshold, and aspects of cognition, emotion and motor performance. As hypothesized heat pain threshold was significantly increased after the PEMF stimulation. All other outcomes were unaltered by the PEMF but there was a trend level reduction of cognitive performance after PEMF stimulation as measured by the digit-symbol substitution task. Results from this pilot study suggest that our device is able to stimulate the brain and to modulate its function. This is in agreement with previous studies that used similar magnetic field strengths to stimulate the brain. Specifically, pain control may be achieved with PEMF and for this analgesic effect, coil design does not appear to play a dominant role. In addition, the flexible configuration with small coils on a head cap improves clinical applicability. Trial Registration Dutch Cochrane Centre NTR1093 PMID:23620795

  19. Understanding pain and improving management of sickle cell disease: the PiSCES study.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wally R.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Penberthy, Lynne T.; McClish, Donna K.; Levenson, James L.; Roberts, John D.; Gil, Karen; Roseff, Susan D.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2005-01-01

    Until recent decades, sickle cell disease (SCD) was associated with recurrent, disabling pain, organ failure and death in childhood or early adulthood. SCD treatment advances have now decreased pain and prolonged survival, but episodic or chronic pain may still require substantial analgesic use and frequent hospitalization for pain episodes. This pain is poorly characterized and often poorly treated. Adult patients may face barriers to comprehensive SCD care, stigmatization of their care-seeking behavior by providers and lack of family support, forcing them into maladaptive coping strategies. The Pain in Sickle Cell Epidemiology Study (PiSCES) attempts to develop and validate a biopsychosocial model of SCD pain, pain response and healthcare utilization in a large, multisite adult cohort. PiSCES participants complete a baseline survey and six months of daily pain diaries in which they record levels of SCD-related pain and related disability and distress as well as responses to pain (e.g., medication use, hospital visits). PiSCES will advance methods of measuring pain and pain response in SCD by better describing home-managed as well as provider-managed pain. PiSCES will assess the relative contributions of biological (disease-related), psychosocial and environmental (readiness to utilize) factors to overall pain and pain response in SCD, suggesting targets for biobehavioral interventions over time. Importantly, PiSCES will also identify "triggers" of SCD pain episodes and healthcare utilization in the moment of pain, suggesting targets for timely care that mutes pain episodes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15712781

  20. [Physical activity can influence the course of early arthritis. Both strength training and aerobic exercise provide pain relief and functional improvement].

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    There is no causal treatment for osteoarthritis. Instead treatment is aimed at decreasing pain and improving function. The base of osteoarthritis treatment is education and exercise. Exercise, both aerobic exercise and muscular strength training, have positive effects on pain and function. The minimum recommendations of exercise are equivalent to the recommendations of physical activity to obtain or maintain a good general health. Acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritis pain. However, function is not automatically improved when pain is relieved.

  1. Functional brain connectivity during fear of pain: a comparison between dental phobics and controls.

    PubMed

    Scharmüller, Wilfried; Wabnegger, Albert; Schienle, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Fear of pain is the most common reason for avoiding the dentist by patients suffering from dental phobia. Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging investigations demonstrated that already thinking about pain during the viewing of images depicting dental treatment provoked enhanced orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) activation in the clinical group. In the present study, the authors investigated whether this differential activation can be explained by differential connectivity patterns between patients and controls. They found that the control subjects displayed a stronger and more widespread connectivity compared to patients. This connectivity pattern comprised prefrontal seeds (e.g., the anterior cingulate cortex), which were coupled with limbic structures (e.g., the amygdala) and the basal ganglia (putamen, pallidum, caudate nucleus). This pattern might reflect successful emotion regulation, which was absent in the clinical group. The patients showed coupling of the OFC and the caudate nucleus, which may be the neural correlate of associating pain with dental treatment. PMID:25357006

  2. A randomized controlled evaluation of an online chronic pain self management program.

    PubMed

    Ruehlman, Linda S; Karoly, Paul; Enders, Craig

    2012-02-01

    Internet-based educational and therapeutic programs (e-health applications) are becoming increasingly popular for a variety of psychological and physical disorders. We tested the efficacy of an online Chronic Pain Management Program, a comprehensive, fully self-directed and self-paced system that integrates social networking features and self-management tools into an interactive learning environment. Of 305 adult participants (196 women, 109 men), a total of 162 individuals with chronic pain were randomly assigned unsupervised access to the program for approximately 6 weeks; 143 were assigned to the wait-listed control group with treatment as usual. A comprehensive assessment was administered before the study and approximately 7 and 14 weeks thereafter. All recruitment, data collection, and participant involvement took place online. Participation was fully self-paced, permitting the evaluation of program effectiveness under real-world conditions. Intent-to-treat analysis that used linear growth models was used as the primary analytic tool. Results indicated that program utilization was associated with significant decreases in pain severity, pain-related interference and emotional burden, perceived disability, catastrophizing, and pain-induced fear. Further, program use led to significant declines in depression, anxiety, and stress. Finally, as compared to the wait-listed control group, the experimental group displayed a significant increase in knowledge about the principles of chronic pain and its management. Study limitations are considered, including the recognition that not all persons with chronic pain are necessarily good candidates for self-initiated, self-paced, interactive learning. PMID:22133450

  3. Effectiveness of Strengthening Exercises for the Elderly with Low Back Pain to Improve Symptoms and Functions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Nor Azizah; Zahari, Zarina; Justine, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of strengthening exercises for older people with low back pain (LBP). Methods. This study is a systematic review of experimental study which evaluated the evidence regarding exercises for older people with LBP by using EBSCO Academic Search Premier, EBSCO EconLit, Science Direct, PUBMED, and PEDro from 2006 to 2016. Search strategy for each database was conducted by using keywords such as “low back pain”, “older people”, and “strengthening exercise”. Boolean operators were used to combine keywords and manual exclusion was conducted to verify studies which met the inclusion criteria. The articles reviewed were evaluated and critically appraised by using PEDro scale and SPSS version 20 was used to analyze the data. Results. Three articles were found regarding strengthening exercise for older people with LBP whereas one study was conducted on multicomponent exercise. The mean, standard deviation, and variance of the PEDro score of all the studies were 5.67, 2.33, and 1.528, respectively. Overall, the qualities of all studies reviewed were fair. Two articles showed significant results when compared to control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Strengthening exercise is a beneficial treatment for older people with LBP in reducing pain intensity, disability, and improved functional performances. PMID:27293970

  4. Recent advances in the treatment of pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer pain and chronic non-malignant pain can be difficult to manage and may not respond satisfactorily to standard analgesics. Sequential empiric analgesic trials are usually done to manage individual patients. Experimental human pain models have helped to clarify mechanisms of opioid and adjuvant analgesic actions. Combinations of opioids and adjuvant analgesics better relieve pain than either opioids or adjuvant analgesics alone, as demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. The analgesic activity of antidepressants is largely dependent upon norepinephrine reuptake and activation of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors. Corticosteroids reduce postoperative orthopedic incident pain, which may allow patients to ambulate earlier and with less pain. Spinal corticosteroids reduce lower hemibody pain. Gabapentinoids as single high doses reduce postoperative pain and certain acute pain syndromes. Individuals who experience flares of pain while on spinal opioids benefit from intrathecal boluses of levobupivicaine or sublingual ketamine. Interventional approaches to pain management are often necessary due to the limitations of systemic analgesics. Electronics stimulators (peripheral, spinal and motor cortex) improve difficult to manage chronic pain syndromes. Pulsed radiofrequency reduces pain without tissue damage, which could be an advantage over chemical or radiofrequency neurotomy. Botulinum toxin A reduces focal neuropathic pain that is durable. Interventional related successes in relieving pain are operator dependent. Most reported benefits of systemic and regional analgesics and interventional approaches to pain relief are not based on randomized trials and are subject to selection bias, sampling error, and placebo responses, which may over-inflate reported benefits. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm reported benefits. PMID:21173850

  5. Effect of establishing pain committee on the pain assessment skills of paediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Pouran Varvani; Alhani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Eisa

    2014-10-01

    Successful pain management relies on pain assessment. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of establishing pain committee on pain assessment skills of paediatric nurses. We used a quasi-experimental design. The study was conducted in surgery, emergency and orthopaedic wards of two teaching hospitals selected through simple random sampling. The intervention consisted of establishing a pain committee, the steps of which included organizing (3 months), holding workshop (five sessions) and clinical training (1 week). We found that the scores in the intervention group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Therefore, establishing pain committee in the management level of nursing improves nurses' pain assessment skills.

  6. Randomized controlled trial of an educational booklet for patients presenting with back pain in general practice.

    PubMed

    Roland, M; Dixon, M

    1989-06-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate an educational booklet on back pain for patients presenting to five group practices during one calendar year. The booklet had no immediate effect on consultations for back pain, but in the period from two weeks to one year after presentation significantly fewer patients in the group receiving the booklet consulted with back pain (35.6%) than in the control group (42.2%) (P less than 0.05). There were no significant differences between the booklet and control groups in certified absence from work owing to back pain. Referral to hospital, referral to physiotherapy, admissions to hospital and laminectomies were all less common in the booklet group. The reduction in the combined referral rate to physiotherapy and hospital, and the reduction in laminectomy rate almost reached statistical significance at the 5% level. In replying to a questionnaire sent one year after entry to the study 94.1% of respondents in the booklet group said that they had read the book, 84.0% said that they found it useful, and 68.0% said that they still had a copy. Scores on a 15-item test of knowledge about back pain were significantly higher in the group of patients who had received the booklet than in the control group. The results suggest that the booklet had some effect in altering both the knowledge and behaviour of patients with back pain. The provision of an educational booklet was a method of giving information which was appreciated by both patients and doctors.

  7. In search of risk factors for chronic pain in adolescents: a case–control study of childhood and parental associations

    PubMed Central

    Coenders, Alies; Chapman, Cindy; Hannaford, Patricia; Jaaniste, Tiina; Qiu, Wen; Anderson, David; Glogauer, Maline; Goodison-Farnsworth, Evelyn; McCormick, Marianne; Champion, David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate whether an individual and parental history of functional pain syndromes (FPS) is found more often in adolescents suffering from chronic pain than in their pain-free peers. Methods Our case–control study involved 101 adolescents aged 10–18 years. Cases were 45 patients of the Chronic Pain Clinic at Sydney Children’s Hospital with diverse chronic pain disorders. Controls consisted of 56 adolescent volunteers who did not have chronic pain. Adolescents and their parents filled out questionnaires assessing demographic data as well as known and potential risk factors for chronic pain. A history of FPS was assessed by questionnaire, including restless legs syndrome (RLS). Chi-squared tests and t-tests were used to investigate univariate associations between chronic pain in adolescents and lifetime prevalence of FPS. Logistic regression was used to test multivariate associations, while controlling for possible confounders. Results Migraine, non-migraine headaches, recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and RLS were reported significantly more frequently in cases than controls (P-values of 0.01, <0.001, 0.01, and 0.03, respectively). Parental migraine, RAP, and RLS were also significantly associated with adolescent chronic pain in the multivariate analyses. Individual history of migraine, non-migraine headaches, and RAP, along with parental history of RAP and depression significantly accounted for 36%–49% of variance in chronic pain. Other associations with chronic pain were generally in accordance with previous reports. Discussion It may be helpful when assessing a child who has chronic pain or is at risk of chronic pain, to enquire about these associations. Based on the current findings, an individual history of migraine, non-migraine headaches, and RAP, as well as parental migraine, RAP, and RLS are symptoms that are of particular relevance to assess. PMID:24707186

  8. Ibuprofen versus acetaminophen with codeine for the relief of perineal pain after childbirth: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Elizabeth A.; Janssen, Patricia A.; Grange, Caroline S.; Douglas, M. Joanne

    2001-01-01

    Background Pain from episiotomy or tearing of perineal tissues during childbirth is often poorly treated and may be severe. This randomized double-blind controlled trial was performed to compare the effectiveness, side effects and cost of, and patient preference for, 2 analgesics for the management of postpartum perineal pain. Methods A total of 237 women who gave birth vaginally with episiotomy or a third- or fourth-degree tear between August 1995 and November 1996 at a tertiary-level teaching and referral centre for obstetric care in Vancouver were randomly assigned to receive either ibuprofen (400 mg) (n = 127) or acetaminophen (600 mg) with codeine (60 mg) and caffeine (15 mg) (Tylenol No. 3) (n = 110), both given orally every 4 hours as necessary. Pain ratings were recorded before the first dose and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 12 and 24 hours after the first dose on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. Side effects and overall opinion were assessed at 24 hours. Results Ibuprofen and acetaminophen with codeine had similar analgesic properties in the first 24 hours post partum (mean pain rating 3.4 and 3.3, mean number of doses in 24 hours 3.4 and 3.3, and proportion of treatment failures 13.8% [16/116] and 16.0% [16/100] respectively). Significantly fewer subjects in the ibuprofen group than in the acetaminophen with codeine group experienced side effects (52.4% v. 71.7%) (p = 0.006). There were no significant differences in overall patient satisfaction between the 2 groups. The major determinant of pain intensity was forceps-assisted delivery. Overall, 78% of the treatment failures were in women with forceps-assisted deliveries. Interpretation Since the 2 analgesics were rated similarly, ibuprofen may be the preferred choice because it is less expensive and requires less nursing time to dispense. Further studies need to address improved analgesia for women with forceps-assisted deliveries. PMID:11706909

  9. Low-dose laser acupuncture for non-specific chronic low back pain: a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Glazov, Gregory; Yelland, Michael; Emery, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if infrared laser acupuncture (LA) may have a specific effect in reducing pain and disability in treatment of chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods This was a double-blind sham laser controlled trial performed in general practices in Perth, Western Australia. The participants were 144 adults with chronic non-specific LBP. They were randomised to receive eight once-weekly treatments. Laser machines (20 mW, 840 nm diode, power density 0.1 W/cm2) stimulated points in three treatment groups: sham (0 joules/point), low dose (0.2 J/point) and high dose (0.8 joules/point). Participants were followed-up at 1 and 6 weeks, and 6 and 12 months post treatment. Primary outcomes were pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS)) and disability (Oswestry Disability Inventory (ODI)) at 6 weeks post treatment. Secondary outcomes included numerical rating scale for limitation of activity, global assessment of improvement, analgesic usage and adverse effects after treatment. Results The analysis showed no difference between sham and the laser groups at 6 weeks for pain or disability. There was a significant reduction in mean pain and disability in all groups at 6 weeks (p<0.005); NPRS: sham (−1.5 (95% CI −2.1 to −0.8)), low dose (−1.3 (−2.0 to −0.8)), high dose (−1.1 (−1.7 to −0.5)). ODI: sham (−4.0 (−7.1 to −1.0)), low dose (−4.1, (−6.7 to −1.5)), high dose (−2.6 (−5.7 to 0.5)). All secondary outcomes also showed clinical improvement over time but with no differences between groups. Conclusions LA using energy density range (0–4 J/cm2) for the treatment of chronic non-specific LBP resulted in clinical improvement unrelated to laser stimulation. Trial registration http://www.anzctr.org.au ACTRN12610000043033. PMID:24280948

  10. Comparison of controlled-release ketoprofen and diclofenac in the control of post-surgical dental pain.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Y M; Baker, R

    1992-01-01

    Preoperative treatment with controlled-release ketoprofen or diclofenac was compared in 56 out-patients, for control of postoperative dental pain, following unilateral or bilateral surgical removal of lower third molars. Six patients were excluded due to non-compliance, leaving 50 evaluable patients. Patients were assessed by the dental surgeon, on the day of the operation and one week later, prior to removal of sutures. Additionally, patients completed a daily diary during the postoperative week. Following surgery, scores for graded dental pain, consumption of paracetamol, incidence of dental bleeding, dysphagia, sleep disturbance and trismus were similar for the two treatment groups. However, median pain scores were consistently elevated in the diclofenac group over those seen with the ketoprofen group. The four adverse events reported were all minor and posed no problem to patient management. PMID:1548648

  11. A multifaceted workplace intervention for low back pain in nurses' aides: a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Charlotte Diana Nørregaard; Holtermann, Andreas; Bay, Hans; Søgaard, Karen; Birk Jørgensen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    This study established the effectiveness of a workplace multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and cognitive-behavioural training (CBT) for low back pain (LBP). Between November 2012 and May 2014, we conducted a pragmatic stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial with 594 workers from eldercare workplaces (nursing homes and home care) randomised to 4 successive time periods, 3 months apart. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and consisted of 19 sessions in total (physical training [12 sessions], CBT [2 sessions], and participatory ergonomics [5 sessions]). Low back pain was the outcome and was measured as days, intensity (worst pain on a 0-10 numeric rank scale), and bothersomeness (days) by monthly text messages. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the intervention effect. Analyses were performed according to intention to treat, including all eligible randomised participants, and were adjusted for baseline values of the outcome. The linear mixed models yielded significant effects on LBP days of -0.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.19 to -0.38), LBP intensity of -0.4 (95% CI, -0.60 to -0.26), and bothersomeness days of -0.5 (95% CI, -0.85 to -0.13) after the intervention compared with the control group. This study shows that a multifaceted intervention consisting of participatory ergonomics, physical training, and CBT can reduce LBP among workers in eldercare. Thus, multifaceted interventions may be relevant for improving LBP in a working population.

  12. Suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide in patients with fibromyalgia: a comparison with non-pain controls and patients suffering from low-back pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Rodríguez, Irene; Garcia-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Beatriz M; Condés-Moreno, Emilia; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Calandre, Elena P

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with an increased rate of mortality from suicide. In fact, this disease is associated with several characteristics that are linked to an increased risk of suicidal behaviors, such as being female and experiencing chronic pain, psychological distress, and sleep disturbances. However, the literature concerning suicidal behaviors and their risk factors in fibromyalgia is sparse. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia compared with a sample of healthy subjects and a sample of patients with chronic low-back pain. We also aimed to evaluate the relevance of pain intensity, depression, and sleep quality as variables related to suicidal ideation and risks. Logistic regression was applied to estimate the likelihood of suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide adjusted by age and sex. We also used two logistic regression models using age, sex, pain severity score, depression severity, sleep quality, and disease state as independent variables and using the control group as a reference. Forty-four patients with fibromyalgia, 32 patients with low-back pain, and 50 controls were included. Suicidal ideation, measured with item 9 of the Beck Depression Inventory, was almost absent among the controls and was low among patients with low-back pain; however, suicidal ideation was prominent among patients with fibromyalgia (P<0.0001). The risk of suicide, measured with the Plutchik Suicide Risk Scale, was also higher among patients with fibromyalgia than in patients with low-back pain or in controls (P<0.0001). The likelihood for suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide were higher among patients with fibromyalgia (odds ratios of 26.9 and 48.0, respectively) than in patients with low-back pain (odds ratios 4.6 and 4.7, respectively). Depression was the only factor associated with suicidal ideation or the risk of suicide. PMID:24790444

  13. Acupuncture and rehabilitation of the painful shoulder: study protocol of an ongoing multicentre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN28687220

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Jorge; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Mendez, Camila; Galante, Antonia Herrera; Madrazo, Fernando; Medina, Ivan; Ortega, Caridad; Olmo, Victoria; Fernandez, Francisco Perez; Hernandez, Luz; Seminario, Jose Maria; Brioso, Mauricio; Luna, Francisco; Gordo, Isabel; Godoy, Ana Maria; Jimenez, Carmen; Ruiz, Manuel Anselmo; Montes, Joaquin; Hidalgo, Alonso; Gonzalez-Quevedo, Rosa; Bosch, Pablo; Vazquez, Antonio; Lozano, Juan Vicente

    2005-01-01

    variables, we will record the changes in diurnal pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS), nocturnal pain intensity on the VAS, doses of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) taken during the study period, credibility scale for the treatment, degree of improvement perceived by the patient and degree of improvement perceived by the evaluator. A follow up examination will be made at 3, 6 and 12 months after the study period has ended. Two types of population will be considered for analysis: per protocol and per intention to treat. Discussion The discussion will take into account the limitations of the study, together with considerations such as the choice of a simple, safe method to treat this shoulder complaint, the choice of the control group, and the blinding of the patients, evaluators and those responsible for carrying out the final analysis. PMID:16225693

  14. The Impact of Demand Characteristics on Brief Acceptance- and Control-Based Interventions for Pain Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Bryan; Forsyth, John P.; Maher, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    The present analog study compared the effectiveness of an acceptance- and control-based intervention on pain tolerance using a cold pressor task, and is a partial replication and extension of the Hayes, Bissett et al. (Hayes, S. C., Bissett, R.T., Korn, Z., Zettle, R. D., Rosenfarb, I. S., Cooper, L. D., & Grundt, A. M. (1999). "The impact of…

  15. Responsibility for Teaching Pain Control in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter B.; Campbell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of 53 dental schools found most were not interested in developing a separate division or department of dental anesthesiology. Of those with a dentist anesthesiologist responsible for teaching pain control, all have or favor such a division. Less than one-third employ professionals limiting their practice to anesthesiology. (MSE)

  16. Delivery Pain Anxiety/Fear Control between Midwives among Women in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyira, Emilia James; Mgbekem, Mary; Osuchukwu, Easther Chukwudi; Affiong, Ekpenyong Onoyom; Lukpata, Felicia E.; Ojong-Alasia, Mary Manyo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine background of midwives the effectiveness in delivery pain and anxiety/fear control of expectant mothers in Nigeria. Methods: Two null hypotheses were formulated. The survey design with sample of 360 post-natal women was selected from a population of 78,814 through the polio immunization registers of selected health center in…

  17. The effectiveness of the quality program Pac-IficO to improve pain management in hospitalized cancer patients: a before-after cluster phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer-related pain continues to be a major healthcare issue worldwide. Despite the availability of effective analgesic drugs, published guidelines and educational programs for Health Care Professionals (HCPs) the symptom is still under-diagnosed and its treatment is not appropriate in many patients. The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of the Pac-IFicO programme in improving the quality of pain management in hospitalised cancer patients. Methods/design This is a before-after cluster phase II study. After the before assessment, the experimental intervention – the Pac-IFicO programme – will be implemented in ten medicine, oncology and respiratory disease hospital wards. The same assessment will be repeated after the completion of the intervention. The Pac-IFicO programme is a complex intervention with multiple components. It includes focus group with ward professionals for identifying possible local obstacles to optimal pain control, informative material for the patients, an educational program performed through guides from the wards, and an organisational intervention to the ward. The primary end-point of the study is the proportion of cancer patients with severe pain. Secondary end-points include opioids administered in the wards, knowledge in pain management, and quality of pain management. We plan to recruit about 500 cancer patients. This sample size should be sufficient, after appropriate statistical adjustments for clustering, to detect an absolute decrease in the primary end-point from 20% to 9%. Discussion This trial is aimed at exploring with an experimental approach the efficacy of a new quality improvement educational intervention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02035098 PMID:24678911

  18. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: A qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Ware, Mark A; Posel, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain is one of the most common reasons for individuals to seek medical advice, yet it remains poorly managed. One of the main reasons that poor pain management persists is the lack of adequate knowledge and skills of practicing clinicians, which stems from a perceived lack of pain education during the training of undergraduate medical students. OBJECTIVE: To identify gaps in knowledge with respect to pain management as perceived by students, patients and educators. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were generated through six focus groups with second- and fourth-year medical students, four focus groups with patients and individual semistructured interviews with nine educators. All interviews were audiotaped and an inductive thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 70 individuals participated in the present study. Five main themes were identified: assessment of physical and psychosocial aspects of pain; clinical management of pain with pharmacology and alternative therapies; communication and the development of a good therapeutic relationship; ethical considerations surrounding pain; and institutional context of medical education about pain. CONCLUSION: Participating patients, students and pain experts recognized a need for additional medical education about pain assessment and management. Educational approaches need to teach students to gather appropriate information about pain, to acquire knowledge of a broad spectrum of therapeutic options, to develop a mutual, trusting relationship with patients and to become aware of their own biases and prejudice toward patients with pain. The results of the present study should be used to develop and enhance existing pain curricula content. PMID:23985579

  19. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer, Francisco; López-Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion, dysfunction, or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the hesperidin antihyperalgesic effects alone or combined with diosmin in a model of neuropathic pain to corroborate a possible synergistic antinociceptive activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed in the aesthesiometer and plantar tests, respectively, after chronic constriction injury (CCI) model in rats receiving hesperidin (HS, 5 doses from 10 to 1000 mg/kg) alone or combined with diosmin (DS, 10 and 100 mg/kg) in comparison to gabapentin (31.6 mg/kg). UHPLC-MS analysis of cerebral samples was used to recognize the central concentrations of these flavonoids. Participation of different receptors was also investigated in the presence of haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone antagonists. Acute hesperidin administration significantly decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Antihyperalgesic response of hesperidin, improved by a combination with diosmin (DS10/HS100) in both stimuli, was blockaded by haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone, but not WAY100635, antagonists. Both flavonoids were detected in brain samples. In conclusion, hesperidin alone and combined with diosmin produces antihyperalgesic response in the CCI model in rats. Antihyperalgesic effect of DS10/HS100 combination involves central activity partially modulated by D2, GABAA, and opioids, but not by 5-HT1A, receptors. PMID:27672659

  20. Antihyperalgesic Effect of Hesperidin Improves with Diosmin in Experimental Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer, Francisco; López-Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is caused by a primary lesion, dysfunction, or transitory perturbation in the peripheral or central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the hesperidin antihyperalgesic effects alone or combined with diosmin in a model of neuropathic pain to corroborate a possible synergistic antinociceptive activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed in the aesthesiometer and plantar tests, respectively, after chronic constriction injury (CCI) model in rats receiving hesperidin (HS, 5 doses from 10 to 1000 mg/kg) alone or combined with diosmin (DS, 10 and 100 mg/kg) in comparison to gabapentin (31.6 mg/kg). UHPLC-MS analysis of cerebral samples was used to recognize the central concentrations of these flavonoids. Participation of different receptors was also investigated in the presence of haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone antagonists. Acute hesperidin administration significantly decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. Antihyperalgesic response of hesperidin, improved by a combination with diosmin (DS10/HS100) in both stimuli, was blockaded by haloperidol, bicuculline, and naloxone, but not WAY100635, antagonists. Both flavonoids were detected in brain samples. In conclusion, hesperidin alone and combined with diosmin produces antihyperalgesic response in the CCI model in rats. Antihyperalgesic effect of DS10/HS100 combination involves central activity partially modulated by D2, GABAA, and opioids, but not by 5-HT1A, receptors.

  1. Placebo, nocebo, and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Skyt, Ina; Hall, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, the apparent increase in placebo responses in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of neuropathic pain have complicated and potentially limited development and availability of new effective pain medication. Placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia effects are well described in nociceptive and idiopathic pain conditions, but less is known about the magnitude and mechanisms of placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, placebo treatments have primarily been used as control conditions for active agents under investigation in RCTs and these placebo responses are typically not controlled for the natural history of pain and other confounding factors. Recently, mechanistic studies that control for the natural history of pain have investigated placebo and nocebo effects in neuropathic pain in their own right. Large placebo analgesia but no nocebo hyperalgesic effects have been found, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. Here we review placebo and nocebo effects and the underlying mechanisms in neuropathic pain and compare them with those of nociceptive and idiopathic pain. This allows for a novel discussion on how knowledge of psychological, neurobiological, and genetic factors underlying well-controlled placebo effects may help improve the information that can be obtained from and potentially restore the utility of RCTs.

  2. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions causing weight loss or improved physical fitness in obese individuals may lead to improved physical function. This study involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at baseline (n = 2,203). The purposes of this study we...

  3. Intensive lifestyle intervention improves physical function among obese adults with knee pain: Findings from the Look AHEAD Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifestyle interventions have resulted in weight loss or improved physical fitness among individuals with obesity, which may lead to improved physical function. This prospective investigation involved participants in the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) trial who reported knee pain at basel...

  4. Further Effort is Needed to Improve Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Results from the Arkys Project

    PubMed Central

    Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Piccinocchi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years) had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%). In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%). Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%). NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%), while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation. PMID:27478585

  5. Further Effort is Needed to Improve Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Results from the Arkys Project.

    PubMed

    Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Piccinocchi, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years) had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%). In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%). Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%). NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%), while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation. PMID:27478585

  6. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima e

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg−1·h−1 (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  7. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the application of capsaicin cream in chronic distal painful polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Low, P A; Opfer-Gehrking, T L; Dyck, P J; Litchy, W J; O'Brien, P C

    1995-08-01

    We have completed a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized study on the efficacy of the application of capsaicin (CAPS) cream (0.075%) in the treatment of chronic distal painful polyneuropathy. Forty patients were enrolled and 39 completed the study. The 2 limbs were randomly assigned to CAPS or placebo (PLAC). The cream was applied 4 times a day. The first tube contained the active PLAC, methyl nicotinate. In the final 4 weeks (single-blind wash-out phase), PLAC was administered bilaterally. Efficacy was evaluated using the following scales: (1) investigator global, (2) patient global, (3) visual analog (VAS) of pain severity, (4) VAS of pain relief, (5) activities of daily living, and (6) allodynia. Patients were examined at onset and at monthly intervals using a neurologic disability scale, nerve conduction studies, computer-assisted sensory examination for vibration and thermal cooling and warming, QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test) and quantitative flare response. There was no statistical evidence of efficacy of CAPS cream over PLAC for any of the pain indices. At early time points (1-4 weeks), there were a small number of indices that favored the PLAC. The percent of limbs that improved on the investigator's global scale were 51.3 vs. 53.8 at 4 weeks, 56.4 vs. 64.1 at 8 weeks and 59 vs. 66.7 at 12 weeks for CAPS vs. PLAC; no statistically significant difference was found. All the safety indices showed no difference between sides. We interpret the early hyperalgesia on the CAPS side as being responsible for the better performance of PLAC at early time points. The large percentage of limbs that improved may be a pronounced PLAC response.

  8. Paraspinous Lidocaine Injection for Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Marta; Imamura, Satiko Tomikawa; Targino, Rosa Alves; Morales-Quezada, León; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis C.; Onoda Tomikawa, Luis G.; Alfieri, Fabio M.; Filippo, Thais R.; da Rocha, Ivan D.; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2016-01-01

    In this large, sham-controlled, randomized trial, we examined the efficacy of the combination of standard treatment and paraspinous lidocaine injection compared with standard therapy alone in subjects with chronic low back pain. There is little research-based evidence for the routine clinical use of paraspinous lidocaine injection for low back pain. A total of 378 subjects with nonspecific chronic low back pain were randomized to 3 groups: paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 1, LID-INJ); sham paraspinous lidocaine injection, analgesics, and exercises (group 2, SH-INJ); and analgesics and exercises (group 3, STD-TTR). A blinded rater assessed the study outcomes at 3 time points: baseline, after treatment, and after 3 months of follow-up. There were increased frequency of pain responses and better low back functional scores in the LID-INJ group compared with the SH-INJ and STD-TTR groups. These effects remained at the 3-month follow-up but differed between all 3 groups. There were significant changes in pain threshold immediately after treatment, supporting the effects of this intervention in reducing central sensitization. Paraspinous lidocaine injection therapy is not associated with a higher risk of adverse effects compared with conventional treatment and sham injection. Its effects on hyperalgesia might correlate with changes in central sensitization. PMID:26828801

  9. Comparison of the Effects of pH-Dependent Peppermint Oil and Synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + Fructooligosaccharides) on Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Asgarshirazi, Masoumeh; Shariat, Mamak; Dalili, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Still there is no consensus on the best treatment for abdominal pain-related functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharide (FOS)), peppermint oil (Colpermin) and placebo (folic acid) on abdominal pain-related FGIDs except for abdominal migraine. Patients and Methods: This placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 children aged 4 - 13 years to compare the efficacy of pH-dependent peppermint oil (Colpermin) versus synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharids (FOS)) in decreasing duration, severity and frequency of functional abdominal pain. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups (n = 40 in each group) and each group received Colpermin or Lactol or placebo. Results: Eighty-eight out of 120 enrolled patients completed a one-month protocol and analyses were performed on 88 patients’ data. Analyses showed that improvement in pain duration, frequency and severity in the Colpermin group was better than the placebo group (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Moreover, pain duration and frequency were decreased in the Lactol group more than the placebo (P = 0.012 and P = 0.0001, respectively), but changes in pain severity were not significant (P = 0.373). Colpermin was superior to Lactol in decreasing pain duration and severity (P = 0.040 and P = 0.013, respectively). No known side effects or intolerance were seen with Colpermin or Lactol. Conclusions: The pH-dependent peppermint oil capsule and Lactol tablet (Bacillus coagulans+ FOS) as synbiotics seem to be superior to placebo in decreasing the severity, duration and frequency of pain in abdominal pain-related functional GI disorders. PMID:26023339

  10. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving. PMID:27485132

  11. Playing Action Video Games Improves Visuomotor Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Rongrong; Chen, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Can playing action video games improve visuomotor control? If so, can these games be used in training people to perform daily visuomotor-control tasks, such as driving? We found that action gamers have better lane-keeping and visuomotor-control skills than do non-action gamers. We then trained non-action gamers with action or nonaction video games. After they played a driving or first-person-shooter video game for 5 or 10 hr, their visuomotor control improved significantly. In contrast, non-action gamers showed no such improvement after they played a nonaction video game. Our model-driven analysis revealed that although different action video games have different effects on the sensorimotor system underlying visuomotor control, action gaming in general improves the responsiveness of the sensorimotor system to input error signals. The findings support a causal link between action gaming (for as little as 5 hr) and enhancement in visuomotor control, and suggest that action video games can be beneficial training tools for driving.

  12. Iliotibial band tightness and patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zoe; Darthuy, Emma

    2009-04-01

    Tight lateral structures have been implicated in subjects presenting with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). It has been proposed that a tight iliotibial band (ITB) through its attachment of the lateral retinaculum into the patella could cause lateral patella tracking, patella tilt and compression. Twelve subjects presenting with PFPS were compared with 12 matched control subjects. Hip adduction was measured using the Ober test in each subject as an indirect measure of ITB length. The mean values for hip adduction in the control group were 21.4 (+/-4.9) and 20.3 (+/-3.8) degrees in the left and right legs, respectively, and in the PFPS group, 17.3 (+/-6.1) and 14.9 (+/-4.2) degrees in the non-painful leg and painful leg, respectively. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a highly significant difference between groups (F=4.485, p=0.008) and post-hoc analysis showed a significant difference between the painful leg in the PFPS group and the left and right legs in the control group, p=0.002 and 0.009, respectively. The results from this study show that subjects presenting with PFPS do have a tighter ITB. Future work should investigate this observation prospectively in order to determine whether a tight ITB is the cause or effect of PFPS. PMID:18313972

  13. Iliotibial band tightness and patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zoe; Darthuy, Emma

    2009-04-01

    Tight lateral structures have been implicated in subjects presenting with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). It has been proposed that a tight iliotibial band (ITB) through its attachment of the lateral retinaculum into the patella could cause lateral patella tracking, patella tilt and compression. Twelve subjects presenting with PFPS were compared with 12 matched control subjects. Hip adduction was measured using the Ober test in each subject as an indirect measure of ITB length. The mean values for hip adduction in the control group were 21.4 (+/-4.9) and 20.3 (+/-3.8) degrees in the left and right legs, respectively, and in the PFPS group, 17.3 (+/-6.1) and 14.9 (+/-4.2) degrees in the non-painful leg and painful leg, respectively. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a highly significant difference between groups (F=4.485, p=0.008) and post-hoc analysis showed a significant difference between the painful leg in the PFPS group and the left and right legs in the control group, p=0.002 and 0.009, respectively. The results from this study show that subjects presenting with PFPS do have a tighter ITB. Future work should investigate this observation prospectively in order to determine whether a tight ITB is the cause or effect of PFPS.

  14. Wii-Workouts on Chronic Pain, Physical Capabilities and Mood of Older Women: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; de Souza, Cíntia Pereira; Lattari, Eduardo; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa Ferreira; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) is a public health problem and older women have higher incidence of this symptom, which affect body balance, functional capacity and behavior. The purpose of this study was to verifying the effect of exercises with Nintendo Wii on CLBP, functional capacity and mood of elderly. Thirty older women (68 ± 4 years; 68 ± 12 kg; 154 ± 5 cm) with CLBP participated in this study. Elderly individuals were divided into a Control Exercise Group (n = 14) and an Experimental Wii Group (n = 16). Control Exercise Group did strength exercises and core training, while Experimental Wii Group did ones additionally to exercises with Wii. CLBP, balance, functional capacity and mood were assessed pre and post training by the numeric pain scale, Wii Balance Board, sit to stand test and Profile of Mood States, respectively. Training lasted eight weeks and sessions were performed three times weekly. MANOVA 2 x 2 showed no interaction on pain, siting, stand-up and mood (P = 0.53). However, there was significant difference within groups (P = 0.0001). ANOVA 2 x 2 showed no interaction for each variable (P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences within groups in these variables (P < 0.05). Tukey's post-hoc test showed significant difference in pain on both groups (P = 0.0001). Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests identified no significant differences on balance (P > 0.01). Capacity to Sit improved only in Experimental Wii Group (P = 0.04). In conclusion, physical exercises with Nintendo Wii Fit Plus additional to strength and core training were effective only for sitting capacity, but effect size was small.

  15. Wii-Workouts on Chronic Pain, Physical Capabilities and Mood of Older Women: A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Trial.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato Sobral; de Souza, Cíntia Pereira; Lattari, Eduardo; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa Ferreira; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) is a public health problem and older women have higher incidence of this symptom, which affect body balance, functional capacity and behavior. The purpose of this study was to verifying the effect of exercises with Nintendo Wii on CLBP, functional capacity and mood of elderly. Thirty older women (68 ± 4 years; 68 ± 12 kg; 154 ± 5 cm) with CLBP participated in this study. Elderly individuals were divided into a Control Exercise Group (n = 14) and an Experimental Wii Group (n = 16). Control Exercise Group did strength exercises and core training, while Experimental Wii Group did ones additionally to exercises with Wii. CLBP, balance, functional capacity and mood were assessed pre and post training by the numeric pain scale, Wii Balance Board, sit to stand test and Profile of Mood States, respectively. Training lasted eight weeks and sessions were performed three times weekly. MANOVA 2 x 2 showed no interaction on pain, siting, stand-up and mood (P = 0.53). However, there was significant difference within groups (P = 0.0001). ANOVA 2 x 2 showed no interaction for each variable (P > 0.05). However, there were significant differences within groups in these variables (P < 0.05). Tukey's post-hoc test showed significant difference in pain on both groups (P = 0.0001). Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests identified no significant differences on balance (P > 0.01). Capacity to Sit improved only in Experimental Wii Group (P = 0.04). In conclusion, physical exercises with Nintendo Wii Fit Plus additional to strength and core training were effective only for sitting capacity, but effect size was small. PMID:26556092

  16. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Han; Jeon, Yo-Han; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Won

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33) who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28) on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV), Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain.

  17. The Effects of Forest Therapy on Coping with Chronic Widespread Pain: Physiological and Psychological Differences between Participants in a Forest Therapy Program and a Control Group

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin-Woo; Choi, Han; Jeon, Yo-Han; Yoon, Chong-Hyeon; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Won

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of a two-day forest therapy program on individuals with chronic widespread pain. Sixty one employees of a public organization providing building and facilities management services within the Seoul Metropolitan area participated in the study. Participants were assigned to an experimental group (n = 33) who participated in a forest therapy program or a control group (n = 28) on a non-random basis. Pre- and post-measures of heart rate variability (HRV), Natural Killer cell (NK cell) activity, self-reported pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), depression level using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and health-related quality of life measures using the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) were collected in both groups. The results showed that participants in the forest therapy group, as compared to the control group, showed physiological improvement as indicated by a significant increase in some measures of HRV and an increase in immune competence as indicated by NK cell activity. Participants in the forest therapy group also reported significant decreases in pain and depression, and a significant improvement in health-related quality of life. These results support the hypothesis that forest therapy is an effective intervention to relieve pain and associated psychological and physiological symptoms in individuals with chronic widespread pain. PMID:26927141

  18. Controlled medial branch anesthetic block in the diagnosis of chronic lumbar facet joint pain: the value of a three-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Ivan Dias; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To verify the incidence of facetary and low back pain after a controlled medial branch anesthetic block in a three-month follow-up and to verify the correlation between the positive results and the demographic variables. METHODS: Patients with chronic lumbar pain underwent a sham blockade (with a saline injection) and then a controlled medial branch block. Their symptoms were evaluated before and after the sham injection and after the real controlled medial branch block; the symptoms were reevaluated after one day and one week, as well as after one, two and three months using the visual analog scale. We searched for an association between the positive results and the demographic characteristics of the patients. RESULTS: A total of 104 controlled medial branch blocks were performed and 54 patients (52%) demonstrated >50% improvements in pain after the blockade. After three months, lumbar pain returned in only 18 individuals, with visual analogue scale scores >4. Therefore, these patients were diagnosed with chronic facet low back pain. The three-months of follow-up after the controlled medial branch block excluded 36 patients (67%) with false positive results. The results of the controlled medial branch block were not correlated to sex, age, pain duration or work disability but were correlated with patient age (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patient diagnosis with a controlled medial branch block proved to be effective but was not associated with any demographic variables. A three-month follow-up is required to avoid a high number of false positives. PMID:25141111

  19. Quantitative sensory testing in gynaecology: improving preoperative and postoperative pain diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jarrell, John; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Chronic pelvic pain presents difficulties for women suffering its complex presentation. It also presents difficulties for clinicians involved in diagnosing and managing the problem. We review here clinically relevant information related to visceral pathology and its association with peripheral and central aspects of pain hypersensitivity. We address why surgery appears to be successful in some cases but less than successful in others, and what cautionary indicators should be taken into account. A categorization of chronic pelvic pain based on our understanding of pain physiology and mechanisms involved is proposed. The benefits of multidimensional sensory and pain testing in gynaecological care are reviewed.

  20. Central or peripheral delivery of an adenosine A1 receptor agonist improves mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Katz, N K; Ryals, J M; Wright, D E

    2015-01-29

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, and a significant proportion of individuals suffer debilitating pain that significantly affects their quality of life. Unfortunately, symptomatic treatment options have limited efficacy, and often carry significant risk of systemic adverse effects. Activation of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) by the analgesic small molecule adenosine has been shown to have antinociceptive benefits in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The current study used a mouse model of painful diabetic neuropathy to determine the effect of diabetes on endogenous adenosine production, and if central or peripheral delivery of adenosine receptor agonists could alleviate signs of mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Diabetes was induced using streptozocin in male A/J mice. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds were measured weekly to characterize neuropathy phenotype. Hydrolysis of AMP into adenosine by ectonucleotidases was determined in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord at 8 weeks post-induction of diabetes. AMP, adenosine and the specific A1R agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), were administered both centrally (intrathecal) and peripherally (intraplantar) to determine the effect of activation of adenosine receptors on mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. Eight weeks post-induction, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased hydrolysis of extracellular AMP in the DRG; at this same time, diabetic mice displayed significantly decreased mechanical withdrawal thresholds compared to nondiabetic controls. Central delivery AMP, adenosine and CPA significantly improved mechanical withdrawal thresholds in diabetic mice. Surprisingly, peripheral delivery of CPA also improved mechanical allodynia in diabetic mice. This study provides new evidence that diabetes significantly affects endogenous AMP hydrolysis, suggesting that altered adenosine production could contribute to the development of

  1. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping in Women with Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Şeyhmus; Alpayci, Mahmut; Karaman, Erbil; Çetin, Orkun; Özkan, Yasemin; İlter, Server; Şah, Volkan; Şahin, Hanım Güler

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregnancy-related low back pain is a common condition during pregnancy. Kinesio tape is a drug-free elastic therapeutic tape used for treating various musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of lumbar Kinesio taping on pain intensity and disability in women with pregnancy-related low back pain. Material/Methods A total of 65 patients with pregnancy-related low back pain were randomly allocated into either Kinesio taping (n=33) or control (n=32) groups. The intervention group was treated with paracetamol plus Kinesio taping, while the control group received only paracetamol. Kinesio taping was applied in the lumbar flexion position, and four I-shaped bands were used. Two bands were attached horizontally, with space correction technique. The remaining 2 bands, 1 on each side of the lumbar spine, were placed vertically, with inhibition technique. Low back pain intensity was measured on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS), and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) was used for evaluation of disability. Results Pain intensity and RMDQ scores improved significantly in both groups at 5 days compared with baseline. Considering the degree of treatment effect (the change from baseline to day 5), the Kinesio taping group was significantly superior than the control group in all outcome measures (for all, P<0.001). Conclusions The results of this study indicate that Kinesio taping can be used as a complementary treatment method to achieve effective control of pregnancy-related low back pain. PMID:27088271

  2. Short-Term Effects of Kinesio Taping in Women with Pregnancy-Related Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Şeyhmus; Alpayci, Mahmut; Karaman, Erbil; Çetin, Orkun; Özkan, Yasemin; İlter, Server; Şah, Volkan; Şahin, Hanım Güler

    2016-04-18

    BACKGROUND Pregnancy-related low back pain is a common condition during pregnancy. Kinesio tape is a drug-free elastic therapeutic tape used for treating various musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of lumbar Kinesio taping on pain intensity and disability in women with pregnancy-related low back pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 65 patients with pregnancy-related low back pain were randomly allocated into either Kinesio taping (n=33) or control (n=32) groups. The intervention group was treated with paracetamol plus Kinesio taping, while the control group received only paracetamol. Kinesio taping was applied in the lumbar flexion position, and four I-shaped bands were used. Two bands were attached horizontally, with space correction technique. The remaining 2 bands, 1 on each side of the lumbar spine, were placed vertically, with inhibition technique. Low back pain intensity was measured on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS), and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) was used for evaluation of disability. RESULTS Pain intensity and RMDQ scores improved significantly in both groups at 5 days compared with baseline. Considering the degree of treatment effect (the change from baseline to day 5), the Kinesio taping group was significantly superior than the control group in all outcome measures (for all, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The results of this study indicate that Kinesio taping can be used as a complementary treatment method to achieve effective control of pregnancy-related low back pain.

  3. Electroacupuncture as a complement to usual care for patients with non-acute pain after back surgery: a study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Man-Suk; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Hyeon-Yeop; Heo, In; Kim, Nam-Kwen; Choi, Byung-Kwan; Son, Dong-Wuk; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent or persistent low back pain is common after back surgery but is typically not well controlled. Previous randomised controlled trials on non-acute pain after back surgery were flawed. In this article, the design and protocol of a randomised controlled trial to treat pain and improve function after back surgery are described. Methods and analysis This study is a pilot randomised, active-controlled, assessor-blinded trial. Patients with recurring or persistent low back pain after back surgery, defined as a visual analogue scale value of ≥50 mm, with or without leg pain, will be randomly assigned to an electroacupuncture-plus-usual-care group or to a usual-care-only group. Patients assigned to both groups will have usual care management, including physical therapy and patient education, twice a week during a 4-week treatment period that would begin at randomisation. Patients assigned to the electroacupuncture-plus-usual-care group will also have electroacupuncture twice a week during the 4-week treatment period. The primary outcome will be measured with the 100 mm pain visual analogue scale of low back pain by a blinded evaluator. Secondary outcomes will be measured with the EuroQol 5-Dimension and the Oswestry Disability Index. The primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Pusan National University Korean Hospital in September 2013 (IRB approval number 2013012). The study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number This trial was registered with the US National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry: NCT01966250. PMID:25652804

  4. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Continuous Intravenous Ketorolac vs Placebo for Adjuvant Pain Control After Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grimsby, Gwen M.; Conley, Sarah P.; Trentman, Terrence L.; Castle, Erik P.; Andrews, Paul E.; Mihalik, Laurie A.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Humphreys, Mitchell R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel, continuous intravenous infusion of ketorolac, a powerful nonopioid analgesic, for postoperative pain control. Patients and Methods A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a continuous infusion of ketorolac tromethamine in 1 L of normal saline vs placebo was performed in 135 patients aged 18 to 75 years after laparoscopic donor nephrectomy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy completed from October 7, 2008, through July 21, 2010. Primary study end points were the 24-hour differences in visual analog pain scores and total narcotic consumption, whereas secondary end points were differences in urine output, serum creatinine level, and hemoglobin level. Results The study was stopped after randomization of 135 patients (68 in the ketorolac group and 67 in the placebo group) when interim analysis indicated that the difference in mean pain scores between the 2 groups (difference, 0.6) was smaller than the 1-point threshold set forth in the power calculations. No statistically significant change was noted in hemoglobin levels from preoperative to postoperative values (P=.13) or in postoperative serum creatinine levels (P=.13). Conclusion Although continuous infusion of ketorolac produced only a modest decrease in the use of narcotics, it appears to offer a safe therapeutic option for nonnarcotic pain control. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00765128 and NCT00765232 PMID:23058854

  5. Behavioral interventions to improve infection control practices.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, E K; Larson, E L

    1998-06-01

    No single intervention has been successful in improving and sustaining such infection control practices as universal precautions and handwashing by health care professionals. This paper examines several behavioral theories (Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior, self-efficacy, and the Transtheoretic Model) and relates them to individual factors, also considering interpersonal and organizational factors. Further, this article includes recommendations of individual and organizational components to be addressed when planning a theoretically based intervention for improving infection control practices. A hypothetic framework to enhance handwashing practice is proposed. PMID:9638287

  6. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, phenotype panel study.

    PubMed

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B; Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Segerdahl, Märtha S; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2015-11-01

    In neuropathic pain with irritable nociceptor (IN) phenotype, upregulation of sodium channels on nociceptors is supposed to be an important pain mechanism that may be targeted by topical sodium channel blockade. This randomised, double-blind, phenotype panel, crossover study with 4-week treatment periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without IN phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small-fibre function determined by quantitative sensory testing. Forty-six patients with neuropathic pain due to nerve injury or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The modified intention-to-treat population comprised 15 patients with irritable nociceptor and 25 patients with nonirritable nociceptor. In the total sample, lidocaine reduced pain by 0.3 numeric rating scale points (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.1-0.5) and pain-related sleep disturbance by 0.6 points (95% CI: 0.4-0.8) more than placebo (P = 0.007 and P < 0.001) and relieved pain by 0.4 verbal score (-1-5) points more (P = 0.036). For these measures, there was no significant interaction between treatment and phenotype, but there was a significant interaction for pain paroxysms (0.8, 95% CI: 0.4-1.2, P < 0.001) and deep aching pain (0.6, 95% CI: 0.1-1.0, P = 0.013). In conclusion, lidocaine 5% patch had an effect on peripheral neuropathic pain, and it may be most efficacious in patients with IN phenotype. The lack of significant phenotype differences may be caused by too low statistical power.

  7. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DRY NEEDLING AND STRETCHING VS. STRETCHING ALONE ON HAMSTRING FLEXIBILITY IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE PAIN: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Michael; Dolbeer, Jeffery; Morris, Jamie; Terry, Aspen; Koppenhaver, Shane; Goss, Donald Lee

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, dry needling has emerged as a popular treatment for muscular pain and impairments. While there are numerous studies detailing the benefits of dry needling for pain, few studies exist examining the effects on soft tissue mobility. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if the addition of hamstring dry needling to a standard stretching program results in greater improvements in hamstring flexibility compared to sham dry needling and stretching in subjects with atraumatic knee pain. Additionally, squat range of motion, knee pain, and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale were compared between the two groups. Study Design Double blinded randomized controlled trial. Methods Thirty-nine subjects were randomized to receive either dry needling (n = 20) or sham (n = 19) dry needling in addition to hamstring stretching, to all detected hamstring trigger points on two visits. All dependent variables were measured at baseline, immediately post intervention, and 1, 3, and 7 days after the initial treatment. Each subject also performed hamstring stretching three times daily for one week. Results Significant improvements in hamstring range of motion and all other dependent variables were observed across time regardless of treatment group. However, the lack of significant time by group interactions indicated the improvements were not different between dry needling and sham dry needling groups. Conclusions The results of the current randomized controlled trial suggest that two sessions of dry needling did not improve hamstring range of motion or other knee pain-related impairments more than sham dry needling in a young active population with atraumatic knee pain. Level of Evidence Therapy, Level 2 PMID:27757280

  8. An Improved Model of Heat-Induced Hyperalgesia—Repetitive Phasic Heat Pain Causing Primary Hyperalgesia to Heat and Secondary Hyperalgesia to Pinprick and Light Touch

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Florian; Magerl, Walter; May, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a modified experimental model of heat-induced hyperalgesia, which improves the efficacy to induce primary and secondary hyperalgesia and the efficacy-to-safety ratio reducing the risk of tissue damage seen in other heat pain models. Quantitative sensory testing was done in eighteen healthy volunteers before and after repetitive heat pain stimuli (60 stimuli of 48°C for 6 s) to assess the impact of repetitive heat on somatosensory function in conditioned skin (primary hyperalgesia area) and in adjacent skin (secondary hyperalgesia area) as compared to an unconditioned mirror image control site. Additionally, areas of flare and secondary hyperalgesia were mapped, and time course of hyperalgesia determined. After repetitive heat pain conditioning we found significant primary hyperalgesia to heat, and primary and secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick and to light touch (dynamic mechanical allodynia). Acetaminophen (800 mg) reduced pain to heat or pinpricks only marginally by 11% and 8%, respectively (n.s.), and had no effect on heat hyperalgesia. In contrast, the areas of flare (−31%) and in particular of secondary hyperalgesia (−59%) as well as the magnitude of hyperalgesia (−59%) were significantly reduced (all p<0.001). Thus, repetitive heat pain induces significant peripheral sensitization (primary hyperalgesia to heat) and central sensitization (punctate hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia). These findings are relevant to further studies using this model of experimental heat pain as it combines pronounced peripheral and central sensitization, which makes a convenient model for combined pharmacological testing of analgesia and anti-hyperalgesia mechanisms related to thermal and mechanical input. PMID:24911787

  9. Implementation of RCGP guidelines for acute low back pain: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Paola; Simpson, Carl W R; Collins, Stuart I; Hodgson, G; Dowrick, Christopher F; Simison, A J M; Rose, M J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) has produced guidelines for the management of acute low back pain in primary care. AIM: To investigate the impact on patient management of an educational strategy to promote these guidelines among general practitioners (GPs). DESIGN OF STUDY: Group randomised controlled trial, using the health centre as the unit of randomisation. SETTING: Primary care teams in north-west England. METHOD: Twenty-four health centres were randomly allocated to an intervention or control arm. Practices in the intervention arm were offered outreach visits to promote national guidelines on acute low back pain, as well as access to fast-track physiotherapy and to a triage service for patients with persistent symptoms. RESULTS: Twenty-four centres were randomised. Two thousand, one hundred and eighty-seven eligible patients presented with acute low back pain during the study period: 1049 in the intervention group and 1138 in the control group. There were no significant differences between study groups in the proportion of patients who were referred for X-ray, issued with a sickness certificate, prescribed opioids or muscle relaxants, or who were referred to secondary care, but significantly more patients in the intervention group were referred to physiotherapy or the back pain unit (difference in proportion = 12.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8% to 21.6%). CONCLUSION: The management of patients presenting with low back pain to primary care was mostly unchanged by an outreach educational strategy to promote greater adherence to RCGP guidelines among GPs. An increase in referral to physiotherapy or educational programmes followed the provision of a triage service. PMID:14965404

  10. Magnesium Versus Bupivacaine Infiltration in Controlling Postoperative Pain in Inguinal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Peyvandi, Hasan; Badrkhani Jam, Ali Reza; Safari, Farhad; Teymourian, Houman; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is one of the most common problems after hernia repair. Decrease in postoperative pain accelerates functional recovery, decreases duration of hospital stay and postoperative morbidity. Objectives: To compare postoperative analgesic effect of infiltration of magnesium versus bupivacaine into incision of inguinal hernia repair. Patients and Methods: In a double blind clinical trial, 80 patients’ candidates for elective inguinal hernia repair were enrolled. Right before closure of incision, in Bupivacaine group 5 mL Bupivacaine 0.5% added to 5 mL normal saline and in Magnesium group, 10 mL Magnesium sulfate 20% was infused subcutaneously. Pain score was measured using numeric rating score (NRS) at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours postoperatively. If NRS was above 3, 1 mg morphine was administered as rescue analgesic until patient felt comfortable or NRS < 3. Results: Postoperative pain scores at 1 and 3 hours were not significantly different between bupivacaine and magnesium groups (P = 0.21, 0.224; respectively). However, at 6 (P = 0.003), 12 (P = 0.028) and 24 (P = 0.022) hours postoperative, pain score (NRS) was significantly lower in bupivacaine group. Number of patients needed at least 1 dose of rescue morphine (P = 0.001), mean number of episodes asked for morphine during next 24 hours (P = 0.001) and total dose of morphine requirement (P = 0.01) were significantly lower in bupivacaine group. Conclusions: Magnesium infiltration did not decrease total dose and number of episodes needed for morphine rescue analgesic. Bupivacaine infiltration into surgical site was more effective than magnesium sulfate infiltration in postoperative pain control. PMID:26705525

  11. Differences in pain-related fear acquisition and generalization: an experimental study comparing patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Meulders, Ann; Jans, Anne; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies in fear learning, such as failure to inhibit fear to safe stimuli, lead to sustained anxiety, which in turn may augment pain. In the same vein, stimulus generalization is adaptive as it enables individuals to extrapolate the predictive value of 1 stimulus to similar stimuli. However, when fear spreads in an unbridled way to novel technically safe stimuli, stimulus generalization becomes maladaptive and may lead to dysfunctional avoidance behaviors and culminate in severe pain disability. In a voluntary movement conditioning paradigm, we compared the acquisition and generalization of pain-related fear in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy controls. During acquisition, participants received predictable pain in 1 context (ie, 1 movement predicts pain, whereas another does not), and unpredictable pain in another (ie, pain never contingent upon movement). Fear generalization to novel movements (resembling the original painful or nonpainful movement) was tested in both contexts. Results indicated that the FM group showed slower differential acquisition of pain-related fear in the predictable context, and more contextual pain-related fear in the unpredictable context. Fear of movement-related pain spreads selectively to novel movements similar to the original painful movement, and not to those resembling the nonpainful movement in the healthy controls, but nondifferential fear generalization was observed in FM. As expected, in the unpredictable context, we also observed nondifferential fear generalization; this effect was more pronounced in FM. Given the status of overgeneralization as a plausible transdiagnostic pathogenic marker, we believe that this research might increase our knowledge about pathogenesis of musculoskeletal widespread pain. PMID:25599307

  12. Differences in pain-related fear acquisition and generalization: an experimental study comparing patients with fibromyalgia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Meulders, Ann; Jans, Anne; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies in fear learning, such as failure to inhibit fear to safe stimuli, lead to sustained anxiety, which in turn may augment pain. In the same vein, stimulus generalization is adaptive as it enables individuals to extrapolate the predictive value of 1 stimulus to similar stimuli. However, when fear spreads in an unbridled way to novel technically safe stimuli, stimulus generalization becomes maladaptive and may lead to dysfunctional avoidance behaviors and culminate in severe pain disability. In a voluntary movement conditioning paradigm, we compared the acquisition and generalization of pain-related fear in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and healthy controls. During acquisition, participants received predictable pain in 1 context (ie, 1 movement predicts pain, whereas another does not), and unpredictable pain in another (ie, pain never contingent upon movement). Fear generalization to novel movements (resembling the original painful or nonpainful movement) was tested in both contexts. Results indicated that the FM group showed slower differential acquisition of pain-related fear in the predictable context, and more contextual pain-related fear in the unpredictable context. Fear of movement-related pain spreads selectively to novel movements similar to the original painful movement, and not to those resembling the nonpainful movement in the healthy controls, but nondifferential fear generalization was observed in FM. As expected, in the unpredictable context, we also observed nondifferential fear generalization; this effect was more pronounced in FM. Given the status of overgeneralization as a plausible transdiagnostic pathogenic marker, we believe that this research might increase our knowledge about pathogenesis of musculoskeletal widespread pain.

  13. Ananas comosus Effect on Perineal Pain and Wound Healing After Episiotomy: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Golezar, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ananas comosus has long been used for medical purposes. Currently, we are experiencing an unprecedented interest in the use of complementary medicine as well as a growing attention to traditional products such as bromelain for wound healing and reducing pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral bromelain on perineal pain and wound healing after episiotomy in primiparous women. Patients and Methods: In this double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 82 primiparous women fulfilling the inclusion criteria received bromelain or placebo randomly. Participants were given three tablets, three times a day for six successive days. The initial dose was given 2 hours after delivery. Episiotomy pain was measured using VAS scale before the initial dose, as well as on the 1st hour and on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after the initial dose. Wound healing was measured using REEDA scale on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after delivery. Results: Episiotomy pain significantly reduced in bromelain group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05) and wound healing was faster in bromelain group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.05) on follow-up days. Conclusions: The results showed the effectiveness of bromelain on episiotomy pain and wound healing. Therefore, it is suggested to use bromelain in postoperative stage to improve wound healing and reduce pain. PMID:27247780

  14. Postural control and low back pain in elite athletes comparison of static balance in elite athletes with and without low back pain.

    PubMed

    Oyarzo, Claudio A; Villagrán, Claudio R; Silvestre, Rony E; Carpintero, Pedro; Berral, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Although current research findings suggest that postural control or static balance is impaired in subjects with low back pain, few studies have specifically addressed the effect of low back pain on static balance in elite athletes. Forty-four athletes belonging to Chilean national teams took part in this study; 20 had low back pain and the remaining 24 were healthy controls. Displacement of the centre of pressure was analyzed by computerized platform posturography, using a standardized protocol; subjects were required to stand upright on both feet, with eyes first open then closed. The results showed that, athletes with low back pain used significantly more energy (p< 0.0182) and had a greater displacement of the centre of pressure (p< 0.005) with open eyes to control posture than healthy athletes. It may be concluded that static balance is impaired in elite athletes with low back pain and that analysis of two-footed stance provides a sensitive assessment of static balance in athletes.

  15. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part III, Surgical Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of the evidence for massage therapy’s efficacy in treating pain, function-related, and health-related quality of life outcomes in surgical pain populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A professionally diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were included in the review. Results indicate massage therapy is effective for treating pain [standardized mean difference (SMD) = −0.79] and anxiety (SMD = −0.57) compared to active comparators. Conclusion. Based on the available evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to active comparators for reducing pain intensity/severity and anxiety in patients undergoing surgical procedures. This review also discusses massage therapy safety, challenges within this research field, how to address identified research gaps, and next steps for future research. PMID:27165970

  16. Randomized controlled trials in industrial low back pain relating to return to work. Part 2. Discogenic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Scheer, S J; Radack, K L; O'Brien, D R

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine the efficacy of treatments for discogenic low back pain (LBP) by examining all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of discogenic LBP published in the English language literature between 1975 and 1993 with "return to work" (RTW) as the end point. From more than 4,000 LBP citations, nearly 600 articles were initially reviewed; 35 studies met our selection criteria. Twenty-two studies were discussed in Part 1 (Acute Interventions) or will be discussed in Part 3 (Chronic Interventions). In this review, of 13 RCTs assessing interventions for LBP with sciatica, 9 were appropriate for their focus on, and radiologic confirmation of, discogenic LBP. The treatments assessed included chemonucleolysis, surgical discectomy, and epidural steroid injection. A 26-point system to assess the quality of methodologic rigor was used for each article. Our literature survey found a need for additional studies comparing surgery, conservative care, epidural steroids, traction, and other approaches to determine their individual effects for RTW after discogenic disease. PMID:8931535

  17. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  18. Improved approximations for control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology for control-augmented structural synthesis is presented for structure-control systems which can be modeled as an assemblage of beam, truss, and nonstructural mass elements augmented by a noncollocated direct output feedback control system. Truss areas, beam cross sectional dimensions, nonstructural masses and rotary inertias, and controller position and velocity gains are treated simultaneously as design variables. The structural mass and a control-system performance index can be minimized simultaneously, with design constraints placed on static stresses and displacements, dynamic harmonic displacements and forces, structural frequencies, and closed-loop eigenvalues and damping ratios. Intermediate design-variable and response-quantity concepts are used to generate new approximations for displacements and actuator forces under harmonic dynamic loads and for system complex eigenvalues. This improves the overall efficiency of the procedure by reducing the number of complete analyses required for convergence. Numerical results which illustrate the effectiveness of the method are given.

  19. The association between component malalignment and post-operative pain following navigation-assisted total knee arthroplasty: results of a cohort/nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Czurda, Thomas; Fennema, Peter; Baumgartner, Martin; Ritschl, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have noted an adverse relationship between implant malalignment during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and post-operative pain. Although some evidence exists indicating that computer-assisted surgical navigation for TKA can improve the accuracy of component alignment, its impact on clinical outcomes is currently unknown. The dual goals of the present cohort/nested case-control study were to (1) compare self-reported responses to the Western Ontario-McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire between computer-assisted TKA (123 patients) using the imageless PiGalileo navigation system and conventional TKA (207 patients) [cohort analysis], and (2) to investigate a potential association between malalignment and post-operative pain in 19 painful knees and 19 asymptomatic knees obtained from the cohort analysis using matched sampling [nested case-control study]. In the cohort analysis, a relevant but non-significant (P = 0.06) difference in the occurrence of chronic pain was observed between the navigated (12%) and conventional arms (20%). Median post-operative WOMAC pain score was 100 (range, 50-100) in the conventional group and 100 (range, 65-100) in the navigated group. However, the Mann-Whitney test revealed a significant difference in favor of the navigated group (P = 0.01). In the nested case-control analysis, radiological outcomes and computer tomography (CT) measurements of femoral rotation were compared between the groups. The CT rotation measurements yielded evidence of a relationship between post-operative pain and incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component of more than 3 degrees (OR: 7; 95% CI: 1.2-42; P = .033). In conclusion, there was no clinical benefit to computer-assisted navigation; however, a statistically significant relationship was observed between incorrect rotational alignment of the femoral component and symptoms of post-operative pain following TKA.

  20. The effect of oxcarbazepine in peripheral neuropathic pain depends on pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phenotype-stratified study.

    PubMed

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Vollert, Jan; Maier, Christoph; Segerdahl, Märtha; Finnerup, Nanna B; Jensen, Troels S; Sindrup, Søren H

    2014-11-01

    In neuropathic pain it has been suggested that pain phenotype based on putative pain mechanisms may predict response to treatment. This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and phenotype-stratified study with 2 6-week treatment periods of oxcarbazepine (1800-2400mg) and placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change in median pain intensity between baseline and the last week of treatment measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of oxcarbazepine in patients with and without the irritable nociceptor phenotype as defined by hypersensitivity and preserved small nerve fibre function determined by detailed quantitative sensory testing. Ninety-seven patients with peripheral neuropathic pain due to polyneuropathy, surgical or traumatic nerve injury, or postherpetic neuralgia were randomised. The intention-to-treat population comprised 83 patients: 31 with the irritable and 52 with the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype. In the total sample, oxcarbazepine relieved pain of 0.7 points (on a numeric rating scale 0-10; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-1.4) more than placebo (P=0.015) and there was a significant interaction between treatment and phenotype of 0.7 (95% CI 0.01-1.4, P=0.047). The number needed to treat to obtain one patient with more than 50% pain relief was 6.9 (95% CI 4.2-22) in the total sample, 3.9 (95% CI 2.3-12) in the irritable, and 13 (95% CI 5.3-∞) in the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype. In conclusion, oxcarbazepine is more efficacious for relief of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with the irritable vs the nonirritable nociceptor phenotype.

  1. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD.

  2. Quantitative sensory testing and pain-evoked cytokine reactivity: comparison of patients with sickle cell disease to healthy matched controls.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Carroll, C Patrick; Kiley, Kasey; Han, Dingfen; Haywood, Carlton; Lanzkron, Sophie; Swedberg, Lauren; Edwards, Robert R; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder associated with significant morbidity, which includes severe episodic pain, and, often, chronic pain. Compared to healthy individuals, patients with SCD report enhanced sensitivity to thermal detection and pain thresholds and have altered inflammatory profiles, yet no studies to date have examined biomarker reactivity after laboratory-induced pain. We sought to examine this relationship in patients with SCD compared to healthy control participants. We completed quantitative sensory testing in 83 patients with SCD and sequential blood sampling in 27 of them, whom we matched (sex, age, race, body mass index, and education) to 27 healthy controls. Surprisingly, few quantitative sensory testing differences emerged between groups. Heat pain tolerance, pressure pain threshold at the trapezius, thumb, and quadriceps, and thermal temporal summation at 45°C differed between groups in the expected direction, whereas conditioned pain modulation and pain ratings to hot water hand immersion were counterintuitive, possibly because of tailoring the water temperature to a perceptual level; patients with SCD received milder temperatures. In the matched subsample, group differences and group-by-time interactions were observed in biomarkers including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-4, and neuropeptide Y. These findings highlight the utility of laboratory pain testing methods for understanding individual differences in inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest amplified pain-evoked proinflammatory cytokine reactivity among patients with SCD relative to carefully matched controls. Future research is warranted to evaluate the impact of enhanced pain-related cytokine response and whether it is predictive of clinical characteristics and the frequency/severity of pain crises in patients with SCD. PMID:26713424

  3. Immediate and short-term pain relief by acute sciatic nerve press: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiman; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Wenlong; Ten, Guangping

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite much research, an immediately available, instantly effective and harmless pain relief technique has not been discovered. This study describes a new manipulation: a "2-minute sciatic nerve press", for rapid short-term relief of pain brought on by various dental and renal diseases. Methods This randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial ran in three hospitals in Anhui Province, China, with an enrollment of 66 out of 111 solicited patients aged 16 to 74 years. Patients were recruited sequentially, by specific participating physicians at their clinic visits to three independent hospitals. The diseases in enrolled dental patients included dental caries, periodontal diseases and dental trauma. Renal diseases in recruits included kidney infections, stones and some other conditions. Patients were randomly assigned to receive the "2-minute sciatic nerve press" or the "placebo press". For the "2-minute sciatic nerve press", pressure was applied simultaneously to the sciatic nerves at the back of the thighs, using the fists while patients lay prone. For the "placebo press", pressure was applied simultaneously to a parallel spot on the front of the thighs, using the fists while patients lay supine. Each fist applied a pressure of 11 to 20 kg for 2 minutes, after which, patients arose to rate pain. Results The "2-minute sciatic nerve press" produced greater pain relief than the "placebo press". Within the first 10 minutes after sciatic pressure, immediate pain relief ratings averaged 66.4% (p < 0.001) for the dental patients, versus pain relief of 20% for the placebo press, and, 52.2% (p < 0.01) for the renal patients, versus relief of 14% for the placebo press, in median. The method worked excellently for dental caries and periodontal diseases, but poorly for dental trauma. Forty percent of renal patients with renal colic did not report any pain relief after the treatment. Conclusion Two minutes of pressure on both sciatic nerves can produce

  4. Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. Methods A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. Results Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). Conclusions Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of

  5. Improvement of chronic facial pain and facial dyskinesia with the help of botulinum toxin application

    PubMed Central

    Junghans, Katharina; Rohrbach, Saskia; Ellies, Maik; Laskawi, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Background Facial pain syndromes can be very heterogeneous and need individual diagnosis and treatment. This report describes an interesting case of facial pain associated with eczema and an isolated dyskinesia of the lower facial muscles following dental surgery. Different aspects of the pain, spasms and the eczema will be discussed. Case presentation In this patient, persistent intense pain arose in the lower part of her face following a dental operation. The patient also exhibited dyskinesia of her caudal mimic musculature that was triggered by specific movements. Several attempts at therapy had been unsuccessful. We performed local injections of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) into the affected region of the patient's face. Pain relief was immediate following each set of botulinum toxin injections. The follow up time amounts 62 weeks. Conclusion Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) can be a safe and effective therapy for certain forms of facial pain syndromes. PMID:17714591

  6. Multiple mechanisms have been tested in pain--how can we improve the chances of success?

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ann G; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Tate, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of pain have led to a wealth of molecular targets for novel analgesic drugs and many clinical drug trials. There have been successes, like the gabapentinoids for neuropathic pain and calcium channel blockers for otherwise intractable pain states; and drugs which show promise in clinical trials, like nerve growth factor inhibitors and p38 kinase inhibitors. Unfortunately there have also been a number of failures. We suggest factors which might predispose to success, for example some clinical precedence for the mechanism in pain or a genetic link for the mechanism, for example a mutation linked to a pain syndrome. We also stress the importance of demonstrating molecular target engagement with a novel compound and suggest pain biomarkers which can be used for mechanistic drug profiling. PMID:24565006

  7. A 12-week rehabilitation program improves body composition, pain sensation, and internal/external torques of baseball pitchers with shoulder impingement symptom.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jun-Youl; Kim, Jae-Hak; Hong, Ju; Choi, Young-Tae; Kim, Min-Ho; Cho, Ji-Hyun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week rehabilitation program on body composition, shoulder pain, and isokinetic internal/external torques of pitchers with impingement syndrome. A total of 30 pitchers were divided into 2 groups: experimental group (EG, n = 16) and control group (CG, n= 14). The rehabilitation program consisted of physical therapy, warm-up, work-out, and cool-down. As results, body weight and fat mass of EG were decreased whereas muscle mass of EG was significantly increased after the experiment. The pain degree