Science.gov

Sample records for improving customer experience

  1. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  2. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  3. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it. PMID:26571974

  4. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it.

  5. The Customer Service Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chip R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to embed customer service learning and customer loyalty including making customers think, examining every aspect of customers' service encounters with staff, providing follow-up, making learning fun, and involving customers in your business. (JOW)

  6. Breaking down IT silos: a "connected" way to improve customer experience and the bottom line.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, Bruce; Turisco, Frances

    2009-03-01

    Hospitals can provide customer service like Amazon.com without purchasing new technology. Making technology interactive requires sharing patient data across applications and enhancing existing IT with decision support. Breaking down technology silos between hospital and outpatient care provider systems significantly improves efficiency, lowers costs, and speeds care delivery. PMID:20669844

  7. Breaking down IT silos: a "connected" way to improve customer experience and the bottom line.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, Bruce; Turisco, Frances

    2009-03-01

    Hospitals can provide customer service like Amazon.com without purchasing new technology. Making technology interactive requires sharing patient data across applications and enhancing existing IT with decision support. Breaking down technology silos between hospital and outpatient care provider systems significantly improves efficiency, lowers costs, and speeds care delivery.

  8. Extend{trademark} customization -- Experiences and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.Y.

    1997-12-09

    Extend{trademark} simulation software is a dynamic modeling package developed by Imagine That Incorporated. The Technology Modeling and Analysis group (TSA-7) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has used Extend extensively over the past few years as one of various tools employed to perform simulation modeling and analysis. Development efforts over much of this period have made Extend a more effective and efficient tool through block customization. TSA-7 has taken advantage of the built-in capability in Extend to allow users to create new or modify existing functional blocks from which simulation models are constructed. As a result, Extend is much more effective and efficient for the group`s applications. This paper summarizes block customization and simulation model development that markedly improved the utilization of the Extend software package. The material covered herein includes some background information on Extend, which is necessary for understanding the balance of the paper. Following the background, the paper addresses Extend block customization efforts, including advantages and disadvantages to customizing, and the impact customization has had on Extend modeling efforts in TSA-7. Brief descriptions of many customized blocks developed by the author are presented in the appendix.

  9. Gaining customer knowledge: obtaining and using customer judgments for hospitalwide quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E C; Caldwell, C; Quinn, D; Rose, R

    1991-03-01

    Customer knowledge is an essential feature of hospitalwide quality improvement. All systems and processes have customers. The aim is to use customer knowledge and voice of the customer measurement to plan, design, improve, and monitor these systems and processes continuously. In this way, the hospital stands the best chance of meeting customers' needs and, hopefully, delivering services that are so outstanding that customers will be surprised and delighted. There are many methods, both soft and hard, that can be used to increase customer knowledge. One useful strategy is to use a family of quality measures that reflect the voice of the customer. These measures can generate practical and powerful customer knowledge information that is essential to performing strategic planning, deploying quality policy, designing new services, finding targets for improvements, and monitoring those continuous improvements based on customers' judgments.

  10. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92 Section 3055.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys....

  11. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  12. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  13. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  14. 76 FR 24339 - Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer Service

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Delivery and Improving Customer Service By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and... this end, Executive Order 12862 (Setting Customer Service Standards), issued on September 11, 1993... customers, establish service standards and track performance against those standards, and benchmark...

  15. Improving Customer Satisfaction in an R and D Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Anita; Liou, Y. H. Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Satisfying customer needs is critical to the sustained competitive advantage of service suppliers. It is therefore important to understand the types of customer needs which, if fulfilled or exceeded, add value and contribute to overall customer satisfaction. This study identifies the needs of various research and development (R&D) customers who contract for engineering and design support services. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to organize and translate each customer need into performance measures that, if implemented, can improve customer satisfaction. This study also provides specific performance measures that will more accurately guide the efforts of the engineering supplier. These organizations can either implement the QFD methodology presented herein or extract a few performance measures that are specific to the quality dimensions in need of improvement. Listening to 'what' customers talk about is a good first start.

  16. Preintervention analysis and improvement of customer greeting in a restaurant.

    PubMed

    Therrien, Kelly; Wilder, David A; Rodriguez, Manuel; Wine, Byron

    2005-01-01

    We examined customer greeting by employees at one location of a sandwich restaurant chain. First, a preintervention analysis was conducted to determine the conditions under which greeting a customer within 3 s of his or her entry into the restaurant did and did not occur. Results suggested that an appropriate customer greeting was most likely to occur when a door chime was used to indicate that a customer had entered the store and when the store manager was present behind the service counter. Next, a performance improvement intervention, which consisted of the combination of the use of a door chime and manager presence, was evaluated. Results showed that during baseline, a mean of 6% of customers were greeted; during intervention a mean of 63% of customers were greeted. The addition of manager-delivered verbal and graphic group feedback resulted in 100% of customers being greeted across two consecutive sessions.

  17. Improving customer service. It's not just what's in the box.

    PubMed

    Redling, Robert

    2003-08-01

    Patient satisfaction scores can plummet when medical emergencies throw schedules into disarray or a receptionist ignores a patient at the front desk. Patients' expectations of good customer service have been shaped by technological conveniences and the concerted efforts of retailers, restaurants and other service providers. Physician leaders and administrators can improve customer service by paying more attention to organizational culture, physician behavior, staff incentives, hiring practices and team-building.

  18. Assessing customer satisfaction for improving NOAA's climate products and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. C.; Hawkins, M. D.; Timofeyeva, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) is developing a comprehensive climate user requirements process with the ultimate goal of producing climate services that meet the needs of NWS climate information users. An important part of this effort includes engaging users through periodical surveys conducted by the Claes Fornell International (CFI) Group using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The CFI Group conducted a Climate Services Satisfaction (CSS) Survey in May of 2009 to measure customer satisfaction with current products and services and to gain insight on areas for improvement. The CSS Survey rates customer satisfaction on a range of NWS climate services data and products, including Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks, drought monitoring, and ENSO monitoring and forecasts, as well as NWS local climate data services. In addition, the survey assesses the users of the products to give the NWS insight into its climate customer base. The survey also addresses specific topics such as NWS forecast category names, probabilistic nature of climate products, and interpretation issues. The survey results identify user requirements for improving existing NWS climate services and introducing new ones. CSD will merge the survey recommendations with available scientific methodologies and operational capabilities to develop requirements for improved climate products and services. An overview of the 2009 survey results will be presented, such as users' satisfaction with the accuracy, reliability, display and functionality of products and services.

  19. Voice of the customer---a roadmap for service improvement.

    PubMed

    Uberoi, Ravinder S; Nayak, Yogamaya; Sachdeva, Pritindira; Sibal, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys help a great deal in identifying ways of improving a hospital's services. Ultimately, that translates into better care and happier patients. Moreover, it shows the staff and the community that the hospital is serious about quality and is looking for ways to improve. This article describes how the Voice of the Customer (VOC) Survey can be used as a tool for improving services. Regular monitoring of VOC scores is essential for minimizing the gaps between service delivery and patient expectations. The present study showcases the various initiatives undertaken to improve the VOC scores from an original 4.40 to 4.77 (on a 5 point scale) at the hospital under study. PMID:24228344

  20. Voice of the customer---a roadmap for service improvement.

    PubMed

    Uberoi, Ravinder S; Nayak, Yogamaya; Sachdeva, Pritindira; Sibal, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys help a great deal in identifying ways of improving a hospital's services. Ultimately, that translates into better care and happier patients. Moreover, it shows the staff and the community that the hospital is serious about quality and is looking for ways to improve. This article describes how the Voice of the Customer (VOC) Survey can be used as a tool for improving services. Regular monitoring of VOC scores is essential for minimizing the gaps between service delivery and patient expectations. The present study showcases the various initiatives undertaken to improve the VOC scores from an original 4.40 to 4.77 (on a 5 point scale) at the hospital under study.

  1. A Quality Improvement Customer Service Process and CSS [Customer Service System]. Burlington County College Employee Development Series, Volumes I & II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlington County Coll., Pemberton, NJ.

    Prepared for use by staff in development workshops at Burlington County College (BCC), in New Jersey, this handbook offers college-wide guidelines for improving the quality of service provided to internal and external customers, and reviews key elements of BCC's Customer Service System (CSS), a computerized method of recording and following-up on…

  2. Process improvement for regulatory analyses of custom-blend fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical testing of custom-blend fertilizers is essential to ensure that the products meet the formulation requirements. For purposes of proper crop nutrition and consumer protection, regulatory oversight promotes compliance and particular attention to blending and formulation specifications. Analyses of custom-blend fertilizer products must be performed and reported within a very narrow window in order to be effective. The Colorado Department of Agriculture's Biochemistry Laboratory is an ISO 17025 accredited facility and conducts analyses of custom-blend fertilizer products primarily during the spring planting season. Using the Lean Six Sigma (LSS) process, the Biochemistry Laboratory has reduced turnaround times from as much as 45 days to as little as 3 days. The LSS methodology focuses on waste reduction through identifying: non-value-added steps, unneeded process reviews, optimization of screening and confirmatory analyses, equipment utilization, nonessential reporting requirements, and inefficient personnel deployment. Eliminating these non-value-added activities helped the laboratory significantly shorten turnaround time and reduce costs. Key improvement elements discovered during the LSS process included: focused sample tracking, equipment redundancy, strategic supply stocking, batch size optimization, critical sample paths, elimination of nonessential QC reviews, and more efficient personnel deployment.

  3. Process improvement for regulatory analyses of custom-blend fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Chemical testing of custom-blend fertilizers is essential to ensure that the products meet the formulation requirements. For purposes of proper crop nutrition and consumer protection, regulatory oversight promotes compliance and particular attention to blending and formulation specifications. Analyses of custom-blend fertilizer products must be performed and reported within a very narrow window in order to be effective. The Colorado Department of Agriculture's Biochemistry Laboratory is an ISO 17025 accredited facility and conducts analyses of custom-blend fertilizer products primarily during the spring planting season. Using the Lean Six Sigma (LSS) process, the Biochemistry Laboratory has reduced turnaround times from as much as 45 days to as little as 3 days. The LSS methodology focuses on waste reduction through identifying: non-value-added steps, unneeded process reviews, optimization of screening and confirmatory analyses, equipment utilization, nonessential reporting requirements, and inefficient personnel deployment. Eliminating these non-value-added activities helped the laboratory significantly shorten turnaround time and reduce costs. Key improvement elements discovered during the LSS process included: focused sample tracking, equipment redundancy, strategic supply stocking, batch size optimization, critical sample paths, elimination of nonessential QC reviews, and more efficient personnel deployment. PMID:25051621

  4. Using customer input to improve managed care performance.

    PubMed

    Kairey, M S; Baumruk, R W

    1995-01-01

    How do you get the information you need to manage your company's health care plans effectively? Consider a "customer satisfaction survey" that gathers data from the people who use the plans every day: employees. Make the data work for you when you negotiate costs, communicate key plan features, and look for ways to improve health care quality and upgrade the service you and your employees get from your health plans. American Express and the Chicago Health Plan Value Project (a unique group of 14 companies and 7 health plans) tried this approach, and they now expect a "win-win-win" situation all around. PMID:10151595

  5. Practical choices for infobutton customization: experience from four sites.

    PubMed

    Cimino, James J; Overby, Casey L; Devine, Emily B; Hulse, Nathan C; Jing, Xia; Maviglia, Saverio M; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Context-aware links between electronic health records (EHRs) and online knowledge resources, commonly called "infobuttons" are being used increasingly as part of EHR "meaningful use" requirements. While an HL7 standard exists for specifying how the links should be constructed, there is no guidance on what links to construct. Collectively, the authors manage four infobutton systems that serve 16 institutions. The purpose of this paper is to publish our experience with linking various resources and specifying particular criteria that can be used by infobutton managers to select resources that are most relevant for a given situation. This experience can be used directly by those wishing to customize their own EHRs, for example by using the OpenInfobutton infobutton manager and its configuration tool, the Librarian Infobutton Tailoring Environment.

  6. Preintervention Analysis and Improvement of Customer Greeting in a Restaurant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, Kelly; Wilder, David A.; Rodriguez, Manuel; Wine, Byron

    2005-01-01

    We examined customer greeting by employees at one location of a sandwich restaurant chain. First, a preintervention analysis was conducted to determine the conditions under which greeting a customer within 3 s of his or her entry into the restaurant did and did not occur. Results suggested that an appropriate customer greeting was most likely to…

  7. Experience with custom processors in space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraeman, M. E.; Hayes, J. R.; Lohr, D. A.; Ballard, B. W.; Williams, R. L.; Henshaw, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has developed a magnetometer instrument for a swedish satellite named Freja with launch scheduled for August 1992 on a Chinese Long March rocket. The magnetometer controller utilized a custom microprocessor designed at APL with the Genesil silicon compiler. The processor evolved from our experience with an older bit-slice design and two prior single chip efforts. The architecture of our microprocessor greatly lowered software development costs because it was optimized to provide an interactive and extensible programming environment hosted by the target hardware. Radiation tolerance of the microprocessor was also tested and was adequate for Freja's mission -- 20 kRad(Si) total dose and very infrequent latch-up and single event upset events.

  8. Customers First: Using Process Improvement To Improve Service Quality and Efficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Catherine A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes steps in a process-improvement project for reserve book services at the University of Arizona Library: (1) plan--identify process boundaries and customer requirements, gather/analyze data, prioritize problems; (2) do--encourage divergent thinking, reach convergent thinking, find solutions; (3) check--pilot solutions, compare costs; and…

  9. Automation improves houston L P's customer assistance system

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S.A.; Hunter, W.A.; Petersen, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    In corporations nationwide, automated customer-assistance telephone systems are becoming widespread. As these systems become increasingly user-friendly, customers can accomplish many transactions without the help of a customer service representative (CSR) by using interactive voice response units (VRUs). VRUs benefit customers by offering around-the-clock access to basis account information, increasing the speed of transactions and reducing the amount of time a customer remains on hold. VRU systems benefit companies by reducing the volume of calls handled by representatives (reducing labor costs), increasing levels of service (the ratio of calls handled to calls abandoned), and providing better overall customer service. Utilities remain relative newcomers to this method of customer service. Two years ago, Houston Lighting and Power Co. (HL P) began a transition toward automation in its customer-service telephone center. HL P managers began with an idea of where they wanted to go, but a limited knowledge of how to get there. They quickly found that few utilities had made the transition to automation. This meant there were few places to turn for information or guidance. Because of the limited precedents in the industry, HL P had to guide itself through the transition. It emerged on the leading edge of utility companies moving into the world of automated phone centers.

  10. Improving the flow of customers in a hospital cafeteria.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Soriano, E M; Matthews, M E; Norback, J P

    1981-12-01

    Customer flow through a hospital cafeteria was modeled as a queuing system for the purpose of analyzing the problems of long lines and excessive waiting by customers during lunch hours. Different policies of the hospital affecting the arrival times of customers to the cafeteria were simulated on a computer. The key factor was found to be group arrivals because of the pattern in which the hospital departments released their employees for lunch. Alternative policies were simulated, and performance with those policies in effect was measured and reported.

  11. The quality improvement customers didn't want.

    PubMed

    Iacobucci, D

    1996-01-01

    Is investing in new technology always the right choice for a company and its customers? Allan Moulter, the CEO of Quality Care, isn't sure he wants to invest in the computerized reception system that consultant Jack Zadow has outlined for him. But in this HBR case study, the argument Zadow makes is impossible to ignore. Quality Care's rivals have invested in similar systems or are planning to do so. The new system promises to take care of routine busywork, freeing staff up for other interactions with patients. It seems as if the competition hasn't even cut staff and is counting on increased customer retention to pay for the investment. And yet, Quality Care's surveys of its own customers show that they prefer the human touch when checking in. How would customers feel if the first ¿person¿ they met when they came in the door turned out to be a machine? Moulter prides himself on his responsiveness to customers. And with 86% of Quality Care's customers either satisfied or completely satisfied, aren't things fine as they are? Has Moulter considered all the facets of his predicament? How will Quality Care's staff be affected by a decision one way or another? What about the costs of upgrading the system? Can Quality Care maintain its standing without going high-tech? Would customers rebel when confronted with the proposed reception area or would they appreciate the increased efficiency? Six experts weigh the costs and benefits of technology in a service industry. PMID:10154606

  12. X Marks the Spot: Creating and Managing a Single Service Point to Improve Customer Service and Maximize Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venner, Mary Ann; Keshmiripour, Seti

    2016-01-01

    This article will describe how merging service points in an academic library is an opportunity to improve customer service and utilize staffing resources more efficiently. Combining service points provides libraries with the ability to create a more positive library experience for patrons by minimizing the ping-pong effect for assistance. The…

  13. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Marketing. Course: Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, T.; Egan, B.

    One of thirteen individualized courses included in a marketing curriculum, this course covers the various credit plans, shopping conveniences, and advisory services provided by wholesale and retail businesses to their customers. The course is comprised of two units: (1) Credit and (2) Shopping Services. Each unit begins with a Unit Learning…

  14. Learn from experience: insights of 200+ PACS customers.

    PubMed

    Swaton, Norm

    2002-01-01

    This article is based on a PACS study published in June 2001 by KLAS Enterprises. The study offers unique insight into the performance, underlying technology, product depth and breadth, and "real world" issues facing 10 of the leading PACS vendors and their clients as rated at more than 200 of their client sites by CIOs, department directors and vendor executives. The driving force behind this report reflects the heightened interest in PACS systems in general and PACS' contributions to the benefits associated with an electronic medical record. This research was sponsored by 10 healthcare provider organizations (not vendors), ranging from a 150-bed acute-care hospital to a seven-hospital IDN. Most of the data in the report focuses on the use of PACS in the radiology department, since comparatively few sites are using PACS systems in other departments, such as cardiology or pathology. The participating vendors supplied their customer lists, which contributed to the majority of clients surveyed. Clients surveyed in the study vary widely in size, ranging from 50 to 2,000 beds, with about 46 percent of those surveyed having a hospital size of more than 400 beds. The customers represent a broad cross-section of PACS clients, ranging from 10 percent to 95 percent filmless, with large-scale users making up the majority of respondents. Each of the customers were asked to numerically rate their vendor on 28 aspects of performance, as well as to answer 12 questions relating to customer satisfaction. Based on study results, success with PACS can be distilled into some basic principles. There are other issues that will help with a successful PACS selection and implementation, but the following list should help anyone get started. If you are able to focus on and accomplish these few things, you stand a better chance of building and meeting your business case. Pre-sell your PACS concept to the radiologists, technicians, IS/IT staff supporting it and to the referring physicians

  15. Learn from experience: insights of 200+ PACS customers.

    PubMed

    Swaton, Norm

    2002-01-01

    This article is based on a PACS study published in June 2001 by KLAS Enterprises. The study offers unique insight into the performance, underlying technology, product depth and breadth, and "real world" issues facing 10 of the leading PACS vendors and their clients as rated at more than 200 of their client sites by CIOs, department directors and vendor executives. The driving force behind this report reflects the heightened interest in PACS systems in general and PACS' contributions to the benefits associated with an electronic medical record. This research was sponsored by 10 healthcare provider organizations (not vendors), ranging from a 150-bed acute-care hospital to a seven-hospital IDN. Most of the data in the report focuses on the use of PACS in the radiology department, since comparatively few sites are using PACS systems in other departments, such as cardiology or pathology. The participating vendors supplied their customer lists, which contributed to the majority of clients surveyed. Clients surveyed in the study vary widely in size, ranging from 50 to 2,000 beds, with about 46 percent of those surveyed having a hospital size of more than 400 beds. The customers represent a broad cross-section of PACS clients, ranging from 10 percent to 95 percent filmless, with large-scale users making up the majority of respondents. Each of the customers were asked to numerically rate their vendor on 28 aspects of performance, as well as to answer 12 questions relating to customer satisfaction. Based on study results, success with PACS can be distilled into some basic principles. There are other issues that will help with a successful PACS selection and implementation, but the following list should help anyone get started. If you are able to focus on and accomplish these few things, you stand a better chance of building and meeting your business case. Pre-sell your PACS concept to the radiologists, technicians, IS/IT staff supporting it and to the referring physicians

  16. Customizing orientation to improve the critical thinking ability of newly hired pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina; Tatum, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    A descriptive, correlational study design was used to determine if a customized clinical education for orientation based on knowledge weaknesses identified from a prehire screening examination would reduce the length of orientation and improve the critical thinking ability of newly hired nurses. Results of the study demonstrated significant evidence that customized education based on this prehire assessment has a positive effect on both the length of orientation and critical thinking. PMID:23528686

  17. Customizing orientation to improve the critical thinking ability of newly hired pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina; Tatum, Kathy

    2013-04-01

    A descriptive, correlational study design was used to determine if a customized clinical education for orientation based on knowledge weaknesses identified from a prehire screening examination would reduce the length of orientation and improve the critical thinking ability of newly hired nurses. Results of the study demonstrated significant evidence that customized education based on this prehire assessment has a positive effect on both the length of orientation and critical thinking.

  18. Vision improvement by correcting higher-order aberrations with customized soft contact lenses in keratoconic eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Jeong, Tae Moon; Carvalho, Luis; Cox, Ian G.; Williams, David R.; Yoon, Geunyoung

    2007-04-01

    Higher-order aberration correction in abnormal eyes can result in significant vision improvement, especially in eyes with abnormal corneas. Customized optics such as phase plates and customized contact lenses are one of the most practical, nonsurgical ways to correct these ocular higher-order aberrations. We demonstrate the feasibility of correcting higher-order aberrations and improving visual performance with customized soft contact lenses in keratoconic eyes while compensating for the static decentration and rotation of the lens. A reduction of higher-order aberrations by a factor of 3 on average was obtained in these eyes. The higher-order aberration correction resulted in an average improvement of 2.1 lines in visual acuity over the conventional correction of defocus and astigmatism alone.

  19. Improving The Performance of Customer Loyalty of Online Ticketing in Indonesia's Showbiz Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachyar, M.; Athory, E. S.

    2015-06-01

    Currently the entertainment industry is adopting online ticketing for supporting business from main products to profitability improvement. E-loyalty needs to be examined because are deals with less loyal customer characteristic. The sample are 249 customers whom have purchased for tickets online at least once. Data was gathered by questionnaires and analyzed by Path Analysis and Importance - Performance Analysis. The findings of the research indicate that satisfaction has the strongest relationship to e-loyalty. This study provides four improvement alternatives as a form of new business development strategy for showbiz industry in Indonesia.

  20. Humana looks to ISO registration to address quality improvement and customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    Seeking new ways to improve standardization of clinical operations and customer focus, Louisville, KY-based Humana, Inc. announced in November that it has become the first healthcare company to be registered in the U.S. under ISO 9001:2000, a quality management standard published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

  1. Customer System Efficiency Improvement Assessment: Description and examination of system characterization data

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes three data bases that were developed in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment project to help characterize transmission and distribution (T and D) system losses experienced by utility customers in the Pacific Northwest. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for electric energy conservation in the T and D systems of BPA's utility customers. The three data bases provide essential input on the number and operating characteristics of T and D component stocks that was used in another task of the CSEI Project to estimate the conservation supply functions that result from replacing existing stocks with more efficient components (Tepel et al. 1986). This document describes the three data bases, provides a guide to their use, and presents a summary characterization of the principal loss-generating components (lines and transformers) of the region's T and D systems.

  2. Weakest students benefit most from a customized educational experience for Generation Y students

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Most current dental students were born in the 1980s and 1990s and are defined as Generation Y (Gen Y). The authors developed a customized educational experience that brought together some characteristics of Gen Y and the objective of this educational experience was to develop the critical thinking skills of Gen Y students. The objective of the current study is to evaluate outcomes from pre-session and post-session tests. Additionally, we wanted to integrate aspects of team-based learning, self-directed learning and peer-to-peer teaching as a means of reducing the need for intense faculty supervision but maintain positive educational outcomes. Single bitewing x-ray was displayed and informal class discussion was facilitated by a Senior Tutor. A list of questions and concepts that needed to be understood more clearly was made. Student groups self allocated research tasks to members. After conducting research, students presented to class and faculty facilitated discussions aiming to foster critical thinking and identify what information needed to be more thoroughly understood. Pre-session and post-session tests were conducted and compared. Students who scored below 85% in their pre-session test improved their score in the post-session test by a mean of 9.5 points (p = 0.02). Those who scored above 95% in their pre-session test scored less in the post-session test (mean reduction of 6.31 points, p = 0.001). Findings from this study demonstrate that the weakest students in the class (those who scored below 85% correct in the pre-session test) benefitted most from this unique educational experience. PMID:25493212

  3. Weakest students benefit most from a customized educational experience for Generation Y students.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Most current dental students were born in the 1980s and 1990s and are defined as Generation Y (Gen Y). The authors developed a customized educational experience that brought together some characteristics of Gen Y and the objective of this educational experience was to develop the critical thinking skills of Gen Y students. The objective of the current study is to evaluate outcomes from pre-session and post-session tests. Additionally, we wanted to integrate aspects of team-based learning, self-directed learning and peer-to-peer teaching as a means of reducing the need for intense faculty supervision but maintain positive educational outcomes. Single bitewing x-ray was displayed and informal class discussion was facilitated by a Senior Tutor. A list of questions and concepts that needed to be understood more clearly was made. Student groups self allocated research tasks to members. After conducting research, students presented to class and faculty facilitated discussions aiming to foster critical thinking and identify what information needed to be more thoroughly understood. Pre-session and post-session tests were conducted and compared. Students who scored below 85% in their pre-session test improved their score in the post-session test by a mean of 9.5 points (p = 0.02). Those who scored above 95% in their pre-session test scored less in the post-session test (mean reduction of 6.31 points, p = 0.001). Findings from this study demonstrate that the weakest students in the class (those who scored below 85% correct in the pre-session test) benefitted most from this unique educational experience. PMID:25493212

  4. Improving Customer Waiting Time at a DMV Center Using Discrete-Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaout, Georges M.; Bowling, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Virginia's Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) serves a customer base of approximately 5.6 million licensed drivers and ID card holders and 7 million registered vehicle owners. DMV has more daily face-to-face contact with Virginia's citizens than any other state agency [1]. The DMV faces a major difficulty in keeping up with the excessively large customers' arrival rate. The consequences are queues building up, stretching out to the entrance doors (and sometimes even outside) and customers complaining. While the DMV state employees are trying to serve at their fastest pace, the remarkably large queues indicate that there is a serious problem that the DMV faces in its services, which must be dealt with rapidly. Simulation is considered as one of the best tools for evaluating and improving complex systems. In this paper, we use it to model one of the DMV centers located in Norfolk, VA. The simulation model is modeled in Arena 10.0 from Rockwell systems. The data used is collected from experts of the DMV Virginia headquarter located in Richmond. The model created was verified and validated. The intent of this study is to identify key problems causing the delays at the DMV centers and suggest possible solutions to minimize the customers' waiting time. In addition, two tentative hypotheses aiming to improve the model's design are tested and validated.

  5. Do reports on drinking water quality affect customers' concerns? Experiments in report content.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B

    2003-10-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 required U.S. utilities to report on drinking water quality to their customers annually, beginning in fall 1999, on the assumption that such reports would alert them to quality problems and perhaps mobilize pressure for improvement. A random sample of New Jersey customers read alternative versions of a water quality report, in an experiment on reactions to water quality information under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) rules. Experiment design was 2 x 3 + 1: two versions each--one with, one without, a violation of a health standard--of a report that was (1) Qualitative (without water quality numbers, thus not meeting USEPA rules); (2) Basic, with minimal information meeting the rules; or (3) Extended, adding reading aids and utility performance information; plus a control instrument without any hypothetical report. Results of ANOVA suggest the reports will have less effect than hoped or feared. These manipulations were successful: people reading the Qualitative versions were less likely to say that the report gave the amounts of substances found in the water, and those reading Violation versions were more likely to report a violation of a health standard. The main differences in responses to the report involved the judged adequacy of the information, and to a lesser extent responses on a Concern scale (constructed from measures of concern, judged risk, clean-up intentions, distrust of utility information, and doubt that the utility was doing all it could to improve water quality). Overall judgments of water quality and utility performance did not change, either relative to the controls or in before versus after responses. Qualitative reports performed worse than others, confirming the decision to have utilities report actual contaminant levels. Extended reports did only slightly better than the Basic versions on these measures. Many respondents had trouble identifying the presence or absence of substance

  6. Case study: the Health SmartLibrary* experiences in web personalization and customization at the Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University

    PubMed Central

    Shedlock, James; Frisque, Michelle; Hunt, Steve; Walton, Linda; Handler, Jonathan; Gillam, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Question: How can the user's access to health information, especially full-text articles, be improved? The solution is building and evaluating the Health SmartLibrary (HSL). Setting: The setting is the Galter Health Sciences Library, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Method: The HSL was built on web-based personalization and customization tools: My E-Resources, Stay Current, Quick Search, and File Cabinet. Personalization and customization data were tracked to show user activity with these value-added, online services. Main Results: Registration data indicated that users were receptive to personalized resource selection and that the automated application of specialty-based, personalized HSLs was more frequently adopted than manual customization by users. Those who did customize customized My E-Resources and Stay Current more often than Quick Search and File Cabinet. Most of those who customized did so only once. Conclusion: Users did not always take advantage of the services designed to aid their library research experiences. When personalization is available at registration, users readily accepted it. Customization tools were used less frequently; however, more research is needed to determine why this was the case. PMID:20428276

  7. Customizing a clinical data warehouse for housestaff education in practice-based learning and improvement.

    PubMed

    Lyman, J; Schorling, J; May, N; Scully, K; Sarafian, N; Nadkarni, M; Voss, J

    2006-01-01

    We developed Systems and Practice Analysis for Resident Competencies (SPARC), a Web-based tool to support teaching the practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) ACGME competencies. SPARC allows Department of Medicine residents to explore de-identified, population-based data about their patient panels with peer comparisons. Data primarily comes from an existing data warehouse that has been customized for this application. Our preliminary evaluation suggests that it improves residents' abilities in PBLI, is easy to use, and perceived as important and useful by the housestaff.

  8. Four Easy Steps to Drastically Improve Your Phone-Based Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Peller, Spencer; Beimes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Japan is renowned for impeccable customer service (as anyone who's watched an apple get wrapped up like a crown jewel in a Tokyo grocery store will tell you). The Japanese concept of kaizen (constant improvement) is a fundamental reason for this, and for the enduring success of conglomerates such as Toyota, Honda, and Sony. From afar, you may think this trait is caused by something in the waters from Mt. Fuji, but many in the know credit the work of an American engineer named W. Edwards Deming as the catalyst for this movement. If his ideas could transform a nation, there's no question they can improve the patient satisfaction rates at your practice.

  9. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction. PMID:25585766

  10. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction.

  11. A framework for improving access and customer service times in health care: application and analysis at the UCLA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Duda, Catherine; Rajaram, Kumar; Barz, Christiane; Rosenthal, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing emphasis on health care efficiency and costs and on improving quality in health care settings such as hospitals or clinics. However, there has not been sufficient work on methods of improving access and customer service times in health care settings. The study develops a framework for improving access and customer service time for health care settings. In the framework, the operational concept of the bottleneck is synthesized with queuing theory to improve access and reduce customer service times without reduction in clinical quality. The framework is applied at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center to determine the drivers for access and customer service times and then provides guidelines on how to improve these drivers. Validation using simulation techniques shows significant potential for reducing customer service times and increasing access at this institution. Finally, the study provides several practice implications that could be used to improve access and customer service times without reduction in clinical quality across a range of health care settings from large hospitals to small community clinics.

  12. Customer system efficiency improvement assessment: Supply curves for transmission and distribution conservation options

    SciTech Connect

    Tepel, R.C.; Callaway, J.W.; De Steese, J.G.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of Task 6 in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment Project. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for energy conservation in the transmission and distribution (TandD) systems of electric utilities in the BPA service area. The scope of this assessment covers BPA customers in the Pacific Northwest region and all non-federal TandD systems, including those that currently place no load on the BPA system. Supply curves were developed to describe the conservation resource potentially available from TandD-system efficiency improvements. These supply curves relate the levelized cost of upgrading existing equipment to the estimated amount of energy saved. Stated in this form, the resource represented by TandD loss reductions can be compared with other conservation options and regional electrical generation resources to determine the most cost-effective method of supplying power to the Pacific Northwest. The development of the supply curves required data acquisition and methodology development that are also described in this report. 11 refs., 11 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Four Easy Steps to Drastically Improve Your Phone-Based Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Peller, Spencer; Beimes, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Japan is renowned for impeccable customer service (as anyone who's watched an apple get wrapped up like a crown jewel in a Tokyo grocery store will tell you). The Japanese concept of kaizen (constant improvement) is a fundamental reason for this, and for the enduring success of conglomerates such as Toyota, Honda, and Sony. From afar, you may think this trait is caused by something in the waters from Mt. Fuji, but many in the know credit the work of an American engineer named W. Edwards Deming as the catalyst for this movement. If his ideas could transform a nation, there's no question they can improve the patient satisfaction rates at your practice. PMID:26182703

  14. Electrolysis Performance Improvement and Validation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Franz H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electrolysis performance improvement and validation experiment are presented. Topics covered include: water electrolysis: an ever increasing need/role for space missions; static feed electrolysis (SFE) technology: a concept developed for space applications; experiment objectives: why test in microgravity environment; and experiment description: approach, hardware description, test sequence and schedule.

  15. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  16. Lessons Learned: A review of utility experience with conservation and load management programs for commercial and industrial customers

    SciTech Connect

    Nadel, S.

    1990-10-01

    This report examines utility experience with conservation and load management (C LM) programs of commercial and industrial (C I) customers in order to summarize the lessons learned from program experiences to date and what these teach us about how to operate successful programs in the future. This analysis was motivated by a desire to learn about programs which achieve high participation rates and high electricity savings while remaining cost effective. Also, we wanted to review the very latest experiences with innovative program approaches -- approaches that might prove useful to utilities as they scale up their C LM activities. Specific objectives of this phase of the study are threefold: (1) To disseminate information on utility C LM experience to a nationwide audience. (2) To review current New York State utility programs and make suggestions on how these programs can be improved. (3) To collect data for the final phase of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy/New York State Energy Research and Development Authority project, which will examine the savings that are achievable if C LM programs are pushed to the limit'' of current knowledge on how to structure and run cost-effective C LM programs. 19 tabs.

  17. [Measurement of customer satisfaction and participation of citizens in improving the quality of healthcare services.].

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Flori; Sopranzi, Cristina; Leto, Antonella; Amato, Simona; D'Urso, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Managing quality in health care whilst ensuring equity is a fundamental aspect of the provision of services by healthcare organizations. Measuring perceived quality of care is an important tool for evaluating the quality of healthcare delivery in that it allows the implementation of corrective actions to meet the healthcare needs of patients. The Rome B (ASL RMB) local health authority adopted the UNI EN 10006:2006 norms as a management tool, therefore introducing the evaluation of customer satisfaction as an opportunity to involve users in the creation of quality healthcare services with and for the citizens. This paper presents the activities implemented and the results achieved with regards to shared and integrated continuous improvement of services. PMID:20376160

  18. [Measurement of customer satisfaction and participation of citizens in improving the quality of healthcare services.].

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Flori; Sopranzi, Cristina; Leto, Antonella; Amato, Simona; D'Urso, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Managing quality in health care whilst ensuring equity is a fundamental aspect of the provision of services by healthcare organizations. Measuring perceived quality of care is an important tool for evaluating the quality of healthcare delivery in that it allows the implementation of corrective actions to meet the healthcare needs of patients. The Rome B (ASL RMB) local health authority adopted the UNI EN 10006:2006 norms as a management tool, therefore introducing the evaluation of customer satisfaction as an opportunity to involve users in the creation of quality healthcare services with and for the citizens. This paper presents the activities implemented and the results achieved with regards to shared and integrated continuous improvement of services.

  19. MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment evaluation and customization for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cosmo, M.; Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Mico, S.; Vasey, F.

    2015-01-01

    The MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA industry standards are candidate modular electronics platforms for the upgrade of the current generation of high energy physics experiments at CERN. The PH-ESE group at CERN launched an xTCA evaluation project with the aim of performing technical evaluations and providing support for commercially available components. Over the past years, different equipment from different vendors has been acquired and evaluated. This paper summarizes our evaluation results of commercial MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment. Special emphasis is put on the component requirements to be defined in view of future equipment procurement. Customized prototypes developed according to these generic specifications are presented for the first time.

  20. How to improve the promotion of Korean beef barbecue, bulgogi, for international customers. An application of quality function deployment.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Hyun; Ham, Sunny; Lee, Min-A

    2012-10-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is a product development technique that translates customer requirements into activities for the development of products and services. This study utilizes QFD to identify American customer's requirements for bulgogi, a popular Korean dish among international customers, and how to fulfill those requirements. A customer survey and an expert opinion survey were conducted for US customers. The top five customer requirements for bulgogi were identified as taste, freshness, flavor, tenderness, and juiciness; ease of purchase was included in the place of tenderness after calculating the weight requirements. Eighteen engineering characteristics were developed, and a 'localization of bulgogi menu' is strongly related to the other characteristics as well. The results from the calculation of relative importance of engineering characteristics identified that the 'control of marinating time', 'localization of bulgogi menu', 'improvement of cooking and serving process', 'development of recipe by parts of beef', and 'use of various seasonings' were the highest contributors to the overall improvement of bulgogi. The relative importance of engineering characteristics, correlation, and technical difficulties are ranked and integrated to develop the most effective strategy. The findings are discussed relative to industry implications. PMID:22634190

  1. How to improve the promotion of Korean beef barbecue, bulgogi, for international customers. An application of quality function deployment.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Hyun; Ham, Sunny; Lee, Min-A

    2012-10-01

    Quality function deployment (QFD) is a product development technique that translates customer requirements into activities for the development of products and services. This study utilizes QFD to identify American customer's requirements for bulgogi, a popular Korean dish among international customers, and how to fulfill those requirements. A customer survey and an expert opinion survey were conducted for US customers. The top five customer requirements for bulgogi were identified as taste, freshness, flavor, tenderness, and juiciness; ease of purchase was included in the place of tenderness after calculating the weight requirements. Eighteen engineering characteristics were developed, and a 'localization of bulgogi menu' is strongly related to the other characteristics as well. The results from the calculation of relative importance of engineering characteristics identified that the 'control of marinating time', 'localization of bulgogi menu', 'improvement of cooking and serving process', 'development of recipe by parts of beef', and 'use of various seasonings' were the highest contributors to the overall improvement of bulgogi. The relative importance of engineering characteristics, correlation, and technical difficulties are ranked and integrated to develop the most effective strategy. The findings are discussed relative to industry implications.

  2. Task clarification, performance feedback, and social praise: Procedures for improving the customer service of bank tellers.

    PubMed

    Crowell, C R; Anderson, D C; Abel, D M; Sergio, J P

    1988-01-01

    Customer service for bank tellers was defined in terms of 11 verbal behavior categories. An audio-recording system was used to track the occurrence of behaviors in these categories for six retail banking tellers. Three behavior management interventions (task clarification, performance feedback, and social praise), applied in sequence, were designed to improve overall teller performance with regard to the behavioral categories targeted. Clarification was accomplished by providing clear delineation of the various target categories, with specific examples of the behaviors in each. Feedback entailed presentation of ongoing verbal and visual information regarding teller performance. Praise consisted of verbal recognition of teller performance by branch managers. Results showed that clarification effects emerged quickly, producing an overall increase in desired behaviors of 12% over baseline. Feedback and praise effects occurred more gradually, resulting in overall increases of 6% and 7%, respectively. A suspension of all procedures led to a decline in overall performance, whereas reinstatement of feedback and praise was again accompanied by performance improvement. These findings extend the generality of behavior management applications and help to distinguish between possible antecedent and consequent effects of performance feedback. PMID:16795713

  3. Establishing Customer Requirements: An Instructional Analysis for Continuous Quality Improvement Training Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Jo D.

    Establishing customer requirements spans two steps in the planning for quality set forth by Juran (1988), those of discovering customer needs and expectations and translating them into the language of those responsible for meeting the needs. The need for training was documented in a large, decentralized service organization through qualitative…

  4. Custom Cementless Stem Improves Hip Function in Young Patients at 15-year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Flecher, Xavier; Pearce, Oliver; Parratte, Sebastien; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    THA in young patients is challenging regarding restoration and survival because patients are young, active, and tend to have disturbed anatomy. We asked whether a three-dimensional custom cementless stem could restore hip function, decrease osteolysis and wear, and enhance stem survival in young patients. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients (233 hips) younger than 50 years (mean, 40 years) at a followup of 5 to 16 years (mean, 10 years). The Merle D’Aubigné-Postel and Harris hip scores improved at last followup. No thigh pain was recorded for any of the patients; 187 of the 212 patients (88%) had full activity recovery, 206 had full range of motion, and 151 had a score greater than 80 points for all five categories of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome score. Five patients had femoral osteolysis not associated with pain. With revision for any reason as an end point, the survivorship was 87% (range, 77%–97%) at 15 years, and considering stem revision only, the survivorship was 93% (confidence interval, 90%–97%) at 15 years. Our data compare favorably with those from series using standard cementless stems at the same followup with a high percentage of patients achieving functional restoration and a low rate of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19690930

  5. Customer interviews to improve NASA office of space science education and public outreach leveraging success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, L. L.

    2002-01-01

    Leveraging with organizations that serve our customers and focusing on the needs of those organizations are two prime elements of the NASA Office of Space Science (OSS) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Strategy. On behalf of NASA OSS, the Solar System Exploration (SSE) Education and Public Outreach Forum has conducted a series of customer interviews with representatives from leading organizations who serve some of the audiences we wish to reach.

  6. Improved electrothermal performance of custom-shaped micro heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tian-Yu; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Qian; Wang, Dan-Yang; Deng, Ning-Qin; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a flexible heater based on anisotropic laser-reduced graphene oxide (LRGO) is established. Attributing to precision and shape design of laser processing and excellent adhesion of graphene oxide, the LRGO-based heater can be microminiaturized with custom patterns and integrated on various substrates, which is what the existing film heaters cannot do and can be widely used for wearable heating devices, flexural warming systems in medical science, and light deicing equipment and heaters for aero vehicles. The electrothermal performance of the anisotropic LRGO is investigated systematically through a series of experiments including Raman spectra, SEM, white-light interferograms, IV testing, and infrared thermography. The electrothermal performance of the LRGO with the parallel aligned direction is better than the LRGO with the vertical aligned direction. The electrothermal performance can be improved greatly through radiating repeatedly. The saturated temperature and heating rate of the LRGO radiated twice are almost double that of the LRGO radiated once. Radiating thrice damages the material and structure, reducing electrothermal performance.

  7. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Scheer, Richard

    2014-09-01

    One of the most important aspects for the successful implementation of customer-facing programs is to better understand how to engage and communicate with consumers. Customer-facing programs include time-based rates, information and feedback, load management, and energy efficiency. This report presents lessons learned by utilities through consumer behavior studies (CBS) conducted as part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) program. The SGIG CBS effort presents a unique opportunity to advance the understanding of consumer behaviors in terms of customer acceptance and retention, and electricity consumption and peak demand impacts. The effort includes eleven comprehensive studies with the aim of evaluating the response of residential and small commercial customers to time-based rate programs implemented in conjunction with advanced metering infrastructure and customer systems such as in-home displays, programmable communicating thermostats, and web portals. DOE set guidelines and protocols that sought to help the utilities design studies that would rigorously test and more precisely estimate the impact of time-based rates on customers’ energy usage patterns, as well as identify the key drivers that motivate behavioral changes.

  8. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  9. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  10. Quality Improvement of Business Education in Romanian Universities: The Student as Customer and Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser-Segura, Daniel A.; Mudge, Suzanne; Bratianu, Constantin; Jianu, Ionela; Valcea, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    This study frames the quality transition of Romanian business education embracing the role of students as clients and customers. In the first part of the study, responses from ninety-four fourth-year Romanian students provided a statistically significant gap between the level of importance of business competences and their level of preparation.…

  11. Customer Relationship Management in Higher Education: Using Information Systems to Improve the Student-School Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeman, Elaine D.; O'Hara, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore customer relationship management (CRM) in a higher education setting. Design/methodology/approach: The development and implementation of a CRM project in a state community college was examined as were the benefits realized by implementing CRM. As colleges increasingly embrace distance learning and…

  12. Improvement in cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction by a quality management system according to EN ISO 9001:2000.

    PubMed

    Beholz, Sven; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    The implementation of a quality management system (QMS) according to EN ISO 9001:2000 has proven to be possible for cardiac surgery departments. However, it remains unclear if a QMS can help to improve quality as indicated by cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction. To control costs for medical goods and laboratory investigations an internal control system for the allocation of resources was implemented. Laboratory costs and medical goods per open heart procedure were investigated in the years 2000 to 2003. In terms of customer satisfaction, repeated questionnaire-based evaluation of referring physicians was obtained from 2001 to 2003 and the influence of repeated interventions on various aspects of communications was investigated. Costs of medical goods could be reduced by 6.1%, and for laboratory investigations by 35% per operation. Additionally, customer satisfaction could be increased efficiently with respect to accessibility and postoperative communication. By the introduction of a process based QMS, efficient control of the costs of medical goods and laboratory investigations could be achieved. Once a year repeat evaluation of satisfaction of advising physicians has proven to be a valuable tool in the process of continuous improvement.

  13. The Application of Waiting Lines System in Improving Customer Service Management: The Examination of Malaysia Fast Food Restaurants Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Zurina; Shokor, Shahrul Suhaimi AB

    2016-03-01

    Rapid life time change of the Malaysian lifestyle had served the overwhelming growth in the service operation industry. On that occasion, this paper will provide the idea to improve the waiting line system (WLS) practices in Malaysia fast food chains. The study will compare the results in between the single server single phase (SSSP) and the single server multi-phase (SSMP) which providing Markovian Queuing (MQ) to be used for analysis. The new system will improve the current WLS, plus intensifying the organization performance. This new WLS were designed and tested in a real case scenario and in order to develop and implemented the new styles, it need to be focusing on the average number of customers (ANC), average number of customer spending time waiting in line (ACS), and the average time customers spend in waiting and being served (ABS). We introduced new WLS design and there will be prompt discussion upon theories of benefits and potential issues that will benefit other researchers.

  14. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Michael J; Sävje, Fredrik; Sekhon, Jasjeet S

    2016-07-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking-threshold blocking-that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  15. Improving massive experiments with threshold blocking

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    2016-01-01

    Inferences from randomized experiments can be improved by blocking: assigning treatment in fixed proportions within groups of similar units. However, the use of the method is limited by the difficulty in deriving these groups. Current blocking methods are restricted to special cases or run in exponential time; are not sensitive to clustering of data points; and are often heuristic, providing an unsatisfactory solution in many common instances. We present an algorithm that implements a widely applicable class of blocking—threshold blocking—that solves these problems. Given a minimum required group size and a distance metric, we study the blocking problem of minimizing the maximum distance between any two units within the same group. We prove this is a nondeterministic polynomial-time hard problem and derive an approximation algorithm that yields a blocking where the maximum distance is guaranteed to be, at most, four times the optimal value. This algorithm runs in O(n log n) time with O(n) space complexity. This makes it, to our knowledge, the first blocking method with an ensured level of performance that works in massive experiments. Whereas many commonly used algorithms form pairs of units, our algorithm constructs the groups flexibly for any chosen minimum size. This facilitates complex experiments with several treatment arms and clustered data. A simulation study demonstrates the efficiency and efficacy of the algorithm; tens of millions of units can be blocked using a desktop computer in a few minutes. PMID:27382151

  16. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention. PMID:18681200

  17. Customer convergence: patients, physicians, and employees share in the experience and evaluation of healthcare quality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Wolosin, Robert J; Gavran, Goran

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the interrelationships between three categories of service quality in healthcare delivery organizations: patient, employee, and physician satisfaction. Using the largest and most representative national databases available, the study compares the evaluations of hospital care by more than 2 million patients, 150,000 employees, and 40,000 physicians. The results confirm the relationship connecting employees' satisfaction and loyalty to their patients' satisfaction and loyalty. Patients' satisfaction and loyalty were also strongly associated with medical staff physicians' evaluations of overall satisfaction and loyalty to the hospital. Similarly, hospital employees' satisfaction and loyalty were related to the medical staff physicians' satisfaction with and loyalty to the hospital. Based upon the strength of the interrelationships, individual measures and subscales can serve as leverage points for improving linked outcomes. Patients, physicians, and employees, the three co-creators of health, agree on the evaluation of the quality of that service experience. The results demonstrate that promoting patient-centeredness, enhancing medical staff relations, and improving the satisfaction and loyalty of employees are not necessarily three separate activities in competition for hospital resources and marketing leadership attention.

  18. Manage customer-centric innovation--systematically.

    PubMed

    Selden, Larry; MacMillan, Ian C

    2006-04-01

    No matter how hard companies try, their approaches to innovation often don't grow the top line in the sustained, profitable way investors expect. For many companies, there's a huge difference between what's in their business plans and the market's expectations for growth (as reflected in firms' share prices, market capitalizations, and P/E ratios). This growth gap springs from the fact that companies are pouring money into their insular R&D labs instead of working to understand what the customer wants and using that understanding to drive innovation. As a result, even companies that spend the most on R&D remain starved for both customer innovation and market-capitalization growth. In this article, the authors spell out a systematic approach to innovation that continuously fuels sustained, profitable growth. They call this approach customer-centric innovation, or CCI. At the heart of CCI is a rigorous customer R&D process that helps companies to continually improve their understanding of who their customers are and what they need. By so doing, they consistently create or improve their customer value proposition. Customer R&D also focuses on better ways of communicating value propositions and delivering the complete experience to real customers. Since so much of the learning about customers and so much of the experimentation with different segmentations, value propositions, and delivery mechanisms involve the people who regularly deal with customers, it is absolutely essential for frontline employees to be at the center of the CCI process. Simply put, customer R&D propels the innovation effort away from headquarters and the traditional R&D lab out to those closest to the customer. Using the example of the luggage manufacturer Tumi, the authors provide a step-by-step approach for achieving true customer-centric innovation. PMID:16579418

  19. 41 CFR 102-85.100 - How does a customer agency pay for tenant improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Tenant Improvement Allowance § 102-85.100 How does a... agency for TIs is amortized over a period of time specified in the OA, not to exceed the useful life...

  20. 41 CFR 102-85.100 - How does a customer agency pay for tenant improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Tenant Improvement Allowance § 102-85.100 How does a... agency for TIs is amortized over a period of time specified in the OA, not to exceed the useful life...

  1. 3 CFR 13571 - Executive Order 13571 of April 27, 2011. Streamlining Service Delivery and Improving Customer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-service options accessed by the Internet or mobile phone and improved processes that deliver services... guidance shall include, among other things, the nature and scope of services to which the...

  2. 41 CFR 102-85.100 - How does a customer agency pay for tenant improvements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Tenant Improvement Allowance § 102-85.100 How does a... agency for TIs is amortized over a period of time specified in the OA, not to exceed the useful life...

  3. Statistics, Structures & Satisfied Customers: Using Web Log Data to Improve Site Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Darren

    This paper explores some of the ways in which the National Museum of Australia is using Web analysis tools to shape its future directions in the delivery of online services. In particular, it explores the potential of quantitative analysis, based on Web server log data, to convert these ephemeral traces of user experience into a strategic…

  4. Missing Link: Integrated Individual Leadership Development, Employee Engagement, and Customer Value-Added Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldenbrand, Lois; Simms, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term care is a key public issue that affects all of us in some way at some time of our lives. Nowhere is performance improvement and quality management more imperative. Through an 8-month field study and follow-up case study, we discuss how using an integrated approach to individual leadership development, employee engagement, and customer…

  5. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    PubMed

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren; Bowler, Matthew W; Brockhauser, Sandor; Flot, David; Gordon, Elspeth J; Hall, David R; Lavault, Bernard; McCarthy, Andrew A; McCarthy, Joanne; Mitchell, Edward; Monaco, Stéphanie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Nurizzo, Didier; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Thibault, Xavier; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M

    2010-09-01

    The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1.

  6. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care.

  7. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. PMID:23084619

  8. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  9. [Quality assurance and quality improvement. Personal experiences and intentions].

    PubMed

    Roche, B G; Sommer, C

    1995-01-01

    In may 1994 we were selected by the surgical Swiss association to make a study about quality in USA. During our travel we visited 3 types of institutions: Hospitals, National Institute of standard and Technology, Industry, Johnson & Johnson. We appreciate to compare 2 types of quality programs: Quality Assurance (QA) and Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI). In traditional healthcare circles, QA is the process established to meet external regulatory requirements and to assure that patient care is consistent with established standards. In a modern quality terms, QA outside of healthcare means designing a product or service, as well as controlling its production, so well that quality is inevitable. The ideas of W. Edward Deming is that there is never improvement just by inspection. He developed a theory based on 14 principles. A productive work is accomplished through processes. Understanding the variability of processes is a key to improve quality. Quality management sees each person in an organisation as part of one or more processes. The job of every worker is to receive the work of others, add value to that work, and supply it to the next person in the process. This is called the triple role the workers as customer, processor, and supplier. The main source of quality defects is problems in the process. The old assumption is that quality fails when people do the right thing wrong; the new assumption is that, more often, quality failures arise when people do the wrong think right. Exhortation, incentives and discipline of workers are unlikely to improve quality. If quality is failing when people do their jobs as designed, then exhorting them to do better is managerial nonsense. Modern quality theory is customer focused. Customers are identified internally and externally. The modern approach to quality is thoroughly grounded in scientific and statistical thinking. Like in medicine, the symptom is a defect in quality. The therapist of process must perform diagnostic

  10. Lessons Learnt from the Improvement of Customer Support Processes: A Case Study on Incident Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäntti, Marko

    IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is the most widely used IT service management framework that provides guidelines how to create, manage and support IT services. Service support processes, such as incident management and problem management, are among the first ITIL processes that organizations start to implement. However, several challenges may exist in the process implementation. The research question of this study is: which issues are important in establishing an ITIL-based incident management process? The main contribution of this paper is to present lessons learnt from an ITIL-based process improvement project that focused on establishing an incident management process in an IS department of a university hospital. Our results show that key issues in implementing incident management are to 1) define the basic concepts of incident management with concrete examples and 2) define process interfaces between incident management and other support processes.

  11. An Improved Diffraction Grating Spectroscope Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherzer, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with standard diffraction grating experiments involving a diffraction grating, a straight meter stick, and a slit. Describes the use of a new spectroscope to overcome these problems using a curved scale to simplify calculations and help students obtain results from simple and straightforward measurements, thus giving…

  12. Improving human welfare through appropriate technology: government responsibility, citizen duty or customer choice.

    PubMed

    Bell, M; Franceys, R

    1995-05-01

    This paper explores recent attempts to improve the effectiveness of environmental health programmes and projects by reference to the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1980-1990) and beyond. Reference is made to how water and sanitation as technical interventions have drawn upon the natural sciences, notably concepts of race and sex, and the social sciences including culture and gender, for their authority and legitimacy. A new and apparently progressive movement, the Water Decade sought to challenge the powerful and enduring high tech image of development on which much western environmental and social transformations have been based. Beginning as a critique of modernism with a commitment to basic needs as human rights, it was driven by a recognition that sophisticated technology could not satisfy human health needs. Alternative technologies would, by contrast, cater for a more extensive and varied market and would promote participatory approaches to service delivery. The paper demonstrates how, during the course of the Decade, sections of the aid community began to redefine basic needs as commodities involving the efficient marketing and delivery of a product with minimal state intervention. Within a shifting international political and economic context, it examines the changing role of the expert and the links being forged between large donors, non-governmental organisations and the private sector. The significance of this reformulated progressivism for the development debate is then considered, notably in relation to concepts of citizenship, consumer choice and the role of the state.

  13. Just Imagine...Improving the Band Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerull, David S.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of imagination as a tool to improve students' musicianship. Suggests that imagery can be used to teach intonation, tone color, sight-reading, and expression. Describes active listening in which the students must use musical memory and participate in musical expression to produce a certain sound that may be difficult to describe.…

  14. Analysis of Customer Loyalty through Total Quality Service, Customer Relationship Management and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binsar Kristian P., Feliks Anggia; Panjaitan, Hotman

    2014-01-01

    This research talks about total quality service and customer relationship management effects toward customer satisfaction and its impact on customer loyalty. Fast food restaurant KFC, always strives to continue to make improvements in total quality service, so that customer satisfaction can be maintained, which in turn will have an impact on…

  15. CT Lesion Model-Based Structural Allografts: Custom Fabrication and Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Jan Claas; Hesselbarth, Uwe; Seifert, Philipp; Nowack, Dimitri; von Versen, Rüdiger; Smith, Mark David; Seifert, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Patients requiring knee and hip revision arthroplasty often present with difficult anatomical situations that limit options for surgery. Customised mega-implants may be one of few remaining treatment options. However, extensive damage to residual bone stock may also be present, and in such cases even customised prosthetics may be difficult to implant. Small quantities of lost bone can be replaced with standard allografts or autologous bone. Larger defects may require structural macro-allografts, sometimes in combination with implants (allograft-prosthesis composites). Methods Herein, we describe a process for manufacturing lesion-specific large structural allografts according to a 3D, full-scale, lithographically generated defect model. These macro-allografts deliver the volume and the mechanical stability necessary for certain complex revisions. They are patient-and implant-matched, negate some requirements for additional implants and biomaterials and save time in the operating theatre by eliminating the requirement for intra-operative sizing and shaping of standard allografts. Conclusion While a robust data set from long-term follow-up of patients receiving customised macro-allografts is not yet available, initial clinical experience and results suggest that lesion-matched macro-allografts can be an important component of revision joint surgery. PMID:23800856

  16. Improved Structure Factors for Modeling XRTS Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Benage, John; Graziani, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Characterizing warm dense matter (WDM) has gained renewed interest due to advances in powerful lasers and next generation light sources. Because WDM is strongly coupled and moderately degenerate, we must often rely on simulations, which are necessarily based on ions interacting through a screened potential that must be determined. Given such a potential, ionic radial distribution functions (RDFs) and structure factors (SFs) can be calculated and related to XRTS data and EOS quantities. While many screening models are available, such as the Debye- (Yukawa-) potential, they are known to over-screen and are unable capture accurate bound state effects, which have been shown to contribute to both scattering data from XRTS as well as the short-range repulsion in the RDF. Here, we present a model which incorporates an improvement to the screening length in addition to a consistent treatment of the core electrons. This new potential improves the accuracy of both bound state and screening effects without contributing to the computational complexity of Debye-like models. Calculations of ionic RDFs and SFs are compared to experimental data and quantum molecular dynamics simulations for Be, Na, Mg and Al in the WDM and liquid metal regime.

  17. Improving the User Experience of Finding and Visualizing Oceanographic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C. L.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    users to construct their own custom searches by applying multiple filters. New filtering and visualization tools are continually being added to the BCO-DMO system as new data types are encountered and as we receive feedback from our data contributors and users. As our system becomes more complex, teaching users about the many interactive features becomes increasingly important. Tutorials and videos are made available online. Recent in-person classroom-style tutorials have proven useful for both demonstrating our system to users and for obtaining feedback to further improve the user experience. References: [1] University of Minnesota. MapServer: Open source web mapping. http://www.mapserver.org [2] OpenLayers: Free Maps for the Web. http://www.openlayers.org [3] Sencha. ExtJS. http://www.sencha.com/products/extjs [4] MySQL. http://www.mysql.com/ [5] Maffei, A. R., Rozell, E. A., West, P., Zednik, S., and Fox, P. A. 2011. Open Standards and Technologies in the S2S Framework. Abstract IN31A-1435 presented at American Geophysical Union 2011 Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, 7 December 2011.

  18. On Improving the Experiment Methodology in Pedagogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horakova, Tereza; Houska, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The paper shows how the methodology for a pedagogical experiment can be improved through including the pre-research stage. If the experiment has the form of a test procedure, an improvement of methodology can be achieved using for example the methods of statistical and didactic analysis of tests which are traditionally used in other areas, i.e.…

  19. The Behavior Engineering Model at Work on a Small Scale: Using Task Clarification, Self-Monitoring, and Public Posting To Improve Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, John; Olson, Ryan; Wellisley, Julie Ann

    2001-01-01

    Explains Gilbert's Behavior Engineering Model that can enable the success of novice performance engineers by prompting appropriate front-end analysis and describes a performance improvement project conducted in the customer service department at an insurance agency. Discusses task clarification, employee self-monitoring, and public posting of…

  20. Implementing the Customer Contact Center: An Opportunity to Create a Valid Measurement System for Assessing and Improving a Library's Telephone Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sarah Anne; Cerqua, Judith

    2012-01-01

    A customer contact center offers academic libraries the ability to consistently improve their telephone, e-mail, and IM services. This paper discusses the establishment of a contact center and the benefits of implementing the contact center model at this institution. It then introduces a practical methodology for developing a valid measurement…

  1. AutoMOPS--B2B and B2C in mask making: mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, Luc; Filies, Olaf; Rodriguez, Ben; Kuijken, Aart

    2001-04-01

    Through application of modern supply chain concepts in combination with state-of-the-art information technology, mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction can be improved radically. The AutoMOPS solution emphasizes on the elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and prototype production stages.

  2. Improving customer satisfaction and quality: hospitals recognized by J.D. power and associates share insights on meeting patient and employee needs.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    For 35 years, J.D. Power and Associates has presented its much-coveted awards recognizing product and service quality and customer satisfaction in a variety of industries. This year, the company added a new category: hospitals. To better understand patients' reactions to their hospital experiences, the company looked at five key drivers of customer satisfaction: dignity and respect, speed and efficiency, comfort, information and communication, and emotional support. This issue looks at five hospitals recognized by the company for their service excellence and why they emphasize employee satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction. PMID:12961834

  3. Exploring Customization in Higher Education: An Experiment in Leveraging Computer Spreadsheet Technology to Deliver Highly Individualized Online Instruction to Undergraduate Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzler, Jayson S.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a research study designed to explore whether customization of online instruction results in improved learning in a college business statistics course. The study involved utilizing computer spreadsheet technology to develop an intelligent tutoring system (ITS) designed to: a) collect and monitor individual real-time…

  4. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  5. Achieving excellence--creating customer passion.

    PubMed

    Scheuing, E E

    1999-08-01

    Customers are the lifeblood of any organization. Without them, it loses its meaning and purpose. Customers provide incentive, vitality, and growth. Serving them well requires a customer-focused culture and a customer-friendly system. It also requires unrelenting effort toward continuous improvement, but the rewards are well worth the effort: unflinching customer loyalty, sustainable growth, and impressive performance.

  6. Maximize Performance Impact: Create Partnerships with Customers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judith; Ibanez, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to improve organizational performance by involving customers in partnerships. Relates experiences at the Center for Development and Disability at the University of New Mexico, serving people with developmental disabilities, which helped realize their mission, helped staff cross from theory to application, and increased relevancy and…

  7. The art of customer service.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeni

    2007-10-01

    Strategies for improving the consumer service skills of finance staff include: Hire employees who have a customer service background. Work with your human resources department to provide customer service training. Monitor new hires extensively. Offer front-end employees scripted language for situations they may face on the job. Measure the quality of customer service provided. Provide incentives for performance.

  8. Using Goals, Feedback, Reinforcement, and a Performance Matrix to Improve Customer Service in a Large Department Store

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eikenhout, Nelson; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    This study employed an ABAC and multiple baseline design to evaluate the effects of (B) feedback and (C) a package of feedback, goalsetting, and reinforcement (supervisor praise and an area-wide celebration as managed through a performance matrix, on a total of 14 various customer service behaviors for a total of 115 employees at a large…

  9. Improvement of AMGA Python Client Library for Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Geunchul; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the recent improvement of the AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) python client library for the Belle II Experiment. We were drawn to the action items related to library improvement after in-depth discussions with the developer of the Belle II distributed computing system. The improvement includes client-side metadata federation support in python, DIRAC SSL library support as well as API refinement for synchronous operation. Some of the improvements have already been applied to the AMGA python client library as bundled with the Belle II distributed computing software. The recent mass Monte- Carlo (MC) production campaign shows that the AMGA python client library is reliably stable.

  10. Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-09-20

    Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers - especially those that are relatively

  11. Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

    PubMed

    Reed, G; Reed, D H

    1999-05-01

    When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data. PMID:10342194

  12. Experience measuring performance improvement in multiphase picture archiving and communications systems implementations.

    PubMed

    Reed, G; Reed, D H

    1999-05-01

    When planning a picture archiving and communications system (PACS) implementation and determining which equipment will be implemented in earlier and later phases, collection and analysis of selected data will aid in setting implementation priorities. If baseline data are acquired relative to performance objectives, the same information used for implementation planning can be used to measure performance improvement and outcomes. The main categories of data to choose from are: (1) financial data; (2) productivity data; (3) operational parameters; (4) clinical data; and (5) information about customer satisfaction. In the authors' experience, detailed workflow data have not proved valuable in measuring PACS performance and outcomes. Reviewing only one category of data in planning will not provide adequate basis for targeting operational improvements that will lead to the most significant gains. Quality improvement takes into account all factors in production: human capacity, materials, operating capital and assets. Once we have identified key areas of focus for quality improvement in each phase, we can translate objectives into implementation requirements and finally into detailed functional and performance requirements. Here, Integration Resources reports its experience measuring PACS performance relative to phased implementation strategies for three large medical centers. Each medical center had its own objectives for overcoming image management, physical/geographical, and functional/technical barriers. The report outlines (1) principal financial and nonfinancial measures used as performance indicators; (2) implementation strategies chosen by each of the three medical centers; and (3) the results of those strategies as compared with baseline data.

  13. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  14. Providing training and technical assistance to customs officers and border guards: An effective mechanism to improve export controls

    SciTech Connect

    Gritton, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    With the disintegration of the Soviet Union, an increasing international concern requiring attention is illegal trafficking in nuclear and nuclear-related dual-use commodities. For the past few years, the US government, including the Department of Energy (DOE), has assisted the former Soviet Union in establishing and enhancing national export control systems. Although US assistance has been targeted to help control approved transfers, part of the focus has shifted to prevent the illegal exit of special nuclear material, dual-use items, and other nuclear-related materials. As part of a State Department initiative, a Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF) was established to address various nonproliferation concerns. One project, funded by NDF, US Customs Service (Customs), and the DOE, focuses on assisting transit countries to prevent illegal trafficking. DOE is providing technical expertise to seven countries in the Baltics and Central Europe to help identify materials, equipment, and technology that might transit their borders. Although there are many mechanisms to prevent illegal trafficking, this paper will discuss the importance of providing international customs officials and border guards with training and technical assistance on nuclear materials and nuclear-related dual-use items. More specifically, detail of the DOE training plan will be discussed.

  15. Improved Kennedy-Thorndike experiment to test special relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hils, Dieter; Hall, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A modern version of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment was carried out by searching for sidereal variations between the frequency of a laser locked to an I2 reference line and a laser locked to the resonance frequency of a highly stable cavity. No variations were found at the level of 2 x 10 to the -12th. This represents a 300-fold improvement over the original Kennedy-Thorndike experiment and allows the Lorentz transformations to be deduced entirely from experiment at an accuracy level of 70 ppm.

  16. Surgical results of cranioplasty with a polymethylmethacrylate customized cranial implant in pediatric patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Pietro; Pavanello, Marco; Imperato, Alessia; Dallolio, Villiam; Accogli, Andrea; Capra, Valeria; Consales, Alessandro; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Cranioplasty is a reconstructive procedure used to restore skull anatomy and repair skull defects. Optimal skull reconstruction is a challenge for neurosurgeons, and the strategy used to achieve the best result remains a topic of debate, especially in pediatric patients for whom the continuing skull growth makes the choice of material more difficult. When the native bone flap, which is universally accepted as the preferred option in pediatric patients, is unavailable, the authors' choice of prosthetic material is a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) implant designed using a custom-made technique. In this paper the authors present the results of their clinical series of 12 custom-made PMMA implants in pediatric patients. METHODS A retrospective study of the patients who had undergone cranioplasty at Gaslini Children's Hospital between 2006 and 2013 was conducted. A total of 12 consecutive cranioplasties in 12 patients was reviewed, in which a patient-specific PMMA implant was manufactured using a virtual 3D model and then transformed into a physical model using selective laser sintering or 3D printing. All patients or parents were administered a questionnaire to assess how the patient/parent judged the aesthetic result. RESULTS Patient age at craniectomy ranged from 5 months to 12.5 years, with a mean age of 84.33 months at cranioplasty. The mean extension of the custom-made plastic was 56.83 cm(2). The mean time between craniectomy and cranioplasty was 9.25 months. The mean follow-up duration was 55.7 months. No major complications were recorded; 3 patients experienced minor/moderate complications (prosthesis dislocation, granuloma formation, and fluid collection). CONCLUSIONS In this patient series, PMMA resulted in an extremely low complication rate and the custom-made technique was associated with an excellent grade of patient or parent satisfaction on long-term follow up. PMID:26824593

  17. Parents of Adolescents with Mental Disorders: Improving Their Caregiving Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatta, Michela; Zotto, Lara Dal; Nequinio, Giulia; Col, Lara Del; Sorgato, Rosaria; Ceranto, Giovanni; Testa, Costantino Paolo; Pertile, Riccardo; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the family members of adolescents with mental diseases experience distress, anxiety and depression, as well as economic strain, all of which contribute to physical and psychological caregiver morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of intervention to improve the caregiving experience…

  18. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric. PMID:12747165

  19. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric.

  20. A compass for customer needs.

    PubMed

    Hines, J D; Murray, M

    1998-02-01

    Baldor Electric uses a tool it calls the value formula to help teach its employees to look at their work through the eyes of the customer. In fact, the goal of the value improvement process is to focus everyone on customer value, and the employees, by going through five training courses, learn how improving quality and service and reducing cost and time lead to higher value for the customer.

  1. "I've been NIATxed": participants' experience with process improvement.

    PubMed

    Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Desirée; Bellows, Anne; Rutkowski, Beth A; Ransom, Loretta; Myers, Ana Ceci; Rawson, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    Process improvement strategies provide industries with a method for improving outcomes and performance at a low cost and with minimal training. In Los Angeles County, two process improvement projects were implemented as a way to improve access to, and engagement and retention in, alcohol and other drug abuse treatment. A qualitative evaluation was completed after the Phase II pilot project to assess how the providers felt about the project, what worked, what did not work, what was learned, and the degree to which process improvements changed program operations. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 33 individuals, representing every level of staff participation in the project. Overall, comments indicated a positive experience for staff, administrators, and clients. Providers noted the relative ease of implementation and how quickly changes resulted in impressive improvements. Challenging issues included resistant staff or a lack of additional resources to pay for the project; however, most noted that these issues were resolved. Interview participants also requested more training on data collection and a reduction in the frequency of the project conference calls. This study gives support to the idea of process improvement being a tool that dramatically improves services to consumers of addiction treatment services. PMID:21138201

  2. Customer Loyalty and Customer Relationship Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Li, Min; Jiao, Xiaojing; Zhou, Ruijin

    The contemporary company attaches great importance to marketing relationship and customer relations is the core of this relationship. Further, customer satisfaction and loyalty is the core of the customer relationship management. Sometimes, high customer satisfaction causes low profit because enterprises do not realize that strengthening the loyalty of the aimed customer is the key of customer relationship management.

  3. Do information, price, or morals influence ethical consumption? A natural field experiment and customer survey on the purchase of Fair Trade coffee.

    PubMed

    Andorfer, Veronika A; Liebe, Ulf

    2015-07-01

    We address ethical consumption using a natural field experiment on the actual purchase of Fair Trade (FT) coffee in three supermarkets in Germany. Based on a quasi-experimental before-and-after design the effects of three different treatments - information, 20% price reduction, and a moral appeal - are analyzed. Sales data cover actual ethical purchase behavior and avoid problems of social desirability. But they offer only limited insights into the motivations of individual consumers. We therefore complemented the field experiment with a customer survey that allows us to contrast observed (ethical) buying behavior with self-reported FT consumption. Results from the experiment suggest that only the price reduction had the expected positive and statistically significant effect on FT consumption.

  4. Do information, price, or morals influence ethical consumption? A natural field experiment and customer survey on the purchase of Fair Trade coffee.

    PubMed

    Andorfer, Veronika A; Liebe, Ulf

    2015-07-01

    We address ethical consumption using a natural field experiment on the actual purchase of Fair Trade (FT) coffee in three supermarkets in Germany. Based on a quasi-experimental before-and-after design the effects of three different treatments - information, 20% price reduction, and a moral appeal - are analyzed. Sales data cover actual ethical purchase behavior and avoid problems of social desirability. But they offer only limited insights into the motivations of individual consumers. We therefore complemented the field experiment with a customer survey that allows us to contrast observed (ethical) buying behavior with self-reported FT consumption. Results from the experiment suggest that only the price reduction had the expected positive and statistically significant effect on FT consumption. PMID:26004466

  5. Using evaluation to improve medical student rural experience.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Jennifer J; Wyatt, Janine E

    2016-04-01

    Objective The aim of this evaluation was to see whether interventions implemented to improve the Rural Medicine Rotation made this a more effective rural medical education experience. Multiple interventions targeting the student experience, lecturers and preceptors were implemented. Methods A quasi-experimental design using pre- and post-measures was used. The participants were all University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Rural Medicine Rotation students who completed the 2009 and 2010 rural medicine rotation evaluations. There were 769 students, with an 84% response rate in 2009 and an 80% response rate in 2010. In addition, all the 25 program preceptors who were visited in 2009 and the 34 who were visited in 2010 participated in the study. Results The implementation of interventions resulted in significant improvement in three outcome measures, namely teaching effectiveness, provision of an environment supportive of learning in a rural/remote setting and opportunities for professional growth. Two of the three other outcome measures - ensuring a safe clinical placement and opportunities for procedural skills experience and development - were very positively evaluated in both 2009 and 2010. Conclusions The interventions contributed to a more effective rural medical education experience, providing students with the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge relevant for rural medicine and to gain an understanding of the context in which rural medicine is practiced. What is known about the topic? Many Australian medical schools offer students rural-based educational opportunities based on the premise that placing medical students in a rural setting may ultimately lead to them choosing careers in rural medicine. However, there is a paucity of evidence on the factors that are considered necessary for medical students to gain a positive rural experience of short conscripted rural placements. What does the paper add? This paper identifies successful interventions

  6. Using evaluation to improve medical student rural experience.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Jennifer J; Wyatt, Janine E

    2016-04-01

    Objective The aim of this evaluation was to see whether interventions implemented to improve the Rural Medicine Rotation made this a more effective rural medical education experience. Multiple interventions targeting the student experience, lecturers and preceptors were implemented. Methods A quasi-experimental design using pre- and post-measures was used. The participants were all University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Rural Medicine Rotation students who completed the 2009 and 2010 rural medicine rotation evaluations. There were 769 students, with an 84% response rate in 2009 and an 80% response rate in 2010. In addition, all the 25 program preceptors who were visited in 2009 and the 34 who were visited in 2010 participated in the study. Results The implementation of interventions resulted in significant improvement in three outcome measures, namely teaching effectiveness, provision of an environment supportive of learning in a rural/remote setting and opportunities for professional growth. Two of the three other outcome measures - ensuring a safe clinical placement and opportunities for procedural skills experience and development - were very positively evaluated in both 2009 and 2010. Conclusions The interventions contributed to a more effective rural medical education experience, providing students with the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge relevant for rural medicine and to gain an understanding of the context in which rural medicine is practiced. What is known about the topic? Many Australian medical schools offer students rural-based educational opportunities based on the premise that placing medical students in a rural setting may ultimately lead to them choosing careers in rural medicine. However, there is a paucity of evidence on the factors that are considered necessary for medical students to gain a positive rural experience of short conscripted rural placements. What does the paper add? This paper identifies successful interventions

  7. Routine clinical mutation profiling using next generation sequencing and a customized gene panel improves diagnostic precision in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephan; Schipper, Elisa; Hasemeier, Britta; Kreipe, Hans; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic examination of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) may be challenging because morphological features can overlap with those of reactive states. Demonstration of clonal hematopoiesis provides a diagnostic clue and has become possible by comprehensive mutation profiling of a number of frequently mutated genes, some of them with large coding regions. To emphasize the potential benefit of NGS in hematopathology we present sequencing results from routinely processed formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bone marrow trephines (n = 192). A customized amplicon-based gene panel including 23 genes frequently mutated in myeloid neoplasms was established and implemented. Thereby, 629,691 reads per sample (range 179,847–1,460,412) and a mean coverage of 2,702 (range 707–6,327) could be obtained, which are sufficient for comprehensive mutational profiling. Seven samples failed in sequencing (3.6%). In 185 samples we found in total 269 pathogenic variants (mean 1.4 variants per patient, range 0-5), 125 Patients exhibit at least one pathogenic mutation (67.6%). Variants show allele frequencies ranging from 6.7% up to 95.7%. Most frequently mutated genes were TET2 (28.7%), SRSF2 (19.5%), ASXL1 (8.6%) and U2AF1 (8.1%). The mutation profiling increases the diagnostic precision and adds prognostic information. PMID:27029036

  8. Routine clinical mutation profiling using next generation sequencing and a customized gene panel improves diagnostic precision in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Stephan; Schipper, Elisa; Hasemeier, Britta; Kreipe, Hans; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2016-05-24

    Microscopic examination of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myelodysplastic-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) may be challenging because morphological features can overlap with those of reactive states. Demonstration of clonal hematopoiesis provides a diagnostic clue and has become possible by comprehensive mutation profiling of a number of frequently mutated genes, some of them with large coding regions.To emphasize the potential benefit of NGS in hematopathology we present sequencing results from routinely processed formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bone marrow trephines (n = 192). A customized amplicon-based gene panel including 23 genes frequently mutated in myeloid neoplasms was established and implemented. Thereby, 629,691 reads per sample (range 179,847-1,460,412) and a mean coverage of 2,702 (range 707-6,327) could be obtained, which are sufficient for comprehensive mutational profiling. Seven samples failed in sequencing (3.6%). In 185 samples we found in total 269 pathogenic variants (mean 1.4 variants per patient, range 0-5), 125 Patients exhibit at least one pathogenic mutation (67.6%). Variants show allele frequencies ranging from 6.7% up to 95.7%. Most frequently mutated genes were TET2 (28.7%), SRSF2 (19.5%), ASXL1 (8.6%) and U2AF1 (8.1%). The mutation profiling increases the diagnostic precision and adds prognostic information. PMID:27029036

  9. [Use of customer relationship management to improve healthcare for citizens. The 24h Andalusian Health Service: Healthline].

    PubMed

    Quero, Manuel; Ramos, María Belén; López, Wilfredo; Cubillas, Juan José; González, José María; Castillo, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Salud Responde (in English: Healthline) is a Health Service and Information Centre of the taxpayer-funded Andalusian Health System (AHS) that offers a Telephone Health Advisory Service called SA24h, among other services. The main objective of SA24h is to inform and advise citizens on health issues and the available health resources of the AHS. SA24h has a Customer Relationship Management information technology tool that organises information at various levels of specialization. Depending on the difficulty of the query, the citizen is attended by professionals with distinct profiles, providing a consensual response within the professionals working within Salud Responde or within other healthcare levels of the AHS. SA24h provided responses to 757,168 patient queries from late 2008 to the end of 01/12/2015. A total of 9.38% of the consultations were resolved by the non-health professionals working at Salud Responde. The remaining 84.07% were resolved by health staff. A total of 6.5% of users were referred to accident and emergency facilities while 88.77% did not need to attend their general practitioner within the next 24hours, thus avoiding unnecessary visits to health care facilities. PMID:26900101

  10. [Use of customer relationship management to improve healthcare for citizens. The 24h Andalusian Health Service: Healthline].

    PubMed

    Quero, Manuel; Ramos, María Belén; López, Wilfredo; Cubillas, Juan José; González, José María; Castillo, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Salud Responde (in English: Healthline) is a Health Service and Information Centre of the taxpayer-funded Andalusian Health System (AHS) that offers a Telephone Health Advisory Service called SA24h, among other services. The main objective of SA24h is to inform and advise citizens on health issues and the available health resources of the AHS. SA24h has a Customer Relationship Management information technology tool that organises information at various levels of specialization. Depending on the difficulty of the query, the citizen is attended by professionals with distinct profiles, providing a consensual response within the professionals working within Salud Responde or within other healthcare levels of the AHS. SA24h provided responses to 757,168 patient queries from late 2008 to the end of 01/12/2015. A total of 9.38% of the consultations were resolved by the non-health professionals working at Salud Responde. The remaining 84.07% were resolved by health staff. A total of 6.5% of users were referred to accident and emergency facilities while 88.77% did not need to attend their general practitioner within the next 24hours, thus avoiding unnecessary visits to health care facilities.

  11. What is a free customer worth? Armchair calculations of nonpaying customers' value can lead to flawed strategies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil; Mela, Carl F

    2008-11-01

    Free customers who are subsidized by paying customers are essential to a vast array of businesses, such as media companies, employment services, and even IT providers. But because they generate revenue only indirectly, figuring out the true value of those customers--and how much attention to devote them--has always been a challenge. Traditional customer-valuation models don't help; they focus exclusively on paying customers and largely ignore network effects, or how customers help draw other customers to a business. Now a new model, devised by professors Gupta, of Harvard Business School, and Mela, of Fuqua School of Business, takes into account not only direct network effects (where buyers attract more buyers or sellers more sellers) but also indirect network effects (where buyers attract more sellers or vice versa) . The model calculates the precise long-term impact of each additional free customer on a company's profits, factoring in the degree to which he or she brings in other customers--whether free or paying--and the ripple effect of those customers. The model helped an online auction house make several critical decisions. The business made its money on fees charged to sellers but recognized that its free customers--its buyers--were valuable, too. As competition heated up, the company worried that it wasn't wooing enough buyers. Using the model, the business discovered that the network effects of buyers were indeed large and that those customers were worth over $1,000 each--much more than had been assumed. Armed with that information, the firm increased its research on buyers, invested more in targeting them with ads, and improved their experience. The model also helped the company identify the effects of various pricing strategies on sellers, showing that they became less price-sensitive over time. As a result, the company raised the fees it charged them as well.

  12. Microwave frequency modulation for improving polarization transfer in DNP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Mallory; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a driven process that transfers the inherently high electron polarization to surrounding nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at or near the electron Larmor frequency. In a typical DNP experiment, the amplitude and frequency of the applied microwaves are constant. However, by adding time dependence in the form of frequency modulation, the electron excitation bandwidth is increased, thereby increasing the number of electron spins active in the polarization transfer process and improving overall efficiency. Both triangular and sinusoidal modulation show a 3 fold improvement over monochromatic irradiation. In the present study, we compare the nuclear spin polarization after DNP experiments with no modulation of the applied microwaves, triangular and sinusoidal modulation, and modulation schemes derived from the sample's ESR spectrum. We characterize the polarization as a function of the modulation amplitude and frequency and compare the optimal results from each modulation scheme. Working at a field of 3.34 T and at a temperature of 4 K, we show that by using a modulation scheme tailored to the electronic environment of the sample, polarization transfer is improved over other modulation schemes. Small-scale simulations of the spin system are developed to gain further insight into the dynamics of this driven open system. This understanding could enable the design of modulation schemes to achieve even higher polarization transfer efficiencies. With support from NSF (CHE-1410504) and by NIH (U19-A1091173).

  13. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents' Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte; Engvall, Gunn; Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80-90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child's and the parent's view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents' experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents' suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2-16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people's lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child's suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process.

  14. Children Undergoing Radiotherapy: Swedish Parents’ Experiences and Suggestions for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mullaney, Tara; Nilsson, Kristina; Wickart-Johansson, Gun; Svärd, Anna-Maja; Nyholm, Tufve; Lindh, Jack; Lindh, Viveca

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 300 children, from 0 to 18 years old, are diagnosed with cancer in Sweden every year. Of these children, 80–90 of them undergo radiotherapy treatment for their cancer. Although radiotherapy is an encounter with advanced technology, few studies have investigated the child’s and the parent’s view of the procedure. As part of an ongoing multicenter study aimed to improve patient preparation and the care environment in pediatric radiotherapy, this article reports the findings from interviews with parents at baseline. The aim of the present study was twofold: to describe parents’ experience when their child undergoes radiotherapy treatment, and to report parents’ suggestions for improvements during radiotherapy for their children. Sixteen mothers and sixteen fathers of children between 2–16 years old with various cancer diagnoses were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The findings showed that cancer and treatment turns people’s lives upside down, affecting the entire family. Further, the parents experience the child’s suffering and must cope with intense feelings. Radiotherapy treatment includes preparation by skilled and empathetic staff. The parents gradually find that they can deal with the process; and lastly, parents have suggestions for improvements during the radiotherapy treatment. An overarching theme emerged: that despair gradually turns to a sense of security, with a sustained focus on and close interaction with the child. In conclusion, an extreme burden was experienced around the start of radiotherapy, though parents gradually coped with the process. PMID:26509449

  15. Customer satisfaction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kelly

    2004-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is not merely a "smile and be nice" set of behaviors. It is a philosophy that is founded in the concept that the patient's experience of care is important and ultimately translates into their actual response to care. The improved response to care that patients exhibit makes patient satisfaction important from a clinical vantage point. That point alone is enough to justify implementation of and commitment to a customer satisfaction program. There are, however, other compelling reasons also. Customer satisfaction has profound ramifications for the financial status of the institution and for its professional reputation in the community. The caregivers who participate in a system of good customer satisfaction experience fewer malpractice suits than their counterparts. And they enjoy a work environment that is more stable and pleasant than other institutions. The implementation of a meaningful customer service program is a huge task. It is a fundamental culture change that requires vision, long-term commitment, and constant surveillance. The single most critical factor in the successful implementation of a program that produces all the gains that it promises is leadership. Leadership must set the stage, create the atmosphere,demand that staff meet expectations, reward success, provide an example,and shape the new culture. Without strong, clear leadership, any customer service initiative will be simply a hospital-wide exercise, and those staff members who harbor a cynical viewpoint will be proved right in the end.One major difference between a successful customer service initiative and an unsuccessful one is the level of sincerity the hospital and its staff have about the care they express for their patients. If the whole process is merely an exercise to improve scores, the success will be limited and without deep roots. If the push is to establish an atmosphere of genuine care and interest for patients, however, the results are more meaningful

  16. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  17. Pathways to Improve Student Pharmacists’ Experience in Research

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Katie S.; Bell, Allison M.; Ellis, Ashley; Adcock, Kim G.; Hogan, Shirley; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of a student research program and to provide outcomes from the initial 4 years’ experience. Design. Students conducted individual research projects in a 4-year longitudinal program (known as Pathway), with faculty member advising and peer mentoring. A prospective assessment compared perceptions of those who completed the Pathway program with those of students who did not. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. Assessment. The class of 2013 was the first to complete the Pathway program. In the Pathway assessment project, 59% (n=47) of students who responded reached self-set goals. Pathway students agreed that this research experience improved their ability to work/think independently, evaluate literature, and distinguish themselves from other students. Conclusion. The Pathway program helped students understand the research process and reach other self-set goals. PMID:26089567

  18. DASHBOARDS & CONTROL CHARTS EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-02-27

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  19. Improving Patients Experience in Peadiatric Emergency Waiting Room.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Siebert, Johan; Wipfli, Rolf; Duret, Cyrille; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    When visiting the emergency department, the perception of the time spent in the waiting room before the beginning of the care, may influence patients' experience. Based on models of service evaluation, highlighting the importance of informing people about their waiting process and their place in the queue, we have developed an innovative information screen aiming at improving perception of time by patients. Following an iterative process, a group of experts including computer scientists, ergonomists and caregivers designed a solution adapted to the pediatric context. The solution includes a screen displaying five lanes representing triage levels. Patients are represented by individual avatars, drawn sequentially in the appropriate line. The interface has been designed using gamification principle, aiming at increasing acceptance, lowering learning curve and improving satisfaction. Questionnaire based evaluation results revealed high satisfaction from the 278 respondents even if the informative content was not always completely clear. PMID:27332258

  20. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone. PMID:12675405

  1. Predictive Systems for Customer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravi; Albert, Sam; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Kannan, Pallipuram V.

    With the coming of age of web as a mainstream customer service channel, B2C companies have invested substantial resources in enhancing their web presence. Today customers can interact with a company, not only through the traditional phone channel but also through chat, email, SMS or web self-service. Each of these channels is best suited for some services and ill-matched for others. Customer service organizations today struggle with the challenge of delivering seamlessly integrated services through these different channels. This paper will evaluate some of the key challenges in multi-channel customer service. It will address the challenge of creating the right channel mix i.e. providing the right choice of channels for a given customer/behavior/issue profile. It will also provide strategies for optimizing the performance of a given channel in creating the right customer experience.

  2. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone.

  3. Performance excellence: using Lean Six Sigma tools to improve the US Army behavioral health surveillance process, boost team morale, and maximize value to customers and stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Eren Youmans; Kemeter, Dave M; Spiess, Anita; Corrigan, Elizabeth; Kateley, Keri; Wills, John V; Mancha, Brent Edward; Nichols, Jerrica; Bell, Amy Millikan

    2014-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a process improvement, problem-solving methodology used in business and manufacturing to improve the speed, quality, and cost of products. LSS can also be used to improve knowledge-based products integral to public health surveillance. An LSS project by the Behavioral Social Health Outcomes Program of the Army Institute of Public Health reduced the number of labor hours spent producing the routine surveillance of suicidal behavior publication. At baseline, the total number of labor hours was 448; after project completion, total labor hours were 199. Based on customer feedback, publication production was reduced from quarterly to annually. Process improvements enhanced group morale and established best practices in the form of standard operating procedures and business rules to ensure solutions are sustained. LSS project participation also fostered a change in the conceptualization of tasks and projects. These results demonstrate that LSS can be used to inform the public health process and should be considered a viable method of improving knowledge-based products and processes.

  4. Performance excellence: using Lean Six Sigma tools to improve the US Army behavioral health surveillance process, boost team morale, and maximize value to customers and stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Eren Youmans; Kemeter, Dave M; Spiess, Anita; Corrigan, Elizabeth; Kateley, Keri; Wills, John V; Mancha, Brent Edward; Nichols, Jerrica; Bell, Amy Millikan

    2014-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a process improvement, problem-solving methodology used in business and manufacturing to improve the speed, quality, and cost of products. LSS can also be used to improve knowledge-based products integral to public health surveillance. An LSS project by the Behavioral Social Health Outcomes Program of the Army Institute of Public Health reduced the number of labor hours spent producing the routine surveillance of suicidal behavior publication. At baseline, the total number of labor hours was 448; after project completion, total labor hours were 199. Based on customer feedback, publication production was reduced from quarterly to annually. Process improvements enhanced group morale and established best practices in the form of standard operating procedures and business rules to ensure solutions are sustained. LSS project participation also fostered a change in the conceptualization of tasks and projects. These results demonstrate that LSS can be used to inform the public health process and should be considered a viable method of improving knowledge-based products and processes. PMID:25074608

  5. Improved Dye Stability in Single-Molecule Fluorescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EcheverrÍa Aitken, Colin; Marshall, R. Andrew; Pugi, Joseph D.

    Complex biological systems challenge existing single-molecule methods. In particular, dye stability limits observation time in singlemolecule fluorescence applications. Current approaches to improving dye performance involve the addition of enzymatic oxygen scavenging systems and small molecule additives. We present an enzymatic oxygen scavenging system that improves dye stability in single-molecule experiments. Compared to the currently-employed glucose-oxidase/catalase system, the protocatechuate-3,4-dioxygenase system achieves lower dissolved oxygen concentration and stabilizes single Cy3, Cy5, and Alexa488 fluorophores. Moreover, this system possesses none of the limitations associated with the glucose oxidase/catalase system. We also tested the effects of small molecule additives in this system. Biological reducing agents significantly destabilize the Cy5 fluorophore as a function of reducing potential. In contrast, anti-oxidants stabilize the Cy3 and Alexa488 fluorophores. We recommend use of the protocatechuate-3,4,-dioxygenase system with antioxidant additives, and in the absence of biological reducing agents. This system should have wide application to single-molecule fluorescence experiments.

  6. A Quality Function Deployment Analysis of Customer Needs for Meeting School Improvement Goals: The Voice of the School Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Susan N.; And Others

    In providing leadership for school improvement teams, principals must employ group communication and decision-making skills. In this study, a planning procedure called Quality Function Deployment (QFD) was modified for use with school-based administrators. Teams of school leaders used QFD to generate the top priority needs of school customers…

  7. Retaining and attracting large customers in a competitive market

    SciTech Connect

    Solger, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes marketing and customer satisfaction in the electric power industry and the experiences of Wal-Mart stores. Customer service, reliability, working relationships, and customer knowledge are discussed.

  8. Customer's self-audit to improve the technical quality of maternity care in Tabriz: a community trial.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, K; Tabrizi, J S; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M; Iezadi, S; Farshbaf, N; Rahbar-Farzam, F; Afsharniya, F

    2016-05-01

    Pregnant women have a major role to play in assessing and improving their own quality of care. This study in Tabriz, Islamic Republic of Iran, aimed to assess the effectiveness of an intervention for pregnant women-based on education and support groups and involvement in quality assessment activities-in order to improve the technical quality of public maternity care at public health centres. The intervention phase began in September 2011 and lasted 8 months. The outcome measure was health-care providers' degree of adherence to the Iranian maternity care standards. An intervention group of 92 pregnant women from 10 health centres was compared with a control group of 93 pregnant women from 11 centres. Logistic regression analysis showed that the self-assessed technical quality of maternity care received by the women was significantly better in the intervention that the control group for several of the standards concerning clinical examinations, maternal education and vitamin and mineral supplements. PMID:27553397

  9. Possibilities to improve the aircraft interior comfort experience.

    PubMed

    Vink, P; Bazley, C; Kamp, I; Blok, M

    2012-03-01

    Comfort plays an increasingly important role in the interior design of airplanes. Although ample research has been conducted on airplane design technology, only a small amount of public scientific information is available addressing the passenger's opinion. In this study, more than 10,000 internet trip reports and 153 passenger interviews were used to gather opinions about aspects which need to be improved in order to design a more comfortable aircraft interior. The results show clear relationships between comfort and legroom, hygiene, crew attention and seat/personal space. Passengers rate the newer planes significantly better than older ones, indicating that attention to design for comfort has proven effective. The study also shows that rude flight attendants and bad hygiene reduce the comfort experience drastically and that a high comfort rating is related to higher "fly again" values.

  10. Improved LHCD simulation model and implication for future experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G.; Baek, S.; Bonoli, P.; Faust, I.; Parker, R.; Labombard, B.; White, A.; Wukitch, S.

    2015-11-01

    The simulation model for LHCD using the raytracing/FokkerPlanck (GENRAY/CQL3D) code has been improved. Including realistic 2D SOL profiles resolves the discrepancy previously observed at high density (ne > 1 ×1020m-3). Impact of nonlinear interaction in front of the launcher is investigated. It is shown that the distortion of launch n| | spectrum is rather small (up to 10% of injected power). These simulation results suggest that improvement of current drive observed on Alcator C-Mod is indeed caused by realizing preferable SOL plasma profiles. Implication of these results to future experiments will be discussed. In order to minimize edge parasitic losses, realizing high single pass absorption and reducing prompt losses in front of launcher are both crucial. The advantage of LH launch from low field side (LFS) and high field side (HFS) is compared in this regards. A compact LH launcher suitable to test LH wave launch from HFS on a small scale device is designed and its plasma coupling characteristic will be presented. This work was performed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DoE Office of Science user facility, and is supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Good customer service for patients.

    PubMed

    Foster, Sam

    2016-08-11

    Sam Foster, Chief Nurse at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, looks at what the NHS can learn about good customer service from the private sector, and how Always Events can improve patient care. PMID:27523767

  12. Improving Phase Measurement Procedures for Pump-Probe Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Cara P.; /Merrimack Coll. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    Pump-probe experiments use a visible laser to excite an atom or molecule, while an X-ray pulse measures its shape. The phases and pulse times of each beam are used to calculate the object's positing at a given time - a moving picture of the chemical reaction. Currently, the fastest X-ray pulses can travel a time-length of five femtoseconds. However, present-day phase measurements can only be done as quickly as 50 femtoseconds. The purpose of this research is to explore ways in which phase-timing measurements can be improved. Three experiments are undergone to find the key factors in phase-timing. Different frequency mixers, the radio frequency (RF) components used for phase measurement, are tested for the highest sensitivity. These same mixers are then tested using two different power splitters for the lowest noise-to-sensitivity ratio. Lastly, the temperature dependency of phase is explored by testing each component at a range of temperatures to see how the phase is affected. This research demonstrated that certain mixers were more sensitive than others; on average, one mixer performed the best with a sensitivity of 0.0230 V/ps. The results also showed that same mixer combined with one splitter gave the best noise-to-sensitivity ratio overall with an average of 6.95E-04 fs/{radical}(Hz). All the components tested exhibited a temperature-dependent phase change (ranging from 1.69 to 81.6 fs/{sup o}C); the same mixer that performed at the highest sensitivity with the least noise had a significantly greater phase change than the other two. In conclusion, the experiments showed that a temperature-controlled environment is most appropriate for phase measurement. They also demonstrated that mixers are not significantly noisy and that certain types of mixers may perform better than others, which could be accounted for in their construction. The results of this research encourage further investigation into the study of different mixers and other RF components used in pump

  13. Quantity Versus Quality: A Survey Experiment to Improve the Network Scale-up Method

    PubMed Central

    Feehan, Dennis M.; Umubyeyi, Aline; Mahy, Mary; Hladik, Wolfgang; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The network scale-up method is a promising technique that uses sampled social network data to estimate the sizes of epidemiologically important hidden populations, such as sex workers and people who inject illicit drugs. Although previous scale-up research has focused exclusively on networks of acquaintances, we show that the type of personal network about which survey respondents are asked to report is a potentially crucial parameter that researchers are free to vary. This generalization leads to a method that is more flexible and potentially more accurate. In 2011, we conducted a large, nationally representative survey experiment in Rwanda that randomized respondents to report about one of 2 different personal networks. Our results showed that asking respondents for less information can, somewhat surprisingly, produce more accurate size estimates. We also estimated the sizes of 4 key populations at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection in Rwanda. Our estimates were higher than earlier estimates from Rwanda but lower than international benchmarks. Finally, in this article we develop a new sensitivity analysis framework and use it to assess the possible biases in our estimates. Our design can be customized and extended for other settings, enabling researchers to continue to improve the network scale-up method. PMID:27015875

  14. Emotional experience improves with age: evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Laura L; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Brooks, Kathryn P; Nesselroade, John R

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory.

  15. Emotional experience improves with age: evidence based on over 10 years of experience sampling.

    PubMed

    Carstensen, Laura L; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R; Brooks, Kathryn P; Nesselroade, John R

    2011-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory. PMID:20973600

  16. Emotional Experience Improves With Age: Evidence Based on Over 10 Years of Experience Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Laura L.; Turan, Bulent; Scheibe, Susanne; Ram, Nilam; Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Samanez-Larkin, Gregory R.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Nesselroade, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that emotional well-being improves from early adulthood to old age. This study used experience-sampling to examine the developmental course of emotional experience in a representative sample of adults spanning early to very late adulthood. Participants (N = 184, Wave 1; N = 191, Wave 2; N = 178, Wave 3) reported their emotional states at five randomly selected times each day for a one week period. Using a measurement burst design, the one-week sampling procedure was repeated five and then ten years later. Cross-sectional and growth curve analyses indicate that aging is associated with more positive overall emotional well-being, with greater emotional stability and with more complexity (as evidenced by greater co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions). These findings remained robust after accounting for other variables that may be related to emotional experience (personality, verbal fluency, physical health, and demographic variables). Finally, emotional experience predicted mortality; controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity, individuals who experienced relatively more positive than negative emotions in everyday life were more likely to have survived over a 13 year period. Findings are discussed in the theoretical context of socioemotional selectivity theory. PMID:20973600

  17. Performance Improvements to the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W. C.; Petway, L. P.; Antill, C. W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is the first fully-engineered, modular, tunable, autonomous Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for the remote measurement of water vapor, aerosols and clouds across the troposphere. It was designed, built and environmentally tested at LARC. LASE was designed to fly aboard a NASA/Ames ER-2 aircraft (NASA's high altitude aircraft) and operate at altitudes from 58,000 to 70,000 feet. Since its first flight on May 11, 1994, it has flown 28 total missions on board the ER-2. LASE has been validated with results showing an accuracy better than the initial requirement for vertical profiles of water vapor in the troposphere. LASE can also deploy on several other aircraft including the NASA P-3 and will fly aboard the NASA DC-8 during the Convection And Moisture EXperiment (CAMEX) in July-September 1998. The tunable laser system of LASE was designed to operate in a double-pulse mode at 5Hz, with energy outputs of up to 15OmJ per pulse in the 813 to 819nm wavelength region and with 99% of the output energy within a spectral interval of 1.06 pm. Sixteen wavelengths were selected to cover the various water vapor absorption cross sections needed for the DIAL measurement. The Ti:Sapphire laser was constructed using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the pump source and a single mode diode laser as a injection seeder for the Ti:Al2O3 laser. We have improved the LASE instrument in several important ways. Improvements to the seed source have demonstrated that DFB laser diodes can be used as reliable seed sources on airborne DIAL instruments. The DFB diode has enabled LASE to gather more data and significantly reduced the maintenance required to insure that the system performance requirements are met. The multiwavelength sequential seeding technique is the current method of data collection for LASE. It has the advantages of providing an entire atmospheric coverage of H2O(v) from the ground to the aircraft altitude along a single

  18. Beyond the Rhetoric: A Framework for Evaluating Improvements to the Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Jeanette; Gordon, George

    2009-01-01

    A framework is described to assist institutions in evaluating the extent to which activities described as "quality improvements" or "quality enhancements" are likely to directly improve the student experience. The framework classifies ways of improving the student experience into "coaching improvements", "umpiring improvements", and "facilities…

  19. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-09-26

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

  20. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J.

    1992-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB{sub 6} biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V{sub bias} {le} 50 V and I{sub inj} {ge} 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  1. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  2. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  3. The experience factory: Can it make you a 5? or what is its relationship to other quality and improvement concepts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1992-01-01

    The concepts of quality improvements have permeated many businesses. It is clear that the nineties will be the quality era for software and there is a growing need to develop or adapt quality improvement approaches to the software business. Thus we must understand software as an artifact and software as a business. Since the business we are dealing with is software, we must understand the nature of software and software development. The software discipline is evolutionary and experimental; it is a laboratory science. Software is development not production. The technologies of the discipline are human based. There is a lack of models that allow us to reason about the process and the product. All software is not the same; process is a variable, goals are variable, etc. Packaged, reusable, experiences require additional resources in the form of organization, processes, people, etc. There have been a variety of organizational frameworks proposed to improve quality for various businesses. The ones discussed in this presentation include: Plan-Do-Check-Act, a quality improvement process based upon a feedback cycle for optimizing a single process model/production line; the Experience Factory/Quality Improvement Paradigm, continuous improvements through the experimentation, packaging, and reuse of experiences based upon a business's needs; Total Quality Management, a management approach to long term success through customer satisfaction based on the participation of all members of an organization; the SEI capability maturity model, a staged process improvement based upon assessment with regard to a set of key process areas until you reach a level 5 which represents a continuous process improvement; and Lean (software) Development, a principle supporting the concentration of the production on 'value added' activities and the elimination of reduction of 'not value added' activities.

  4. Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) Flight Experiment-Reflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.

    1997-01-01

    The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) is a flight experiment to demonstrate and validate in a microgravity environment the Static Feed Electrolyzer (SFE) concept which was selected for the use aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for oxygen (O2) generation. It also is to investigate the impact of microgravity on electrochemical cell performance. Electrochemical cells are important to the space program because they provide an efficient means of generating O2 and hydrogen (H2) in space. Oxygen and H2 are essential not only for the survival of humans in space but also for the efficient and economical operation of various space systems. Electrochemical cells can reduce the mass, volume and logistical penalties associated with resupply and storage by generating and/or consuming these gases in space. An initial flight of the EPICS was conducted aboard STS-69 from September 7 to 8, 1995. A temperature sensor characteristics shift and a missing line of software code resulted in only partial success of this initial flight. Based on the review and recommendations of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) review team a reflight activity was initiated to obtain the remaining desired results, not achieved during the initial flight.

  5. Talking about Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Mary; Axelroth, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses customer service in information centers and how to define it. Topics include the effects of competition, that give customers more choices; defining customers, and defining services; communications; physical environment; change, in customers and in technology; measuring customer service; and evaluating policies and procedures. (LRW)

  6. Government Customer Service Improvement Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Cuellar, Henry [D-TX-28

    2011-02-08

    09/12/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Improving Notification of Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Quality Improvement Project and Planned Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Jennifer L.; Munafo, Jennifer Knopf; Ekstrand, Rachel; Gillespie, Gordon; Holland, Carolyn; Britto, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Inadequate follow-up of positive sexually transmitted infection (STI) test results is a gap in health care quality that contributes to the epidemic of STIs in adolescent women. The goal of this study was to improve our ability to contact adolescent women with positive STI test results after an emergency department visit. METHODS: We conducted an interventional quality improvement project at a pediatric emergency department. Phase 1 included plan-do-study-act cycles to test interventions such as provider education and system changes. Phase 2 was a planned experiment studying 2 interventions (study cell phone and patient activation card), using a 2 × 2 factorial design with 1 background variable and 2 replications. Outcomes were: (1) the proportion of women aged 14 to 21 years with STI testing whose confidential telephone number was documented in the electronic medical record; (2) the proportion of STI positive women successfully contacted within 7 days. RESULTS: Phase 1 interventions increased the proportion of records with a confidential number from 24% to 58% and the proportion contacted from 45% to 65%, and decreased loss to follow-up from 40% to 24%. In phase 2, the proportion contacted decreased after the electronic medical record system changed and recording of the confidential number decreased. Study interventions (patient activation card and study cell phone) had a synergistic effect on successful contact, especially when confidential numbers were less reliably documented. CONCLUSIONS: Feasible and sustainable interventions such as improved documentation of a confidential number worked synergistically to increase our ability to successfully contact adolescent women with their STI test results. PMID:22753557

  8. Evaluation of a BSW Research Experience: Improving Student Research Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Ellen E.; Hughes, Anne; Bowden, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experience of 24 BSW students in a faculty-mentored undergraduate research experience (URE) over the course of 1 academic year. In particular, we sought to better understand students' self-perceived sense of competency across 15 specific research skills. In addition, we examined the URE's impact on students' knowledge…

  9. How Healthcare Can Refocus on Its Super-Customers (Patients, n =1) and Customers (Doctors and Nurses) by Leveraging Lessons from Amazon, Uber, and Watson.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Evelyne; Özdemir, Vural; Kolker, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare is transforming with data-intensive omics technologies and Big Data. The "revolution" has already happened in technology, but the bottlenecks have shifted to the social domain: Who can be empowered by Big Data? Who are the users and customers? In this review and innovation field analysis, we introduce the idea of a "super-customer" versus "customer" and relate both to 21st century healthcare. A "super-customer" in healthcare is the patient, sample size of n = 1, while "customers" are the providers of healthcare (e.g., doctors and nurses). The super-customers have been patients, enabled by unprecedented social practices, such as the ability to track one's physical activities, personal genomics, patient advocacy for greater autonomy, and self-governance, to name but a few. In contrast, the originally intended customers-providers, doctors, and nurses-have relatively lagged behind. With patients as super-customers, there are valuable lessons to be learned from industry examples, such as Amazon and Uber. To offer superior quality service, healthcare organizations have to refocus on the needs, pains, and aspirations of their super-customers by enabling the customers. We propose a strategic solution to this end: the PPT-DAM (People-Process-Technology empowered by Data, Analytics, and Metrics) approach. When applied together with the classic Experiment-Execute-Evaluate iterative methodology, we suggest PPT-DAM is an extremely powerful approach to deliver quality health services to super-customers and customers. As an example, we describe the PPT-DAM implementation by the Benchmarking Improvement Program at the Seattle Children's Hospital. Finally, we forecast that cognitive systems in general and IBM Watson in particular, if properly implemented, can bring transformative and sustainable capabilities in healthcare far beyond the current ones. PMID:27310474

  10. How Healthcare Can Refocus on Its Super-Customers (Patients, n =1) and Customers (Doctors and Nurses) by Leveraging Lessons from Amazon, Uber, and Watson.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Evelyne; Özdemir, Vural; Kolker, Eugene

    2016-06-01

    Healthcare is transforming with data-intensive omics technologies and Big Data. The "revolution" has already happened in technology, but the bottlenecks have shifted to the social domain: Who can be empowered by Big Data? Who are the users and customers? In this review and innovation field analysis, we introduce the idea of a "super-customer" versus "customer" and relate both to 21st century healthcare. A "super-customer" in healthcare is the patient, sample size of n = 1, while "customers" are the providers of healthcare (e.g., doctors and nurses). The super-customers have been patients, enabled by unprecedented social practices, such as the ability to track one's physical activities, personal genomics, patient advocacy for greater autonomy, and self-governance, to name but a few. In contrast, the originally intended customers-providers, doctors, and nurses-have relatively lagged behind. With patients as super-customers, there are valuable lessons to be learned from industry examples, such as Amazon and Uber. To offer superior quality service, healthcare organizations have to refocus on the needs, pains, and aspirations of their super-customers by enabling the customers. We propose a strategic solution to this end: the PPT-DAM (People-Process-Technology empowered by Data, Analytics, and Metrics) approach. When applied together with the classic Experiment-Execute-Evaluate iterative methodology, we suggest PPT-DAM is an extremely powerful approach to deliver quality health services to super-customers and customers. As an example, we describe the PPT-DAM implementation by the Benchmarking Improvement Program at the Seattle Children's Hospital. Finally, we forecast that cognitive systems in general and IBM Watson in particular, if properly implemented, can bring transformative and sustainable capabilities in healthcare far beyond the current ones.

  11. POTENTIAL AQUATIC COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT THROUGH A MULTIDISCIPLINARY STORMWATER MANAGEMENT EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small-scale urban stream restoration efforts (e.g., riparian planting and in-stream habitat structures) often fail to improve ecological structure and function due the continuous hydrologic and chemical disturbances posed by impervious surfaces upstream. Decentralized stormwater...

  12. Neurofeedback training aimed to improve focused attention and alertness in children with ADHD: a study of relative power of EEG rhythms using custom-made software application.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Brent; El-Baz, Ayman S; Sears, Lonnie; Tasman, Allan; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2013-07-01

    Neurofeedback is a nonpharmacological treatment for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We propose that operant conditioning of electroencephalogram (EEG) in neurofeedback training aimed to mitigate inattention and low arousal in ADHD, will be accompanied by changes in EEG bands' relative power. Patients were 18 children diagnosed with ADHD. The neurofeedback protocol ("Focus/Alertness" by Peak Achievement Trainer) has a focused attention and alertness training mode. The neurofeedback protocol provides one for Focus and one for Alertness. This does not allow for collecting information regarding changes in specific EEG bands (delta, theta, alpha, low and high beta, and gamma) power within the 2 to 45 Hz range. Quantitative EEG analysis was completed on each of twelve 25-minute-long sessions using a custom-made MatLab application to determine the relative power of each of the aforementioned EEG bands throughout each session, and from the first session to the last session. Additional statistical analysis determined significant changes in relative power within sessions (from minute 1 to minute 25) and between sessions (from session 1 to session 12). Analysis was of relative power of theta, alpha, low and high beta, theta/alpha, theta/beta, and theta/low beta and theta/high beta ratios. Additional secondary measures of patients' post-neurofeedback outcomes were assessed, using an audiovisual selective attention test (IVA + Plus) and behavioral evaluation scores from the Aberrant Behavior Checklist. Analysis of data computed in the MatLab application, determined that theta/low beta and theta/alpha ratios decreased significantly from session 1 to session 12, and from minute 1 to minute 25 within sessions. The findings regarding EEG changes resulting from brain wave self-regulation training, along with behavioral evaluations, will help elucidate neural mechanisms of neurofeedback aimed to improve focused attention and alertness in ADHD.

  13. Experiential Fidelity: Leveraging the Mind to Improve the VR Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhaus, Steffi; Lindeman, Robert W.

    Much of Virtual Reality (VR) is about creating environments that are believable. But though the visual and audio experiences we provide today are already of a rather high sensory fidelity, there is still something lacking; something hinders us from fully buying into the worlds we experience through VR technology. We introduce the notion of Experiential Fidelity, which is an attempt to create a deeper sense of presence by carefully designing the user experience. We suggest to guide the users' frame of mind in a way that their expectations, attitude, and attention are aligned with the actual VR experience, and that the user's own imagination is stimulated to complete the experience. This work was inspired by a collection of personal magic moments and factors that were named by leading researchers in VR. We present those magic moments and some thoughts on how we can tap into experiential fidelity. We propose to do this not through technological means, but rather through the careful use of suggestion and allusion. By priming the user's mind prior to exposure to our virtual worlds, we can assist her in entering a mental state that is more willing to believe, even using the limited actual fidelity available today.

  14. An Improved Design of a Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asfour, Abdul-Fattah A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment which: (1) examines the effect of residence time on conversion in a tubular flow reactor; and (2) compares the experimental conversions with those obtained from plug-flow and laminar-flow reactor models. (JN)

  15. Improving Learning Experiences through Gamification: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geelan, Benjamin; de Salas, Kristy; Lewis, Ian; King, Carolyn; Edwards, Dale; O'Mara, Aidan

    2015-01-01

    Gamified learning systems are becoming increasingly common within educational institutions, however there is a lack of understanding on the elements of gamification that influence, either positively or negatively, the learning experiences of students using these systems. This study examines an existing gamified learning tool implemented within an…

  16. Improving Intercultural Education at Chinese Institutions from German Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Lihe

    2015-01-01

    In this reflection paper, Lihe Huang describes his experience studying abroad in Germany as a visiting scholar. Through the well-designed introductory seminar and study tour arranged by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, which provided the grant for Huang's research on foreign languages teaching and intercultural education in Germany, he…

  17. Cyberbullying: Assessment of Student Experience for Continuous Improvement Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strom, Paris S.; Strom, Robert D.; Wingate, Julius J.; Kraska, Marie F.; Beckert, Troy E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the use of polling students to improve conditions of learning in their school. Students from three schools (N = 2,006) in Grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 completed an online poll about how cyberbullying affects their personal lives. Principals' impressions about the benefits of student polling are explained along with the Cyberbullying…

  18. A Peer Assessment System to Improve Student Team Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Robert; Goodman, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Groups are frequently used in courses, but there is substantial evidence that insufficient attention is paid to creating conditions for successful teamwork. One key condition is high-quality, individual, and team-level feedback. An online peer assessment system and team improvement process was developed for this test case based on three design…

  19. Rethinking Library Service: Improving the User Experience with Service Blueprinting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretlow, Cassi; Sobel, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Service blueprinting is a process that businesses use for analyzing and improving service. Originally presented in the Harvard Business Review in 1984, it has retained a strong following ever since. At present, it is experiencing a revival at numerous academic institutions. The authors of this article present the process of service blueprinting.…

  20. Method for Predicting Which Customers' Time Deposit Balances Will Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Toshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Morita, Masahiro; Komoda, Norihisa

    This paper proposes a method of predicting which customers' account balances will increase by using data mining to effectively and efficiently promote sales. Prediction by mining all the data in a business is difficult because of much time required to collect, process, and calculate it. The selection of which features are used for prediction is a critical issue. We propose a method of selecting features to improve the accuracy of prediction within practical time limits. It consists of three parts: (1) converting collected features into financial behavior features that reflect customer actions, (2) extracting features affecting increases in account balances from these collected and financial behavior features, and (3) predicting customers whose account balances will increase based on the extracted features. We found the accuracy of prediction in an experiment with our method to be higher than with other conventional methods.

  1. Improving quality at many levels. Profamilia's experience in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Trias, M; Plata, M I

    1994-01-01

    Profamilia, the Colombian family planning association and the country's largest family planning provider, began diversifying its services in 1982 to offer prenatal care services as well as general medical consultations. The organization has since attempted to integrate quality assurance at all levels of operation. Specifically, Profamilia is aiming to provide care which is of sustainably high quality to satisfy present clients and attract new ones without overtaxing available organization resources, thereby prompting the eventual financial collapse of the programs and the failure to increase coverage especially among the middle and lower classes of the country. Drawing from the credo of modern corporate enterprise, "the client is always right," Profamilia listens and responds to clients' needs with the goal of making their satisfaction the ultimate objective. Moreover, organization staff receive regular training to motivate their receptiveness to client needs, while the pursuit of quality exists as a major goal at the managerial level. Profamilia regards quality maintenance and improvement as indispensable in program sustainability.

  2. Improving public addiction treatment through performance contracting: the Delaware experiment.

    PubMed

    McLellan, A Thomas; Kemp, Jack; Brooks, Adam; Carise, Deni

    2008-09-01

    In fiscal 2002, Delaware replaced traditional cost-reimbursement contracts with performance-based contracts for all outpatient addiction treatment programs. Incentives included 90% capacity utilization and active patient participation in treatment. One of the programs failed to meet requirements. Strategies adopted by successful programs included extended hours of operation, facility enhancements, salary incentives for counselors, and two evidence-based therapies (MI and CBT). Average capacity utilization from 2001 to 2006 went from 54% to 95%; and the average proportion of patients' meeting participation requirements went from 53% to 70%--with no notable changes in the patient population. We conclude that properly designed, program-based contract incentives are feasible to apply, welcomed by programs and may help set the financial conditions necessary to implement other evidence-based clinical efforts; toward the overall goal of improving addiction treatment. PMID:18325621

  3. Early Experience with a Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Quality Improvement Program.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Derek; Edmiston, Rachel; Bijoor, Pooja; Deshpande, Rahul; de'Liguori Carino, Nicola; Ammori, Basil; Sherlock, David J

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to assess the impact of the introduction of a hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HPB) Quality Improvement Program (QIP) on postoperative complications following liver, biliary and pancreatic surgery. A prospective analysis of postoperative complications over a six month period was performed. Complications were analysed and graded according to internationally agreed definitions. Justification was sought and errors identified. Weekly meetings were performed to review each complication enabling an action plan to be created to prevent future recurrence. Rates were compared with previously audited and published results, using the chi-square test. A total of 326 procedures were performed over the six months including 30 pancreatectomies, 45 liver resections and 251 other procedures. 37 patients developed complications (11.3%) with 47 complications in total including two deaths. Using the ISGPS grading, eight complications were identified; two grade A, four grade B and two grade C. There were three grade A ISGLS complications and one grade B. 30 complications were justified as unavoidable, 16 as avoidable and one as indeterminate. Action plans included continued monitoring (n=41), formulation of new policy (n=3), individual counselling (n=4), educational offering (n=4). When compared with 2010 complication rates, 114 complications occurred in 233 liver operations during the baseline period, compared with 17 complications in 45 liver operations during the QIP period, OR=0.63 (95% CI: 0.33 to 1.22), p=0.17 and 86 complications occurred in 99 pancreatic resections during the baseline period, compared with 20 complications in 30 pancreatic resections during the QIP period OR=0.30 (95% CI: 0.12 to 0.79), p=0.01 The HPB QIP is a rigorous approach to grade every complication and death. A statistically significant reduction in pancreas related complications has already been obtained. Further work is required to determine the persistence and magnitude of this quality

  4. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Solmos, M., Hogan, K.J., VIerow, K.

    2008-09-14

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing.

  5. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors.

  6. The Student-Customer Orientation Questionnaire (SCOQ): Application of Customer Metaphor to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koris, Riina; Nokelainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study Bayesian dependency modelling (BDM) to validate the model of educational experiences and the student-customer orientation questionnaire (SCOQ), and to identify the categories of educatonal experience in which students expect a higher educational institutions (HEI) to be student-customer oriented.…

  7. Reinventing information services to increase customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the author presents her view of the role of an information service and proposes means of improving information customer service and satisfaction. The emphasis of the paper is on placing the primary value on the information customer rather than on the information itself. After receiving a request for information, the information service should strive for speed and accuracy of service to provide full-text sources in a language and format convenient to the customer. The author stresses that information professionals need to re-evaluate their roles to correctly assess and rectify customers` information deficiencies.

  8. Customer Service Training in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warshauer, Susan

    1988-01-01

    Front-line service providers can be the origin of customer's perceptions about an institution, and these initial perceptions can color subsequent interactions. To improve customer service, institutions need to offer training and recognition for providers. Characteristics of effective service and providing effective training are discussed. (MLW)

  9. Closing the loop on improvement: Packaging experience in the Software Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, Sharon R.; Landis, Linda C.; Doland, Jerry T.

    1994-01-01

    As part of its award-winning software process improvement program, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has developed an effective method for packaging organizational best practices based on real project experience into useful handbooks and training courses. This paper shares the SEL's experience over the past 12 years creating and updating software process handbooks and training courses. It provides cost models and guidelines for successful experience packaging derived from SEL experience.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelet Gel Improve Bone Deposition within CAD-CAM Custom-Made Ceramic HA Scaffolds for Condyle Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Ciocca, L.; Donati, D.; Ragazzini, S.; Dozza, B.; Rossi, F.; Fantini, M.; Spadari, A.; Romagnoli, N.; Landi, E.; Tampieri, A.; Piattelli, A.; Iezzi, G.; Scotti, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of a regenerative approach using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and CAD-CAM customized pure and porous hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds to replace the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle. Methods. Pure HA scaffolds with a 70% total porosity volume were prototyped using CAD-CAM technology to replace the two temporomandibular condyles (left and right) of the same animal. MSCs were derived from the aspirated iliac crest bone marrow, and platelets were obtained from the venous blood of the sheep. Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Sheep were sacrificed 4 months postoperatively. The HA scaffolds were explanted, histological specimens were prepared, and histomorphometric analysis was performed. Results. Analysis of the porosity reduction for apposition of newly formed bone showed a statistically significant difference in bone formation between condyles loaded with MSC and condyles without (P < 0.05). The bone ingrowth (BI) relative values of split-mouth comparison (right versus left side) showed a significant difference between condyles with and without MSCs (P < 0.05). Analysis of the test and control sides in the same animal using a split-mouth study design was performed; the condyle with MSCs showed greater bone formation. Conclusion. The split-mouth design confirmed an increment of bone regeneration into the HA scaffold of up to 797% upon application of MSCs. PMID:24073409

  11. How do students improve their value-based learning with task experience?

    PubMed

    DeLozier, Sarah; Dunlosky, John

    2015-01-01

    When learning items that vary in reward, students improve their scores (i.e., earned reward) with task experience. In four experiments, we examined whether such improvements arise from better selective encoding of items that would earn more (vs. less) reward. Participants studied and recalled words across multiple study-test trials. On each trial, 12 words were slated with different values (typically from 1 to 12), and participants earned the point value assigned to a given word if it was correctly recalled. In all experiments, participants earned more points across the first two trials. In Experiment 1, participants either self-paced their study or had experimenter-paced study and in Experiment 2, some participants were penalised for each second spent during study. Improvements in points earned were related to increases in overall recall but not to selective encoding. In Experiment 3, some participants were given value-emphasised instructions, yet they did not demonstrate selective encoding. In Experiment 4, we used a larger range of point values, but selective encoding still did not account for the improvement in point scores across lists. These results suggest that metacognitively-driven selective encoding is not necessary to observe improvements in value-based learning.

  12. Improving INPE'S balloon ground facilities for operation of the protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, F.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Cardoso, L.; Cardoso, P.; Braga, J.

    2014-10-01

    The system requirements for reusing the scientific balloon ground facilities available at INPE were a challenge to the ground system engineers involved in the protoMIRAX X-ray astronomy experiment. A significant effort on software updating was required for the balloon ground station. Considering that protoMIRAX is a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission, a ground infrastructure compatible with INPE's satellite operation approach would be useful and highly recommended to control and monitor the experiment during the balloon flights. This approach will make use of the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software-based architecture developed at INPE for satellite commanding and monitoring. SATCS complies with particular operational requirements of different satellites by using several customized object-oriented software elements and frameworks. We present the ground solution designed for protoMIRAX operation, the Control and Reception System (CRS). A new server computer, properly configured with Ethernet, has extended the existing ground station facilities with switch, converters and new software (OPS/SERVER) in order to support the available uplink and downlink channels being mapped to TCP/IP gateways required by SATCS. Currently, the CRS development is customizing the SATCS for the kernel functions of protoMIRAX command and telemetry processing. Design-patterns, component-based libraries and metadata are widely used in the SATCS in order to extend the frameworks to address the Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) for ground-balloon communication, in compliance with the services provided by the data handling computer onboard the protoMIRAX balloon.

  13. At Their Service. Making Life Happier for Customers and Staff. The Helping Hand Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Claire

    This guide is intended to help persons employed in the hotel and catering industry to improve their customer relations skills. The following topics are discussed: the importance of customers and good customer relations in the hospitality industry; what customers want; what employees in hospitality occupations can give customers; and importance of…

  14. Online Student Evaluation Improves Course Experience Questionnaire Results in a Physiotherapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Beatrice; Jones, Sue; Straker, Leon

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the use of an online student evaluation system, Course Experience on the Web (CEW), in a physiotherapy program to improve their Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) results. CEW comprises a course survey instrument modeled on the CEQ and a tailored unit survey instrument. Closure of the feedback loop is integral in the CEW…

  15. Student Evaluation to Improve the Student Learning Experience: An Australian University Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Beatrice M.

    2013-01-01

    Universities have been collecting student feedback on their experiences in teaching and learning for decades. Their voice is usually captured in surveys, and quantitative and qualitative data are used for quality improvement. Quantitative data are often used to monitor the student experience and used as a key performance measure in universities.…

  16. Assessing and Improving the Quality of Undergraduate Teaching in China: The Course Experience Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan

    2015-01-01

    Assessing and improving the quality of undergraduate teaching is an important issue in China. Using the Course Experience Questionnaire, this study examined the quality of undergraduate teaching by investigating the relationships between students' course experience, the learning outcomes demonstrated by the students and the learning environment.…

  17. An Evaluation of the Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Workshops: Results of a 1998 Customer Survey

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Gordon; N. Hall

    1999-04-01

    This report presents the results of a customer telephone survey of the participants of six workshops provided by the U. S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) during calendar years 1995 and 1996. The primary purpose for the survey was to provide the Team Leader for FEMP Technical Assistance and members of the team with detailed customer feedback pertaining to how well selected FEMP workshops are doing and to identify areas for improvement. The information presented enables managers to see both the strengths of their workshops, as well as workshop components that can be improved. In addition, the report identifies the questions included in the survey that were the most productive for obtaining customers experiences, opinions and recommendations. The experiences gained during this survey provide a platform from which to launch an annual FEMP customer survey.

  18. [On the improvement of the legal support of the food safety in the conditions of trade and economic integration of states-members of the Customs union and the Russian Federation's accession to the WTO].

    PubMed

    Bragina, I V; Aksenova, O I; Bokit'ko, B G; Gorsky, A A

    2013-01-01

    In the article priority activities of The Federal Service for the Oversight of Consumer Protection and Welfare on improvement of standard legal support of safety of foodstuff and control of compliance of foodstuff to legislation requirements are reported. The main documents directed on harmonization of the international requirements with national ones and requirements of the Customs union on safety of foodstuff are submitted. Work within a framework of Russian Federation's accession to the WTO is described. And data on control of quality and safety of foodstuff are provided also.

  19. Continuous improvement for winning in the marketplace: the Granite Rock experience.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, P R

    1996-11-01

    Leadership and the employee involvement approach are features of continuous improvement (CI). The experiences of Granite Rock with the strategy and practices for quality improvements are presented. The major factors to be focused on to move quality from the dismal levels that exist today toward world-class quality status are examined.

  20. Customer Relationship Management: A Case Study from a Metropolitan Campus of a Regional University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Edward R.; Owens, Alison; Yaghi, Shazhi

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the users and uses of a centralised customer relationship management (CRM) system at a regional Australian university to improve the understanding of the staff experience of interacting with this customised technology. How and why the software is used by a cross section of university departments is explored through…

  1. Self-Compassion Promotes Personal Improvement From Regret Experiences via Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Wei; Chen, Serena

    2016-02-01

    Why do some people report more personal improvement from their regret experiences than others? Three studies examined whether self-compassion promotes personal improvement derived from recalled regret experiences. In Study 1, we coded anonymous regret descriptions posted on a blog website. People who spontaneously described their regret with greater self-compassion were also judged as having expressed more personal improvement. In Study 2, higher trait self-compassion predicted greater self-reported and observer-rated personal improvement derived from recalled regret experiences. In Study 3, people induced to take a self-compassionate perspective toward a recalled regret experience reported greater acceptance, forgiveness, and personal improvement. A multiple mediation analysis comparing acceptance and forgiveness showed self-compassion led to greater personal improvement, in part, through heightened acceptance. Furthermore, self-compassion's effects on personal improvement were distinct from self-esteem and were not explained by adaptive emotional responses. Overall, the results suggest that self-compassion spurs positive adjustment in the face of regrets. PMID:26791595

  2. Self-Compassion Promotes Personal Improvement From Regret Experiences via Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Wei; Chen, Serena

    2016-02-01

    Why do some people report more personal improvement from their regret experiences than others? Three studies examined whether self-compassion promotes personal improvement derived from recalled regret experiences. In Study 1, we coded anonymous regret descriptions posted on a blog website. People who spontaneously described their regret with greater self-compassion were also judged as having expressed more personal improvement. In Study 2, higher trait self-compassion predicted greater self-reported and observer-rated personal improvement derived from recalled regret experiences. In Study 3, people induced to take a self-compassionate perspective toward a recalled regret experience reported greater acceptance, forgiveness, and personal improvement. A multiple mediation analysis comparing acceptance and forgiveness showed self-compassion led to greater personal improvement, in part, through heightened acceptance. Furthermore, self-compassion's effects on personal improvement were distinct from self-esteem and were not explained by adaptive emotional responses. Overall, the results suggest that self-compassion spurs positive adjustment in the face of regrets.

  3. Customer Loyalty in Virtual Environments: An Empirical Study in e-Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yu; Lee, Gin-Yuan; Ho, Yung-Ching

    2009-08-01

    The advent of e-commerce has increased the importance of consumer financing operations. Internet banking helps banks to develop relationship marketing, thus improve customer loyalty. This study proposes a research framework to examine the relationships among e-service quality, customer satisfaction, customer trust and e-loyalty in e-bank in Taiwan. Data are collected through a survey using a structured questionnaire. The 442 valid respondents who have experience with e-bank are analyzed by partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method. The managerial implication is e-bank must focus on e-service quality to increase customer satisfaction and trust for obtaining the e-loyalty.

  4. How to get the customer service your practice deserves.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    What is good customer service, and how can office managers and others who deal with medical supply distributors get the customer service they deserve? This article covers the basics of good customer service, including examples of companies known for putting the customer first-Nordstrom, Disney, Johnson &Johnson, and VaxServe. Helpful tips on what to look for in a distributor include personalized service, cost considerations, dedication, knowledge, experience, helpfulness, openness, reliability, and compatibility.

  5. Cleaning up the customer satisfaction waste dump

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, C.; Katz, G.M.

    1994-11-01

    Most electric utilities have been measuring Customer Satisfaction for several years now with the explicit goal of inducing their employees to improve their handling of customers. While many companies experienced early improvements, the scores have now leveled off. Increasingly, utilities are finding that their Customer Satisfaction Measurement system has reverted to little more than a {open_quotes}report card,{close_quotes} with no clear connection to business practice or processes. Even more alarming is the fact that many companies are now questioning the value of this complicated and expensive effort. This phenomenon is not unique to the electric utility industry -- it is happening in almost every industry in America. What companies really need is a way to tie customer satisfaction to business practices. To accomplish this, the Southern Company, along with several other utilities, are using the Voice of the Customer Process, which came out of the Japanese auto industry. It combines Customer Satisfaction Measurement with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in order to guide the company into linking specific customer wants and needs to explicit performance measures and business process improvement efforts.

  6. Healthscape role towards customer satisfaction in private healthcare.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debajani; Ghosh, Tathagata

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify the motives that enforce consumers to find out the major determinants that frame healthscape in private healthcare service that leads to their satisfaction in a developing country like India. Design/methodology/approach - The generic motive dimensions are identified using an exploratory factor analysis. Next the reliability and validity of the factors are established followed by regression analysis using SPSS 20.0 s/w. Findings - This paper identifies six healthscape motives in the private healthcare sector named as service personnel conduct and cleanliness, service delivery and facilities, ambience, location and look, appealing decoration, and upgraded safety service, out of which only service delivery, ambience, location, and decorations contribute the most to build customer satisfaction as per their significance value. Research limitations/implications - The various dimensions of healthcare motives should be viewed as the levers of improving hospitals' service quality in the minds of its present and future customers. This finding can offer valuable insight to the forthcoming as well as existing developer who are planning to have their healthcare service presence in India. Practical implications - This study suggests some important strategic guidelines for service positioning and market segmentation of healthcare services as per customer requirements. In the recent past, availing services from hospitals were purely utilitarian in nature. Customers were more inclined to get proper and timely services and cared more about the service quality of the healthcare service provider. Originality/value - This paper is among the few works done on understanding private healthcare service delivery process in India and customer satisfaction level from those Hospitals. This study addresses the gap by identifying a set of dimensions that are relevant to customers for a unique healthcare experience. PMID:27298059

  7. Healthscape role towards customer satisfaction in private healthcare.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debajani; Ghosh, Tathagata

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify the motives that enforce consumers to find out the major determinants that frame healthscape in private healthcare service that leads to their satisfaction in a developing country like India. Design/methodology/approach - The generic motive dimensions are identified using an exploratory factor analysis. Next the reliability and validity of the factors are established followed by regression analysis using SPSS 20.0 s/w. Findings - This paper identifies six healthscape motives in the private healthcare sector named as service personnel conduct and cleanliness, service delivery and facilities, ambience, location and look, appealing decoration, and upgraded safety service, out of which only service delivery, ambience, location, and decorations contribute the most to build customer satisfaction as per their significance value. Research limitations/implications - The various dimensions of healthcare motives should be viewed as the levers of improving hospitals' service quality in the minds of its present and future customers. This finding can offer valuable insight to the forthcoming as well as existing developer who are planning to have their healthcare service presence in India. Practical implications - This study suggests some important strategic guidelines for service positioning and market segmentation of healthcare services as per customer requirements. In the recent past, availing services from hospitals were purely utilitarian in nature. Customers were more inclined to get proper and timely services and cared more about the service quality of the healthcare service provider. Originality/value - This paper is among the few works done on understanding private healthcare service delivery process in India and customer satisfaction level from those Hospitals. This study addresses the gap by identifying a set of dimensions that are relevant to customers for a unique healthcare experience.

  8. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  9. Customer Relationship Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayerman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an approach increasingly employed by businesses to track and respond to their customers to provide better and faster services: customer relationship management. Discusses its applicability to the operations of higher education and institutional research and the role it plays in the knowledge management framework. (EV)

  10. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors. PMID:25722341

  11. Customized Training Marketing Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Ted

    This report outlines Oregon's Lane Community College's (LCC's) plan for marketing its customized training program for business, community organizations, public agencies, and their employees. Following a mission statement for the customized training program, a brief analysis is provided of the economic environment; of competition from educational…

  12. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  13. How Does Target Know so Much about Its Customers? Utilizing Customer Analytics to Make Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Hope B.; Craciun, Georgiana; Powell, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Every time shoppers make a purchase at a store or browse a Web site, customer behavior is tracked, analyzed, and perhaps shared with other businesses. Target Corporation is a leader in analyzing vast amounts of data to identify buying patterns, improve customer satisfaction, predict future trends, select promotional strategies, and increase…

  14. Customer Communication Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This procedure communicates to the Customers of the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division (AR&SD) Dynamics Systems Test Branch (DSTB) how to obtain services of the Six-Degrees-Of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS). The scope includes the major communication documents between the SDTS and its Customer. It established the initial communication and contact points as well as provides the initial documentation in electronic media for the customer. Contact the SDTS Manager (SM) for the names of numbers of the current contact points.

  15. Customer Aggregation: An Opportunity for Green Power?

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.; Bird, L.

    2001-02-26

    We undertook research into the experience of aggregation groups to determine whether customer aggregation offers an opportunity to bring green power choices to more customers. The objectives of this report, therefore, are to (1) identify the different types of aggregation that are occurring today, (2) learn whether aggregation offers an opportunity to advance sales of green power, and (3) share these concepts and approaches with potential aggregators and green power advocates.

  16. Analysing Customer Opinions with Text Mining Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Domenico

    2009-08-01

    Knowing what the customer thinks of a particular product/service helps top management to introduce improvements in processes and products, thus differentiating the company from their competitors and gain competitive advantages. The customers, with their preferences, determine the success or failure of a company. In order to know opinions of the customers we can use technologies available from the web 2.0 (blog, wiki, forums, chat, social networking, social commerce). From these web sites, useful information must be extracted, for strategic purposes, using techniques of sentiment analysis or opinion mining.

  17. A customer's definition of quality.

    PubMed

    Miller, T O

    1992-01-01

    What's the best way to get "close to the customer"? One company has developed a customer feedback system to drive product design, sales, service, and support functions in order to ensure better customer responsiveness.

  18. Comprehensive Family Services and customer satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Ruth A; Jones, Blake L; Miller, Viola P; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey results. CFS practices are associated with significantly higher customer satisfaction that improved over time for all groups. Although causality cannot be determined, the relationship is consistent, robust, and meaningful. PMID:17039825

  19. The right stuff ... meeting your customer needs.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Carrington, S

    1999-11-01

    Meeting (and exceeding) your customers' needs is a requirement for competing in the current business world. New tools and techniques must be employed to deal with the rapidly changing global environment. This article describes the success of a global supply chain integration project for a division of a large multinational corporation. A state-of-the-art ERP software package was implemented in conjunction with major process changes to improve the organization's ability to promise and deliver product to their customers. PMID:10623132

  20. Customization through Homeschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes why home school is a natural environment for customizing instruction to meet the individual needs of students, especially those with special needs and talents. (Contains 19 references.) (PKP)

  1. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  2. A customer service journey.

    PubMed

    VanDecandelaere, Traci

    2012-01-01

    Converting security team members from simple rule enforcers to superior customer service providers required changes in leadership attitudes, rules, training, and other security traditions, but it has paid off in staff performance and recognition, according to the author.

  3. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too. PMID:14619155

  4. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too.

  5. Liverpool's Discovery: A University Library Applies a New Search Tool to Improve the User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    This article features the University of Liverpool's arts and humanities library, which applies a new search tool to improve the user experience. In nearly every way imaginable, the Sydney Jones Library and the Harold Cohen Library--the university's two libraries that serve science, engineering, and medical students--support the lives of their…

  6. Defining Continuous Improvement and Cost Minimization Possibilities through School Choice Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrifield, John

    2009-01-01

    Studies of existing best practices cannot determine whether the current "best" schooling practices could be even better, less costly, or more effective and/or improve at a faster rate, but we can discover a cost effective menu of schooling options and each item's minimum cost through market accountability experiments. This paper describes…

  7. Development of a Web-Enabled Learning Platform for Geospatial Laboratories: Improving the Undergraduate Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mui, Amy B.; Nelson, Sarah; Huang, Bruce; He, Yuhong; Wilson, Kathi

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a web-enabled learning platform providing remote access to geospatial software that extends the learning experience outside of the laboratory setting. The platform was piloted in two undergraduate courses, and includes a software server, a data server, and remote student users. The platform was designed to improve the quality…

  8. Determining and Implementing Quality Exploratory Field Experience in Early Childhood Education through Improved Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgett, Maxine

    This practicum report describes an intervention to improve the quality of college students' experiences during their placement in a child care center as part of an introductory course in early childhood education. As a result of the intervention, 12 outcomes were expected. These outcomes were divided into 21 standards of achievement. Of these, 7…

  9. What Preschool Classroom Experiences Are Associated with Whether Children Improve in Visuomotor Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Anthony I.; Cameron, Claire E.; Ko, Michelle; LoCasale-Crouch, Jennifer; Grissmer, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: This study examined the contribution of several classroom experience measures (classroom characteristics, teacher characteristics, and teacher-child interactions) to preschoolers' improvement in visuomotor integration. Children (N = 467) ranged in age from 3 to 5 years old and were enrolled in 115 classrooms in 5 U.S. states.…

  10. Improving Students' Educational Experience by Harnessing Digital Technology: elgg in the ODL Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tung, Lai Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising popularity of both open and distance learning (ODL) and social networking tools, it seems logical to merge and harness these two popular technologies with the goal of improving student educational experience. The integration seems to hold tremendous promise for the open and distance learning mode. To reduce the gap in the…

  11. Randomized Controlled Trial of Teaching Methods: Do Classroom Experiments Improve Economic Education in High Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenkopf, Gerald; Sulser, Pascal A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present results from a comprehensive field experiment at Swiss high schools in which they compare the effectiveness of teaching methods in economics. They randomly assigned classes into an experimental and a conventional teaching group, or a control group that received no specific instruction. Both teaching treatments improve economic…

  12. "It's about Improving My Practice": The Learner Experience of Real-Time Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharplin, Erica J.; Stahl, Garth; Kehrwald, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on pre-service teachers' experience of the Real-Time Coaching model, an innovative technology-based approach to teacher training. The Real-Time Coaching model uses multiple feedback cycles via wireless technology to develop within pre-service teachers the specific skills and mindset toward continual improvement. Results of…

  13. Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) flight experiment phase C/D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The overall purpose of the Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study flight experiment is to demonstrate and validate in a microgravity environment the Static Feed Electrolyzer concept as well as investigate the effect of microgravity on water electrolysis performance. The scope of the experiment includes variations in microstructural characteristics of electrodes and current densities in a static feed electrolysis cell configuration. The results of the flight experiment will be used to improve efficiency of the static feed electrolysis process and other electrochemical regenerative life support processes by reducing power and expanding the operational range. Specific technologies that will benefit include water electrolysis for propulsion, energy storage, life support, extravehicular activity, in-space manufacturing and in-space science in addition to other electrochemical regenerative life support technologies such as electrochemical carbon dioxide and oxygen separation, electrochemical oxygen compression and water vapor electrolysis. The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study flight experiment design incorporates two primary hardware assemblies: the Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly and the Control/Monitor Instrumentation. The Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly contains three separate integrated electrolysis cells along with supporting pressure and temperature control components. The Control/Monitor Instrumentation controls the operation of the experiment via the Mechanical/Electrochemical Assembly components and provides for monitoring and control of critical parameters and storage of experimental data.

  14. Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment: a small-scale experiment to improve understanding of the risks of solar geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Dykema, John A; Keith, David W; Anderson, James G; Weisenstein, Debra

    2014-12-28

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) through stratospheric aerosol methods has the potential to mitigate impacts of climate change, our current knowledge of stratospheric processes suggests that these methods may entail significant risks. In addition to the risks associated with current knowledge, the possibility of 'unknown unknowns' exists that could significantly alter the risk assessment relative to our current understanding. While laboratory experimentation can improve the current state of knowledge and atmospheric models can assess large-scale climate response, they cannot capture possible unknown chemistry or represent the full range of interactive atmospheric chemical physics. Small-scale, in situ experimentation under well-regulated circumstances can begin to remove some of these uncertainties. This experiment-provisionally titled the stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment-is under development and will only proceed with transparent and predominantly governmental funding and independent risk assessment. We describe the scientific and technical foundation for performing, under external oversight, small-scale experiments to quantify the risks posed by SRM to activation of halogen species and subsequent erosion of stratospheric ozone. The paper's scope includes selection of the measurement platform, relevant aspects of stratospheric meteorology, operational considerations and instrument design and engineering.

  15. Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment: a small-scale experiment to improve understanding of the risks of solar geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Dykema, John A; Keith, David W; Anderson, James G; Weisenstein, Debra

    2014-12-28

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) through stratospheric aerosol methods has the potential to mitigate impacts of climate change, our current knowledge of stratospheric processes suggests that these methods may entail significant risks. In addition to the risks associated with current knowledge, the possibility of 'unknown unknowns' exists that could significantly alter the risk assessment relative to our current understanding. While laboratory experimentation can improve the current state of knowledge and atmospheric models can assess large-scale climate response, they cannot capture possible unknown chemistry or represent the full range of interactive atmospheric chemical physics. Small-scale, in situ experimentation under well-regulated circumstances can begin to remove some of these uncertainties. This experiment-provisionally titled the stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment-is under development and will only proceed with transparent and predominantly governmental funding and independent risk assessment. We describe the scientific and technical foundation for performing, under external oversight, small-scale experiments to quantify the risks posed by SRM to activation of halogen species and subsequent erosion of stratospheric ozone. The paper's scope includes selection of the measurement platform, relevant aspects of stratospheric meteorology, operational considerations and instrument design and engineering. PMID:25404681

  16. "This Is Malaysia. You Have to Follow the Custom Here": Narratives of the Student and Academic Experience in International Higher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahar, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    An invitation to be a visiting academic at a Malaysian university provided me with rich opportunities to talk with international students and academics and to explore their experiences of learning and teaching in that context. The university had developed an internationalisation strategy and was positioning itself as an "education hub"…

  17. Application of text mining for customer evaluations in commercial banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jing; Du, Xiaojiang; Hao, Pengpeng; Wang, Yanbo J.

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays customer attrition is increasingly serious in commercial banks. To combat this problem roundly, mining customer evaluation texts is as important as mining customer structured data. In order to extract hidden information from customer evaluations, Textual Feature Selection, Classification and Association Rule Mining are necessary techniques. This paper presents all three techniques by using Chinese Word Segmentation, C5.0 and Apriori, and a set of experiments were run based on a collection of real textual data that includes 823 customer evaluations taken from a Chinese commercial bank. Results, consequent solutions, some advice for the commercial bank are given in this paper.

  18. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  19. Development and preliminary psychometric properties of the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT)

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Michelle; Shepherd, Ashley; Lauder, William; Atherton, Iain; Cowie, Julie; Murphy, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a structurally valid and reliable, yet brief measure of patient experience of hospital quality of care, the Care Experience Feedback Improvement Tool (CEFIT). Also, to examine aspects of utility of CEFIT. Background Measuring quality improvement at the clinical interface has become a necessary component of healthcare measurement and improvement plans, but the effectiveness of measuring such complexity is dependent on the purpose and utility of the instrument used. Methods CEFIT was designed from a theoretical model, derived from the literature and a content validity index (CVI) procedure. A telephone population surveyed 802 eligible participants (healthcare experience within the previous 12 months) to complete CEFIT. Internal consistency reliability was tested using Cronbach's α. Principal component analysis was conducted to examine the factor structure and determine structural validity. Quality criteria were applied to judge aspects of utility. Results CVI found a statistically significant proportion of agreement between patient and practitioner experts for CEFIT construction. 802 eligible participants answered the CEFIT questions. Cronbach's α coefficient for internal consistency indicated high reliability (0.78). Interitem (question) total correlations (0.28–0.73) were used to establish the final instrument. Principal component analysis identified one factor accounting for 57.3% variance. Quality critique rated CEFIT as fair for content validity, excellent for structural validity, good for cost, poor for acceptability and good for educational impact. Conclusions CEFIT offers a brief yet structurally sound measure of patient experience of quality of care. The briefness of the 5-item instrument arguably offers high utility in practice. Further studies are needed to explore the utility of CEFIT to provide a robust basis for feedback to local clinical teams and drive quality improvement in the provision of care experience for patients

  20. Applicability of the ReproQ client experiences questionnaire for quality improvement in maternity care.

    PubMed

    Scheerhagen, Marisja; van Stel, Henk F; Tholhuijsen, Dominique J C; Birnie, Erwin; Franx, Arie; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ReproQuestionnaire (ReproQ) measures the client's experience with maternity care, following the WHO responsiveness model. In 2015, the ReproQ was appointed as national client experience questionnaire and will be added to the national list of indicators in maternity care. For using the ReproQ in quality improvement, the questionnaire should be able to identify best and worst practices. To achieve this, ReproQ should be reliable and able to identify relevant differences. Methods and Findings. We sent questionnaires to 17,867 women six weeks after labor (response 32%). Additionally, we invited 915 women for the retest (response 29%). Next we determined the test-retest reliability, the Minimally Important Difference (MID) and six known group comparisons, using two scorings methods: the percentage women with at least one negative experience and the mean score. The reliability for the percentage negative experience and mean score was both 'good' (Absolute agreement = 79%; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.78). The MID was 11% for the percentage negative and 0.15 for the mean score. Application of the MIDs revealed relevant differences in women's experience with regard to professional continuity, setting continuity and having travel time. Conclusions. The measurement characteristics of the ReproQ support its use in quality improvement cycle. Test-retest reliability was good, and the observed minimal important difference allows for discrimination of good and poor performers, also at the level of specific features of performance. PMID:27478690

  1. Applicability of the ReproQ client experiences questionnaire for quality improvement in maternity care

    PubMed Central

    Scheerhagen, Marisja; Tholhuijsen, Dominique J.C.; Birnie, Erwin; Franx, Arie; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The ReproQuestionnaire (ReproQ) measures the client’s experience with maternity care, following the WHO responsiveness model. In 2015, the ReproQ was appointed as national client experience questionnaire and will be added to the national list of indicators in maternity care. For using the ReproQ in quality improvement, the questionnaire should be able to identify best and worst practices. To achieve this, ReproQ should be reliable and able to identify relevant differences. Methods and Findings. We sent questionnaires to 17,867 women six weeks after labor (response 32%). Additionally, we invited 915 women for the retest (response 29%). Next we determined the test–retest reliability, the Minimally Important Difference (MID) and six known group comparisons, using two scorings methods: the percentage women with at least one negative experience and the mean score. The reliability for the percentage negative experience and mean score was both ‘good’ (Absolute agreement = 79%; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.78). The MID was 11% for the percentage negative and 0.15 for the mean score. Application of the MIDs revealed relevant differences in women’s experience with regard to professional continuity, setting continuity and having travel time. Conclusions. The measurement characteristics of the ReproQ support its use in quality improvement cycle. Test–retest reliability was good, and the observed minimal important difference allows for discrimination of good and poor performers, also at the level of specific features of performance. PMID:27478690

  2. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit.

  3. A new concept for utility integrated resource planning: ``Start with the customer``

    SciTech Connect

    Arsali, N.; Neelakanta, P.S.

    1998-04-01

    The competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is intensifying pressures for electric utilities to control costs through improved utilization of existing assets and by minimizing capital investment in new generation, transmission, and distribution capacity. This article introduces a new planning approach that can provide more informed business decisions, resulting in higher asset utilization, lower overall costs, and enhanced customer service. Unlike traditional planning methods, which assumed captive customer load growth, this process starts at the customer, focusing on how the customer`s energy service needs can best be met. Experience garnered from utilities on four continents illustrates the potential of this new approach to reduce capital expenditure for energy resource additions, often at less than one-half the cost of conventional solutions. By reorienting how utilities think, plan, and are internally organized, this new approach can assist utilities in making the fundamental transition to a customer-driven industry. Additional benefits include accurate costing of energy resources and wheeling, reduced vulnerability to conflicts over facility siting, reduced risk in a time of rapid industry change. The process proposed here may not be the best IRP process for utilities in the future but could be of significant benefit during the restructuring period.

  4. A 16 channel frequency-domain-modulation readout system with custom superconducting LC filters for the SWIPE instrument of the balloon-borne LSPE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorelli, G.; Baldini, A. M.; Bemporad, C.; Biasotti, M.; Cei, F.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; Fontanelli, F.; Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Gatti, F.; Incagli, M.; Grassi, M.; Nicolò, D.; Spinella, F.; Vaccaro, D.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, implementation and first tests of the superconducting LC filters for the frequency domain readout of spiderweb TES bolometers of the SWIPE experiment on the balloon-borne LSPE mission which aims at measuring the linear polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background at large angular scales to find the imprint of inflation on the B-mode CMB polarization. LC filters are designed, produced and tested at the INFN sections of Pisa and Genoa where thin film deposition and cryogenic test facilities are present, and where also the TES spiderweb bolometers are being produced.

  5. Improving follow-up to newborn hearing screening: a learning-collaborative experience.

    PubMed

    Russ, Shirley A; Hanna, Doris; DesGeorges, Janet; Forsman, Irene

    2010-08-01

    Although approximately 95% of US newborns are now screened for hearing loss at birth, more than half of those who do not pass the screen lack a documented diagnosis. In an effort to improve the quality of the follow-up process, teams from 8 states participated in a breakthrough-series learning collaborative. Teams were trained in the Model for Improvement, a quality-improvement approach that entails setting clear aims, tracking results, identifying proven or promising change strategies, and the use of small-scale, rapid-cycle plan-do-study-act tests of these changes. Parents acted as equal partners with professionals in guiding system improvement. Teams identified promising change strategies including ensuring the correct identification of the primary care provider before discharge from the birthing hospital; obtaining a second contact number for each family before discharge; "scripting" the message given to families when an infant does not pass the initial screening test; and using a "roadmap for families" as a joint communication tool between parents and professionals to demonstrate each family's location on the "diagnostic journey." A learning-collaborative approach to quality improvement can be applied at a state-system level. Participants reported that the collaborative experience allowed them to move beyond a focus on improving their own service to improving connections between services and viewing themselves as part of a larger system of care. Ongoing quality-improvement efforts will require refinement of measures used to assess improvement, development of valid indicators of system performance, and an active role for families at all levels of system improvement.

  6. Review of recent theories and experiments for improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Liu Guozhi; Tang Chuanxiang; Chen Changhua; Fang Jinyong

    2011-05-15

    Dielectric window breakdown is a serious challenge in high-power microwave (HPM) transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric. Methods of improving breakdown thresholds are key challenges in HPM systems. First, the main theoretical and experimental progress is reviewed. Next, the mechanisms of multipactor suppression for periodic rectangular and triangular surface profiles by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations are surveyed. Improved HPM breakdown thresholds are demonstrated by proof-of-principle and multigigawatt experiments. The current theories and experiments of using dc magnetic field to resonantly accelerate electrons to suppress multipactor are also synthesized. These methods of periodic profiles and magnetic field may solve the key issues of HPM vacuum dielectric breakdown.

  7. Experiments for improved positioning by means of integrated Doppler satellite observations and the NNSS broadcast ephemeris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arur, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    A study to improve position determination using broadcast ephemeris in Doppler data reduction is presented. The uncertainty of the broadcast ephemeris was assessed, and sample autocovariances were computed for acceleration, velocity, and position considering the state disturbance as a signal. An experiment was made in which three stations coobserved 12 passes, and the removal of the radial bias resulted in a chord distance which was in better agreement with the ground survey. In the second experiment, the station positions of the first test simulated the range observations, and the autocovariance function of the acceleration signal in the Cartesian coordinate system was used in an adaptive filtering procedure to improve the state of the satellite in one pass.

  8. Creativity and innovation by empowering the customer: The case of Mulino Bianco. Part II: The digital customer value added

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujor, A.; Avasilcăi, S.

    2015-11-01

    The terms of creativity, co-creation, creative industries, innovation, and coinnovation are more and more used nowadays. While co-creation offers the possibility and encourages a more active involvement from the customers to create value rich experiences, innovation is responsible for the little improvements made for a better life, to grow a business, to improve products, services or company's productivity. Either customers, current and potential, or stakeholders’ involvement into innovation activities, through their creativity, represent an important way of value creation, of actions’ performance that increases the worth of goods, services, or business as a whole. More and more, different size businesses gather ideas for innovation from customers / stakeholders by involving them into the early stages of the innovation process. Actually, it has been shown that their ideas sketch their needs and wishes, and have been described as “need information”. Customers and stakeholders, in general, also offer ideas that have been called “solution information”, which represents, not only need information, but also customer-based proposals that describe how ideas can be transformed into marketable products. The term of creative industries refers to those goods that can technically be reproduced, industrially produced, and commercially sold, this being one of the many definitions found in the literature. Mulino Bianco was first launched in Italy, being one of the value brands of Barilla Group, which we can say, according to the Italian definition and classification, it belongs to creative industries: industry of food and taste. Even though Barilla Group's Research & Development department does its job very efficiently, developing and creating new products under different brands, lately a key strategy for the Group and for Mulino Bianco, by default, is customers’ pro-active involvement in products’ development or creation. One of the tools used for this is the

  9. Simulated and Virtual Science Laboratory Experiments: Improving Critical Thinking and Higher-Order Learning Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Nicole A.

    Virtual laboratory experiments using interactive computer simulations are not being employed as viable alternatives to laboratory science curriculum at extensive enough rates within higher education. Rote traditional lab experiments are currently the norm and are not addressing inquiry, Critical Thinking, and cognition throughout the laboratory experience, linking with educational technologies (Pyatt & Sims, 2007; 2011; Trundle & Bell, 2010). A causal-comparative quantitative study was conducted with 150 learners enrolled at a two-year community college, to determine the effects of simulation laboratory experiments on Higher-Order Learning, Critical Thinking Skills, and Cognitive Load. The treatment population used simulated experiments, while the non-treatment sections performed traditional expository experiments. A comparison was made using the Revised Two-Factor Study Process survey, Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, and the Scientific Attitude Inventory survey, using a Repeated Measures ANOVA test for treatment or non-treatment. A main effect of simulated laboratory experiments was found for both Higher-Order Learning, [F (1, 148) = 30.32,p = 0.00, eta2 = 0.12] and Critical Thinking Skills, [F (1, 148) = 14.64,p = 0.00, eta 2 = 0.17] such that simulations showed greater increases than traditional experiments. Post-lab treatment group self-reports indicated increased marginal means (+4.86) in Higher-Order Learning and Critical Thinking Skills, compared to the non-treatment group (+4.71). Simulations also improved the scientific skills and mastery of basic scientific subject matter. It is recommended that additional research recognize that learners' Critical Thinking Skills change due to different instructional methodologies that occur throughout a semester.

  10. Improved Search for a Light Sterile Neutrino with the Full Configuration of the Daya Bay Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Treskov, K.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Wu, W. J.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    This Letter reports an improved search for light sterile neutrino mixing in the electron antineutrino disappearance channel with the full configuration of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. With an additional 404 days of data collected in eight antineutrino detectors, this search benefits from 3.6 times the statistics available to the previous publication, as well as from improvements in energy calibration and background reduction. A relative comparison of the rate and energy spectrum of reactor antineutrinos in the three experimental halls yields no evidence of sterile neutrino mixing in the 2 ×10-4≲|Δ m412|≲0.3 eV2 mass range. The resulting limits on sin22 θ14 are improved by approx imately a factor of 2 over previous results and constitute the most stringent constraints to date in the |Δ m412|≲0.2 eV2 region.

  11. Childbirth customs in Vietnamese traditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bodo, K.; Gibson, N.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine and understand how differences in the cultural backgrounds of Canadian physicians and their Vietnamese patients can affect the quality and efficacy of prenatal and postnatal treatment. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The information in this paper is based on a review of the literature, supplemented by interviews with members of the Vietnamese community in Edmonton, Alta. The literature was searched with MEDLINE (1966 to present), HEALTHSTAR (1975 to present), EMBASE (1988 to present), and Social Sciences Abstracts (1984 to present). Emphasis was placed on articles and other texts that dealt with Vietnamese customs surrounding childbirth, but information on health and health care customs was also considered. Interviews focused on the accuracy of information obtained from the research and the correlation of those data with personal experiences of Vietnamese community members. MAIN MESSAGE: Information in the texts used to research this paper suggests that traditional Vietnamese beliefs and practices surrounding birth are very different from the biomedical view of the Canadian medical system. The experiences and beliefs of the members of the Vietnamese community support this finding. Such cultural differences could contribute to misunderstandings between physicians and patients and could affect the quality and efficacy of health care provided. CONCLUSIONS: A sensitive and open approach to the patient's belief system and open and frank communication are necessary to ensure effective prenatal and postnatal treatment for recent Vietnamese immigrants and refugees. Education and awareness of cultural differences are necessary for physicians to provide the best and most effective health care possible. Images p692-a PMID:10099808

  12. Custom uniform source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcom, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this final report is to provide information on the Custom Uniform Source System (CSTM-USS-4000). The report includes documentation and summaries of the results for the work performed under the contract. The Annex contain laboratory test findings, photographs, and drawings of the sphere system.

  13. Chinese Festivals and Customs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sandra Aili

    Traditional festivals and customs of the Chinese people are described in this publication which can be used with secondary level students. In the margins of the text are numbers which indicate slides and cultural objects that relate to the text. The text, however, can be used without the slides and objects. The following festivals are described:…

  14. Chippewa Customs. Reprint Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Frances

    Using information obtained between 1907 and 1925 from members of the Chippewa tribe, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the United States National Museum, the book describes various Chippewa customs. Information, collected on six reservations in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the Manitou Rapids Reserve in Ontario, Canada, is provided concerning…

  15. Custom ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cain, J R

    1982-12-01

    The rehabilitation of a patient who has suffered the psychologic trauma of an ocular loss requires a prosthesis that will provide the optimum cosmetic and functional result. Refinement in the details of custom ocular construction has produced a superior restoration delivered more readily.

  16. Students as Customers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The idea that students might be treated as customers triggers academics' antipathy, which in turn can lead to managerial irritation and political frustration. There are different discourses which barely overlap as their protagonists speak past one another. This article argues that these differences can be reconciled by re-conceiving the…

  17. Customer requirements process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Yvonne; Falsetti, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    Customer requirements are presented through three viewgraphs. One graph presents the range of services, which include requirements management, network engineering, operations, and applications support. Another viewgraph presents the project planning process. The third viewgraph presents the programs and/or projects actively supported including life sciences, earth science and applications, solar system exploration, shuttle flight engineering, microgravity science, space physics, and astrophysics.

  18. Impacts of Evidence-Based Quality Improvement on Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Lisa V; Meredith, Lisa S; Parker, Louise E; Gordon, Nancy P; Hickey, Scot C; Oken, Carole; Lee, Martin L

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT Previous studies testing continuous quality improvement (CQI) for depression showed no effects. Methods for practices to self-improve depression care performance are needed. We assessed the impacts of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI), a modification of CQI, as carried out by 2 different health care systems, and collected qualitative data on the design and implementation process. OBJECTIVE Evaluate impacts of EBQI on practice-wide depression care and outcomes. DESIGN Practice-level randomized experiment comparing EBQI with usual care. SETTING Six Kaiser Permanente of Northern California and 3 Veterans Administration primary care practices randomly assigned to EBQI teams (6 practices) or usual care (3 practices). Practices included 245 primary care clinicians and 250,000 patients. INTERVENTION Researchers assisted system senior leaders to identify priorities for EBQI teams; initiated the manual-based EBQI process; and provided references and tools. EVALUATION PARTICIPANTS Five hundred and sixty-seven representative patients with major depression. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Appropriate treatment, depression, functional status, and satisfaction. RESULTS Depressed patients in EBQI practices showed a trend toward more appropriate treatment compared with those in usual care (46.0% vs 39.9% at 6 months, P = .07), but no significant improvement in 12-month depression symptom outcomes (27.0% vs 36.1% poor depression outcome, P = .18). Social functioning improved significantly (mean score 65.0 vs 56.8 at 12 months, P = .02); physical functioning did not. CONCLUSION Evidence-based quality improvement had perceptible, but modest, effects on practice performance for patients with depression. The modest improvements, along with qualitative data, identify potential future directions for improving CQI research and practice. PMID:16836631

  19. Evaluation of Improvements planned for TCS Upgrade on the TCS Prototype Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, John; Vlases, George; Andreason, Samuel; Milroy, Richard

    2002-11-01

    The formation and sustainment of the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) by a rotating magnetic field (RMF) presents new challenges from past FRC experiments. The much longer sustainment time, as well as the close proximity of the plasma to the vacuum boundary demand much better wall conditioning and protection. There are several improvements planned for the TCS experiment in this regard. They include the placing of conducting flux-preserving metal rings inside the vacuum chamber walls to maintain the FRC separatrix radius well away from the quartz wall. In addition, Titanium gettering is also planned to reduce the high impurity content that dominates energy loss in current experiments. Rotational instabilities are observed in the RMF driven plasmas as well, and a high order multipole barrier field is planned to stabilize these modes. It is unclear however whether the presence of the rings, the Ti gettering, or the multipole fields are compatible with the RMF current drive. Both the current TCS experiment, as well as the smaller scale RMF experiment, STX, are being adapted to test these new approaches for feasibility, and the results from these tests will be presented.

  20. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit. PMID:11184973

  1. Systematic review of approaches to using patient experience data for quality improvement in healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Gleeson, Helen; Calderon, Ana; Swami, Viren; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Explore how patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) are collected, communicated and used to inform quality improvement (QI) across healthcare settings. Design Systematic review. Setting Various primary and secondary care settings, including general practice, and acute and chronic care hospitals. Participants A full range of patient populations from (children through to the elderly) and staff (from healthcare practitioners to senior managers). Methods Scientific databases were searched (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE and Cochrane Libraries) as was grey literature. Qualitative and quantitative studies describing collection of PREM data and subsequent QI actions in any healthcare setting were included. Risk of bias was assessed using established criteria. Of 5312 initial hits, 32 full texts were screened, and 11 were included. Results Patient experience data were most commonly collected through surveys and used to identify small areas of incremental change to services that do not require a change to clinician behaviour (eg, changes to admission processes and producing educational materials). While staff in most studies reported having made effective improvements, authors struggled to identify what those changes were or the impact they had. Conclusions Findings suggest there is no single best way to collect or use PREM data for QI, but they do suggest some key points to consider when planning such an approach. For instance, formal training is recommended, as a lack of expertise in QI and confidence in interpreting patient experience data effectively may continue to be a barrier to a successful shift towards a more patient-centred healthcare service. In the context of QI, more attention is required on how patient experience data will be used to inform changes to practice and, in turn, measure any impact these changes may have on patient experience. PMID:27531733

  2. Sensitivity improvements to the YbF electron electric dipole moment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabey, Isabel; Devlin, Jack; Sauer, Ben; Hudson, Jony; Tarbutt, Mike; Hinds, Ed

    The electron is predicted to have a small electric dipole moment (EDM). The size of this fundamental property is intimately connected to the breaking of time reversal symmetry (T) in nature. The Standard Model, which does include a small amount of T asymmetry, predicts the EDM to be too small to ever detect at de<10-38 e.cm. However, many extensions of the Standard Model that suggest additional T-violation predict the electron's EDM to be within a measurable regime of both current and proposed experiments. This talk describes our YbF electron EDM experiment and introduces some of the technical improvements made to our machine since the last measurement. We have increased the statistical sensitivity of our interferometer by increasing the number of YbF molecules that participate in the experiment and by increasing their detection probability. We demonstrate several hardware developments that combine laser, microwave and rf fields which, when applied to YbF, can pump six times more population into the initial measurement state. In the detection region we have used techniques developed for molecular laser cooling, including resonant polarisation modulation, to dramatically increase the number of scattered photons by a factor of 10. Combining all improvements, the statistical uncertainty of our measurement is expected to be reduced by a factor of ninety, allowing us to search for physics beyond the Standard Model and below the recent upper limit of de<8.9x10-29 e.cm.

  3. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  4. Patients’ experience of Chinese Medicine Primary Care Services: Implications on Improving Coordination and Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent CH; Yip, Benjamin HK; Griffiths, Sian M; Yu, Ellen LM; Liu, Siya; Ho, Robin ST; Wu, Xinyin; Leung, Albert WN; Sit, Regina WS; Wu, Justin CY; Wong, Samuel YS

    2015-01-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) is major form of traditional and complementary medicine used by Chinese populations. Evaluation on patients’ experience on CM service is essential for improving service quality. This cross sectional study aims (i) to assess how CM clinics with different administrative model differ in terms of quality from patients’ perspective; and (ii) to investigate how quality varies with patients’ demographic and health characteristics. Five hundred and sixteen patients were sampled from charity and semi-public CM clinics in Hong Kong, and were invited to assess their experience using the Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCAT). Results indicated that overall mean PCAT scoring is satisfactory, achieving 70.7% (91.26/129) of total score. Ratings were lower in areas of “coordination of patient information”, “continuity of care”, and “range of service provided”. Impact of administrative models, including involvement of tax-funded healthcare system and outreach delivery, were minimal after adjusting for patient characteristics. Demographic and health characteristics of patients did not contribute to substantial variations in scoring. To improve patient experience, policy makers should consider strengthening care coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness in CM primary care services. Sharing of electronic records and establishing referral system are potential solutions for linking CM and conventional healthcare services. PMID:26686267

  5. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  6. Improvements in Target Fabrication for Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments at the University of Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, D. C.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A. J.; Doss, F. W.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Gillespie, R. S.

    2007-11-01

    Laboratory astrophysics seeks to study astrophysical phenomenon by modeling them in a micro-scale experiment, called a ``target'', which mimics the conditions and behavior of stellar phenomenon. Once built, the targets are transported to the Omega Laser Facility and placed in the laser chamber, where 5kJ of energy is fired onto a pinhead-sized area in order to create the necessary pressure required to launch the experiment. Collected data is then used to better understand the physics behind these various space phenomenon. Due to their extremely small size, targets must be built with a high degree of accuracy; therefore, continuously improving the process of target fabrication is crucial to experimental success. Some advancements in the target build process include more fully utilizing our machining capabilities, which allows for consistently cleaner, more accurately built targets. Another improvement is consolidating multiple functions into a single piece. This reduces the number of additional components, which reduces opportunities for error, as well as the overall build time. These changes have already been shown to improve our ability to collect successful data. *This research was sponsored by the NNSA through DOE Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058, DE-FG52-04NA00064, and other grants and contracts.

  7. Stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment: a small-scale experiment to improve understanding of the risks of solar geoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Dykema, John A.; Keith, David W.; Anderson, James G.; Weisenstein, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Although solar radiation management (SRM) through stratospheric aerosol methods has the potential to mitigate impacts of climate change, our current knowledge of stratospheric processes suggests that these methods may entail significant risks. In addition to the risks associated with current knowledge, the possibility of ‘unknown unknowns’ exists that could significantly alter the risk assessment relative to our current understanding. While laboratory experimentation can improve the current state of knowledge and atmospheric models can assess large-scale climate response, they cannot capture possible unknown chemistry or represent the full range of interactive atmospheric chemical physics. Small-scale, in situ experimentation under well-regulated circumstances can begin to remove some of these uncertainties. This experiment—provisionally titled the stratospheric controlled perturbation experiment—is under development and will only proceed with transparent and predominantly governmental funding and independent risk assessment. We describe the scientific and technical foundation for performing, under external oversight, small-scale experiments to quantify the risks posed by SRM to activation of halogen species and subsequent erosion of stratospheric ozone. The paper's scope includes selection of the measurement platform, relevant aspects of stratospheric meteorology, operational considerations and instrument design and engineering. PMID:25404681

  8. New tool gauges customer view of reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, M.M.; Robinson, P.J.

    1982-11-01

    Customers' perception and preference regarding the level of electric-system reliability they are willing to accept and pay for are examined in a landmark study sponsored by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corp. Advanced statistical and behavioral techniques are used to predict the impact of policy changes without the hazard of experimenting in the real world. 2 figures.

  9. NMR artifacts caused by decoupling of multiple-spin coherences: improved SLAP experiment.

    PubMed

    Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Contrary to common expectations, multiple-spin coherences containing products of proton and heteronucleus operators (e.g. Hu Cx , u = x, y, z) can produce not only sidebands but also noticeable centerband NMR signals of the heteronucleus during acquisition under 1H broadband decoupling. Such centerband signals of low abundant heteronuclei can be sources of relatively strong unexpected artifacts in NMR experiments that aim to detect very weak signals from much less-abundant isotopomers, e.g. 13C-13C ones. These findings lead to a new design of Sign Labeled Polarization Transfer (SLAP) pulse sequence (MSS-SLAP) with improved suppression of centerband peaks that are because of singly, e.g. 13C, labeled molecules (parent peaks). The MSS-SLAP experiment and its MSS-BIRD-SLAP variant are compared with a few older SLAP versions.

  10. A model for improving student confidence and experience in diagnostic sample collection and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Laurel E; Nettifee-Osborne, Julie A; Johnson, Jeffrey L

    2006-01-01

    Confidence and proficiency in diagnosing and treating a variety of diseases is of obvious importance to veterinary students. Traditional teaching methods relying on live-animal laboratories or teaching-hospital cases may not provide the breadth and depth of experience necessary to promote optimal development of confidence and skills. These settings also raise concerns about expense, about animal welfare when animals are used in teaching laboratories, and about the stress and potential risks associated with client-owned pets in the teaching hospital. A one-week course implemented in our veterinary curriculum provides the opportunity for students to develop self-assurance and experience in sample collection and interpretation skills in a realistic, clinical-model setting. This course provides students with significantly improved levels of confidence when performing procedures and interpreting results from a variety of procedures and helps prepare them to become clinicians entering the practice of veterinary medicine. PMID:16767653

  11. The Dialogue Between Medical Doctors and Bioethicists: Rethinking Experience to Improve Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Valera, Luca; Russo, María Teresa; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    More and more seems to be necessary to find new ways of communication between medical doctors and bioethicists in order to build a shared vocabulary and to prevent conflicts: many bioethical problems seem to be caused by the lack of dialogue between them, which both seem to speak two different languages. Improving this dialogue means searching new languages and innovative forms of communication: the narration could be a really effective tool to enhance the physicians' and bioethicist's moral conscience, since it facilitates reasoning on someone's particular experience, and, ultimately, on our experience. Starting from the results of a questionnaire administered to a group of students of the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University Campus Bio-Medico we present a theoretical discussion about the need for more dialogue and for a shared vocabulary in medical experiences. In this regard, we suggest as a possible solution to the conflicts among medical doctors and bioethicists, an educational strategy, i.e., humanities courses for medical students, which may help them to deeply describe their practical present (and future) experience.

  12. The Dialogue Between Medical Doctors and Bioethicists: Rethinking Experience to Improve Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Valera, Luca; Russo, María Teresa; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    More and more seems to be necessary to find new ways of communication between medical doctors and bioethicists in order to build a shared vocabulary and to prevent conflicts: many bioethical problems seem to be caused by the lack of dialogue between them, which both seem to speak two different languages. Improving this dialogue means searching new languages and innovative forms of communication: the narration could be a really effective tool to enhance the physicians' and bioethicist's moral conscience, since it facilitates reasoning on someone's particular experience, and, ultimately, on our experience. Starting from the results of a questionnaire administered to a group of students of the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University Campus Bio-Medico we present a theoretical discussion about the need for more dialogue and for a shared vocabulary in medical experiences. In this regard, we suggest as a possible solution to the conflicts among medical doctors and bioethicists, an educational strategy, i.e., humanities courses for medical students, which may help them to deeply describe their practical present (and future) experience. PMID:27637191

  13. Does privatisation of vocational rehabilitation improve labour market opportunities? Evidence from a field experiment in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Laun, Lisa; Thoursie, Peter Skogman

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyses if privatisation of vocational rehabilitation can improve labour market opportunities for individuals on long-term sickness absence. We use a field experiment performed by the Public Employment Service and the Social Insurance Agency in Sweden during 2008-2010, in which over 4000 participants were randomly offered private and public rehabilitation. We find no differences in employment rates following rehabilitation between individuals who received rehabilitation by private and public providers. Also the average cost of rehabilitation was essentially equal for the two types of providers. This suggests that there are no large efficiency gains from privatising vocational rehabilitation. PMID:24473220

  14. Improved prognosis in congenital diaphragmatic hernia: experience of 62 cases over 2-year period1

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Alistair; Sumner, Edward

    1982-01-01

    During 1979 and 1980, 62 babies with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were admitted to the Hospitals for Sick Children. All 62 babies underwent surgical closure of the anatomical defect. There were 44 survivors and 18 deaths, a survival rate of 71%. Both the number treated and the overall survival rate were greater than any series reported for a similar period. The number of admissions may reflect earlier diagnosis and improved resuscitation, with safer and more rapid transfer to our units. The improved survival must be mainly attributed to our experience over the past few years which has consolidated understanding and methods of management and led to a close cooperation between surgeon and anaesthetist both in immediate management and in postoperative care. PMID:7108880

  15. EOSDIS Customer Support Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, J. F.; Boquist, C. L.

    2006-05-01

    The Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a large, complex data system currently supporting over 18 operational NASA satellite missions including the flagship EOS missions: Terra, Aqua, and Aura. The observations collected by these missions are kept at geographically distributed data centers. EOSDIS manages over four petabytes of data accessed by over 200,000 distinct users last year. The data centers distributed more than 37 million Earth science data products during 2005 to a diverse customer community. An important goal for these data centers is to provide an adequate service at a uniform level for the user community to ensure we get the most benefit from our investment in space resources. This paper discusses the challenges, the ways the data centers coordinate among themselves to provide service, and recent results of measuring customer satisfaction with this service.

  16. Experience with a practice quality improvement system in a university radiology department.

    PubMed

    Kouo, Theresa

    2012-11-01

    In 2007, the ABR established and implemented Maintenance of Certification as a way to ensure radiologists' licensure and competency and to promote lifelong learning. Maintenance of Certification was instated for all radiologists receiving diagnostic radiology certificates starting in 2002. The 4 components of Maintenance of Certification are (1) Evidence of Professional Standing, (2) Lifelong Learning and Self-Assessment, (3) Cognitive Expertise, and (4) Practice Quality Improvement (PQI). Creating a PQI program involves establishing basic goals that, when met, will best benefit a department's needs. Developing a PQI system that promotes quality improvement will benefit the individuals involved, the department, and the institution. Much good can come from these projects: improved patient safety, increased efficiency and throughput with resultant cost savings, improved outcomes, and revenue generation. In addition, these efforts ensure that faculty members and trainees understand the importance of quality efforts in daily practice. This article reflects the author's experience setting up a PQI program for the radiology department of a large urban teaching hospital. Six steps are suggested to guide the creation of an effective PQI program.

  17. A web-based troubleshooting tool to help customers self-solve color issues with a digital printing workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Loewen, Victor; Lehto, Mark; Allebach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Current printing technologies enable customers to reproduce high quality, realistic, and colorful hard copies of their digital documents. Although the activity of printing is transparent to the customers, the progression of a customer's document through the color printing workflow (CPW) is a complex process that may alter the colors in the print job. Given the complexity of the CPW, it is a difficult problem to diagnose the source of the color issue. Novel tools and methods that address this challenge are beneficial for both the manufacturer and its customers. We propose a Web-based troubleshooting tool that helps customers to self-solve color issues with electrophotographic laser printers when printing solid colors in graphics and text. The tool helps the customer to reconfigure his/her CPW following printing best practices. If the issue is still unresolved, the tool guides the user to search the gamut of the printer for his/her color preference. The usability of the tool was carefully evaluated with human subject experiments. Also, the description and organization of the troubleshooting tasks were continuously reviewed and improved in regular meetings of the development team. In this paper, we describe the troubleshooting strategy, the color preference search algorithm, and the results of the usability experiments.

  18. CERTS customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F. Javier; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi,Kristina S.

    2000-03-01

    This effort represents a contribution to the wider distributed energy resources (DER) research of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS, http://certs.lbl.gov) that is intended to attack and, hopefully, resolve the technical barriers to DER adoption, particularly those that are unlikely to be of high priority to individual equipment vendors. The longer term goal of the Berkeley Lab effort is to guide the wider technical research towards the key technical problems by forecasting some likely patterns of DER adoption. In sharp contrast to traditional electricity utility planning, this work takes a customer-centric approach and focuses on DER adoption decision making at, what we currently think of as, the customer level. This study reports on Berkeley Lab's second year effort (completed in Federal fiscal year 2000, FY00) of a project aimed to anticipate patterns of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). Marnay, et al., 2000 describes the earlier FY99 Berkeley Lab work. The results presented herein are not intended to represent definitive economic analyses of possible DER projects by any means. The paucity of data available and the importance of excluded factors, such as environmental implications, are simply too important to make such an analysis possible at this time. Rather, the work presented represents a demonstration of the current model and an indicator of the potential to conduct more relevant studies in the future.

  19. Government Customer Service Improvement Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Cuellar, Henry [D-TX-28

    2013-04-19

    08/01/2013 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. A Quality Improvement Customer Service Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messina, Robert C., Jr.; And Others

    To develop a college-wide resolution process for dealing with student concerns, Burlington County College, in New Jersey, undertook a planning effort involving the faculty, student, staff, and administrator senates in the college's governance system. Rather than appoint an administrator to lead the project, a member of the staff senate was…

  1. Government Customer Service Improvement Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2013-04-18

    04/18/2013 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Government Customer Service Improvement Act of 2012

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2012-07-30

    07/30/2012 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Improving experience in personal social systems through family constellation seminars: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Christina; Bornhäuser, Annette; Link, Leoni; Schweitzer, Jochen; Weinhold, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the efficacy of family constellation seminars (FCSs) on individuals' experience in their personal social systems, especially the experience of belonging, autonomy, accord, and confidence. We conducted a single-blind, stratified and balanced, randomized controlled trial. Participants were 208 adults (M = 48 years, SD = 10, 79% women) who were randomly allocated either to the intervention group (3-day FCSs; 64 active participants, 40 observing participants) or to the wait-list group (64 active participants, 40 observing participants). Change was measured short-term (2-week and 4-month follow-up) using the Experience In Social Systems Questionnaire, personal domain (EXIS.pers). EXIS.pers is a new outcome measure being applied for the first time in evaluation research. In addition, we used interpersonal scales derived from established measures (Outcome Questionnaire, OQ-45; Tool for the Evaluation of the Psychotherapeutic Progress, FEP). The average person in the intervention group showed improved experience in personal social systems, as compared with approximately 73% of the wait-list group after 2 weeks (total score: Cohen's d = .61, p = .000) and 69% of the wait-list group after 4 months (total score: d = .53, p = .000). The results were confirmed in per-protocol analyses (n = 191) by the results of the EXIS.pers dimensions (Belonging, Autonomy, Accord, and Confidence) and the interpersonal scales derived from the OQ-45 and FEP. No adverse events were reported. This RCT provides first evidence that FCSs tend to positively influence participants' experience in their social systems.

  4. Michoacan People, Customs, and the Day of the Dead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maulhardt, Mary

    This curriculum guide is intended: (1) to expose students to the people and customs of Michoacan, Mexico; (2) to explore the meaning of traditional Day of the Dead customs through hands-on experiences; and (3) to build the self-esteem of second language learners of Mexican descent. During the study, students whose primary language is Spanish read…

  5. Are You Being Served? Designing the Customer Service Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ippoliti, Cinthya

    2014-01-01

    Customer service is a core component of user experience and an important element in making patrons feel welcomed and valued within our libraries. At the University of Maryland Libraries, we took on the challenging task of creating a customer service training curriculum for all staff working at public service points and offering a digital badge for…

  6. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  7. Gradient-Enhanced Triple-Resonance Three-Dimensional NMR Experiments with Improved Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhandiram, D. R.; Kay, L. E.

    1994-03-01

    The sensitivities of a number of gradient and nongradient versions of triple-resonance experiments are compared by quantitating the signal-to-noise ratios in spectra recorded on Cellulomonas fimi cellulose binding domain (110 amino acids), Xenopus laevis calmodulin (148 amino acids), Mycococcus xanthus protein S (173 amino acids), and a 93-amino acid fragment of protein S. It is shown that it is possible to construct sensitivity-enhanced gradient experiments, with 15N selection achieved via pulsed field gradients, that are as sensitive as their sensitivity-enhanced nongradient counterparts and significantly more sensitive than other gradient approaches. These sequences are very closely related to the family of improved-sensitivity sequences proposed by Rance and co-workers (A. G. Palmer, J. Cavanagh, P. E. Wright, and M. Rance, J. Magn. Reson.93, 151, 1991). The use of gradients greatly improves the quality of water suppression and reduces both the number of artifacts and the phase-cycling requirements at no cost in sensitivity for the proteins considered in this study.

  8. A New and Improved Spin-Dependent Dark Matter Exclusion Limit Using the PICASSO Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kenneth John

    2008-12-01

    The PICASSO project is a direct dark matter search experiment located 2070 metres underground in SNOLAB. Superheated droplets of Freon (C4 F10) are used as the active mass, providing a target for the incoming neutralinos. Recoiling nuclei deposit energy in the superheated Freon droplets, triggering a phase transition, the pressure waves of which can be detected using piezo-electric sensors. Previously published limits using an exposure of 1.98+/-0.19 kg day obtained a peak spin-dependent cross section exclusion limit for neutralino-proton interactions of 1.31 pb at a neutralino mass of 29 GeV/c2 at a 90% confidence level (1). Improvements in the detectors installed in the underground experiment have provided 20.99+/-0.25 kg day for analysis and improvements in the analysis method have produced an exclusion limit of 2.9x10-2 pb at a neutralino mass of 16.7 GeV/c2. In addition, a thorough study of the backgrounds, corrections and systematic uncertainties has been included, indicating that this limit does not exceed 3.5x10-2 pb when considering the one sigma error on the uncertainty band.

  9. An Experience Oriented-Convergence Improved Gravitational Search Algorithm for Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamforming Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Tiong, Sieh Kiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Rezai Soleymanpour, Hassan; Kibria, Salehin

    2016-01-01

    An experience oriented-convergence improved gravitational search algorithm (ECGSA) based on two new modifications, searching through the best experiments and using of a dynamic gravitational damping coefficient (α), is introduced in this paper. ECGSA saves its best fitness function evaluations and uses those as the agents’ positions in searching process. In this way, the optimal found trajectories are retained and the search starts from these trajectories, which allow the algorithm to avoid the local optimums. Also, the agents can move faster in search space to obtain better exploration during the first stage of the searching process and they can converge rapidly to the optimal solution at the final stage of the search process by means of the proposed dynamic gravitational damping coefficient. The performance of ECGSA has been evaluated by applying it to eight standard benchmark functions along with six complicated composite test functions. It is also applied to adaptive beamforming problem as a practical issue to improve the weight vectors computed by minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming technique. The results of implementation of the proposed algorithm are compared with some well-known heuristic methods and verified the proposed method in both reaching to optimal solutions and robustness. PMID:27399904

  10. An Experience Oriented-Convergence Improved Gravitational Search Algorithm for Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamforming Optimum.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Tiong, Sieh Kiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Rezai Soleymanpour, Hassan; Kibria, Salehin

    2016-01-01

    An experience oriented-convergence improved gravitational search algorithm (ECGSA) based on two new modifications, searching through the best experiments and using of a dynamic gravitational damping coefficient (α), is introduced in this paper. ECGSA saves its best fitness function evaluations and uses those as the agents' positions in searching process. In this way, the optimal found trajectories are retained and the search starts from these trajectories, which allow the algorithm to avoid the local optimums. Also, the agents can move faster in search space to obtain better exploration during the first stage of the searching process and they can converge rapidly to the optimal solution at the final stage of the search process by means of the proposed dynamic gravitational damping coefficient. The performance of ECGSA has been evaluated by applying it to eight standard benchmark functions along with six complicated composite test functions. It is also applied to adaptive beamforming problem as a practical issue to improve the weight vectors computed by minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming technique. The results of implementation of the proposed algorithm are compared with some well-known heuristic methods and verified the proposed method in both reaching to optimal solutions and robustness. PMID:27399904

  11. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  12. Does using active learning in thermodynamics lectures improve students’ conceptual understanding and learning experiences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, H.; Sharma, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Encouraging ‘active learning’ in the large lecture theatre emerges as a credible recommendation for improving university courses, with reports often showing significant improvements in learning outcomes. However, the recommendations are based predominantly on studies undertaken in mechanics. We set out to examine those claims in the thermodynamics module of a large first year physics course with an established technique, called interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs). The study took place at The University of Sydney, where four parallel streams of the thermodynamics module were divided into two streams that experienced the ILDs and two streams that did not. The programme was first implemented in 2011 to gain experience and refine logistical matters and repeated in 2012 with approximately 500 students. A validated survey, the thermal concepts survey, was used as pre-test and post-test to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided insights into what the ‘active learning’ meant from student experiences. We analysed lecture recordings to capture the time devoted to different activities in a lecture, including interactivity. The learning gains were in the ‘high gain’ range for the ILD streams and ‘medium gain’ for the other streams. The analysis of the lecture recordings showed that the ILD streams devoted significantly more time to interactivity while surveys and interviews showed that students in the ILD streams were thinking in deep ways. Our study shows that ILDs can make a difference in students’ conceptual understanding as well as their experiences, demonstrating the potential value-add that can be provided by investing in active learning to enhance lectures.

  13. Can decision biases improve insurance outcomes? An experiment on status quo bias in health insurance choice.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  14. Can decision biases improve insurance outcomes? An experiment on status quo bias in health insurance choice.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-06-19

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure.

  15. Simultaneous Deposition of Mass Selected Anions and Cations: Improvements in Ion Delivery for Matrix Isolation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Michael E.; Moore, David T.

    2016-06-01

    A focus of the research in our group has been to develop improved methods for ion delivery in matrix isolation experiments. We have previously reported a method to co-deposit low energy, mass selected metal anions and a rare gas counter cation.a A modification allowing for mass selection of both the anion and cation will be discussed. Results from preliminary experiments of mass selected, low energy Cu- and SF5+ will also be highlighted. To our knowledge, these experiments are the first time two mass selected beams of ions have been simultaneously deposited into a cryogenic matrix. Co-deposition of the ions into an argon matrix doped with 0.02% CO at 20K resulted in the observation of bands assigned to SF5+ and anionic copper carbonyl complexes, Cu(CO)n- (n=1-3). Upon irradiation of the matrix with a narrow band, blue LED, the copper carbonyl complexes are converted to the neutral analogues, while the fate of the photodetached electrons can be directly tracked, as a decrease of the SF5+ band and a growth of the neutral SF5 band are observed. aLudwig, R. M.; Moore, D. T.; J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244202 (2013).

  16. A field experiment of improved steam drive with in-situ foaming

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.; Malito, J.A.; Marcou, J.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

    1984-04-01

    This paper is a progress report on the design and execution of a field experiment on recovery of heavy oils by steam drive enhanced by additives. The goal of this project is to study the effect of injection of a commercial surfactant (Suntech IV) and nitrogen on the behavior of a conventional steam drive. The laboratory studies leading to the design and implementation of this field experiment have been referenced many times, consequently in this paper we will emphasize field data obtained in the following areas: reservoir definition, monitoring of the progress of the experiment, production evaluation in a heavy oil reservoir. Several standard and experimental analytical methods have been applied and their validity in the Kern River field test is discussed. Now in its third year, the project has seen the injection of three slugs of surfactant and nitrogen at different rates. The analysis of the results to date show a considerable improvement in oil recovery by steam drive caused by the addition of surfactant and nitrogen to the steam. The changes in production behavior of the reservoir caused by the additives are analyzed and discussed. The economics of this project are difficult to determine at this point but look promising.

  17. Can Decision Biases Improve Insurance Outcomes? An Experiment on Status Quo Bias in Health Insurance Choice

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure. PMID:23783222

  18. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  19. The Customer Comes First: Implementing a Customer Service Program at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Jerrie; Llewellyn, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Library customers have more remote information choices than ever before, so we must ensure that when they do come to the library, they experience a welcoming environment, a high standard of service, and receive equitable levels of service across campus. Developing a customer service program was a logical next step to reinforce the ongoing…

  20. Meeting the needs of customers with health CRM.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jon; Panchal, Samir

    2002-01-01

    Customer relationship management (CRM) is a business strategy, supported by applications and technologies, that can fundamentally transform how healthcare delivery organizations manage patient and physician interactions, reduce cost, improve customer-facing processes, drive market and revenue growth, and manage regulatory compliance processes. PMID:12119844

  1. Improving medical student attitudes toward older patients through a "council of elders" and reflective writing experience.

    PubMed

    Westmoreland, Glenda R; Counsell, Steven R; Sennour, Youcef; Schubert, Cathy C; Frank, Kathryn I; Wu, Jingwei; Frankel, Richard M; Litzelman, Debra K; Bogdewic, Stephen P; Inui, Thomas S

    2009-02-01

    In an effort to reduce "agism" which is prevalent among medical trainees, a new geriatrics educational experience for medical students aimed at improving attitudes toward older patients was developed. Each 90-minute Older Adult Session included four components: initial reflective writing exercise; introduction to the session; 75-minute dialogue with the "Council of Elders," a group of active, "well" older adults; and final reflective writing exercise. The new session was provided to 237 first- and second-year medical students during the 2006/07 academic year at Indiana University School of Medicine. Session evaluation included comparing scores on the 14-item Geriatrics Attitude Scale administered before and after the session, identifying attitude changes in the reflective writing exercises, and a student satisfaction survey. Student responses on the Geriatrics Attitude Scale after the session were significantly improved in seven of 14 items, demonstrating better attitudes toward being with and listening to older people and caring for older patients. Analysis of the reflective writings revealed changing of negative to positive or reinforced positive attitudes in 27% of medical students, with attitudes not discernable in the remaining 73% (except one student, in whom positive attitudes changed to negative). Learner satisfaction with the Older Adult Session was high, with 98% agreeing that the session had a positive effect on insight into the care of older adults. A Council of Elders coupled with a reflective writing exercise is a promising new approach to improving attitudes of medical students toward their geriatric patients.

  2. An initial experience with 85 consecutive robotic assisted rectal dissections: Improved operating times and lower costs with experience

    PubMed Central

    Byrn, John C.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Charlton, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data is limited about the robotic platform in rectal dissections, and its use may be perceived as prohibitively expensive or difficult to learn. We report our experience with the initial robotic-assisted rectal dissections performed by a single surgeon, assessing learning curve and cost. Methods Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review was conducted of the first 85 robotic-assisted rectal dissections performed by a single surgeon between 9/1/2010–12/31/2012. Patient demographic, clinicopathologic, procedure, and outcome data were gathered. Cost data was obtained from the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database. The first 43 cases (Time 1) were compared to the next 42 cases (Time 2) using multivariate linear and logistic regression models. Results Indications for surgery were cancer for 51 patients (60%), inflammatory bowel disease for 18 (21%), and rectal prolapse for 16 (19%). The most common procedures were low anterior resection (n=25, 29%) and abdominoperineal resection (n=21, 25%). The patient body mass index (BMI) was statistically different between the two patient groups (Time 1, 26.1 kg/m2 vs. Time 2, 29.4 kg/m2, p=0.02). Complication and conversion rates did not differ between the groups. Mean operating time was significantly shorter for Time 2 (267 minutes vs. 224 minutes, p=0.049) and remained significant in multivariate analysis. Though not reaching statistical significance, the mean observed direct hospital cost decreased ($17,349 for Time 1 vs. $13,680 for Time 2, p=0.2). The observed/expected cost ratio significantly decreased (1.47 for Time 1 vs. 1.05 for Time 2, p=0.007) but did not remain statistically significant in multivariate analyses. Conclusions Over the series, we demonstrated a significant improvement in operating times. Though not statistically significant, direct hospital costs trended down over time. Studies of larger patient groups are needed to confirm these findings, and to correlate them with

  3. Making customer-service a priority in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Joshua; Persaud, David

    2008-01-01

    Improving customer-service in health care organizations has been linked to better patient care, satisfied staff, a reduction in preventable medical errors, fewer malpractice lawsuits and improved revenue. However, it has been observed that there is sometimes a gap between the level of customer-service provided by health care organizations and their clients' expectations. This paper integrates, synthesizes and extends theory and practice from existing literature to provide health care organizations with strategies for closing this gap. Methods are also outlined for creating, implementing and evaluating an organizational plan for improving customer-service.

  4. Customizing the JPL Multimission Ground Data System: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Susan C.; Louie, John J.; Guerrero, Ana Maria; Hurley, Daniel; Flora-Adams, Dana

    1994-01-01

    The Multimission Ground Data System (MGDS) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has brought improvements and new technologies to mission operations. It was designed as a generic data system to meet the needs of multiple missions and avoid re-inventing capabilities for each new mission and thus reduce costs. It is based on adaptable tools that can be customized to support different missions and operations scenarios. The MGDS is based on a distributed client/server architecture, with powerful Unix workstations, incorporating standards and open system architectures. The distributed architecture allows remote operations and user science data exchange, while also providing capabilities for centralized ground system monitor and control. The MGDS has proved its capabilities in supporting multiple large-class missions simultaneously, including the Voyager, Galileo, Magellan, Ulysses, and Mars Observer missions. The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has been leading Customer Adaptation Training (CAT) teams for adapting and customizing MGDS for the various operations and engineering teams. These CAT teams have typically consisted of only a few engineers who are familiar with operations and with the MGDS software and architecture. Our experience has provided a unique opportunity to work directly with the spacecraft and instrument operations teams and understand their requirements and how the MGDS can be adapted and customized to minimize their operations costs. As part of this work, we have developed workstation configurations, automation tools, and integrated user interfaces at minimal cost that have significantly improved productivity. We have also proved that these customized data systems are most successful if they are focused on the people and the tasks they perform and if they are based upon user confidence in the development team resulting from daily interactions. This paper will describe lessons learned in adapting JPL's MGDS to fly the Voyager, Galileo, and Mars

  5. Co-streaming classes: a follow-up study in improving the user experience to better reach users.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Barrie E; Handler, Lara J; Main, Lindsey R

    2011-01-01

    Co-streaming classes have enabled library staff to extend open classes to distance education students and other users. Student evaluations showed that the model could be improved. Two areas required attention: audio problems experienced by online participants and staff teaching methods. Staff tested equipment and adjusted software configuration to improve user experience. Staff training increased familiarity with specialized teaching techniques and troubleshooting procedures. Technology testing and staff training were completed, and best practices were developed and applied. Class evaluations indicate improvements in classroom experience. Future plans include expanding co-streaming to more classes and on-going data collection, evaluation, and improvement of classes.

  6. Evaluating the welfare effects of improved wastewater treatment using a discrete choice experiment.

    PubMed

    Ndunda, Ezekiel N; Mungatana, Eric D

    2013-07-15

    This paper employs the discrete choice experiment method to estimate the benefits of improved wastewater treatment programs to mitigate the impacts of water pollution in Nairobi, Kenya. Urban and peri-urban farmers who use wastewater for irrigation from Motoine to Ngong River in Nairobi were randomly selected for the study. A random parameter logit model was used to estimate the individual level willingness to pay for the wastewater treatment before reuse in irrigation. The results show that urban and peri-urban farmers are willing to pay significant monthly municipality taxes for treatment of wastewater. We find that the quality of treated wastewater, the quantity of treated wastewater and the riverine ecosystem restoration are significant factors of preference over alternative policy designs in reduction of water pollution. PMID:23583865

  7. Additional experiments on flowability improvements of aviation fuels at low temperatures, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockemer, F. J.; Deane, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study flow improver additives and scale-model fuel heating systems for use with aviation hydrocarbon fuel at low temperatures. Test were performed in a facility that simulated the heat transfer and temperature profiles anticipated in wing fuel tanks during flight of long-range commercial aircraft. The results are presented of experiments conducted in a test tank simulating a section of an outer wing integral fuel tank approximately full-scale in height, chilled through heat exchange panels bonded to the upper and lower horizontal surfaces. A separate system heated lubricating oil externally by a controllable electric heater, to transfer heat to fuel pumped from the test tank through an oil-to-fuel heat exchanger, and to recirculate the heated fuel back to the test tank.

  8. Improving the patient experience with real-time PICC placement confirmation.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, Claire

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are now widely used in health care. The use of ultrasound and the micro introducer set have led to an increase in successful insertion rates. However, malposition can still be a problem. This can lead to delays in treatment, increase in procedure time and repeated chest X-rays as well as placement failure. Evolving technologies mean that these challenges can now be overcome. This article describes how a tracking and tip confirmation system (Sherlock 3CG Tip Confirmation System, CR Bard) was used to improve the patient experience during PICC placements by preventing malposition and delays in the start of treatment. Of 88 PICCs placed with the system, all were in an acceptable position when confirmed by chest X-ray and therefore none required any further adjustments post insertion.

  9. An Interprofessional Diabetes Experience to Improve Pharmacy and Nursing Students’ Competency in Collaborative Practice

    PubMed Central

    Westberg, Sarah; Rowan, Mary; Schweiss, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To improve pharmacy and nursing students’ competency in collaborative practice by having them participate in an interprofessional diabetes experience involving social networking. Design. An existing elective course on diabetes management was modified to include interprofessional content based on Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competency domains. Web-based collaborative tools (social networking and video chat) were used to allow nursing and pharmacy students located on 2 different campuses to apply diabetes management content as an interprofessional team. Assessment. Mixed-method analyses demonstrated an increase in students’ knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the other profession and developed an understanding of interprofessional communication strategies and their central role in effective teamwork. Conclusion. Interprofessional content and activities can be effectively integrated into an existing course and offered successfully to students from other professional programs and on remote campuses. PMID:24249859

  10. Improving prescribing practice in psychiatry: the experience of the Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health (POMH-UK).

    PubMed

    Barnes, Thomas R E; Paton, Carol

    2011-08-01

    Data from the UK Prescribing Observatory for Mental Health (POMH-UK) suggest that while positive change in prescribing practice can be achieved with focused, audit-based, quality improvement programmes (QIPs) that include feedback of benchmarked performance data and customized change interventions, the time frame for progress is long and improvement generally modest. Improvement may be seen between the baseline audit and re-audit, but supplementary audits conducted in subsequent years can show incremental, sustained improvement in clinical services that have been consistently involved. Audit invariably reveals a marked variation across and within healthcare organizations in the level of compliance with evidence-based clinical practice standards. Additional work has identified various impediments to behavioural change. Some are common to all QIPs, such as the incomplete dissemination of audit results throughout participating organizations and variable uptake of change interventions. Others are specific to particular QIPs, depending on the prescribing issue addressed. For example, in a QIP targeting biochemical monitoring of lithium treatment, the major barrier was the complexity of clinical care arrangements, including multiple interfaces between clinical and laboratory services, which were often not directly or wholly under the control of clinical teams. In this QIP there was little improvement in overall performance against the clinical standards in the total national sample between baseline and re-audit.

  11. Neural signatures of experience-based improvements in deterministic decision-making.

    PubMed

    Tremel, Joshua J; Laurent, Patryk A; Wolk, David A; Wheeler, Mark E; Fiez, Julie A

    2016-12-15

    Feedback about our choices is a crucial part of how we gather information and learn from our environment. It provides key information about decision experiences that can be used to optimize future choices. However, our understanding of the processes through which feedback translates into improved decision-making is lacking. Using neuroimaging (fMRI) and cognitive models of decision-making and learning, we examined the influence of feedback on multiple aspects of decision processes across learning. Subjects learned correct choices to a set of 50 word pairs across eight repetitions of a concurrent discrimination task. Behavioral measures were then analyzed with both a drift-diffusion model and a reinforcement learning model. Parameter values from each were then used as fMRI regressors to identify regions whose activity fluctuates with specific cognitive processes described by the models. The patterns of intersecting neural effects across models support two main inferences about the influence of feedback on decision-making. First, frontal, anterior insular, fusiform, and caudate nucleus regions behave like performance monitors, reflecting errors in performance predictions that signal the need for changes in control over decision-making. Second, temporoparietal, supplementary motor, and putamen regions behave like mnemonic storage sites, reflecting differences in learned item values that inform optimal decision choices. As information about optimal choices is accrued, these neural systems dynamically adjust, likely shifting the burden of decision processing from controlled performance monitoring to bottom-up, stimulus-driven choice selection. Collectively, the results provide a detailed perspective on the fundamental ability to use past experiences to improve future decisions. PMID:27523644

  12. Improving Control of Microbially-Induced Mineral Precipitation in Flow Systems - Experiments and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Phillips, A. J.; Lauchnor, E.; Ebigbo, A.; Connolly, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Helmig, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures in our laboratories have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms and biofilm produced calcium carbonate precipitates to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media as well as improve the stability of unconsolidated porous media. Two overarching challenges in effectively implementing microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) are controlling (1) the spatial and temporal distribution of the formed precipitates and (2) the inactivation of microbes during the calcium carbonate precipitation process. Failure to control either one of those could result in injection well plugging or the necessity to implement costly cell-reinjection or -resuscitation strategies. Our recent work has focused on optimizing strategies for MICP in small (capillaries and micromodels), small columns (1 to 2.5 cm diameter, up to 5 cm in length), meso- (2 ft columns and 4 cm x 8 cm 2-d reactors) and large-scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone radial flow) systems. Results of these experiments have been modelled using two different approaches. (1) a microscale phase-field approach and (2) a large scale volume averaging approach. Close interaction between experimenters and modellers have resulted in improved injection strategies and the models are currently being used as experimental design tools. This presentation will focus on our recent efforts that combined 2 ft column experimentation with Darcy-scale modelling to calibrate and validate a model before utilizing the model for the optimization of biomineralization strategies in radial flow demonstrations in meso-scale sand stone cores at ambient and high pressures. Schematic pore-scale representation of MICP model

  13. Experiences in Improving Student Engagement in Professional Societies and Taking the Next Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The "Great Crew Change" in the geosciences workforce is already underway based on demographic and employment data for government agencies and academia, and for the resource industries, the great loss of existing professional experience will begin to "cut to the bone" within the next five years. In addition to this loss of professional experience, the profession's demographics do not allow for traditional mentoring and employee development programs to completely fill the gap. In response to these critical issues, AGI has been focusing on improving career and professional development awareness of new geoscience majors. AGI's program has included efforts to greatly expand student participation in geoscience professional societies early in their academic career, an effort that patterns itself after many engineering discipline best practices. The results of AGI's activities over the last several years have been mixed and reflect a widely varying understanding of students' motivations and their perceptions of actual careers in the geosciences, the nature of the skill portfolio needed for success, and the aptitude of geoscience faculty to advise students in the pursuit of non-academic careers. The dynamics of these efforts have led to several newly emerging programs at AGI, including enhancing the on-campus effort to improve career education in geoscience programs and a collaborative program with the American Institute of Professional Geologists to adopt SLOAN-C best practices in developing online asynchronous, synchronous, and hybrid courses focused on professional development topics that can be taken either as supplemental courses in a degree program or as early-career professional seminars.

  14. Experience with improved charcoal and wood stoves for households and institutions in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Efforts at promoting more fuel-efficient charcoal stoves to replace traditional charcoal stoves in Kenya offer some lessons for the dissemination of appropriate technologies. This paper looks at the market-based approach which has made the Kenyan charcoal stoves project a success. Trends in woodfuels (wood and charcoal) consumption in Kenya are identified; the traditional technology for charcoal combustion and the upgraded traditional technologies are described; production achievement and the dissemination and promotion strategy used are examined; and a financial and economic analysis is performed with social, health and environmental effects assessed. Other ways to achieve a more favourable balance between woodfuels consumption and supply are then discussed looking at more efficient charcoal kilns and household woodstoves, improved institutional stoves and increased wood production. The replication potential of the Kenya experiment in other countries is also explored. The lessons learnt from the the Kenya experience concern the relationship between technology, choice and delivery systems as they interact with, economic, institutional, and policy factors. In this case, the design work accepted the traditional technology as a starting point which helped ensure widespread acceptance by households. The potential desirability of relying on local artisans to manufacture consumer durables using existing private sector channels to market these goods is also shown. It also highlights the importance of going beyond a laissez-faire approach and supporting training, demonstration, and publicity to faciliate the workings of the private sector. In the Kenyan case, technology choice was relatively unsubsidized and left ot the preferences of consumers.

  15. Focusing on the Environment to Improve Youth Participation: Experiences and Perspectives of Occupational Therapists

    PubMed Central

    Anaby, Dana; Law, Mary; Teplicky, Rachel; Turner, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The environment plays a key role in supporting children’s participation and can serve as a focus of intervention. This study aimed to elicit the perceptions and experiences of occupational therapists who had applied the PREP approach—Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation. PREP is a novel 12-week intervention for youth with physical disabilities, aimed at improving participation in leisure community-based activities by modifying aspects of the environment. Using a qualitative post-intervention only design, 12 therapists took part in individual semi-structured interviews, in which the therapists reflected on their experience using PREP to enable participation. A thematic analysis was conducted. Four themes emerged from the data; two of which were informative in nature, describing elements of the PREP intervention that target multi-layered composition of the environment and use strategies that involve leveraging resources and problem solving. The two remaining themes were reflective in nature, illustrating a new take on the Occupational Therapy role and re-positioning the concept of participation in therapy practices. Results emphasize aspects of the environment that can serve as effective targets of intervention, guided by the PREP approach. Findings can broaden the scope and focus of occupational therapy practice by redefining views on participation and the environment. PMID:26512685

  16. Focusing on the Environment to Improve Youth Participation: Experiences and Perspectives of Occupational Therapists.

    PubMed

    Anaby, Dana; Law, Mary; Teplicky, Rachel; Turner, Laura

    2015-10-23

    The environment plays a key role in supporting children's participation and can serve as a focus of intervention. This study aimed to elicit the perceptions and experiences of occupational therapists who had applied the PREP approach--Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation. PREP is a novel 12-week intervention for youth with physical disabilities, aimed at improving participation in leisure community-based activities by modifying aspects of the environment. Using a qualitative post-intervention only design, 12 therapists took part in individual semi-structured interviews, in which the therapists reflected on their experience using PREP to enable participation. A thematic analysis was conducted. Four themes emerged from the data; two of which were informative in nature, describing elements of the PREP intervention that target multi-layered composition of the environment and use strategies that involve leveraging resources and problem solving. The two remaining themes were reflective in nature, illustrating a new take on the Occupational Therapy role and re-positioning the concept of participation in therapy practices. Results emphasize aspects of the environment that can serve as effective targets of intervention, guided by the PREP approach. Findings can broaden the scope and focus of occupational therapy practice by redefining views on participation and the environment.

  17. Focusing on the Environment to Improve Youth Participation: Experiences and Perspectives of Occupational Therapists.

    PubMed

    Anaby, Dana; Law, Mary; Teplicky, Rachel; Turner, Laura

    2015-10-01

    The environment plays a key role in supporting children's participation and can serve as a focus of intervention. This study aimed to elicit the perceptions and experiences of occupational therapists who had applied the PREP approach--Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation. PREP is a novel 12-week intervention for youth with physical disabilities, aimed at improving participation in leisure community-based activities by modifying aspects of the environment. Using a qualitative post-intervention only design, 12 therapists took part in individual semi-structured interviews, in which the therapists reflected on their experience using PREP to enable participation. A thematic analysis was conducted. Four themes emerged from the data; two of which were informative in nature, describing elements of the PREP intervention that target multi-layered composition of the environment and use strategies that involve leveraging resources and problem solving. The two remaining themes were reflective in nature, illustrating a new take on the Occupational Therapy role and re-positioning the concept of participation in therapy practices. Results emphasize aspects of the environment that can serve as effective targets of intervention, guided by the PREP approach. Findings can broaden the scope and focus of occupational therapy practice by redefining views on participation and the environment. PMID:26512685

  18. Improving the climate data management in the meteorological service of Angola: experience from SASSCAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Rafael; Nascimento, Domingos; Neto, Francisco Osvaldo S.; Riede, Jens; Kaspar, Frank

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge on climate variability in parts of Southern Africa is limited because of the low availability of historic and present-day ground-based observations (Niang et al., 2014). However, there is an increased need of climate information for research, climate adaptation measures and climate services. To respond to the challenges of climate change and related issues, Angola, Botswana, Germany, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia have initiated the interdisciplinary regional competence centre SASSCAL, the "Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management". As part of the initiative, Germany's national meteorological service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) cooperates with the meteorological services of Angola, Botswana and Zambia in order to improve the management and availability of historical and present-day climate data in these countries. The first results of the cooperation between the German and the Angolan Meteorological Services are presented here. International assessments have shown that improvements of the data management concepts are needed in several countries. The experience of this cooperation can therefore provide hints for comparable activities in other regions.

  19. Improved Density Control in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment using Internal Fueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bongard, M. W.; Cole, J. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Redd, A. J.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    Routine density control up to and exceeding the Greenwald limit is critical to key Pegasus operational scenarios, including non-solenoidal startup plasmas created using single-point helicity injection and high β Ohmic plasmas. Confinement scalings suggest it is possible to achieve very high β plasmas in Pegasus by lowering the toroidal field and increasing ne/ng. In the past, Pegasus achieved β ˜ 20% in high recycling Ohmic plasmas without running into any operational boundaries.footnotetext Garstka, G.D. et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 1705 (2003) However, recent Ohmic experiments have demonstrated that Pegasus currently operates in an extremely low-recycling regime with R < 0.8 and Zeff ˜ 1 using improved vacuum conditioning techniques, such as Ti gettering and cryogenic pumping. Hence, it is difficult to achieve ne/ng> 0.3 with these improved wall conditions. Presently, gas is injected using low-field side (LFS) modified PV-10 valves. To attain high ne/ng operation and coincidentally separate core plasma and local current source fueling two new gas fueling capabilities are under development. A centerstack capillary injection system has been commissioned and is undergoing initial tests. A LFS movable midplane needle gas injection system is currently under design and will reach r/a ˜ 0.25. Initial results from both systems will be presented.

  20. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  1. Improvements in state-of-the-art uncooled microbolometer system performance based on volume manufacturing experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Brian S.; Breen, Thomas E.; Hartle, Nancy; Kohin, Margaret; Murphy, Robert

    2003-09-01

    Starting in the early 1990"s, BAE SYSTEMS began a significant investment in the development of MicroIR Uncooled Microbolometers. 160 x 120, 320 x 240, and 640 x 480 focal plane array (FPA) technology advances in both large pixel and small pixel format have driven Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD), power, size, weight, and price lower. These improvements have resulted in many new applications that previously could not afford larger, heavier, costlier cooled systems. While advancements in state of the art performance have been published regularly at Aerosense and other industry forums, far less has been discussed on the performance advances that have occurred as a result of volume manufacturing. This paper describes the improvements in performance that have been a result of BAE SYSTEMS leadership position in MicroIR microbolometer manufacturing. With over 15,000 units shipped through 2002, ranging from Standard Imaging Modules (SIM) to Standard Camera Cores (SCC) to complete imaging systems, the cumulative expertise gathered from this manufacturing experience over the past seven years has also pushed the state of the art system performance, in ways that single/small quantity technology demonstrators never could. Comparisons of temporal NETD, spatial NETD, dynamic range, operability, throughput, capacity, and other key metrics from early manufacturing lots to the present will be presented to demonstrate the advances that can only be achieved through volume manufacturing.

  2. Can experience-based household food security scales help improve food security governance?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Experience-based food security scales (EBFSSs) have been shown to be valid across world regions. EBFSSs are increasingly been included in national food and nutrition assessments and food hardship items have been added to regional and global public opinion polls. EBFSSs meet the SMART criteria for identifying useful indicators. And have the potential to help improve accountability, transparency, intersectoral coordination and a more effective and equitable distribution of resources. EBFSSs have increased awareness about food and nutrition insecurity in the court of public opinion. Thus, it’s important to understand the potential that EBFSSs have for improving food and nutrition security governance within and across countries. The case of Brazil illustrates the strong likelihood that EBFSSs do have a strong potential to influence food and governance from the national to the municipal level. A recent Gallup World Poll data analysis on the influence of the ‘2008 food crisis’ on food hardship illustrates how even a single item from EBFSSs can help examine if food security governance in different world regions modifies the impact of crises on household food insecurity. Systematic research that bridges across economics, political science, ethics, public health and program evaluation is needed to better understand if and how measurement in general and EBFSSs in particular affect food security governance. PMID:23795344

  3. Can experience-based household food security scales help improve food security governance?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-12-01

    Experience-based food security scales (EBFSSs) have been shown to be valid across world regions. EBFSSs are increasingly been included in national food and nutrition assessments and food hardship items have been added to regional and global public opinion polls. EBFSSs meet the SMART criteria for identifying useful indicators. And have the potential to help improve accountability, transparency, intersectoral coordination and a more effective and equitable distribution of resources. EBFSSs have increased awareness about food and nutrition insecurity in the court of public opinion. Thus, it's important to understand the potential that EBFSSs have for improving food and nutrition security governance within and across countries. The case of Brazil illustrates the strong likelihood that EBFSSs do have a strong potential to influence food and governance from the national to the municipal level. A recent Gallup World Poll data analysis on the influence of the '2008 food crisis' on food hardship illustrates how even a single item from EBFSSs can help examine if food security governance in different world regions modifies the impact of crises on household food insecurity. Systematic research that bridges across economics, political science, ethics, public health and program evaluation is needed to better understand if and how measurement in general and EBFSSs in particular affect food security governance. PMID:23795344

  4. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms. PMID:27686111

  5. Using precise word timing information improves decoding accuracy in a multiband-accelerated multimodal reading experiment.

    PubMed

    Vu, An T; Phillips, Jeffrey S; Kay, Kendrick; Phillips, Matthew E; Johnson, Matthew R; Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Tubridy, Shannon; Millin, Rachel; Grossman, Murray; Gureckis, Todd; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Yacoub, Essa

    2016-01-01

    The blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments is generally regarded as sluggish and poorly suited for probing neural function at the rapid timescales involved in sentence comprehension. However, recent studies have shown the value of acquiring data with very short repetition times (TRs), not merely in terms of improvements in contrast to noise ratio (CNR) through averaging, but also in terms of additional fine-grained temporal information. Using multiband-accelerated fMRI, we achieved whole-brain scans at 3-mm resolution with a TR of just 500 ms at both 3T and 7T field strengths. By taking advantage of word timing information, we found that word decoding accuracy across two separate sets of scan sessions improved significantly, with better overall performance at 7T than at 3T. The effect of TR was also investigated; we found that substantial word timing information can be extracted using fast TRs, with diminishing benefits beyond TRs of 1000 ms.

  6. Can experience-based household food security scales help improve food security governance?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-12-01

    Experience-based food security scales (EBFSSs) have been shown to be valid across world regions. EBFSSs are increasingly been included in national food and nutrition assessments and food hardship items have been added to regional and global public opinion polls. EBFSSs meet the SMART criteria for identifying useful indicators. And have the potential to help improve accountability, transparency, intersectoral coordination and a more effective and equitable distribution of resources. EBFSSs have increased awareness about food and nutrition insecurity in the court of public opinion. Thus, it's important to understand the potential that EBFSSs have for improving food and nutrition security governance within and across countries. The case of Brazil illustrates the strong likelihood that EBFSSs do have a strong potential to influence food and governance from the national to the municipal level. A recent Gallup World Poll data analysis on the influence of the '2008 food crisis' on food hardship illustrates how even a single item from EBFSSs can help examine if food security governance in different world regions modifies the impact of crises on household food insecurity. Systematic research that bridges across economics, political science, ethics, public health and program evaluation is needed to better understand if and how measurement in general and EBFSSs in particular affect food security governance.

  7. Valuing improvements to threatened and endangered marine species: an application of stated preference choice experiments.

    PubMed

    Wallmo, Kristy; Lew, Daniel K

    2011-07-01

    Non-market valuation research has produced value estimates for over forty threatened and endangered (T&E) species, including mammals, fish, birds, and crustaceans. Increasingly, Stated Preference Choice Experiments (SPCE) are utilized for valuation, as the format offers flexibility for policy analysis and may reduce certain types of response biases relative to the more traditional Contingent Valuation method. Additionally, SPCE formats can allow respondents to make trade-offs among multiple species, providing information on the distinctiveness of preferences for different T&E species. In this paper we present results of an SPCE involving three U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed species: the Puget Sound Chinook salmon, the Hawaiian monk seal, and the smalltooth sawfish. We estimate willingness-to-pay (WTP) values for improving each species' ESA listing status and statistically compare these values between the three species using a method of convolutions approach. Our results suggest that respondents have distinct preferences for the three species, and that WTP estimates differ depending on the species and the level of improvement to their ESA status. Our results should be of interest to researchers and policy-makers, as we provide value estimates for three species that have limited, if any, estimates available in the economics literature, as well as new information about the way respondents make trade-offs among three taxonomically different species. PMID:21392881

  8. Soil improvement with coal ash and sewage sludge: a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuewu; Sun, Daisheng; Fang, Jianguo; Liu, Zhijun; Li, Zhongmin

    2008-02-01

    A field experimental study was carried out successfully to improve the quality of the sandy soil by adding coal ash and sewage sludge. One ha of barren sandy soil field was chosen for the experiment in Shanghe County, Shandong Province, China. For soil amelioration and tree planting, two formulas of the mixture:coal ash, sewage sludge and soil, in ratios of 20:10:70 and 20:20:60, respectively, were used. Poplar trees were planted in pits filled with soils with additives (mixture of ash and sludge) as well as in the original sandy soil. In the 19th months after the trees were planted, the soils with additives were sampled and analyzed. The results show that the barren sandy soil was greatly improved after mixing with coal ash and sludge. The improved soils have remarkably higher nutrient concentrations, better texture, smaller bulk density, higher porosity and mass moisture content, and higher content of fine-grained minerals. During the first 22 months after planting, the annual increase in height of the trees grown in the soil with additives (4.78 m per year) was 55% higher than that of the control group (3.07 m per year), and the annual increase in diameter at the breast height (1.3 m) was 33 % higher (43.03 vs. 32.36 mm). Trees planted in soils with additives appeared healthier and shed leaves later than those in the control group. As the volume of the additives (30-40% in both formulas) is less than that of the sandy soil in and around the tree pits, it appears that the use of coal ash and sludge for tree planting and soil amelioration is environmentally safe even though the additives have relatively high heavy metal concentrations.

  9. Model-experiment interaction to improve representation of phosphorus limitation in land models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Yang, X.; Cabugao, K. G. M.; Childs, J.; Gu, L.; Haworth, I.; Mayes, M. A.; Porter, W. S.; Walker, A. P.; Weston, D. J.; Wright, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon-nutrient interactions play important roles in regulating terrestrial carbon cycle responses to atmospheric and climatic change. None of the CMIP5 models has included routines to represent the phosphorus (P) cycle, although P is commonly considered to be the most limiting nutrient in highly productive, lowland tropical forests. Model simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM-CNP) show that inclusion of P coupling leads to a smaller CO2 fertilization effect and warming-induced CO2 release from tropical ecosystems, but there are important uncertainties in the P model, and improvements are limited by a dearth of data. Sensitivity analysis identifies the relative importance of P cycle parameters in determining P availability and P limitation, and thereby helps to define the critical measurements to make in field campaigns and manipulative experiments. To improve estimates of P supply, parameters that describe maximum amount of labile P in soil and sorption-desorption processes are necessary for modeling the amount of P available for plant uptake. Biochemical mineralization is poorly constrained in the model and will be improved through field observations that link root traits to mycorrhizal activity, phosphatase activity, and root depth distribution. Model representation of P demand by vegetation, which currently is set by fixed stoichiometry and allometric constants, requires a different set of data. Accurate carbon cycle modeling requires accurate parameterization of the photosynthetic machinery: Vc,max and Jmax. Relationships between the photosynthesis parameters and foliar nutrient (N and P) content are being developed, and by including analysis of covariation with other plant traits (e.g., specific leaf area, wood density), we can provide a basis for more dynamic, trait-enabled modeling. With this strong guidance from model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, field studies are underway in Puerto Rico and Panama to collect model-relevant data on P

  10. Improving scaling methods to estimate eruption energies from volcanic crater structures using blast experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonder, I.; Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G.; Schmid, A.; Zimanowski, B.; Majji, M.; Ross, P.; White, J. D.; Taddeucci, J.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    In an ongoing effort to understand the relevant processes behind the formation of volcanic crater-, maar-, and diatreme structures, experiments producing craters with radii exceeding one meter were conducted at University at Buffalos Geohazards Field Station. A chemical explosive was used as energy source for the tests, and detonated in prepared test beds made from several stratified, compacted aggregates. The amount of explosive, as well as its depth of burial were varied in the twelve experiments. The detonations were recorded by a diverse set of sensors including high-speed/high-definition cameras, seismic and electric field sensors, normal- and infrasound microphones. Morphology and structures were documented after each blast by manual measurements and semi-automated photogrammetry. After all blasts were complete the structures excavated and analyzed. The measured sensor signals were evaluated and related to blast energies, depths of burial and crater morphologies. Former experiments e.g. performed by Goto et al. (2001; Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 4287-4290) considered craters of single blasts at a given lateral position and found empirical relationships emphasizing the importance of length scaling with the cube root of the blasts energy E. For example the depth of burial producing the largest crater radius--the ';optimal' depth--is proportional to E1/3, as is the corresponding radius. Resembling natural processes creating crater and diatreme structures the experiments performed here feature several blasts at one lateral position. The dependencies on E1/3 could be roughly confirmed. Also the scaled depth correlated with the sensor signals capturing the blasts dynamics. However, significant scatter was introduced by the pre-existing morphologies. Using a suitable re-definition for the charges depth of burial (';eruption depth'), accounting for a pre-existing (crater) morphology, the measured dependencies of morphology and blast dynamics on E can be improved

  11. On improving rainfall and solid precipitation weighing-gauge measurements using laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Landolt, Scott; Rasmussen, Roy; Govanni Lanza, Luca; La Barbera, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Short interval snowfall, drizzle and light rainfall events can be hard to measure with precipitation gauges due to sampling limitations, wind effects, and noise. The noise observed in the data sampling can often be greater than the detectable signal from a real precipitation event. In addition wind effects can induce differential air pressure on the measurement devices inside the gauges increasing the signal noise. Various algorithms have been devised to help reduce noise and other unwanted effects in precipitation gauge measurements. Most of these algorithms have focused on the removal of wind effects, while others have focused on reducing temperature dependencies. Recent laboratory testing has demonstrated the ability to reproduce some of these anomalies observed in precipitation measurements during field trial campaigns. Assessing the factors contributing to these anomalies is required to accurately simulate these conditions in the laboratory. It is also important to understand these factors to support the selection of the appropriate natural conditions to be simulated in the laboratory environment. This work details the wind-free laboratory testing of some of the above-mentioned effects in order to develop a measurement interpretation algorithm capable of improving the accuracy of the Geonor T-200B vibrating wire gauge and the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauge. Specifically, these experiments will examine the effects of temperature oscillations on the various gauge components, as well as snow capping and the potential heat-plume problem associated with heating the gauge orifices. These experiments use an artificial snow-generation machine: a snowflake simulation system in which snowflake sizes and snowfall rates can be controlled in a wind-free environment. The positive outcome of this preliminary phase would result in the transfer of the tested methodologies to the on-going WMO Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE) campaign. The laboratory

  12. Generating Customized Verifiers for Automatically Generated Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Program verification using Hoare-style techniques requires many logical annotations. We have previously developed a generic annotation inference algorithm that weaves in all annotations required to certify safety properties for automatically generated code. It uses patterns to capture generator- and property-specific code idioms and property-specific meta-program fragments to construct the annotations. The algorithm is customized by specifying the code patterns and integrating them with the meta-program fragments for annotation construction. However, this is difficult since it involves tedious and error-prone low-level term manipulations. Here, we describe an annotation schema compiler that largely automates this customization task using generative techniques. It takes a collection of high-level declarative annotation schemas tailored towards a specific code generator and safety property, and generates all customized analysis functions and glue code required for interfacing with the generic algorithm core, thus effectively creating a customized annotation inference algorithm. The compiler raises the level of abstraction and simplifies schema development and maintenance. It also takes care of some more routine aspects of formulating patterns and schemas, in particular handling of irrelevant program fragments and irrelevant variance in the program structure, which reduces the size, complexity, and number of different patterns and annotation schemas that are required. The improvements described here make it easier and faster to customize the system to a new safety property or a new generator, and we demonstrate this by customizing it to certify frame safety of space flight navigation code that was automatically generated from Simulink models by MathWorks' Real-Time Workshop.

  13. Utility competition and residential customers

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1994-11-01

    Residential customers have found themselves either ignored or ill-used by the major participants in the struggle over utility competition. No group is seeking to secure them the benefits of competition, and those who oppose competition have curried their favor by conjuring up misleading horror stories about how competition would harm them. Yet residential customers ultimately stand to gain as much from competition as larger customers.

  14. Customer Behavior Clustering Using SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongying; Su, Xiaolong

    In order to supply better service for network customers, deeply analyzing customers' behavior is required. This paper extracts three features from customers' network behavior which is divided into different categories, such as browsing news, downloading shared resources and real-time communications etc. Support vector machine is used to perform clustering, thanks to its fast and valid executing, especially in the situation of small datasets. Using the analysis results, we can make our applications and services more personalized and easier to be used.

  15. Helping Invested Families Improve Veterans' Experiences Study (HI-FIVES): study design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Oddone, Eugene Z; Hastings, Susan N; Hendrix, Cristina; Olsen, Maren; Neelon, Brian; Lindquist, Jennifer; Weidenbacher, Hollis; Boles, Jillian; Chapman, Jennifer; Weinberger, Morris

    2014-07-01

    Within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the largest integrated health care system in the US, approximately 8.5 million Veteran patients receive informal care. Despite a need for training, half of VHA caregivers report that they have not received training that they deemed necessary. Rigorous study is needed to identify effective ways of providing caregivers with the skills they need. This paper describes the Helping Invested Families Improve Veterans' Experience Study (HI-FIVES), an ongoing randomized controlled trial that is evaluating a skills training program designed to support caregivers of cognitively and/or functionally impaired, community-dwelling Veterans who have been referred to receive additional formal home care services. This two-arm randomized controlled trial will enroll a total of 240 caregiver-patient dyads. For caregivers in the HI-FIVES group, weekly individual phone training occurs for 3 weeks, followed by 4 weekly group training sessions, and two additional individual phone training calls. Caregivers in usual care receive information about the VA Caregiver Support Services Program services, including a hotline number. The primary outcome is the number of days a Veteran patient spends at home in the 12 months following randomization (e.g. not in the emergency department, inpatient or nursing home setting). Secondary outcomes include patient VHA health care costs, patient and caregiver satisfaction with VHA health care, and caregiver depressive symptoms. Outcomes from HI-FIVES have the potential to improve our knowledge of how to maximize the ability to maintain patients safely at home for caregivers while preventing poor mental health outcomes among caregivers.

  16. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Hover, John; Wlodek, Tomasz; Wenaus, Torre; Frey, Jaime; Tannenbaum, Todd; Livny, Miron; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA "AutoPilot" scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  17. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao X.; Hover John; Wlodek Tomasz; Wenaus Torre; Frey Jaime; Tannenbaum Todd; Livny Miron

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  18. Doing It Differently: Attempts to Improve Millikan's Oil-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heering, Peter; Klassen, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Millikan's oil-drop experiment is one of the classic experiments from the history of physics. Due to its content (the determination of the elementary charge) it is also among those experiments that are frequently used and discussed in teaching situations. Disappointingly, a review of the educational literature on this experiment reveals that its…

  19. Internships That Make a Difference: Two Campuses Continuous Internship Improvement Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Richard; Petrausch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Internships have been used by many academic programs to augment the student's educational experience. We discuss two internship programs that have been continuously refined in recent years to provide the students with a structured learning experience. We present a model for enriching student experiences by integrating internship experiences with…

  20. Using laboratory experiments to improve reliability in rainfall and solid precipitation weighing-gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, S.; Colli, M.; La Barbera, P.; Lanza, L. G.; Rasmussen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Snowfall, drizzle and light rainfall events (defined as events with intensities < 12 mm/h) can often be hard to detect over a short-time resolution due to sampling limitations, wind effects, and noise influencing the weighing-gauge measurements. In many instances, the noise observed in the data sampling can often be greater than the detectable signal from a real precipitation event. Wind can be one of the largest contributors to gauge undercatch, and can also increase noise due to wind pumping on the measurement devices inside the gauges. Various algorithms have been devised to help reduce noise and other unwanted effects in precipitation gauge measurements. Most of these algorithms have focused on the removal of wind effects, while others have focused on reducing temperature dependencies and snow capping. Recent laboratory testing has demonstrated the ability to reproduce some of these anomalies observed in precipitation measurements during field trial campaigns. Assessing the factors contributing to these anomalies is required to accurately simulate these conditions in the laboratory. It is also important to understand these factors to support the selection of the appropriate natural conditions to be simulated in the laboratory environment. Significant research has already been undertaken to measure the influence of wind affecting the gauges. This work details the wind-free laboratory testing of some of the above-mentioned algorithms developed to improve measurement accuracy from the Geonor T-200b vibrating wire gauge and the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauges. Specifically, these experiments will examine the effects of temperature oscillations and their subsequent effects on the various gauge components, as well as snow capping and the potential heat-plume problem associated with heating the gauges. These experiments employ an artificial snow-generation machine; a snowflake simulation system in which snowflake sizes and snowfall rates can be controlled in a wind

  1. Improvements in and actual performance of the Plant Experiment Unit onboard Kibo, the Japanese experiment module on the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Sachiko; Kasahara, Haruo; Masuda, Daisuke; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shimazu, Toru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Karahara, Ichirou; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Tayama, Ichiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshikazu; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2013-03-01

    In 2004, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the engineered model of the Plant Experiment Unit and the Cell Biology Experiment Facility. The Plant Experiment Unit was designed to be installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility and to support the seed-to-seed life cycle experiment of Arabidopsis plants in space in the project named Space Seed. Ground-based experiments to test the Plant Experiment Unit showed that the unit needed further improvement of a system to control the water content of a seedbed using an infrared moisture analyzer and that it was difficult to keep the relative humidity inside the Plant Experiment Unit between 70 and 80% because the Cell Biology Experiment Facility had neither a ventilation system nor a dehumidifying system. Therefore, excess moisture inside the Cell Biology Experiment Facility was removed with desiccant bags containing calcium chloride. Eight flight models of the Plant Experiment Unit in which dry Arabidopsis seeds were fixed to the seedbed with gum arabic were launched to the International Space Station in the space shuttle STS-128 (17A) on August 28, 2009. Plant Experiment Unit were installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility with desiccant boxes, and then the Space Seed experiment was started in the Japanese Experiment Module, named Kibo, which was part of the International Space Station, on September 10, 2009 by watering the seedbed and terminated 2 months later on November 11, 2009. On April 19, 2010, the Arabidopsis plants harvested in Kibo were retrieved and brought back to Earth by the space shuttle mission STS-131 (19A). The present paper describes the Space Seed experiment with particular reference to the development of the Plant Experiment Unit and its actual performance in Kibo onboard the International Space Station. Downlinked images from Kibo showed that the seeds had started germinating 3 days after the initial watering. The plants continued growing, producing rosette leaves, inflorescence

  2. Custom cranioplasty using stereolithography and acrylic.

    PubMed

    D'Urso, P S; Earwaker, W J; Barker, T M; Redmond, M J; Thompson, R G; Effeney, D J; Tomlinson, F H

    2000-04-01

    Numerous methods of cranioplasty have been described. Customization and prefabrication have been reported to reduce operating time and improve cosmesis. An original technique for the manufacture of customized cranioplastic implants has been developed and tested in 30 patients.Thirty patients requiring cranioplasties were selected. Data acquired from computed tomography (CT) were used to manufacture exact plastic replicas (biomodels) of craniotomy defects and master cranioplastic implants using the rapid prototyping technology of stereolithography (SL). The three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques of mirroring and interpolation were used to extrapolate on existing anatomy to design the master implants. The master implants were hand finished to fit the defect in the corresponding cranial biomodel exactly and were then used to create a cavity mould. The mould was used to cast thermally polymerised custom acrylic implants. The surgeons reported that the customized implants reduced operating time, afforded excellent cosmesis and were cost effective. The patients reported that the opportunity to see the biomodel and implant preoperatively improved their understanding of the procedure. Two complications were noted, one infection and one implant required significant trimming. The simultaneous manufacture of the master implant (male) and biomodel (female) components from SL allowed custom accurate implants to be manufactured. Disadvantages identified were the time required for computer manipulations of the CT data (up to 2 h), difficulty in assessing the accuracy of the computer generated master as a 3D rendering, the potential for SL parts to warp, manufacturing time (minimum 2 days) and the cost of approximately $1300 US per case ($1000 for the SL biomodel and $300 for the acrylic casting). PMID:10738323

  3. Willingness to Pay for Improving the Residential Waste Disposal System in Korea: A Choice Experiment Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Se-Ju; Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Kwak, Seung-Jun

    2009-08-01

    This study attempts to apply choice experiments with regard to the residential waste disposal system (RWDS) in Korea by considering various attributes that are related to RWDS. Using data from a survey conducted on 492 households, the empirical analysis yields estimates of the willingness to pay for a clean food-waste collection facility, the collection of small items (such as obsolete mobile phones and add-ons for personal computers), and a more convenient large waste disposal system. The estimation results of multinomial logit models are quite similar to those of nested logit models. The results reveal that residents have preferences for the cleanliness of facilities and the collection of small items. In Korea, residents are required to purchase and attach stickers for the disposal of large items; they want to be able to obtain stickers at not only village offices but also supermarkets. On the other hand, the frequency of waste collection is not a significant factor in the choice of the improved waste management program.

  4. Willingness to pay for improving the residential waste disposal system in Korea: a choice experiment study.

    PubMed

    Ku, Se-Ju; Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Kwak, Seung-Jun

    2009-08-01

    This study attempts to apply choice experiments with regard to the residential waste disposal system (RWDS) in Korea by considering various attributes that are related to RWDS. Using data from a survey conducted on 492 households, the empirical analysis yields estimates of the willingness to pay for a clean food-waste collection facility, the collection of small items (such as obsolete mobile phones and add-ons for personal computers), and a more convenient large waste disposal system. The estimation results of multinomial logit models are quite similar to those of nested logit models. The results reveal that residents have preferences for the cleanliness of facilities and the collection of small items. In Korea, residents are required to purchase and attach stickers for the disposal of large items; they want to be able to obtain stickers at not only village offices but also supermarkets. On the other hand, the frequency of waste collection is not a significant factor in the choice of the improved waste management program.

  5. Improving the social responsiveness of medical schools: lessons from the Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Cappon, P; Watson, D

    1999-08-01

    The recent Canadian experience in promoting social accountability and social responsiveness of medical schools has been one of steady improvement in certain institutions, against a background lacking overall national policy direction. Canada has several distinct advantages in trying to devise means of enhancing social accountability of medical training and health services, including a strong national system of publicly supported and financed health care of high quality, a network of excellent academic medical centers, and well-established accreditation bodies. A review of the literature, complemented by a new survey of Canadian medical schools, confirms that some of the centers, conscious of the need to promote social responsiveness, are developing innovative programs to do so. Future progress toward the goal of social responsiveness of medical schools on a pan-Canadian basis will require a more cohesive approach involving systematic sharing of best practices among academic health centers, effective alliances with other health professionals to promote these objectives, and support by federal and provincial ministries of health. Canadian awareness of an international movement tending to similar objectives would support the efforts of Canadian health professionals engaged in practices of enhanced accountability.

  6. Subcooled Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Mechanisms in Microgravity: Terrier-improved Orion Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Benton, John; Kucner, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A microscale heater array was used to study boiling in earth gravity and microgravity. The heater array consisted of 96 serpentine heaters on a quartz substrate. Each heater was 0.27 square millimeters. Electronic feedback loops kept each heater's temperature at a specified value. The University of Maryland constructed an experiment for the Terrier-Improved Orion sounding rocket that was delivered to NASA Wallops and flown. About 200 s of high quality microgravity and heat transfer data were obtained. The VCR malfunctioned, and no video was acquired. Subsequently, the test package was redesigned to fly on the KC-135 to obtain both data and video. The pressure was held at atmospheric pressure and the bulk temperature was about 20 C. The wall temperature was varied from 85 to 65 C. Results show that gravity has little effect on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble was surrounded by smaller bubbles, which eventually merged with the primary bubble. This bubble was formed by smaller bubbles coalescing, but had a constant size for a given superheat, indicating a balance between evaporation at the base and condensation on the cap. Most of the heaters under the bubble indicated low heat transfer, suggesting dryout at those heaters. High heat transfer occurred at the contact line surrounding the primary bubble. Marangoni convection formed a "jet" of fluid into the bulk fluid that forced the bubble onto the heater.

  7. Improving Metallic Thermal Protection System Hypervelocity Impact Resistance Through Design of Experiments Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Blosser, Max L.

    2001-01-01

    A design of experiments approach has been implemented using computational hypervelocity impact simulations to determine the most effective place to add mass to an existing metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) to improve hypervelocity impact protection. Simulations were performed using axisymmetric models in CTH, a shock-physics code developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and validated by comparison with existing test data. The axisymmetric models were then used in a statistical sensitivity analysis to determine the influence of five design parameters on degree of hypervelocity particle dispersion. Several damage metrics were identified and evaluated. Damage metrics related to the extent of substructure damage were seen to produce misleading results, however damage metrics related to the degree of dispersion of the hypervelocity particle produced results that corresponded to physical intuition. Based on analysis of variance results it was concluded that the most effective way to increase hypervelocity impact resistance is to increase the thickness of the outer foil layer. Increasing the spacing between the outer surface and the substructure is also very effective at increasing dispersion.

  8. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  9. Relational representation for improved decisions with an information-theoretic CADe system: initial experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A.; Tourassi, Georgia D.

    2009-02-01

    Our previously presented information-theoretic computer-aided detection (IT-CADe) system for distinguishing masses and normal parenchyma in mammograms is an example of a case-based system. IT-CAD makes decisions by evaluating the querys average similarity with known mass and normal examples stored in the systems case base. Pairwise case similarity is measured in terms of their normalized mutual information. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether incorporating a new machine learning concept of relational representation to IT-CAD is a more effective strategy than the decision algorithm that is currently in place. A trainable relational representation classifier builds a decision rule using the relational representation of cases. Instead of describing a case by a vector of intrinsic features, the case is described by its NMI-based similarity to a set of known examples. For this study, we first applied random mutation hill climbing algorithm to select the concise set of knowledge cases and then we applied a support vector machine to derive a decision rule using the relational representation of cases. We performed the study with a database of 600 mammographic regions of interest (300 with masses and 300 with normal parenchyma). Our experiments indicate that incorporating the concept of relational representation with a trainable classifier to IT-CAD provides an improvement in performance as compared with the original decision rule. Therefore, relational representation is a promising strategy for IT-CADe.

  10. Enabling Data Discovery and Reuse by Improving Software Usability:Data Science Experiences, Lessons, and Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, A.; Yarmey, L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well understood that a good data scientist needs domain science, analysis, programming, and communication skills to create finished data products, visualizations, and reports. Articles and blogs tout the need for "expert" skill levels in domain knowledge, statistics, storytelling, graphic design, technology…and the list goes on. Since it seems impossible that one person would encompass all these skills, it is often suggested that data science be done by a team instead of an individual. This research into, and experience with, data product design offers an augmented definition - one that elevates relationships and engagement with the final user of a product. Essentially, no matter how fantastic or technically advanced a product appears, the intended audience of that product must be able to understand, use, and find value in the product in order for it to be considered a success. Usability is often misunderstood and seen as common sense or common knowledge, but it is actually an important and challenging piece of product development. This paper describes the National Snow and Ice Data Center's process to usability test the Arctic Data Explorer (ADE). The ADE is a federated data search tool for interdisciplinary Arctic science data that has been improved in features, appearance, functionality, and quality through a series of strategic and targeted usability testing and assessments. Based on the results, it is recommended that usability testing be incorporated into the skill set of each data science team.

  11. Improved VAS regression soundings of mesoscale temperature structure observed during the 1982 atmospheric variability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Keyser, Dennis A.; Larko, David E.; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    An Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE) was conducted over the central U.S. in the spring of 1982, collecting radiosonde date to verify mesoscale soundings from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on the GOES satellite. Previously published VAS/AVE comparisons for the 6 March 1982 case found that the satellite retrievals scarcely detected a low level temperature inversion or a mid-tropospheric cold pool over a special mesoscale radiosonde verification network in north central Texas. The previously published regression and physical retrieval algorithms did not fully utilize VAS' sensitivity to important subsynoptic thermal features. Therefore, the 6 March 1982 case was reprocessed adding two enhancements to the VAS regression retrieval algorithm: (1) the regression matrix was determined using AVE profile data obtained in the region at asynoptic times, and (2) more optimistic signal-to-noise statistical conditioning factors were applied to the VAS temperature sounding channels. The new VAS soundings resolve more of the low level temperature inversion and mid-level cold pool. Most of the improvements stems from the utilization of asynoptic radiosonde observations at NWS sites. This case suggests that VAS regression soundings may require a ground-based asynoptic profiler network to bridge the gap between the synoptic radiosonde network and the high resolution geosynchronous satellite observations during the day.

  12. Improving the social responsiveness of medical schools: lessons from the Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Cappon, P; Watson, D

    1999-08-01

    The recent Canadian experience in promoting social accountability and social responsiveness of medical schools has been one of steady improvement in certain institutions, against a background lacking overall national policy direction. Canada has several distinct advantages in trying to devise means of enhancing social accountability of medical training and health services, including a strong national system of publicly supported and financed health care of high quality, a network of excellent academic medical centers, and well-established accreditation bodies. A review of the literature, complemented by a new survey of Canadian medical schools, confirms that some of the centers, conscious of the need to promote social responsiveness, are developing innovative programs to do so. Future progress toward the goal of social responsiveness of medical schools on a pan-Canadian basis will require a more cohesive approach involving systematic sharing of best practices among academic health centers, effective alliances with other health professionals to promote these objectives, and support by federal and provincial ministries of health. Canadian awareness of an international movement tending to similar objectives would support the efforts of Canadian health professionals engaged in practices of enhanced accountability. PMID:10495748

  13. Oil field experiments of microbial improved oil recovery in Vyngapour, West Siberia, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Murygina, V.P.; Mats, A.A.; Arinbasarov, M.U.; Salamov, Z.Z.; Cherkasov, A.B.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on microbial improved oil recovery (MIOR) have been performed in the Vyngapour oil field in West Siberia for two years. Now, the product of some producing wells of the Vyngapour oil field is 98-99% water cut. The operation of such wells approaches an economic limit. The nutritious composition containing local industry wastes and sources of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium was pumped into an injection well on the pilot area. This method is called {open_quotes}nutritional flooding.{close_quotes} The mechanism of nutritional flooding is based on intensification of biosynthesis of oil-displacing metabolites by indigenous bacteria and bacteria from food industry wastes in the stratum. 272.5 m{sup 3} of nutritious composition was introduced into the reservoir during the summer of 1993, and 450 m3 of nutritious composition-in 1994. The positive effect of the injections in 1993 showed up in 2-2.5 months and reached its maximum in 7 months after the injections were stopped. By July 1, 1994, 2,268.6 tons of oil was produced over the base variant, and the simultaneous water extraction reduced by 33,902 m{sup 3} as compared with the base variant. The injections in 1994 were carried out on the same pilot area.

  14. Improving Proteome Coverage on a LTQ-Orbitrap Using Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Genna L.; Dean, Ralph A.; Hawkridge, Adam M.; Muddiman, David C.

    2011-04-01

    Design of experiments (DOE) was used to determine improved settings for a LTQ-Orbitrap XL to maximize proteome coverage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A total of nine instrument parameters were evaluated with the best values affording an increase of approximately 60% in proteome coverage. Utilizing JMP software, 2 DOE screening design tables were generated and used to specify parameter values for instrument methods. DOE 1, a fractional factorial design, required 32 methods fully resolving the investigation of six instrument parameters involving only half the time necessary for a full factorial design of the same resolution. It was advantageous to complete a full factorial design for the analysis of three additional instrument parameters. Measured with a maximum of 1% false discovery rate, protein groups, unique peptides, and spectral counts gauged instrument performance. Randomized triplicate nanoLC-LTQ-Orbitrap XL MS/MS analysis of the S. cerevisiae digest demonstrated that the following five parameters significantly influenced proteome coverage of the sample: (1) maximum ion trap ionization time; (2) monoisotopic precursor selection; (3) number of MS/MS events; (4) capillary temperature; and (5) tube lens voltage. Minimal influence on the proteome coverage was observed for the remaining four parameters (dynamic exclusion duration, resolving power, minimum count threshold to trigger a MS/MS event, and normalized collision energy). The DOE approach represents a time- and cost-effective method for empirically optimizing MS-based proteomics workflows including sample preparation, LC conditions, and multiple instrument platforms.

  15. A dignified approach to improving the patient experience: promoting privacy, dignity and respect through collaborative training.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Angelina

    2012-07-01

    Globally there is a plethora of literature surrounding patients' privacy, dignity and respect, consequently highlighting the need for healthcare professionals to ensure such basic human rights are upheld when delivering care. For qualified practitioners this is further emphasised through the professional bodies and their varying codes of practice. To ensure privacy, dignity and respect move from rhetoric to reality in professional practice many pre-registration programmes promote service user involvement. Evidence suggests that involving service users in the delivery of educational programmes by directly telling their own stories enhances patient centred care. However given a number of recent patient surveys and/or audits reporting the lack of privacy, dignity and respect in health and social care settings there seems to be a growing need to reaffirm practitioners' knowledge, skills and values once qualified and practising in healthcare organisations. This paper reports on a project in a UK NHS Mental health Trust where service users, in collaboration with Trust staff, planned and delivered a series of privacy and dignity workshops to healthcare practitioners with the aim of improving the patient experience. Although the project took place within a Mental Health Trust the issues of privacy, dignity and respect apply to all healthcare sectors.

  16. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13) and the other using a postal survey (n = 82). Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient experience. PMID:22913525

  17. Negative Correlation Learning for Customer Churn Prediction: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  18. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  19. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis.

  20. Internal Branding: Using Performance Technology To Create an Organization Focused on Customer Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Stotz, Rodger

    2000-01-01

    Presents a performance technology approach to revenue enhancement, with the goal of improving customer retention through building customer value. Topics include internal branding, a way to make sure that what the company delivers matches what's promised in the advertising; product versus service brands; and customer satisfaction, including…

  1. 75 FR 35093 - Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... performance in providing services. Customer satisfaction surveys are valuable tools to gather information from our customers so we can design and implement new ways to improve our service to meet their needs. This... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236. AGENCY:...

  2. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  3. Customer Service in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sines, Robert G., Jr.; Duckworth, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    It is argued that colleges and universities need to understand the importance of customer service in student retention, particularly in a competitive marketplace. Customer service concepts that work in the private sector are seen as useful in higher education, and a model is proposed. (MSE)

  4. Customer Service in Ontario's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, John

    2005-01-01

    No doubt there are detractors who cringe at the prospect of connecting the term customer service with an institution of higher education. Some may consider the term demeaning. However, given the college funding crisis and current economic climate, a quality customer service strategy is a prudent adjunct to any marketing activity undertaken. It is…

  5. Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment: A Maturity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luftman, Jerry; Brown, Carol V.; Balaji, S.

    This chapter presents a new model for assessing the maturity of a ­customer-provider relationship from a collaborative service delivery perspective: the Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment Maturity (CPSAM) Model. This model builds on recent research for effectively managing the customer-provider relationship in IT service outsourcing contexts and a validated model for assessing alignment across internal IT service units and their business customers within the same organization. After reviewing relevant literature by service science and information systems researchers, the six overarching components of the maturity model are presented: value measurements, governance, partnership, communications, human resources and skills, and scope and architecture. A key assumption of the model is that all of the components need be addressed to assess and improve customer-provider alignment. Examples of specific metrics for measuring the maturity level of each component over the five levels of maturity are also presented.

  6. Patient or customer?

    PubMed

    Parker, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates caring in practice within the context of the global imperative of increasing rationalisation of care based on an economic ethic. The notion of the global marketplace has spread to the domain of health services, so that 'health' has come to be seen as a commodity, with the body as its site, and the 'patient' a customer; clinicians work to construct standard pathways through the healthcare supermarket. The challenge for nurses is to work within but also to challenge and resist the reductionist impetus of economically based and commercially driven approaches to health care. They must retain the sense of the value of the wholeness of the person, the deeply personal and profoundly significant professional-recipient relationship, and find ways of demonstrating their capacity to deliver high-quality care in a cost-effective way. Proper and appropriate accountability is a key strategy to maintaining quality nursing as a significant aspect of care. The expansion of the role of the advanced practice nurse is very useful in providing holistic and cost-effective care, though there are currently limitations to scope of practice that need to be removed. The metaphor of the marketplace, underpinned by powerful global economic forces, can draw us into unthinking compliance with its imperatives--but other metaphors are available. Metaphor and creativity are linked, and we need to consider how the creative use of language can facilitate the emergence of new ways of understanding in health care. PMID:10401282

  7. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations.

  8. Diversifying customer review rankings.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Ralf; Dokoohaki, Nima

    2015-06-01

    E-commerce Web sites owe much of their popularity to consumer reviews accompanying product descriptions. On-line customers spend hours and hours going through heaps of textual reviews to decide which products to buy. At the same time, each popular product has thousands of user-generated reviews, making it impossible for a buyer to read everything. Current approaches to display reviews to users or recommend an individual review for a product are based on the recency or helpfulness of each review. In this paper, we present a framework to rank product reviews by optimizing the coverage of the ranking with respect to sentiment or aspects, or by summarizing all reviews with the top-K reviews in the ranking. To accomplish this, we make use of the assigned star rating for a product as an indicator for a review's sentiment polarity and compare bag-of-words (language model) with topic models (latent Dirichlet allocation) as a mean to represent aspects. Our evaluation on manually annotated review data from a commercial review Web site demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach, outperforming plain recency ranking by 30% and obtaining best results by combining language and topic model representations. PMID:25795511

  9. Understanding and improving lithium ion batteries through mathematical modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rutooj D.

    There is an intense, worldwide effort to develop durable lithium ion batteries with high energy and power densities for a wide range of applications, including electric and hybrid electric vehicles. For improvement of battery technology understanding the capacity fading mechanism in batteries is of utmost importance. Novel electrode material and improved electrode designs are needed for high energy- high power batteries with less capacity fading. Furthermore, for applications such as automotive applications, precise cycle-life prediction of batteries is necessary. One of the critical challenges in advancing lithium ion battery technologies is fracture and decrepitation of the electrodes as a result of lithium diffusion during charging and discharging operations. When lithium is inserted in either the positive or negative electrode, there is a volume change associated with insertion or de-insertion. Diffusion-induced stresses (DISs) can therefore cause the nucleation and growth of cracks, leading to mechanical degradation of the batteries. With different mathematical models we studied the behavior of diffusion induces stresses and effects of electrode shape, size, concentration dependent material properties, pre-existing cracks, phase transformations, operating conditions etc. on the diffusion induced stresses. Thus we develop tools to guide the design of the electrode material with better mechanical stability for durable batteries. Along with mechanical degradation, chemical degradation of batteries also plays an important role in deciding battery cycle life. The instability of commonly employed electrolytes results in solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation. Although SEI formation contributes to irreversible capacity loss, the SEI layer is necessary, as it passivates the electrode-electrolyte interface from further solvent decomposition. SEI layer and diffusion induced stresses are inter-dependent and affect each-other. We study coupled chemical

  10. Improvement of Experiment Planning as an Important Precondition for the Quality of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkiene, Ausra; Tereseviciene, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the stages of the experiment planning that are necessary to ensure the validity and reliability of it. The research data reveal that doctoral students of Educational Research approach the planning of the experiment as the planning of the whole dissertation research; and the experiment as a research method is often confused…

  11. Space Mission Operations Ground Systems Integration Customer Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    , and cultural differences, to ensure an efficient response to customer issues using a small Customer Service Team (CST) and adaptability, constant communication with customers, technical expertise and knowledge of services, and dedication to customer service. The HOSC Customer Support Team has implemented a variety of processes, and procedures that help to mitigate the potential problems that arise when integrating ground system services for a variety of complex missions and the lessons learned from this experience will lead the future of customer service in the space operations industry.

  12. An empirical research on customer satisfaction study: a consideration of different levels of performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Che; Lu, Shu-Chiung; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Chien, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dong, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key factor for successful and depends highly on the behaviors of frontline service providers. Customers should be managed as assets, and that customers vary in their needs, preferences, and buying behavior. This study applied the Taiwan Customer Satisfaction Index model to a tourism factory to analyze customer satisfaction and loyalty. We surveyed 242 customers served by one tourism factory organizations in Taiwan. A partial least squares was performed to analyze and test the theoretical model. The results show that perceived quality had the greatest influence on the customer satisfaction for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. In addition, in terms of customer loyalty, the customer satisfaction is more important than image for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. The contribution of this paper is to propose two satisfaction levels of CSI models for analyzing customer satisfaction and loyalty, thereby helping tourism factory managers improve customer satisfaction effectively. Compared with traditional techniques, we believe that our method is more appropriate for making decisions about allocating resources and for assisting managers in establishing appropriate priorities in customer satisfaction management. PMID:27652150

  13. An empirical research on customer satisfaction study: a consideration of different levels of performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Che; Lu, Shu-Chiung; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Chien, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dong, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key factor for successful and depends highly on the behaviors of frontline service providers. Customers should be managed as assets, and that customers vary in their needs, preferences, and buying behavior. This study applied the Taiwan Customer Satisfaction Index model to a tourism factory to analyze customer satisfaction and loyalty. We surveyed 242 customers served by one tourism factory organizations in Taiwan. A partial least squares was performed to analyze and test the theoretical model. The results show that perceived quality had the greatest influence on the customer satisfaction for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. In addition, in terms of customer loyalty, the customer satisfaction is more important than image for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. The contribution of this paper is to propose two satisfaction levels of CSI models for analyzing customer satisfaction and loyalty, thereby helping tourism factory managers improve customer satisfaction effectively. Compared with traditional techniques, we believe that our method is more appropriate for making decisions about allocating resources and for assisting managers in establishing appropriate priorities in customer satisfaction management.

  14. In-vivo classification of colorectal neoplasia using high-resolution microendoscopy: improvement with experience

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil D.; Perl, Daniel; Lee, Michelle H.; Chang, Shannon S; Polydorides, Alexandros D.; Moshier, Erin; Godbold, James; Zhou, Elinor; Mitcham, Josephine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims High-resolution microendoscopy (HRME) is a novel, low-cost “optical biopsy” technology that allows for subcellular imaging. The study aim was to evaluate the learning curve of HRME for the differentiation of neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. Methods In a prospective cohort fashion, a total of 162 polyps from 97 patients at a single tertiary care center were imaged by HRME and classified in real-time as neoplastic (adenomatous, cancer) or non-neoplastic (normal, hyperplastic, inflammatory). Histopathology was the gold standard for comparison. Diagnostic accuracy was examined at three intervals over time throughout the study; the initial interval included the first 40 polyps, the middle interval included the next 40 polyps examined, and the final interval included the last 82 polyps examined. Results Sensitivity increased significantly from the initial interval (50%) to the middle interval (94%, p = 0.02) and the last interval (97%, p = 0.01). Similarly, specificity was 69% for the initial interval but increased to 92% (p = 0.07) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.02) in the last interval. Overall accuracy was 63% for the initial interval and then improved to 93% (p = 0.003) in the middle interval and 96% (p = 0.0007) in the last interval. Conclusions In conclusion, this in-vivo study demonstrates that an endoscopist without prior colon HRME experience can achieve greater than 90% accuracy for identifying neoplastic colorectal polyps after 40 polyps imaged. HRME is a promising modality to complement white-light endoscopy in differentiating neoplastic from non-neoplastic colorectal polyps. PMID:25753782

  15. Mining Rare Events Data for Assessing Customer Attrition Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Tom; Chin, Meei-Ling Ivy; Ma, Guangqin

    Customer attrition refers to the phenomenon whereby a customer leaves a service provider. As competition intensifies, preventing customers from leaving is a major challenge to many businesses such as telecom service providers. Research has shown that retaining existing customers is more profitable than acquiring new customers due primarily to savings on acquisition costs, the higher volume of service consumption, and customer referrals. For a large enterprise, its customer base consists of tens of millions service subscribers, more often the events, such as switching to competitors or canceling services are large in absolute number, but rare in percentage, far less than 5%. Based on a simple random sample, popular statistical procedures, such as logistic regression, tree-based method and neural network, can sharply underestimate the probability of rare events, and often result a null model (no significant predictors). To improve efficiency and accuracy for event probability estimation, a case-based data collection technique is then considered. A case-based sample is formed by taking all available events and a small, but representative fraction of nonevents from a dataset of interest. In this article we showed a consistent prior correction method for events probability estimation and demonstrated the performance of the above data collection techniques in predicting customer attrition with actual telecommunications data.

  16. 19 CFR 146.3 - Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs supervision. 146.3 Section 146.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.3 Customs supervision. (a) Assignment of...

  17. Customer Service: Another Side of TQM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirkin, Arlene Farber

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the customer satisfaction element of Total Quality Management (TQM) in libraries, including definition of the terms customer and customer satisfaction, determining customer expectations, complaint systems, keeping customers, and empowerment of staff. Appendices list approaches libraries and other organizations have used to improve…

  18. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  19. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  20. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  1. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  2. 19 CFR 101.7 - Customs seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Customs seal. 101.7 Section 101.7 Customs Duties U... GENERAL PROVISIONS § 101.7 Customs seal. (a) Design. According to the design furnished by the Department of the Treasury, the Customs seal of the United States shall consist of the seal of the Department...

  3. Novel customized manufacturable DFM solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mark; Zhou, Cong-shu; Tian, Yi; Goh, Soo Muay; Quek, Shyue-Fong; Lam, Hein-Mun; Zhang, Jian

    2012-11-01

    This paper provides DFM solutions on yield improvement based on a foundry's perspective. We have created a novel work flow for efficient yield enhancement at different stages throughout the process of design-to-silicon. In the design environment, other than conforming to the conventional design rule manual, we may guide the designer to employ the well-characterized regular logic bricks that are built from process validated hotspots. Later, after design sign-off, layout manipulation or layout retargeting are implemented during the mask preparation stage to enlarge the process window when faced with a diversity of layout patterns in the design. At the same time, two crucial methods, namely layout analysis and layout comparison, are used to capture all layout related detractors. The first method can identify the process sensitive hotspots, which will be highlighted and anchored as process limiters during the patterning process. Layout comparison can be an efficient way to narrow down the yield roadblocks by debugging the yield loss on similar process and design styles. Another smart solution is creating customized process control monitoring structures (PCM), which are extracted from previous yield ramping lessons and process hotspots. These PCMs will be dropped into scribe lane of production tapeouts and serve as pioneer testkeys for the initial production ramp up.

  4. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material. The main effort was directed toward developing reliable material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 and toward improving functional relations and parameterization of the workpiece/workpiece contact-interaction models. The LFW process model is then used to predict thermo-mechanical response of Carpenter Custom 465 during LFW. Specifically, temporal evolutions and spatial distribution of temperature within, and expulsion of the workpiece material from, the weld region are examined as a function of the basic LFW process parameters, i.e., (a) contact-pressure history, (b) reciprocation frequency, and (c) reciprocation amplitude. Examination of the results obtained clearly revealed the presence of three zones within the weld, i.e., (a) Contact-interface region, (b) Thermo-mechanically affected zone, and (c) heat-affected zone. While there are no publicly available reports related to Carpenter Custom 465 LFW behavior, to allow an experiment/computation comparison, these findings are consistent with the results of our ongoing companion experimental investigation.

  5. Doing it differently: attempts to improve Millikan's oil-drop experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter; Klassen, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Millikan's oil-drop experiment is one of the classic experiments from the history of physics. Due to its content (the determination of the elementary charge) it is also among those experiments that are frequently used and discussed in teaching situations. Disappointingly, a review of the educational literature on this experiment reveals that its implementation in teaching situations is not especially successful. Using a collaborative approach, we have attempted to develop an understanding of the difficulties that students encounter with this experiment. In our approach, apart from evaluating students' lab reports, we used questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Additionally, we have used the historical development of the oil-drop experiment as a resource for restructuring the educational use of the experiment, and we have attempted to develop a more thorough understanding of the experiment through an analysis of the data generated in the experiment and its mathematical treatment. As a result, we suggest a different use of the apparatus that appears to result in less frustration of the students as well as a better understanding of the experiment and its difficulties by the students.

  6. Designing and implementing customer-focused functional support teams

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Cejka, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    The contract services department of a U.S. Department of Energy research laboratory is radically revising how it serves its primary customers--the laboratory research and development staff. The department provides services that include contract research initiation (proposal preparation and contract negotiation) and acquisition of goods and services to support specific research projects. It previously provided these services with approximately 170 staff in four centralized functional units. In reorganizing, the department used a structured analysis and design process to categorize internal customers according to their unique attributes and specific support needs. Concurrently, it identified a number of conceptually distinct customer-focused units that could accomplish the contract processes in different ways and then chose a preferred concept for each customer category. The organizational concepts were designed to enhance customer service and improve staff morale and development opportunities. The new organization will have a total of 10 customer support units as well as other centralized services and activities. It will flatten the organizational structures and encourage more cooperation among contracts staff to meet customer needs for improved timeliness, communication, and teaming with researchers.

  7. Assessment of fetal growth by customized growth charts.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Romy; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-01-01

    Customized fetal growth charts take account of the individual variation in the fetal growth potential based on non-pathological maternal and fetal characteristics. Application of these customized weight charts might improve the distinction between pathological growth-restricted fetuses and fetuses that are small but have reached their growth potential. Current models for customized growth standards have been based on birth weight and fetal growth data. Variables used for customization are gestational age, maternal age, parity, ethnicity, height, weight and fetal sex. Thus far, it remains controversial whether these maternal and fetal characteristics used for customization are strong enough predictors for fetal growth on an individual level and are truly physiological characteristics. The currently available customized growth charts might be of benefit for use in epidemiological studies and clinical practice. Further studies are needed to validate these customized growth models and to examine whether and to what extend they improve identification of children that are at risk for morbidity in the perinatal period and later in life.

  8. The quest for customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line. PMID:15807042

  9. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis.

  10. The Utah Beacon Experience: Integrating Quality Improvement, Health Information Technology, and Practice Facilitation to Improve Diabetes Outcomes in Small Health Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J.; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010–2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC3 was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients’ diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Innovation: Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC3 helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients’ diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Findings: Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clinics lack knowledge and experience with QI and have limited HIT experience to improve patient care using electronic clinical data. Additionally, future projects like IC3 Beacon will be instrumental in changing clinic culture so that QI is integrated into routine workflow. Conclusion and Discussion: Our efforts led to significant changes in how practice staff optimized their EHRs to manage and improve diabetes care, while establishing the framework for sustainability. Some of the IC3 Beacon practices are currently smoothly

  11. The value of customer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Herig, C.; Houston, A.

    1996-05-01

    Customer preference (CP), or green pricing, may be the financial hedge for electric supply industry integration of photovoltaics. CP is currently defined as a voluntary contribution for energy generated with renewable resources. Several utilities have examined the CP financing of renewables through experimental or implemented programs and market research. This paper first expands the concept of customer preference to include both voluntary and involuntary customer contributions. It then categorizes the features of existing and proposed CP programs. The connections between these features and market research and marketing strategies for new product development from a competitive industry are analyzed.

  12. Customer concerns regarding satellite servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, Gordon

    1987-01-01

    The organization of orbital servicing of satellites is discussed. Provision of servicing equipment; design interfaces between the satellite and the servicing equipment; and the economic viability of the concept are discussed. The proposed solution for satisfying customer concerns is for the servicing organizations to baseline an adequate inventory of servicing equipment with standard interfaces and established servicing costs. With this knowledge, the customer can conduct tradeoff studies and make programmatic decisions regarding servicing options. A dialog procedure between customers and servicing specialists is outlined.

  13. Customer choice test is running well for IP

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    As of May 4, eight of the 21 eligible Illinois Power Company (IP) electricity customers had chosen to buy some of their power from an entity other than IP. They are free to do this because IP is conducting an experiment in customer choice, the first of its kind in the country, according to the utility. Although it is still very early, the experiment seems to be working well. {open_quotes}Our experience so far has been very good,{close_quotes} said John Dewey, a spokesman for IP. {open_quotes}Some of our customers say they expect to see substantial savings.{close_quotes} IP expects to gain knowledge of what it takes to retain customers and, when the entire industry becomes competitive, to gain new customers. IP`s own marketing affiliate, Illinova Power Marketing, based in Salt Lake City, Utah, is participating: It arranged for 4 MWe of power from another supplier to be shipped across IP`s transmission system to one of IP`s customers. IP`s tariff for such use of its transmission lines, as approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, is between 0.3 and 0.5 cents/kWh.

  14. Shoe Inserts and Prescription Custom Orthotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feet » Foot Health Information Shoe Inserts and Prescription Custom Orthotics What are Shoe Inserts? You've seen ... hold on to your receipt.) What are Prescription Custom Orthotics? Custom orthotics are specially-made devices designed ...

  15. Work Contexts Matter: Practical Considerations for Improving New Special Educators' Experiences in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Bonnie S.

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests teachers first experiences in the classroom have an impact on their effectiveness, their students' achievement, and the teaching practices they will use for many years. New special educators experience many of the same challenges as other new teachers. Both general and special educators struggle with addressing …

  16. Using Propensity Score Matching Methods to Improve Generalization from Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The main result of an experiment is typically an estimate of the average treatment effect (ATE) and its standard error. In most experiments, the number of covariates that may be moderators is large. One way this issue is typically skirted is by interpreting the ATE as the average effect for "some" population. Cornfield and Tukey (1956) famously…

  17. Improving Generalizations from Experiments Using Propensity Score Subclassification: Assumptions, Properties, and Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the use of random assignment to treatment, randomized experiments typically have high internal validity. However, units are very rarely randomly selected from a well-defined population of interest into an experiment; this results in low external validity. Under nonrandom sampling, this means that the estimate of the sample average…

  18. Improving the International Student Experience in Australia through Embedded Peer Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outhred, Tim; Chester, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    As Australia endeavors to sustain growth of its international education industry, there have been major concerns regarding the experience of international students. This review examines the international student experience in Australia, particularly issues surrounding study-work-life balance (SWLB), acculturation, health, and well-being. The…

  19. Simulated and Virtual Science Laboratory Experiments: Improving Critical Thinking and Higher-Order Learning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Nicole A.

    2013-01-01

    Virtual laboratory experiments using interactive computer simulations are not being employed as viable alternatives to laboratory science curriculum at extensive enough rates within higher education. Rote traditional lab experiments are currently the norm and are not addressing inquiry, Critical Thinking, and cognition throughout the laboratory…

  20. Determining Gram-Equivalent Mass by Evolution of Hydrogen: An Improved Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Marlon E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an experiment where the gram-equivalent mass of an unknown metal is determined by reacting the metal with dilute hydrochloric acid and collecting the evolved gas over water. This simple, reliable experiment routinely gives results within 1% of the accepted value. (PR)

  1. Improving Quality of Life and Career Attitudes of Youth with Disabilities: Experiences from the Adolescent Employment Readiness Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Branigin, Michael; Schuyler, Vincent; White, Patience

    2007-01-01

    Improving quality of life is the primary focus as adolescents with disabilities enter adulthood. They increasingly, however, encounter difficulties transitioning into domains such as employment as these services occur near the end of their high school experience. Using an ecosystems model within a developmental approach, the program sought to…

  2. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  3. Marketing management enhances customer relations.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, I R; Petras, G J; Bradford, C

    1992-10-01

    The implementation of automated marketing management systems in hospitals across the United States can change dramatically the way in which a hospital builds business by managing relationships with prospective customers.

  4. Changes in operational procedures to improve spaceflight experiments in plant biology in the European Modular Cultivation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Aanes, Gjert; Schiefloe, Mona; Coelho, Liz H. F.; Millar, Katherine D. L.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2014-03-01

    The microgravity environment aboard orbiting spacecraft has provided a unique laboratory to explore topics in basic plant biology as well as applied research on the use of plants in bioregenerative life support systems. Our group has utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to study plant growth, development, tropisms, and gene expression in a series of spaceflight experiments. The most current project performed on the ISS was termed Seedling Growth-1 (SG-1) which builds on the previous TROPI (for tropisms) experiments performed in 2006 and 2010. Major technical and operational changes in SG-1 (launched in March 2013) compared to the TROPI experiments include: (1) improvements in lighting conditions within the EMCS to optimize the environment for phototropism studies, (2) the use of infrared illumination to provide high-quality images of the seedlings, (3) modifications in procedures used in flight to improve the focus and overall quality of the images, and (4) changes in the atmospheric conditions in the EMCS incubator. In SG-1, a novel red-light-based phototropism in roots and hypocotyls of seedlings that was noted in TROPI was confirmed and now can be more precisely characterized based on the improvements in procedures. The lessons learned from sequential experiments in the TROPI hardware provide insights to other researchers developing space experiments in plant biology.

  5. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of all securities and property received from customers, retail forex customers or option customers in lieu of money to margin, purchase, guarantee, or secure the commodity, retail forex or commodity option transactions of such customers, retail forex customers or option customers. Such record shall show...

  6. Customer-centered brand management.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Zeithaml, Valarie A; Lemon, Katherine N

    2004-09-01

    Most executives today agree that their efforts should be focused on growing the lifetime value of their customers. Yet few companies have come to terms with the implications of that idea for their marketing management. Oldsmobile, for example, enjoyed outstanding brand equity with many customers through the 1980s. But as the century wore further on, the people who loved the Olds got downright old. So why did General Motors spend so many years and so much money trying to reposition and refurbish the tired,tarnished brand? Why didn't GM managers instead move younger buyers along a path of less resistance, toward another of the brands in GM's stable--or even launch a wholly new brand geared to their tastes? Catering to new customers, even at the expense of the brand, would surely have been the path to profits. The reason, argue the authors, is that in large consumer-goods companies like General Motors, brands are the raison d'etre. They are the focus of decision making and the basis of accountability. But this overwhelming focus on growing brand equity is inconsistent with the goal of growing customer equity. Drawing on a wide range of current examples, the authors offer seven tactics that will put brands in the service of growing customer equity. These include replacing traditional brand managers with a new position--the customer segment manager; targeting brands to as narrow an audience as possible; developing the capability and the mind-set to hand off customers from one brand to another within the company; and changing the way brand equity is measured by basing calculations on individual, rather than average, customer data.

  7. Fostering employee service creativity: Joint effects of customer empowering behaviors and supervisory empowering leadership.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuntao; Liao, Hui; Chuang, Aichia; Zhou, Jing; Campbell, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Integrating insights from the literature on customers' central role in service and the literature on employee creativity, we offer theoretical and empirical account of how and when customer empowering behaviors can motivate employee creativity during service encounters and, subsequently, influence customer satisfaction with service experience. Using multilevel, multisource, experience sampling data from 380 hairstylists matched with 3550 customers in 118 hair salons, we found that customer empowering behaviors were positively related to employee creativity and subsequent customer satisfaction via employee state promotion focus. Results also showed that empowering behaviors from different agents function synergistically in shaping employee creativity: supervisory empowering leadership strengthened the indirect effect of customer empowering behaviors on employee creativity via state promotion focus. PMID:25774571

  8. Fostering employee service creativity: Joint effects of customer empowering behaviors and supervisory empowering leadership.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuntao; Liao, Hui; Chuang, Aichia; Zhou, Jing; Campbell, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Integrating insights from the literature on customers' central role in service and the literature on employee creativity, we offer theoretical and empirical account of how and when customer empowering behaviors can motivate employee creativity during service encounters and, subsequently, influence customer satisfaction with service experience. Using multilevel, multisource, experience sampling data from 380 hairstylists matched with 3550 customers in 118 hair salons, we found that customer empowering behaviors were positively related to employee creativity and subsequent customer satisfaction via employee state promotion focus. Results also showed that empowering behaviors from different agents function synergistically in shaping employee creativity: supervisory empowering leadership strengthened the indirect effect of customer empowering behaviors on employee creativity via state promotion focus.

  9. External Technical Support for School Improvement: Critical Issues from the Chilean Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osses, Alejandra; Bellei, Cristián; Valenzuela, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    To what extent school improvement processes can be initiated and sustained from the outside has been a relevant question for policy-makers seeking to increase quality in education. Since 2008, the Chilean Government is strongly promoting the use of external technical support (ETS) services to support school improvement processes, as part of the…

  10. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  11. HNCA+, HNCO+, and HNCACB+ experiments: improved performance by simultaneous detection of orthogonal coherence transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Gil-Caballero, Sergio; Favier, Adrien; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2014-09-01

    Three experiments, BEST-TROSY HNCA+, HNCO+ and HNCACB+ are presented for sequential backbone resonance assignment of (13)C, (15)N labelled proteins. The novelty of these experiments with respect to conventional pulse sequences is the detection of additional orthogonal coherence transfer pathways that results in enhanced sensitivity for sequential correlations without significantly compromising the intensity of intra-residue correlation peaks. In addition, a 2-step phase cycle separates peaks originating from the orthogonal coherence transfer pathways in 2 sub-spectra, thus providing similar information as obtained from performing a pair of sequential and intra-residue correlation experiments. PMID:25056271

  12. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  13. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  14. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  15. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.4 - Customs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.4 Customs. Customs means...

  17. Learning from the European experience of using targets to improve population health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter C; Busse, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    Health targets have become a widely used instrument to promote population health. We describe the experience in England, where the use of targets has reached the most advanced stage of development, and other European countries. The experience demonstrates that targets may change the behavior of a health system, probably to a larger extent than many other policy instruments, if incentives are aligned correctly and if measures to deal with unintended effects are put in place.

  18. Learning from the European experience of using targets to improve population health.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter C; Busse, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    Health targets have become a widely used instrument to promote population health. We describe the experience in England, where the use of targets has reached the most advanced stage of development, and other European countries. The experience demonstrates that targets may change the behavior of a health system, probably to a larger extent than many other policy instruments, if incentives are aligned correctly and if measures to deal with unintended effects are put in place. PMID:20712929

  19. Experiments in transforming the global workplace: incentives for and impediments to improving workplace conditions in China.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Dara; Brown, Garrett D

    2003-01-01

    This article highlights current economic conditions in China and analyzes existing obstacles to improving workplace conditions and labor practices. There are significant disincentives to strengthening workplace protections, and downward pressures are currently worsening conditions in a number of economic sectors. However, there are also potential strategies for motivating multinational corporations (MNCs) and Chinese government agencies to improve workplace conditions and to implement international and national laws and corporate codes of conduct. Four key principles are discussed that hold promise for creating incentives and sustainable mechanisms to improve factory conditions: transparency, verification, and accountability for MNCs and Chinese government agencies, and greatly strengthening worker participation.

  20. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). Executive summary. [weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions so as to significantly reduce the cost for frost and freeze protection and crop losses. The design and implementation of the first phase of an economic experiment which will monitor citrus growers decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events was carried out. The economic experiment was designed to measure the change in annual protection costs and crop losses which are the direct result of improved temperature forecasts. To estimate the benefits that may result from improved temperature forecasting capability, control and test groups were established with effective separation being accomplished temporally. The control group, utilizing current forecasting capability, was observed during the 1976-77 frost season and the results are reported. A brief overview is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done.

  1. Tracheotomy improves experiment success rate in mice during urethane anesthesia and stereotaxic surgery.

    PubMed

    Moldestad, Olve; Karlsen, Pernille; Molden, Sturla; Storm, Johan F

    2009-01-30

    Urethane anesthesia is frequently used for acute experiments on small rodents in physiology and neuroscience. Severe respiratory distress is a common side-effect of urethane anesthesia in many strains of mice. Associated complications interfere with completion of experiments, and as a consequence more animals must be sacrificed. During experiments with stereotaxic brain surgery, we found that intubation by means of tracheotomy is an efficient way to maintain patent airways in these animals. Artificial ventilation of the animals is not required. In this paper we describe a simple, fast and reliable method for intubation of mice in experiments that involve a stereotaxic instrument. The method proved considerably easier to learn and apply than conventional intubation through the oral route. The incidence of breathing problems decreased from 77% in untreated mice to 9% in those that underwent tracheotomy. In addition, the success rate for our acute electrophysiological experiments increased from 24 to 77%. We conclude that tracheotomy reduces the number of sacrificed animals, and saves time and labor.

  2. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T

    2011-01-01

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  3. Evaluation of HEU-Beryllium Benchmark Experiments to Improve Computational Analysis of Space Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Keith C. Bledsoe; Bradley T. Rearden

    2011-02-01

    An assessment was previously performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify preliminary biases and uncertainties associated with the modeling methods and data utilized in designing a nuclear reactor such as a beryllium-reflected, highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fission surface power (FSP) system for space nuclear power. The conclusion of the previous study was that current capabilities could preclude the necessity of a cold critical test of the FSP; however, additional testing would reduce uncertainties in the beryllium and uranium cross-section data and the overall uncertainty in the computational models. A series of critical experiments using HEU metal were performed in the 1960s and 1970s in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. Of the hundreds of experiments, three were identified as fast-fission configurations reflected by beryllium metal. These experiments have been evaluated as benchmarks for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE). Further evaluation of the benchmark experiments was performed using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6. The data adjustment methods of SCALE 6 have been employed in the validation of an example FSP design model to reduce the uncertainty due to the beryllium cross section data.

  4. Data Mining for Customer Segmentation in Personal Financial Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoxun; Li, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Yingjie; Shi, Yong

    The personal financial market segmentation plays an important role in retail banking. It is widely admitted that there are a lot of limitations of conventional ways in customer segmentation, which are knowledge based and often get bias results. In contrast, data mining can deal with mass of data and never miss any useful knowledge. Due to the mass storage volume of unlabeled transaction data, in this paper, we propose a clustering ensemble method based on majority voting mechanism and two alternative manners to further enhance the performance of customer segmentation in real banking business. Through the experiments and examinations in real business environment, we can come to a conclusion that our model reflect the true characteristics of various types of customers and can be used to find the investment preferences of customers.

  5. Resampling analysis of participant variance to improve the efficiency of sensor modeling perception experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John D.; Hixson, Jonathan; McKnight, Patrick; Peterson, Matthew S.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2010-04-01

    Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) Modeling and Simulation Division (MSD) sensor models, such as NV Therm IP, are developed through perception experiments that investigate phenomena associated with sensor performance (e.g. sampling, noise, sensitivity). A standardized laboratory perception testing method developed in the mid-1990's has been responsible for advances in sensor modeling that are supported by field sensor performance experiments.1 The number of participants required to yield dependable results for these experiments could not be estimated because the variance in performance due to participant differences was not known. NVESD and George Mason University (GMU) scientists measured the contribution of participant variance within the overall experimental variance for 22 individuals each exposed to 1008 stimuli. Results of the analysis indicate that the total participant contribution to overall experimental variance was between 1% and 2%.

  6. Improvement and extension of data from ATS-6 Solar Cell Radiation Damage Experiment (SCRDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhammer, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The ATS 6 solar cell radiation damage experiment data through 2 1/3 years of synchronous orbit operation are presented. Comparisons are made of the performances of the 13 different types of solar cell/cover configurations, including solar cell and cover thickness variations, base resistivity variation, new cover processes and materials, and the COMSAT violet cell. These performances are also compared to the performance of the LES 6 solar cell experiment, the ATS 6 main solar arrays, and laboratory spectrum electron irradiations. It is found that the cells of the ATS 6 experiment generally performed as expected through 6 to 9 months in orbit, but that at 2 1/3 years they were severely degraded in current. The short circuit current degradation after 2 1/3 years in orbit appears to exhibit an anomalous additional degradation of 5 to 9 percent over what was experienced in synchronous orbit operation.

  7. The Role of Interactivity in Internet Business on Customer Experiential Values and Behavioral Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, So Ra

    2012-01-01

    Customers' experiential value is based on holistic experience customers would have when they interact with a product/service. Experiential value is defined as "relativistic preference characterizing a subject's experience with some object" (Holbrook, 1994). Internet is characterized for interactivity and it should have a role…

  8. Experimental design: computer simulation for improving the precision of an experiment.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Henk; Zillesen, Piet G van Schaick; Krulichova, Iva

    2004-06-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program, ExpDesign, that has been developed for simulating animal experiments, is introduced. The program guides students through the steps for designing animal experiments and estimating optimal sample sizes. Principles are introduced for controlling variation, establishing the experimental unit, selecting randomised block and factorial experimental designs, and applying the appropriate statistical analysis. Sample Power is a supporting tool that visualises the process of estimating the sample size. The aim of developing the ExpDesign program has been to make biomedical research workers more familiar with some basic principles of experimental design and statistics and to facilitate discussions with statisticians.

  9. Using reactor operating experience to improve the design of a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.D.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Drexler, R.L.; Leyse, C.F.

    1993-07-01

    Increasing regulatory demands and effects of plant aging are limiting the operation of existing test reactors. Additionally, these reactors have limited capacities and capabilities for supporting future testing missions. A multidisciplinary team of experts developed sets of preliminary safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor design concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). Anticipated missions for the new reactor include fuels and materials irradiation testing, isotope production, space testing, medical research, fusion testing, intense positron research, and transmutation doping. The early BATR design decisions have benefited from operating experiences with existing reactors. This paper discusses these experiences and highlights their significance for the design of a new BATR.

  10. Courtesy in caring. The patient as customer.

    PubMed

    DeBaca, V

    1990-01-01

    If you were paying $500 a night for a hotel room,. would you be happy if you were told you would be sharing it with a stranger? While such a question cannot be literally asked about a hospital experience, metaphorically it can be--and is--asked every time a patient enters a hospital. The idea of patient-as-consumer is not longer just another trendy concept but an integral part of the way many hospitals do business, and it's the hospital manager's responsibility to ensure the customer's satisfaction. PMID:10105899

  11. Corporatization as a means of improving water quality: the experience in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Narelle

    Factors including fragmentation, a lack of direction, poor accountability, poor water quality, and a sizable state government subsidy contributed to the rural water industry in Victoria, Australia, in 1993. In 1993 the state government set out parameters for reform to change the size, structure, performance, and culture of the water industry. The path taken was not privatization, but corporatization. Tools used included amalgamation of organizations; separating water provisions from local government; changing the composition and reporting mechanisms of the boards; establishing clear benchmarks and performance criteria; making information publicly available; and providing a commercial orientation. The outcomes of the reforms were to be a focus on water quality and effluent management. In 2001, 15 water authorities were in place. There were significant improvements in accountability, finances, and performance. The authorities provided information on performance to both the state and the public. Reductions of operating costs have been in the range of 20-35%, with savings put back into new infrastructure. Water quality has significantly improved in a number of parameters and effluent management has also improved. This paper describes the challenges faced before the reform process, the reforms initiated, and the outcomes. It argues that privatization is not the only path to improvement: Developing a corporate structure and accountability can also deliver substantial improvements. PMID:15371224

  12. Corporatization as a means of improving water quality: the experience in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Martin, Narelle

    Factors including fragmentation, a lack of direction, poor accountability, poor water quality, and a sizable state government subsidy contributed to the rural water industry in Victoria, Australia, in 1993. In 1993 the state government set out parameters for reform to change the size, structure, performance, and culture of the water industry. The path taken was not privatization, but corporatization. Tools used included amalgamation of organizations; separating water provisions from local government; changing the composition and reporting mechanisms of the boards; establishing clear benchmarks and performance criteria; making information publicly available; and providing a commercial orientation. The outcomes of the reforms were to be a focus on water quality and effluent management. In 2001, 15 water authorities were in place. There were significant improvements in accountability, finances, and performance. The authorities provided information on performance to both the state and the public. Reductions of operating costs have been in the range of 20-35%, with savings put back into new infrastructure. Water quality has significantly improved in a number of parameters and effluent management has also improved. This paper describes the challenges faced before the reform process, the reforms initiated, and the outcomes. It argues that privatization is not the only path to improvement: Developing a corporate structure and accountability can also deliver substantial improvements.

  13. Improving immunization coverage through budgeted microplans and sub-national performance agreements: early experience from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Soeung, S C; Grundy, B M J; Ly, C K; Samnang, C; Boreland, M; Brooks, A; Maynard, J; Biggs, B A

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, Cambodia has demonstrated significant success in specific aspects of immunization with gains through campaign efforts in measles control and polio eradication. In contrast, routine immunization rates have failed to improve over the last five years. In response, the National Immunization Program of the Ministry of Health developed a coverage improvement planning (CIP) process. This paper describes the CIP process in Cambodia, including identified barriers to and strategies for improving coverage. Immunization coverage rose in 8 of 10 pilot districts in the year following the introduction of CIP in 2003. The mean increase in DPT3 coverage across pilot districts on an annual basis was 16%, which provides encouraging early evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention. Factors associated with success in coverage improvement included: (1) development of a needs-based micro-plan, (2) application of performance-based contracting between levels of management, (3) investment in social mobilization, (4) securing finance for health outreach programs and (5) strengthened monitoring systems. Lessons learned will guide program expansion to improve immunization coverage nationally.

  14. Hippocampal Synaptic Expansion Induced by Spatial Experience in Rats Correlates with Improved Information Processing in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ochoa-Alvarez, Adrian; Velázquez-Campos, Giovanna; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía Y.; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Spatial water maze (WM) overtraining induces hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) expansion, and it has been suggested that spatial pattern separation depends on the MF pathway. We hypothesized that WM experience inducing MF expansion in rats would improve spatial pattern separation in the hippocampal network. We first tested this by using the the delayed non-matching to place task (DNMP), in animals that had been previously trained on the water maze (WM) and found that these animals, as well as animals treated as swim controls (SC), performed better than home cage control animals the DNMP task. The “catFISH” imaging method provided neurophysiological evidence that hippocampal pattern separation improved in animals treated as SC, and this improvement was even clearer in animals that experienced the WM training. Moreover, these behavioral treatments also enhance network reliability and improve partial pattern separation in CA1 and pattern completion in CA3. By measuring the area occupied by synaptophysin staining in both the stratum oriens and the stratun lucidum of the distal CA3, we found evidence of structural synaptic plasticity that likely includes MF expansion. Finally, the measures of hippocampal network coding obtained with catFISH correlate significantly with the increased density of synaptophysin staining, strongly suggesting that structural synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus induced by the WM and SC experience is related to the improvement of spatial information processing in the hippocampus. PMID:26244549

  15. Monitoring of learning at the category level when learning a natural concept: will task experience improve its resolution?

    PubMed

    Tauber, Sarah K; Dunlosky, John

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have recently begun to investigate people's ability to monitor their learning of natural categories. For concept learning tasks, a learner seeks to accurately monitor learning at the category level - i.e., to accurately judge whether exemplars will be correctly classified into the appropriate category on an upcoming test. Our interest was in whether monitoring resolution at the category level would improve as participants gain task experience across multiple study-test blocks, as well as within each block. In four experiments, exemplar birds (e.g., American Goldfinch, Cassin's Finch) paired with each family name (e.g., Finch) were studied, and participants made a judgment of learning (JOL) for each exemplar. Of most interest, before and after studying the exemplars, participants made category learning judgments (CLJs), which involved predicting the likelihood of correctly classifying novel birds into each family. Tests included exemplars that had been studied or exemplars that had not been studied (novel). This procedure was repeated for either one or two additional blocks. The relative accuracy of CLJs did not improve across blocks even when explicit feedback was provided, whereas item-by-item JOL accuracy improved across blocks. Category level resolution did improve from pre-study to post-study on an initial block, but it did not consistently increase within later blocks. The stable accuracy of CLJs across blocks poses a theoretical and empirical challenge for identifying techniques to improve people's ability to judge their learning of natural categories.

  16. The role of health professional organizations in improving maternal and newborn health: The FIGO LOGIC experience.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David J

    2015-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health improved the internal and external capacity of eight national professional organizations of obstetrics and gynecology in six African and two Asian countries. The initiative was funded by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and had three key objectives: to support the eight FIGO member associations to strengthen their capacity to work effectively; to influence national policies on maternal and newborn health; and to work toward improving clinical practice in this area. Through improved capacity, and underpinned by Memoranda of Understanding with their governments, the associations influenced national policy in maternal and newborn health, impacted clinical care through the development of over forty national clinical guidelines, delivered national curricula, trained clinical and management staff, and led the development of national maternal death and near-miss review programs.

  17. Improving Learning in Primary Schools of Developing Countries: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    I gathered 77 randomized experiments (with 111 treatment arms) that evaluated the effects of school-based interventions on learning in developing-country primary schools. On average, monetary grants and deworming treatments had mean effect sizes that were close to zero and not statistically significant. Nutritional treatments, treatments that…

  18. Improving the Quality of Experience Journals: Training Educational Psychology Students in Basic Qualitative Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds-Keefer, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of teaching basic qualitative methodology to preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course in the quality of observation journals. Preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course requiring 45 hr of field experience were given qualitative methodological training as a part of the…

  19. Understanding Transfer Students at the University of Delaware: Transition Experiences and Recommendations for Improving Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinci, Carolyn Eaton

    2012-01-01

    Transfer students comprise about ten percent of the student population in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at the University of Delaware. This research presents findings from a mixed methods study investigating the transition experiences of transfer students in the college. Demographic data were gathered on CAS transfer students admitted to…

  20. Trans-Parency in the Workplace: How the Experiences of Transsexual Employees Can Be Improved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Charlie L.; Martinez, Larry R.; Ruggs, Enrica N.; Hebl, Michelle R.; Akers, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Very little research has focused exclusively on the workplace experiences of transsexual employees. Studies that have been done are either qualitative case studies (e.g., Budge, Tebbe, & Howard; 2010; Schilt & Connell, 2007), or aggregate transsexual individuals with lesbian, gay, and bisexual employees (e.g., Irwin, 2002). The current study…

  1. A Collective Self-Study to Improve Program Coherence of Clinical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaras, Anastasia P.; Frank, Toya Jones; Williams, Monique Apollon; Christopher, Emily; Rodick, William Harry, III.

    2016-01-01

    Student feedback collected through program evaluation of secondary education licensure and Master's program clinical experiences prompted us to conduct a collective self-study. We used a reflective framework for analysis and discussion of the shifts students in our courses made as they progressed from observers to practicing teachers. Along with…

  2. Concentrated Study Time and Improved Learning Efficiency: An Experiment Using "Economics U$A."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Paul W.; Niss, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Reports on an experiment that tested whether course length and concentration affect learning. Using the "Economics U$A" television series, compares student performance in two classes taught over differing time periods. Results implied that concentrated time periods for courses may lead to more concentrated student effort. (LS)

  3. Beyond the Binary: Serving the Transgender Student, Improving the College Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Eleanor Ford

    2010-01-01

    This research study examines transgender (trans) identity, how it is manifested in trans students, the college and university experiences of these individuals, and how organizational systems hinder, enhance, expand, and redefine trans student success. This study provides a greater understanding of a population that is often misunderstood by fellow…

  4. Motivational Interviewing May Improve Exercise Experience for People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Small Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.; Lanesskog, Deirdre; Cleeland, Leah; Motl, Robert; Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre

    2012-01-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are likely to benefit from regular exercise, but physical inactivity is more common among people with MS than among the general population. This small randomized study evaluated whether motivational interviewing (MI) affects adherence to and personal experience in an exercise program. Inactive people with MS…

  5. Improving Dental Experiences by Using Virtual Reality Distraction: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; P. White, Mathew; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people’s previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events. PMID:24621518

  6. [Suggestion of an improved technique of general anaesthesia for ophthalmological experiments on rabbits (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Holtmann, H W; Stein, H J

    1975-02-01

    The potentiated general anaesthesia with ethyl urethane and propionylpromazine for long-time ophthalmological experiments on rabbits is not adequate. It is suggested to apply additional ketamin (i.v. and i.m.). With this procedure a satisfactory position of rest is obtained for more than two hours.

  7. Learning Experiences Reuse Based on an Ontology Modeling to Improve Adaptation in E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadj M'tir, Riadh; Rumpler, Béatrice; Jeribi, Lobna; Ben Ghezala, Henda

    2014-01-01

    Current trends in e-Learning focus mainly on personalizing and adapting the learning environment and learning process. Although their increasingly number, theses researches often ignore the concepts of capitalization and reuse of learner experiences which can be exploited later by other learners. Thus, the major challenge of distance learning is…

  8. Depression among Alumni of Foster Care: Decreasing Rates through Improvement of Experiences in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; English, Diana; Williams, Jason R.; Phillips, Chereese M.

    2009-01-01

    The Northwest Foster Care Alumni Study examined the relation between experiences in foster care and depression among young adults who spent at least a year in foster care as adolescents. Results indicate that preparation for leaving foster care, nurturing supports from the foster family, school stability, access to tutoring, access to therapeutic…

  9. Custom hip prostheses by integrating CAD and casting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pedro F.; Leal, Nuno; Neto, Rui J.; Lino, F. Jorge; Reis, Ana

    2012-09-01

    Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) is a surgical intervention that is being achieving high rates of success, leaving room to research on long run durability, patient comfort and costs reduction. Even so, up to the present, little research has been done to improve the method of manufacturing customized prosthesis. The common customized prostheses are made by full machining. This document presents a different approach methodology which combines the study of medical images, through CAD (Computer Aided Design) software, SLadditive manufacturing, ceramic shell manufacture, precision foundry with Titanium alloys and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM). The goal is to achieve the best comfort for the patient, stress distribution and the maximum lifetime of the prosthesis produced by this integrated methodology. The way to achieve this desiderate is to make custom hip prosthesis which are adapted to each patient needs and natural physiognomy. Not only the process is reliable, but also represents a cost reduction comparing to the conventional full machined custom hip prosthesis.

  10. 12 CFR 13.5 - Customer information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Customer information. 13.5 Section 13.5 Banks... PRACTICES § 13.5 Customer information. Prior to the execution of a transaction recommended to a non... obtain information concerning: (a) The customer's financial status; (b) The customer's tax status;...

  11. 7 CFR 1260.129 - Customs Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Customs Service. 1260.129 Section 1260.129... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.129 Customs Service. Customs Service means the United States Customs Service of the United States Department of the Treasury....

  12. 27 CFR 27.185 - Customs release.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customs release. 27.185... Distilled Spirits From Customs Custody Free of Tax for Use of the United States § 27.185 Customs release. (a) Upon receipt of appropriate customs entry and a photocopy of a permit, Form 5150.33 or...

  13. 47 CFR 32.6623 - Customer services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer services. 32.6623 Section 32.6623... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6623 Customer services. (a... includes: (1) Initiating customer service orders and records; (2) Maintaining and billing customer...

  14. Web Evaluation at the US National Institutes of Health: Use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index Online Customer Survey

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Elliot R; Feldman, Sue; Love, Cynthia B; Rodrigues, Dennis; Malamud, Mark; Lagana, Marie; Crafts, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    broad cross-section of websites participated, and a majority reported significant benefits and new knowledge gained from the ACSI survey results. NIH websites as a group scored consistently higher on overall customer satisfaction relative to US government-wide and private sector benchmarks. Conclusions Overall, the enterprise-wide experiment was successful. On the level of individual websites, the project confirmed the value of online customer surveys as a Web evaluation method. The evaluation results indicated that successful use of the ACSI, whether site-by-site or enterprise-wide, depends in large part on strong staff and management support and adequate funding and time for the use of such evaluative methods. In the age of Web-based e-government, a broad commitment to Web evaluation may well be needed. This commitment would help assure that the potential of the Web and other information technologies to improve customer and citizen satisfaction is fully realized. PMID:18276580

  15. Improving the Virtual Reference Experience: How Closely Do Academic Libraries Adhere to RUSA Guidelines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jessica; Benson, Pete

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the degree to which academic libraries or library staff members throughout the United States adhere to the Guidelines for Virtual Reference Services provided by the Reference & User Services Association (RUSA). The results of the study were analyzed to identify specific areas where improvement is needed in…

  16. Preserving Heritage While Restoring and Improving Facilities: A Rural Community's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Burton Edward

    In Waitsburg, Washington, the community was actively involved in a rural school facilities improvement project. The district serves approximately 410 students in three buildings on a single campus. Spurred by growing enrollment and aging facilities, the project included the complete renovation and restoration of a historic school building to serve…

  17. "What Works": Recommendations on Improving Academic Experiences and Outcomes for Black Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Tyrone C.; Douglas, Ty-Ron, M. O.; Warren, Chezare A.

    2016-01-01

    This brief presents the most significant recommendations based on a review of key findings from research presented in this special issue. The authors offer what they believe to be the most important considerations of what works for improving Black male school achievement in the domains of research, practice, and policy.

  18. Improving the Experience of TAFE Award-Holders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Although their rate of admission to university appears to be improving, the academic success of former TAFE students depends on the extent to which universities are prepared to meet their need for support in developing academic literacy skills. Australian universities' traditional reliance on schools to deliver students who are academically…

  19. How Can We Improve through Pupil Participation? An Infants School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceballos López, Noelia; Susinos Rada, Teresa; Saiz Linares, Ángela

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a research project and forms part of a doctoral thesis in development whose aim was to promote and encourage improvement in schools based on the student voice. We believe that student participation is essential in order to progress towards inclusive educational communities. We present the main conclusions obtained in two…

  20. Improving Safety, Quality and Efficiency through the Management of Emerging Processes: The TenarisDalmine Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonometti, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this contribution is to describe a new complexity-science-based approach for improving safety, quality and efficiency and the way it was implemented by TenarisDalmine. Design/methodology/approach: This methodology is called "a safety-building community". It consists of a safety-behaviour social self-construction process…

  1. A School Council's Experience with School Improvement: A Saskatchewan Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a qualitative case study conducted within one Saskatchewan (Canada) rural community, the purpose of this article is to describe the challenges a school council faced when supporting a school improvement plan. The primary data for the study were 35 semi-structured individual interviews conducted with school council members, teachers, and…

  2. Improving the Quality of Student Experience in Large Lectures Using Quick Polls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calma, Angelito; Webster, Beverley; Petry, Stefan; Pesina, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A quick polling initiative was tested in finance classes using multiple choice questions to determine whether it can improve student interaction and engagement in a large class. Students (n = 446) responded using either a smartphone app (53%) or by using pen and paper (47%). Immediate feedback was provided to students using charts that were…

  3. Using COPE To Improve Quality of Care: The Experience of the Family Planning Association of Kenya.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Janet

    1998-01-01

    COPE (Client-Oriented, Provider-Efficient) methodology, a self-assessment tool that has been used in 35 countries around the world, was used to improve the quality of care in family planning clinics in Kenya. COPE involves a process that legitimately invests power with providers and clinic-level staff. It gives providers more control over their…

  4. Creating a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement: one DNP program's experience.

    PubMed

    Meek, Julie A; Runshe, Debra; Young, Judith; Embree, Jennifer; Riner, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Developing faculty ownership of ongoing curricular improvement presents educational and management challenges for schools of nursing, yet little has been published about which components help build a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement. The purpose of this case study was to describe key features of and faculty satisfaction with one school of nursing's doctor of nursing practice curricular assessment process, with a description of key considerations for developing an ePortfolio-supported curricular assessment process. ePortfolio matrices were used as a curricular organizing structure for mapping and scoring each completed student assignment to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essential descriptor using a rubric that measured evidence of student learning. Faculty satisfaction with the process was also evaluated. First-year results indicated high levels of faculty satisfaction with the assessment process. The initial findings led to four actions for curricular improvement and agreement to continue the assessment process biannually. The curricular assessment was successful in generating faculty satisfaction, identifying needed areas to improve the curriculum, and obtaining faculty agreement to continue the process. A faculty community supportive of curricular assessment is essential to a transformational learning environment that prepares future nursing leaders. PMID:25601241

  5. Practice leaders programme: entrusting and enabling general practitioners to lead change to improve patient experience.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Marion; McFetridge, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    This program focused on practice-level service change as a means of improving patient care and developing leadership skills of 19 general practitioners (GPs) and aimed to: promote and support change in leadership thinking and practice, facilitate practice-led service improvement, support career development, support continuing professional development, and contribute to the development of extended GP specialty training. Nineteen GPs, in Milton Keynes, United Kingdom, both new and experienced, volunteered to participate. Milton Keynes was selected on the basis of it being an area of relative social deprivation and underperformance in national quality indicators. New and experienced GPs took part in biweekly Action Learning Sets, individual coaching, and placements with the national and local health organizations. Each participant completed a project to improve the quality of patient care. The learning sets supported the process and 11 of the GPs chose to complete a postgraduate certificate in General Practice. Evaluation consisted of analysis of development of leadership competencies recorded through Medical Leadership Competency Framework pre- and postintervention assessment, analysis of learning recorded in participants' reflective diaries, analysis of learning process recorded through participant focus groups, and analysis of learning and project outcomes recorded in project reports. Outcomes showed statistically significant increases in leadership competencies, changes in services and care, improved confidence and changed culture. GPs expressed increased confidence to "have a go" and motivation to "make a difference." This innovative narrative, complex, neuroleadership-based program continues to inform educational policy and practice, increasing leadership competencies, and to improve the quality of patient care. PMID:21505615

  6. Evolution and Initial Experience of a Statewide Care Transitions Quality Improvement Collaborative: Preventing Avoidable Readmissions Together.

    PubMed

    Axon, R Neal; Cole, Laura; Moonan, Aunyika; Foster, Richard; Cawley, Patrick; Long, Laura; Turley, Christine B

    2016-02-01

    Increasing scrutiny of hospital readmission rates has spurred a wide variety of quality improvement initiatives. The Preventing Avoidable Readmissions Together (PART) initiative is a statewide quality improvement learning collaborative organized by stakeholder organizations in South Carolina. This descriptive report focused on initial interventions with hospitals. Eligible participants included all acute care hospitals plus home health organizations, nursing facilities, hospices, and other health care organizations. Measures were degree of statewide participation, curricular engagement, adoption of evidence-based improvement strategies, and readmission rate changes. Fifty-nine of 64 (92%) acute care hospitals and 9 of 10 (90%) hospital systems participated in collaborative events. Curricular engagement included: webinars and coaching calls (49/59, 83%), statewide in-person meetings (35/59, 59%), regional in-person meetings (44/59, 75%), and individualized consultations (46/59, 78%). Among 34 (58%) participating hospitals completing a survey at the completion of Year 1, respondents indicated complete implementation of multidisciplinary rounding (58%), post-discharge telephone calls (58%), and teach-back (32%), and implementation in process of high-quality transition records (52%), improved discharge summaries (45%), and timely follow-up appointments (39%). A higher proportion of hospitals had significant decreases (≥10% relative change) in all-cause readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (55.6% vs. 30.4%, P=0.01), heart failure (54.2% vs. 31.7%, P=0.09), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (41.7% vs. 33.3%, P=0.83) between 2011-2013 compared to earlier (2009-2011) trends. Focus on reducing readmissions is driving numerous, sometimes competing, quality improvement initiatives. PART successfully engaged the majority of acute care facilities in one state to harmonize and accelerate adoption of evidence-based care transitions strategies. PMID:26102592

  7. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  8. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    PubMed

    Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  9. Improving throughput and user experience for information intensive websites by applying HTTP compression technique.

    PubMed

    Malla, Ratnakar

    2008-11-06

    HTTP compression is a technique specified as part of the W3C HTTP 1.0 standard. It allows HTTP servers to take advantage of GZIP compression technology that is built into latest browsers. A brief survey of medical informatics websites show that compression is not enabled. With compression enabled, downloaded files sizes are reduced by more than 50% and typical transaction time is also reduced from 20 to 8 minutes, thus providing a better user experience.

  10. The solar activity measurements experiments (SAMEX) for improved scientific understanding of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Activity Measurements Experiments (SAMEX) mission is described. It is designed to provide a look at the interactions of magnetic fields and plasmas that create flares and other explosive events on the sun in an effort to understand solar activity and the nature of the solar magnetic field. The need for this mission, the instruments to be used, and the expected benefits of SAMEX are discussed.

  11. Human posture in microgravity: An experiment on EUROMIR '95 to verify and improve a simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colford, Nicholas; Giorgi, Pier Luigi; Gaia, Enrico; Cotronei, Vittorio

    1995-10-01

    An anthropometric mannequin implemented in robotic modelling software has proved very useful in the simulation of static and semi-dynamic reachability envelopes. Its prediction of working postures has been verified to some extent during neutral buoyancy trials. While a robotic solution is useful for static analyses or rough estimates of simple movements, more realistic movement strategies need to be identified directly measuring astronauts' in-orbit behaviour. A set of experiments is to be performed as part of the EUROMIR '95 mission to the MIR orbiting station in which dynamic posture (i.e. posture and movement) measurements will be taken using the ELITE system. The data and analyses of the data will be used to animate the Alenia anthopometric mannequin and to develop movement algorithms more similar to those of a person in microgravity than the robotic solutions currently employed. This paper presents the experiments to be performed and the changes to Alenia's mannequin that will allow the model to effect movements according to the experimental results. It is aimed at expanding the dialog between the biomechanical and human factors disciplines started in this experiment to other potential end-users of the experimental results.

  12. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups. PMID:10115898

  13. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups.

  14. Improving ITC studies of cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by global analysis of conventional and non-conventional experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bertaut, Eléonore

    2014-01-01

    Summary The study of 1:1 cyclodextrin inclusion compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry was explored in a theoretical and experimental point of view to compare the efficiency of conventional and non-conventional experiments. All direct and competitive protocols were described and evaluated in terms of accuracy on both binding constant and inclusion enthalpy. Significant improvement in the calorimetric characterization may be obtained by means of the global analysis of non-conventional experiments coupled to the standard titration protocol. While the titration-release approach proved to be the most accurate strategy for classical complexations, the valuable contribution of other non-conventional experiments was demonstrated for issues concerning weak stability, enthalpy, or solubility. PMID:25550724

  15. Improving the physics impact of next-generation 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hossbach, Todd W.

    2009-01-01

    It was shown that segmentation and pulse-shape discrimination can improve the discovery sensitivity of a next-gen 0vBB-decay experiment by 90%. - However, when practical aspects are considered (such as instrumenting each segment with front-end electronics), the discovery sensitivity is decreased by 19%. - This has extremely important consequences to proposed next-gen experiments since the two active collaborations have strongly advocated the use of segmented detectors for all or part of the experiment. - New germanium detector technology, currently under development, has demonstrated excellent multi-site background rejection capabilities without the complexity of segmentation or complicated PSD algorithms. - The physically-segmented p-type germanium detector technology has proven to be a useful and practical tool in modern nuclear physics. The PSEG technology deserves further development as it has the potential for use in a variety of applications.

  16. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). [weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions. An economic experiment was carried out which will monitor citrus growers' decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events and will establish the economic benefits of improved temperature forecasts. A summary is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done. Specifically, the experiment design is described in detail as are the developed data collection methodology and procedures, sampling plan, data reduction techniques, cost and loss models, establishment of frost severity measures, data obtained from citrus growers, National Weather Service, and Federal Crop Insurance Corp., resulting protection costs and crop losses for the control group sample, extrapolation of results of control group to the Florida citrus industry and the method for normalization of these results to a normal or average frost season so that results may be compared with anticipated similar results from test group measurements.

  17. Improved Understanding of Carbon Storage Risk Via Controlled-Release Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholzer, J. T.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Zheng, L.; Spycher, N.

    2014-12-01

    Two issues are often recognized as main risk drivers for carbon storage projects. The first is the possibility of pressure-induced slip of pre-existing faults, which can lead to breaching of seals to CO2 storage reservoirs. Although the mechanics of induced seismicity are well known, the characteristics of such slip events are poorly constrained and significant questions remain. The second is the potential impact of leaking CO2 on the quality of shallow potable groundwater. While several studies have been conducted using laboratory tests, natural analogues, and numerical models to evaluate the water quality changes induced by elevated CO2 concentrations, predictive understanding of these coupled processes remains limited in realistic field settings. We discuss in this invited contribution two controlled-release field experiments targeting remaining science gaps associated with induced seismicity and groundwater chemistry. The first experiment is a planned active fault slip experiment conducted in an underground research laboratory (URL) in a hardened shale formation that serves as a caprock analog. The critically stressed fault will be perturbed by the injection of fluid under pressure to simulate the influence of CO2 overpressure. The in situ reactivation experiment will use a novel borehole deformation tool that assesses the magnitude of overpressure required to cause slip, defines the mode of this slip as creeping (aseismic) or rapid (seismic), and measures the evolution of permeability on the fault. The second controlled-release field experiment was conducted in 2011/2012 to simulate the release of CO2 from a geologic storage site and study the transport as well as the chemical mechanisms leading to the CO2-induced mobilization of trace elements in a shallow aquifer. The field test involved a dipole system in which the shallow groundwater was pumped from one well, saturated with CO2 at the pressure corresponding to the hydraulic pressure of the aquifer, and

  18. Employee and customer satisfaction in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Wood, Ben D

    2010-01-01

    There were multiple factors identified in a literature review that have a relationship to customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and links between employee and customer satisfaction. Some of the factors identified were communication, wait times, perceived value, trust, dissatisfaction with management, changes in the workplace, vision,and fun at work. Managers must identify these topics to ensure customer satisfaction, customer loyalty,and employee satisfaction which will ultimately have a positive impact on their organizations. PMID:22279715

  19. Using technology and collaborative working for a positive patient experience and to improve safety.

    PubMed

    Desai, Usha

    2016-09-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with wounds need access to the resources that will enable them to deliver the best and most appropriate treatments. A partnership working initiative between Greenwich CCG Medicines management (commissioner), Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust (provider) and ConvaTec (commercial partner) was set up to provide wound-care dressings and products to patients via the community services. It lead to improved access, greater patient benefits, a reduction in dressings waste, and an increase in clinical confidence to make cost-effective, evidence-based prescribing decisions. This inspired the commissioners to collaborate with BlueBay (technology partner) to 'trailblaze' the development and introduction of an electronic wound care template for practice nurses and doctors in primary care to use in conjunction with VISION and EMIS, clinical software systems used in GP practices. This interoperability of clinical systems to improve wound care is, to date, the only one of its kind in the UK. PMID:27594317

  20. Experiments for improved positioning by means of integrated Doppler satellite observations and the NNSS broadcast ephemeris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arur, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to improve station position recovery using broadcast ephemeris in Doppler data reduction was studied. A comparison of precise and broadcast ephemerides, treating the former as the standard, yielded information about the state disturbance that can be associated with the broadcast ephemeris. Statistical information about the state disturbance was used with current observational data for improved position recovery. The rank deficiency problem encountered in the short arc geodetic adjustment procedure was analysed and it was deduced that the fundamental rank deficiency is six, scale information being derivable from the wavelength of transmission. Coordinate differences between stations coobserving a pass are estimable. The uncertainty of the broadcast ephemeris, now in the WGS72 system, was assessed. It was conservatively estimated that its positional uncertainty may vary between 19 to 26 m in-track, 15 to 20 m cross-track and 9 to 10 m in radial directions depending on the incidence of the epoch of observations in the interinjection period.

  1. Resident perspectives on a dermatology Quality Improvement curriculum: the University of Colorado experience.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Sammie J; Huff, Laura S; Lott, Jason P; Dellavalle, Robert P; Dunnick, Cory A

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have prioritized the objective of optimizing quality healthcare though quality improvement initiatives, yet research on dermatology-specific QI programs and their perceptions among dermatology residents remains limited. We explore residents' opinions of a dermatology-specific QI scholarly project curriculum implemented at University of Colorado Denver (UCD) in 2010 and also evaluate residents' attitudes regarding the value of this curriculum in aiding them to meet ACGME core competencies. PMID:27617468

  2. An improved technique of expanding metal ring experiment under high explosive loading.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tiegang; Ren, Guowu; Guo, Zhaoliang; Li, Qingzhong

    2013-04-01

    An experimental technique for metal expanding ring subjected to high explosive loading is conducted to significantly improve the loading stability compared with the traditional setup of two-end detonator initiation. Aspects of the circuit design, experimental arrangement, and initiation principle are illustrated in great detail. In terms of this experimental platform, we examine the velocity response of an individual ring, which demonstrates the experimental reproducibility. Moreover, fragmentation of multiple rings stacked on a metal driver is discussed.

  3. Airline Safety Improvement Through Experience with Near-Misses: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Peter; Dillon, Robin L; Tinsley, Catherine H

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the U.S. commercial airline industry has achieved unprecedented levels of safety, with the statistical risk associated with U.S. commercial aviation falling to 0.003 fatalities per 100 million passengers. But decades of research on organizational learning show that success often breeds complacency and failure inspires improvement. With accidents as rare events, can the airline industry continue safety advancements? This question is complicated by the complex system in which the industry operates where chance combinations of multiple factors contribute to what are largely probabilistic (rather than deterministic) outcomes. Thus, some apparent successes are realized because of good fortune rather than good processes, and this research intends to bring attention to these events, the near-misses. The processes that create these near-misses could pose a threat if multiple contributing factors combine in adverse ways without the intervention of good fortune. Yet, near-misses (if recognized as such) can, theoretically, offer a mechanism for continuing safety improvements, above and beyond learning gleaned from observable failure. We test whether or not this learning is apparent in the airline industry. Using data from 1990 to 2007, fixed effects Poisson regressions show that airlines learn from accidents (their own and others), and from one category of near-misses-those where the possible dangers are salient. Unfortunately, airlines do not improve following near-miss incidents when the focal event has no clear warnings of significant danger. Therefore, while airlines need to and can learn from certain near-misses, we conclude with recommendations for improving airline learning from all near-misses. PMID:26503596

  4. Airline Safety Improvement Through Experience with Near-Misses: A Cautionary Tale.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Peter; Dillon, Robin L; Tinsley, Catherine H

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the U.S. commercial airline industry has achieved unprecedented levels of safety, with the statistical risk associated with U.S. commercial aviation falling to 0.003 fatalities per 100 million passengers. But decades of research on organizational learning show that success often breeds complacency and failure inspires improvement. With accidents as rare events, can the airline industry continue safety advancements? This question is complicated by the complex system in which the industry operates where chance combinations of multiple factors contribute to what are largely probabilistic (rather than deterministic) outcomes. Thus, some apparent successes are realized because of good fortune rather than good processes, and this research intends to bring attention to these events, the near-misses. The processes that create these near-misses could pose a threat if multiple contributing factors combine in adverse ways without the intervention of good fortune. Yet, near-misses (if recognized as such) can, theoretically, offer a mechanism for continuing safety improvements, above and beyond learning gleaned from observable failure. We test whether or not this learning is apparent in the airline industry. Using data from 1990 to 2007, fixed effects Poisson regressions show that airlines learn from accidents (their own and others), and from one category of near-misses-those where the possible dangers are salient. Unfortunately, airlines do not improve following near-miss incidents when the focal event has no clear warnings of significant danger. Therefore, while airlines need to and can learn from certain near-misses, we conclude with recommendations for improving airline learning from all near-misses.

  5. Improving sexually transmitted disease management in the private sector: the Jamaica experience.

    PubMed

    Green, M; Hoffman, I F; Brathwaite, A; Wedderburn, M; Figueroa, P; Behets, F; Dallabetta, G; Hoyo, C; Cohen, M S

    1998-01-01

    The Jamaican Ministry of Health has estimated that over 60% of all sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are managed within the private sector, where 800 (66%) of the country's 1200 registered physicians practice. To improve the quality of STD case management provided by these practitioners, the Medical Association of Jamaica organized a series of 6 half-day seminars repeated at 3-4 month intervals in three geographic locations between December 1993 and July 1995. Topics addressed included urethritis, genital ulcer disease, HIV/AIDS, vaginal discharge, pelvic inflammatory disease, and STDs in children and adolescents. A total of 628 private practitioners attended at least one seminar and almost half the physicians attended two or more. Comparisons of scores on a written pretest completed before the seminar and those from a post-test conducted by telephone after the seminar revealed significant improvements in all four general STD management categories: counseling/education, diagnostics/screening, treatment, and knowledge. The proportion of practitioners who obtained syphilis serologies during pregnancy rose from 38.3% to 83.8% and those providing effective treatment for gonorrhea increased from 57.8% to 81.1%. Overall, 96% of practitioners were providing some level of risk-reduction counseling at the time of the post-test and 74% were prescribing correct treatment regimens. Ongoing education and motivation by the national STD control program or the Medical Association are recommended to improve STD case management even further.

  6. The four faces of mass customization.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, J H; Pine, B J

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all executives today recognize the need to provide outstanding service to customers. Focusing on the customer, however, is both an imperative and a potential curse. In their desire to become customer driven, many companies have resorted to inventing new programs and procedures to meet every customer's request. But as customers and their needs grow increasingly diverse, such an approach has become a surefire way to add unnecessary cost and complexity to operations. Companies around the world have embraced mass customization in an attempt to avoid those pitfalls. Readily available information technology and flexible work processes permit them to customize goods or services for individual customers in high volumes at low cost. But many managers have discovered that mass customization itself can produce unnecessary cost and complexity. They are realizing that they did not examine thoroughly enough what kind of customization their customers would value before they plunged ahead. That is understandable. Until now, no framework has existed to help managers determine the type of customization they should pursue. James Gilmore and Joseph Pine provide managers with just such a framework. They have identified four distinct approaches to customization. When designing or redesigning a product, process, or business unit, managers should examine each approach for possible insights into how to serve their customers best. In some cases, a single approach will dominate the design. More often, however, managers will need a mix of some or all of the four approaches to serve their own particular set of customers. PMID:10174455

  7. The four faces of mass customization.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, J H; Pine, B J

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all executives today recognize the need to provide outstanding service to customers. Focusing on the customer, however, is both an imperative and a potential curse. In their desire to become customer driven, many companies have resorted to inventing new programs and procedures to meet every customer's request. But as customers and their needs grow increasingly diverse, such an approach has become a surefire way to add unnecessary cost and complexity to operations. Companies around the world have embraced mass customization in an attempt to avoid those pitfalls. Readily available information technology and flexible work processes permit them to customize goods or services for individual customers in high volumes at low cost. But many managers have discovered that mass customization itself can produce unnecessary cost and complexity. They are realizing that they did not examine thoroughly enough what kind of customization their customers would value before they plunged ahead. That is understandable. Until now, no framework has existed to help managers determine the type of customization they should pursue. James Gilmore and Joseph Pine provide managers with just such a framework. They have identified four distinct approaches to customization. When designing or redesigning a product, process, or business unit, managers should examine each approach for possible insights into how to serve their customers best. In some cases, a single approach will dominate the design. More often, however, managers will need a mix of some or all of the four approaches to serve their own particular set of customers.

  8. Learning from local knowledge to improve disease surveillance: perceptions of the guinea worm illness experience.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Kendall, C

    1992-12-01

    Surveillance is an essential tool in any campaign to eradicate disease; guinea worm (dracunculiasis), which is targeted for eradication before the year 2000, is no exception. One criterion of an eradicable disease is that it be easy to recognize as the program advances. Few experts doubt that the experience of a meter-long subcutaneous worm protruding through a painful ulcer can be missed or confused with another disease, thus ensuring that guinea worm meets this criterion. Field experiences of anthropologists and health educators have shown that one should never assume that community perceptions of illness experience coincide fully with medical case definitions of disease. This paper describes efforts to learn how the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria perceive sobia, the local name for guinea worm. Qualitative methods including informal interview, village discussion and participant observation were used to discern a pattern of illness presentation and progression. Interestingly, local perceptions were found to include a variety of illness manifestations beyond the common clinical case definition of an emergent worm, thus creating the potential for a high level of false positive reports. Local knowledge was then used to design a pilot project that trained volunteers to become part of the surveillance network for the national eradication program. The volunteers, who were largely illiterate, were able to distinguish between cultural and clinical definitions, and submit quite accurate reports on the guinea worm status of their villages. Among the 164 volunteers, only two submitted false reports due to incorrect disease definition. In contrast local government health workers who were conducting village searches during the same period were significantly more likely to register false positive reports. The culturally sensitive training based on local knowledge received by the village volunteers is thought to have contributed to their superior performance.

  9. Improving the Canadian Precipitation Analysis Estimates through an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasnezhadi, K.; Rasmussen, P. F.; Stadnyk, T.

    2014-12-01

    To gain a better understanding of the spatiotemporal distribution of rainfall over the Churchill River basin, this study was undertaken. The research incorporates gridded precipitation data from the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA) system. CaPA has been developed by Environment Canada and provides near real-time precipitation estimates on a 10 km by 10 km grid over North America at a temporal resolution of 6 hours. The spatial fields are generated by combining forecasts from the Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model with precipitation observations from the network of synoptic weather stations. CaPA's skill is highly influenced by the number of weather stations in the region of interest as well as by the quality of the observations. In an attempt to evaluate the performance of CaPA as a function of the density of the weather station network, a dual-stage design algorithm to simulate CaPA is proposed which incorporates generated weather fields. More specifically, we are adopting a controlled design algorithm which is generally known as Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE). The advantage of using the experiment is that one can define reference precipitation fields assumed to represent the true state of rainfall over the region of interest. In the first stage of the defined OSSE, a coupled stochastic model of precipitation and temperature gridded fields is calibrated and validated. The performance of the generator is then validated by comparing model statistics with observed statistics and by using the generated samples as input to the WATFLOOD™ hydrologic model. In the second stage of the experiment, in order to account for the systematic error of station observations and GEM fields, representative errors are to be added to the reference field using by-products of CaPA's variographic analysis. These by-products explain the variance of station observations and background errors.

  10. Dissection and dissection-associated required experiences improve student performance in gross anatomy: Differences among quartiles.

    PubMed

    Pizzimenti, Marc A; Pantazis, Nicholas; Sandra, Alexander; Hoffmann, Darren S; Lenoch, Susan; Ferguson, Kristi J

    2016-05-01

    To promote student learning, educational strategies should provide multiple levels of engagement with the subject matter. This study investigated examination data from five first year medical gross anatomy class cohorts (692 students) to determine if enhanced student performance was correlated with learning through dissection in a course that used a rotating dissection schedule coupled with peer teaching and other associated experiences. When students performed two of five weekly dissections for a given unit, their average scores on both laboratory and written examinations tended to increase as compared to when they had completed only one week of dissection (P < 0.01). However, these performance gains differed across the class strata and were related to the amount of dissection completed. Students in the upper quartile (UQS) of the class benefited when they had dissected once (92.8%) or twice (92.4%), and these scores were significantly higher than those attained when learning from peers (90.3%, P < 0.01). Students in the lower quartile (LQS) benefited most from the dissection experiences, where practical examination performance was better (77.8% and 80.5%) than when these students learned material from their peers (73.7%, P < 0.01). Although UQS benefited from dissection, LQS benefited to a greater extent in both the practical and written examinations with dissection. Although limited, these data suggest that dissection, coupled with associated educational activities, is an effective pedagogical strategy for learning. Further investigation is required to evaluate the concomitant benefits of peer teaching that are associated with the dissection experience. Anat Sci Educ 9: 238-246. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. 17 CFR 1.36 - Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....36 Record of securities and property received from customers and option customers. (a) Each futures... or option customer, such futures commission merchant shall obtain written acknowledgment from such... property received from customers and option customers. 1.36 Section 1.36 Commodity and Securities...

  12. Using a design of experiment method to improve KDP crystal machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Philippe; Chomont, Christian; Dumont, Pierre; Duchesne, Jacky; Chabassier, Genevieve

    1999-07-01

    Surface quality is an important issue for KDP crystal implemented in high power lasers. Single Point Diamond Turning is the only way to get the required transmitted wavefront and damage threshold, specially in the UV band of the laser Megajoule. The aim of the process development was to reach an rms roughness lower than 3 nm using a vertical fly-cutter, an appropriate cleaning equipment and an interferometric microscope for measurements. A Taguchi Design of Experiment method has been sued to optimize the fly-cutting process parameters on 100 X 100 mm2 KDP crystals.

  13. Using a design of experiment method to improve KDP crystal machining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahaye, Philippe; Chomont, Christian; Dumont, Pierre; Duchesne, Jacky; Chabassier, Genevieve

    1999-09-01

    Surface quality is an important issue for KDP crystals implemented in high power lasers. Single Point Diamond Turning is the only way to get the required transmitted wavefront and damage threshold, especially in the UV band of the laser Megajoule. The aim of the process development was to reach an rms roughness lower than 3 nm using a vertical fly-cutter, an appropriate cleaning equipment and an interferometric microscope for measurements. A Taguchi Design of Experiment method has been used to optimize the fly-cutting process parameters on 100 X 100 mm2 KDP crystals.

  14. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  15. Translational Research to Improve the Efficacy of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: Experience of Gunma University.

    PubMed

    Oike, Takahiro; Sato, Hiro; Noda, Shin-Ei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy holds great promise for cancer therapy. Clinical data show that carbon ion radiotherapy is an effective treatment for tumors that are resistant to X-ray radiotherapy. Since 1994 in Japan, the National Institute of Radiological Sciences has been heading the development of carbon ion radiotherapy using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba. The Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was established in the year 2006 as a proof-of-principle institute for carbon ion radiotherapy with a view to facilitating the worldwide spread of compact accelerator systems. Along with the management of more than 1900 cancer patients to date, GHMC engages in translational research to improve the treatment efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy. Research aimed at guiding patient selection is of utmost importance for making the most of carbon ion radiotherapy, which is an extremely limited medical resource. Intratumoral oxygen levels, radiation-induced cellular apoptosis, the capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks, and the mutational status of tumor protein p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor genes are all associated with X-ray sensitivity. Assays for these factors are useful in the identification of X-ray-resistant tumors for which carbon ion radiotherapy would be beneficial. Research aimed at optimizing treatments based on carbon ion radiotherapy is also important. This includes assessment of dose fractionation, normal tissue toxicity, tumor cell motility, and bystander effects. Furthermore, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy will likely be enhanced by research into combined treatment with other modalities such as chemotherapy. Several clinically available chemotherapeutic drugs (carboplatin, paclitaxel, and etoposide) and drugs at the developmental stage (Wee-1 and heat shock protein 90 inhibitors) show a sensitizing effect on tumor cells treated with carbon ions. Additionally, the efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy can be improved by

  16. Improving the managed entry of new medicines: sharing experiences across Europe.

    PubMed

    Godman, Brian; Paterson, Ken; Malmström, Rickard E; Selke, Gisbert; Fagot, Jean-Paul; Mrak, Jana

    2012-08-01

    The 3-day course on the managed entry of new medicines was run by the Piperska group, which is a pan-European group striving to enhance the health of the public as a whole and the individual patient through exchanging ideas and research around the rational use of drugs. Participants included health authority and health insurance personnel, academics and those from commercial organizations. The principal aim of the conference was to bring together people to discuss ways to improve the managed entry of new drugs.

  17. From intermittent antibiotic point prevalence surveys to quality improvement: experience in Scottish hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2008, the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG) was established to coordinate a national antimicrobial stewardship programme. In 2009 SAPG led participation in a European point prevalence survey (PPS) of hospital antibiotic use. We describe how SAPG used this baseline PPS as the foundation for implementation of measures for improvement in antibiotic prescribing. Methods In 2009 data for the baseline PPS were collected in accordance with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption [ESAC] protocol. This informed the development of two quality prescribing indicators: compliance with antibiotic policy in acute admission units and duration of surgical prophylaxis. From December 2009 clinicians collected these data on a monthly basis. The prescribing indicators were reviewed and further modified in March 2011. Data for the follow up PPS in September 2011 were collected as part of a national PPS of healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial use developed using ECDC protocols. Results In the baseline PPS data were collected in 22 (56%) acute hospitals. The frequency of recording the reason for treatment in medical notes was similar in Scotland (75.9%) and Europe (75.7%). Compliance with policy (81.0%) was also similar to Europe (82.5%) but duration of surgical prophylaxis <24hr (68.6%), was higher than in Europe (48.1%, OR: 0.41, p<0.001). Following the development and implementation of the prescribing indicators monthly measurement and data feedback in admission units illustrated improvement in indication documented of ≥90% and compliance with antibiotic prescribing policy increasing from 76% to 90%. The initial prescribing indicator in surgical prophylaxis was less successful in providing consistent national data as there was local discretion on which procedures to include. Following a review and a focus on colorectal surgery the mean proportion receiving single dose prophylaxis exceeded the target of 95% and the mean

  18. Customized News in Your Mailbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudich, Joe

    1996-01-01

    Customized Internet services deliver news and selected research via e-mail, fax, Web browser, or their own software. Some are clipping services while others are full-fledged online newspapers. Most charge a monthly subscription fee, but a few are free to registered users. Provides the addresses, cost, scope, and evaluation of eight services. (PEN)

  19. Customer Service & Team Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sabrina Budasi

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a six-session, site-specific training course in customer service and team problem solving for the Claretian Medical Center. The course outline is followed the six lesson plans. Components of each lesson plan include a list of objectives, an outline of activities and discussion topics for the lesson,…

  20. Custom Search Engines: Tools & Tips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    2008-01-01

    Few have the resources to build a Google or Yahoo! from scratch. Yet anyone can build a search engine based on a subset of the large search engines' databases. Use Google Custom Search Engine or Yahoo! Search Builder or any of the other similar programs to create a vertical search engine targeting sites of interest to users. The basic steps to…