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Sample records for improving graph partitions

  1. An improved spectral graph partitioning algorithm for mapping parallel computations

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1992-09-01

    Efficient use of a distributed memory parallel computer requires that the computational load be balanced across processors in a way that minimizes interprocessor communication. We present a new domain mapping algorithm that extends recent work in which ideas from spectral graph theory have been applied to this problem. Our generalization of spectral graph bisection involves a novel use of multiple eigenvectors to allow for division of a computation into four or eight parts at each stage of a recursive decomposition. The resulting method is suitable for scientific computations like irregular finite elements or differences performed on hypercube or mesh architecture machines. Experimental results confirm that the new method provides better decompositions arrived at more economically and robustly than with previous spectral methods. We have also improved upon the known spectral lower bound for graph bisection.

  2. Spectral partitioning in equitable graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Graph partitioning problems emerge in a wide variety of complex systems, ranging from biology to finance, but can be rigorously analyzed and solved only for a few graph ensembles. Here, an ensemble of equitable graphs, i.e., random graphs with a block-regular structure, is studied, for which analytical results can be obtained. In particular, the spectral density of this ensemble is computed exactly for a modular and bipartite structure. Kesten-McKay's law for random regular graphs is found analytically to apply also for modular and bipartite structures when blocks are homogeneous. An exact solution to graph partitioning for two equal-sized communities is proposed and verified numerically, and a conjecture on the absence of an efficient recovery detectability transition in equitable graphs is suggested. A final discussion summarizes results and outlines their relevance for the solution of graph partitioning problems in other graph ensembles, in particular for the study of detectability thresholds and resolution limits in stochastic block models.

  3. Evolving bipartite authentication graph partitions

    DOE PAGES

    Pope, Aaron Scott; Tauritz, Daniel Remy; Kent, Alexander D.

    2017-01-16

    As large scale enterprise computer networks become more ubiquitous, finding the appropriate balance between user convenience and user access control is an increasingly challenging proposition. Suboptimal partitioning of users’ access and available services contributes to the vulnerability of enterprise networks. Previous edge-cut partitioning methods unduly restrict users’ access to network resources. This paper introduces a novel method of network partitioning superior to the current state-of-the-art which minimizes user impact by providing alternate avenues for access that reduce vulnerability. Networks are modeled as bipartite authentication access graphs and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm is used to simultaneously minimize the size of largemore » connected components while minimizing overall restrictions on network users. Lastly, results are presented on a real world data set that demonstrate the effectiveness of the introduced method compared to previous naive methods.« less

  4. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  5. Efficient multiple-way graph partitioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dasdan, A.; Aykanat, C.

    1995-12-01

    Graph partitioning deals with evenly dividing a graph into two or more parts such that the total weight of edges interconnecting these parts, i.e., cutsize, is minimized. Graph partitioning has important applications in VLSI layout, mapping, and sparse Gaussian elimination. Since graph partitioning problem is NP-hard, we should resort to polynomial-time algorithms to obtain a good solution, or hopefully a near-optimal solution. Kernighan-Lin (KL) propsoed a 2-way partitioning algorithms. Fiduccia-Mattheyses (FM) introduced a faster version of KL algorithm. Sanchis (FMS) generalized FM algorithm to a multiple-way partitioning algorithm. Simulated Annealing (SA) is one of the most successful approaches that are not KL-based.

  6. Geometric crossovers for multiway graph partitioning.

    PubMed

    Moraglio, Alberto; Kim, Yong-Hyuk; Yoon, Yourim; Moon, Byung-Ro

    2007-01-01

    Geometric crossover is a representation-independent generalization of the traditional crossover defined using the distance of the solution space. By choosing a distance firmly rooted in the syntax of the solution representation as a basis for geometric crossover, one can design new crossovers for any representation. Using a distance tailored to the problem at hand, the formal definition of geometric crossover allows us to design new problem-specific crossovers that embed problem-knowledge in the search. The standard encoding for multiway graph partitioning is highly redundant: each solution has a number of representations, one for each way of labeling the represented partition. Traditional crossover does not perform well on redundant encodings. We propose a new geometric crossover for graph partitioning based on a labeling-independent distance that filters out the redundancy of the encoding. A correlation analysis of the fitness landscape based on this distance shows that it is well suited to graph partitioning. A second difficulty with designing a crossover for multiway graph partitioning is that of feasibility: in general recombining feasible partitions does not lead to feasible offspring partitions. We design a new geometric crossover for permutations with repetitions that naturally suits partition problems and we test it on the graph partitioning problem. We then combine it with the labeling-independent crossover and obtain a much superior geometric crossover inheriting both advantages.

  7. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  8. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity.

  9. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  10. Vertex Separators for Partitioning a Graph

    PubMed Central

    Evrendilek, Cem

    2008-01-01

    Finite Element Method (FEM) is a well known technique extensively studied for spatial and temporal modeling of environmental processes, weather prediction computations, and intelligent signal processing for wireless sensors. The need for huge computational power arising in such applications to simulate physical phenomenon correctly mandates the use of massively parallel computers to distribute the workload evenly. In this study, a novel heuristic algorithm called Line Graph Bisection which partitions a graph via vertex separators so as to balance the workload amongst the processors and to minimize the communication overhead is proposed. The proposed algorithm is proved to be computationally feasible and makes cost-effective parallel implementations possible to speed up the solution process. PMID:27879727

  11. On The Partition Dimension of a Lollipop Graph and a Generalized Jahangir Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purna Kartika Dewi, Maylinda; Atmojo Kusmayadi, Tri

    2017-06-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V (G), such that V (G) can be divided into any partition set S. The set Π with S ∈ Π is a resolving partition of G if each vertex in G has a distinct representation with respect to Π, and Π is an ordered k-partition. The minimum cardinality of resolving k-partitions of V (G) is called a partition dimension of G, denoted by pd(G). The lollipop graph Lm,n is a graph obtained by joining a complete graph Km to a path Pn with a bridge. A generalized Jahangir graph is a graph consisting of a cycle Cmn and one additional vertex which is adjacent to n vertices of Cmn at m distance to each other on Cmn . Many researchers have conducted research in determining the partition dimension for speci c graph classes. They are as references to determine some of the graph classes that haven’t been studied previously. In this paper, we determine the partition dimension of a lollipop graph Lm,n and a generalized Jahangir graph Jm,n . The research methods in this paper is a book study. The results of this paper are as follows. We obtain the partition dimension of a lollipop graph pd(Lm,n ) = m for m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 1. The partition dimension of a generalized Jahangir graph consists of two cases. We showed that pd(Jm,n ) = 3 for n = 3, 4, 5 and we prove that pd({J}m,n)=\\lfloor \\frac{n}{2}\\rfloor +1 {for} n≥ 6.

  12. RNA graph partitioning for the discovery of RNA modularity: a novel application of graph partition algorithm to biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Zheng, Zhe; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Graph representations have been widely used to analyze and design various economic, social, military, political, and biological networks. In systems biology, networks of cells and organs are useful for understanding disease and medical treatments and, in structural biology, structures of molecules can be described, including RNA structures. In our RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) framework, we represent RNA structures as tree graphs by translating unpaired regions into vertices and helices into edges. Here we explore the modularity of RNA structures by applying graph partitioning known in graph theory to divide an RNA graph into subgraphs. To our knowledge, this is the first application of graph partitioning to biology, and the results suggest a systematic approach for modular design in general. The graph partitioning algorithms utilize mathematical properties of the Laplacian eigenvector (µ2) corresponding to the second eigenvalues (λ2) associated with the topology matrix defining the graph: λ2 describes the overall topology, and the sum of µ2's components is zero. The three types of algorithms, termed median, sign, and gap cuts, divide a graph by determining nodes of cut by median, zero, and largest gap of µ2's components, respectively. We apply these algorithms to 45 graphs corresponding to all solved RNA structures up through 11 vertices (∼ 220 nucleotides). While we observe that the median cut divides a graph into two similar-sized subgraphs, the sign and gap cuts partition a graph into two topologically-distinct subgraphs. We find that the gap cut produces the best biologically-relevant partitioning for RNA because it divides RNAs at less stable connections while maintaining junctions intact. The iterative gap cuts suggest basic modules and assembly protocols to design large RNA structures. Our graph substructuring thus suggests a systematic approach to explore the modularity of biological networks. In our applications to RNA structures, subgraphs also suggest

  13. RNA Graph Partitioning for the Discovery of RNA Modularity: A Novel Application of Graph Partition Algorithm to Biology

    PubMed Central

    Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Graph representations have been widely used to analyze and design various economic, social, military, political, and biological networks. In systems biology, networks of cells and organs are useful for understanding disease and medical treatments and, in structural biology, structures of molecules can be described, including RNA structures. In our RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) framework, we represent RNA structures as tree graphs by translating unpaired regions into vertices and helices into edges. Here we explore the modularity of RNA structures by applying graph partitioning known in graph theory to divide an RNA graph into subgraphs. To our knowledge, this is the first application of graph partitioning to biology, and the results suggest a systematic approach for modular design in general. The graph partitioning algorithms utilize mathematical properties of the Laplacian eigenvector (µ2) corresponding to the second eigenvalues (λ2) associated with the topology matrix defining the graph: λ2 describes the overall topology, and the sum of µ2′s components is zero. The three types of algorithms, termed median, sign, and gap cuts, divide a graph by determining nodes of cut by median, zero, and largest gap of µ2′s components, respectively. We apply these algorithms to 45 graphs corresponding to all solved RNA structures up through 11 vertices (∼220 nucleotides). While we observe that the median cut divides a graph into two similar-sized subgraphs, the sign and gap cuts partition a graph into two topologically-distinct subgraphs. We find that the gap cut produces the best biologically-relevant partitioning for RNA because it divides RNAs at less stable connections while maintaining junctions intact. The iterative gap cuts suggest basic modules and assembly protocols to design large RNA structures. Our graph substructuring thus suggests a systematic approach to explore the modularity of biological networks. In our applications to RNA structures, subgraphs also suggest

  14. Multilevel Algorithms for Partitioning Power-Law Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-18

    par- titioning of that graph. Since the size of this graph is quite small, even simple algorithms such as Kernighan -Lin (KL) [23] or Fiduccia...those based on variations of the Kernighan - Lin and Fiduccia-Mattheyses algorithms [15, 1, 5, 21, 20, 10]. This paradigm was independently studied by...www.cs.umn.edu/˜metis. [23] B. W. Kernighan and S. Lin. An efficient heuristic procedure for partitioning graphs. The Bell System Technical Journal, 49(2

  15. Partitioning and modularity of graphs with arbitrary degree distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Jörg; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We solve the graph bipartitioning problem in dense graphs with arbitrary degree distribution using the replica method. We find the cut size to scale universally with ⟨k⟩ . In contrast, earlier results studying the problem in graphs with a Poissonian degree distribution had found a scaling with ⟨k⟩ [Fu and Anderson, J. Phys. A 19, 1605 (1986)]. Our results also generalize to the problem of q partitioning. They can be used to find the expected modularity Q [Newman and Girvan, Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)] of random graphs and allow for the assessment of the statistical significance of the output of community detection algorithms.

  16. Partitioning sparse matrices with eigenvectors of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pothen, Alex; Simon, Horst D.; Liou, Kang-Pu

    1990-01-01

    The problem of computing a small vertex separator in a graph arises in the context of computing a good ordering for the parallel factorization of sparse, symmetric matrices. An algebraic approach for computing vertex separators is considered in this paper. It is shown that lower bounds on separator sizes can be obtained in terms of the eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix associated with a graph. The Laplacian eigenvectors of grid graphs can be computed from Kronecker products involving the eigenvectors of path graphs, and these eigenvectors can be used to compute good separators in grid graphs. A heuristic algorithm is designed to compute a vertex separator in a general graph by first computing an edge separator in the graph from an eigenvector of the Laplacian matrix, and then using a maximum matching in a subgraph to compute the vertex separator. Results on the quality of the separators computed by the spectral algorithm are presented, and these are compared with separators obtained from other algorithms for computing separators. Finally, the time required to compute the Laplacian eigenvector is reported, and the accuracy with which the eigenvector must be computed to obtain good separators is considered. The spectral algorithm has the advantage that it can be implemented on a medium-size multiprocessor in a straightforward manner.

  17. Graph Partitioning for Parallel Applications in Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisws, Rupak; Kumar, Shailendra; Das, Sajal K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The problem of partitioning irregular graphs and meshes for parallel computations on homogeneous systems has been extensively studied. However, these partitioning schemes fail when the target system architecture exhibits heterogeneity in resource characteristics. With the emergence of technologies such as the Grid, it is imperative to study the partitioning problem taking into consideration the differing capabilities of such distributed heterogeneous systems. In our model, the heterogeneous system consists of processors with varying processing power and an underlying non-uniform communication network. We present in this paper a novel multilevel partitioning scheme for irregular graphs and meshes, that takes into account issues pertinent to Grid computing environments. Our partitioning algorithm, called MiniMax, generates and maps partitions onto a heterogeneous system with the objective of minimizing the maximum execution time of the parallel distributed application. For experimental performance study, we have considered both a realistic mesh problem from NASA as well as synthetic workloads. Simulation results demonstrate that MiniMax generates high quality partitions for various classes of applications targeted for parallel execution in a distributed heterogeneous environment.

  18. Learning Algorithm for the Uniform Graph Partitioning Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, C. B.; Chen, Kan

    We study the uniform graph partitioning problem using the learning algorithm proposed by one of us. We discuss the characteristics of the learning algorithm and compare the performance of the algorithm empirically with the Kernighan-Lin algorithm on a range of instances. Even with a simple implementation, the learning algorithm is capable of producing very good results.

  19. On The Partition Dimension of Cm + Pn Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertana, Hidra; Atmojo Kusmayadi, Tri

    2017-06-01

    Let G be a connected graph with V (G) = {v 1, v 2, …, vi } and E(G) = {e 1, e 2, …, ej }, where V (G) is vertex set and E(G) is edge set. If S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), then the distance between v and S is de ned by d(v, S) = min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. For an ordered k-partition Π = {S 1, S 2, …, Sk } of V (G), the representation of v with respect to Π is r(v|Π) with r(v|Π) = (d(v, S 1), d(v, S 2), …, d(v, Sk )). If the representation of v ∈ V (G) with respect to Π are distinct, so Π is called a resolving partition of V (G). The minimum cardinality of resolving partition Π is called a partition dimension of G, denoted by pd(G). In this paper, we study the partition dimension of a Cm + Pn graph. Cm + Pn graph is a graph formed from join operation of cycle graph Cm with order m ≥ 3 and path Pn with order n ≥ 2. Cm + Pn is the union Cm ∪ Pn together with all edges uavb , for ua ∈ V (Cm ) and vb ∈ V (Pn ) with 1 ≤ a ≤ m and 1 ≤ b ≤ n. We obtain the partition dimension of Cm + Pn graph is pd(C 3 + Pn ) = g where g is the smallest positive integer such that n ≤ 5g - 12 for g = 5 and n≤ \\frac{{g}3-7{g}2+20g-18}{2} for g ≥ 6, and pd(Cq + Pn ) = min{p + f, r + t, x + y} for q ≥ 4 and n ≥ 2 where p, f, r, t, x and y are some positive integers related to the number of partition classes containing vertices of Cq and Pn .

  20. Interactive image segmentation by constrained spectral graph partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; He, Jin; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Zhanhua

    2010-11-01

    This paper proposed an interactive image segmentation algorithm that can tolerate slightly incorrect user constraints. Interactive image segmentation was formulated as a constrained spectral graph partitioning problem. Furthermore, it was proven to equal to a supervised classification problem, where the feature space was formed by rows of the eigenvector matrix that was computed by spectral graph analysis. ν-SVM (support vector machine) was preferred as the classifier. Some incorrect labels in user constraints were tolerated by being identified as margin errors in ν-SVM. Comparison with other algorithms on real color images was reported.

  1. Graph partitions and cluster synchronization in networks of oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; O’Clery, Neave; Billeh, Yazan N.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Lambiotte, Renaud; Barahona, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Synchronization over networks depends strongly on the structure of the coupling between the oscillators. When the coupling presents certain regularities, the dynamics can be coarse-grained into clusters by means of External Equitable Partitions of the network graph and their associated quotient graphs. We exploit this graph-theoretical concept to study the phenomenon of cluster synchronization, in which different groups of nodes converge to distinct behaviors. We derive conditions and properties of networks in which such clustered behavior emerges, and show that the ensuing dynamics is the result of the localization of the eigenvectors of the associated graph Laplacians linked to the existence of invariant subspaces. The framework is applied to both linear and non-linear models, first for the standard case of networks with positive edges, before being generalized to the case of signed networks with both positive and negative interactions. We illustrate our results with examples of both signed and unsigned graphs for consensus dynamics and for partial synchronization of oscillator networks under the master stability function as well as Kuramoto oscillators. PMID:27781454

  2. Modularity-based graph partitioning using conditional expected models

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Teng; Leahy, Richard M.; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Modularity-based partitioning methods divide networks into modules by comparing their structure against random networks conditioned to have the same number of nodes, edges, and degree distribution. We propose a novel way to measure modularity and divide graphs, based on conditional probabilities of the edge strength of random networks. We provide closed-form solutions for the expected strength of an edge when it is conditioned on the degrees of the two neighboring nodes, or alternatively on the degrees of all nodes comprising the network. We analytically compute the expected network under the assumptions of Gaussian and Bernoulli distributions. When the Gaussian distribution assumption is violated, we prove that our expression is the best linear unbiased estimator. Finally, we investigate the performance of our conditional expected model in partitioning simulated and real-world networks. PMID:22400627

  3. Exact Potts model partition functions on ladder graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert

    2000-08-01

    We present exact calculations of the partition function Z of the q-state Potts model and its generalization to real q, for arbitrary temperature on n-vertex ladder graphs, i.e., strips of the square lattice with width Ly=2 and arbitrary length Lx, with free, cyclic, and Möbius longitudinal boundary conditions. These partition functions are equivalent to Tutte/Whitney polynomials for these graphs. The free energy is calculated exactly for the infinite-length limit of these ladder graphs and the thermodynamics is discussed. By comparison with strip graphs of other widths, we analyze how the singularities at the zero-temperature critical point of the ferromagnet on infinite-length, finite-width strips depend on the width. We point out and study the following noncommutativity at certain special values q s: lim n→∞ limq→q s Z 1/n≠ limq→q s limn→∞ Z 1/n. It is shown that the Potts antiferromagnet on both the infinite-length line and ladder graphs with cyclic or Möbius boundary conditions exhibits a phase transition at finite temperature if 0< q<2, but with unphysical properties, including negative specific heat and non-existence, in the low-temperature phase, of an n→∞ limit for thermodynamic functions that is independent of boundary conditions. Considering the full generalization to arbitrary complex q and temperature, we determine the singular locus B in the corresponding C2 space, arising as the accumulation set of partition function zeros as n→∞. In particular, we study the connection with the T=0 limit of the Potts antiferromagnet where B reduces to the accumulation set of chromatic zeros. Certain properties of the complex-temperature phase diagrams are shown to exhibit close connections with those of the model on the square lattice, showing that exact solutions on infinite-length strips provide a way of gaining insight into these complex-temperature phase diagrams.

  4. Extracting building patterns with multilevel graph partition and building grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Shihong; Luo, Liqun; Cao, Kai; Shu, Mi

    2016-12-01

    Building patterns are crucial for urban landscape evaluation, social analyses and multiscale spatial data automatic production. Although many studies have been conducted, there is still lack of satisfying results due to the incomplete typology of building patterns and the ineffective extraction methods. This study aims at providing a typology with four types of building patterns (e.g., collinear patterns, curvilinear patterns, parallel and perpendicular groups, and grid patterns) and presenting four integrated strategies for extracting these patterns effectively and efficiently. First, the multilevel graph partition method is utilized to generate globally optimal building clusters considering area, shape and visual distance similarities. In this step, the weights of similarity measurements are automatically estimated using Relief-F algorithm instead of manual selection, thus building clusters with high quality can be obtained. Second, based on the clusters produced in the first step, the extraction strategies group the buildings from each cluster into patterns according to the criteria of proximity, continuity and directionality. The proposed methods are tested using three datasets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methods can produce satisfying results, and demonstrate that the F-Histogram model is better than the two widely used models (i.e., centroid model and the Voronoi graph) to represent relative directions for building patterns extraction.

  5. A Weakly Robust PTAS for Minimum Clique Partition in Unit Disk Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirwani, Imran A.; Salavatipour, Mohammad R.

    We consider the problem of partitioning the set of vertices of a given unit disk graph (UDG) into a minimum number of cliques. The problem is NP-hard and various constant factor approximations are known, with the best known ratio of 3. Our main result is a weakly robust polynomial time approximation scheme (PTAS) for UDGs expressed with edge-lengths and ɛ> 0 that either (i) computes a clique partition, or (ii) produces a certificate proving that the graph is not a UDG; if the graph is a UDG, then our partition is guaranteed to be within (1 + ɛ) ratio of the optimum; however, if the graph is not a UDG, it either computes a clique partition, or detects that the graph is not a UDG. Noting that recognition of UDG's is NP-hard even with edge lengths, this is a significant weakening of the input model.

  6. Semiclassical limits of quantum partition functions on infinite graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Güneysu, Batu

    2015-02-15

    We prove that if H denotes the operator corresponding to the canonical Dirichlet form on a possibly locally infinite weighted graph (X, b, m), and if v : X → ℝ is such that H + v/ħ is well-defined as a form sum for all ħ > 0, then the quantum partition function tr(e{sup −βħ(H+v/ħ)}) converges to ∑{sub x∈X}e{sup −βv(x)} as ħ → 0 +, for all β > 0, regardless of the fact whether e{sup −βv} is a priori summable or not. This fact can be interpreted as a semiclassical limit, and it allows geometric Weyl-type convergence results. We also prove natural generalizations of this semiclassical limit to a large class of covariant Schrödinger operators that act on sections in Hermitian vector bundle over (X, m, b), a result that particularly applies to magnetic Schrödinger operators that are defined on (X, m, b)

  7. A Graph Partitioning Approach to Simultaneous Angular Reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Pragier, Gabi; Greenberg, Ido; Cheng, Xiuyuan; Shkolnisky, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary challenges in single particle reconstruction with cryo-electron microscopy is to find a three-dimensional model of a molecule using its noisy two-dimensional projection-images. As the imaging orientations of the projection-images are unknown, we suggest a common-lines-based method to simultaneously estimate the imaging orientations of all images that is independent of the distribution of the orientations. Since the relative orientation of each pair of images may only be estimated up to a two-way handedness ambiguity, we suggest an efficient procedure to consistently assign the same handedness to all relative orientations. This is achieved by casting the handedness assignment problem as a graph-partitioning problem. Once a consistent handedness of all relative orientations is determined, the orientations corresponding to all projection-images are determined simultaneously, thus rendering the method robust to noise. Our proposed method has also the advantage of allowing one to incorporate confidence information regarding the trustworthiness of each relative orientation in a natural manner. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach using simulated clean and noisy data. PMID:28217720

  8. De novo analysis of peptide tandem mass spectra by spectral graph partitioning.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Goldberg, David

    2006-03-01

    We report on a new de novo peptide sequencing algorithm that uses spectral graph partitioning. In this approach, relationships between m/z peaks are represented by attractive and repulsive springs, and the vibrational modes of the spring system are used to infer information about the peaks (such as "likely b-ion" or "likely y-ion"). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by comparison with other de novo sequencers on test sets of ion-trap and QTOF spectra, including spectra of mixtures of peptides. On all datasets, we outperform the other sequencers. Along with spectral graph theory techniques, the new de novo sequencer EigenMS incorporates another improvement of independent interest: robust statistical methods for recalibration of time-of-flight mass measurements. Robust recalibration greatly outperforms simple least-squares recalibration, achieving about three times the accuracy for one QTOF dataset.

  9. SpecP: A tool for spectral partitioning of protein contact graph.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, Saritha; K, Kripadas

    2013-01-01

    SpecP is an open-source Python module that performs Spectral Partitioning on Protein Contact Graphs. Protein Contact Graphs are graph theory based representation of the protein structure, where each amino acid forms a 'vertex' and spatial contact of any two amino acids is an 'edge' between them. Spectral partitioning is carried out in SpecP based on the second smallest spectral value (eigen value) of the Protein Contact Graph. The eigen vector corresponding to the second smallest spectral value are partitioned into two clusters based on the sign of the corresponding vector entry. Spectral Partitioning algorithm is repeatedly carried out until the desired numbers of partitions are obtained. SpecP visualizes the spectrally partitioned clusters of protein structure along with the Protein Contact Map and Protein Contact Graph which can be saved for later use. It also possesses an interactive mode whereby the user has the ability to zoom, pan, resize and save these raster images in various image formats (.eps, .jpg, .png) manually. SpecP is a stand-alone extensible tool useful for structural analysis of proteins.

  10. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  11. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  12. Robust Optimization of Graph Partitioning and Critical Node Detection in Analyzing Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Neng; Pardalos, Panos M.

    The graph partitioning problem (GPP) consists of partitioning the vertex set of a graph into several disjoint subsets so that the sum of weights of the edges between the disjoint subsets is minimized. The critical node problem (CNP) is to detect a set of vertices in a graph whose deletion results in the graph having the minimum pairwise connectivity between the remaining vertices. Both GPP and CNP find many applications in identification of community structures or influential individuals in social networks, telecommunication networks, and supply chain networks. In this paper, we use integer programming to formulate GPP and CNP. In several practice cases, we have networks with uncertain weights of links. Some times, these uncertainties have no information of probability distribution. We use robust optimization models of GPP and CNP to formulate the community structures or influential individuals in such networks.

  13. Integrating graph partitioning and matching for trajectory analysis in video surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Lu, Yongyi; Pan, Yan; Chen, Xiaowu

    2012-12-01

    In order to track moving objects in long range against occlusion, interruption, and background clutter, this paper proposes a unified approach for global trajectory analysis. Instead of the traditional frame-by-frame tracking, our method recovers target trajectories based on a short sequence of video frames, e.g., 15 frames. We initially calculate a foreground map at each frame obtained from a state-of-the-art background model. An attribute graph is then extracted from the foreground map, where the graph vertices are image primitives represented by the composite features. With this graph representation, we pose trajectory analysis as a joint task of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. The task can be formulated by maximizing a posteriori under the Bayesian framework, in which we integrate the spatio-temporal contexts and the appearance models. The probabilistic inference is achieved by a data-driven Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Given a period of observed frames, the algorithm simulates an ergodic and aperiodic Markov chain, and it visits a sequence of solution states in the joint space of spatial graph partitioning and temporal graph matching. In the experiments, our method is tested on several challenging videos from the public datasets of visual surveillance, and it outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  14. On the partition dimension of comb product of path and complete graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmaji, Alfarisi, Ridho

    2017-08-01

    For a vertex v of a connected graph G(V, E) with vertex set V(G), edge set E(G) and S ⊆ V(G). Given an ordered partition Π = {S1, S2, S3, …, Sk} of the vertex set V of G, the representation of a vertex v ∈ V with respect to Π is the vector r(v|Π) = (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), …, d(v, Sk)), where d(v, Sk) represents the distance between the vertex v and the set Sk and d(v, Sk) = min{d(v, x)|x ∈ Sk}. A partition Π of V(G) is a resolving partition if different vertices of G have distinct representations, i.e., for every pair of vertices u, v ∈ V(G), r(u|Π) ≠ r(v|Π). The minimum k of Π resolving partition is a partition dimension of G, denoted by pd(G). Finding the partition dimension of G is classified to be a NP-Hard problem. In this paper, we will show that the partition dimension of comb product of path and complete graph. The results show that comb product of complete grapph Km and path Pn namely p d (Km⊳Pn)=m where m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 2 and p d (Pn⊳Km)=m where m ≥ 3, n ≥ 2 and m ≥ n.

  15. On the star partition dimension of comb product of cycle and complete graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarisi, Ridho; Darmaji; Dafik

    2017-06-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a connected graphs with vertex set V (G), edge set E(G) and S ⊆ V (G). For an ordered partition Π = {S 1, S 2, S 3, …, Sk } of V (G), the representation of a vertex v ∈ V (G) with respect to Π is the k-vectors r(v|Π) = (d(v, S 1), d(v, S 2), …, d(v, Sk )), where d(v, Sk ) represents the distance between the vertex v and the set Sk , defined by d(v, Sk ) = min{d(v, x)|x ∈ Sk}. The partition Π of V (G) is a resolving partition if the k-vektors r(v|Π), v ∈ V (G) are distinct. The minimum resolving partition Π is a partition dimension of G, denoted by pd(G). The resolving partition Π = {S 1, S 2, S 3, …, Sk} is called a star resolving partition for G if it is a resolving partition and each subgraph induced by Si , 1 ≤ i ≤ k, is a star. The minimum k for which there exists a star resolving partition of V (G) is the star partition dimension of G, denoted by spd(G). Finding a star partition dimension of G is classified to be a NP-Hard problem. Furthermore, the comb product between G and H, denoted by G ⊲ H, is a graph obtained by taking one copy of G and |V (G)| copies of H and grafting the i-th copy of H at the vertex o to the i-th vertex of G. By definition of comb product, we can say that V (G ⊲ H) = {(a, u)|a ∈ V (G), u ∈ V (H)} and (a, u)(b, v) ∈ E(G ⊲ H) whenever a = b and uv ∈ E(H), or ab ∈ E(G) and u = v = o. In this paper, we will study the star partition dimension of comb product of cycle and complete graph, namely Cn ⊲ Km and Km ⊲ Cn for n ≥ 3 and m ≥ 3.

  16. Applying graph partitioning methods in measurement-based dynamic load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Fourestier, Sebastien; Menon, Harshitha; Kale, Laxmikant V.; Pellegrini, Francois

    2011-09-26

    Load imbalance leads to an increasing waste of resources as an application is scaled to more and more processors. Achieving the best parallel efficiency for a program requires optimal load balancing which is a NP-hard problem. However, finding near-optimal solutions to this problem for complex computational science and engineering applications is becoming increasingly important. Charm++, a migratable objects based programming model, provides a measurement-based dynamic load balancing framework. This framework instruments and then migrates over-decomposed objects to balance computational load and communication at runtime. This paper explores the use of graph partitioning algorithms, traditionally used for partitioning physical domains/meshes, for measurement-based dynamic load balancing of parallel applications. In particular, we present repartitioning methods developed in a graph partitioning toolbox called SCOTCH that consider the previous mapping to minimize migration costs. We also discuss a new imbalance reduction algorithm for graphs with irregular load distributions. We compare several load balancing algorithms using microbenchmarks on Intrepid and Ranger and evaluate the effect of communication, number of cores and number of objects on the benefit achieved from load balancing. New algorithms developed in SCOTCH lead to better performance compared to the METIS partitioners for several cases, both in terms of the application execution time and fewer number of objects migrated.

  17. A novel graph-based partitioning algorithm for large-scale dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamelian, Saeed; Salahshoor, Karim

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel graph-based system partitioning approach is proposed to facilitate the design of distributed or decentralised control in large-scale dynamical systems. In large-scale dynamical systems, a decomposition method is required to determine a suitable set of distributed subsystems and their relevant variables. In the proposed approach, a decomposition algorithm starts to generate an overall graph representation of the system model in the form of a new weighted digraph on the basis of a sensitivity analysis concept to quantify the coupling strengths among the system variables in terms of graph edge weights. The produced weighted digraph and its structural information are then used to partition the system model. All the potential system control inputs are first characterised as the main graph vertices, representing fixed subsystems centres. Then, the remaining vertices, representing system states or outputs, are assigned to the created subgraphs. Once the initial grouping is accordingly formed, a merging routine is automatically conducted to merge the small subgraphs in other subgraphs in an iterative searching way to find the smaller cut sizes. Each time a merging occurs, the total cost of the merged configuration, being defined in terms of an averaged linear quadratic regulator (LQR) metric, is used as a novel dynamic performance metric versus total group number reduction to terminate the algorithm for the best grouping result. A chemical industrial process plant is used as a benchmark to assess performance of the proposed methodology to fulfil the system partitioning objective. The output result of the algorithm is then comparatively used for a decentralised non-linear model-based predictive control methodology to demonstrate its ultimate merits.

  18. Partitioning a chordal graph into transitive subgraphs for parallel sparse triangular solution

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.; Pothen, A.; Yuan, Xiaoqing

    1992-12-01

    A recent approach for solving sparse triangular systems of equations on massively parallel computers employs a factorization of the triangular coefficient matrix to obtain a representation of its inverse in product form. The number of general communication steps required by this approach is proportional to the number of factors in the factorization. The triangular matrix can be symmetrically permuted to minimize the number of factors over suitable classes of permutations, and thereby the complexity of the parallel algorithm can be minimized. Algorithms for minimizing the number of factors over several classes of permutations have been considered in earlier work. Let F = L+L{sup T} denote the symmetric filled matrix corresponding to a Cholesky factor L, and let G{sub F} denote the adjacency graph of F. In this paper we consider the problem of minirriizing the number of factors over all permutations which preserve the structure of G{sub F}. The graph model of this problem is to partition the vertices G{sub F} into the fewest transitively closed subgraphs over all perfect elimination orderings while satisfying a certain precedence relationship. The solution to this chordal graph partitioning problem can be described by a greedy scheme which eliminates a largest permissible subgraph at each step. Further, the subgraph eliminated at each step can be characterized in terms of lengths of chordless paths in the current elimination graph. This solution relies on several results concerning transitive perfect elimination orderings introduced in this paper. We describe a partitioning algorithm with {Omicron}({vert_bar}V{vert_bar} + {vert_bar}E{vert_bar}) time and space complexity.

  19. Partitioning a chordal graph into transitive subgraphs for parallel sparse triangular solution

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W. ); Pothen, A. . Dept. of Computer Science); Yuan, Xiaoqing )

    1992-12-01

    A recent approach for solving sparse triangular systems of equations on massively parallel computers employs a factorization of the triangular coefficient matrix to obtain a representation of its inverse in product form. The number of general communication steps required by this approach is proportional to the number of factors in the factorization. The triangular matrix can be symmetrically permuted to minimize the number of factors over suitable classes of permutations, and thereby the complexity of the parallel algorithm can be minimized. Algorithms for minimizing the number of factors over several classes of permutations have been considered in earlier work. Let F = L+L[sup T] denote the symmetric filled matrix corresponding to a Cholesky factor L, and let G[sub F] denote the adjacency graph of F. In this paper we consider the problem of minirriizing the number of factors over all permutations which preserve the structure of G[sub F]. The graph model of this problem is to partition the vertices G[sub F] into the fewest transitively closed subgraphs over all perfect elimination orderings while satisfying a certain precedence relationship. The solution to this chordal graph partitioning problem can be described by a greedy scheme which eliminates a largest permissible subgraph at each step. Further, the subgraph eliminated at each step can be characterized in terms of lengths of chordless paths in the current elimination graph. This solution relies on several results concerning transitive perfect elimination orderings introduced in this paper. We describe a partitioning algorithm with [Omicron]([vert bar]V[vert bar] + [vert bar]E[vert bar]) time and space complexity.

  20. Automated Extraction of Buildings and Roads in a Graph Partitioning Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, A. O.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents an original unsupervised framework to identify regions belonging to buildings and roads from monocular very high resolution (VHR) satellite images. The proposed framework consists of three main stages. In the first stage, we extract information only related to building regions using shadow evidence and probabilistic fuzzy landscapes. Firstly, the shadow areas cast by building objects are detected and the directional spatial relationship between buildings and their shadows is modelled with the knowledge of illumination direction. Thereafter, each shadow region is handled separately and initial building regions are identified by iterative graph-cuts designed in a two-label partitioning. The second stage of the framework automatically classifies the image into four classes: building, shadow, vegetation, and others. In this step, the previously labelled building regions as well as the shadow and vegetation areas are involved in a four-label graph optimization performed in the entire image domain to achieve the unsupervised classification result. The final stage aims to extend this classification to five classes in which the class road is involved. For that purpose, we extract the regions that might belong to road segments and utilize that information in a final graph optimization. This final stage eventually characterizes the regions belonging to buildings and roads. Experiments performed on seven test images selected from GeoEye-1 VHR datasets show that the presented approach has ability to extract the regions belonging to buildings and roads in a single graph theory framework.

  1. Protein and gene model inference based on statistical modeling in k-partite graphs.

    PubMed

    Gerster, Sarah; Qeli, Ermir; Ahrens, Christian H; Bühlmann, Peter

    2010-07-06

    One of the major goals of proteomics is the comprehensive and accurate description of a proteome. Shotgun proteomics, the method of choice for the analysis of complex protein mixtures, requires that experimentally observed peptides are mapped back to the proteins they were derived from. This process is also known as protein inference. We present Markovian Inference of Proteins and Gene Models (MIPGEM), a statistical model based on clearly stated assumptions to address the problem of protein and gene model inference for shotgun proteomics data. In particular, we are dealing with dependencies among peptides and proteins using a Markovian assumption on k-partite graphs. We are also addressing the problems of shared peptides and ambiguous proteins by scoring the encoding gene models. Empirical results on two control datasets with synthetic mixtures of proteins and on complex protein samples of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that the results with MIPGEM are competitive with existing tools for protein inference.

  2. On Complex Zeros of the q-Potts Partition Function for a Self-dual Family of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billiot, J.-M.; Corset, F.; Fontenas, E.

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with the location of the complex zeros of q-Potts partition function for a class of self-dual graphs. For this class of graphs, as the form of the eigenvalues is known, the regions of the complex plane can be focused on the sets where there is only one dominant eigenvalue in particular containing the positive half plane. Thus, in these regions, the analyticity of the free energy per site can be derived easily. Next, some examples of graphs with their Tutte polynomial having few eigenvalues are given. The case of the cycle with an edge having a high order of multiplicity is presented in detail. In particular, we show that the well known conjecture of Chen et al. is false in the finite case. Furthermore we obtain a sequence of self-dual graphs for which the unit circle does not belong to the accumulation sets of the zeros.

  3. Improving the Communication Pattern in Matrix-Vector Operations for Large Scale-Free Graphs by Disaggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlemann, Verena; Vassilevski, Panayot S.

    2013-10-28

    Matrix-vector multiplication is the key operation in any Krylov-subspace iteration method. We are interested in Krylov methods applied to problems associated with the graph Laplacian arising from large scale-free graphs. Furthermore, computations with graphs of this type on parallel distributed-memory computers are challenging. This is due to the fact that scale-free graphs have a degree distribution that follows a power law, and currently available graph partitioners are not efficient for such an irregular degree distribution. The lack of a good partitioning leads to excessive interprocessor communication requirements during every matrix-vector product. Here, we present an approach to alleviate this problem based on embedding the original irregular graph into a more regular one by disaggregating (splitting up) vertices in the original graph. The matrix-vector operations for the original graph are performed via a factored triple matrix-vector product involving the embedding graph. And even though the latter graph is larger, we are able to decrease the communication requirements considerably and improve the performance of the matrix-vector product.

  4. Potts model partition functions for self-dual families of strip graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2001-12-01

    We consider the q-state Potts model on families of self-dual strip graphs GD of the square lattice of width Ly and arbitrarily great length Lx, with periodic longitudinal boundary conditions. The general partition function Z and the T=0 antiferromagnetic special case P (chromatic polynomial) have the respective forms ∑ j=1 NF, Ly, λcF, Ly, j( λF, Ly, j) Lx, with F= Z, P. For arbitrary Ly, we determine (i) the general coefficient cF, Ly, j in terms of Chebyshev polynomials, (ii) the number nF( Ly, d) of terms with each type of coefficient, and (iii) the total number of terms NF, Ly, λ. We point out interesting connections between the nZ( Ly, d) and Temperley-Lieb algebras, and between the NF, Ly, λ and enumerations of directed lattice animals. Exact calculations of P are presented for 2⩽ Ly⩽4. In the limit of infinite length, we calculate the ground state degeneracy per site (exponent of the ground state entropy), W( q). Generalizing q from Z+ to C, we determine the continuous locus B in the complex q plane where W( q) is singular. We find the interesting result that for all Ly values considered, the maximal point at which B crosses the real q-axis, denoted qc, is the same, and is equal to the value for the infinite square lattice, qc=3. This is the first family of strip graphs of which we are aware that exhibits this type of universality of qc.

  5. Equal graph partitioning on estimated infection network as an effective epidemic mitigation measure.

    PubMed

    Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2011-01-01

    Controlling severe outbreaks remains the most important problem in infectious disease area. With time, this problem will only become more severe as population density in urban centers grows. Social interactions play a very important role in determining how infectious diseases spread, and organization of people along social lines gives rise to non-spatial networks in which the infections spread. Infection networks are different for diseases with different transmission modes, but are likely to be identical or highly similar for diseases that spread the same way. Hence, infection networks estimated from common infections can be useful to contain epidemics of a more severe disease with the same transmission mode. Here we present a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the effectiveness of epidemic mitigation based on such estimated infection networks. We first generate artificial social networks of different sizes and average degrees, but with roughly the same clustering characteristic. We then start SIR epidemics on these networks, censor the simulated incidences, and use them to reconstruct the infection network. We then efficiently fragment the estimated network by removing the smallest number of nodes identified by a graph partitioning algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this targeted strategy, by comparing it against traditional untargeted strategies, in slowing down and reducing the size of advancing epidemics.

  6. Equal Graph Partitioning on Estimated Infection Network as an Effective Epidemic Mitigation Measure

    PubMed Central

    Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2011-01-01

    Controlling severe outbreaks remains the most important problem in infectious disease area. With time, this problem will only become more severe as population density in urban centers grows. Social interactions play a very important role in determining how infectious diseases spread, and organization of people along social lines gives rise to non-spatial networks in which the infections spread. Infection networks are different for diseases with different transmission modes, but are likely to be identical or highly similar for diseases that spread the same way. Hence, infection networks estimated from common infections can be useful to contain epidemics of a more severe disease with the same transmission mode. Here we present a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the effectiveness of epidemic mitigation based on such estimated infection networks. We first generate artificial social networks of different sizes and average degrees, but with roughly the same clustering characteristic. We then start SIR epidemics on these networks, censor the simulated incidences, and use them to reconstruct the infection network. We then efficiently fragment the estimated network by removing the smallest number of nodes identified by a graph partitioning algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this targeted strategy, by comparing it against traditional untargeted strategies, in slowing down and reducing the size of advancing epidemics. PMID:21799777

  7. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    SciTech Connect

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  8. Exact Results on Potts Model Partition Functions in a Generalized External Field and Weighted-Set Graph Colorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert; Xu, Yan

    2010-12-01

    We present exact results on the partition function of the q-state Potts model on various families of graphs G in a generalized external magnetic field that favors or disfavors spin values in a subset I s ={1,…, s} of the total set of possible spin values, Z( G, q, s, v, w), where v and w are temperature- and field-dependent Boltzmann variables. We remark on differences in thermodynamic behavior between our model with a generalized external magnetic field and the Potts model with a conventional magnetic field that favors or disfavors a single spin value. Exact results are also given for the interesting special case of the zero-temperature Potts antiferromagnet, corresponding to a set-weighted chromatic polynomial Ph( G, q, s, w) that counts the number of colorings of the vertices of G subject to the condition that colors of adjacent vertices are different, with a weighting w that favors or disfavors colors in the interval I s . We derive powerful new upper and lower bounds on Z( G, q, s, v, w) for the ferromagnetic case in terms of zero-field Potts partition functions with certain transformed arguments. We also prove general inequalities for Z( G, q, s, v, w) on different families of tree graphs. As part of our analysis, we elucidate how the field-dependent Potts partition function and weighted-set chromatic polynomial distinguish, respectively, between Tutte-equivalent and chromatically equivalent pairs of graphs.

  9. Spatial partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, Andrew; Tostevin, Filipe; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity is a hallmark of living systems, even at the molecular scale in individual cells. A key example is the partitioning of membrane-bound proteins via lipid domain formation or cytoskeleton-induced corralling. However, the impact of this spatial heterogeneity on biochemical signaling processes is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling. We exactly solve a stochastic model describing a ubiquitous motif in membrane signaling. The solution reveals that partitioning improves signaling reliability via two effects: it moderates the nonlinearity of the switching response, and it reduces noise in the response by suppressing correlations between molecules. An optimal partition size arises from a trade-off between minimizing the number of proteins per partition to improve signaling reliability and ensuring sufficient proteins per partition to maintain signal propagation. The predicted optimal partition size agrees quantitatively with experimentally observed systems. These results persist in spatial simulations with explicit diffusion barriers. Our findings suggest that molecular partitioning is not merely a consequence of the complexity of cellular substructures, but also plays an important functional role in cell signaling. PMID:23530194

  10. Strong Scalability Study of Distributed Memory Parallel Markov Random Fields Using Graph Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Colleen

    Research in material science is increasingly reliant on image-based data from experiments, demanding construction of new analysis tools that help scientists discover information from digital images. Because there is such a wide variety of materials and image modalities, detecting different compounds from imaged materials continues to be a challenging task. A vast collection of algorithms for filtering, image segmentation, and texture description have facilitated and improved accuracy for sample measurements (see Chapter 1 Introduction and Literature Review). Despite this, the community still lacks scalable, general purpose, easily configurable image analysis frameworks that allow pattern detection on different imaging modalities across multiple scales. The need for such a framework was the motivation behind the development of a distributed-memory parallel Markov Random Field based framework. Markov Random Field (MRF) algorithms provide the ability to explore contextual information about a given dataset. Given the complexity of such algorithms, however, they are limited by performance when running serial. Thus, running in some sort of parallel fashion is necessary. The effects are twofold. Not only does running the MRF algorithm in parallel provide the ability to run current datasets faster and more efficiently, it also provides the ability for datasets to continue to grow in size and still be able to be run with such frameworks. The variation of the Markov Random Field algorithm utilized in this study first oversegments the given input image and constructs a graph model based on photometric and geometric distances. Next, the resulting graph model is refactored specifically into the MRF model to target image segmentation. Finally, a distributed approach is used for the optimization process to obtain the best labeling for the graph, which is essentially the goal of using a MRF algorithm. Given the concept of using a distributed memory parallel framework, specifically

  11. Biodiversity improves water quality through niche partitioning.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Bradley J

    2011-04-07

    Excessive nutrient loading of water bodies is a leading cause of water pollution worldwide, and controlling nutrient levels in watersheds is a primary objective of most environmental policy. Over the past two decades, much research has shown that ecosystems with more species are more efficient at removing nutrients from soil and water than are ecosystems with fewer species. This has led some to suggest that conservation of biodiversity might be a useful tool for managing nutrient uptake and storage, but this suggestion has been controversial, in part because the specific biological mechanisms by which species diversity influences nutrient uptake have not been identified. Here I use a model system of stream biofilms to show that niche partitioning among species of algae can increase the uptake and storage of nitrate, a nutrient pollutant of global concern. I manipulated the number of species of algae growing in the biofilms of 150 stream mesocosms that had been set up to mimic the variety of flow habitats and disturbance regimes that are typical of natural streams. Nitrogen uptake rates, as measured by using (15)N-labelled nitrate, increased linearly with species richness and were driven by niche differences among species. As different forms of algae came to dominate each unique habitat in a stream, the more diverse communities achieved a higher biomass and greater (15)N uptake. When these niche opportunities were experimentally removed by making all of the habitats in a stream uniform, diversity did not influence nitrogen uptake, and biofilms collapsed to a single dominant species. These results provide direct evidence that communities with more species take greater advantage of the niche opportunities in an environment, and this allows diverse systems to capture a greater proportion of biologically available resources such as nitrogen. One implication is that biodiversity may help to buffer natural ecosystems against the ecological impacts of nutrient pollution.

  12. Co-Clustering by Bipartite Spectral Graph Partitioning for Out-of-Tutor Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivedi, Shubhendu; Pardos, Zachary A.; Sarkozy, Gabor N.; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    Learning a more distributed representation of the input feature space is a powerful method to boost the performance of a given predictor. Often this is accomplished by partitioning the data into homogeneous groups by clustering so that separate models could be trained on each cluster. Intuitively each such predictor is a better representative of…

  13. Improving Neural-Network Classifiers Using Nearest Neighbor Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Bo; Chen, Yuehui; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Orchard, Jeff

    2016-06-30

    This paper presents a nearest neighbor partitioning method designed to improve the performance of a neural-network classifier. For neural-network classifiers, usually the number, positions, and labels of centroids are fixed in partition space before training. However, that approach limits the search for potential neural networks during optimization; the quality of a neural network classifier is based on how clear the decision boundaries are between classes. Although attempts have been made to generate floating centroids automatically, these methods still tend to generate sphere-like partitions and cannot produce flexible decision boundaries. We propose the use of nearest neighbor classification in conjunction with a neural-network classifier. Instead of being bound by sphere-like boundaries (such as the case with centroid-based methods), the flexibility of nearest neighbors increases the chance of finding potential neural networks that have arbitrarily shaped boundaries in partition space. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method exhibits superior performance on accuracy and average f-measure.

  14. Cascading failures in bi-partite graphs: model for systemic risk propagation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008-2011.

  15. Cascading Failures in Bi-partite Graphs: Model for Systemic Risk Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    As economic entities become increasingly interconnected, a shock in a financial network can provoke significant cascading failures throughout the system. To study the systemic risk of financial systems, we create a bi-partite banking network model composed of banks and bank assets and propose a cascading failure model to describe the risk propagation process during crises. We empirically test the model with 2007 US commercial banks balance sheet data and compare the model prediction of the failed banks with the real failed banks after 2007. We find that our model efficiently identifies a significant portion of the actual failed banks reported by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The results suggest that this model could be useful for systemic risk stress testing for financial systems. The model also identifies that commercial rather than residential real estate assets are major culprits for the failure of over 350 US commercial banks during 2008–2011. PMID:23386974

  16. Improving Student Knowledge of the Graphing Calculator's Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Donna

    This paper describes an intervention in two Algebra II classes in which the graphing calculator was incorporated into the curriculum as often as possible. The targeted population consisted of high school students in a growing middle to upper class community located in a suburb of a large city. The problem of a lack of understanding of the…

  17. Does Guiding Toward Task-Relevant Information Help Improve Graph Processing and Graph Comprehension of Individuals with Low or High Numeracy? An Eye-Tracker Experiment.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carmen; Junghans, Alex

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with low numeracy have difficulties with understanding complex graphs. Combining the information-processing approach to numeracy with graph comprehension and information-reduction theories, we examined whether high numerates' better comprehension might be explained by their closer attention to task-relevant graphical elements, from which they would expect numerical information to understand the graph. Furthermore, we investigated whether participants could be trained in improving their attention to task-relevant information and graph comprehension. In an eye-tracker experiment ( N = 110) involving a sample from the general population, we presented participants with 2 hypothetical scenarios (stomach cancer, leukemia) showing survival curves for 2 treatments. In the training condition, participants received written instructions on how to read the graph. In the control condition, participants received another text. We tracked participants' eye movements while they answered 9 knowledge questions. The sum constituted graph comprehension. We analyzed visual attention to task-relevant graphical elements by using relative fixation durations and relative fixation counts. The mediation analysis revealed a significant ( P < 0.05) indirect effect of numeracy on graph comprehension through visual attention to task-relevant information, which did not differ between the 2 conditions. Training had a significant main effect on visual attention ( P < 0.05) but not on graph comprehension ( P < 0.07). Individuals with high numeracy have better graph comprehension due to their greater attention to task-relevant graphical elements than individuals with low numeracy. With appropriate instructions, both groups can be trained to improve their graph-processing efficiency. Future research should examine (e.g., motivational) mediators between visual attention and graph comprehension to develop appropriate instructions that also result in higher graph comprehension.

  18. On Improved Exact Algorithms for L(2,1)-Labeling of Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junosza-Szaniawski, Konstanty; Rzążewski, Paweł

    L(2,1)-labeling is graph labeling model where adjacent vertices get labels that differ by at least 2 and vertices in distance 2 get different labels. In this paper we present an algorithm for finding an optimal L(2,1)-labeling (i.e. an L(2,1)-labeling in which largest label is the least possible) of a graph with time complexity O * ( 3.5616 n ), which improves a previous best result: O * ( 3.8739 n ).

  19. Bayesian Estimation of Conditional Independence Graphs Improves Functional Connectivity Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Hinne, Max; Janssen, Ronald J.; Heskes, Tom; van Gerven, Marcel A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity concerns the correlated activity between neuronal populations in spatially segregated regions of the brain, which may be studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This coupled activity is conveniently expressed using covariance, but this measure fails to distinguish between direct and indirect effects. A popular alternative that addresses this issue is partial correlation, which regresses out the signal of potentially confounding variables, resulting in a measure that reveals only direct connections. Importantly, provided the data are normally distributed, if two variables are conditionally independent given all other variables, their respective partial correlation is zero. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic generative model that allows us to estimate functional connectivity in terms of both partial correlations and a graph representing conditional independencies. Simulation results show that this methodology is able to outperform the graphical LASSO, which is the de facto standard for estimating partial correlations. Furthermore, we apply the model to estimate functional connectivity for twenty subjects using resting-state fMRI data. Results show that our model provides a richer representation of functional connectivity as compared to considering partial correlations alone. Finally, we demonstrate how our approach can be extended in several ways, for instance to achieve data fusion by informing the conditional independence graph with data from probabilistic tractography. As our Bayesian formulation of functional connectivity provides access to the posterior distribution instead of only to point estimates, we are able to quantify the uncertainty associated with our results. This reveals that while we are able to infer a clear backbone of connectivity in our empirical results, the data are not accurately described by simply looking at the mode of the distribution over connectivity. The implication of this is that

  20. Improved visibility graph fractality with application for the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlou, Mehran; Adeli, Hojjat; Adeli, Amir

    2012-10-01

    Recently, the visibility graph (VG) algorithm was proposed for mapping a time series to a graph to study complexity and fractality of the time series through investigation of the complexity of its graph. The visibility graph algorithm converts a fractal time series to a scale-free graph. VG has been used for the investigation of fractality in the dynamic behavior of both artificial and natural complex systems. However, robustness and performance of the power of scale-freeness of VG (PSVG) as an effective method for measuring fractality has not been investigated. Since noise is unavoidable in real life time series, the robustness of a fractality measure is of paramount importance. To improve the accuracy and robustness of PSVG to noise for measurement of fractality of time series in biological time-series, an improved PSVG is presented in this paper. The proposed method is evaluated using two examples: a synthetic benchmark time series and a complicated real life Electroencephalograms (EEG)-based diagnostic problem, that is distinguishing autistic children from non-autistic children. It is shown that the proposed improved PSVG is less sensitive to noise and therefore more robust compared with PSVG. Further, it is shown that using improved PSVG in the wavelet-chaos neural network model of Adeli and c-workers in place of the Katz fractality dimension results in a more accurate diagnosis of autism, a complicated neurological and psychiatric disorder.

  1. Retinal vessel width measurement at branchings using an improved electric field theory-based graph approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiayu; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Hu, Qiao; Bakall, Benjamin; Tlucek, Paul S; Bertelsen, Geir; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts.

  2. Retinal Vessel Width Measurement at Branchings Using an Improved Electric Field Theory-Based Graph Approach

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiayu; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hu, Qiao; Bakall, Benjamin; Tlucek, Paul S.; Bertelsen, Geir; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vessel width relationship at vessel branch points in fundus images is an important biomarker of retinal and systemic disease. We propose a fully automatic method to measure the vessel widths at branch points in fundus images. The method is a graph-based method, in which a graph construction method based on electric field theory is applied which specifically deals with complex branching patterns. The vessel centerline image is used as the initial segmentation of the graph. Branching points are detected on the vessel centerline image using a set of detection kernels. Crossing points are distinguished from branch points and excluded. The electric field based graph method is applied to construct the graph. This method is inspired by the non-intersecting force lines in an electric field. At last, the method is further improved to give a consistent vessel width measurement for the whole vessel tree. The algorithm was validated on 100 artery branchings and 100 vein branchings selected from 50 fundus images by comparing with vessel width measurements from two human experts. PMID:23209588

  3. Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

  4. Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

  5. A graph-based method for improving GSAT

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, K.; Dechter, R.

    1996-12-31

    GSAT is a randomized greedy local repair procedure that was introduced for solving propositional satisfiability and constraint satisfaction problems. We present an improvement to GSAT that is sensitive to the problem`s structure. When the problem has a tree structure the algorithm is guaranteed to find a solution in linear time. For non-tree networks, the algorithm designates a subset of nodes, called cutset, and executes a regular GSAT algorithm on this set of variables. On all the rest of the variables it executes a specialized local search algorithm for trees. This algorithm finds an assignment that, like GSAT, locally minimizes the sum of unsatisfied constraints and also globally minimizes the number of conflicts in every tree-like sub-network. We will present results of experiments showing that this new algorithm outperforms regular GSAT on sparse networks whose cycle-cutset size is bounded by 30% of the nodes.

  6. Improved segmentation of abnormal cervical nuclei using a graph-search based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Shaoxiong; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping; Sonka, Milan

    2015-03-01

    Reliable segmentation of abnormal nuclei in cervical cytology is of paramount importance in automation-assisted screening techniques. This paper presents a general method for improving the segmentation of abnormal nuclei using a graph-search based approach. More specifically, the proposed method focuses on the improvement of coarse (initial) segmentation. The improvement relies on a transform that maps round-like border in the Cartesian coordinate system into lines in the polar coordinate system. The costs consisting of nucleus-specific edge and region information are assigned to the nodes. The globally optimal path in the constructed graph is then identified by dynamic programming. We have tested the proposed method on abnormal nuclei from two cervical cell image datasets, Herlev and H and E stained liquid-based cytology (HELBC), and the comparative experiments with recent state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method.

  7. High dimensional data clustering by partitioning the hypergraphs using dense subgraph partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xili; Tian, Shoucai; Lu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    Due to the curse of dimensionality, traditional clustering methods usually fail to produce meaningful results for the high dimensional data. Hypergraph partition is believed to be a promising method for dealing with this challenge. In this paper, we first construct a graph G from the data by defining an adjacency relationship between the data points using Shared Reverse k Nearest Neighbors (SRNN). Then a hypergraph is created from the graph G by defining the hyperedges to be all the maximal cliques in the graph G. After the hypergraph is produced, a powerful hypergraph partitioning method called dense subgraph partition (DSP) combined with the k-medoids method is used to produce the final clustering results. The proposed method is evaluated on several real high-dimensional datasets, and the experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the clustering results of the high dimensional data compared with applying k-medoids method directly on the original data.

  8. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  9. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  10. Improved genome inference in the MHC using a population reference graph.

    PubMed

    Dilthey, Alexander; Cox, Charles; Iqbal, Zamin; Nelson, Matthew R; McVean, Gil

    2015-06-01

    Although much is known about human genetic variation, such information is typically ignored in assembling new genomes. Instead, reads are mapped to a single reference, which can lead to poor characterization of regions of high sequence or structural diversity. We introduce a population reference graph, which combines multiple reference sequences and catalogs of variation. The genomes of new samples are reconstructed as paths through the graph using an efficient hidden Markov model, allowing for recombination between different haplotypes and additional variants. By applying the method to the 4.5-Mb extended MHC region on human chromosome 6, combining 8 assembled haplotypes, the sequences of known classical HLA alleles and 87,640 SNP variants from the 1000 Genomes Project, we demonstrate using simulations, SNP genotyping, and short-read and long-read data how the method improves the accuracy of genome inference and identified regions where the current set of reference sequences is substantially incomplete.

  11. An Improved Multi-Sensor Fusion Navigation Algorithm Based on the Factor Graph.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghua; Chen, Weina; Liu, Jianye; Wang, Huizhe

    2017-03-21

    An integrated navigation system coupled with additional sensors can be used in the Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MUAV) applications because the multi-sensor information is redundant and complementary, which can markedly improve the system accuracy. How to deal with the information gathered from different sensors efficiently is an important problem. The fact that different sensors provide measurements asynchronously may complicate the processing of these measurements. In addition, the output signals of some sensors appear to have a non-linear character. In order to incorporate these measurements and calculate a navigation solution in real time, the multi-sensor fusion algorithm based on factor graph is proposed. The global optimum solution is factorized according to the chain structure of the factor graph, which allows for a more general form of the conditional probability density. It can convert the fusion matter into connecting factors defined by these measurements to the graph without considering the relationship between the sensor update frequency and the fusion period. An experimental MUAV system has been built and some experiments have been performed to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. An Improved Multi-Sensor Fusion Navigation Algorithm Based on the Factor Graph

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinghua; Chen, Weina; Liu, Jianye; Wang, Huizhe

    2017-01-01

    An integrated navigation system coupled with additional sensors can be used in the Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (MUAV) applications because the multi-sensor information is redundant and complementary, which can markedly improve the system accuracy. How to deal with the information gathered from different sensors efficiently is an important problem. The fact that different sensors provide measurements asynchronously may complicate the processing of these measurements. In addition, the output signals of some sensors appear to have a non-linear character. In order to incorporate these measurements and calculate a navigation solution in real time, the multi-sensor fusion algorithm based on factor graph is proposed. The global optimum solution is factorized according to the chain structure of the factor graph, which allows for a more general form of the conditional probability density. It can convert the fusion matter into connecting factors defined by these measurements to the graph without considering the relationship between the sensor update frequency and the fusion period. An experimental MUAV system has been built and some experiments have been performed to prove the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28335570

  13. An improved bi-level algorithm for partitioning dynamic grid hierarchies.

    SciTech Connect

    Deiterding, Ralf (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA); Johansson, Henrik (Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden); Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2006-05-01

    Structured adaptive mesh refinement methods are being widely used for computer simulations of various physical phenomena. Parallel implementations potentially offer realistic simulations of complex three-dimensional applications. But achieving good scalability for large-scale applications is non-trivial. Performance is limited by the partitioner's ability to efficiently use the underlying parallel computer's resources. Designed on sound SAMR principles, Nature+Fable is a hybrid, dedicated SAMR partitioning tool that brings together the advantages of both domain-based and patch-based techniques while avoiding their drawbacks. But the original bi-level partitioning approach in Nature+Fable is insufficient as it for realistic applications regards frequently occurring bi-levels as ''impossible'' and fails. This document describes an improved bi-level partitioning algorithm that successfully copes with all possible bi-levels. The improved algorithm uses the original approach side-by-side with a new, complementing approach. By using a new, customized classification method, the improved algorithm switches automatically between the two approaches. This document describes the algorithms, discusses implementation issues, and presents experimental results. The improved version of Nature+Fable was found to be able to handle realistic applications and also to generate less imbalances, similar box count, but more communication as compared to the native, domain-based partitioner in the SAMR framework AMROC.

  14. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  15. An improved image compression algorithm using binary space partition scheme and geometric wavelets.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Garima; Pal, A K

    2011-01-01

    Geometric wavelet is a recent development in the field of multivariate nonlinear piecewise polynomials approximation. The present study improves the geometric wavelet (GW) image coding method by using the slope intercept representation of the straight line in the binary space partition scheme. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with the wavelet transform-based compression methods such as the embedded zerotree wavelet (EZW), the set partitioning in hierarchical trees (SPIHT) and the embedded block coding with optimized truncation (EBCOT), and other recently developed "sparse geometric representation" based compression algorithms. The proposed image compression algorithm outperforms the EZW, the Bandelets and the GW algorithm. The presented algorithm reports a gain of 0.22 dB over the GW method at the compression ratio of 64 for the Cameraman test image.

  16. Partition functions. I. Improved partition functions and thermodynamic quantities for normal, equilibrium, and ortho and para molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovas, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. Its thermodynamic quantities dominate the physical conditions in molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, etc. It is also of high interest in plasma physics. Therefore thermodynamic data for molecular hydrogen have to be as accurate as possible in a wide temperature range. Aims: We here rigorously show the shortcomings of various simplifications that are used to calculate the total internal partition function. These shortcomings can lead to errors of up to 40 percent or more in the estimated partition function. These errors carry on to calculations of thermodynamic quantities. Therefore a more complicated approach has to be taken. Methods: Seven possible simplifications of various complexity are described, together with advantages and disadvantages of direct summation of experimental values. These were compared to what we consider the most accurate and most complete treatment (case 8). Dunham coefficients were determined from experimental and theoretical energy levels of a number of electronically excited states of H2. Both equilibrium and normal hydrogen was taken into consideration. Results: Various shortcomings in existing calculations are demonstrated, and the reasons for them are explained. New partition functions for equilibrium, normal, and ortho and para hydrogen are calculated and thermodynamic quantities are reported for the temperature range 1-20 000 K. Our results are compared to previous estimates in the literature. The calculations are not limited to the ground electronic state, but include all bound and quasi-bound levels of excited electronic states. Dunham coefficients of these states of H2 are also reported. Conclusions: For most of the relevant astrophysical cases it is strongly advised to avoid using simplifications, such as a harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor or ad hoc summation limits of the eigenstates to estimate accurate partition functions and to be particularly careful when

  17. A new algorithm based on bipartite graph networks for improving aggregate recommendation diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lulu; Zhang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Most of the traditional recommendation algorithms focus on the accuracy of recommendation results; however, the diversity of recommendation results is also important, which can be used to avoid the long-tail phenomenon. In this paper, a new algorithm for improving aggregate recommendation diversity is proposed. Firstly, a candidate recommendation list based on predictive scores is constructed; and then a bipartite graph network model is constructed. Secondly, item capacity is set to limit the number of recommendations of popular items. Finally, the final recommendation result is generated by combining the recommendation augmenting path. Based on the real world movie rating datasets, experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively guarantee the accuracy of the recommendation results as well as improved the aggregate diversity of the recommendation.

  18. Using the SWAT model to improve process descriptions and define hydrologic partitioning in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, C. L.; Maharjan, G. R.; Tenhunen, J.; Seo, B.; Kim, K.; Riley, J.; Arnhold, S.; Koellner, T.; Ok, Y. S.; Peiffer, S.; Kim, B.; Park, J.-H.; Huwe, B.

    2014-02-01

    Watershed-scale modeling can be a valuable tool to aid in quantification of water quality and yield; however, several challenges remain. In many watersheds, it is difficult to adequately quantify hydrologic partitioning. Data scarcity is prevalent, accuracy of spatially distributed meteorology is difficult to quantify, forest encroachment and land use issues are common, and surface water and groundwater abstractions substantially modify watershed-based processes. Our objective is to assess the capability of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model to capture event-based and long-term monsoonal rainfall-runoff processes in complex mountainous terrain. To accomplish this, we developed a unique quality-control, gap-filling algorithm for interpolation of high-frequency meteorological data. We used a novel multi-location, multi-optimization calibration technique to improve estimations of catchment-wide hydrologic partitioning. The interdisciplinary model was calibrated to a unique combination of statistical, hydrologic, and plant growth metrics. Our results indicate scale-dependent sensitivity of hydrologic partitioning and substantial influence of engineered features. The addition of hydrologic and plant growth objective functions identified the importance of culverts in catchment-wide flow distribution. While this study shows the challenges of applying the SWAT model to complex terrain and extreme environments; by incorporating anthropogenic features into modeling scenarios, we can enhance our understanding of the hydroecological impact.

  19. Improving Students' Understanding of Waves by Plotting a Displacement-Time Graph in Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yajun

    2012-04-01

    The topic of waves is one that many high school physics students find difficult to understand. This is especially true when using some A-level textbooks1,2used in the U.K., where the concept of waves is introduced prior to the concept of simple harmonic oscillations. One of the challenges my students encounter is understanding the difference between displacement-time graphs and displacement-position graphs. Many students wonder why these two graphs have the same sinusoidal shape. Having the students use multimedia simulations allows them to see, in a hands-on fashion, the relationship between the two graphs.

  20. Improved microarray-based decision support with graph encoded interactome data.

    PubMed

    Daemen, Anneleen; Signoretto, Marco; Gevaert, Olivier; Suykens, Johan A K; De Moor, Bart

    2010-04-19

    In the past, microarray studies have been criticized due to noise and the limited overlap between gene signatures. Prior biological knowledge should therefore be incorporated as side information in models based on gene expression data to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis in cancer. As prior knowledge, we investigated interaction and pathway information from the human interactome on different aspects of biological systems. By exploiting the properties of kernel methods, relations between genes with similar functions but active in alternative pathways could be incorporated in a support vector machine classifier based on spectral graph theory. Using 10 microarray data sets, we first reduced the number of data sources relevant for multiple cancer types and outcomes. Three sources on metabolic pathway information (KEGG), protein-protein interactions (OPHID) and miRNA-gene targeting (microRNA.org) outperformed the other sources with regard to the considered class of models. Both fixed and adaptive approaches were subsequently considered to combine the three corresponding classifiers. Averaging the predictions of these classifiers performed best and was significantly better than the model based on microarray data only. These results were confirmed on 6 validation microarray sets, with a significantly improved performance in 4 of them. Integrating interactome data thus improves classification of cancer outcome for the investigated microarray technologies and cancer types. Moreover, this strategy can be incorporated in any kernel method or non-linear version of a non-kernel method.

  1. Clustering gene expression data using graph separators.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Bangaly; Pinet, Nicolas; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Sigayret, Alain; Berry, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has used graphs to modelize expression data from microarray experiments, in view of partitioning the genes into clusters. In this paper, we introduce the use of a decomposition by clique separators. Our aim is to improve the classical clustering methods in two ways: first we want to allow an overlap between clusters, as this seems biologically sound, and second we want to be guided by the structure of the graph to define the number of clusters. We test this approach with a well-known yeast database (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results are good, as the expression profiles of the clusters we find are very coherent. Moreover, we are able to organize into another graph the clusters we find, and order them in a fashion which turns out to respect the chronological order defined by the the sporulation process.

  2. Potts model and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. Y.

    1988-07-01

    Elementary exposition is given of some recent developments in studies of graphtheoretic aspects of the Potts model. Topics discussed include graphical expansions of the Potts partition function and correlation functions and their relationships with the chromatic, dichromatic, and flow polynomials occurring in graph theory. It is also shown that the Potts model realization of these classic graph-theoretic problems provides alternate and direct proofs of properties established heretofore only in the context of formal graph theory.

  3. Genetic Improvement in Short-Season Soybeans: II. Nitrogen Accumulation, Remobilization, and Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Kumudini, S.; Hume, D. J.; Chu, G.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic improvement in yield is conditional on surmounting yield-limiting factors. Nitrogen (N) has been considered an important limiting factor to soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] yield. The high demand for N by soybean seed was previously considered to lead to early leaf senescence through accelerated remobilization of N from the vegetative tissue. The consequent reduction in photosynthetic capacity was postulated to limit yield. The objectives of the current experiment were to determine the changes in N accumulation, remobilization, and partitioning associated with genetic yield improvement. Two groups of old, low-yielding ('Pagoda' and 'Mandarin Ottawa') and new, high-yielding ('Maple Glen' and 'OAC Bayfield') soybean cultivars of similar maturity were grown in side-by-side trials at the Elora Research Station, Ontario, in 1996 and 1997. Nitrogen and dry matter accumulation in leaf, stem + petiole, roots, and seeds were determined during the growing season. The newer cultivars had higher yields and higher seed N content. Contrary to the postulated association between leaf senescence and leaf N values, neither leaf N concentration nor leaf N content per unit leaf area (at R6) were association consistently with either yield or leaf area duration (LAD). Although most of the N in the seed was derived from N remobilized from vegetative tissue, the newer cultivars with their higher yields and LAD, remobilized no more N out of the vegetative tissue than did older, lower-yielding ones. The newer cultivars were distinct from their older counterparts in their ability to accumulate more N during the seed filling period (SFP). Genetic improvement of the short-season soybeans tested was a consequence of continued N accumulation during the SFP and was not due to differences in the genotype's capacity to remobilize or partition N to the seed.

  4. Using cascading Bloom filters to improve the memory usage for de Brujin graphs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background De Brujin graphs are widely used in bioinformatics for processing next-generation sequencing data. Due to a very large size of NGS datasets, it is essential to represent de Bruijn graphs compactly, and several approaches to this problem have been proposed recently. Results In this work, we show how to reduce the memory required by the data structure of Chikhi and Rizk (WABI’12) that represents de Brujin graphs using Bloom filters. Our method requires 30% to 40% less memory with respect to their method, with insignificant impact on construction time. At the same time, our experiments showed a better query time compared to the method of Chikhi and Rizk. Conclusion The proposed data structure constitutes, to our knowledge, currently the most efficient practical representation of de Bruijn graphs. PMID:24565280

  5. Multibody graph transformations and analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper uses graph transformation methods to develop methods for partitioning, aggregating, and constraint embedding for multibody systems. This first part focuses on tree-topology systems and reviews the key notion of spatial kernel operator (SKO) models for such systems. It develops systematic and rigorous techniques for partitioning SKO models in terms of the SKO models of the component subsystems based on the path-induced property of the component subgraphs. It shows that the sparsity structure of key matrix operators and the mass matrix for the multibody system can be described using partitioning transformations. Subsequently, the notions of node contractions and subgraph aggregation and their role in coarsening graphs are discussed. It is shown that the tree property of a graph is preserved after subgraph aggregation if and only if the subgraph satisfies an aggregation condition. These graph theory ideas are used to develop SKO models for the aggregated tree multibody systems. PMID:24288438

  6. The use of acoustically tuned resonators to improve the sound transmission loss of double-panel partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, J. M.; Fahy, F. J.

    1988-07-01

    Double-leaf partitions are often utilized in situations requiring low weight structures with high transmission loss, an example of current interest being the fuselage walls of propeller-driven aircraft. In this case, acoustic excitation is periodic and, if one of the frequencies of excitation lies in the region of the fundamental mass-air-mass frequency of the partition, insulation performance is considerably less than desired. The potential effectiveness of tuned Helmholtz resonators connected to the partition cavity is investigated as a method of improving transmission loss. This is demonstrated by a simple theoretical model and then experimentally verified. Results show that substantial improvements may be obtained at and around the mass-air-mass frequency for a total resonator volume 15 percent of the cavity volume.

  7. Graph-based sampling for approximating global helical topologies of RNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Laing, Christian; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Jung, Segun; Curuksu, Jeremy; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-03-18

    A current challenge in RNA structure prediction is the description of global helical arrangements compatible with a given secondary structure. Here we address this problem by developing a hierarchical graph sampling/data mining approach to reduce conformational space and accelerate global sampling of candidate topologies. Starting from a 2D structure, we construct an initial graph from size measures deduced from solved RNAs and junction topologies predicted by our data-mining algorithm RNAJAG trained on known RNAs. We sample these graphs in 3D space guided by knowledge-based statistical potentials derived from bending and torsion measures of internal loops as well as radii of gyration for known RNAs. Graph sampling results for 30 representative RNAs are analyzed and compared with reference graphs from both solved structures and predicted structures by available programs. This comparison indicates promise for our graph-based sampling approach for characterizing global helical arrangements in large RNAs: graph rmsds range from 2.52 to 28.24 Å for RNAs of size 25-158 nucleotides, and more than half of our graph predictions improve upon other programs. The efficiency in graph sampling, however, implies an additional step of translating candidate graphs into atomic models. Such models can be built with the same idea of graph partitioning and build-up procedures we used for RNA design.

  8. Graph ensemble boosting for imbalanced noisy graph stream classification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shirui; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    Many applications involve stream data with structural dependency, graph representations, and continuously increasing volumes. For these applications, it is very common that their class distributions are imbalanced with minority (or positive) samples being only a small portion of the population, which imposes significant challenges for learning models to accurately identify minority samples. This problem is further complicated with the presence of noise, because they are similar to minority samples and any treatment for the class imbalance may falsely focus on the noise and result in deterioration of accuracy. In this paper, we propose a classification model to tackle imbalanced graph streams with noise. Our method, graph ensemble boosting, employs an ensemble-based framework to partition graph stream into chunks each containing a number of noisy graphs with imbalanced class distributions. For each individual chunk, we propose a boosting algorithm to combine discriminative subgraph pattern selection and model learning as a unified framework for graph classification. To tackle concept drifting in graph streams, an instance level weighting mechanism is used to dynamically adjust the instance weight, through which the boosting framework can emphasize on difficult graph samples. The classifiers built from different graph chunks form an ensemble for graph stream classification. Experiments on real-life imbalanced graph streams demonstrate clear benefits of our boosting design for handling imbalanced noisy graph stream.

  9. Graphing Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paine, Carolyn

    1983-01-01

    An explanation is given of the uses of graphs for conveying information pictorially. Picture, bar, line, and area graphs are illustrated. Graphing projects for science, social studies, mathematics, economics, and language arts are listed, and teaching tips are suggested. (FG)

  10. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  11. Quantitative synteny scoring improves homology inference and partitioning of gene families.

    PubMed

    Ali, Raja Hashim; Muhammad, Sayyed; Khan, Mehmood; Arvestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Clustering sequences into families has long been an important step in characterization of genes and proteins. There are many algorithms developed for this purpose, most of which are based on either direct similarity between gene pairs or some sort of network structure, where weights on edges of constructed graphs are based on similarity. However, conserved synteny is an important signal that can help distinguish homology and it has not been utilized to its fullest potential. Here, we present GenFamClust, a pipeline that combines the network properties of sequence similarity and synteny to assess homology relationship and merge known homologs into groups of gene families. GenFamClust identifies homologs in a more informed and accurate manner as compared to similarity based approaches. We tested our method against the Neighborhood Correlation method on two diverse datasets consisting of fully sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and synthetic data. The results obtained from both datasets confirm that synteny helps determine homology and GenFamClust improves on Neighborhood Correlation method. The accuracy as well as the definition of synteny scores is the most valuable contribution of GenFamClust.

  12. Quantitative synteny scoring improves homology inference and partitioning of gene families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clustering sequences into families has long been an important step in characterization of genes and proteins. There are many algorithms developed for this purpose, most of which are based on either direct similarity between gene pairs or some sort of network structure, where weights on edges of constructed graphs are based on similarity. However, conserved synteny is an important signal that can help distinguish homology and it has not been utilized to its fullest potential. Results Here, we present GenFamClust, a pipeline that combines the network properties of sequence similarity and synteny to assess homology relationship and merge known homologs into groups of gene families. GenFamClust identifies homologs in a more informed and accurate manner as compared to similarity based approaches. We tested our method against the Neighborhood Correlation method on two diverse datasets consisting of fully sequenced genomes of eukaryotes and synthetic data. Conclusions The results obtained from both datasets confirm that synteny helps determine homology and GenFamClust improves on Neighborhood Correlation method. The accuracy as well as the definition of synteny scores is the most valuable contribution of GenFamClust. PMID:24564516

  13. Anatomically-adapted graph wavelets for improved group-level fMRI activation mapping.

    PubMed

    Behjat, Hamid; Leonardi, Nora; Sörnmo, Leif; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-12-01

    A graph based framework for fMRI brain activation mapping is presented. The approach exploits the spectral graph wavelet transform (SGWT) for the purpose of defining an advanced multi-resolutional spatial transformation for fMRI data. The framework extends wavelet based SPM (WSPM), which is an alternative to the conventional approach of statistical parametric mapping (SPM), and is developed specifically for group-level analysis. We present a novel procedure for constructing brain graphs, with subgraphs that separately encode the structural connectivity of the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter (GM), and address the inter-subject GM variability by the use of template GM representations. Graph wavelets tailored to the convoluted boundaries of GM are then constructed as a means to implement a GM-based spatial transformation on fMRI data. The proposed approach is evaluated using real as well as semi-synthetic multi-subject data. Compared to SPM and WSPM using classical wavelets, the proposed approach shows superior type-I error control. The results on real data suggest a higher detection sensitivity as well as the capability to capture subtle, connected patterns of brain activity.

  14. Improvement of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography for measuring octanol-water partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhining; Jiang, Xuemei; Mu, Xiaojing; Chen, Hua

    2008-02-01

    Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) has been used to indirectly measure octanol-water partition coefficients (log P(ow)) of compounds. In order to obtain an accurate log P(ow) value, the electrophoretic mobilities of the microemulsion phase (mu(me)) and the analyte (mu(eff)) in MEEKC must be accurately required. However, in conventional MEEKC, the shortage of obtaining mu(me) with a tracing method was discovered, and the influences of concentration, injection volume of analyte, and high electric field on measuring mu(eff) were also found. In this paper, a novel method called improved MEEKC (I-MEEKC) was developed to avoid the problems mentioned above. In I-MEEKC, a nonlinearity fitting program was used to obtain mu(me) to avoid the error from tracing mu(me); the extrapolating method was used to eliminate the effects of concentrations and injection volumes of analytes on mu(eff) measurement, and an enough stable microemulsion was selected to eliminate the effect of high electric field on mu(eff )measurement. Then the novel method was applied to estimate log P(ow) of uncharged compounds and charged pharmaceuticals compared to the conventional MEEKC. The log P(ow) of all analytes obtained by I-MEEKC agreed with those obtained by classical shake flask or literature values, the errors between them were within 0.1 logarithm units, better than the ones by conventional MEEKC.

  15. Graph Library

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Martin; Arnold, Dorian

    2007-06-12

    GraphLib is a support library used by other tools to create, manipulate, store, and export graphs. It provides a simple interface to specifS’ arbitrary directed and undirected graphs by adding nodes and edges. Each node and edge can be associated with a set of attributes describing size, color, and shape. Once created, graphs can be manipulated using a set of graph analysis algorithms, including merge, prune, and path coloring operations. GraphLib also has the ability to export graphs into various open formats such as DOT and GML.

  16. Improved initialisation of model-based clustering using Gaussian hierarchical partitions

    PubMed Central

    Scrucca, Luca; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    Initialisation of the EM algorithm in model-based clustering is often crucial. Various starting points in the parameter space often lead to different local maxima of the likelihood function and, so to different clustering partitions. Among the several approaches available in the literature, model-based agglomerative hierarchical clustering is used to provide initial partitions in the popular mclust R package. This choice is computationally convenient and often yields good clustering partitions. However, in certain circumstances, poor initial partitions may cause the EM algorithm to converge to a local maximum of the likelihood function. We propose several simple and fast refinements based on data transformations and illustrate them through data examples. PMID:26949421

  17. Application of annular centrifugal contactors in the hot test of the improved total partitioning process for high level liquid waste.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wuhua; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jianchen; Wang, Shuwei; Feng, Xiaogui; Wang, Xinghai; Li, Shaowei; Xu, Chao

    2014-08-15

    High level liquid waste (HLLW) produced from the reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel still contains moderate amounts of uranium, transuranium (TRU) actinides, (90)Sr, (137)Cs, etc., and thus constitutes a permanent hazard to the environment. The partitioning and transmutation (P&T) strategy has increasingly attracted interest for the safe treatment and disposal of HLLW, in which the partitioning of HLLW is one of the critical technical issues. An improved total partitioning process, including a TRPO (tri-alkylphosphine oxide) process for the removal of actinides, a CESE (crown ether strontium extraction) process for the removal of Sr, and a CECE (calixcrown ether cesium extraction) process for the removal of Cs, has been developed to treat Chinese HLLW. A 160-hour hot test of the improved total partitioning process was carried out using 72-stage 10-mm-dia annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) and genuine HLLW. The hot test results showed that the average DFs of total α activity, Sr and Cs were 3.57 × 10(3), 2.25 × 10(4) and 1.68 × 10(4) after the hot test reached equilibrium, respectively. During the hot test, 72-stage 10-mm-dia ACCs worked stable, continuously with no stage failing or interruption of the operation.

  18. "Improved Geometric Network Model" (IGNM): a novel approach for deriving Connectivity Graphs for Indoor Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortari, F.; Zlatanova, S.; Liu, L.; Clementini, E.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few years Personal Navigation Systems have become an established tool for route planning, but they are mainly designed for outdoor environments. Indoor navigation is still a challenging research area for several reasons: positioning is not very accurate, users can freely move between the interior boundaries of buildings, path network construction process may not be easy and straightforward due to complexity of indoor space configurations. Therefore the creation of a good network is essential for deriving overall connectivity of a building and for representing position of objects within the environment. This paper reviews current approaches to automatic derivation of route graphs for indoor navigation and discusses some of their limitations. Then, it introduces a novel algorithmic strategy for extracting a 3D connectivity graph for indoor navigation based on 2D floor plans.

  19. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  20. Spectral Graph Theory Analysis of Software-Defined Networks to Improve Performance and Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    and approximated by Eqn. (3.47) can be exploited by adding a virtual node or phantom node to the graph that does not exist in the physical network...the network. Virtual network and virtual machines (VMs) were considered, but there were too many drawbacks. Emulation with a virtual environment is...test bed, the concepts and scheme proposed in this dissertation would not have been exposed to the realities of non-deterministic time delays and the

  1. Some trees with partition dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlina, Ketut Queena; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The concept of partition dimension of a graph was introduced by Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang (1998) [2]. Let G(V, E) be a connected graph. For S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), define the distance d(v, S) from v to S is min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. Let Π be an ordered partition of V (G) and Π = {S1, S2, ..., Sk }. The representation r(v|Π) of vertex v with respect to Π is (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), ..., d(v, Sk)). If the representations of all vertices are distinct, then the partition Π is called a resolving partition of G. The partition dimension of G is the minimum k such that G has a resolving partition with k partition classes. In this paper, we characterize some classes of trees with partition dimension three, namely olive trees, weeds, and centipedes.

  2. Improved method estimating bioconcentration/bioaccumulation factor from octanol/water partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Meylan, W.M.; Howard, P.H.; Aronson, D.; Printup, H.; Gouchie, S.; Boethling, R.S.

    1999-04-01

    A compound`s bioconcentration factor (BDF) is the most commonly used indicator of its tendency to accumulate in aquatic organisms from the surrounding medium. Because it is expensive to measure, the BCF is generally estimated from the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}), but currently used regression equations were developed from small data sets that do not adequately represent the wide range of chemical substances now subject to review. To develop and improved method, the authors collected BCF data in a file that contained information on measured BCFs and other key experimental details for 694 chemicals. Log BCF was then regressed against log K{sub ow} and chemicals with significant deviations from the line of best fit were analyzed by chemical structure. The resulting algorithm classifies a substance as either nonionic or ionic, the latter group including carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids and their salts, and quaternary N compounds. Log BCF for nonionics is estimated from log K{sub ow} and a series of correction factors if applicable; different equations apply for log K{sub ow} 1.0 to 7.0 and >7.0. For ionics, chemicals are categorized by log K{sub ow} and a log BCF in the range 0.5 to 1.75 is assigned. Organometallics, nonionics with long alkyl chains, and aromatic azo compounds receive special treatment. The correlation coefficient and mean error for log BCF indicate that the new method is a significantly better fit to existing data than other methods.

  3. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)→R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k≥2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  4. Partitioning Breaks Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    Considering a clique as a conservative definition of community structure, we examine how graph partitioning algorithms interact with cliques. Many popular community-finding algorithms partition the entire graph into non-overlapping communities. We show that on a wide range of empirical networks, from different domains, significant numbers of cliques are split across the separate partitions produced by these algorithms. We then examine the largest connected component of the subgraph formed by retaining only edges in cliques, and apply partitioning strategies that explicitly minimise the number of cliques split. We further examine several modern overlapping community finding algorithms, in terms of the interaction between cliques and the communities they find, and in terms of the global overlap of the sets of communities they find. We conclude that, due to the connectedness of many networks, any community finding algorithm that produces partitions must fail to find at least some significant structures. Moreover, contrary to traditional intuition, in some empirical networks, strong ties and cliques frequently do cross community boundaries; much community structure is fundamentally overlapping and unpartitionable in nature.

  5. Higher-order graph wavelets and sparsity on circulant graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzagiannidis, Madeleine S.; Dragotti, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    The notion of a graph wavelet gives rise to more advanced processing of data on graphs due to its ability to operate in a localized manner, across newly arising data-dependency structures, with respect to the graph signal and underlying graph structure, thereby taking into consideration the inherent geometry of the data. In this work, we tackle the problem of creating graph wavelet filterbanks on circulant graphs for a sparse representation of certain classes of graph signals. The underlying graph can hereby be data-driven as well as fixed, for applications including image processing and social network theory, whereby clusters can be modelled as circulant graphs, respectively. We present a set of novel graph wavelet filter-bank constructions, which annihilate higher-order polynomial graph signals (up to a border effect) defined on the vertices of undirected, circulant graphs, and are localised in the vertex domain. We give preliminary results on their performance for non-linear graph signal approximation and denoising. Furthermore, we provide extensions to our previously developed segmentation-inspired graph wavelet framework for non-linear image approximation, by incorporating notions of smoothness and vanishing moments, which further improve performance compared to traditional methods.

  6. Improved algorithms for enumerating tree-like chemical graphs with given path frequency.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yusuke; Zhao, Liang; Nagamochi, Hiroshi; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of enumerating all non-isomorphic tree-like chemical graphs with given path frequency, where "tree-like" means that the graph can be viewed as a tree if multiple edges (i.e., edges with the same end points) and a benzene ring are treated as one edge and one vertex, respectively, and "path frequency" is a vector of the numbers of specified vertex-labeled paths that must be realized in every output. This and related problems have several potential applications such as classification of chemical compounds, structure determination using mass-spectrum and/or NMR and design of novel chemical compounds. For this problem, several studies have been done. Recently, Fujiwara et al. (2008) showed two formulations and for each of them, they gave a branch-and-bound algorithm, which combined efficient enumeration of non-isomorphic trees with bounding operations based on the path frequency and the atom-atom bonds to avoid the generation of invalid trees. In this paper, based on their work and a result of Nagamochi (2006), we introduce two new bounding operations, the detachment-cut and the H-cut, to further reduce the size of the search space. We performed computational experiments to compare our proposed algorithms with those of Fujiwara et al. (2008) using some chemical compound data obtained from the KEGG LIGAND database (http://www.genome.jp/kegg/ligand.html). The results show that our proposed algorithms are much faster than their algorithms.

  7. Improving graph-based OCT segmentation for severe pathology in retinitis pigmentosa patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Bittner, Ava K.; Ying, Howard S.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2017-03-01

    Three dimensional segmentation of macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) data of subjects with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a challenging problem due to the disappearance of the photoreceptor layers, which causes algorithms developed for segmentation of healthy data to perform poorly on RP patients. In this work, we present enhancements to a previously developed graph-based OCT segmentation pipeline to enable processing of RP data. The algorithm segments eight retinal layers in RP data by relaxing constraints on the thickness and smoothness of each layer learned from healthy data. Following from prior work, a random forest classifier is first trained on the RP data to estimate boundary probabilities, which are used by a graph search algorithm to find the optimal set of nine surfaces that fit the data. Due to the intensity disparity between normal layers of healthy controls and layers in various stages of degeneration in RP patients, an additional intensity normalization step is introduced. Leave-one-out validation on data acquired from nine subjects showed an average overall boundary error of 4.22 μm as compared to 6.02 μm using the original algorithm.

  8. Automatic analysis of D-partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaevskaya, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to automatization of D-partition analysis. D-partition is one of the most common methods for determination of solution stability in systems with time-delayed feedback control and its dependency on values of control parameters. A transition from analytical form of D-partition to plain graph has been investigated. An algorithm of graph faces determination and calculation of count of characteristic equation roots with positive real part for appropriate area of D-partition has been developed. The algorithm keeps an information about analytical formulas for edges of faces. It allows to make further analytical research based on the results of computer analysis.

  9. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  10. Graph cut and image intensity-based splitting improves nuclei segmentation in high-content screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan, Muhammad; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämö, Pauli; Yli-Harja, Olli; Dehio, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Quantification of phenotypes in high-content screening experiments depends on the accuracy of single cell analysis. In such analysis workflows, cell nuclei segmentation is typically the first step and is followed by cell body segmentation, feature extraction, and subsequent data analysis workflows. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that the first steps of high-content analysis are done accurately in order to guarantee correctness of the final analysis results. In this paper, we present a novel cell nuclei image segmentation framework which exploits robustness of graph cut to obtain initial segmentation for image intensity-based clump splitting method to deliver the accurate overall segmentation. By using quantitative benchmarks and qualitative comparison with real images from high-content screening experiments with complicated multinucleate cells, we show that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art nuclei segmentation methods. Moreover, we provide a modular and easy-to-use implementation of the method for a widely used platform.

  11. PIGS: improved estimates of identity-by-descent probabilities by probabilistic IBD graph sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying segments in the genome of different individuals that are identical-by-descent (IBD) is a fundamental element of genetics. IBD data is used for numerous applications including demographic inference, heritability estimation, and mapping disease loci. Simultaneous detection of IBD over multiple haplotypes has proven to be computationally difficult. To overcome this, many state of the art methods estimate the probability of IBD between each pair of haplotypes separately. While computationally efficient, these methods fail to leverage the clique structure of IBD resulting in less powerful IBD identification, especially for small IBD segments. We develop a hybrid approach (PIGS), which combines the computational efficiency of pairwise methods with the power of multiway methods. It leverages the IBD graph structure to compute the probability of IBD conditional on all pairwise estimates simultaneously. We show via extensive simulations and analysis of real data that our method produces a substantial increase in the number of identified small IBD segments. PMID:25860540

  12. Filtering Random Graph Processes Over Random Time-Varying Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isufi, Elvin; Loukas, Andreas; Simonetto, Andrea; Leus, Geert

    2017-08-01

    Graph filters play a key role in processing the graph spectra of signals supported on the vertices of a graph. However, despite their widespread use, graph filters have been analyzed only in the deterministic setting, ignoring the impact of stochastic- ity in both the graph topology as well as the signal itself. To bridge this gap, we examine the statistical behavior of the two key filter types, finite impulse response (FIR) and autoregressive moving average (ARMA) graph filters, when operating on random time- varying graph signals (or random graph processes) over random time-varying graphs. Our analysis shows that (i) in expectation, the filters behave as the same deterministic filters operating on a deterministic graph, being the expected graph, having as input signal a deterministic signal, being the expected signal, and (ii) there are meaningful upper bounds for the variance of the filter output. We conclude the paper by proposing two novel ways of exploiting randomness to improve (joint graph-time) noise cancellation, as well as to reduce the computational complexity of graph filtering. As demonstrated by numerical results, these methods outperform the disjoint average and denoise algorithm, and yield a (up to) four times complexity redution, with very little difference from the optimal solution.

  13. The peculiar phase structure of random graph bisection

    SciTech Connect

    Percus, Allon G; Istrate, Gabriel; Goncalves, Bruno T; Sumi, Robert Z

    2008-01-01

    The mincut graph bisection problem involves partitioning the n vertices of a graph into disjoint subsets, each containing exactly n/2 vertices, while minimizing the number of 'cut' edges with an endpoint in each subset. When considered over sparse random graphs, the phase structure of the graph bisection problem displays certain familiar properties, but also some surprises. It is known that when the mean degree is below the critical value of 2 log 2, the cutsize is zero with high probability. We study how the minimum cutsize increases with mean degree above this critical threshold, finding a new analytical upper bound that improves considerably upon previous bounds. Combined with recent results on expander graphs, our bound suggests the unusual scenario that random graph bisection is replica symmetric up to and beyond the critical threshold, with a replica symmetry breaking transition possibly taking place above the threshold. An intriguing algorithmic consequence is that although the problem is NP-hard, we can find near-optimal cutsizes (whose ratio to the optimal value approaches 1 asymptotically) in polynomial time for typical instances near the phase transition.

  14. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    In Italy about 100.000 km2 are covered by forests. This surface is the 30% of the whole national land and this shows how the forests are important both for socio-economic and for environmental aspects. Forests changes affect a delicate balance that involve not only vegetation components but also bio-geochemical cycles and global climate. The knowledge of the amount of Carbon sequestered by forests represents a precious information for their sustainable management in the framework of climate changes. Primary studies in terms of model about this important issue, has been done through Forest Ecosystem Model (FEM), well known and validated as 3PG (Landsberg et Waring, 1997; Sands 2004). It is based on light use efficiency approach at the canopy level. The present study started from the original model 3PG, producing an improved version that uses many of explicit formulations of all relevant ecophysiological processes but makes it able to be applied for natural forests. The mutual interaction of forest growth and light conditions causes vertical and horizontal differentiation in the natural forest mosaic. Only ecophysiological parameters which can be either directly measured or estimates with reasonable certainty are used. The model has been written in C language and has been created considering a tri-dimensional cell structure with different vertical layers depending on the forest type that has to be simulated. This 3PG 'improved' version enable to work on multi-layer and multi-species forests type with cell resolution of one hectare for the typical Italian forest species. The multi-layer version is the result of the implementation and development of Lambert-Beer law for the estimation of intercepted, absorbed and transmitted light through different storeys of the forest. It is possible estimates, for each storey, a Par value (Photosynthetic Active Radiation) through Leaf Area Index (LAI), Light Extinction Coefficient and cell Canopy Cover using a "Big Leaf" approach

  15. Graph Zeta function and gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui

    2011-03-01

    Along the recently trodden path of studying certain number theoretic properties of gauge theories, especially supersymmetric theories whose vacuum manifolds are non-trivial, we investigate Ihara's Graph Zeta Function for large classes of quiver theories and periodic tilings by bi-partite graphs. In particular, we examine issues such as the spectra of the adjacency and whether the gauge theory satisfies the strong and weak versions of the graph theoretical analogue of the Riemann Hypothesis.

  16. Improved characterization of gas-particle partitioning for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in the atmosphere using annular diffusion denuder samplers.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Lutz; Harner, Tom; Shoeib, Mahiba; Lane, Douglas A; Murphy, Jennifer G

    2012-07-03

    Gas-phase perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) sorb strongly on filter material (i.e., GFF, QFF) used in conventional high volume air samplers, which results in an overestimation of the particle-phase concentration. In this study, we investigated an improved technique for measuring the gas-particle partitioning of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) using an annular diffusion denuder sampler. Samples were analyzed for 7 PFAS classes [i.e., PFCAs, perfluoroalkane sulfonic acids (PFSAs), fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), fluorotelomer methacrylates (FTMACs), fluorotelomer acrylates (FTACs), perfluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs), and perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs)]. The measured particulate associated fraction (Φ') using the diffusion denuder sampler generally followed the trend FTACs (0%) < FTOHs (~8%) < FOSAs (~21%) < PFSAs (~29%) < FOSEs (~66%), whereas the Φ' of the C(8)-C(18) PFCAs increased with carbon chain length, and ranged from 6% to 100%. The ionizability of some PFASs, when associated with particles, is an important consideration when calculating the gas-particle partitioning coefficient as both ionic and neutral forms can be present in the particles. Here we differentiate between a gas-particle partitioning coefficient for neutral species, K(p), and one that accounts for both ionic and neutral species of a compound, K(p)'. The measured K(p)' for PFSAs and PFCAs was 4-5 log units higher compared to the interpolated K(p) for the neutral form only. The measured K(p)' can be corrected (to apply to the neutral form only) with knowledge of the pK(a) of the chemical and the pH of the condensed medium ("wet" particle or aqueous aerosol). The denuder-based sampling of PFASs has yielded a robust data set that demonstrates the importance of atmospheric pH and chemical pK(a) values in determining gas-particle partitioning of PFASs.

  17. Learning graph matching.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Tibério S; McAuley, Julian J; Cheng, Li; Le, Quoc V; Smola, Alex J

    2009-06-01

    As a fundamental problem in pattern recognition, graph matching has applications in a variety of fields, from computer vision to computational biology. In graph matching, patterns are modeled as graphs and pattern recognition amounts to finding a correspondence between the nodes of different graphs. Many formulations of this problem can be cast in general as a quadratic assignment problem, where a linear term in the objective function encodes node compatibility and a quadratic term encodes edge compatibility. The main research focus in this theme is about designing efficient algorithms for approximately solving the quadratic assignment problem, since it is NP-hard. In this paper we turn our attention to a different question: how to estimate compatibility functions such that the solution of the resulting graph matching problem best matches the expected solution that a human would manually provide. We present a method for learning graph matching: the training examples are pairs of graphs and the 'labels' are matches between them. Our experimental results reveal that learning can substantially improve the performance of standard graph matching algorithms. In particular, we find that simple linear assignment with such a learning scheme outperforms Graduated Assignment with bistochastic normalisation, a state-of-the-art quadratic assignment relaxation algorithm.

  18. Graph-based modeling of tandem repeats improves global multiple sequence alignment

    PubMed Central

    Szalkowski, Adam M.; Anisimova, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are often present in proteins with crucial functions, responsible for resistance, pathogenicity and associated with infectious or neurodegenerative diseases. This motivates numerous studies of TRs and their evolution, requiring accurate multiple sequence alignment. TRs may be lost or inserted at any position of a TR region by replication slippage or recombination, but current methods assume fixed unit boundaries, and yet are of high complexity. We present a new global graph-based alignment method that does not restrict TR unit indels by unit boundaries. TR indels are modeled separately and penalized using the phylogeny-aware alignment algorithm. This ensures enhanced accuracy of reconstructed alignments, disentangling TRs and measuring indel events and rates in a biologically meaningful way. Our method detects not only duplication events but also all changes in TR regions owing to recombination, strand slippage and other events inserting or deleting TR units. We evaluate our method by simulation incorporating TR evolution, by either sampling TRs from a profile hidden Markov model or by mimicking strand slippage with duplications. The new method is illustrated on a family of type III effectors, a pathogenicity determinant in agriculturally important bacteria Ralstonia solanacearum. We show that TR indel rate variation contributes to the diversification of this protein family. PMID:23877246

  19. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean.

  20. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs.

  1. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  2. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  3. Improved estimation of solubility and partitioning through correction of UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, S.; Howard, P.H.

    1988-07-01

    Octanol-water partition coefficients (K/sub ow/) of 75 compounds ranging over 9 orders of magnitude are correlated by log K/sub ow/ = -0.40 + 0.73 log (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ -0.39 log (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ (r = 0.98), where (..gamma..//sub W/)/sub U/ and (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/ are UNIFAC-derived activity coefficients in water and octanol, respectively. The constants 0.73 and -0.39 are obtained empirically and are intended to compensate for group nonadditivity. Correction factors of similar magnitude are obtained in independent correlations of water solubility with (..gamma../sub W/)/sub U/ and of octanol solubility with (..gamma../sub 0/)/sub U/, thereby confirming the validity of the approach.

  4. On bottleneck partitioning k-ary n-cubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Mao, Weizhen

    1994-01-01

    Graph partitioning is a topic of extensive interest, with applications to parallel processing. In this context graph nodes typically represent computation, and edges represent communication. One seeks to distribute the workload by partitioning the graph so that every processor has approximately the same workload, and the communication cost (measured as a function of edges exposed by the partition) is minimized. Measures of partition quality vary; in this paper we consider a processor's cost to be the sum of its computation and communication costs, and consider the cost of a partition to be the bottleneck, or maximal processor cost induced by the partition. For a general graph the problem of finding an optimal partitioning is intractable. In this paper we restrict our attention to the class of k-art n-cube graphs with uniformly weighted nodes. Given mild restrictions on the node weight and number of processors, we identify partitions yielding the smallest bottleneck. We also demonstrate by example that some restrictions are necessary for the partitions we identify to be optimal. In particular, there exist cases where partitions that evenly partition nodes need not be optimal.

  5. Continuous Graph Partitioning for Camera Network Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-23

    Proposition 3.4]. In order to compute the stated upper bound for the stepsize ε, it can be shown that K ≤ 2dmax(`max)2. Finally, the claimed statement...locations is given by |V| = 14. The stepsizes for Algorithm 5 and Algorithm 6 are chosen sharp, up to a constant = .01, to their upper bounds stated in...setup and we introduce some concepts which will be extensively used to state our results. 3.1 Problem Setup We consider the problem of surveilling an

  6. Scenario Graphs and Attack Graphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-14

    46 6.1 Vulnerability Analysis of a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 6.2 Sandia Red Team Attack Graph...asymptotic bound. The test machine was a 1Ghz Pentium III with 1GB of RAM, running Red Hat Linux 7.3. Figure 4.1(a) plots running time of the implemen...host scanning tools network information vulnerability Attack Graph network Red

  7. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  8. Improved method for estimating water solubility from octanol/water partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Meylan, W.; Howard, P.; Boethling, R.

    1994-12-31

    Water solubility (wsol) is a critical property in risk assessments for chemicals. It is often necessary to estimate wsol because measured values are unavailable. However, the most widely used estimation methods predict wsol from the logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient (log K{sub ow}), via regression equations based on approximately 200 (or fewer) measured values of log K{sub ow}. The overall accuracy of these correlations is only about {+-} one order of magnitude. To update and enhance existing wsol estimation methods, the authors first collected 3,000+ measured values from a variety of sources. The range of chemical structures represented by this data set is much greater than for the older regressions. They then investigated the accuracy of wsol/log K{sub ow} correlations for the entire data set and for various chemical classes, as well as the importance of melting point (mp) to the estimate. The results of this investigation include a new regression equation for estimating wsol. This method has been encoded in a computer program that is compatible with other programs in the Estimation Programs Interface (EPI), a program used by OPPT to estimate key properties and fate parameters for existing and Premanufacture Notice (PMN) chemicals. To estimate wsol the user can enter a measured value of log K{sub ow}, or allow the program to estimate log K{sub ow} from the chemical`s SMILES notation.

  9. Unsupervised spectral mesh segmentation driven by heterogeneous graphs.

    PubMed

    Theologou, Panagiotis; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Theoharis, Theoharis

    2016-03-21

    A fully automatic mesh segmentation scheme using heterogeneous graphs is presented. We introduce a spectral framework where local geometry affinities are coupled with surface patch affinities. A heterogeneous graph is constructed combining two distinct graphs: a weighted graph based on adjacency of patches of an initial over-segmentation, and the weighted dual mesh graph. The partitioning relies on processing each eigenvector of the heterogeneous graph Laplacian individually, taking into account the nodal set and nodal domain theory. Experiments on standard datasets show that the proposed unsupervised approach outperforms the state-of-the-art unsupervised methodologies and is comparable to the best supervised approaches.

  10. Unsupervised Spectral Mesh Segmentation Driven by Heterogeneous Graphs.

    PubMed

    Theologou, Panagiotis; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Theoharis, Theoharis

    2017-02-01

    A fully automatic mesh segmentation scheme using heterogeneous graphs is presented. We introduce a spectral framework where local geometry affinities are coupled with surface patch affinities. A heterogeneous graph is constructed combining two distinct graphs: a weighted graph based on adjacency of patches of an initial over-segmentation, and the weighted dual mesh graph. The partitioning relies on processing each eigenvector of the heterogeneous graph Laplacian individually, taking into account the nodal set and nodal domain theory. Experiments on standard datasets show that the proposed unsupervised approach outperforms the state-of-the-art unsupervised methodologies and is comparable to the best supervised approaches.

  11. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Umesh P; Ayre, Brian G; Bush, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  12. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  13. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE PAGES

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in themore » earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.« less

  14. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models. PMID:25954297

  15. F-RAG: Generating Atomic Coordinates from RNA Graphs by Fragment Assembly.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Schlick, Tamar

    2017-10-05

    Coarse-grained models represent attractive approaches to analyze and simulate RNA molecules, for example for structure prediction and design, as they simplify the RNA structure to reduce the conformational search space. Our structure prediction protocol RAGTOP (RNA-As-Graphs Topology Prediction) represents RNA structures as tree graphs, and samples graph topologies to produce candidate graphs. However, for a more detailed study and analysis, construction of atomic from coarse-grained models is required. Here we present our graph-based fragment assembly algorithm (F-RAG) to convert candidate 3D tree graph models, produced by RAGTOP into atomic structures. We use our related RAG-3D utilities to partition graphs into subgraphs and search for structurally similar atomic fragments in a dataset of RNA 3D structures. The fragments are edited and superimposed using common residues, full atomic models are scored using RAGTOP's knowledge based potential, and geometries of top scoring models is optimized. To evaluate our models, we assess all-atom RMSDs and Interaction Network Fidelity (a measure of residue interactions) with respect to experimentally solved structures, and compare our results to other fragment assembly programs. For a set of 50 RNA structures, we obtain atomic models with reasonable geometries and interactions, particularly good for RNAs containing junctions. Additional improvements to our protocol and databases are outlined. These results provide a good foundation for further work on RNA structure prediction and design applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Garten Jr, Charles T; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J; Thornton, Peter E; Weston, David; Gu, Lianhong; Brice, Deanne Jane; Childs, Joanne; Evans, R

    2012-01-01

    Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning

  17. Lung segmentation with graph cuts: Graph size versus performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-10-01

    The effect of graph size on segmentation performance and speed is investigated, where segmentation is based on the graph cuts algorithm. The study is performed on lung extraction in 50 complete multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) datasets, and a fully automatic procedure. The experiments were performed on different graph sizes for both 2-D (4 and 8 neighbours) and 3-D (6 and 26 neighbours) graphs. Five slices from each segmented dataset were compared to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist. Our evaluations highlight the fact that when medical image segmentation is performed using graph cuts, increasing graph and neighbourhood connection size does not necessarily improve the segmentation performance, but also increase the running time dramatically.

  18. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE TO IMPROVE PHOTOMETRY IN CONFUSED IMAGES USING GRAPHS AND BAYESIAN PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Ferguson, Henry C.; Lu, Yu; Inami, Hanae; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2015-01-10

    We present a new technique for overcoming confusion noise in deep far-infrared Herschel space telescope images making use of prior information from shorter λ < 2 μm wavelengths. For the deepest images obtained by Herschel, the flux limit due to source confusion is about a factor of three brighter than the flux limit due to instrumental noise and (smooth) sky background. We have investigated the possibility of de-confusing simulated Herschel PACS 160 μm images by using strong Bayesian priors on the positions and weak priors on the flux of sources. We find the blended sources and group them together and simultaneously fit their fluxes. We derive the posterior probability distribution function of fluxes subject to these priors through Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling by fitting the image. Assuming we can predict the FIR flux of sources based on the ultraviolet-optical part of their SEDs to within an order of magnitude, the simulations show that we can obtain reliable fluxes and uncertainties at least a factor of three fainter than the confusion noise limit of 3σ {sub c} = 2.7 mJy in our simulated PACS-160 image. This technique could in principle be used to mitigate the effects of source confusion in any situation where one has prior information of positions and plausible fluxes of blended sources. For Herschel, application of this technique will improve our ability to constrain the dust content in normal galaxies at high redshift.

  19. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng-Lung; Tsay, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid.

  20. Test of Graphing and Graph Interpretation Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, J.

    This monograph is a test of graphing and graph interpretation skills which assesses performance on all the skills of graphing which are contained in the AAAS program, Science - A Process Approach. The testing includes construction of bar graphs, interpreting information on graphs, the use of the Cartesian coordinate system, making predictions from…

  1. Graphing Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  2. Capacitated max -Batching with Interval Graph Compatibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonner, Tim

    We consider the problem of partitioning interval graphs into cliques of bounded size. Each interval has a weight, and the weight of a clique is the maximum weight of any interval in the clique. This natural graph problem can be interpreted as a batch scheduling problem. Solving a long-standing open problem, we show NP-hardness, even if the bound on the clique sizes is constant. Moreover, we give a PTAS based on a novel dynamic programming technique for this case.

  3. Accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Castellana, Vito G.; Haglin, David J.; Feo, John T.; Weaver, Jesse R.; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2013-10-06

    We are developing a full software system for accelerating semantic graph databases on commodity cluster that scales to hundreds of nodes while maintaining constant query throughput. Our framework comprises a SPARQL to C++ compiler, a library of parallel graph methods and a custom multithreaded runtime layer, which provides a Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming model with fork/join parallelism and automatic load balancing over a commodity clusters. We present preliminary results for the compiler and for the runtime.

  4. Effects of Constituent Properties on Performance Improvement of a Quenching and Partitioning Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Taylor, Mark D.; De Moor, Emmanuel; Speer, John; Matlock, David K.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of material parameters of the constituent phases on the macroscopic tensile behavior of Q&P steel and then to do a computational materials design approach for its performance improvement. For this purpose, a model Q&P steel is first produced and various experiments are then performed to characterize the steel. Actual microstructure-based model is generated based on the information from EBSD, SEM and nano-indentation test, and the material properties for the constituent phases are determined based on the initial constituents’ properties from HEXRD test and the subsequent calibration of model prediction to tensile test results. Influence of various material parameters of the constituents on the macroscopic behaviors is then investigated by separately adjusting them by small amount. Based on the observation on the respective influence of constituents’ material parameters, a new set of material parameters are devised, which results in better performance in ductility. The results indicate that various material parameters may need to be concurrently adjusted in a cohesive way in order to improve the performance of Q&P steel. In summary, higher austenite stability, less strength difference between the phases, higher hardening exponents of the phases are generally beneficial for the performance improvement. The information from this study can be used to devise new Q&P heat-treating parameters to produce the Q&P steels with better performance.

  5. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  6. Improved graph clustering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    optimization problem (2)–(3) is convex and can 1We adopt the convention that yii = 1 for any node i that belongs to a cluster. 2We assume aii = 1 for all i. 3The...relaxations: The formulation (2)–(3) is not the only way to relax the non - convex ML estimator. Instead of the nuclear norm regularizer, a hard constraint ...presented a convex optimization formulation, essentially a convexification of the maximum likelihood estimator. Our theoretic analysis shows that this

  7. GRACE-assisted Budyko Hypothesis for Improved Estimates of Long-term Water Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, K.; Shen, C.; Fisher, J. B.; Niu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Budyko hypothesis provides a reference condition of water balance and describes an empirical relationship between precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (E) and potential evapotranspiration (Ep). However, real-world catchments often deviate significantly from the theoretical Budyko curve. Recent advances of understanding in the impacts of seasonal water balances on long-term averaged water balance showed that phase difference between P and Ep is a major cause of downward departure from the Budyko curve. The phase difference and its processing by the catchments are in fact recorded over the globe in the form of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment satellite (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomalies (TWSA). Here we present a GRACE-assisted Budyko-type formula that has improved predictive accuracy for long term E/P using the aridity index and storage patterns. We established an error model for the residual between Turk-Pike form of the Budyko curve and the observed E, based on a seamless United States basin water balance dataset. We found that the error model could improve the prediction efficiency by more than 60% comparing to Budyko model. The form of the error model was supported by Monte Carlo analysis. We compared the results with NLDAS predict E and found that the GRACE-corrected formula are in closer agreement with NLDAS than that without GRACE correction. In addition, we apply this error model to the whole world and global E was predicted. By comparing with other E products we found this error model can correct Budyko curve effectively.

  8. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  9. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  10. GraphBench

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    GraphBench is a benchmark suite for graph pattern mining and graph analysis systems. The benchmark suite is a significant addition to conducting apples-apples comparison of graph analysis software (databases, in-memory tools, triple stores, etc.)

  11. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  12. Comment on "Multipartite Entanglement in Four-qubit Graph States"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Saeed

    2017-09-01

    The following comment is based on an article by Jafarpour and Assadi (Eur. Phys. J. D 70, 62 2016) which with an exploitation of Scott measure (or generalized Meyer-Wallach measure) the entanglement quantity of four-qubit graph states has been calculated. We are to reveal that a 2-2 partition necessarily always does not provide a stronger entanglement than a 3-1 partition in all the graph states.

  13. An Efficient Data Partitioning to Improve Classification Performance While Keeping Parameters Interpretable

    PubMed Central

    Korjus, Kristjan; Hebart, Martin N.; Vicente, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Supervised machine learning methods typically require splitting data into multiple chunks for training, validating, and finally testing classifiers. For finding the best parameters of a classifier, training and validation are usually carried out with cross-validation. This is followed by application of the classifier with optimized parameters to a separate test set for estimating the classifier’s generalization performance. With limited data, this separation of test data creates a difficult trade-off between having more statistical power in estimating generalization performance versus choosing better parameters and fitting a better model. We propose a novel approach that we term “Cross-validation and cross-testing” improving this trade-off by re-using test data without biasing classifier performance. The novel approach is validated using simulated data and electrophysiological recordings in humans and rodents. The results demonstrate that the approach has a higher probability of discovering significant results than the standard approach of cross-validation and testing, while maintaining the nominal alpha level. In contrast to nested cross-validation, which is maximally efficient in re-using data, the proposed approach additionally maintains the interpretability of individual parameters. Taken together, we suggest an addition to currently used machine learning approaches which may be particularly useful in cases where model weights do not require interpretation, but parameters do. PMID:27564393

  14. Line graphs for fractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warchalowski, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Malgorzata J.

    2017-03-01

    We found the Lindenmayer systems for line graphs built on selected fractals. We show that the fractal dimension of such obtained graphs in all analysed cases is the same as for their original graphs. Both for the original graphs and for their line graphs we identified classes of nodes which reflect symmetry of the graph.

  15. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  16. Extended sorption partitioning models for pesticide leaching risk assessments: Can we improve upon the koc concept?

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Models used to assess leaching of pesticides to groundwater still rely on the sorption koc value, even though its limitations have been known for several decades, especially for soils of low organic carbon content (i.e. subsoils). This is mainly because the general applicability of any improved model approach that is also simple enough to use for regulatory purposes has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to test and compare alternative models of sorption that could be useful in pesticide risk assessment and management. To this end, a database containing the results of batch sorption experiments for pesticides was compiled from published studies in the literature, which placed at least as much emphasis on measurements in subsoil horizons as in topsoil. The database includes 785 data entries from 34 different published studies and for 21 different active substances. Overall, the apparent koc value, koc(app), roughly doubled as the soil organic carbon content decreased by a factor of ten. Nevertheless, in nearly half of the individual datasets, a constant koc value proved to be an adequate model. Further analysis showed that significant increases in koc(app) in subsoil were found primarily for the more weakly adsorbing compounds (koc values

  17. Teaching and Assessing Graphing Using Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    As a college biology instructor, I often see graphs in lab reports that do not meet my expectations. I also observe that many college students do not always adequately differentiate between good and poor (or misleading) graphs. The activity described in this paper is the result of my work with students to improve their graphing literacy. The…

  18. Teaching and Assessing Graphing Using Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    As a college biology instructor, I often see graphs in lab reports that do not meet my expectations. I also observe that many college students do not always adequately differentiate between good and poor (or misleading) graphs. The activity described in this paper is the result of my work with students to improve their graphing literacy. The…

  19. Carbon partitioning in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2013-06-01

    The work seeks to raise awareness of a fundamental problem that impacts the renewable generation of fuels and chemicals via (photo)synthetic biology. At issue is regulation of the endogenous cellular carbon partitioning between different biosynthetic pathways, over which the living cell exerts stringent control. The regulation of carbon partitioning in photosynthesis is not understood. In plants, microalgae and cyanobacteria, methods need be devised to alter photosynthetic carbon partitioning between the sugar, terpenoid, and fatty acid biosynthetic pathways, to lower the prevalence of sugar biosynthesis and correspondingly upregulate terpenoid and fatty acid hydrocarbons production in the cell. Insight from unusual but naturally occurring carbon-partitioning processes can help in the design of blueprints for improved photosynthetic fuels and chemicals production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal Clustering in Graphs with Weighted Edges: A Unified Approach to the Threshold Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetschel, Roy; Voxman, William

    1987-01-01

    Relations on a finite set V are viewed as weighted graphs. Using the language of graph theory, two methods of partitioning V are examined: selecting threshold values and applying them to a maximal weighted spanning forest, and using a parametric linear program to obtain a most adhesive partition. (Author/EM)

  1. Exact Potts/Tutte polynomials for polygon chain graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert

    2011-04-01

    We present exact calculations of Potts model partition functions and the equivalent Tutte polynomials for polygon chain graphs with open and cyclic boundary conditions. Special cases of the results that yield flow and reliability polynomials are discussed. We also analyze special cases of the Tutte polynomials that determine various quantities of graph-theoretic interest.

  2. Stability of graph communities across time scales

    PubMed Central

    Delvenne, J.-C.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of biological, social, and engineering networks makes it desirable to find natural partitions into clusters (or communities) that can provide insight into the structure of the overall system and even act as simplified functional descriptions. Although methods for community detection abound, there is a lack of consensus on how to quantify and rank the quality of partitions. We introduce here the stability of a partition, a measure of its quality as a community structure based on the clustered autocovariance of a dynamic Markov process taking place on the network. Because the stability has an intrinsic dependence on time scales of the graph, it allows us to compare and rank partitions at each time and also to establish the time spans over which partitions are optimal. Hence the Markov time acts effectively as an intrinsic resolution parameter that establishes a hierarchy of increasingly coarser communities. Our dynamical definition provides a unifying framework for several standard partitioning measures: modularity and normalized cut size can be interpreted as one-step time measures, whereas Fiedler’s spectral clustering emerges at long times. We apply our method to characterize the relevance of partitions over time for constructive and real networks, including hierarchical graphs and social networks, and use it to obtain reduced descriptions for atomic-level protein structures over different time scales. PMID:20615936

  3. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  4. Network reconstruction via graph blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Rolando

    2016-05-01

    Graphs estimated from empirical data are often noisy and incomplete due to the difficulty of faithfully observing all the components (nodes and edges) of the true graph. This problem is particularly acute for large networks where the number of components may far exceed available surveillance capabilities. Errors in the observed graph can render subsequent analyses invalid, so it is vital to develop robust methods that can minimize these observational errors. Errors in the observed graph may include missing and spurious components, as well fused (multiple nodes are merged into one) and split (a single node is misinterpreted as many) nodes. Traditional graph reconstruction methods are only able to identify missing or spurious components (primarily edges, and to a lesser degree nodes), so we developed a novel graph blending framework that allows us to cast the full estimation problem as a simple edge addition/deletion problem. Armed with this framework, we systematically investigate the viability of various topological graph features, such as the degree distribution or the clustering coefficients, and existing graph reconstruction methods for tackling the full estimation problem. Our experimental results suggest that incorporating any topological feature as a source of information actually hinders reconstruction accuracy. We provide a theoretical analysis of this phenomenon and suggest several avenues for improving this estimation problem.

  5. Improving Budyko curve-based estimates of long-term water partitioning using hydrologic signatures from GRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Kuai; Shen, Chaopeng; Fisher, Joshua B.; Niu, Jie

    2016-07-01

    The Budyko hypothesis provides a first-order estimate of water partitioning into runoff (Q) and evapotranspiration (E). Observations, however, often show significant departures from the Budyko curve; moreover, past improvements to Budyko curve tend to lose predictive power when migrated between regions or to small scales. Here to estimate departures from the Budyko curve, we use hydrologic signatures extracted from Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomalies. The signatures include GRACE amplitude as a fraction of precipitation (A/P), interannual variability, and 1-month lag autocorrelation. We created a group of linear models embodying two alternate hypotheses that departures can be predicted by (a) Taylor series expansion based on the deviation of physical characteristics (seasonality, snow fraction, and vegetation index) from reference conditions and (b) surrogate indicators covarying with E, e.g., A/P. These models are fitted using a mesoscale USA data set (HUC4) and then evaluated using world data sets and USA basins <1 × 105 km2. The model with A/P could reduce error by 50% compared to Budyko itself. We found that seasonality and fraction of precipitation as snow account for a major portion of the predictive power of A/P, while the remainder is attributed to unexplained basin characteristics. When migrated to a global data set, type b models performed better than type a. This contrast in transferability is argued to be due to data set limitations and catchment coevolution. The GRACE-based correction performs well for USA basins >1000 km2 and, according to comparison with other global data sets, is suitable for data fusion purposes, with GRACE error as estimates of uncertainty.

  6. Aboveground autotrophic respiration in a Spanish black pine forest: Comparison of scaling methods to improve component partitioning.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, E; Dadi, T; Rubio, E; García-Morote, F A; Andrés-Abellán, M; López-Serrano, F R

    2017-02-15

    Total wood CO2 efflux (Rw) varies vertically within individual trees, and leaves experience large variations in foliar respiration (Rf) rates over their life spans and during daily periods. Therefore, accurate sampling approaches are required to improve aboveground autotrophic respiration (RAa) estimations in stand-scale carbon cycling studies. We scaled-up Rw (comprising stem and branch CO2 efflux; ES and EB, respectively) and Rf from biometric and flux-chamber measurements taken between 2011 and 2013 in a Spanish black pine (Pinus nigra Arn. ssp. salzmannii) forest at an unburnt (UB) site and a low burn-severity (LS) site. We measured seasonal ES at breast height (1.30m) on 9 trees at each site, which was also vertically examined on 5 of those trees. We also measured seasonal Rf in current- and previous-year needles on 3 trees at each site, and quantified Rf variations in darkness and light. Finally, we compared complex and simple scale-up methods which did or did not account for the vertical variation in Rw and the effects of leaf ageing and light inhibition on Rf, respectively. The simple methods underestimated the annual stand-level stem, branch, and total wood respiration ≈35%, 55%, and 41%, respectively, and overestimated annual stand-level whole-canopy foliage respiration ≈43% at both sites. Both methods provided similar annual stand-level RAa estimates, although the complex methods improved estimations of the relative contribution of RAa components. Thus, based on the complex methods the mean annual RAa at the stand-level was 4.53±0.25 and 4.45±0.12MgCha(-1)year(-1) at the UB and LS sites, respectively. Our data also confirmed that the low-severity fire did not alter the RAa rates. Collectively, this study reveals that complex approaches, applicable in other forest ecosystems, enhance the accuracy of partitioning RAa sources by reducing the error in scaling-up in chamber-based measurements.

  7. Bipartite Graphs for Visualization Analysis of Microbiome Data

    PubMed Central

    Sedlar, Karel; Videnska, Petra; Skutkova, Helena; Rychlik, Ivan; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Visualization analysis plays an important role in metagenomics research. Proper and clear visualization can help researchers get their first insights into data and by selecting different features, also revealing and highlighting hidden relationships and drawing conclusions. To prevent the resulting presentations from becoming chaotic, visualization techniques have to properly tackle the high dimensionality of microbiome data. Although a number of different methods based on dimensionality reduction, correlations, Venn diagrams, and network representations have already been published, there is still room for further improvement, especially in the techniques that allow visual comparison of several environments or developmental stages in one environment. In this article, we represent microbiome data by bipartite graphs, where one partition stands for taxa and the other stands for samples. We demonstrated that community detection is independent of taxonomical level. Moreover, focusing on higher taxonomical levels and the appropriate merging of samples greatly helps improving graph organization and makes our presentations clearer than other graph and network visualizations. Capturing labels in the vertices also brings the possibility of clearly comparing two or more microbial communities by showing their common and unique parts. PMID:27279729

  8. A Hybrid Parallel Strategy Based on String Graph Theory to Improve De Novo DNA Assembly on the TianHe-2 Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Liao, Xiangke; Peng, Shaoliang; Cui, Yingbo; Wang, Bingqiang; Zhu, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    ' The de novo assembly of DNA sequences is increasingly important for biological researches in the genomic era. After more than one decade since the Human Genome Project, some challenges still exist and new solutions are being explored to improve de novo assembly of genomes. String graph assembler (SGA), based on the string graph theory, is a new method/tool developed to address the challenges. In this paper, based on an in-depth analysis of SGA we prove that the SGA-based sequence de novo assembly is an NP-complete problem. According to our analysis, SGA outperforms other similar methods/tools in memory consumption, but costs much more time, of which 60-70 % is spent on the index construction. Upon this analysis, we introduce a hybrid parallel optimization algorithm and implement this algorithm in the TianHe-2's parallel framework. Simulations are performed with different datasets. For data of small size the optimized solution is 3.06 times faster than before, and for data of middle size it's 1.60 times. The results demonstrate an evident performance improvement, with the linear scalability for parallel FM-index construction. This results thus contribute significantly to improving the efficiency of de novo assembly of DNA sequences.

  9. On the Potts Model Partition Function in an External Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Leslie M.; Moffatt, Iain

    2012-03-01

    We study the partition function of the Potts model in an external (magnetic) field, and its connections with the zero-field Potts model partition function. Using a deletion-contraction formulation for the partition function Z for this model, we show that it can be expanded in terms of the zero-field partition function. We also show that Z can be written as a sum over the spanning trees, and the spanning forests, of a graph G. Our results extend to Z the well-known spanning tree expansion for the zero-field partition function that arises though its connections with the Tutte polynomial.

  10. A Partition Formula for Fibonacci Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Philipp; Ringerl, Claus Michael

    2008-02-01

    We present a partition formula for the even index Fibonacci numbers. The formula is motivated by the appearance of these Fibonacci numbers in the representation theory of the socalled 3-Kronecker quiver, i.e., the oriented graph with two vertices and three arrows in the same direction.

  11. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid. PMID:25474347

  12. Cayley Bipolar Fuzzy Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Noura O.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the concept of Cayley bipolar fuzzy graphs and investigate some of their properties. We present some interesting properties of bipolar fuzzy graphs in terms of algebraic structures. We also discuss connectedness in Cayley bipolar fuzzy graphs. PMID:24453797

  13. Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Catalyurek, Umit; Bisseling, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Graph partitioning is often used for load balancing in parallel computing, but it is known that hypergraph partitioning has several advantages. First, hypergraphs more accurately model communication volume, and second, they are more expressive and can better represent nonsymmetric problems. Hypergraph partitioning is particularly suited to parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication, a common kernel in scientific computing. We present a parallel software package for hypergraph (and sparse matrix) partitioning developed at Sandia National Labs. The algorithm is a variation on multilevel partitioning. Our parallel implementation is novel in that it uses a two-dimensional data distribution among processors. We present empirical results that show our parallel implementation achieves good speedup on several large problems (up to 33 million nonzeros) with up to 64 processors on a Linux cluster.

  14. On the refined counting of graphs on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Wen, Congkao

    2013-05-01

    Ribbon graphs embedded on a Riemann surface provide a useful way to describe the double-line Feynman diagrams of large N computations and a variety of other QFT correlator and scattering amplitude calculations, e.g. in MHV rules for scattering amplitudes, as well as in ordinary QED. Their counting is a special case of the counting of bi-partite embedded graphs. We review and extend relevant mathematical literature and present results on the counting of some infinite classes of bi-partite graphs. Permutation groups and representations as well as double cosets and quotients of graphs are useful mathematical tools. The counting results are refined according to data of physical relevance, such as the structure of the vertices, faces and genus of the embedded graph. These counting problems can be expressed in terms of observables in three-dimensional topological field theory with Sd gauge group which gives them a topological membrane interpretation.

  15. Comparing dynamical systems by a graph matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiongxuan; Skufca, Joseph D.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we consider comparing dynamical systems by using a method of graph matching, either between the graphs representing the underlying symbolic dynamics, or between the graphs approximating the action of the systems on a fine but otherwise non-generating partition. For conjugate systems, the graphs are isomorphic and we show that the permutation matrices that relate the adjacency matrices coincide with the solution of Monge’s mass transport problem. We use the underlying earth mover’s distance (EMD) to generate the “approximate” matching matrix to illustrate the association of graphs which are derived from equal-distance partitioning of the phase spaces of systems. In addition, for one system which embeds into the other, we show that the comparison of these two systems by our method is an issue of subgraph matching.

  16. Differentials on graph complexes II: hairy graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshkin, Anton; Willwacher, Thomas; Živković, Marko

    2017-10-01

    We study the cohomology of the hairy graph complexes which compute the rational homotopy of embedding spaces, generalizing the Vassiliev invariants of knot theory. We provide spectral sequences converging to zero whose first pages contain the hairy graph cohomology. Our results yield a way to construct many nonzero hairy graph cohomology classes out of (known) non-hairy classes by studying the cancellations in those sequences. This provide a first glimpse at the tentative global structure of the hairy graph cohomology.

  17. Molecular graph convolutions: moving beyond fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kearnes, Steven; McCloskey, Kevin; Berndl, Marc; Pande, Vijay; Riley, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Molecular "fingerprints" encoding structural information are the workhorse of cheminformatics and machine learning in drug discovery applications. However, fingerprint representations necessarily emphasize particular aspects of the molecular structure while ignoring others, rather than allowing the model to make data-driven decisions. We describe molecular graph convolutions, a machine learning architecture for learning from undirected graphs, specifically small molecules. Graph convolutions use a simple encoding of the molecular graph-atoms, bonds, distances, etc.-which allows the model to take greater advantage of information in the graph structure. Although graph convolutions do not outperform all fingerprint-based methods, they (along with other graph-based methods) represent a new paradigm in ligand-based virtual screening with exciting opportunities for future improvement.

  18. Improved prediction of octanol-water partition coefficients from liquid-solute water solubilities and molar volumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Schmedding, D.W.; Manes, M.

    2005-01-01

    A volume-fraction-based solvent-water partition model for dilute solutes, in which the partition coefficient shows a dependence on solute molar volume (V??), is adapted to predict the octanol-water partition coefficient (K ow) from the liquid or supercooled-liquid solute water solubility (Sw), or vice versa. The established correlation is tested for a wide range of industrial compounds and pesticides (e.g., halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, halogenated benzenes, ethers, esters, PAHs, PCBs, organochlorines, organophosphates, carbamates, and amidesureas-triazines), which comprise a total of 215 test compounds spanning about 10 orders of magnitude in Sw and 8.5 orders of magnitude in Kow. Except for phenols and alcohols, which require special considerations of the Kow data, the correlation predicts the Kow within 0.1 log units for most compounds, much independent of the compound type or the magnitude in K ow. With reliable Sw and V data for compounds of interest, the correlation provides an effective means for either predicting the unavailable log Kow values or verifying the reliability of the reported log Kow data. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  19. Rectilinear partitioning of irregular data parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1991-01-01

    New mapping algorithms for domain oriented data-parallel computations, where the workload is distributed irregularly throughout the domain, but exhibits localized communication patterns are described. Researchers consider the problem of partitioning the domain for parallel processing in such a way that the workload on the most heavily loaded processor is minimized, subject to the constraint that the partition be perfectly rectilinear. Rectilinear partitions are useful on architectures that have a fast local mesh network. Discussed here is an improved algorithm for finding the optimal partitioning in one dimension, new algorithms for partitioning in two dimensions, and optimal partitioning in three dimensions. The application of these algorithms to real problems are discussed.

  20. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational-rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our "path-by-path" enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P(-6)) to O(P(-12)), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational-rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan-Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300-3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  1. Improved methods for Feynman path integral calculations and their application to calculate converged vibrational–rotational partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities for methane

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, Steven L. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu; Truhlar, Donald G. E-mail: truhlar@umn.edu

    2015-01-28

    We present an improved version of our “path-by-path” enhanced same path extrapolation scheme for Feynman path integral (FPI) calculations that permits rapid convergence with discretization errors ranging from O(P{sup −6}) to O(P{sup −12}), where P is the number of path discretization points. We also present two extensions of our importance sampling and stratified sampling schemes for calculating vibrational–rotational partition functions by the FPI method. The first is the use of importance functions for dihedral angles between sets of generalized Jacobi coordinate vectors. The second is an extension of our stratification scheme to allow some strata to be defined based only on coordinate information while other strata are defined based on both the geometry and the energy of the centroid of the Feynman path. These enhanced methods are applied to calculate converged partition functions by FPI methods, and these results are compared to ones obtained earlier by vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) calculations, both calculations being for the Jordan–Gilbert potential energy surface. The earlier VCI calculations are found to agree well (within ∼1.5%) with the new benchmarks. The FPI partition functions presented here are estimated to be converged to within a 2σ statistical uncertainty of between 0.04% and 0.07% for the given potential energy surface for temperatures in the range 300–3000 K and are the most accurately converged partition functions for a given potential energy surface for any molecule with five or more atoms. We also tabulate free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities.

  2. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  3. Predictable oxygen isotope exchange of plant lipids improves our ability to understand hydrologic shifts and partition evapotranspiration across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T.; Silva, L. C. R.; Horwath, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the partitioning of evapotranspiration is critical to assessing how changes in climate affect the terrestrial water cycle. N-alkyl lipids have been successfully used to integrate local to regional scale hydrologic change through the integration of δD measured in specific compounds found in sediments. However, such studies are limited compared to contemporary hydrologic studies which have the advantage of using dual isotope methods whereby δD and δ18O are used in conjunction to partition evapotranspiration. δD values in n-alkyl lipids have been established as resistant to exchange with environmental water and, this approach has allowed for routine measurement and reconstruction of plant water δD. In contrast, the use of δ18O in organic matter remains incipient because the low oxygen content of plant lipids makes it difficult to accurately measure δ18O. In the interest of addressing both fundamental and practical potential of a lipid δ18O proxy, we present the first evidence for predictable exchange of δ18O between environmental water and hydrophobic bulk organic matter, neutral saponified lipids, and specific plant derived compounds Our data suggests that these different pools may be used to reconstruct the original source water δD/δ18O relationship from soil or sedimentary organic matter, which will help elucidate hydrologic shifts in terrestrial systems. Our results bring new insight into methods by which organic compounds might be used to partition evapotranspiration across large spatial scales in both contemporary and reconstructed systems.

  4. Factorized Graph Matching.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; de la Torre, Fernando

    2015-11-19

    Graph matching (GM) is a fundamental problem in computer science, and it plays a central role to solve correspondence problems in computer vision. GM problems that incorporate pairwise constraints can be formulated as a quadratic assignment problem (QAP). Although widely used, solving the correspondence problem through GM has two main limitations: (1) the QAP is NP-hard and difficult to approximate; (2) GM algorithms do not incorporate geometric constraints between nodes that are natural in computer vision problems. To address aforementioned problems, this paper proposes factorized graph matching (FGM). FGM factorizes the large pairwise affinity matrix into smaller matrices that encode the local structure of each graph and the pairwise affinity between edges. Four are the benefits that follow from this factorization: (1) There is no need to compute the costly (in space and time) pairwise affinity matrix; (2) The factorization allows the use of a path-following optimization algorithm, that leads to improved optimization strategies and matching performance; (3) Given the factorization, it becomes straight-forward to incorporate geometric transformations (rigid and non-rigid) to the GM problem. (4) Using a matrix formulation for the GM problem and the factorization, it is easy to reveal commonalities and differences between different GM methods. The factorization also provides a clean connection with other matching algorithms such as iterative closest point; Experimental results on synthetic and real databases illustrate how FGM outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms for GM. The code is available at http://humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/fgm.

  5. Improvements in Heat Transfer for Anti-Icing of Gas-Heated Airfoils with Internal Fins and Partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.

    1950-01-01

    The effect of modifying the gas passage of hollow metal airfoils by the additIon of internal fins and partitions was experimentally investigated and comparisons were made among a basic unfinned airfoil section and two airfoil designs having metal fins attached at the leading edge of the internal gas passage. An analysis considering the effects of heat conduction in the airfoil metal was made to determine the internal modification effectiveness that may be obtained in gas-heated components, such as turbojet-inlet guide vanes, support struts, hollow propeller blades, arid. thin wings. Over a wide range of heated-gas flow and tunnel-air velocity, the increase In surface-heating rates with internal finning was marked (up to 3.5 times), with the greatest increase occurring at the leading edge where anti-icing heat requirements are most critical. Variations in the amount and the location of internal finning and. partitioning provided. control over the local rates of surface heat transfer and permitted efficient anti-icing utilization of the gas-stream heat content.

  6. Software Partitioning Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-29

    1 Software Partitioning Technologies Tim Skutt Smiths Aerospace 3290 Patterson Ave. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512-1991 (616) 241-8645 skutt_timothy...Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 12 2 Agenda n Software Partitioning Overview n Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Software Partitioning...Partition Level OS Core Module Level OS Timers MMU I/O API Layer Partitioning Services 6 Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Smiths has developed

  7. TrajGraph: A Graph-Based Visual Analytics Approach to Studying Urban Network Centralities Using Taxi Trajectory Data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoke; Zhao, Ye; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Chong; Ma, Chao; Ye, Xinyue

    2016-01-01

    We propose TrajGraph, a new visual analytics method, for studying urban mobility patterns by integrating graph modeling and visual analysis with taxi trajectory data. A special graph is created to store and manifest real traffic information recorded by taxi trajectories over city streets. It conveys urban transportation dynamics which can be discovered by applying graph analysis algorithms. To support interactive, multiscale visual analytics, a graph partitioning algorithm is applied to create region-level graphs which have smaller size than the original street-level graph. Graph centralities, including Pagerank and betweenness, are computed to characterize the time-varying importance of different urban regions. The centralities are visualized by three coordinated views including a node-link graph view, a map view and a temporal information view. Users can interactively examine the importance of streets to discover and assess city traffic patterns. We have implemented a fully working prototype of this approach and evaluated it using massive taxi trajectories of Shenzhen, China. TrajGraph's capability in revealing the importance of city streets was evaluated by comparing the calculated centralities with the subjective evaluations from a group of drivers in Shenzhen. Feedback from a domain expert was collected. The effectiveness of the visual interface was evaluated through a formal user study. We also present several examples and a case study to demonstrate the usefulness of TrajGraph in urban transportation analysis.

  8. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance.

    PubMed

    Polania, Jose A; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Beebe, Stephen; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW), canopy biomass, and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index, and pod harvest index) in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID) was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE). The main objectives were: (i) to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii) to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought) over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593, and BFS 67) were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass, and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into two

  9. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Polania, Jose A.; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Beebe, Stephen; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW), canopy biomass, and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index, and pod harvest index) in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID) was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE). The main objectives were: (i) to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii) to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought) over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593, and BFS 67) were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass, and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into two

  10. Computing the isoperimetric number of a graph

    SciTech Connect

    Golovach, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Let G be a finite graph. Denote by {partial_derivative}X, where X {contained_in} VG, the set of edges of the graph G with one end in X and the other end in the set VG{backslash}X. The ratio i(G) = min {vert_bar}{vert_bar}X{vert_bar}/{vert_bar}X{vert_bar}, where the minimum is over all nonempty subsets X of the set VG such that {vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {le} {vert_bar} VG {vert_bar}/2, is called the isoperimetric number of the graph G. It is easy to see that the isoperimetric number may be used as a {open_quotes}measure of connectivity{close_quotes} of the graph. The problem of determining the isoperimetric number is clearly linked with graph partition problems, which often arise in various applications. The isoperimetric number is also important for studying Riemann surfaces. These and other applications of the isoperimetric number justify the analysis of graphs of this kind. The properties of the isoperimetric number are presented in more detail elsewhere. It is shown elsewhere that the computation of the isoperimetric number is an NP-hard problem for graphs with multiple edges. We will show that the decision problem {open_quotes}given the graph G and two integers s and t decide if i(G) {le} s/t{close_quotes} is NP-complete even for simple graphs with vertex degrees not exceeding 3. Note that the isoperimetric number of a tree can be computed by a known polynomial-time algorithm.

  11. Spectral graph optimization for instance reduction.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Konstantinos; Rodriguez-Martinez, Eduardo; Goulermas, John Yannis; Wu, Q H

    2012-07-01

    The operation of instance-based learning algorithms is based on storing a large set of prototypes in the system's database. However, such systems often experience issues with storage requirements, sensitivity to noise, and computational complexity, which result in high search and response times. In this brief, we introduce a novel framework that employs spectral graph theory to efficiently partition the dataset to border and internal instances. This is achieved by using a diverse set of border-discriminating features that capture the local friend and enemy profiles of the samples. The fused information from these features is then used via graph-cut modeling approach to generate the final dataset partitions of border and nonborder samples. The proposed method is referred to as the spectral instance reduction (SIR) algorithm. Experiments with a large number of datasets show that SIR performs competitively compared to many other reduction algorithms, in terms of both objectives of classification accuracy and data condensation.

  12. Intrinsic graph structure estimation using graph Laplacian.

    PubMed

    Noda, Atsushi; Hino, Hideitsu; Tatsuno, Masami; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2014-07-01

    A graph is a mathematical representation of a set of variables where some pairs of the variables are connected by edges. Common examples of graphs are railroads, the Internet, and neural networks. It is both theoretically and practically important to estimate the intensity of direct connections between variables. In this study, a problem of estimating the intrinsic graph structure from observed data is considered. The observed data in this study are a matrix with elements representing dependency between nodes in the graph. The dependency represents more than direct connections because it includes influences of various paths. For example, each element of the observed matrix represents a co-occurrence of events at two nodes or a correlation of variables corresponding to two nodes. In this setting, spurious correlations make the estimation of direct connection difficult. To alleviate this difficulty, a digraph Laplacian is used for characterizing a graph. A generative model of this observed matrix is proposed, and a parameter estimation algorithm for the model is also introduced. The notable advantage of the proposed method is its ability to deal with directed graphs, while conventional graph structure estimation methods such as covariance selections are applicable only to undirected graphs. The algorithm is experimentally shown to be able to identify the intrinsic graph structure.

  13. Molecular graph convolutions: moving beyond fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Kearnes, Steven; McCloskey, Kevin; Berndl, Marc; Pande, Vijay; Riley, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Molecular “fingerprints” encoding structural information are the workhorse of cheminformatics and machine learning in drug discovery applications. However, fingerprint representations necessarily emphasize particular aspects of the molecular structure while ignoring others, rather than allowing the model to make data-driven decisions. We describe molecular graph convolutions, a machine learning architecture for learning from undirected graphs, specifically small molecules. Graph convolutions use a simple encoding of the molecular graph—atoms, bonds, distances, etc.—which allows the model to take greater advantage of information in the graph structure. Although graph convolutions do not outperform all fingerprint-based methods, they (along with other graph-based methods) represent a new paradigm in ligand-based virtual screening with exciting opportunities for future improvement. PMID:27558503

  14. Molecular graph convolutions: moving beyond fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearnes, Steven; McCloskey, Kevin; Berndl, Marc; Pande, Vijay; Riley, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Molecular "fingerprints" encoding structural information are the workhorse of cheminformatics and machine learning in drug discovery applications. However, fingerprint representations necessarily emphasize particular aspects of the molecular structure while ignoring others, rather than allowing the model to make data-driven decisions. We describe molecular graph convolutions, a machine learning architecture for learning from undirected graphs, specifically small molecules. Graph convolutions use a simple encoding of the molecular graph—atoms, bonds, distances, etc.—which allows the model to take greater advantage of information in the graph structure. Although graph convolutions do not outperform all fingerprint-based methods, they (along with other graph-based methods) represent a new paradigm in ligand-based virtual screening with exciting opportunities for future improvement.

  15. Interval Graph Limits

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2015-01-01

    We work out a graph limit theory for dense interval graphs. The theory developed departs from the usual description of a graph limit as a symmetric function W (x, y) on the unit square, with x and y uniform on the interval (0, 1). Instead, we fix a W and change the underlying distribution of the coordinates x and y. We find choices such that our limits are continuous. Connections to random interval graphs are given, including some examples. We also show a continuity result for the chromatic number and clique number of interval graphs. Some results on uniqueness of the limit description are given for general graph limits. PMID:26405368

  16. Genetic algorithm and graph theory based matrix factorization method for online friend recommendation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qu; Yao, Min; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Online friend recommendation is a fast developing topic in web mining. In this paper, we used SVD matrix factorization to model user and item feature vector and used stochastic gradient descent to amend parameter and improve accuracy. To tackle cold start problem and data sparsity, we used KNN model to influence user feature vector. At the same time, we used graph theory to partition communities with fairly low time and space complexity. What is more, matrix factorization can combine online and offline recommendation. Experiments showed that the hybrid recommendation algorithm is able to recommend online friends with good accuracy.

  17. Convergence of Mayer and Virial expansions and the Penrose tree-graph identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Aldo; Yuhjtman, Sergio A.

    2016-11-01

    We establish new lower bounds for the convergence radius of the Mayer series and the Virial series of a continuous particle system interacting via a stable and tempered pair potential. Our bounds considerably improve those given by Penrose (J Math Phys 4:1312, 1963) and Ruelle (Ann Phys 5:109-120, 1963) for the Mayer series and by Lebowitz and Penrose (J Math Phys 7:841-847, 1964) for the Virial series. To get our results, we exploit the tree-graph identity given by Penrose (Statistical mechanics: foundations and applications. Benjamin, New York, 1967) using a new partition scheme based on minimum spanning trees.

  18. Convergence of Mayer and Virial expansions and the Penrose tree-graph identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procacci, Aldo; Yuhjtman, Sergio A.

    2017-01-01

    We establish new lower bounds for the convergence radius of the Mayer series and the Virial series of a continuous particle system interacting via a stable and tempered pair potential. Our bounds considerably improve those given by Penrose (J Math Phys 4:1312, 1963) and Ruelle (Ann Phys 5:109-120, 1963) for the Mayer series and by Lebowitz and Penrose (J Math Phys 7:841-847, 1964) for the Virial series. To get our results, we exploit the tree-graph identity given by Penrose (Statistical mechanics: foundations and applications. Benjamin, New York, 1967) using a new partition scheme based on minimum spanning trees.

  19. Methods for fine registration of cadastre graphs to images.

    PubMed

    Trias-Sanz, Roger; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Louchet, Jean; Stamon, Georges

    2007-11-01

    We propose two algorithms to match edges in a geometrically-imprecise graph to geometrically-precise strong boundaries in an image, where the graph is meant to give an a priori partition of the image into objects. This can be used to partition an image into objects described by imprecise external data, and thus to simplify the segmentation problem. We apply them to the problem of registering cadastre data to georeferenced aerial images, thus correcting the lack of geometrical detail of the cadastre data, and the fact that cadastre data gives information of a different nature than that found in images (fiscal information as opposed to actual land use).

  20. Cognitive Aids for Guiding Graph Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mautone, Patricia D.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to improve students' comprehension of scientific graphs by adapting scaffolding techniques used to aid text comprehension. In 3 experiments involving 121 female and 88 male college students, some students were shown cognitive aids prior to viewing 4 geography graphs whereas others were not; all students were then asked to write a…

  1. Cognitive Aids for Guiding Graph Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mautone, Patricia D.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to improve students' comprehension of scientific graphs by adapting scaffolding techniques used to aid text comprehension. In 3 experiments involving 121 female and 88 male college students, some students were shown cognitive aids prior to viewing 4 geography graphs whereas others were not; all students were then asked to write a…

  2. Recursive Partitioning Identifies Greater Than 4 Units of PRBC's Per Hour as an Improved Massive Transfusion Definition

    PubMed Central

    Moren, Alexis; Hampton, David; Diggs, Brian; Kiraly, Laszlo; Fox, Erin; Holcomb, John; Rahbar, Mohammad; Brasel, Karen; Cohen, Mitchell; Bulger, Eileen; Schreiber, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Massive transfusion (MT) is classically defined as >10units of packed RBCs in 24 hours. This fails to capture the most severely injured patients. Extending the prior work of Savage and Rahbar, a rolling hourly rate-based definition of MT may more accurately define critically injured patients requiring early, aggressive resuscitation. Methods The Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) trial collected data from ten level-1 trauma centers. Patients were placed into rate-based transfusion groups by maximal number of PRBC's transfused in any hour within the first 6 hours. A nonparametric analysis using classification trees partitioned data according to mortality at 24-hours using a predictor variable of maximum number PRBC units transfused in an hour. Dichotomous variables significant in previous scores and models as predictors of MT were used to identify critically ill patients: a positive FAST exam, GCS <8, HR >120, SBP <90, penetrating mechanism of injury, INR >1.5, Hg <11 and BD >5. These critical indicators were then compared among the nodes of the classification tree. Patients omitted included those who did not receive PRBC's (n=24) and those who did not have all 8 critical indicators reported (n=449). Results In a population of 1245 patients, the classification tree included 772 patients. Analysis by recursive partitioning showed increased mortality among patients receiving greater than 13U/hr (73.9%, p<0.01). In those patients receiving ≤13U/hr, mortality was greater in patients who received more than 4U/hr (16.7% vs 6.0%; p<0.01) (Figure 1). Nodal analysis showed the median number of critical indicators for each node were: 3 (2,4) (≤4U/hr), 4(3,5) (>4U/hr and ≤13U/hr) and 5(4,5.5) (>13U/hr). Conclusions A rate-based transfusion definition identifies a difference in mortality in patients who receive >4U/hr of PRBC's. Redefining MT to >4U/hr allows early identification of patients with a significant mortality

  3. The Oriented Graph Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willwacher, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The oriented graph complexes are complexes of directed graphs without directed cycles. They govern, for example, the quantization of Lie bialgebras and infinite dimensional deformation quantization. Similar to the ordinary graph complexes GC n introduced by Kontsevich they come in two essentially different versions, depending on the parity of n. It is shown that, surprisingly, the oriented graph complex is quasi-isomorphic to the ordinary commutative graph complex of opposite parity GC n-1, up to some known classes. This yields in particular a combinatorial description of the action of on Lie bialgebras, and shows that a cycle-free formality morphism in the sense of Shoikhet can be constructed rationally without reference to configuration space integrals. Curiously, the obstruction class in the oriented graph complex found by Shoikhet corresponds to the well known theta graph in the ordinary graph complex.

  4. On molecular graph comparison.

    PubMed

    Melo, Jenny A; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Since the last half of the nineteenth century, molecular graphs have been present in several branches of chemistry. When used for molecular structure representation, they have been compared after mapping the corresponding graphs into mathematical objects. However, direct molecular comparison of molecular graphs is a research field less explored. The goal of this mini-review is to show some distance and similarity coefficients which were proposed to directly compare molecular graphs or which could be useful to do so.

  5. Identities between dimer partition functions on different surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimasoni, David; Pham, Anh Minh

    2016-10-01

    Given a weighted graph G embedded in a non-orientable surface Σ , one can consider the corresponding weighted graph \\widetilde{G} embedded in the so-called orientation cover \\widetildeΣ of Σ . We prove identities relating twisted partition functions of the dimer model on these two graphs. When Σ is the Möbius strip or the Klein bottle, then \\widetildeΣ is the cylinder or the torus, respectively, and under some natural assumptions, these identities imply relations between the genuine dimer partition functions Z(G) and Z(\\widetilde{G}) . For example, we show that if G is a locally but not globally bipartite graph embedded in the Möbius strip, then Z(\\widetilde{G}) is equal to the square of Z(G). This extends results for the square lattice previously obtained by various authors.

  6. Graph-Plotting Routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

  7. Graphs in Scientific Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, William S.

    Two surveys were carried out to help increase knowledge of current graph usage in science. A detailed analysis of all graphs in one volume of the journal "Science" revealed that 30 percent had errors. Graphs are used more in some disciplines than in others; a survey of 57 journals revealed natural science journals use far more graphs…

  8. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  9. Are Graphs Finally Surfacing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beineke, Lowell W.

    1989-01-01

    Explored are various aspects of drawing graphs on surfaces. The Euler's formula, Kuratowski's theorem and the drawing of graphs in the plane with as few crossings as possible are discussed. Some applications including embedding of graphs and coloring of maps are included. (YP)

  10. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  11. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  12. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  13. Parallel algorithms for finding cliques in a graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, S.

    2011-01-01

    A clique is a subgraph in a graph that is complete in the sense that each two of its nodes are connected by an edge. Finding cliques in a given graph is an important procedure in discrete mathematical modeling. The paper will show how concepts such as splitting partitions, quasi coloring, node and edge dominance are related to clique search problems. In particular we will discuss the connection with parallel clique search algorithms. These concepts also suggest practical guide lines to inspect a given graph before starting a large scale search.

  14. Partitioning of heat production in growing pigs as a tool to improve the determination of efficiency of energy utilization

    PubMed Central

    Labussière, Etienne; Dubois, Serge; van Milgen, Jaap; Noblet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    In growing pigs, the feed cost accounts for more than 60% of total production costs. The determination of efficiency of energy utilization through calorimetry measurements is of importance to sustain suitable feeding practice. The objective of this paper is to describe a methodology to correct daily heat production (HP) obtained from measurements in respiration chamber for the difference in energy expenditure related to physical activity between animals. The calculation is based on a preliminary published approach for partitioning HP between HP due to physical activity (AHP), thermic effect of feeding (TEF) and basal metabolic rate (fasting HP; FHP). Measurements with male growing pigs [mean body weight (BW): 115 kg] which were surgically castrated (SC), castrated through immunization against GnRH (IC), or kept as entire male (EM) were used as an example. Animals were fed the same diet ad-libitum and were housed individually in two 12-m3 open-circuit respiration chambers during 6 days when fed ad-libitum and one supplementary day when fasted. Physical activity was recorded through interruption of an infrared beam to detect standing and lying positions and with force transducers that recorded the mechanical force the animal exerted on the floor of the cage. Corrected AHP (AHPc), TEF (TEFc), and HP (HPc) were calculated to standardize the level of AHP between animals, assuming that the ratio between AHPc and ME intake should be constant. Inefficiency of energy utilization (sum of AHPc and TEFc) was lower than the inefficiency estimated from the slope of the classical relationship between HPc and ME intake but was associated with higher requirements for maintenance. Results indicate that EM pigs had higher FHP but lower TEFc than IC and SC pigs. These results agree with the higher contents in viscera of EM pigs that stimulate their basal metabolic rate and with the reduced utilization of dietary protein to provide energy for maintenance energy requirements and fat

  15. Using Flashcard Drill Methods and Self-Graphing Procedures to Improve the Reading Performance of English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Hoffman, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The increasing numbers of English language learners who are enrolled in schools across the nation, combined with the escalating academic demands placed on all students, warrant the evaluation of instructional strategies designed to improve English language learners' reading performance. In this study, the authors used a multiple baseline design…

  16. Methods of visualizing graphs

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  17. A local search for a graph clustering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrotskaya, Anna; Il'ev, Victor

    2016-10-01

    In the clustering problems one has to partition a given set of objects (a data set) into some subsets (called clusters) taking into consideration only similarity of the objects. One of most visual formalizations of clustering is graph clustering, that is grouping the vertices of a graph into clusters taking into consideration the edge structure of the graph whose vertices are objects and edges represent similarities between the objects. In the graph k-clustering problem the number of clusters does not exceed k and the goal is to minimize the number of edges between clusters and the number of missing edges within clusters. This problem is NP-hard for any k ≥ 2. We propose a polynomial time (2k-1)-approximation algorithm for graph k-clustering. Then we apply a local search procedure to the feasible solution found by this algorithm and hold experimental research of obtained heuristics.

  18. Applying Graph Theory to Problems in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrahi, Amir Hossein; Goldbert, Alan; Bagasol, Leonard Neil; Jung, Jaewoo

    2017-01-01

    Graph theory is used to investigate three different problems arising in air traffic management. First, using a polynomial reduction from a graph partitioning problem, it is shown that both the airspace sectorization problem and its incremental counterpart, the sector combination problem are NP-hard, in general, under several simple workload models. Second, using a polynomial time reduction from maximum independent set in graphs, it is shown that for any fixed e, the problem of finding a solution to the minimum delay scheduling problem in traffic flow management that is guaranteed to be within n1-e of the optimal, where n is the number of aircraft in the problem instance, is NP-hard. Finally, a problem arising in precision arrival scheduling is formulated and solved using graph reachability. These results demonstrate that graph theory provides a powerful framework for modeling, reasoning about, and devising algorithmic solutions to diverse problems arising in air traffic management.

  19. Can Comparison of Contrastive Examples Facilitate Graph Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linsey A.; Gentner, Dedre

    2011-01-01

    The authors explore the role of comparison in improving graph fluency. The ability to use graphs fluently is crucial for STEM achievement, but graphs are challenging to interpret and produce because they often involve integration of multiple variables, continuous change in variables over time, and omission of certain details in order to highlight…

  20. Hyperbolic graph generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Orsini, Chiara; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erdős-Rényi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

  1. Partitioning Rectangular and Structurally Nonsymmetric Sparse Matrices for Parallel Processing

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hendrickson; T.G. Kolda

    1998-09-01

    A common operation in scientific computing is the multiplication of a sparse, rectangular or structurally nonsymmetric matrix and a vector. In many applications the matrix- transpose-vector product is also required. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of these operations. We show that the problem can be expressed in terms of partitioning bipartite graphs. We then introduce several algorithms for this partitioning problem and compare their performance on a set of test matrices.

  2. Hypergraph partitioning implementation for parallelizing matrix-vector multiplication using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murni, Bustamam, A.; Ernastuti, Handhika, T.; Kerami, D.

    2017-07-01

    Calculation of the matrix-vector multiplication in the real-world problems often involves large matrix with arbitrary size. Therefore, parallelization is needed to speed up the calculation process that usually takes a long time. Graph partitioning techniques that have been discussed in the previous studies cannot be used to complete the parallelized calculation of matrix-vector multiplication with arbitrary size. This is due to the assumption of graph partitioning techniques that can only solve the square and symmetric matrix. Hypergraph partitioning techniques will overcome the shortcomings of the graph partitioning technique. This paper addresses the efficient parallelization of matrix-vector multiplication through hypergraph partitioning techniques using CUDA GPU-based parallel computing. CUDA (compute unified device architecture) is a parallel computing platform and programming model that was created by NVIDIA and implemented by the GPU (graphics processing unit).

  3. A Review of Big Graph Mining Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atastina, I.; Sitohang, B.; Saptawati, G. A. P.; Moertini, V. S.

    2017-03-01

    Big Graph Mining” is a continuously developing research that was started in 2009 until now. After 7 years, there are many researches that put this topic as the main concern. However, there is no mapping or summary concerning the important issues and solutions to explain this topic. This paper contains a summary of researches that have been conducted since 2009. The result is grouped based on the algorithms, built system and also preprocess techniques that have been developed. Based on survey, there are 11 algorithms and 6 distributed systems to analyse the Big Graph have been improved. While improved pre-process algorithm only covers: sampling and compression technique. These improving algorithms are usually aimed to frequent sub graphs discovery, whereas slightly those of is aimed to cluster Big Graph, and there is no algorithm to classify Big Graph. As a conclusion of this survey, there is a need for more researches to be conducted to improve a comprehensive Graph Mining System, especially for very big Graph.

  4. Graphing trillions of triangles

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The increasing size of Big Data is often heralded but how data are transformed and represented is also profoundly important to knowledge discovery, and this is exemplified in Big Graph analytics. Much attention has been placed on the scale of the input graph but the product of a graph algorithm can be many times larger than the input. This is true for many graph problems, such as listing all triangles in a graph. Enabling scalable graph exploration for Big Graphs requires new approaches to algorithms, architectures, and visual analytics. A brief tutorial is given to aid the argument for thoughtful representation of data in the context of graph analysis. Then a new algebraic method to reduce the arithmetic operations in counting and listing triangles in graphs is introduced. Additionally, a scalable triangle listing algorithm in the MapReduce model will be presented followed by a description of the experiments with that algorithm that led to the current largest and fastest triangle listing benchmarks to date. Finally, a method for identifying triangles in new visual graph exploration technologies is proposed. PMID:28690426

  5. OPEX: Optimized Eccentricity Computation in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Keith

    2011-11-14

    Real-world graphs have many properties of interest, but often these properties are expensive to compute. We focus on eccentricity, radius and diameter in this work. These properties are useful measures of the global connectivity patterns in a graph. Unfortunately, computing eccentricity for all nodes is O(n2) for a graph with n nodes. We present OPEX, a novel combination of optimizations which improves computation time of these properties by orders of magnitude in real-world experiments on graphs of many different sizes. We run OPEX on graphs with up to millions of links. OPEX gives either exact results or bounded approximations, unlike its competitors which give probabilistic approximations or sacrifice node-level information (eccentricity) to compute graphlevel information (diameter).

  6. Graph-theoretic algorithm for hierarchial decomposition of dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pichai, V.; Sezer, M.E.; Siljak, D.D.

    1982-03-24

    A graph-theoretic scheme is proposed for partitioning of dynamic systems into hierarchially ordered subsystems having independent inputs and outputs. The resulting subsystems are input-output reachable as well as structurally controllable and observable, so that a piece-by-piece design of estimators and controllers can be accomplished for systems with large dimensions without excessive computer requirements.

  7. The Perfectly Matchable Subgraph Polytope of an Arbitrary Graph.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    G, it determines the Edmonds-Gallai partition in polynomial time. Let c =(c. v E V) be a vector of node costs. We consider here the linear program...Ray-Chandhuri eds., Hypergraph Seminar, Springer Verlag Berlin (1974) 214-242. A.. [8] W.T. Tutte , The factorization of linear graphs, J. London Math

  8. Information-theoretic indices usage for the prediction and calculation of octanol-water partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Persona, Marek; Kutarov, Vladimir V; Kats, Boris M; Persona, Andrzej; Marczewska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the new prediction method of octanol-water partition coefficient, which is based on molecular graph theory. The results obtained using the new method are well correlated with experimental values. These results were compared with the ones obtained by use of ten other structure correlated methods. The comparison shows that graph theory can be very useful in structure correlation research.

  9. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J; Standley, Robert A; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubis, Gabriel S; Ritov, Vladimir B; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E; Smith, Steven R; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Houmard, Joseph A; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-11-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery-induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  10. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; Menshikova, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J.; Standley, Robert A.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E.; Smith, Steven R.; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery–induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  11. Nested Tracking Graphs

    DOE PAGES

    Lukasczyk, Jonas; Weber, Gunther; Maciejewski, Ross; ...

    2017-06-01

    Tracking graphs are a well established tool in topological analysis to visualize the evolution of components and their properties over time, i.e., when components appear, disappear, merge, and split. However, tracking graphs are limited to a single level threshold and the graphs may vary substantially even under small changes to the threshold. To examine the evolution of features for varying levels, users have to compare multiple tracking graphs without a direct visual link between them. We propose a novel, interactive, nested graph visualization based on the fact that the tracked superlevel set components for different levels are related to eachmore » other through their nesting hierarchy. This approach allows us to set multiple tracking graphs in context to each other and enables users to effectively follow the evolution of components for different levels simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of our approach on datasets from finite pointset methods, computational fluid dynamics, and cosmology simulations.« less

  12. Reflections on High School Students' Graphing Skills and Their Conceptual Understanding of Drawing Chemistry Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gültepe, Nejla

    2016-01-01

    Graphing subjects in chemistry has been used to provide alternatives to verbal and algorithmic descriptions of a subject by handing students another way of improving their manipulation of concepts. Teachers should therefore know the level of students' graphing skills. Studies have identified that students have difficulty making connections with…

  13. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  14. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  15. Improved reactor performance and operability in the biotransformation of carveol to carvone using a solid-liquid two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Jenna L E; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to improve reactor performance and process operability, the microbial biotransformation of (-)-trans-carveol to (R)-(-)-carvone by hydrophobic Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 was carried out in a two phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) with solid polymer beads acting as the partitioning phase. Previous work had demonstrated that the substrate and product become inhibitory to the organism at elevated aqueous concentrations and the use of an immiscible second phase in the bioreactor was intended to provide a reservoir for substrates to be delivered to the aqueous phase based on the metabolic rate of the cells, while also acting as a sink to uptake the product as it is produced. The biotransformation was previously undertaken in a two liquid phase TPPB with 1-dodecene and with silicone oil as the immiscible second phase and, although improvement in the reactor performance was obtained relative to a single phase system, the hydrophobic nature of the organism caused the formation of severe emulsions leading to significant operational challenges. In the present work, eight types of polymer beads were screened for their suitability for use in a solid-liquid TPPB for this biotransformation. The use of selected solid polymer beads as the second phase completely prevented emulsion formation and therefore improved overall operability of the reactor. Three modes of solid-liquid TPPB operation were considered: the use of a single polymer bead type (styrene/butadiene copolymer) in the reactor, the use of a mixture of polymer beads in the reactor (styrene/butadiene copolymer plus Hytrel(R) 8206), and the use of one type of polymer beads in the reactor (styrene/butadiene copolymer), and another bead type (Hytrel(R) 8206) in an external column through which fermentation medium was recirculated. This last configuration achieved the best reactor performance with 7 times more substrate being added throughout the biotransformation relative to a single aqueous phase

  16. Hacking the thylakoid proton motive force for improved photosynthesis: modulating ion flux rates that control proton motive force partitioning into Δψ and ΔpH.

    PubMed

    Davis, Geoffry A; Rutherford, A William; Kramer, David M

    2017-09-26

    There is considerable interest in improving plant productivity by altering the dynamic responses of photosynthesis in tune with natural conditions. This is exemplified by the 'energy-dependent' form of non-photochemical quenching (qE), the formation and decay of which can be considerably slower than natural light fluctuations, limiting photochemical yield. In addition, we recently reported that rapidly fluctuating light can produce field recombination-induced photodamage (FRIP), where large spikes in electric field across the thylakoid membrane (Δψ) induce photosystem II recombination reactions that produce damaging singlet oxygen ((1)O2). Both qE and FRIP are directly linked to the thylakoid proton motive force (pmf), and in particular, the slow kinetics of partitioning pmf into its ΔpH and Δψ components. Using a series of computational simulations, we explored the possibility of 'hacking' pmf partitioning as a target for improving photosynthesis. Under a range of illumination conditions, increasing the rate of counter-ion fluxes across the thylakoid membrane should lead to more rapid dissipation of Δψ and formation of ΔpH. This would result in increased rates for the formation and decay of qE while resulting in a more rapid decline in the amplitudes of Δψ-spikes and decreasing (1)O2 production. These results suggest that ion fluxes may be a viable target for plant breeding or engineering. However, these changes also induce transient, but substantial mismatches in the ATP : NADPH output ratio as well as in the osmotic balance between the lumen and stroma, either of which may explain why evolution has not already accelerated thylakoid ion fluxes. Overall, though the model is simplified, it recapitulates many of the responses seen in vivo, while spotlighting critical aspects of the complex interactions between pmf components and photosynthetic processes. By making the programme available, we hope to enable the community of photosynthesis researchers to

  17. Topologies on directed graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Given a directed graph, a natural topology is defined and relationships between standard topological properties and graph theoretical concepts are studied. In particular, the properties of connectivity and separatedness are investigated. A metric is introduced which is shown to be related to separatedness. The topological notions of continuity and homeomorphism. A class of maps is studied which preserve both graph and topological properties. Applications involving strong maps and contractions are also presented.

  18. Online dynamic graph drawing.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for drawing a sequence of graphs online. The algorithm strives to maintain the global structure of the graph and thus the user's mental map, while allowing arbitrary modifications between consecutive layouts. The algorithm works online and uses various execution culling methods in order to reduce the layout time and handle large dynamic graphs. Techniques for representing graphs on the GPU allow a speedup by a factor of up to 17 compared to the CPU implementation. The scalability of the algorithm across GPU generations is demonstrated. Applications of the algorithm to the visualization of discussion threads in Internet sites and to the visualization of social networks are provided.

  19. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  20. Recognition of Probe Ptolemaic Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Maw-Shang; Hung, Ling-Ju

    Let G denote a graph class. An undirected graph G is called a probe G graph if one can make G a graph in G by adding edges between vertices in some independent set of G. By definition graph class G is a subclass of probe G graphs. Ptolemaic graphs are chordal and induced gem free. They form a subclass of both chordal graphs and distance-hereditary graphs. Many problems NP-hard on chordal graphs can be solved in polynomial time on ptolemaic graphs. We proposed an O(nm)-time algorithm to recognize probe ptolemaic graphs where n and m are the numbers of vertices and edges of the input graph respectively.

  1. Implementation of spectral clustering with partitioning around medoids (PAM) algorithm on microarray data of carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyaningrum, Rosalia D.; Bustamam, Alhadi; Siswantining, Titin

    2017-03-01

    Technology of microarray became one of the imperative tools in life science to observe the gene expression levels, one of which is the expression of the genes of people with carcinoma. Carcinoma is a cancer that forms in the epithelial tissue. These data can be analyzed such as the identification expressions hereditary gene and also build classifications that can be used to improve diagnosis of carcinoma. Microarray data usually served in large dimension that most methods require large computing time to do the grouping. Therefore, this study uses spectral clustering method which allows to work with any object for reduces dimension. Spectral clustering method is a method based on spectral decomposition of the matrix which is represented in the form of a graph. After the data dimensions are reduced, then the data are partitioned. One of the famous partition method is Partitioning Around Medoids (PAM) which is minimize the objective function with exchanges all the non-medoid points into medoid point iteratively until converge. Objectivity of this research is to implement methods spectral clustering and partitioning algorithm PAM to obtain groups of 7457 genes with carcinoma based on the similarity value. The result in this study is two groups of genes with carcinoma.

  2. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    DOE PAGES

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; ...

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implementmore » a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.« less

  3. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Aydın; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.

  4. Towards a better understanding of water partitioning processes for improved smallholder rainfed agricultural systems: A case study of Makanya catchment, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makurira, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Rockström, J.; Senzanje, A.

    Water shortage in agricultural systems has led to low crop water productivity in various farming systems. For smallholder rainfed systems, dry spell occurrences during seasons and in between seasons has severely undermined food security and general livelihoods as the majority of populations, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, derive their livelihoods solely from rainfed agriculture. This paper presents part of the on-going research to better understand the hydrology and hence improve rainfed water productivity in arid and semi-arid regions. The study showed that rainwater alone is not sufficient to support maize which is the preferred staple food crop hence the need to employ a combination of improved tillage and rainwater harvesting techniques which help to boost crop yields. The study showed that with as little rainfall as 186-403 mm/season yields of up to 4.8 t ha -1 can be achieved through the application of more efficient soil and water retention techniques compared to much less than 1 t ha -1 as presently achieved. It was concluded that water is the limiting factor to productivity and that a combination of rainwater harvesting and conservation agriculture can contribute to improved grain yields by as much as 80%. There was no significant improvement to treatments with manure and/or cover crop. Water availability indeed plays a significant role in the yields realised. The challenge then is to better understand how, at field scale, the existing water partitioning process can be altered to channel more water into the productive green water processes at the expense of the non-productive white and green water fluxes.

  5. Some exact results on the Potts model partition function in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2009-09-01

    We consider the Potts model in a magnetic field on an arbitrary graph G. Using a formula by F Y Wu for the partition function Z of this model as a sum over spanning subgraphs of G, we prove some properties of Z concerning factorization, monotonicity and zeros. A generalization of the Tutte polynomial is presented that corresponds to this partition function. In this context, we formulate and discuss two weighted graph-coloring problems. We also give a general structural result for Z for cyclic strip graphs.

  6. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  7. Graphing from Everyday Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, David; Schliemann, Analucia; Nemirousky, Ricardo

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching grounded in the everyday experiences and concerns of the learners. Studies how people with limited school experience can understand graphs and concludes that individuals with limited academic education can clarify the role of everyday experiences in learning about graphs. (ASK)

  8. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  9. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  10. Using Specialized Graph Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of logarithm and reciprocal graphs in the college physics classroom. Provides examples, such as electrical conductivity, reliability function in the Weibull model, and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for latent heat of vaporation. Shows graphs with weighting of points. (YP)

  11. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  12. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph…

  13. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  14. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  15. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  16. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  17. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  18. An iterated tabu search approach for the clique partitioning problem.

    PubMed

    Palubeckis, Gintaras; Ostreika, Armantas; Tomkevičius, Arūnas

    2014-01-01

    Given an edge-weighted undirected graph with weights specifying dissimilarities between pairs of objects, represented by the vertices of the graph, the clique partitioning problem (CPP) is to partition the vertex set of the graph into mutually disjoint subsets such that the sum of the edge weights over all cliques induced by the subsets is as small as possible. We develop an iterated tabu search (ITS) algorithm for solving this problem. The proposed algorithm incorporates tabu search, local search, and solution perturbation procedures. We report computational results on CPP instances of size up to 2000 vertices. Performance comparisons of ITS against state-of-the-art methods from the literature demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach.

  19. An Iterated Tabu Search Approach for the Clique Partitioning Problem

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Given an edge-weighted undirected graph with weights specifying dissimilarities between pairs of objects, represented by the vertices of the graph, the clique partitioning problem (CPP) is to partition the vertex set of the graph into mutually disjoint subsets such that the sum of the edge weights over all cliques induced by the subsets is as small as possible. We develop an iterated tabu search (ITS) algorithm for solving this problem. The proposed algorithm incorporates tabu search, local search, and solution perturbation procedures. We report computational results on CPP instances of size up to 2000 vertices. Performance comparisons of ITS against state-of-the-art methods from the literature demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach. PMID:24737968

  20. Evolutionary stability on graphs.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A

    2008-04-21

    Evolutionary stability is a fundamental concept in evolutionary game theory. A strategy is called an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), if its monomorphic population rejects the invasion of any other mutant strategy. Recent studies have revealed that population structure can considerably affect evolutionary dynamics. Here we derive the conditions of evolutionary stability for games on graphs. We obtain analytical conditions for regular graphs of degree k > 2. Those theoretical predictions are compared with computer simulations for random regular graphs and for lattices. We study three different update rules: birth-death (BD), death-birth (DB), and imitation (IM) updating. Evolutionary stability on sparse graphs does not imply evolutionary stability in a well-mixed population, nor vice versa. We provide a geometrical interpretation of the ESS condition on graphs.

  1. Quantum causal graph dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrighi, Pablo; Martiel, Simon

    2017-07-01

    Consider a graph having quantum systems lying at each node. Suppose that the whole thing evolves in discrete time steps, according to a global, unitary causal operator. By causal we mean that information can only propagate at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. Suppose, moreover, that the graph itself is subject to the evolution, and may be driven to be in a quantum superposition of graphs—in accordance to the superposition principle. We show that these unitary causal operators must decompose as a finite-depth circuit of local unitary gates. This unifies a result on quantum cellular automata with another on reversible causal graph dynamics. Along the way we formalize a notion of causality which is valid in the context of quantum superpositions of time-varying graphs, and has a number of good properties. We discuss some of the implications for quantum gravity.

  2. Evolutionary stability on graphs

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary stability is a fundamental concept in evolutionary game theory. A strategy is called an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), if its monomorphic population rejects the invasion of any other mutant strategy. Recent studies have revealed that population structure can considerably affect evolutionary dynamics. Here we derive the conditions of evolutionary stability for games on graphs. We obtain analytical conditions for regular graphs of degree k > 2. Those theoretical predictions are compared with computer simulations for random regular graphs and for lattices. We study three different update rules: birth-death (BD), death-birth (DB), and imitation (IM) updating. Evolutionary stability on sparse graphs does not imply evolutionary stability in a well-mixed population, nor vice versa. We provide a geometrical interpretation of the ESS condition on graphs. PMID:18295801

  3. GoFFish: A Sub-Graph Centric Framework for Large-Scale Graph Analytics1

    SciTech Connect

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Kumbhare, Alok; Wickramaarachchi, Charith; Nagarkar, Soonil; Ravi, Santosh; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Prasanna, Viktor

    2014-08-25

    Large scale graph processing is a major research area for Big Data exploration. Vertex centric programming models like Pregel are gaining traction due to their simple abstraction that allows for scalable execution on distributed systems naturally. However, there are limitations to this approach which cause vertex centric algorithms to under-perform due to poor compute to communication overhead ratio and slow convergence of iterative superstep. In this paper we introduce GoFFish a scalable sub-graph centric framework co-designed with a distributed persistent graph storage for large scale graph analytics on commodity clusters. We introduce a sub-graph centric programming abstraction that combines the scalability of a vertex centric approach with the flexibility of shared memory sub-graph computation. We map Connected Components, SSSP and PageRank algorithms to this model to illustrate its flexibility. Further, we empirically analyze GoFFish using several real world graphs and demonstrate its significant performance improvement, orders of magnitude in some cases, compared to Apache Giraph, the leading open source vertex centric implementation. We map Connected Components, SSSP and PageRank algorithms to this model to illustrate its flexibility. Further, we empirically analyze GoFFish using several real world graphs and demonstrate its significant performance improvement, orders of magnitude in some cases, compared to Apache Giraph, the leading open source vertex centric implementation.

  4. Community detection in directed acyclic graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Leo; Takaguchi, Taro; Masuda, Naoki

    2015-08-01

    Some temporal networks, most notably citation networks, are naturally represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). To detect communities in DAGs, we propose a modularity for DAGs by defining an appropriate null model (i.e., randomized network) respecting the order of nodes. We implement a spectral method to approximately maximize the proposed modularity measure and test the method on citation networks and other DAGs. We find that the attained values of the modularity for DAGs are similar for partitions that we obtain by maximizing the proposed modularity (designed for DAGs), the modularity for undirected networks and that for general directed networks. In other words, if we neglect the order imposed on nodes (and the direction of links) in a given DAG and maximize the conventional modularity measure, the obtained partition is close to the optimal one in the sense of the modularity for DAGs. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.

  5. Ridge network detection in crumpled paper via graph density maximization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chiou-Ting; Huang, Marvin

    2012-10-01

    Crumpled sheets of paper tend to exhibit a specific and complex structure, which is described by physicists as ridge networks. Existing literature shows that the automation of ridge network detection in crumpled paper is very challenging because of its complex structure and measuring distortion. In this paper, we propose to model the ridge network as a weighted graph and formulate the ridge network detection as an optimization problem in terms of the graph density. First, we detect a set of graph nodes and then determine the edge weight between each pair of nodes to construct a complete graph. Next, we define a graph density criterion and formulate the detection problem to determine a subgraph with maximal graph density. Further, we also propose to refine the graph density by including a pairwise connectivity into the criterion to improve the connectivity of the detected ridge network. Our experimental results show that, with the density criterion, our proposed method effectively automates the ridge network detection.

  6. Function plot response: A scalable system for teaching kinematics graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverty, James; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2012-08-01

    Understanding and interpreting graphs are essential skills in all sciences. While students are mostly proficient in plotting given functions and reading values off graphs, they frequently lack the ability to construct and interpret graphs in a meaningful way. Students can use graphs as representations of value pairs, but often fail to interpret them as the representation of functions, and mostly fail to use them as representations of physical reality. Working with graphs in classroom settings has been shown to improve student abilities with graphs, particularly when the students can interact with them. We introduce a novel problem type in an online homework system, which requires students to construct the graphs themselves in free form, and requires no hand-grading by instructors. Initial experiences using the new problem type in an introductory physics course are reported.

  7. Implementing Graph Pattern Queries on a Relational Database

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L; Abdulla, G M; Brugger, S T; Kohn, S R

    2007-12-26

    When a graph database is implemented on top of a relational database, queries in the graph query language are translated into relational SQL queries. Graph pattern queries are an important feature of a graph query language. Translating graph pattern queries into single SQL statements results in very poor query performance. By taking into account the pattern query structure and generating multiple SQL statements, pattern query performance can be dramatically improved. The performance problems encountered with the single SQL statements generated for pattern queries reflects a problem in the SQL query planner and optimizer. Addressing this problem would allow relational databases to better support semantic graph databases. Relational database systems that provide good support for graph databases may also be more flexible platforms for data warehouses.

  8. Multi-level graph layout on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for force directed graph layout on the GPU. The algorithm, whose goal is to compute layouts accurately and quickly, has two contributions. The first contribution is proposing a general multi-level scheme, which is based on spectral partitioning. The second contribution is computing the layout on the GPU. Since the GPU requires a data parallel programming model, the challenge is devising a mapping of a naturally unstructured graph into a well-partitioned structured one. This is done by computing a balanced partitioning of a general graph. This algorithm provides a general multi-level scheme, which has the potential to be used not only for computation on the GPU, but also on emerging multi-core architectures. The algorithm manages to compute high quality layouts of large graphs in a fraction of the time required by existing algorithms of similar quality. An application for visualization of the topologies of ISP (Internet Service Provider) networks is presented.

  9. Asymptote Misconception on Graphing Functions: Does Graphing Software Resolve It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öçal, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Graphing function is an important issue in mathematics education due to its use in various areas of mathematics and its potential roles for students to enhance learning mathematics. The use of some graphing software assists students' learning during graphing functions. However, the display of graphs of functions that students sketched by hand may…

  10. The Effect of Using Graphing Calculators in Complex Function Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the role of graphing calculators in multiple representations for knowledge transfer and the omission of oversimplification in complex function graphs. The main aim is to examine whether graphing calculators were used efficiently to see different cases and multiple perspectives among complex function graphs, or whether…

  11. Scaling metagenome sequence assembly with probabilistic de Bruijn graphs.

    PubMed

    Pell, Jason; Hintze, Arend; Canino-Koning, Rosangela; Howe, Adina; Tiedje, James M; Brown, C Titus

    2012-08-14

    Deep sequencing has enabled the investigation of a wide range of environmental microbial ecosystems, but the high memory requirements for de novo assembly of short-read shotgun sequencing data from these complex populations are an increasingly large practical barrier. Here we introduce a memory-efficient graph representation with which we can analyze the k-mer connectivity of metagenomic samples. The graph representation is based on a probabilistic data structure, a Bloom filter, that allows us to efficiently store assembly graphs in as little as 4 bits per k-mer, albeit inexactly. We show that this data structure accurately represents DNA assembly graphs in low memory. We apply this data structure to the problem of partitioning assembly graphs into components as a prelude to assembly, and show that this reduces the overall memory requirements for de novo assembly of metagenomes. On one soil metagenome assembly, this approach achieves a nearly 40-fold decrease in the maximum memory requirements for assembly. This probabilistic graph representation is a significant theoretical advance in storing assembly graphs and also yields immediate leverage on metagenomic assembly.

  12. Understanding graphs with two independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    Adults are not necessarily competent users of graphs with two independent variables, despite the frequency of this representational format. The three tasks in this thesis address the impact of interpretation statements and graph patterns. Interpretation statements were based on the statistical effects -- simple effects, main effects, and interactions. Graph patterns were systematically varied based on a novel classification scheme of graphs with two IVs. I suggest that the complexity of a graph's data pattern depends on the consistency of the simple effects' directions and magnitudes. In the first study, undergraduates constructed graphs based on statements about data patterns. Errors reflected a misunderstanding of how two IVs could be combined and represented graphically. When the experimental group had graph-relevant information added (variable labels spatially located on axes), the ability to represent the relationships among the IVs significantly increased. The ability to satisfy the constraints imposed by the statements was not affected. Adding labels specifically targeted skills relevant to graphical literacy. Transfer to a third trial was stronger for those of higher math abilities. The second study focused on the effect of an introductory statistics course. Overall, undergraduates performed well on statements describing the simple effects of the IVs. However, even though they improved from Time 1 to Time 2 for interaction statements, performance on statements about main effects and interactions still showed considerable room for improvement. In the third study, repeated trials of the 20 patterns proposed by the simple effects consistency model established that the proposed classification scheme addresses additional sources of variability in reasoning with graphs (i.e., sources not captured by traditional classification schemes). As the complexity level of the data pattern increased, performance (based on accuracy and RT) decreased, with parallel impacts on

  13. Plasmid Partition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jamie C; Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    The stable maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids in bacteria is actively driven by partition mechanisms that are responsible for the positioning of plasmids inside the cell. Partition systems are ubiquitous in the microbial world and are encoded by many bacterial chromosomes as well as plasmids. These systems, although different in sequence and mechanism, typically consist of two proteins and a DNA partition site, or prokaryotic centromere, on the plasmid or chromosome. One protein binds site-specifically to the centromere to form a partition complex, and the other protein uses the energy of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to transport the plasmid, via interactions with this partition complex inside the cell. For plasmids, this minimal cassette is sufficient to direct proper segregation in bacterial cells. There has been significant progress in the last several years in our understanding of partition mechanisms. Two general areas that have developed are (i) the structural biology of partition proteins and their interactions with DNA and (ii) the action and dynamics of the partition ATPases that drive the process. In addition, systems that use tubulin-like GTPases to partition plasmids have recently been identified. In this chapter, we concentrate on these recent developments and the molecular details of plasmid partition mechanisms.

  14. Improving energy partitioning and the nighttime energy balance by implementation of a multi-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiying; Ryder, James; Naudts, Kim; McGrath, Matthew J.; Otto, Juliane; Bastriko, Vladislav; Valade, Aude; Launiainen, Samuli; Ogée, Jérôme; Elbers, Jan A.; Foken, Thomas; Tiedemann, Frank; Heinesch, Bernard; Black, Andrew; Haverd, Vanessa; Loustau, Denis; Ottlé, Catherine; Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Canopy structure is one of the most important vegetation characteristics for land-atmosphere interactions as it determines the energy and scalar exchanges between land surface and overlay air mass. In this study we evaluated the performance of a newly developed multi-layer energy budget (Ryder et al., 2014) in a land surface model, ORCHIDEE-CAN (Naudts et al., 2014), which simulates canopy structure and can be coupled to an atmospheric model using an implicit procedure. Furthermore, a vertical discrete drag parametrization scheme was also incorporated into this model, in order to obtain a better description of the sub-canopy wind profile simulation. Site level datasets, including the top-of-the-canopy and sub-canopy observations made available from eight flux observation sites, were collected in order to conduct this evaluation. The geo-location of the collected observation sites crossed climate zones from temperate to boreal and the vegetation types included deciduous, evergreen broad leaved and evergreen needle leaved forest with maximum LAI ranging from 2.1 to 7.0. First, we used long-term top-of-the-canopy measurements to analyze the performance of the current one-layer energy budget in ORCHIDEE-CAN. Three major processes were identified for improvement through the implementation of a multi-layer energy budget: 1) night time radiation balance, 2) energy partitioning during winter and 3) prediction of the ground heat flux. Short-term sub-canopy observations were used to calibrate the parameters in sub-canopy radiation, turbulence and resistances modules with an automatic tuning process following the maximum gradient of the user-defined objective function. The multi-layer model is able to capture the dynamic of sub-canopy turbulence, temperature and energy fluxes with imposed LAI profile and optimized parameter set at a site level calibration. The simulation result shows the improvement both on the nighttime energy balance and energy partitioning during winter

  15. Tailored Random Graph Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, E. S.; Annibale, A.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2013-02-01

    Tailored graph ensembles are a developing bridge between biological networks and statistical mechanics. The aim is to use this concept to generate a suite of rigorous tools that can be used to quantify and compare the topology of cellular signalling networks, such as protein-protein interaction networks and gene regulation networks. We calculate exact and explicit formulae for the leading orders in the system size of the Shannon entropies of random graph ensembles constrained with degree distribution and degree-degree correlation. We also construct an ergodic detailed balance Markov chain with non-trivial acceptance probabilities which converges to a strictly uniform measure and is based on edge swaps that conserve all degrees. The acceptance probabilities can be generalized to define Markov chains that target any alternative desired measure on the space of directed or undirected graphs, in order to generate graphs with more sophisticated topological features.

  16. Reaction spreading on graphs.

    PubMed

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension d{s}, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension d{l}. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)∼t{d{l}}. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)e{αt} with α proportional to ln(k), where (k) is the average degree of the graph.

  17. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  18. A Negative Partition Relation

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, A.

    1971-01-01

    If the continuum hypothesis is assumed, there is a graph G whose vertices form an ordered set of type ω12; G does not contain triangles or complete even graphs of form [[unk]0,[unk]0], and there is no independent subset of vertices of type ω12. PMID:16591893

  19. Assortativity of complementary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Winterbach, W.; van Mieghem, P.

    2011-09-01

    Newman's measure for (dis)assortativity, the linear degree correlationρD, is widely studied although analytic insight into the assortativity of an arbitrary network remains far from well understood. In this paper, we derive the general relation (2), (3) and Theorem 1 between the assortativity ρD(G) of a graph G and the assortativityρD(Gc) of its complement Gc. Both ρD(G) and ρD(Gc) are linearly related by the degree distribution in G. When the graph G(N,p) possesses a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs Gp(N), its complementary graph Gpc(N) = G1-p(N) follows a binomial degree distribution as in the Erdős-Rényi random graphs G1-p(N). We prove that the maximum and minimum assortativity of a class of graphs with a binomial distribution are asymptotically antisymmetric: ρmax(N,p) = -ρmin(N,p) for N → ∞. The general relation (3) nicely leads to (a) the relation (10) and (16) between the assortativity range ρmax(G)-ρmin(G) of a graph with a given degree distribution and the range ρmax(Gc)-ρmin(Gc) of its complementary graph and (b) new bounds (6) and (15) of the assortativity. These results together with our numerical experiments in over 30 real-world complex networks illustrate that the assortativity range ρmax-ρmin is generally large in sparse networks, which underlines the importance of assortativity as a network characterizer.

  20. Commuting projections on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, Panayot S.; Zikatanov, Ludmil T.

    2013-02-19

    For a given (connected) graph, we consider vector spaces of (discrete) functions defined on its vertices and its edges. These two spaces are related by a discrete gradient operator, Grad and its adjoint, ₋Div, referred to as (negative) discrete divergence. We also consider a coarse graph obtained by aggregation of vertices of the original one. Then a coarse vertex space is identified with the subspace of piecewise constant functions over the aggregates. We consider the ℓ2-projection QH onto the space of these piecewise constants. In the present paper, our main result is the construction of a projection π H from the original edge-space onto a properly constructed coarse edge-space associated with the edges of the coarse graph. The projections π H and QH commute with the discrete divergence operator, i.e., we have div π H = QH div. The respective pair of coarse edge-space and coarse vertexspace offer the potential to construct two-level, and by recursion, multilevel methods for the mixed formulation of the graph Laplacian which utilizes the discrete divergence operator. The performance of one two-level method with overlapping Schwarz smoothing and correction based on the constructed coarse spaces for solving such mixed graph Laplacian systems is illustrated on a number of graph examples.

  1. Metabolic networks: beyond the graph.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Andrés; Daza, Edgar

    2011-06-01

    Drugs are devised to enter into the metabolism of an organism in order to produce a desired effect. From the chemical point of view, cellular metabolism is constituted by a complex network of reactions transforming metabolites one in each other. Knowledge on the structure of this network could help to develop novel methods for drug design, and to comprehend the root of known unexpected side effects. Many large-scale studies on the structure of metabolic networks have been developed following models based on different kinds of graphs as the fundamental image of the reaction network. Graphs models, however, comport wrong assumptions regarding the structure of reaction networks that may lead into wrong conclusions if they are not taken into account. In this article we critically review some graph-theoretical approaches to the analysis of centrality, vulnerability and modularity of metabolic networks, analyzing their limitations in estimating these key network properties, consider some proposals explicit or implicitly based on directed hypergraphs regarding their ability to overcome these issues, and review some recent implementation improvements that make the application of these models in increasingly large networks a viable option.

  2. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  3. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Austin R.; Gleich, David F.; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms. PMID:27812399

  4. Partitioned Bayesian analyses, partition choice, and the phylogenetic relationships of scincid lizards.

    PubMed

    Brandley, Matthew C; Schmitz, Andreas; Reeder, Tod W

    2005-06-01

    Partitioned Bayesian analyses of approximately 2.2 kb of nucleotide sequence data (mtDNA) were used to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among 30 scincid lizard genera. Few partitioned Bayesian analyses exist in the literature, resulting in a lack of methods to determine the appropriate number of and identity of partitions. Thus, a criterion, based on the Bayes factor, for selecting among competing partitioning strategies is proposed and tested. Improvements in both mean -lnL and estimated posterior probabilities were observed when specific models and parameter estimates were assumed for partitions of the total data set. This result is expected given that the 95% credible intervals of model parameter estimates for numerous partitions do not overlap and it reveals that different data partitions may evolve quite differently. We further demonstrate that how one partitions the data (by gene, codon position, etc.) is shown to be a greater concern than simply the overall number of partitions. Using the criterion of the 2 ln Bayes factor > 10, the phylogenetic analysis employing the largest number of partitions was decisively better than all other strategies. Strategies that partitioned the ND1 gene by codon position performed better than other partition strategies, regardless of the overall number of partitions. Scincidae, Acontinae, Lygosominae, east Asian and North American "Eumeces" + Neoseps; North African Eumeces, Scincus, and Scincopus, and a large group primarily from sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and neighboring islands are monophyletic. Feylinia, a limbless group of previously uncertain relationships, is nested within a "scincine" clade from sub-Saharan Africa. We reject the hypothesis that the nearly limbless dibamids are derived from within the Scincidae, but cannot reject the hypothesis that they represent the sister taxon to skinks. Amphiglossus, Chalcides, the acontines Acontias and Typhlosaurus, and Scincinae are paraphyletic. The globally widespread

  5. Proxy Graph: Visual Quality Metrics of Big Graph Sampling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quan-Hoang; Hong, Seok-Hee; Eades, Peter; Meidiana, Amyra

    2017-02-24

    Data sampling has been extensively studied for large scale graph mining. Many analyses and tasks become more efficient when performed on graph samples of much smaller size. The use of proxy objects is common in software engineering for analysis and interaction with heavy objects or systems. In this paper, we coin the term 'proxy graph' and empirically investigate how well a proxy graph visualization can represent a big graph. Our investigation focuses on proxy graphs obtained by sampling; this is one of the most common proxy approaches. Despite the plethora of data sampling studies, this is the first evaluation of sampling in the context of graph visualization. For an objective evaluation, we propose a new family of quality metrics for visual quality of proxy graphs. Our experiments cover popular sampling techniques. Our experimental results lead to guidelines for using sampling-based proxy graphs in visualization.

  6. Integration of Building Knowledge Into Binary Space Partitioning for the Reconstruction of Regularized Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, A.; Jung, J.; Sohn, G.; Kada, M.; Ehlers, M.

    2015-09-01

    Recent approaches for the automatic reconstruction of 3D building models from airborne point cloud data integrate prior knowledge of roof shapes with the intention to improve the regularization of the resulting models without lessening the flexibility to generate all real-world occurring roof shapes. In this paper, we present a method to integrate building knowledge into the data-driven approach that uses binary space partitioning (BSP) for modeling the 3D building geometry. A retrospective regularization of polygons that emerge from the BSP tree is not without difficulty because it has to deal with the 2D BSP subdivision itself and the plane definitions of the resulting partition regions to ensure topological correctness. This is aggravated by the use of hyperplanes during the binary subdivision that often splits planar roof regions into several parts that are stored in different subtrees of the BSP tree. We therefore introduce the use of hyperpolylines in the generation of the BSP tree to avoid unnecessary spatial subdivisions, so that the spatial integrity of planar roof regions is better maintained. The hyperpolylines are shown to result from basic building roof knowledge that is extracted based on roof topology graphs. An adjustment of the underlying point segments ensures that the positions of the extracted hyperpolylines result in regularized 2D partitions as well as topologically correct 3D building models. The validity and limitations of the approach are demonstrated on real-world examples.

  7. "K"-Balance Partitioning: An Exact Method with Applications to Generalized Structural Balance and Other Psychological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Structural balance theory (SBT) has maintained a venerable status in the psychological literature for more than 5 decades. One important problem pertaining to SBT is the approximation of structural or generalized balance via the partitioning of the vertices of a signed graph into "K" clusters. This "K"-balance partitioning problem also has more…

  8. "K"-Balance Partitioning: An Exact Method with Applications to Generalized Structural Balance and Other Psychological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Structural balance theory (SBT) has maintained a venerable status in the psychological literature for more than 5 decades. One important problem pertaining to SBT is the approximation of structural or generalized balance via the partitioning of the vertices of a signed graph into "K" clusters. This "K"-balance partitioning problem also has more…

  9. Key-Node-Separated Graph Clustering and Layouts for Human Relationship Graph Visualization.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takayuki; Klein, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Many graph-drawing methods apply node-clustering techniques based on the density of edges to find tightly connected subgraphs and then hierarchically visualize the clustered graphs. However, users may want to focus on important nodes and their connections to groups of other nodes for some applications. For this purpose, it is effective to separately visualize the key nodes detected based on adjacency and attributes of the nodes. This article presents a graph visualization technique for attribute-embedded graphs that applies a graph-clustering algorithm that accounts for the combination of connections and attributes. The graph clustering step divides the nodes according to the commonality of connected nodes and similarity of feature value vectors. It then calculates the distances between arbitrary pairs of clusters according to the number of connecting edges and the similarity of feature value vectors and finally places the clusters based on the distances. Consequently, the technique separates important nodes that have connections to multiple large clusters and improves the visibility of such nodes' connections. To test this technique, this article presents examples with human relationship graph datasets, including a coauthorship and Twitter communication network dataset.

  10. Selecting optimal partitioning schemes for phylogenomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Lanfear, Robert; Calcott, Brett; Kainer, David; Mayer, Christoph; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2014-04-17

    Partitioning involves estimating independent models of molecular evolution for different subsets of sites in a sequence alignment, and has been shown to improve phylogenetic inference. Current methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes, however, are only computationally feasible with datasets of fewer than 100 loci. This is a problem because datasets with thousands of loci are increasingly common in phylogenetics. We develop two novel methods for estimating best-fit partitioning schemes on large phylogenomic datasets: strict and relaxed hierarchical clustering. These methods use information from the underlying data to cluster together similar subsets of sites in an alignment, and build on clustering approaches that have been proposed elsewhere. We compare the performance of our methods to each other, and to existing methods for selecting partitioning schemes. We demonstrate that while strict hierarchical clustering has the best computational efficiency on very large datasets, relaxed hierarchical clustering provides scalable efficiency and returns dramatically better partitioning schemes as assessed by common criteria such as AICc and BIC scores. These two methods provide the best current approaches to inferring partitioning schemes for very large datasets. We provide free open-source implementations of the methods in the PartitionFinder software. We hope that the use of these methods will help to improve the inferences made from large phylogenomic datasets.

  11. Optimized Graph Search Using Multi-Level Graph Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, Rahul; Shukla, Anupam; Tiwari, Ritu

    Graphs find a variety of use in numerous domains especially because of their capability to model common problems. The social networking graphs that are used for social networking analysis, a feature given by various social networking sites are an example of this. Graphs can also be visualized in the search engines to carry search operations and provide results. Various searching algorithms have been developed for searching in graphs. In this paper we propose that the entire network graph be clustered. The larger graphs are clustered to make smaller graphs. These smaller graphs can again be clustered to further reduce the size of graph. The search is performed on the smallest graph to identify the general path, which may be further build up to actual nodes by working on the individual clusters involved. Since many searches are carried out on the same graph, clustering may be done once and the data may be used for multiple searches over the time. If the graph changes considerably, only then we may re-cluster the graph.

  12. PieceStack: Toward Better Understanding of Stacked Graphs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongshuang; Wu, Yingcai; Shi, Conglei; Qu, Huamin; Cui, Weiwei

    2016-02-24

    Stacked graphs have been widely adopted in various fields, because they are capable of hierarchically visualizing a set of temporal sequences as well as their aggregation. However, because of visual illusion issues, connections between overly-detailed individual layers and overly-generalized aggregation are intercepted. Consequently, information in this area has yet to be fully excavated. Thus, we present PieceStack in this paper, to reveal the relevance of stacked graphs in understanding intrinsic details of their displayed shapes. This new visual analytic design interprets the ways through which aggregations are generated with individual layers by interactively splitting and re-constructing the stacked graphs. A clustering algorithm is designed to partition stacked graphs into sub-aggregated pieces based on trend similarities of layers. We then visualize the pieces with augmented encoding to help analysts decompose and explore the graphs with respect to their interests. Case studies and a user study are conducted to demonstrate the usefulness of our technique in understanding the formation of stacked graphs.

  13. Observability and coarse graining of consensus dynamics through the external equitable partition.

    PubMed

    O'Clery, Neave; Yuan, Ye; Stan, Guy-Bart; Barahona, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Using the intrinsic relationship between the external equitable partition (EEP) and the spectral properties of the graph Laplacian, we characterize convergence and observability properties of consensus dynamics on networks. In particular, we establish the relationship between the original consensus dynamics and the associated consensus of the quotient graph under varied initial conditions, and characterize the asymptotic convergence to the synchronization manifold under nonuniform input signals. We also show that the EEP with respect to a node can reveal nodes in the graph with an increased rate of asymptotic convergence to the consensus value, as characterized by the second smallest eigenvalue of the quotient Laplacian. Finally, we show that the quotient graph preserves the observability properties of the full graph and how the inheritance by the quotient graph of particular aspects of the eigenstructure of the full Laplacian underpins the observability and convergence properties of the system.

  14. Robust Spectral Clustering Using Statistical Sub-Graph Affinity Model

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, Justin A.; Wong, Alexander; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral clustering methods have been shown to be effective for image segmentation. Unfortunately, the presence of image noise as well as textural characteristics can have a significant negative effect on the segmentation performance. To accommodate for image noise and textural characteristics, this study introduces the concept of sub-graph affinity, where each node in the primary graph is modeled as a sub-graph characterizing the neighborhood surrounding the node. The statistical sub-graph affinity matrix is then constructed based on the statistical relationships between sub-graphs of connected nodes in the primary graph, thus counteracting the uncertainty associated with the image noise and textural characteristics by utilizing more information than traditional spectral clustering methods. Experiments using both synthetic and natural images under various levels of noise contamination demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve improved segmentation performance when compared to existing spectral clustering methods. PMID:24386111

  15. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  16. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  17. Quantum ergodicity on graphs.

    PubMed

    Gnutzmann, S; Keating, J P; Piotet, F

    2008-12-31

    We investigate the equidistribution of the eigenfunctions on quantum graphs in the high-energy limit. Our main result is an estimate of the deviations from equidistribution for large well-connected graphs. We use an exact field-theoretic expression in terms of a variant of the supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model. Our estimate is based on a saddle-point analysis of this expression and leads to a criterion for when equidistribution emerges asymptotically in the limit of large graphs. Our theory predicts a rate of convergence that is a significant refinement of previous estimates, long assumed to be valid for quantum chaotic systems, agreeing with them in some situations but not all. We discuss specific examples for which the theory is tested numerically.

  18. Quantum Ergodicity on Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Gnutzmann, S.; Keating, J. P.; Piotet, F.

    2008-12-31

    We investigate the equidistribution of the eigenfunctions on quantum graphs in the high-energy limit. Our main result is an estimate of the deviations from equidistribution for large well-connected graphs. We use an exact field-theoretic expression in terms of a variant of the supersymmetric nonlinear {sigma} model. Our estimate is based on a saddle-point analysis of this expression and leads to a criterion for when equidistribution emerges asymptotically in the limit of large graphs. Our theory predicts a rate of convergence that is a significant refinement of previous estimates, long assumed to be valid for quantum chaotic systems, agreeing with them in some situations but not all. We discuss specific examples for which the theory is tested numerically.

  19. Sparse graph-based inductive learning with its application to image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qianying; Zhang, Xiaohong; Huang, Sheng; Yang, Dan

    2016-09-01

    We present a graph-based classification approach called sparse graph-based inductive learning (SGIL). Different to the conventional graph-based classifiers, which perform the classification in a semisupervised way, SGIL is a purely supervised method whose classifier is totally learned in an inductive fashion instead of transductive fashion. Similar to the idea of sparse graph-based classifier, SGIL constructs a sparse graph to encode the correlations of training samples, and considers the classification issue as a regularized sparse graph partition issue where the optimal graph cut should not only minimize the correlation loss of the training samples but also minimize the classification errors. Essentially, the learned graph cut plays a role as the predicted labels here. Thus, a linear classifier can be inductively derived by learning a mapping between the training samples and the graph cuts. Since SGIL is purely supervised, it enjoys several desirable properties over the semisupervised ones in graph construction and model training. We evaluate our work on several popular image datasets. The experimental results demonstrate its superiority.

  20. The spectral theory of the Schrodinger operator on general graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lukun

    The goal of this dissertation is to give the sufficient conditions for the absence of a.c.spectrum or existence of the pure point (p.p.) spectrum for the deterministic or random Schrodinger operators on the general graphs. For the particular situations of "non-percolating" graphs like Sierpinski lattice and Quasi-1 dimensional tree, we'll prove the Simon-Spencer type results and the localization theorem for Anderson Hamiltonians. Technical tools here are the extensions of the real-analytic methods presented for the 1D lattice Z1 and corresponding Schrodinger operators. The central moment is the cluster expansion of the resolvent with respect to appropriate partition of the graph.

  1. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  2. Cookies and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Carol

    1975-01-01

    Teachers of an integrated elementary classroom used cookie-sharing time as a learning experience for students. Responsible for dividing varying amounts of cookies daily, the students learned to translate their experiences to graphs of differing sophistication and analyses. Further interpretation and application were done by individual students…

  3. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  4. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  5. Hidden Behavior in Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, H. Edward; George, Elizabeth Ann

    1993-01-01

    Demonstrates how to construct rational, exponential, and sinusoidal functions that appear normal on one scale but exhibit interesting hidden behavior when viewed on another scale. By exploring these examples, students learn the importance of scale, window size, and resolution effects in computer and calculator graphing. (MAZ)

  6. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  7. GraphLib

    SciTech Connect

    2013-02-19

    This library is used in several LLNL projects, including STAT (the Stack Trace Analysis Tool for scalable debugging) and some modules in P^nMPI (a tool MPI tool infrastructure). It can also be used standalone for creating and manipulationg graphs, but its API is primarily tuned to support these other projects

  8. Graph-theoretical exorcism

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Given a graph G and an ordering phi of the vertices, V(G), we define a parsimonious proper coloring (PPC) of V(G) under phi to be a proper coloring of V(G) in the order phi, where a new color is introduced only when a vertex cannot be properly colored in its order with any of the colors already used.

  9. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  10. Introduction to Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    In this autoinstructional packet, the student is given an experimental situation which introduces him to the process of graphing. The lesson is presented for secondary school students in chemistry. Algebra I and a Del Mod System program (indicated as SE 018 020) are suggested prerequisites for the use of this program. Behavioral objectives are…

  11. Straight Line Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares one effective lesson idea on straight line graphs that he applied in his lower ability Y9 class. The author wanted something interesting for his class to do, something that was fun and engaging with direct feedback, and something that worked because someone else had tried it before. In a word, the author admits…

  12. Quantum walks on quotient graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-15

    A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

  13. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  14. Improving Design Efficiency for Large-Scale Heterogeneous Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregerson, Anthony

    Despite increases in logic density, many Big Data applications must still be partitioned across multiple computing devices in order to meet their strict performance requirements. Among the most demanding of these applications is high-energy physics (HEP), which uses complex computing systems consisting of thousands of FPGAs and ASICs to process the sensor data created by experiments at particles accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Designing such computing systems is challenging due to the scale of the systems, the exceptionally high-throughput and low-latency performance constraints that necessitate application-specific hardware implementations, the requirement that algorithms are efficiently partitioned across many devices, and the possible need to update the implemented algorithms during the lifetime of the system. In this work, we describe our research to develop flexible architectures for implementing such large-scale circuits on FPGAs. In particular, this work is motivated by (but not limited in scope to) high-energy physics algorithms for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC. To make efficient use of logic resources in multi-FPGA systems, we introduce Multi-Personality Partitioning, a novel form of the graph partitioning problem, and present partitioning algorithms that can significantly improve resource utilization on heterogeneous devices while also reducing inter-chip connections. To reduce the high communication costs of Big Data applications, we also introduce Information-Aware Partitioning, a partitioning method that analyzes the data content of application-specific circuits, characterizes their entropy, and selects circuit partitions that enable efficient compression of data between chips. We employ our information-aware partitioning method to improve the performance of the hardware validation platform for evaluating new algorithms for the CMS experiment. Together, these research efforts help to improve the efficiency

  15. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  16. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  17. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  18. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  19. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  20. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  1. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  2. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  3. A graph based algorithm for adaptable dynamic airspace configuration for NextGen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savai, Mehernaz P.

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is a complicated large-scale aviation network, consisting of many static sectors wherein each sector is controlled by one or more controllers. The main purpose of the NAS is to enable safe and prompt air travel in the U.S. However, such static configuration of sectors will not be able to handle the continued growth of air travel which is projected to be more than double the current traffic by 2025. Under the initiative of the Next Generation of Air Transportation system (NextGen), the main objective of Adaptable Dynamic Airspace Configuration (ADAC) is that the sectors should change to the changing traffic so as to reduce the controller workload variance with time while increasing the throughput. Change in the resectorization should be such that there is a minimal increase in exchange of air traffic among controllers. The benefit of a new design (improvement in workload balance, etc.) should sufficiently exceed the transition cost, in order to deserve a change. This leads to the analysis of the concept of transition workload which is the cost associated with a transition from one sectorization to another. Given two airspace configurations, a transition workload metric which considers the air traffic as well as the geometry of the airspace is proposed. A solution to reduce this transition workload is also discussed. The algorithm is specifically designed to be implemented for the Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) Algorithm. A graph model which accurately represents the air route structure and air traffic in the NAS is used to formulate the airspace configuration problem. In addition, a multilevel graph partitioning algorithm is developed for Dynamic Airspace Configuration which partitions the graph model of airspace with given user defined constraints and hence provides the user more flexibility and control over various partitions. In terms of air traffic management, vertices represent airports and waypoints. Some of the major

  4. A Visual Analytics Paradigm Enabling Trillion-Edge Graph Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Haglin, David J.; Gillen, David S.; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Castellana, Vito G.; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Chappell, Alan R.; Zhang, Song

    2015-07-06

    We present a visual analytics paradigm and a system prototype for exploring web-scale graphs. A web-scale graph is described as a graph with ~one trillion edges and ~50 billion vertices. While there is an aggressive R&D effort in processing and exploring web-scale graphs among internet vendors such as Facebook and Google, visualizing a graph of that scale still remains an underexplored R&D area. The paper describes a nontraditional peek-and-filter strategy that facilitates the exploration of a graph database of unprecedented size for visualization and analytics. We demonstrate that our system prototype can 1) preprocess a graph with ~25 billion edges in less than two hours and 2) support database query and visualization on the processed graph database afterward. Based on our computational performance results, we argue that we most likely will achieve the one trillion edge mark (a computational performance improvement of 40 times) for graph visual analytics in the near future.

  5. Graph-state basis for Pauli channels

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaoyu; Jiang Lizhen

    2011-05-15

    Quantum capacities of Pauli channels are not additive, a degenerate quantum code may improve the hashing bound of the capacity. The difficulty in approaching the capacity is how to calculate the coherent information of a generic degenerate quantum code. Using graph state basis, we greatly reduce the problem for the input of quantum error-correcting code. We show that for a graph diagonal state passing through a Pauli channel the output state is diagonalizable and the joint output state of the system and ancilla is block diagonalizable. When the input state is an equal probable mixture of codewords of a stabilizer code, the coherent information can be analytically obtained.

  6. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach. PMID:25859564

  7. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2014-10-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach.

  8. A brief history of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2016-04-01

    'Number rules the universe.' The Pythagoras 'If you wish to forsee the future of mathematics our course is to study the history and present conditions of the science.' Henri Poincaré 'The primary source (Urqell) of all mathematics are integers.' Hermann Minkowski This paper is written to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Mathematical Association of America. It deals with a short history of different kinds of natural numbers including triangular, square, pentagonal, hexagonal and k-gonal numbers, and their simple properties and their geometrical representations. Included are Euclid's and Pythagorean's main contributions to elementary number theory with the main contents of the Euclid Elements of the 13-volume masterpiece of mathematical work. This is followed by Euler's new discovery of the additive number theory based on partitions of numbers. Special attention is given to many examples, Euler's theorems on partitions of numbers with geometrical representations of Ferrers' graphs, Young's diagrams, Lagrange's four-square theorem and the celebrated Waring problem. Included are Euler's generating functions for the partitions of numbers, Euler's pentagonal number theorem, Gauss' triangular and square number theorems and the Jacobi triple product identity. Applications of the theory of partitions of numbers to different statistics such as the Bose- Einstein, Fermi- Dirac, Gentile, and Maxwell- Boltzmann statistics are briefly discussed. Special attention is given to pedagogical information through historical approach to number theory so that students and teachers at the school, college and university levels can become familiar with the basic concepts of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications, and can pursue advanced study and research in analytical and computational number theory.

  9. What is a complex graph?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Many papers published in recent years show that real-world graphs G(n,m) ( n nodes, m edges) are more or less “complex” in the sense that different topological features deviate from random graphs. Here we narrow the definition of graph complexity and argue that a complex graph contains many different subgraphs. We present different measures that quantify this complexity, for instance C1e, the relative number of non-isomorphic one-edge-deleted subgraphs (i.e. DECK size). However, because these different subgraph measures are computationally demanding, we also study simpler complexity measures focussing on slightly different aspects of graph complexity. We consider heuristically defined “product measures”, the products of two quantities which are zero in the extreme cases of a path and clique, and “entropy measures” quantifying the diversity of different topological features. The previously defined network/graph complexity measures Medium Articulation and Offdiagonal complexity ( OdC) belong to these two classes. We study OdC measures in some detail and compare it with our new measures. For all measures, the most complex graph G has a medium number of edges, between the edge numbers of the minimum and the maximum connected graph n-1graph complexity measures are characterized with the help of different example graphs. For all measures the corresponding time complexity is given. Finally, we discuss the complexity of 33 real-world graphs of different biological, social and economic systems with the six computationally most simple measures (including OdC). The complexities of the real graphs are compared with average complexities of two different random graph versions: complete random graphs (just fixed n,m) and rewired graphs with fixed node degrees.

  10. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  11. Orthocomplemented complete lattices and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollech, Astrid

    1995-08-01

    The problem I consider originates from Dörfler, who found a construction to assign an Orthocomplemented lattice H(G) to a graph G. By Dörfler it is known that for every finite Orthocomplemented lattice L there exists a graph G such that H(G)=L. Unfortunately, we can find more than one graph G with this property, i.e., orthocomplemented lattices which belong to different graphs can be isomorphic. I show some conditions under which two graphs have the same orthocomplemented lattice.

  12. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluhař, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  13. Tracing retinal blood vessels by matrix-forest theorem of directed graphs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Li, Huiqi

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to trace retinal blood vessel trees in fundus images. This task is far from being trivial as the crossover of vessels are commonly encountered in image-based vessel networks. Meanwhile it is often crucial to separate the vessel tree structures in applications such as diabetic retinopathy analysis. In this work, a novel directed graph based approach is proposed to cast the task as label propagation over directed graphs, such that the graph is to be partitioned into disjoint sub-graphs, or equivalently, each of the vessel trees is traced and separated from the rest of the vessel network. Then the tracing problem is addressed by making novel usage of the matrix-forest theorem in algebraic graph theory. Empirical experiments on synthetic as well as publicly available fundus image datasets demonstrate the applicability of our approach.

  14. Improved 3D-QSPR analysis of the predictive octanol-air partition coefficients of hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxia; Shi, Jiaqi; Liu, Hui; Wang, Zunyao

    2013-10-01

    The octanol/air partition coefficient (KOA) is a key physicochemical parameter for describing the partition of organic pollutants between air and environment organic phase. The development of appropriate method to estimate KOA is of great importance. In the present study, the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor descriptors were computed by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). On the basis of these parameters, the statistically quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models for logKOA of hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) congeners were developed using partial least-squares (PLS) analysis, of which the R2 is about 0.980, 0.952 respectively. The electrostatic field was found to be main factors governing the logKOA. The results of validation indicate the models of this study exhibit optimum stability, and thus it is feasible to predict logKOA.

  15. Prostate cancer grading: use of graph cut and spatial arrangement of nuclei.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kien; Sarkar, Anindya; Jain, Anil K

    2014-12-01

    Tissue image grading is one of the most important steps in prostate cancer diagnosis, where the pathologist relies on the gland structure to assign a Gleason grade to the tissue image. In this grading scheme, the discrimination between grade 3 and grade 4 is the most difficult, and receives the most attention from researchers. In this study, we propose a novel method (called nuclei-based method) that 1) utilizes graph theory techniques to segment glands and 2) computes a gland-score (based on the spatial arrangement of nuclei) to estimate how similar a segmented region is to a gland. Next, we create a fusion method by combining this nuclei-based method with the lumen-based method presented in our previous work to improve the performance of grade 3 versus grade 4 classification problem (the accuracy is now improved to 87.3% compared to 81.1% of the lumen-based method alone). To segment glands, we build a graph of nuclei and lumina in the image, and use the normalized cut method to partition the graph into different components, each corresponding to a gland. Unlike most state-of-the-art lumen-based gland segmentation method, the nuclei-based method is able to segment glands without lumen or glands with multiple lumina. Moreover, another important contribution in this research is the development of a set of measures to exploit the difference in nuclei spatial arrangement between grade 3 images (where nuclei form closed chain structure on the gland boundary) and grade 4 image (where nuclei distribute more randomly in the gland). These measures are combined to generate a single gland-score value, which estimates how similar a segmented region (which is a set of nuclei and lumina) is to a gland.

  16. A generalized Beraha conjecture for non-planar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Salas, Jesús

    2013-10-01

    We study the partition function ZG(nk,k)(Q,v) of the Q-state Potts model on the family of (non-planar) generalized Petersen graphs G(nk,k). We study its zeros in the plane (Q,v) for 1⩽k⩽7. We also consider two specializations of ZG(nk,k), namely the chromatic polynomial PG(nk,k)(Q) (corresponding to v=-1), and the flow polynomial ΦG(nk,k)(Q) (corresponding to v=-Q). In these two cases, we study their zeros in the complex Q-plane for 1⩽k⩽7. We pay special attention to the accumulation loci of the corresponding zeros when n→∞. We observe that the Berker-Kadanoff phase that is present in two-dimensional Potts models, also exists for non-planar recursive graphs. Their qualitative features are the same; but the main difference is that the role played by the Beraha numbers for planar graphs is now played by the non-negative integers for non-planar graphs. At these integer values of Q, there are massive eigenvalue cancellations, in the same way as the eigenvalue cancellations that happen at the Beraha numbers for planar graphs.

  17. Graph - Based High Resolution Satellite Image Segmentation for Object Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravali, K.; Kumar, M. V. Ravi; Venugopala Rao, K.

    2014-11-01

    Object based image processing and analysis is challenging research in very high resolution satellite utilisation. Commonly ei ther pixel based classification or visual interpretation is used to recognize and delineate land cover categories. The pixel based classification techniques use rich spectral content of satellite images and fail to utilise spatial relations. To overcome th is drawback, traditional time consuming visual interpretation methods are being used operational ly for preparation of thematic maps. This paper addresses computational vision principles to object level image segmentation. In this study, computer vision algorithms are developed to define the boundary between two object regions and segmentation by representing image as graph. Image is represented as a graph G (V, E), where nodes belong to pixels and, edges (E) connect nodes belonging to neighbouring pixels. The transformed Mahalanobis distance has been used to define a weight function for partition of graph into components such that each component represents the region of land category. This implies that edges between two vertices in the same component have relatively low weights and edges between vertices in different components should have higher weights. The derived segments are categorised to different land cover using supervised classification. The paper presents the experimental results on real world multi-spectral remote sensing images of different landscapes such as Urban, agriculture and mixed land cover. Graph construction done in C program and list the run time for both graph construction and segmentation calculation on dual core Intel i7 system with 16 GB RAM, running 64bit window 7.

  18. Exact Algorithms for Coloring Graphs While Avoiding Monochromatic Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talla Nobibon, Fabrice; Hurkens, Cor; Leus, Roel; Spieksma, Frits C. R.

    We consider the problem of deciding whether a given directed graph can be vertex partitioned into two acyclic subgraphs. Applications of this problem include testing rationality of collective consumption behavior, a subject in micro-economics. We identify classes of directed graphs for which the problem is easy and prove that the existence of a constant factor approximation algorithm is unlikely for an optimization version which maximizes the number of vertices that can be colored using two colors while avoiding monochromatic cycles. We present three exact algorithms, namely an integer-programming algorithm based on cycle identification, a backtracking algorithm, and a branch-and-check algorithm. We compare these three algorithms both on real-life instances and on randomly generated graphs. We find that for the latter set of graphs, every algorithm solves instances of considerable size within few seconds; however, the CPU time of the integer-programming algorithm increases with the number of vertices in the graph while that of the two other procedures does not. For every algorithm, we also study empirically the transition from a high to a low probability of YES answer as function of a parameter of the problem. For real-life instances, the integer-programming algorithm fails to solve the largest instance after one hour while the other two algorithms solve it in about ten minutes.

  19. A new graph drawing scheme for social network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Eric Ke; Zou, Futai

    2014-01-01

    With the development of social networks, people have started to use social network tools to record their life and work more and more frequently. How to analyze social networks to explore potential characteristics and trend of social events has been a hot research topic. In order to analyze it effectively, a kind of techniques called information visualization is employed to extract the potential information from the large scale of social network data and present the information briefly as visualized graphs. In the process of information visualization, graph drawing is a crucial part. In this paper, we study the graph layout algorithms and propose a new graph drawing scheme combining multilevel and single-level drawing approaches, including the graph division method based on communities and refining approach based on partitioning strategy. Besides, we compare the effectiveness of our scheme and FM(3) in experiments. The experiment results show that our scheme can achieve a clearer diagram and effectively extract the community structure of the social network to be applied to drawing schemes.

  20. Constructing splits graphs.

    PubMed

    Dress, Andreas W M; Huson, Daniel H

    2004-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees correspond one-to-one to compatible systems of splits and so splits play an important role in theoretical and computational aspects of phylogeny. Whereas any tree reconstruction method can be thought of as producing a compatible system of splits, an increasing number of phylogenetic algorithms are available that compute split systems that are not necessarily compatible and, thus, cannot always be represented by a tree. Such methods include the split decomposition, Neighbor-Net, consensus networks, and the Z-closure method. A more general split system of this kind can be represented graphically by a so-called splits graph, which generalizes the concept of a phylogenetic tree. This paper addresses the problem of computing a splits graph for a given set of splits. We have implemented all presented algorithms in a new program called SplitsTree4.

  1. Complete graph model for community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng Gang; Sun, Xiya

    2017-04-01

    Community detection brings plenty of considerable problems, which has attracted more attention for many years. This paper develops a new framework, which tries to measure the interior and the exterior of a community based on a same metric, complete graph model. In particular, the exterior is modeled as a complete bipartite. We partition a network into subnetworks by maximizing the difference between the interior and the exterior of the subnetworks. In addition, we compare our approach with some state of the art methods on computer-generated networks based on the LFR benchmark as well as real-world networks. The experimental results indicate that our approach obtains better results for community detection, is capable of splitting irregular networks and achieves perfect results on the karate network and the dolphin network.

  2. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  3. Optical tomography on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Francis J.; Gilbert, Anna C.; Hoskins, Jeremy G.; Schotland, John C.

    2017-05-01

    We present an algorithm for solving inverse problems on graphs analogous to those arising in diffuse optical tomography for continuous media. In particular, we formulate and analyze a discrete version of the inverse Born series, proving estimates characterizing the domain of convergence, approximation errors, and stability of our approach. We also present a modification which allows additional information on the structure of the potential to be incorporated, facilitating recovery for a broader class of problems.

  4. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  5. Convex Graph Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    evaluating the function ΘP (A) for any fixed A,P is equivalent to solving the so-called Quadratic Assignment Problem ( QAP ), and thus we can employ various...tractable linear programming, spectral, and SDP relaxations of QAP [40, 11, 33]. In particular we discuss recent work [14] on exploiting group...symmetry in SDP relaxations of QAP , which is useful for approximately computing elementary convex graph invariants in many interesting cases. Finally in

  6. An asynchronous traversal engine for graph-based rich metadata management

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert B.; Jenkins, John; Muirhead, Nicholas; Chen, Yong

    2016-06-23

    and execution merging) necessary for efficient performance. We further explore the effect of different graph partitioning strategies on the traversal performance for both synchronous and asynchronous traversal engines. Our experiments show that the asynchronous graph traversal engine is more efficient than its synchronous counterpart in the case of HPC rich metadata processing, where more servers are involved and larger traversals are needed. Furthermore, the asynchronous traversal engine is more adaptive to different graph partitioning strategies.

  7. An asynchronous traversal engine for graph-based rich metadata management

    DOE PAGES

    Dai, Dong; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert B.; ...

    2016-06-23

    -affiliate caching and execution merging) necessary for efficient performance. We further explore the effect of different graph partitioning strategies on the traversal performance for both synchronous and asynchronous traversal engines. Our experiments show that the asynchronous graph traversal engine is more efficient than its synchronous counterpart in the case of HPC rich metadata processing, where more servers are involved and larger traversals are needed. Furthermore, the asynchronous traversal engine is more adaptive to different graph partitioning strategies.« less

  8. An asynchronous traversal engine for graph-based rich metadata management

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert B.; Jenkins, John; Muirhead, Nicholas; Chen, Yong

    2016-06-23

    and execution merging) necessary for efficient performance. We further explore the effect of different graph partitioning strategies on the traversal performance for both synchronous and asynchronous traversal engines. Our experiments show that the asynchronous graph traversal engine is more efficient than its synchronous counterpart in the case of HPC rich metadata processing, where more servers are involved and larger traversals are needed. Furthermore, the asynchronous traversal engine is more adaptive to different graph partitioning strategies.

  9. Fast clique minor generation in Chimera qubit connectivity graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boothby, Tomas; King, Andrew D.; Roy, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    The current generation of D-Wave quantum annealing processor is designed to minimize the energy of an Ising spin configuration whose pairwise interactions lie on the edges of a Chimera graph C_{M,N,L}. In order to solve an Ising spin problem with arbitrary pairwise interaction structure, the corresponding graph must be minor-embedded into a Chimera graph. We define a combinatorial class of native clique minors in Chimera graphs with vertex images of uniform, near minimal size and provide a polynomial-time algorithm that finds a maximum native clique minor in a given induced subgraph of a Chimera graph. These minors allow improvement over recent work and have immediate practical applications in the field of quantum annealing.

  10. Eigenvector synchronization, graph rigidity and the molecule problem.

    PubMed

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Singer, Amit; Cowburn, David

    2012-12-01

    The graph realization problem has received a great deal of attention in recent years, due to its importance in applications such as wireless sensor networks and structural biology. In this paper, we extend the previous work and propose the 3D-As-Synchronized-As-Possible (3D-ASAP) algorithm, for the graph realization problem in ℝ(3), given a sparse and noisy set of distance measurements. 3D-ASAP is a divide and conquer, non-incremental and non-iterative algorithm, which integrates local distance information into a global structure determination. Our approach starts with identifying, for every node, a subgraph of its 1-hop neighborhood graph, which can be accurately embedded in its own coordinate system. In the noise-free case, the computed coordinates of the sensors in each patch must agree with their global positioning up to some unknown rigid motion, that is, up to translation, rotation and possibly reflection. In other words, to every patch, there corresponds an element of the Euclidean group, Euc(3), of rigid transformations in ℝ(3), and the goal was to estimate the group elements that will properly align all the patches in a globally consistent way. Furthermore, 3D-ASAP successfully incorporates information specific to the molecule problem in structural biology, in particular information on known substructures and their orientation. In addition, we also propose 3D-spectral-partitioning (SP)-ASAP, a faster version of 3D-ASAP, which uses a spectral partitioning algorithm as a pre-processing step for dividing the initial graph into smaller subgraphs. Our extensive numerical simulations show that 3D-ASAP and 3D-SP-ASAP are very robust to high levels of noise in the measured distances and to sparse connectivity in the measurement graph, and compare favorably with similar state-of-the-art localization algorithms.

  11. Eigenvector synchronization, graph rigidity and the molecule problemR

    PubMed Central

    Cucuringu, Mihai; Singer, Amit; Cowburn, David

    2013-01-01

    The graph realization problem has received a great deal of attention in recent years, due to its importance in applications such as wireless sensor networks and structural biology. In this paper, we extend the previous work and propose the 3D-As-Synchronized-As-Possible (3D-ASAP) algorithm, for the graph realization problem in ℝ3, given a sparse and noisy set of distance measurements. 3D-ASAP is a divide and conquer, non-incremental and non-iterative algorithm, which integrates local distance information into a global structure determination. Our approach starts with identifying, for every node, a subgraph of its 1-hop neighborhood graph, which can be accurately embedded in its own coordinate system. In the noise-free case, the computed coordinates of the sensors in each patch must agree with their global positioning up to some unknown rigid motion, that is, up to translation, rotation and possibly reflection. In other words, to every patch, there corresponds an element of the Euclidean group, Euc(3), of rigid transformations in ℝ3, and the goal was to estimate the group elements that will properly align all the patches in a globally consistent way. Furthermore, 3D-ASAP successfully incorporates information specific to the molecule problem in structural biology, in particular information on known substructures and their orientation. In addition, we also propose 3D-spectral-partitioning (SP)-ASAP, a faster version of 3D-ASAP, which uses a spectral partitioning algorithm as a pre-processing step for dividing the initial graph into smaller subgraphs. Our extensive numerical simulations show that 3D-ASAP and 3D-SP-ASAP are very robust to high levels of noise in the measured distances and to sparse connectivity in the measurement graph, and compare favorably with similar state-of-the-art localization algorithms. PMID:24432187

  12. Thermodynamic characterization of networks using graph polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Cheng; Comin, César H.; Peron, Thomas K. DM.; Silva, Filipi N.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Costa, Luciano da F.; Torsello, Andrea; Hancock, Edwin R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method for characterizing the evolution of time-varying complex networks by adopting a thermodynamic representation of network structure computed from a polynomial (or algebraic) characterization of graph structure. Commencing from a representation of graph structure based on a characteristic polynomial computed from the normalized Laplacian matrix, we show how the polynomial is linked to the Boltzmann partition function of a network. This allows us to compute a number of thermodynamic quantities for the network, including the average energy and entropy. Assuming that the system does not change volume, we can also compute the temperature, defined as the rate of change of entropy with energy. All three thermodynamic variables can be approximated using low-order Taylor series that can be computed using the traces of powers of the Laplacian matrix, avoiding explicit computation of the normalized Laplacian spectrum. These polynomial approximations allow a smoothed representation of the evolution of networks to be constructed in the thermodynamic space spanned by entropy, energy, and temperature. We show how these thermodynamic variables can be computed in terms of simple network characteristics, e.g., the total number of nodes and node degree statistics for nodes connected by edges. We apply the resulting thermodynamic characterization to real-world time-varying networks representing complex systems in the financial and biological domains. The study demonstrates that the method provides an efficient tool for detecting abrupt changes and characterizing different stages in network evolution.

  13. Evaluation of Graph Pattern Matching Workloads in Graph Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung-Hwan; Sukumar, Sreenivas Rangan; Vatsavai, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Graph analysis has emerged as a powerful method for data scientists to represent, integrate, query, and explore heterogeneous data sources. As a result, graph data management and mining became a popular area of research, and led to the development of plethora of systems in recent years. Unfortunately, the number of emerging graph analysis systems and the wide range of applications, coupled with a lack of apples-to-apples comparisons, make it difficult to understand the trade-offs between different systems and the graph operations for which they are designed. A fair comparison of these systems is a challenging task for the following reasons: multiple data models, non-standardized serialization formats, various query interfaces to users, and diverse environments they operate in. To address these key challenges, in this paper we present a new benchmark suite by extending the Lehigh University Benchmark (LUBM) to cover the most common capabilities of various graph analysis systems. We provide the design process of the benchmark, which generalizes the workflow for data scientists to conduct the desired graph analysis on different graph analysis systems. Equipped with this extended benchmark suite, we present performance comparison for nine subgraph pattern retrieval operations over six graph analysis systems, namely NetworkX, Neo4j, Jena, Titan, GraphX, and uRiKA. Through the proposed benchmark suite, this study reveals both quantitative and qualitative findings in (1) implications in loading data into each system; (2) challenges in describing graph patterns for each query interface; and (3) different sensitivity of each system to query selectivity. We envision that this study will pave the road for: (i) data scientists to select the suitable graph analysis systems, and (ii) data management system designers to advance graph analysis systems.

  14. Iron Partitioning in Ferropericlase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, J. W. H.; Stixrude, L. P.; Pinilla, C.; Holmstrom, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O, is the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. Whether iron favours the liquid or solid phase of (Mg,Fe)O has important implications for the Earth's mantle, both chemically and dynamically. As iron is much heavier than magnesium, the partitioning of iron between liquid and solid will lead to a contrast in densities. This difference in density will lead one phase to be more buoyant than the other and would help, in part, to explain how the mantle crystallised from the magma ocean of the Hadean eon to its current state. The partitioning of iron between the two phases is characterized by partition coefficients. Using ab-initio methods, thermodynamic integration and adiabatic switching these coefficients have been determined. Results are presented for pressures encompassing the region between the upper mantle and the core-mantle boundary (10-140GPa).

  15. Automated Program Recognition by Graph Parsing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    programs are represented as attributed dataflow graphs and a library of clichis is encoded as an attributed graph grammar . Graph parsing is used to...recognition. Second, we investigate the expressiveness of our graph grammar formalism for capturing pro- gramming cliches. Third, we empirically and...library of cliches is encoded as an attributed graph grammar . Graph parsing is used to recognize clich6s in the code. We demonstrate that this graph

  16. Partition density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  17. GOGrapher: A Python library for GO graph representation and analysis.

    PubMed

    Muller, Brian; Richards, Adam J; Jin, Bo; Lu, Xinghua

    2009-07-07

    The Gene Ontology is the most commonly used controlled vocabulary for annotating proteins. The concepts in the ontology are organized as a directed acyclic graph, in which a node corresponds to a biological concept and a directed edge denotes the parent-child semantic relationship between a pair of terms. A large number of protein annotations further create links between proteins and their functional annotations, reflecting the contemporary knowledge about proteins and their functional relationships. This leads to a complex graph consisting of interleaved biological concepts and their associated proteins. What is needed is a simple, open source library that provides tools to not only create and view the Gene Ontology graph, but to analyze and manipulate it as well. Here we describe the development and use of GOGrapher, a Python library that can be used for the creation, analysis, manipulation, and visualization of Gene Ontology related graphs. An object-oriented approach was adopted to organize the hierarchy of the graphs types and associated classes. An Application Programming Interface is provided through which different types of graphs can be pragmatically created, manipulated, and visualized. GOGrapher has been successfully utilized in multiple research projects, e.g., a graph-based multi-label text classifier for protein annotation. The GOGrapher project provides a reusable programming library designed for the manipulation and analysis of Gene Ontology graphs. The library is freely available for the scientific community to use and improve.

  18. A significance test for graph-constrained estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sen; Shojaie, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Graph-constrained estimation methods encourage similarities among neighboring covariates presented as nodes of a graph, and can result in more accurate estimates, especially in high-dimensional settings. Variable selection approaches can then be utilized to select a subset of variables that are associated with the response. However, existing procedures do not provide measures of uncertainty of estimates. Further, the vast majority of existing approaches assume that available graph accurately captures the association among covariates; violations to this assumption could severely hurt the reliability of the resulting estimates. In this article, we present a new inference framework, called the Grace test, which produces coefficient estimates and corresponding p-values by incorporating the external graph information. We show, both theoretically and via numerical studies, that the proposed method asymptotically controls the type-I error rate regardless of the choice of the graph. We also show that when the underlying graph is informative, the Grace test is asymptotically more powerful than similar tests that ignore the external information. We study the power properties of the proposed test when the graph is not fully informative and develop a more powerful Grace-ridge test for such settings. Our numerical studies show that as long as the graph is reasonably informative, the proposed inference procedures deliver improved statistical power over existing methods that ignore external information.

  19. Robust deformable and occluded object tracking with dynamic graph.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhaowei; Wen, Longyin; Lei, Zhen; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Li, Stan Z

    2014-12-01

    While some efforts have been paid to handle deformation and occlusion in visual tracking, they are still great challenges. In this paper, a dynamic graph-based tracker (DGT) is proposed to address these two challenges in a unified framework. In the dynamic target graph, nodes are the target local parts encoding appearance information, and edges are the interactions between nodes encoding inner geometric structure information. This graph representation provides much more information for tracking in the presence of deformation and occlusion. The target tracking is then formulated as tracking this dynamic undirected graph, which is also a matching problem between the target graph and the candidate graph. The local parts within the candidate graph are separated from the background with Markov random field, and spectral clustering is used to solve the graph matching. The final target state is determined through a weighted voting procedure according to the reliability of part correspondence, and refined with recourse to a foreground/background segmentation. An effective online updating mechanism is proposed to update the model, allowing DGT to robustly adapt to variations of target structure. Experimental results show improved performance over several state-of-the-art trackers, in various challenging scenarios.

  20. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  1. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  2. On Edge Exchangeable Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Svante

    2017-06-01

    We study a recent model for edge exchangeable random graphs introduced by Crane and Dempsey; in particular we study asymptotic properties of the random simple graph obtained by merging multiple edges. We study a number of examples, and show that the model can produce dense, sparse and extremely sparse random graphs. One example yields a power-law degree distribution. We give some examples where the random graph is dense and converges a.s. in the sense of graph limit theory, but also an example where a.s. every graph limit is the limit of some subsequence. Another example is sparse and yields convergence to a non-integrable generalized graphon defined on (0,∞).

  3. New methods for analyzing semantic graph based assessments in science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikaros, Lance Steven

    This research investigated how the scoring of semantic graphs (known by many as concept maps) could be improved and automated in order to address issues of inter-rater reliability and scalability. As part of the NSF funded SENSE-IT project to introduce secondary school science students to sensor networks (NSF Grant No. 0833440), semantic graphs illustrating how temperature change affects water ecology were collected from 221 students across 16 schools. The graphing task did not constrain students' use of terms, as is often done with semantic graph based assessment due to coding and scoring concerns. The graphing software used provided real-time feedback to help students learn how to construct graphs, stay on topic and effectively communicate ideas. The collected graphs were scored by human raters using assessment methods expected to boost reliability, which included adaptations of traditional holistic and propositional scoring methods, use of expert raters, topical rubrics, and criterion graphs. High levels of inter-rater reliability were achieved, demonstrating that vocabulary constraints may not be necessary after all. To investigate a new approach to automating the scoring of graphs, thirty-two different graph features characterizing graphs' structure, semantics, configuration and process of construction were then used to predict human raters' scoring of graphs in order to identify feature patterns correlated to raters' evaluations of graphs' topical accuracy and complexity. Results led to the development of a regression model able to predict raters' scoring with 77% accuracy, with 46% accuracy expected when used to score new sets of graphs, as estimated via cross-validation tests. Although such performance is comparable to other graph and essay based scoring systems, cross-context testing of the model and methods used to develop it would be needed before it could be recommended for widespread use. Still, the findings suggest techniques for improving the

  4. A Novel Graph Constructor for Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis: Combined Low-Rank and k-Nearest Neighbor Graph

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yongke; Niu, Wenjia

    2017-01-01

    Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis (SDA) is a semisupervised dimensionality reduction algorithm, which can easily resolve the out-of-sample problem. Relative works usually focus on the geometric relationships of data points, which are not obvious, to enhance the performance of SDA. Different from these relative works, the regularized graph construction is researched here, which is important in the graph-based semisupervised learning methods. In this paper, we propose a novel graph for Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis, which is called combined low-rank and k-nearest neighbor (LRKNN) graph. In our LRKNN graph, we map the data to the LR feature space and then the kNN is adopted to satisfy the algorithmic requirements of SDA. Since the low-rank representation can capture the global structure and the k-nearest neighbor algorithm can maximally preserve the local geometrical structure of the data, the LRKNN graph can significantly improve the performance of SDA. Extensive experiments on several real-world databases show that the proposed LRKNN graph is an efficient graph constructor, which can largely outperform other commonly used baselines. PMID:28316616

  5. A Novel Graph Constructor for Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis: Combined Low-Rank and k-Nearest Neighbor Graph.

    PubMed

    Zu, Baokai; Xia, Kewen; Pan, Yongke; Niu, Wenjia

    2017-01-01

    Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis (SDA) is a semisupervised dimensionality reduction algorithm, which can easily resolve the out-of-sample problem. Relative works usually focus on the geometric relationships of data points, which are not obvious, to enhance the performance of SDA. Different from these relative works, the regularized graph construction is researched here, which is important in the graph-based semisupervised learning methods. In this paper, we propose a novel graph for Semisupervised Discriminant Analysis, which is called combined low-rank and k-nearest neighbor (LRKNN) graph. In our LRKNN graph, we map the data to the LR feature space and then the kNN is adopted to satisfy the algorithmic requirements of SDA. Since the low-rank representation can capture the global structure and the k-nearest neighbor algorithm can maximally preserve the local geometrical structure of the data, the LRKNN graph can significantly improve the performance of SDA. Extensive experiments on several real-world databases show that the proposed LRKNN graph is an efficient graph constructor, which can largely outperform other commonly used baselines.

  6. k-Partite cliques of protein interactions: A novel subgraph topology for functional coherence analysis on PPI networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-07

    Many studies are aimed at identifying dense clusters/subgraphs from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for protein function prediction. However, the prediction performance based on the dense clusters is actually worse than a simple guilt-by-association method using neighbor counting ideas. This indicates that the local topological structures and properties of PPI networks are still open to new theoretical investigation and empirical exploration. We introduce a novel topological structure called k-partite cliques of protein interactions-a functionally coherent but not-necessarily dense subgraph topology in PPI networks-to study PPI networks. A k-partite protein clique is a maximal k-partite clique comprising two or more nonoverlapping protein subsets between any two of which full interactions are exhibited. In the detection of PPI's maximal k-partite cliques, we propose to transform PPI networks into induced K-partite graphs where edges exist only between the partites. Then, we present a maximal k-partite clique mining (MaCMik) algorithm to enumerate maximal k-partite cliques from K-partite graphs. Our MaCMik algorithm is then applied to a yeast PPI network. We observed interesting and unusually high functional coherence in k-partite protein cliques-the majority of the proteins in k-partite protein cliques, especially those in the same partites, share the same functions, although k-partite protein cliques are not restricted to be dense compared with dense subgraph patterns or (quasi-)cliques. The idea of k-partite protein cliques provides a novel approach of characterizing PPI networks, and so it will help function prediction for unknown proteins.

  7. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  8. Eigensolutions of dodecahedron graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Piyali; Karmakar, Somnath; Mandal, Bholanath

    2014-02-01

    Eigensolutions of 20-vertex cage (i.e. dodecahedron) have been determined with the use of fivefold rotational symmetry. For homo-dodecahedron the eigensolutions become analytical but for the hetero-dodecahedron having two different types of atoms ((C,N),(C,B),(B,N)) the eigensolutions are found to be factored out into five 4-degree polynomials with one corresponding to nondegenerate and other four corresponding to two degenerate eigensolutions. Eigenspectra and total π-electron energies of homo- and hetero-dodecahedron graphs have been calculated.

  9. Strongly Regular Graphs,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-10-01

    The theory of strongly regular graphs was introduced by Bose r7 1 in 1963, in connection with partial geometries and 2 class association schemes. One...non adjacent vertices is constant and equal to ~. We shall denote by ~(p) (reap.r(p)) the set of vertices adjacent (resp.non adjacent) to a vertex p...is the complement of .2’ if the set of vertices of ~ is the set of vertices of .2’ and if two vertices in .2’ are adjacent if and only if they were

  10. Graph Theory of Tower Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Andreas M.

    2012-01-01

    The appropriate mathematical model for the problem space of tower transformation tasks is the state graph representing positions of discs or balls and their moves. Graph theoretical quantities like distance, eccentricities or degrees of vertices and symmetries of graphs support the choice of problems, the selection of tasks and the analysis of performance of subjects whose solution paths can be projected onto the graph. The mathematical model is also at the base of a computerized test tool to administer various types of tower tasks. PMID:22207419

  11. Noncommutative Riemannian geometry on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn

    2013-07-01

    We show that arising out of noncommutative geometry is a natural family of edge Laplacians on the edges of a graph. The family includes a canonical edge Laplacian associated to the graph, extending the usual graph Laplacian on vertices, and we find its spectrum. We show that for a connected graph its eigenvalues are strictly positive aside from one mandatory zero mode, and include all the vertex degrees. Our edge Laplacian is not the graph Laplacian on the line graph but rather it arises as the noncommutative Laplace-Beltrami operator on differential 1-forms, where we use the language of differential algebras to functorially interpret a graph as providing a 'finite manifold structure' on the set of vertices. We equip any graph with a canonical 'Euclidean metric' and a canonical bimodule connection, and in the case of a Cayley graph we construct a metric compatible connection for the Euclidean metric. We make use of results on bimodule connections on inner calculi on algebras, which we prove, including a general relation between zero curvature and the braid relations.

  12. Gluing Nekrasov Partition Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jian; Tizzano, Luigi; Winding, Jacob; Zabzine, Maxim

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we summarise the localisation calculation of 5D super Yang-Mills on simply connected toric Sasaki-Einstein (SE) manifolds. We show how various aspects of the computation, including the equivariant index, the asymptotic behaviour and the factorisation property are governed by the combinatorial data of the toric geometry. We prove that the perturbative partition function on a simply connected SE manifold corresponding to an n-gon toric diagram factorises to n copies of perturbative part (zero instanton sector) of the Nekrasov partition function. This leads us to conjecture a prescription for the computation of the complete partition function, by gluing n copies of the full Nekrasov partition functions. This work is a generalisation of some earlier computation carried out on Y p, q manifolds, whose moment map cone has a quadrangle base and our result is valid for manifolds whose moment map cones have pentagon base, hexagon base, etc. The algorithm we used for dealing with general cones may also be of independent interest.

  13. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Methods Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Results Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data. PMID:26044522

  14. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Sandhan, Tushar; Yoo, Youngjun; Choi, Jin; Kim, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data.

  15. An Efficient Algorithm for Partitioning and Authenticating Problem-Solutions of eLeaming Contents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Jahangir; Chowdhury, Morshed; Batten, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Content authenticity and correctness is one of the important challenges in eLearning as there can be many solutions to one specific problem in cyber space. Therefore, the authors feel it is necessary to map problems to solutions using graph partition and weighted bipartite matching. This article proposes an efficient algorithm to partition…

  16. Clustering Qualitative Data Based on Binary Equivalence Relations: Neighborhood Search Heuristics for the Clique Partitioning Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Kohn, Hans-Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The clique partitioning problem (CPP) requires the establishment of an equivalence relation for the vertices of a graph such that the sum of the edge costs associated with the relation is minimized. The CPP has important applications for the social sciences because it provides a framework for clustering objects measured on a collection of nominal…

  17. An Efficient Algorithm for Partitioning and Authenticating Problem-Solutions of eLeaming Contents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Jahangir; Chowdhury, Morshed; Batten, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Content authenticity and correctness is one of the important challenges in eLearning as there can be many solutions to one specific problem in cyber space. Therefore, the authors feel it is necessary to map problems to solutions using graph partition and weighted bipartite matching. This article proposes an efficient algorithm to partition…

  18. Clustering Qualitative Data Based on Binary Equivalence Relations: Neighborhood Search Heuristics for the Clique Partitioning Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Kohn, Hans-Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The clique partitioning problem (CPP) requires the establishment of an equivalence relation for the vertices of a graph such that the sum of the edge costs associated with the relation is minimized. The CPP has important applications for the social sciences because it provides a framework for clustering objects measured on a collection of nominal…

  19. Exact Potts model partition function on strips of the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shu-Chiuan; Shrock, Robert

    2000-10-01

    In this paper we present exact calculations of the partition function Z of the q-state Potts model and its generalization to real q, for arbitrary temperature on n-vertex strip graphs, of width Ly=2 and arbitrary length, of the triangular lattice with free, cyclic, and Möbius longitudinal boundary conditions. These partition functions are equivalent to Tutte/Whitney polynomials for these graphs. The free energy is calculated exactly for the infinite-length limit of the graphs, and the thermodynamics is discussed. Considering the full generalization to arbitrary complex q and temperature, we determine the singular locus B in the corresponding C2 space, arising as the accumulation set of partition function zeros as n→∞. In particular, we study the connection with the T=0 limit of the Potts antiferromagnet where B reduces to the accumulation set of chromatic zeros. Comparisons are made with our previous exact calculation of Potts model partition functions for the corresponding strips of the square lattice. Our present calculations yield, as special cases, several quantities of graph-theoretic interest.

  20. Graph Visualization for RDF Graphs with SPARQL-EndPoints

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Bond, Nathaniel

    2014-07-11

    RDF graphs are hard to visualize as triples. This software module is a web interface that connects to a SPARQL endpoint and retrieves graph data that the user can explore interactively and seamlessly. The software written in python and JavaScript has been tested to work on screens as little as the smart phones to large screens such as EVEREST.

  1. Quantum Graph Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm; Sterk, Jonathan David; Lobser, Daniel; Parekh, Ojas D.; Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, advanced network analytics have become increasingly important to na- tional security with applications ranging from cyber security to detection and disruption of ter- rorist networks. While classical computing solutions have received considerable investment, the development of quantum algorithms to address problems, such as data mining of attributed relational graphs, is a largely unexplored space. Recent theoretical work has shown that quan- tum algorithms for graph analysis can be more efficient than their classical counterparts. Here, we have implemented a trapped-ion-based two-qubit quantum information proces- sor to address these goals. Building on Sandia's microfabricated silicon surface ion traps, we have designed, realized and characterized a quantum information processor using the hyperfine qubits encoded in two 171 Yb + ions. We have implemented single qubit gates using resonant microwave radiation and have employed Gate set tomography (GST) to characterize the quan- tum process. For the first time, we were able to prove that the quantum process surpasses the fault tolerance thresholds of some quantum codes by demonstrating a diamond norm distance of less than 1 . 9 x 10 [?] 4 . We used Raman transitions in order to manipulate the trapped ions' motion and realize two-qubit gates. We characterized the implemented motion sensitive and insensitive single qubit processes and achieved a maximal process infidelity of 6 . 5 x 10 [?] 5 . We implemented the two-qubit gate proposed by Molmer and Sorensen and achieved a fidelity of more than 97 . 7%.

  2. Comparing pedigree graphs.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Reshef, Yakir; Finucane, Hilary; Jiang, Haitao; Zhu, Binhai; Karp, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    Pedigree graphs, or family trees, are typically constructed by an expensive process of examining genealogical records to determine which pairs of individuals are parent and child. New methods to automate this process take as input genetic data from a set of extant individuals and reconstruct ancestral individuals. There is a great need to evaluate the quality of these methods by comparing the estimated pedigree to the true pedigree. In this article, we consider two main pedigree comparison problems. The first is the pedigree isomorphism problem, for which we present a linear-time algorithm for leaf-labeled pedigrees. The second is the pedigree edit distance problem, for which we present (1) several algorithms that are fast and exact in various special cases, and (2) a general, randomized heuristic algorithm. In the negative direction, we first prove that the pedigree isomorphism problem is as hard as the general graph isomorphism problem, and that the sub-pedigree isomorphism problem is NP-hard. We then show that the pedigree edit distance problem is APX-hard in general and NP-hard on leaf-labeled pedigrees. We use simulated pedigrees to compare our edit-distance algorithms to each other as well as to a branch-and-bound algorithm that always finds an optimal solution.

  3. Text categorization of biomedical data sets using graph kernels and a controlled vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Bleik, Said; Mishra, Meenakshi; Huan, Jun; Song, Min

    2013-01-01

    Recently, graph representations of text have been showing improved performance over conventional bag-of-words representations in text categorization applications. In this paper, we present a graph-based representation for biomedical articles and use graph kernels to classify those articles into high-level categories. In our representation, common biomedical concepts and semantic relationships are identified with the help of an existing ontology and are used to build a rich graph structure that provides a consistent feature set and preserves additional semantic information that could improve a classifier's performance. We attempt to classify the graphs using both a set-based graph kernel that is capable of dealing with the disconnected nature of the graphs and a simple linear kernel. Finally, we report the results comparing the classification performance of the kernel classifiers to common text-based classifiers.

  4. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  5. Explicit and probabilistic constructions of distance graphs with small clique numbers and large chromatic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupavskii, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    We study distance graphs with exponentially large chromatic numbers and without k-cliques, that is, complete subgraphs of size k. Explicit constructions of such graphs use vectors in the integer lattice. For a large class of graphs we find a sharp threshold for containing a k-clique. This enables us to improve the lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers of such graphs. We give a new probabilistic approach to the construction of distance graphs without k-cliques, and this yields better lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers for large k.

  6. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  7. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  8. Blind Identification of Graph Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segarra, Santiago; Mateos, Gonzalo; Marques, Antonio G.; Ribeiro, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    Network processes are often represented as signals defined on the vertices of a graph. To untangle the latent structure of such signals, one can view them as outputs of linear graph filters modeling underlying network dynamics. This paper deals with the problem of joint identification of a graph filter and its input signal, thus broadening the scope of classical blind deconvolution of temporal and spatial signals to the less-structured graph domain. Given a graph signal $\\mathbf{y}$ modeled as the output of a graph filter, the goal is to recover the vector of filter coefficients $\\mathbf{h}$, and the input signal $\\mathbf{x}$ which is assumed to be sparse. While $\\mathbf{y}$ is a bilinear function of $\\mathbf{x}$ and $\\mathbf{h}$, the filtered graph signal is also a linear combination of the entries of the lifted rank-one, row-sparse matrix $\\mathbf{x} \\mathbf{h}^T$. The blind graph-filter identification problem can thus be tackled via rank and sparsity minimization subject to linear constraints, an inverse problem amenable to convex relaxations offering provable recovery guarantees under simplifying assumptions. Numerical tests using both synthetic and real-world networks illustrate the merits of the proposed algorithms, as well as the benefits of leveraging multiple signals to aid the blind identification task.

  9. Graphs and Zero-Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

    2010-01-01

    The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

  10. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  11. A PVS Graph Theory Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Sjogren, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the NASA Langley PVS graph theory library. The library provides fundamental definitions for graphs, subgraphs, walks, paths, subgraphs generated by walks, trees, cycles, degree, separating sets, and four notions of connectedness. Theorems provided include Ramsey's and Menger's and the equivalence of all four notions of connectedness.

  12. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  13. Dependence Graphs for Information Assurance of Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    in sequential programs using dependence analysis, which provides a sound basis for understanding such information flows. The goal was to develop...the design of extensions to the dependence analysis to support concurrency and asynchronous transfer of control. To improve accuracy, it was necessary...achieving results in the area of dependence -graph representations, and queries for software assurance. The results of the research are described in the appendices.

  14. High performance genetic algorithm for VLSI circuit partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Simona

    2016-12-01

    Partitioning is one of the biggest challenges in computer-aided design for VLSI circuits (very large-scale integrated circuits). This work address the min-cut balanced circuit partitioning problem- dividing the graph that models the circuit into almost equal sized k sub-graphs while minimizing the number of edges cut i.e. minimizing the number of edges connecting the sub-graphs. The problem may be formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. Experimental studies in the literature have shown the problem to be NP-hard and thus it is important to design an efficient heuristic algorithm to solve it. The approach proposed in this study is a parallel implementation of a genetic algorithm, namely an island model. The information exchange between the evolving subpopulations is modeled using a fuzzy controller, which determines an optimal balance between exploration and exploitation of the solution space. The results of simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the standard sequential genetic algorithm both in terms of solution quality and convergence speed. As a direction for future study, this research can be further extended to incorporate local search operators which should include problem-specific knowledge. In addition, the adaptive configuration of mutation and crossover rates is another guidance for future research.

  15. Inexact Matching of Ontology Graphs Using Expectation-Maximization

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Prashant; Kolli, Ravikanth; Thomas, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method for mapping ontology schemas that address similar domains. The problem of ontology matching is crucial since we are witnessing a decentralized development and publication of ontological data. We formulate the problem of inferring a match between two ontologies as a maximum likelihood problem, and solve it using the technique of expectation-maximization (EM). Specifically, we adopt directed graphs as our model for ontology schemas and use a generalized version of EM to arrive at a map between the nodes of the graphs. We exploit the structural, lexical and instance similarity between the graphs, and differ from the previous approaches in the way we utilize them to arrive at, a possibly inexact, match. Inexact matching is the process of finding a best possible match between the two graphs when exact matching is not possible or is computationally difficult. In order to scale the method to large ontologies, we identify the computational bottlenecks and adapt the generalized EM by using a memory bounded partitioning scheme. We provide comparative experimental results in support of our method on two well-known ontology alignment benchmarks and discuss their implications. PMID:20160892

  16. Experimental quantum annealing: case study involving the graph isomorphism problem.

    PubMed

    Zick, Kenneth M; Shehab, Omar; French, Matthew

    2015-06-08

    Quantum annealing is a proposed combinatorial optimization technique meant to exploit quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling and entanglement. Real-world quantum annealing-based solvers require a combination of annealing and classical pre- and post-processing; at this early stage, little is known about how to partition and optimize the processing. This article presents an experimental case study of quantum annealing and some of the factors involved in real-world solvers, using a 504-qubit D-Wave Two machine and the graph isomorphism problem. To illustrate the role of classical pre-processing, a compact Hamiltonian is presented that enables a reduced Ising model for each problem instance. On random N-vertex graphs, the median number of variables is reduced from N(2) to fewer than N log2 N and solvable graph sizes increase from N = 5 to N = 13. Additionally, error correction via classical post-processing majority voting is evaluated. While the solution times are not competitive with classical approaches to graph isomorphism, the enhanced solver ultimately classified correctly every problem that was mapped to the processor and demonstrated clear advantages over the baseline approach. The results shed some light on the nature of real-world quantum annealing and the associated hybrid classical-quantum solvers.

  17. In-Memory Graph Databases for Web-Scale Data

    SciTech Connect

    Castellana, Vito G.; Morari, Alessandro; Weaver, Jesse R.; Tumeo, Antonino; Haglin, David J.; Villa, Oreste; Feo, John

    2015-03-01

    RDF databases have emerged as one of the most relevant way for organizing, integrating, and managing expo- nentially growing, often heterogeneous, and not rigidly structured data for a variety of scientific and commercial fields. In this paper we discuss the solutions integrated in GEMS (Graph database Engine for Multithreaded Systems), a software framework for implementing RDF databases on commodity, distributed-memory high-performance clusters. Unlike the majority of current RDF databases, GEMS has been designed from the ground up to primarily employ graph-based methods. This is reflected in all the layers of its stack. The GEMS framework is composed of: a SPARQL-to-C++ compiler, a library of data structures and related methods to access and modify them, and a custom runtime providing lightweight software multithreading, network messages aggregation and a partitioned global address space. We provide an overview of the framework, detailing its component and how they have been closely designed and customized to address issues of graph methods applied to large-scale datasets on clusters. We discuss in details the principles that enable automatic translation of the queries (expressed in SPARQL, the query language of choice for RDF databases) to graph methods, and identify differences with respect to other RDF databases.

  18. Experimental quantum annealing: case study involving the graph isomorphism problem

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Kenneth M.; Shehab, Omar; French, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Quantum annealing is a proposed combinatorial optimization technique meant to exploit quantum mechanical effects such as tunneling and entanglement. Real-world quantum annealing-based solvers require a combination of annealing and classical pre- and post-processing; at this early stage, little is known about how to partition and optimize the processing. This article presents an experimental case study of quantum annealing and some of the factors involved in real-world solvers, using a 504-qubit D-Wave Two machine and the graph isomorphism problem. To illustrate the role of classical pre-processing, a compact Hamiltonian is presented that enables a reduced Ising model for each problem instance. On random N-vertex graphs, the median number of variables is reduced from N2 to fewer than N log2 N and solvable graph sizes increase from N = 5 to N = 13. Additionally, error correction via classical post-processing majority voting is evaluated. While the solution times are not competitive with classical approaches to graph isomorphism, the enhanced solver ultimately classified correctly every problem that was mapped to the processor and demonstrated clear advantages over the baseline approach. The results shed some light on the nature of real-world quantum annealing and the associated hybrid classical-quantum solvers. PMID:26053973

  19. Ionic partitioning and stomatal regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanoubar, Rabab; Orsini, Francesco; Gianquinto, Giorgio Prosdocimi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable grafting is commonly claimed to improve crop’s tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salinity. Although the use of inter-specific graftings is relatively common, whether the improved salt tolerance should be attributed to the genotypic background rather than the grafting per se is a matter of discussion among scientists. It is clear that most of published research has to date overlooked the issue, with the mutual presence of self-grafted and non-grafted controls resulting to be quite rare within experimental evidences. It was recently demonstrated that the genotype of the rootstock and grafting per se are responsible respectively for the differential ion accumulation and partitioning as well as to the stomatal adaptation to the stress. The present paper contributes to the ongoing discussion with further data on the differences associated to salinity response in a range of grafted melon combinations. PMID:24309549

  20. Improving power for robust trans-ethnic meta-analysis of rare and low-frequency variants with a partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Sergii; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2015-02-01

    While genome-wide association studies have discovered numerous bona fide variants that are associated with common diseases and complex traits; these variants tend to be common in the population and explain only a small proportion of the phenotype variance. The search for the missing heritability has thus switched to rare and low-frequency variants, defined as <5% in the population, but which are expected to have a bigger impact on phenotypic outcomes. The rarer nature of these variants coupled with the curse of testing multiple variants across the genome meant that large sample sizes will still be required despite the assumption of bigger effect sizes. Combining data from multiple studies in a meta-analysis will continue to be the natural approach in boosting sample sizes. However, the population genetics of rare variants suggests that allelic and effect size heterogeneity across populations of different ancestries is likely to pose a greater challenge to trans-ethnic meta-analysis of rare variants than to similar analyses of common variants. Here, we introduce a novel method to perform trans-ethnic meta-analysis of rare and low-frequency variants. The approach is centered on partitioning the studies into distinct clusters using local inference of genomic similarity between population groups, with the aim to minimize both the number of clusters and between-study heterogeneity in each cluster. Through a series of simulations, we show that our approach either performs similarly to or outperforms conventional and recently introduced meta-analysis strategies, particularly in the presence of allelic heterogeneity.

  1. Heuristic-driven graph wavelet modeling of complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioacǎ, Teodor; Dumitrescu, Bogdan; Stupariu, Mihai-Sorin; Pǎtru-Stupariu, Ileana; Nǎpǎrus, Magdalena; Stoicescu, Ioana; Peringer, Alexander; Buttler, Alexandre; Golay, François

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel method for building a multi-resolution representation of large digital surface models. The surface points coincide with the nodes of a planar graph which can be processed using a critically sampled, invertible lifting scheme. To drive the lazy wavelet node partitioning, we employ an attribute aware cost function based on the generalized quadric error metric. The resulting algorithm can be applied to multivariate data by storing additional attributes at the graph's nodes. We discuss how the cost computation mechanism can be coupled with the lifting scheme and examine the results by evaluating the root mean square error. The algorithm is experimentally tested using two multivariate LiDAR sets representing terrain surface and vegetation structure with different sampling densities.

  2. Semi-Markov Graph Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Raberto, Marco; Rapallo, Fabio; Scalas, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we outline a model of graph (or network) dynamics based on two ingredients. The first ingredient is a Markov chain on the space of possible graphs. The second ingredient is a semi-Markov counting process of renewal type. The model consists in subordinating the Markov chain to the semi-Markov counting process. In simple words, this means that the chain transitions occur at random time instants called epochs. The model is quite rich and its possible connections with algebraic geometry are briefly discussed. Moreover, for the sake of simplicity, we focus on the space of undirected graphs with a fixed number of nodes. However, in an example, we present an interbank market model where it is meaningful to use directed graphs or even weighted graphs. PMID:21887245

  3. Quantum Ergodicity on Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaman, Nalini

    2017-07-01

    We give three different proofs of the main result of Anantharaman and Le Masson (Duke Math J 164(4):723-765, 2015), establishing quantum ergodicity—a form of delocalization—for eigenfunctions of the laplacian on large regular graphs of fixed degree. These three proofs are much shorter than the original one, quite different from one another, and we feel that each of the four proofs sheds a different light on the problem. The goal of this exploration is to find a proof that could be adapted for other models of interest in mathematical physics, such as the Anderson model on large regular graphs, regular graphs with weighted edges, or possibly certain models of non-regular graphs. A source of optimism in this direction is that we are able to extend the last proof to the case of anisotropic random walks on large regular graphs.

  4. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four.

  5. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four. PMID:27272401

  6. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D L

    2016-06-07

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four.

  7. TIFF Image Writer patch for OpenSceneGraph

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, Bryce

    2012-01-05

    This software consists of code modifications to the open-source OpenSceneGraph software package to enable the creation of TlFF images containing 16 bit unsigned data. They also allow the user to disable compression and set the DPI tags in the resulting TIFF Images. Some image analysis programs require uncompressed, 16 bit unsigned input data. These code modifications allow programs based on OpenSceneGraph to write out such images, improving connectivity between applications.

  8. Completeness and regularity of generalized fuzzy graphs.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sovan; Sarkar, Biswajit; Shin, Dongmin; Pal, Madhumangal

    2016-01-01

    Fuzzy graphs are the backbone of many real systems like networks, image, scheduling, etc. But, due to some restriction on edges, fuzzy graphs are limited to represent for some systems. Generalized fuzzy graphs are appropriate to avoid such restrictions. In this study generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. In this study, matrix representation of generalized fuzzy graphs is described. Completeness and regularity are two important parameters of graph theory. Here, regular and complete generalized fuzzy graphs are introduced. Some properties of them are discussed. After that, effective regular graphs are exemplified.

  9. Comparison and enumeration of chemical graphs.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nagamochi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are usually represented as graph structured data in computers. In this review article, we overview several graph classes relevant to chemical compounds and the computational complexities of several fundamental problems for these graph classes. In particular, we consider the following problems: determining whether two chemical graphs are identical, determining whether one input chemical graph is a part of the other input chemical graph, finding a maximum common part of two input graphs, finding a reaction atom mapping, enumerating possible chemical graphs, and enumerating stereoisomers. We also discuss the relationship between the fifth problem and kernel functions for chemical compounds.

  10. Comparison and Enumeration of Chemical Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nagamochi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are usually represented as graph structured data in computers. In this review article, we overview several graph classes relevant to chemical compounds and the computational complexities of several fundamental problems for these graph classes. In particular, we consider the following problems: determining whether two chemical graphs are identical, determining whether one input chemical graph is a part of the other input chemical graph, finding a maximum common part of two input graphs, finding a reaction atom mapping, enumerating possible chemical graphs, and enumerating stereoisomers. We also discuss the relationship between the fifth problem and kernel functions for chemical compounds. PMID:24688697

  11. GRAPH III: a digitizing and graph plotting program

    SciTech Connect

    Selleck, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    GRAPH is an interactive program that allows the user to perform two functions. The first is to plot two dimensional graphs and the second is to digitize graphs or plots to create data files of points. The program is designed to allow the user to get results quickly and easily. It is written in RATIV (a FORTRAN preprocessor) and is currently in use at Sandia under VMS on a VAX computer and CTSS on a Cray supercomputer. The program provides graphical output through all of the Sandia Virtual Device Interface (VDI) graphics devices. 2 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Graphical literacy: the quality of graphs in a large-circulation journal.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richelle J; Schriger, David L; Close, Reb J H

    2002-09-01

    graphs, although we noted more graphs in the 2000 issues. Graph quality was similar in Annals of Emergency Medicine and JAMA, but graphs were more common in the original research articles in JAMA. Although univariate displays predominated in both publications, there were more bivariate displays in Annals of Emergency Medicine but fewer advanced graphic features. The graphs in JAMA were similar to those in Annals of Emergency Medicine and, although generally clear and without errors, often failed to depict detailed data. Authors and editors could improve data presentations by incorporating graphic formats that depict stratified, detailed data.

  13. MTC: A Fast and Robust Graph-Based Transductive Learning Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Ming; Huang, Kaizhu; Geng, Guang-Gang; Liu, Cheng-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Despite the great success of graph-based transductive learning methods, most of them have serious problems in scalability and robustness. In this paper, we propose an efficient and robust graph-based transductive classification method, called minimum tree cut (MTC), which is suitable for large-scale data. Motivated from the sparse representation of graph, we approximate a graph by a spanning tree. Exploiting the simple structure, we develop a linear-time algorithm to label the tree such that the cut size of the tree is minimized. This significantly improves graph-based methods, which typically have a polynomial time complexity. Moreover, we theoretically and empirically show that the performance of MTC is robust to the graph construction, overcoming another big problem of traditional graph-based methods. Extensive experiments on public data sets and applications on web-spam detection and interactive image segmentation demonstrate our method's advantages in aspect of accuracy, speed, and robustness.

  14. Adaptive graph construction for Isomap manifold learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Loc; Zheng, Zezhong; Zhou, Guoqing; Li, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Isomap is a classical manifold learning approach that preserves geodesic distance of nonlinear data sets. One of the main drawbacks of this method is that it is susceptible to leaking, where a shortcut appears between normally separated portions of a manifold. We propose an adaptive graph construction approach that is based upon the sparsity property of the l1 norm. The l1 enhanced graph construction method replaces k-nearest neighbors in the classical approach. The proposed algorithm is first tested on the data sets from the UCI data base repository which showed that the proposed approach performs better than the classical approach. Next, the proposed approach is applied to two image data sets and achieved improved performances over standard Isomap.

  15. Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

  16. Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

  17. DNA Rearrangements through Spatial Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

    The paper is a short overview of a recent model of homologous DNA recombination events guided by RNA templates that have been observed in certain species of ciliates. This model uses spatial graphs to describe DNA rearrangements and show how gene recombination can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent rigid vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  18. Multigraph: Reusable Interactive Data Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    There are surprisingly few good software tools available for presenting time series data on the internet. The most common practice is to use a desktop program such as Excel or Matlab to save a graph as an image which can be included in a web page like any other image. This disconnects the graph from the data in a way that makes updating a graph with new data a cumbersome manual process, and it limits the user to one particular view of the data. The Multigraph project defines an XML format for describing interactive data graphs, and software tools for creating and rendering those graphs in web pages and other internet connected applications. Viewing a Multigraph graph is extremely simple and intuitive, and requires no instructions; the user can pan and zoom by clicking and dragging, in a familiar "Google Maps" kind of way. Creating a new graph for inclusion in a web page involves writing a simple XML configuration file. Multigraph can read data in a variety of formats, and can display data from a web service, allowing users to "surf" through large data sets, downloading only those the parts of the data that are needed for display. The Multigraph XML format, or "MUGL" for short, provides a concise description of the visual properties of a graph, such as axes, plot styles, data sources, labels, etc, as well as interactivity properties such as how and whether the user can pan or zoom along each axis. Multigraph reads a file in this format, draws the described graph, and allows the user to interact with it. Multigraph software currently includes a Flash application for embedding graphs in web pages, a Flex component for embedding graphs in larger Flex/Flash applications, and a plugin for creating graphs in the WordPress content management system. Plans for the future include a Java version for desktop viewing and editing, a command line version for batch and server side rendering, and possibly Android and iPhone versions. Multigraph is currently in use on several web

  19. Measuring edge importance: a quantitative analysis of the stochastic shielding approximation for random processes on graphs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Deena R; Thomas, Peter J

    2014-04-17

    Mathematical models of cellular physiological mechanisms often involve random walks on graphs representing transitions within networks of functional states. Schmandt and Galán recently introduced a novel stochastic shielding approximation as a fast, accurate method for generating approximate sample paths from a finite state Markov process in which only a subset of states are observable. For example, in ion-channel models, such as the Hodgkin-Huxley or other conductance-based neural models, a nerve cell has a population of ion channels whose states comprise the nodes of a graph, only some of which allow a transmembrane current to pass. The stochastic shielding approximation consists of neglecting fluctuations in the dynamics associated with edges in the graph not directly affecting the observable states. We consider the problem of finding the optimal complexity reducing mapping from a stochastic process on a graph to an approximate process on a smaller sample space, as determined by the choice of a particular linear measurement functional on the graph. The partitioning of ion-channel states into conducting versus nonconducting states provides a case in point. In addition to establishing that Schmandt and Galán's approximation is in fact optimal in a specific sense, we use recent results from random matrix theory to provide heuristic error estimates for the accuracy of the stochastic shielding approximation for an ensemble of random graphs. Moreover, we provide a novel quantitative measure of the contribution of individual transitions within the reaction graph to the accuracy of the approximate process.

  20. Local quality functions for graph clustering with non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Laarhoven, Twan; Marchiori, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Many graph clustering quality functions suffer from a resolution limit, namely the inability to find small clusters in large graphs. So-called resolution-limit-free quality functions do not have this limit. This property was previously introduced for hard clustering, that is, graph partitioning. We investigate the resolution-limit-free property in the context of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for hard and soft graph clustering. To use NMF in the hard clustering setting, a common approach is to assign each node to its highest membership cluster. We show that in this case symmetric NMF is not resolution-limit free, but that it becomes so when hardness constraints are used as part of the optimization. The resulting function is strongly linked to the constant Potts model. In soft clustering, nodes can belong to more than one cluster, with varying degrees of membership. In this setting resolution-limit free turns out to be too strong a property. Therefore we introduce locality, which roughly states that changing one part of the graph does not affect the clustering of other parts of the graph. We argue that this is a desirable property, provide conditions under which NMF quality functions are local, and propose a novel class of local probabilistic NMF quality functions for soft graph clustering.

  1. On the star partition dimension of comb product of cycle and path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarisi, Ridho; Darmaji

    2017-08-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a connected graphs with vertex set V(G), edge set E(G) and S ⊆ V(G). Given an ordered partition Π = {S1, S2, S3, …, Sk} of the vertex set V of G, the representation of a vertex v ∈ V with respect to Π is the vector r(v|Π) = (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), …, d(v, Sk)), where d(v, Sk) represents the distance between the vertex v and the set Sk and d(v, Sk) = min{d(v, x)|x ∈ Sk }. A partition Π of V(G) is a resolving partition if different vertices of G have distinct representations, i.e., for every pair of vertices u, v ∈ V(G), r(u|Π) ≠ r(v|Π). The minimum k of Π resolving partition is a partition dimension of G, denoted by pd(G). The resolving partition Π = {S1, S2, S3, …, Sk } is called a star resolving partition for G if it is a resolving partition and each subgraph induced by Si, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, is a star. The minimum k for which there exists a star resolving partition of V(G) is the star partition dimension of G, denoted by spd(G). Finding the star partition dimension of G is classified to be a NP-Hard problem. In this paper, we will show that the partition dimension of comb product of cycle and path namely Cm⊳Pn and Pn⊳Cm for n ≥ 2 and m ≥ 3.

  2. On the Exact Evaluation of Certain Instances of the Potts Partition Function by Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2008-05-01

    We present an efficient quantum algorithm for the exact evaluation of either the fully ferromagnetic or anti-ferromagnetic q-state Potts partition function Z for a family of graphs related to irreducible cyclic codes. This problem is related to the evaluation of the Jones and Tutte polynomials. We consider the connection between the weight enumerator polynomial from coding theory and Z and exploit the fact that there exists a quantum algorithm for efficiently estimating Gauss sums in order to obtain the weight enumerator for a certain class of linear codes. In this way we demonstrate that for a certain class of sparse graphs, which we call Irreducible Cyclic Cocycle Code (ICCCɛ) graphs, quantum computers provide a polynomial speed up in the difference between the number of edges and vertices of the graph, and an exponential speed up in q, over the best classical algorithms known to date.

  3. TopoLayout: multilevel graph layout by topological features.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Daniel; Munzner, Tamara; Auber, David

    2007-01-01

    We describe TopoLayout, a feature-based, multilevel algorithm that draws undirected graphs based on the topological features they contain. Topological features are detected recursively inside the graph, and their subgraphs are collapsed into single nodes, forming a graph hierarchy. Each feature is drawn with an algorithm tuned for its topology. As would be expected from a feature-based approach, the runtime and visual quality of TopoLayout depends on the number and types of topological features present in the graph. We show experimental results comparing speed and visual quality for TopoLayout against four other multilevel algorithms on a variety of data sets with a range of connectivities and sizes. TopoLayout frequently improves the results in terms of speed and visual quality on these data sets.

  4. A Graph Based Backtracking Algorithm for Solving General CSPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Wanlin; Goodwin, Scott D.

    2003-01-01

    Many AI tasks can be formalized as constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs), which involve finding values for variables subject to constraints. While solving a CSP is an NP-complete task in general, tractable classes of CSPs have been identified based on the structure of the underlying constraint graphs. Much effort has been spent on exploiting structural properties of the constraint graph to improve the efficiency of finding a solution. These efforts contributed to development of a class of CSP solving algorithms called decomposition algorithms. The strength of CSP decomposition is that its worst-case complexity depends on the structural properties of the constraint graph and is usually better than the worst-case complexity of search methods. Its practical application is limited, however, since it cannot be applied if the CSP is not decomposable. In this paper, we propose a graph based backtracking algorithm called omega-CDBT, which shares merits and overcomes the weaknesses of both decomposition and search approaches.

  5. Structural pursuit over multiple undirected graphs*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunzhang; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Gaussian graphical models are useful to analyze and visualize conditional dependence relationships between interacting units. Motivated from network analysis under di erent experimental conditions, such as gene networks for disparate cancer subtypes, we model structural changes over multiple networks with possible heterogeneities. In particular, we estimate multiple precision matrices describing dependencies among interacting units through maximum penalized likelihood. Of particular interest are homogeneous groups of similar entries across and zero-entries of these matrices, referred to as clustering and sparseness structures, respectively. A non-convex method is proposed to seek a sparse representation for each matrix and identify clusters of the entries across the matrices. Computationally, we develop an e cient method on the basis of di erence convex programming, the augmented Lagrangian method and the block-wise coordinate descent method, which is scalable to hundreds of graphs of thousands nodes through a simple necessary and sufficient partition rule, which divides nodes into smaller disjoint subproblems excluding zero-coe cients nodes for arbitrary graphs with convex relaxation. Theoretically, a finite-sample error bound is derived for the proposed method to reconstruct the clustering and sparseness structures. This leads to consistent reconstruction of these two structures simultaneously, permitting the number of unknown parameters to be exponential in the sample size, and yielding the optimal performance of the oracle estimator as if the true structures were given a priori. Simulation studies suggest that the method enjoys the benefit of pursuing these two disparate kinds of structures, and compares favorably against its convex counterpart in the accuracy of structure pursuit and parameter estimation. PMID:25642006

  6. Structural pursuit over multiple undirected graphs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yunzhang; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Gaussian graphical models are useful to analyze and visualize conditional dependence relationships between interacting units. Motivated from network analysis under di erent experimental conditions, such as gene networks for disparate cancer subtypes, we model structural changes over multiple networks with possible heterogeneities. In particular, we estimate multiple precision matrices describing dependencies among interacting units through maximum penalized likelihood. Of particular interest are homogeneous groups of similar entries across and zero-entries of these matrices, referred to as clustering and sparseness structures, respectively. A non-convex method is proposed to seek a sparse representation for each matrix and identify clusters of the entries across the matrices. Computationally, we develop an e cient method on the basis of di erence convex programming, the augmented Lagrangian method and the block-wise coordinate descent method, which is scalable to hundreds of graphs of thousands nodes through a simple necessary and sufficient partition rule, which divides nodes into smaller disjoint subproblems excluding zero-coe cients nodes for arbitrary graphs with convex relaxation. Theoretically, a finite-sample error bound is derived for the proposed method to reconstruct the clustering and sparseness structures. This leads to consistent reconstruction of these two structures simultaneously, permitting the number of unknown parameters to be exponential in the sample size, and yielding the optimal performance of the oracle estimator as if the true structures were given a priori. Simulation studies suggest that the method enjoys the benefit of pursuing these two disparate kinds of structures, and compares favorably against its convex counterpart in the accuracy of structure pursuit and parameter estimation.

  7. Uncluttering graph layouts using anisotropic diffusion and mass transport.

    PubMed

    Frishman, Yaniv; Tal, Ayellet

    2009-01-01

    Many graph layouts include very dense areas, making the layout difficult to understand. In this paper, we propose a technique for modifying an existing layout in order to reduce the clutter in dense areas. A physically inspired evolution process based on a modified heat equation is used to create an improved layout density image, making better use of available screen space. Using results from optimal mass transport problems, a warp to the improved density image is computed. The graph nodes are displaced according to the warp. The warp maintains the overall structure of the graph, thus limiting disturbances to the mental map, while reducing the clutter in dense areas of the layout. The complexity of the algorithm depends mainly on the resolution of the image visualizing the graph and is linear in the size of the graph. This allows scaling the computation according to required running times. It is demonstrated how the algorithm can be significantly accelerated using a graphics processing unit (GPU), resulting in the ability to handle large graphs in a matter of seconds. Results on several layout algorithms and applications are demonstrated.

  8. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  9. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  10. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jeremy T.

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  11. A Ranking Approach on Large-Scale Graph With Multidimensional Heterogeneous Information.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Tie-Yan; Wang, Taifeng; Li, Guohui; Li, Hang

    2016-04-01

    Graph-based ranking has been extensively studied and frequently applied in many applications, such as webpage ranking. It aims at mining potentially valuable information from the raw graph-structured data. Recently, with the proliferation of rich heterogeneous information (e.g., node/edge features and prior knowledge) available in many real-world graphs, how to effectively and efficiently leverage all information to improve the ranking performance becomes a new challenging problem. Previous methods only utilize part of such information and attempt to rank graph nodes according to link-based methods, of which the ranking performances are severely affected by several well-known issues, e.g., over-fitting or high computational complexity, especially when the scale of graph is very large. In this paper, we address the large-scale graph-based ranking problem and focus on how to effectively exploit rich heterogeneous information of the graph to improve the ranking performance. Specifically, we propose an innovative and effective semi-supervised PageRank (SSP) approach to parameterize the derived information within a unified semi-supervised learning framework (SSLF-GR), then simultaneously optimize the parameters and the ranking scores of graph nodes. Experiments on the real-world large-scale graphs demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the algorithms that consider such graph information only partially.

  12. The airborne sound insulations of timber-framed partitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, G. D.

    The sound insulation performances of several lightweight, timber framed partitions were measured. The purpose was to assess the merits of various sheet materials and the effects of changes in the construction details on the sound insulation performances of the partitions. The aim was to produce a design for a new type of partition which was cheaper than the conventional 'Camden', which is currently widely used in the BBC. As a result, a new design was tested and is recommended for use as a replacement for the Camden. It uses less material, is much cheaper to build, and should be more tolerant of poor building practices. Several recommendations are made on construction techniques, which apply whether the partition being built is a traditional Camden or the new design. Also, the use of fiberboard as a damping material for plasterboard is shown to improve the isolation of partitions greatly, much more than the consideration of its mass alone would lead one to expect.

  13. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  14. The Replica Symmetric Solution for Potts Models on d-Regular Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembo, Amir; Montanari, Andrea; Sly, Allan; Sun, Nike

    2014-04-01

    We establish an explicit formula for the limiting free energy density (log-partition function divided by the number of vertices) for ferromagnetic Potts models on uniformly sparse graph sequences converging locally to the d-regular tree for d even, covering all temperature regimes. This formula coincides with the Bethe free energy functional evaluated at a suitable fixed point of the belief propagation recursion on the d-regular tree, the so-called replica symmetric solution. For uniformly random d-regular graphs we further show that the replica symmetric Bethe formula is an upper bound for the asymptotic free energy for any model with permissive interactions.

  15. Partitioning the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Philip L.; Lewin, John

    2016-11-01

    We review the historical purposes and procedures for stratigraphical division and naming within the Quaternary, and summarize the current requirements for formal partitioning through the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). A raft of new data and evidence has impacted traditional approaches: quasi-continuous records from ocean sediments and ice cores, new numerical dating techniques, and alternative macro-models, such as those provided through Sequence Stratigraphy and Earth-System Science. The practical usefulness of division remains, but there is now greater appreciation of complex Quaternary detail and the modelling of time continua, the latter also extending into the future. There are problems both of commission (what is done, but could be done better) and of omission (what gets left out) in partitioning the Quaternary. These include the challenge set by the use of unconformities as stage boundaries, how to deal with multiphase records in ocean and terrestrial sediments, what happened at the 'Early-Mid- (Middle) Pleistocene Transition', dealing with trends that cross phase boundaries, and the current controversial focus on how to subdivide the Holocene and formally define an 'Anthropocene'.

  16. Robust (semi) nonnegative graph embedding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwang; Zha, Zheng-Jun; Yang, Yang; Yan, Shuicheng; Chua, Tat-Seng

    2014-07-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has received considerable attention in image processing, computer vision, and patter recognition. An important variant of NMF is nonnegative graph embedding (NGE), which encodes the statistical or geometric information of data in the process of matrix factorization. The NGE offers a general framework for unsupervised/supervised settings. However, NGE-like algorithms often suffer from noisy data, unreliable graphs, and noisy labels, which are commonly encountered in real-world applications. To address these issues, in this paper, we first propose a robust nonnegative graph embedding (RNGE) framework, where the joint sparsity in both graph embedding and data reconstruction endues robustness to undesirable noises. Next, we present a robust seminonnegative graph embedding (RsNGE) framework, which only constrains the coefficient matrix to be nonnegative while places no constraint on the base matrix. This extends the applicable range of RNGE to data which are not nonnegative and endows more discriminative power of the learnt base matrix. The RNGE/RsNGE provides a general formulation such that all the algorithms unified within the graph embedding framework can be easily extended to obtain their robust nonnegative/seminonnegative solutions. Further, we develop elegant multiplicative updating solutions that can solve RNGE/RsNGE efficiently and offer a rigorous convergence analysis. We conduct extensive experiments on four real-world data sets and compare the proposed RNGE/RsNGE to other representative NMF variants and data factorization methods. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  17. Chromatic polynomials of random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bussel, Frank; Ehrlich, Christoph; Fliegner, Denny; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Timme, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Chromatic polynomials and related graph invariants are central objects in both graph theory and statistical physics. Computational difficulties, however, have so far restricted studies of such polynomials to graphs that were either very small, very sparse or highly structured. Recent algorithmic advances (Timme et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 023001) now make it possible to compute chromatic polynomials for moderately sized graphs of arbitrary structure and number of edges. Here we present chromatic polynomials of ensembles of random graphs with up to 30 vertices, over the entire range of edge density. We specifically focus on the locations of the zeros of the polynomial in the complex plane. The results indicate that the chromatic zeros of random graphs have a very consistent layout. In particular, the crossing point, the point at which the chromatic zeros with non-zero imaginary part approach the real axis, scales linearly with the average degree over most of the density range. While the scaling laws obtained are purely empirical, if they continue to hold in general there are significant implications: the crossing points of chromatic zeros in the thermodynamic limit separate systems with zero ground state entropy from systems with positive ground state entropy, the latter an exception to the third law of thermodynamics.

  18. Iterative cross section sequence graph for handwritten character segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dawoud, Amer

    2007-08-01

    The iterative cross section sequence graph (ICSSG) is an algorithm for handwritten character segmentation. It expands the cross section sequence graph concept by applying it iteratively at equally spaced thresholds. The iterative thresholding reduces the effect of information loss associated with image binarization. ICSSG preserves the characters' skeletal structure by preventing the interference of pixels that causes flooding of adjacent characters' segments. Improving the structural quality of the characters' skeleton facilitates better feature extraction and classification, which improves the overall performance of optical character recognition (OCR). Experimental results showed significant improvements in OCR recognition rates compared to other well-established segmentation algorithms.

  19. Partitioning the UMLS semantic network.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zong; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Geller, James; Gu, Huanying

    2002-06-01

    The unified medical language system (UMLS) integrates many well-established biomedical terminologies. The UMLS semantic network (SN) can help orient users to the vast knowledge content of the UMLS Metathesaurus (META) via its abstract conceptual view. However, the SN itself is large and complex and may still be difficult to comprehend. Our technique partitions the SN into smaller meaningful units amenable to display on limited-sized computer screens. The basis for the partitioning is the distribution of the relationships within the SN. Three rules are applied to transform the original partition into a second more cohesive partition.

  20. Flow graphs: interweaving dynamics and structure.

    PubMed

    Lambiotte, R; Sinatra, R; Delvenne, J-C; Evans, T S; Barahona, M; Latora, V

    2011-07-01

    The behavior of complex systems is determined not only by the topological organization of their interconnections but also by the dynamical processes taking place among their constituents. A faithful modeling of the dynamics is essential because different dynamical processes may be affected very differently by network topology. A full characterization of such systems thus requires a formalization that encompasses both aspects simultaneously, rather than relying only on the topological adjacency matrix. To achieve this, we introduce the concept of flow graphs, namely weighted networks where dynamical flows are embedded into the link weights. Flow graphs provide an integrated representation of the structure and dynamics of the system, which can then be analyzed with standard tools from network theory. Conversely, a structural network feature of our choice can also be used as the basis for the construction of a flow graph that will then encompass a dynamics biased by such a feature. We illustrate the ideas by focusing on the mathematical properties of generic linear processes on complex networks that can be represented as biased random walks and their dual consensus dynamics, and show how our framework improves our understanding of these processes.

  1. Graph Matching: Relax at Your Own Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lyzinski, Vince; Fishkind, Donniell E.; Fiori, Marcelo; Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Priebe, Carey E.; Sapiro, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Graph matching—aligning a pair of graphs to minimize their edge disagreements—has received wide-spread attention from both theoretical and applied communities over the past several decades, including combinatorics, computer vision, and connectomics. Its attention can be partially attributed to its computational difficulty. Although many heuristics have previously been proposed in the literature to approximately solve graph matching, very few have any theoretical support for their performance. A common technique is to relax the discrete problem to a continuous problem, therefore enabling practitioners to bring gradient-descent-type algorithms to bear. We prove that an indefinite relaxation (when solved exactly) almost always discovers the optimal permutation, while a common convex relaxation almost always fails to discover the optimal permutation. These theoretical results suggest that initializing the indefinite algorithm with the convex optimum might yield improved practical performance. Indeed, experimental results illuminate and corroborate these theoretical findings, demonstrating that excellent results are achieved in both benchmark and real data problems by amalgamating the two approaches. PMID:26656578

  2. Delay-dependent stability and stabilization criteria for T-S fuzzy singular systems with interval time-varying delay by improved delay partitioning approach.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Wang, Fuli; He, Xiqin

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability analysis and fuzzy stabilizing controller design for a class of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy singular systems with interval time-varying delay and linear fractional uncertainties. By decomposing the delay interval into two unequal subintervals and seeking a appropriate ρ, a new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is constructed to develop the improved delay-dependent stability criteria, which ensures the considered system to be regular, impulse-free and stable. Furthermore, the desired fuzzy controller gains are also presented by solving a set of strict linear matrix inequalities. Compared with some existing results, the obtained ones give the result with less conservatism. Finally, some examples are given to show the improvement and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  4. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  5. A New Study of Mountain Snowpack through Graph Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongora, J. A.; Marshall, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to accurately quantify snowpack variability has major impacts on estimations of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Complex physics based models have attempted to constrain the physical mechanisms that most affect snowpack properties and have been successful in producing results that are comparable to the average changes seasonal snowpack undergoes during the accumulation and melt periods. However they fail to accurately model any abrupt changes, especially in mountainous terrain; in part, due to the lack of in-situ measurements that contain the detailed forcing data required by such models. This study approaches the problem using a merger of Graph Theory, Spectral and K-means Cluster Analysis, as well as Radial Basis Function Neural Network to partition a complete data set of SNODAS product in addition to LiDAR datasets at the 1 km scale. These partitions are used to implement machine learning techniques to make predictions about current and future snowpack conditions. This system leverages the ability of Graphs, collections of nodes and edges, to represent nonlinear systems, such as the continuous spatiotemporal changes in seasonal snowpack and has unique properties that allow optimal sampling design for monitoring and studying snowpack patterns.

  6. Principal Graph and Structure Learning Based on Reversed Graph Embedding.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qi; Wang, Li; Tsang, Ivor; Sun, Yijun

    2016-12-05

    Many scientific datasets are of high dimension, and the analysis usually requires retaining the most important structures of data. Principal curve is a widely used approach for this purpose. However, many existing methods work only for data with structures that are mathematically formulated by curves, which is quite restrictive for real applications. A few methods can overcome the above problem, but they either require complicated human-made rules for a specific task with lack of adaption flexibility to different tasks, or cannot obtain explicit structures of data. To address these issues, we develop a novel principal graph and structure learning framework that captures the local information of the underlying graph structure based on reversed graph embedding. As showcases, models that can learn a spanning tree or a weighted undirected `1 graph are proposed, and a new learning algorithm is developed that learns a set of principal points and a graph structure from data, simultaneously. The new algorithm is simple with guaranteed convergence. We then extend the proposed framework to deal with large-scale data. Experimental results on various synthetic and six real world datasets show that the proposed method compares favorably with baselines and can uncover the underlying structure correctly.

  7. Private Graphs - Access Rights on Graphs for Seamless Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, W.; Hau, F.; Pagany, R.

    2016-06-01

    After the success of GNSS (Global Navigational Satellite Systems) and navigation services for public streets, indoor seems to be the next big development in navigational services, relying on RTLS - Real Time Locating Services (e.g. WIFI) and allowing seamless navigation. In contrast to navigation and routing services on public streets, seamless navigation will cause an additional challenge: how to make routing data accessible to defined users or restrict access rights for defined areas or only to parts of the graph to a defined user group? The paper will present case studies and data from literature, where seamless and especially indoor navigation solutions are presented (hospitals, industrial complexes, building sites), but the problem of restricted access rights was only touched from a real world, but not a technical perspective. The analysis of case studies will show, that the objective of navigation and the different target groups for navigation solutions will demand well defined access rights and require solutions, how to make only parts of a graph to a user or application available to solve a navigational task. The paper will therefore introduce the concept of private graphs, which is defined as a graph for navigational purposes covering the street, road or floor network of an area behind a public street and suggest different approaches how to make graph data for navigational purposes available considering access rights and data protection, privacy and security issues as well.

  8. Using Correlation to Compute Better Probability Estimates in Plan Graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryce, Daniel; Smith, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Plan graphs are commonly used in planning to help compute heuristic "distance" estimates between states and goals. A few authors have also attempted to use plan graphs in probabilistic planning to compute estimates of the probability that propositions can be achieved and actions can be performed. This is done by propagating probability information forward through the plan graph from the initial conditions through each possible action to the action effects, and hence to the propositions at the next layer of the plan graph. The problem with these calculations is that they make very strong independence assumptions - in particular, they usually assume that the preconditions for each action are independent of each other. This can lead to gross overestimates in probability when the plans for those preconditions interfere with each other. It can also lead to gross underestimates of probability when there is synergy between the plans for two or more preconditions. In this paper we introduce a notion of the binary correlation between two propositions and actions within a plan graph, show how to propagate this information within a plan graph, and show how this improves probability estimates for planning. This notion of correlation can be thought of as a continuous generalization of the notion of mutual exclusion (mutex) often used in plan graphs. At one extreme (correlation=0) two propositions or actions are completely mutex. With correlation = 1, two propositions or actions are independent, and with correlation > 1, two propositions or actions are synergistic. Intermediate values can and do occur indicating different degrees to which propositions and action interfere or are synergistic. We compare this approach with another recent approach by Bryce that computes probability estimates using Monte Carlo simulation of possible worlds in plan graphs.

  9. A class of finite symmetric graphs with 2-arc transitive quotients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cai Heng; Praeger, Cheryl E.; Zhou, Sanming

    2000-07-01

    Let [Gamma] be a finite G-symmetric graph whose vertex set admits a non-trivial G-invariant partition [script B] with block size v. A framework for studying such graphs [Gamma] was developed by Gardiner and Praeger which involved an analysis of the quotient graph [Gamma][script B] relative to [script B], the bipartite subgraph [Gamma][B, C] of [Gamma] induced by adjacent blocks B, C of [Gamma][script B] and a certain 1-design [script D](B) induced by a block B [set membership] [script B]. The present paper studies the case where the size k of the blocks of [script D](B) satisfies k = v [minus sign] 1. In the general case, where k = v [minus sign] 1 [gt-or-equal, slanted] 2, the setwise stabilizer GB is doubly transitive on B and G is faithful on [script B]. We prove that [script D](B) contains no repeated blocks if and only if [Gamma][script B] is (G, 2)-arc transitive and give a method for constructing such a graph from a 2-arc transitive graph with a self-paired orbit on 3-arcs. We show further that each such graph may be constructed by this method. In particular every 3-arc transitive graph, and every 2-arc transitive graph of even valency, may occur as [Gamma][script B] for some graph [Gamma] with these properties. We prove further that [Gamma][B, C] [congruent with] Kv[minus sign]1,v[minus sign]1 if and only if [Gamma][script B] is (G, 3)-arc transitive.

  10. Sharing Teaching Ideas: Graphing Families of Curves Using Transformations of Reference Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, David

    2007-01-01

    This article provides for a fast extremely accurate approach to graphing functions that is based on learning function reference graphs and then applying algebraic transformations to these reference graphs.

  11. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  12. Partitioning: splitting fact from fiction.

    PubMed

    Pike, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Many larger hospitals are sprawling complexes with endless corridors and rooms of varying purpose. While cleanliness and infection control are, understandably, leading considerations in any hospital building, fire safety also plays a crucial role. Here Brian Pike MBE, technical consultant at partitioning system designer and manufacturer, Komfort Workspace, looks at how current fire guidelines impact on the use of partitioning systems in hospital premises.

  13. Graph classification by means of Lipschitz embedding.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Kaspar; Bunke, Horst

    2009-12-01

    In pattern recognition and related fields, graph-based representations offer a versatile alternative to the widely used feature vectors. Therefore, an emerging trend of representing objects by graphs can be observed. This trend is intensified by the development of novel approaches in graph-based machine learning, such as graph kernels or graph-embedding techniques. These procedures overcome a major drawback of graphs, which consists of a serious lack of algorithms for classification. This paper is inspired by the idea of representing graphs through dissimilarities and extends our previous work to the more general setting of Lipschitz embeddings. In an experimental evaluation, we empirically confirm that classifiers that rely on the original graph distances can be outperformed by a classification system using the Lipschitz embedded graphs.

  14. Indoor scene reconstruction using feature sensitive primitive extraction and graph-cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesau, Sven; Lafarge, Florent; Alliez, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    We present a method for automatic reconstruction of permanent structures, such as walls, floors and ceilings, given a raw point cloud of an indoor scene. The main idea behind our approach is a graph-cut formulation to solve an inside/outside labeling of a space partitioning. We first partition the space in order to align the reconstructed models with permanent structures. The horizontal structures are located through analysis of the vertical point distribution, while vertical wall structures are detected through feature preserving multi-scale line fitting, followed by clustering in a Hough transform space. The final surface is extracted through a graph-cut formulation that trades faithfulness to measurement data for geometric complexity. A series of experiments show watertight surface meshes reconstructed from point clouds measured on multi-level buildings.

  15. VISAGE: Interactive Visual Graph Querying.

    PubMed

    Pienta, Robert; Navathe, Shamkant; Tamersoy, Acar; Tong, Hanghang; Endert, Alex; Chau, Duen Horng

    2016-06-01

    Extracting useful patterns from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains. We present VISAGE, an interactive visual graph querying approach that empowers users to construct expressive queries, without writing complex code (e.g., finding money laundering rings of bankers and business owners). Our contributions are as follows: (1) we introduce graph autocomplete, an interactive approach that guides users to construct and refine queries, preventing over-specification; (2) VISAGE guides the construction of graph queries using a data-driven approach, enabling users to specify queries with varying levels of specificity, from concrete and detailed (e.g., query by example), to abstract (e.g., with "wildcard" nodes of any types), to purely structural matching; (3) a twelve-participant, within-subject user study demonstrates VISAGE's ease of use and the ability to construct graph queries significantly faster than using a conventional query language; (4) VISAGE works on real graphs with over 468K edges, achieving sub-second response times for common queries.

  16. VISAGE: Interactive Visual Graph Querying

    PubMed Central

    Pienta, Robert; Navathe, Shamkant; Tamersoy, Acar; Tong, Hanghang; Endert, Alex; Chau, Duen Horng

    2017-01-01

    Extracting useful patterns from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains. We present VISAGE, an interactive visual graph querying approach that empowers users to construct expressive queries, without writing complex code (e.g., finding money laundering rings of bankers and business owners). Our contributions are as follows: (1) we introduce graph autocomplete, an interactive approach that guides users to construct and refine queries, preventing over-specification; (2) VISAGE guides the construction of graph queries using a data-driven approach, enabling users to specify queries with varying levels of specificity, from concrete and detailed (e.g., query by example), to abstract (e.g., with “wildcard” nodes of any types), to purely structural matching; (3) a twelve-participant, within-subject user study demonstrates VISAGE’s ease of use and the ability to construct graph queries significantly faster than using a conventional query language; (4) VISAGE works on real graphs with over 468K edges, achieving sub-second response times for common queries. PMID:28553670

  17. A tillering inhibition gene influences root–shoot carbon partitioning and pattern of water use to improve wheat productivity in rainfed environments

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, P.W.; Kirkegaard, J.A.; Lilley, J.M.; Gregory, P.J.; Rebetzke, G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic modification of shoot and root morphology has potential to improve water and nutrient uptake of wheat crops in rainfed environments. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) varying for a tillering inhibition (tin) gene and representing multiple genetic backgrounds were phenotyped in contrasting, controlled environments for shoot and root growth. Leaf area, shoot and root biomass were similar until tillering, whereupon reduced tillering in tin-containing NILs produced reductions of up to 60% in total leaf area and biomass, and increases in total root length of up to 120% and root biomass to 145%. Together, the root-to-shoot ratio increased two-fold with the tin gene. The influence of tin on shoot and root growth was greatest in the cv. Banks genetic background, particularly in the biculm-selected NIL, and was typically strongest in cooler environments. A separate de-tillering study confirmed greater root-to-shoot ratios with regular tiller removal in non-tin-containing genotypes. In validating these observations in a rainfed field study, the tin allele had a negligible effect on seedling growth but was associated with significantly (P<0.05) reduced tiller number (–37%), leaf area index (–26%), and spike number (–35%) to reduce plant biomass (–19%) at anthesis. Root biomass, root-to-shoot ratio at early stem elongation, and root depth at maturity were all increased in tin-containing NILs. Soil water use was slowed in tin-containing NILs, resulting in greater water availability, greater stomatal conductance, cooler canopy temperatures, and maintenance of green leaf area during grain-filling. Together these effects contributed to increases in harvest index and grain yield. In both the controlled and field environments, the tin gene was commonly associated with increased root length and biomass, but the significant influence of genetic background and environment suggests careful assessment of tin-containing progeny in selection for genotypic increases in root growth

  18. Morphological algorithms based on Voronoi and Delaunay graphs: microscopic and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Etienne; Marcelpoil, Raphael; Chassery, Jean-Marc

    1992-06-01

    We illustrate a cooperation between Voronoi diagram and Mathematical Morphology in 2-D and 3-D. Domains of application are multiple: 2-D image segmentation, and 3-D image representation, cellular sociology in 2-D and 3-D. The principal tool that we use is the algorithm of research of connected components in a graph abiding by constraints. The originality takes place in the choice of the constraint parameters. Other tools are used: binary dilation, labeling, and influence zone on graphs. The graph support of our work is the Voronoi diagram, well known for its power of modelling for natural reality. The dual graph of this space partition is the Delaunay graph containing all the neighboring information. The first developed application concerns a method for 2-D and 3-D images segmentation. We have elaborated tools to measure intra-graph structures distance, search of connected component under constraints to extract a 3-d object included in a volume data. The second application we developed concerns the theory of cellular sociology where the set of points identified the location of cells. Our method makes it possible to determine for a given set of cells, a model including its nearest homogeneous set, and the intrinsic disorder to which it refers. In this paper, our methods will be discussed and illustrated in the biological domain.

  19. Designing better graphs by including distributional information and integrating words, numbers, and images.

    PubMed

    Lane, David M; Sándor, Anikó

    2009-09-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting the data. The authors present several recommendations for improving graphs including the following: (a) bar charts of means with or without standard errors should be supplanted by graphs containing distributional information, (b) good design should be used to allow more information to be included in a graph without obscuring trends in the data, and (c) figures should include both graphic images and inferential statistics presented in words and numbers.

  20. Cluster Consensus of Nonlinearly Coupled Multi-Agent Systems in Directed Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Austin; Chen, Shi-Hua

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the cluster consensus problem in directed networks of nonlinearly coupled multi-agent systems by using pinning control. Depending on the community structure generated by the group partition of the underlying digraph, various clusters can be made coherently independent by applying feedback injections to a fraction of the agents. Sufficient conditions for cluster consensus are obtained using algebraic graph theory and matrix theory and some simulations results are included to illustrate the method.

  1. Optimal preparation of graph states

    SciTech Connect

    Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J.; Danielsen, Lars Eirik; Portillo, Jose R.

    2011-04-15

    We show how to prepare any graph state of up to 12 qubits with (a) the minimum number of controlled-Z gates and (b) the minimum preparation depth. We assume only one-qubit and controlled-Z gates. The method exploits the fact that any graph state belongs to an equivalence class under local Clifford operations. We extend up to 12 qubits the classification of graph states according to their entanglement properties, and identify each class using only a reduced set of invariants. For any state, we provide a circuit with both properties (a) and (b), if it does exist, or, if it does not, one circuit with property (a) and one with property (b), including the explicit one-qubit gates needed.

  2. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  3. Graph modeling systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Neergaard, Mike

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus and a method for vulnerability and reliability modeling are provided. The method generally includes constructing a graph model of a physical network using a computer, the graph model including a plurality of terminating vertices to represent nodes in the physical network, a plurality of edges to represent transmission paths in the physical network, and a non-terminating vertex to represent a non-nodal vulnerability along a transmission path in the physical network. The method additionally includes evaluating the vulnerability and reliability of the physical network using the constructed graph model, wherein the vulnerability and reliability evaluation includes a determination of whether each terminating and non-terminating vertex represents a critical point of failure. The method can be utilized to evaluate wide variety of networks, including power grid infrastructures, communication network topologies, and fluid distribution systems.

  4. The star arboricity of graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algor, Ilan

    1988-03-01

    The problem concerns the minimum time in which a number of messages can be transmitted through a communication network in which each node can transmit to many other nodes simultaneously but can receive only one message at a time. In the undirected version of the problem, the graphs, G, representing the messages are finite, undirected and simple; the messages transmitted in unit time form a subgraph which is a star. The star aboricity, st(G) of a graph G is the minimum number of star forests whose union covers all edges of G. A maximum value is derived for the star aboricity of any d-regular graph G, and is proved through probabilistic arguments.

  5. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  6. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-02-15

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  7. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  8. Detecting labor using graph theory on connectivity matrices of uterine EMG.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, S; Diab, A; Nader, N; Khalil, M; Karlsson, B; Marque, C

    2015-08-01

    Premature labor is one of the most serious health problems in the developed world. One of the main reasons for this is that no good way exists to distinguish true labor from normal pregnancy contractions. The aim of this paper is to investigate if the application of graph theory techniques to multi-electrode uterine EMG signals can improve the discrimination between pregnancy contractions and labor. To test our methods we first applied them to synthetic graphs where we detected some differences in the parameters results and changes in the graph model from pregnancy-like graphs to labor-like graphs. Then, we applied the same methods to real signals. We obtained the best differentiation between pregnancy and labor through the same parameters. Major improvements in differentiating between pregnancy and labor were obtained using a low pass windowing preprocessing step. Results show that real graphs generally became more organized when moving from pregnancy, where the graph showed random characteristics, to labor where the graph became a more small-world like graph.

  9. Synchronizability of random rectangular graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Ernesto Chen, Guanrong

    2015-08-15

    Random rectangular graphs (RRGs) represent a generalization of the random geometric graphs in which the nodes are embedded into hyperrectangles instead of on hypercubes. The synchronizability of RRG model is studied. Both upper and lower bounds of the eigenratio of the network Laplacian matrix are determined analytically. It is proven that as the rectangular network is more elongated, the network becomes harder to synchronize. The synchronization processing behavior of a RRG network of chaotic Lorenz system nodes is numerically investigated, showing complete consistence with the theoretical results.

  10. Interacting particle systems on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Vishal

    In this dissertation, the dynamics of socially or biologically interacting populations are investigated. The individual members of the population are treated as particles that interact via links on a social or biological network represented as a graph. The effect of the structure of the graph on the properties of the interacting particle system is studied using statistical physics techniques. In the first chapter, the central concepts of graph theory and social and biological networks are presented. Next, interacting particle systems that are drawn from physics, mathematics and biology are discussed in the second chapter. In the third chapter, the random walk on a graph is studied. The mean time for a random walk to traverse between two arbitrary sites of a random graph is evaluated. Using an effective medium approximation it is found that the mean first-passage time between pairs of sites, as well as all moments of this first-passage time, are insensitive to the density of links in the graph. The inverse of the mean-first passage time varies non-monotonically with the density of links near the percolation transition of the random graph. Much of the behavior can be understood by simple heuristic arguments. Evolutionary dynamics, by which mutants overspread an otherwise uniform population on heterogeneous graphs, are studied in the fourth chapter. Such a process underlies' epidemic propagation, emergence of fads, social cooperation or invasion of an ecological niche by a new species. The first part of this chapter is devoted to neutral dynamics, in which the mutant genotype does not have a selective advantage over the resident genotype. The time to extinction of one of the two genotypes is derived. In the second part of this chapter, selective advantage or fitness is introduced such that the mutant genotype has a higher birth rate or a lower death rate. This selective advantage leads to a dynamical competition in which selection dominates for large populations

  11. COMPLEX DIFFUSION ON IMAGE GRAPHS

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dohyung; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-01-01

    Complex diffusion was introduced in image processing literature as a means to achieve simultaneous denoising and enhancement of scalar valued images. In this paper, we present a novel geometric framework for achieving complex diffusion on color images expressed as image graphs. In this framework, we develop a new variational formulation for achieving complex diffusion. This formulation involves a modified harmonic map functional and is quite distinct from the Polyakov action described in earlier work by Sochen et al. Our formulation provides a framework for simultaneous (feature preserving) denoising and enhancement. We present results of comparison between the complex diffusion, and Beltrami flow all in the image graph framework. PMID:20490365

  12. Boosting for multi-graph classification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia; Pan, Shirui; Zhu, Xingquan; Cai, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we formulate a novel graph-based learning problem, multi-graph classification (MGC), which aims to learn a classifier from a set of labeled bags each containing a number of graphs inside the bag. A bag is labeled positive, if at least one graph in the bag is positive, and negative otherwise. Such a multi-graph representation can be used for many real-world applications, such as webpage classification, where a webpage can be regarded as a bag with texts and images inside the webpage being represented as graphs. This problem is a generalization of multi-instance learning (MIL) but with vital differences, mainly because instances in MIL share a common feature space whereas no feature is available to represent graphs in a multi-graph bag. To solve the problem, we propose a boosting based multi-graph classification framework (bMGC). Given a set of labeled multi-graph bags, bMGC employs dynamic weight adjustment at both bag- and graph-levels to select one subgraph in each iteration as a weak classifier. In each iteration, bag and graph weights are adjusted such that an incorrectly classified bag will receive a higher weight because its predicted bag label conflicts to the genuine label, whereas an incorrectly classified graph will receive a lower weight value if the graph is in a positive bag (or a higher weight if the graph is in a negative bag). Accordingly, bMGC is able to differentiate graphs in positive and negative bags to derive effective classifiers to form a boosting model for MGC. Experiments and comparisons on real-world multi-graph learning tasks demonstrate the algorithm performance.

  13. Mathematical foundations of the GraphBLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Kepner, Jeremy; Aaltonen, Peter; Bader, David; ...

    2016-12-01

    The GraphBLAS standard (GraphBlas.org) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix-based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. Mathematically, the GraphBLAS defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This study provides an introduction to the mathematics of the GraphBLAS. Graphs represent connections between vertices with edges. Matrices can represent a wide range of graphs using adjacency matrices or incidence matrices. Adjacency matrices are often easier to analyze while incidence matrices are often better for representing data. Fortunately, themore » two are easily connected by matrix multiplication. A key feature of matrix mathematics is that a very small number of matrix operations can be used to manipulate a very wide range of graphs. This composability of a small number of operations is the foundation of the GraphBLAS. A standard such as the GraphBLAS can only be effective if it has low performance overhead. Finally, performance measurements of prototype GraphBLAS implementations indicate that the overhead is low.« less

  14. Multiple graph regularized protein domain ranking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein domain ranking is a fundamental task in structural biology. Most protein domain ranking methods rely on the pairwise comparison of protein domains while neglecting the global manifold structure of the protein domain database. Recently, graph regularized ranking that exploits the global structure of the graph defined by the pairwise similarities has been proposed. However, the existing graph regularized ranking methods are very sensitive to the choice of the graph model and parameters, and this remains a difficult problem for most of the protein domain ranking methods. Results To tackle this problem, we have developed the Multiple Graph regularized Ranking algorithm, MultiG-Rank. Instead of using a single graph to regularize the ranking scores, MultiG-Rank approximates the intrinsic manifold of protein domain distribution by combining multiple initial graphs for the regularization. Graph weights are learned with ranking scores jointly and automatically, by alternately minimizing an objective function in an iterative algorithm. Experimental results on a subset of the ASTRAL SCOP protein domain database demonstrate that MultiG-Rank achieves a better ranking performance than single graph regularized ranking methods and pairwise similarity based ranking methods. Conclusion The problem of graph model and parameter selection in graph regularized protein domain ranking can be solved effectively by combining multiple graphs. This aspect of generalization introduces a new frontier in applying multiple graphs to solving protein domain ranking applications. PMID:23157331

  15. Approximate Graph Edit Distance in Quadratic Time.

    PubMed

    Riesen, Kaspar; Ferrer, Miquel; Bunke, Horst

    2015-09-14

    Graph edit distance is one of the most flexible and general graph matching models available. The major drawback of graph edit distance, however, is its computational complexity that restricts its applicability to graphs of rather small size. Recently the authors of the present paper introduced a general approximation framework for the graph edit distance problem. The basic idea of this specific algorithm is to first compute an optimal assignment of independent local graph structures (including substitutions, deletions, and insertions of nodes and edges). This optimal assignment is complete and consistent with respect to the involved nodes of both graphs and can thus be used to instantly derive an admissible (yet suboptimal) solution for the original graph edit distance problem in O(n3) time. For large scale graphs or graph sets, however, the cubic time complexity may still be too high. Therefore, we propose to use suboptimal algorithms with quadratic rather than cubic time for solving the basic assignment problem. In particular, the present paper introduces five different greedy assignment algorithms in the context of graph edit distance approximation. In an experimental evaluation we show that these methods have great potential for further speeding up the computation of graph edit distance while the approximated distances remain sufficiently accurate for graph based pattern classification.

  16. Mathematical foundations of the GraphBLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Aaltonen, Peter; Bader, David; Buluc, Aydin; Franchetti, Franz; Gilbert, John; Hutchison, Dylan; Kumar, Manoj; Lumsdaine, Andrew; Meyerhenke, Henning; McMillan, Scott; Yang, Carl; Owens, John D.; Zalewski, Marcin; Mattson, Timothy; Moreira, Jose

    2016-12-01

    The GraphBLAS standard (GraphBlas.org) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix-based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. Mathematically, the GraphBLAS defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This study provides an introduction to the mathematics of the GraphBLAS. Graphs represent connections between vertices with edges. Matrices can represent a wide range of graphs using adjacency matrices or incidence matrices. Adjacency matrices are often easier to analyze while incidence matrices are often better for representing data. Fortunately, the two are easily connected by matrix multiplication. A key feature of matrix mathematics is that a very small number of matrix operations can be used to manipulate a very wide range of graphs. This composability of a small number of operations is the foundation of the GraphBLAS. A standard such as the GraphBLAS can only be effective if it has low performance overhead. Finally, performance measurements of prototype GraphBLAS implementations indicate that the overhead is low.

  17. Link community detection based on line graphs with a novel link similarity measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guishen; Huang, Lan; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Ma, Qin

    2016-02-01

    Link community gradually unfolds its capacity in complex network research. In this paper, a novel link similarity measure on line graphs is proposed. This measure can be adapted to different types of networks with an adjustable parameter. We prove its value converges to a limit on line graphs with the relationship of the nonneighbor links taken into account. Based on this similarity measure, we propose a novel link community detection algorithm for link clustering on line graphs. The detection algorithm combines the novel link similarity measure with the classic Markov Cluster (MCL) Algorithm and determines the link community partitions by calculating an extended modularity measure. Extensive experiments on two types of complex networks demonstrate the effectiveness, reliability and rationality of our solution in contrast to the other two classical algorithms.

  18. Multibody Graph Transformations and Analysis Part II: Closed-chain constraint embedding

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part paper that develops graph theoretic techniques for the topological transformation and analysis of multibody system dynamics. The first part focused on tree systems, and developed systematic and rigorous techniques for the partitioning, aggregation and sub-structuring of multibody dynamics models. This second part, uses the aggregation techniques as the foundation to develop the constraint-embedding technique that enables the transformation of the non-tree system graphs into tree graphs. This enables the application of a large family of analytical and computational techniques for trees to closed-chain systems. This is illustrated through an extension of the low-order articulated-body forward dynamics algorithm for tree systems to closed-chain systems. PMID:22267894

  19. Incentives for partitioning, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cloninger, M.O.

    1980-03-24

    The incentives for separating and eliminating various elements from radioactive waste prior to final geologic disposal were investigated. Exposure pathways to humans were defined, and potential radiation doses to an individual living within the region of influence of the underground storage site were calculated. The assumed radionuclide source was 1/5 of the accumulated high-level waste from the US nuclear power economy through the year 2000. The repository containing the waste was assumed to be located in a reference salt site geology. The study required numerous assumptions concerning the transport of radioactivity from the geologic storage site to man. The assumptions used maximized the estimated potential radiation doses, particularly in the case of the intrusion water well scenario, where hydrologic flow field dispersion effects were ignored. Thus, incentives for removing elements from the waste tended to be maximized. Incentives were also maximized by assuming that elements removed from the waste could be eliminated from the earth without risk. The results of the study indicate that for reasonable disposal conditions, incentives for partitioning any elements from the waste in order to minimize the risk to humans are marginal at best.

  20. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems.

  1. Dynamic criteria for partitioning and transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, A.H. )

    1991-11-01

    Because of the slow progress being made in the national geologic repository program, the idea of partitioning and transmuting (P-T) long-lived radionuclides resurfaces as a potential improvement in high-level radioactive waste management. It seems theoretically possible to reduce the overall problems of radioactive waste by repeatedly partitioning and recycling wastes into actinide-free wastes, but there are recognizable difficulties and negative consequences that may overshadow the long-term benefits. This paper addresses some of the criteria that might be used to achieve an optimal P-T concept development, i.e., to minimize the negative short-term impact and to maximize both short-term and long-term benefits.

  2. Graphing and Social Studies: An Interdisciplinary Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Julia L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a graphing activity that promotes mathematical connections with social studies lessons. Students should be familiar with graphing on the Cartesian coordinate system to play this variation of the game Battleship on maps of various regions of the world. (AIM)

  3. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  4. Understanding Conic Sections Using Alternate Graph Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article describes two alternative coordinate systems and their use in graphing conic sections. This alternative graph paper helps students explore the idea of eccentricity using the definitions of the conic sections.

  5. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  6. Standard Distributions: One Graph Fits All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Clifford H.

    2007-01-01

    Standard distributions are ubiquitous but not unique. With suitable scaling, the graph of a standard distribution serves as the graph for every distribution in the family. The standard exponential can easily be taught in elementary statistics courses.

  7. Torsional rigidity, isospectrality and quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colladay, Don; Kaganovskiy, Leon; McDonald, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We study torsional rigidity for graph and quantum graph analogs of well-known pairs of isospectral non-isometric planar domains. We prove that such isospectral pairs are distinguished by torsional rigidity.

  8. Comparison Graph of Sea Ice Minimum - 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animated graph tracks the retreat of sea ice, measured in millions of square kilometers, averaged from the start of the satellite record in 1979 through 2000 (white). Next, the graph follows t...

  9. Hierarchical image feature extraction by an irregular pyramid of polygonal partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Skurikhin, Alexei N

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithmic framework for hierarchical image segmentation and feature extraction. We build a successive fine-to-coarse hierarchy of irregular polygonal partitions of the original image. This multiscale hierarchy forms the basis for object-oriented image analysis. The framework incorporates the Gestalt principles of visual perception, such as proximity and closure, and exploits spectral and textural similarities of polygonal partitions, while iteratively grouping them until dissimilarity criteria are exceeded. Seed polygons are built upon a triangular mesh composed of irregular sized triangles, whose spatial arrangement is adapted to the image content. This is achieved by building the triangular mesh on the top of detected spectral discontinuities (such as edges), which form a network of constraints for the Delaunay triangulation. The image is then represented as a spatial network in the form of a graph with vertices corresponding to the polygonal partitions and edges reflecting their relations. The iterative agglomeration of partitions into object-oriented segments is formulated as Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) construction. An important characteristic of the approach is that the agglomeration of polygonal partitions is constrained by the detected edges; thus the shapes of agglomerated partitions are more likely to correspond to the outlines of real-world objects. The constructed partitions and their spatial relations are characterized using spectral, textural and structural features based on proximity graphs. The framework allows searching for object-oriented features of interest across multiple levels of details of the built hierarchy and can be generalized to the multi-criteria MST to account for multiple criteria important for an application.

  10. Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

  11. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  12. Two-Player Graph Pebbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudente, Matthew James

    Given a graph G with pebbles on the vertices, we define a pebbling move as removing two pebbles from a vertex u, placing one pebble on a neighbor v, and discarding the other pebble, like a toll. The pebbling number pi( G) is the least number of pebbles needed so that every arrangement of pi(G) pebbles can place a pebble on any vertex through a sequence of pebbling moves. We introduce a new variation on graph pebbling called two-player pebbling. In this, players called the mover and the defender alternate moves, with the stipulation that the defender cannot reverse the previous move. The mover wins only if they can place a pebble on a specified vertex and the defender wins if the mover cannot. We define η(G), analogously, as the minimum number of pebbles such that given every configuration of the η( G) pebbles and every specified vertex r, the mover has a winning strategy. First, we will investigate upper bounds for η( G) on various classes of graphs and find a certain structure for which the defender has a winning strategy, no matter how many pebbles are in a configuration. Then, we characterize winning configurations for both players on a special class of diameter 2 graphs. Finally, we show winning configurations for the mover on paths using a recursive argument.

  13. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  14. Graphs and Enhancing Maple Multiplication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cecil, David R.; Wang, Rongdong

    2002-01-01

    Description of a technique in Maple programming language that automatically prints all paths of any desired length along with the name of each vertex, proceeding in order from the beginning vertex to the ending vertex for a given graph. (Author/MM)

  15. Affect and Graphing Calculator Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Allison W.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study of six high school calculus students designed to build an understanding about the affect associated with graphing calculator use in independent situations. DeBellis and Goldin's (2006) framework for affect as a representational system was used as a lens through which to understand the ways in which…

  16. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  17. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  18. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  19. Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

  20. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…